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Sample records for increased effective beam

  1. Coherent beam-beam effects, theory & observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri I Alexahin

    2003-07-16

    Current theoretical understanding of the coherent beam-beam effect as well as its experimental observations are discussed: conditions under which the coherent beambeam modes may appear, possibility of their resonant interaction (coherent resonances), stability of beam-beam oscillations in the presence of external impedances. A special attention is given to the coherent beam-beam modes of finite length bunches: the synchro-betatron coupling is shown to provide reduction in the coherent tuneshift and--at the synchrotron tune values smaller than the beam-beam parameter--Landau damping by overlapping synchrotron satellites.

  2. Increasing the effective aperture of a detector and enlarging the receiving field of view in a 3D imaging lidar system through hexagonal prism beam splitting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xiaobao; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Tianxiang; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Yunxi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-11

    The detector in a highly accurate and high-definition scanning 3D imaging lidar system requires high frequency bandwidth and sufficient photosensitive area. To solve the problem of small photosensitive area of an existing indium gallium arsenide detector with a certain frequency bandwidth, this study proposes a method for increasing the receiving field of view (FOV) and enlarging the effective photosensitive aperture of such detector through hexagonal prism beam splitting. The principle and construction of hexagonal prism beam splitting is also discussed in this research. Accordingly, a receiving optical system with two hexagonal prisms is provided and the splitting beam effect of the simulation experiment is analyzed. Using this novel method, the receiving optical system's FOV can be improved effectively up to ±5°, and the effective photosensitive aperture of the detector is increased from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm.

  3. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  4. Study of beam-beam effects in eRHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Y.; Litvinenko, V.; Ptitsyn, V.

    2010-05-23

    Beam-beam effects in eRHIC have a number of unique features, which distinguish them from both hadron and lepton colliders. Due to beam-beam interaction, both electron and hadron beams would suffer quality degradation or beam loss from without proper treatments. Those features need novel study and dedicate countermeasures. We study the beam dynamics and resulting luminosity of the characteristics, including mismatch, disruption and pinch effects on electron beam, in additional to their consequences on the opposing beam as a wake field and other incoherent effects of hadron beam. We also carry out countermeasures to prevent beam quality degrade and coherent instability.

  5. Increased effective barrier heights in Schottky diodes by molecular-beam epitaxy of CoSi2 and Ga-doped Si on Si(111)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Lin, T. L.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Andersson, P. O.; Iannelli, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Increasing the effective Schottky-barrier height of epitaxial CoSi2/Si(111) diodes by the use of thin, highly doped Si layers in close proximity to the metal-semiconductor interface has been studied. Intrinsic Si, Si doped by coevaporation of Ga, and epitaxial CoSi2 layers have all been grown in the same molecular-beam epitaxy system. Current-voltage and photoresponse characterization yield barrier heights ranging from 0.61 eV for a sample with no p(+) layer to 0.89 eV for a sample with a 20-nm-thick p(+) layer. These results are compared to theoretical values based on a one-dimensional solution of Poisson's equation under the depletion approximation.

  6. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  7. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  8. Simulations of coherent beam-beam effects with head-on compensation

    SciTech Connect

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo. Y.

    2012-05-20

    Electron lenses are under construction for installation in RHIC in order to mitigate the head-on beam-beam effects. This would allow operation with higher bunch intensity and result in a significant increase in luminosity. We report on recent strong-strong simulations and experiments that were carried out using the RHIC upgrade parameters to assess the impact of coherent beam-beam effects in the presence of head-on compensation.

  9. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  10. Sealing Force Increasing of ACM Gasket through Electron Beam Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, D. J.; Batalha, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Rubber is an engineering material largely used as sealing parts, in form of O-rings, solid gaskets and liquid gaskets, materials applied in liquid state with posterior vulcanization and sealing. Stress relaxation is a rubber characteristic which impacts negatively in such industrial applications (rings and solid gaskets). This work has the purpose to investigate the use of electron beam radiation (EB) as a technology able to decrease the stress relaxation in acrylic rubber (ACM), consequently increasing the sealing capability of this material. ACM samples were irradiated with dose of 100 kGy and 250 kGy, its behavior was comparatively investigated using, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments. The results obtained by DMA shown an increase of Tg and changes in dynamic mechanical behavior.

  11. Interplay of space-charge and beam-beam effects in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-09-27

    Operation of a collider at low energy or use of cooling techniques to increase beam density may result in luminosity limitation due to the space-charge effects. Understanding of such limitation became important for Low-Energy RHIC physics program with heavy ions at the center of mass energies of 5-20 GeV/nucleon. For a collider, we are interested in a long beam lifetime, which limits the allowable space-charge tune shift. An additional complication comes from the fact that ion beams are colliding, which requires careful consideration of the interplay of direct space-charge and beam-beam effects. This paper summarizes the initial observations during experimental studies in RHIC at low energies.

  12. Creep Effects in Pultruded FRP Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscato, G.; Casalegno, C.; Russo, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of two creep tests on pultruded open-section GFRP beams aimed to evaluate the long-term deformations, the residual deflection after unloading, and the influence of creep strains on the flexuraltorsional buckling phenomenon. Two beams were subjected to a constant load for about one year. Then one of the beams was unloaded to evaluate its residual deflection. For the other beam, the load was increased up to failure, and the residual buckling strength was compared with that of a similar beam tested up to failure. The parameters of the Findley power law are evaluated, and the experimental results are compared with those of numerical analyses and with available formulations for prediction of the time-dependent properties of composite beams. Results of the investigation testify, in particular, to a noninsignificant time-dependent increment in deflections of the beams and to a significant reduction in their buckling strength due to creep deformations.

  13. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W; Brennan, J M; Cameron, P; Connolly, R; Montag, C; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Van Zeijts, J

    2003-05-12

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far.

  14. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

    In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

  15. Analysis of multiwavelength coherent beam combining effect.

    PubMed

    Kai, Han; Xiaojun, Xu; Zejin, Liu

    2012-12-01

    The combination effect of multiwavelength active coherent beam combination (CBC) is investigated theoretically. The dependence of the combination effect on the optical path control precision, spectral width, wavelength number, and channel number is revealed. In the case of small optical path variance, the combination effect approximately decreases in quadratic form with wavelength number N, spectral width Δν, and optical path variance σ increasing. In the case of large optical path variance, the combination effect is independent of the optical path variance and the spectral width. The larger the wavelength number is, the smaller the Strehl ratio expectation is, and it finally degenerates to the incoherent combination. The necessity of optical path control is discussed. This study is helpful for multiwavelength CBC system design and the combination effect estimation.

  16. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  17. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  18. Compensation of the beam-beam effect in proton-proton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Zinchenko, A.

    1993-10-01

    Compensation of the beam-beam effect in high-energy proton-proton colliders using a low-energy electron beam is proposed. It is concluded that such compensation looks feasible. Requirements for such a device are formulated.

  19. Radii effect on the translation spring constant of force transducer beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Multi-component strain-gage force transducer design requires the designer to determine the spring constant of the numerous beams or flexures incorporated in the transducer. The classical beam deflection formulae that are used in calculating these spring constants typically assume that the beam has a uniform moment of inertia along the entire beam length. In practice all beams have a radius at the end where the beam interfaces with the shoulder of the transducer, and on short beams in particular this increases the beam spring constant considerably. A Basic computer program utilizing numerical integration is presented to determine this effect.

  20. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  1. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Yahia, M. E.; Azzouz, I. M.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-19

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  2. Effect of crosstalk on combined beam characteristics in spectral beam combining systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Wu, Zhen; Zhong, Zheqiang; Zhang, Bin

    2017-02-01

    In a spectral beam combining (SBC) system, crosstalk always happens because stray lights are inevitable due to fabrication errors of optical components and 'smile' effect of laser arrays. Two kinds of crosstalk, including the crosstalk generated between two adjacent emitters of the laser array (ad-crosstalk) and that generated between two non-adjacent emitters (non-ad-crosstalk), have been analyzed. The equivalent light of the crosstalk model has been proposed, and the propagation model of the SBC system with the crosstalk has been built up. On this basis, influences of above two kinds of the crosstalk on the combined beam have been numerically simulated and discussed in detail. The results show that the wavelength composition of the combined beam varies evidently owing to the existence of the crosstalk. With the increasing of the crosstalk intensity, the beam quality of the combined beam degrades, and the side lobes of intensity distribution of the combined beam become more and more obvious. Furthermore, the influence of the non-ad-crosstalk on the beam quality is more serious than that of the ad-crosstalk.

  3. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  4. Solar electric propulsion thrust beam interactive effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.; Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Interactive effects between ion engine thrust beams and an SEP spacecraft and its science payload have been examined. AC electric contamination from thrust beam potential fluctuations of both 'common mode' and 'point-to-point' forms has been evaluated. Quenching of point-to-point E-fields by both thrust ion and charge exchange ion plasmas is expected. Reduction methods for AC electric contamination from common mode thrust beam potential fluctuations have been developed. Charged particle contamination of ambient space and plasma wave contamination may result from density magnitude and spatial extent of charge exchange plasma plumes. Reduction methods for cone of directions of high angle charge exchange ions have been examined.

  5. EFFECTS OF TRANSFERSE BEAM SIZE IN BEAM POSITIONS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. KURENNOY

    2001-06-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The non-linearities and corrections to BPM signals due to a finite transverse beam size are calculated for an arbitrary chamber cross section. Simple analytical expressions are given for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current in a circular or rectangular chamber. Of particular interest is a general proof that in an arbitrary homogeneous chamber the beam-size corrections vanish for any axisymmetric beam current distribution.

  6. Beam-beam and electron cloud effects in CEPC/FCC-ee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Kazuhito

    2016-11-01

    We discuss beam dynamics issues in CEPC/FCC-ee, especially focusing on the beam-beam and electron cloud effects. Beamstrahlung is strong in extreme high energy collision such as Higgs and top factory. Beam-beam simulations considering beamstrahlung are now ready. Several points of beam-beam effects for FCC-ee are presented. Electron cloud effects are serious for high current positron machine, especially in Z factory that many bunches are stored. Analytical estimate for threshold of electron density and electron build-up for CEPC are presented.

  7. Effect of dispersion on the spectrum of partially coherent beams.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liuzhan; Yuan, Xiao; Ding, Chaoliang; Lü, Baida

    2008-08-01

    Taking the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam as a typical example of partially coherent beams, the analytical expressions of the spectrum of GSM beams propagating in dispersive media are derived, and the spectral properties are studied in detail. It is shown that, in comparison with propagation in free space and in turbulence, whether or not GSM beams satisfy the scaling law, the normalized spectrum of GSM beams in dispersive media changes on propagation in general, because the dispersive medium affects different spectral components differently. As compared with the free-space propagation, for the scaling-law GSM beams the dispersion results in spectrum change, and for the nonscaling-law GSM beams the dispersion gives rise to a further increase in spectral changes. The structure constant of the dispersive property of the media, the transverse coordinate of the observation point, the spatial correlation length of the source, and the propagation distance affect the spectral behavior of GSM beams; this effect is illustrated numerically.

  8. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  9. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M. S.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-02-15

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  10. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  11. RHIC PROTON BEAM LIFETIME INCREASE WITH 10- AND 12-POLE CORRECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2010-05-23

    The RHIC beam lifetime in polarized proton operation is dominated by the beam-beam effect, parameter modulations, and nonlinear magnet errors in the interaction region magnets. Sextupole and skew sextupole errors have been corrected deterministically for a number of years based on tune shift measurements with orbit bumps in the triplets. During the most recent polarized proton run 10- and 12- pole correctors were set through an iterative procedure, and used for the first time operationally in one of the beams. We report on the procedure to set these high-order multipole correctors and estimate their effect on the integrated luminosity.

  12. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  13. Simulations and Experiments of Beam-Beam Effects in e+e- Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Seeman, J.; Kozanecki, W.; Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-05-16

    Over the past decade, extensive simulations of beam-beam effects in e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, based on the particle-in-cell method, were developed to explain many complex experimental observations. Recently, such simulations were used to predict the future luminosity performance of e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Some predictions have been proven to be correct in the existing accelerators. In this paper, many effects such as the beam-beam limit, crossing angle, parasitic collisions, betatron spectrum, and the beam-beam lifetime, will be directly compared between simulations and experiments.

  14. High luminosity operation, beam-beam effects and their compensation in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Over the past 2 years the Tevatron peak luminosity steadily progressed and reached the level of 3.15 {center_dot} 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} which exceeds the Run II Upgrade goal. We discuss the collider performance, illustrate limitations and understanding of beam-beam effects and present experimental results of compensation of the beam-beam effects by electron lenses--a technique of great interest for the LHC.

  15. Beam hardening and partial beam hardening of the bowtie filter: Effects on dosimetric applications in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rendon, X.; Zhang, G.; Bosmans, H.; Oyen, R.; Zanca, F.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate the consequences on dosimetric applications when a CT bowtie filter is modeled by means of full beam hardening versus partial beam hardening. Method: A model of source and filtration for a CT scanner as developed by Turner et. al. [1] was implemented. Specific exposures were measured with the stationary CT X-ray tube in order to assess the equivalent thickness of Al of the bowtie filter as a function of the fan angle. Using these thicknesses, the primary beam attenuation factors were calculated from the energy dependent photon mass attenuation coefficients and used to include beam hardening in the spectrum. This was compared to a potentially less computationally intensive approach, which accounts only partially for beam hardening, by giving the photon spectrum a global (energy independent) fan angle specific weighting factor. Percentage differences between the two methods were quantified by calculating the dose in air after passing several water equivalent thicknesses representative for patients having different BMI. Specifically, the maximum water equivalent thickness of the lateral and anterior-posterior dimension and of the corresponding (half) effective diameter were assessed. Results: The largest percentage differences were found for the thickest part of the bowtie filter and they increased with patient size. For a normal size patient they ranged from 5.5% at half effective diameter to 16.1% for the lateral dimension; for the most obese patient they ranged from 7.7% to 19.3%, respectively. For a complete simulation of one rotation of the x-ray tube, the proposed method was 12% faster than the complete simulation of the bowtie filter. Conclusion: The need for simulating the beam hardening of the bow tie filter in Monte Carlo platforms for CT dosimetry will depend on the required accuracy.

  16. Radio-frequency ion source generating beams with an increased proton content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Podyminogin, A. A.; Shikhovtsev, I. V.

    2007-01-01

    The results of experiments with an rf ion source generating a beam with an improved mass composition are reported. The proton content in the beam is increased by raising the rf power density in the discharge under the antenna and installing a magnetic filter near the plasma grid. Additional steps are taken to prevent the earlier observed degradation of the beam composition because of aluminum reduction on the inner surface of the ceramic discharge chamber and water release. Specifically, the chamber is lined with pyrolytic boron nitride sheets.

  17. Increase of the beam intensity for BNCT by changing the core configuration at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Liu, Y H; Tsai, P E; Jiang, S H

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we will consider several core configurations and run the core calculation with MCNP to obtain the neutrons distribution at THOR. The thermal neutron flux inside the vertical tubes (VT-B-VT-E) and the fast neutron flux in the first row facing to the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility (I3-I5) were tallied for indication. Based on these simulation results, the fuel elements were rearranged during the annual repair period in 2007. The epithermal neutron flux at the center of BNCT beam exit in air was measured again, and the results showed that the beam intensity increased by 50%. Comparing the neutron intensities both in reactor core and at the BNCT beam exit for several core configurations, the results show that the BNCT beam intensity can be increased without decreasing the neutron intensity in core.

  18. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  19. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-01-01

    There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s). PMID:25723941

  20. Investigation of the effects of beam scattering and beam wandering on laser beams passing thorough the off-gas duct of an Electric Arc Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanzadeh, Amirhossein

    The project sets to determine the effects of scattering and beam wandering on light that passes through the off-gas of EAF. The effects of light scattering from metallic dust and beam wandering due to temperature gradient and turbulence in the medium are investigated. Using Matlab, a model was developed based on Mie theory to calculate light transmission when the optical properties are known; most importantly refractive index of the dust as well as incident wavelength, particle size and concentration of the particles per cm 3 of the gas. The model was validated and was used to show that as the particle size parameter increases, the scattering losses decreases. Turbulence and temperature gradients in the air cause the laser beam to change shape. Using a big collection lens can minimize the signal fluctuation caused by the beam wandering. A thorough understanding of these phenomena helps in designing optical sensors in the industry.

  1. f Number Increase of a High-Intensity Green Laser Beam in a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobble, J. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Mason, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    Earlier(J. A. Cobble, R. P. Johnson, R. J. Mason, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3006 (1997).), we studied the increase in f number of a high-intensity, 1054-nm laser beam passing through a low density, preformed plasma, i. e., an exploding foil. We have extended this work to 527-nm light. Again we find an increase in the f number of the probe beam. Near field imaging of the transmitted green beam shows a factor of four reduction in beam divergence at 8 percent of the critical density. The change is less for lower densities, and the beam compression corresponds to the critical power dropping below the laser power (0.6 TW) as the density increases. The density is estimated from the spectra of stimulated Raman back scatter and from modeling of the target plasma with LASNEX. A CCD camera and a spectrometer with a 200-nm bandwidth were used to record the backscattered spectra. *Work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy.

  2. Effects of beam irregularity on uniform scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Jang, Sea duk; Yang, Tae-Keun

    2016-09-01

    An active scanning beam delivery method has many advantages in particle beam applications. For the beam is to be successfully delivered to the target volume by using the active scanning technique, the dose uniformity must be considered and should be at least 2.5% in the case of therapy application. During beam irradiation, many beam parameters affect the 2-dimensional uniformity at the target layer. A basic assumption in the beam irradiation planning stage is that the shape of the beam is symmetric and follows a Gaussian distribution. In this study, a pure Gaussian-shaped beam distribution was distorted by adding parasitic Gaussian distribution. An appropriate uniform scanning condition was deduced by using a quantitative analysis based on the gamma value of the distorted beam and 2-dimensional uniformities.

  3. Diffraction Effects in Directed Radiation Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-03

    Toraldo di Francia, NuoVo Cimento, Suppl. 9, 426 (1952)> 3. W T. Welford, Qptics, (Onfordi University Press, New York, 1981), chap. 3. 4 . C.. J. Bouwkarnp...Naval Research Laboratoy 4 Washington, DC 20375.5000 It) NRL Memorandum Report 6609 Diffraction Effects in Directed Radiation BeamsI B. HAFIZI* AND P...Wq ts :Iiio ’’,t tor VVes-q , .I (), O’at 1 4 , nci,rr itlon ot)$rmtioiI ld AepoTiQ , 21 ,’ tl,’fc sonr [I•11 Fi0r h ci ti’ 204, i litiqtOt VA 220 0

  4. Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

  5. LHC cryogenics – new experience of run with increased beam energy and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Delikaris, D.; Delprat, L.; Ferlin, G.; Rogez, E.; Tavian, L.

    2017-03-01

    After the LHC first long shut down (LS1), when necessary consolidation and maintenance activities were performed on different technical systems, the Large Hadron Collider was progressively cooled down from ambient to operation temperatures from May of 2014. Prior to physics run with increased beam energy to 6.5 TeV/beam, increased beam intensity and modified beam injection scheme, several qualifications and tests affecting cryogenic system have been performed to ensure stable run of the accelerator. New beam parameters were gradually applied to the accelerator, reducing operational margins of cryogenic capacity from previous run. The process optimization and related updates in the control system were applied. This paper will briefly recall the main consolidations performed on the cryogenic system during LS1. The cool down process and behaviour of the cryogenic system during qualifications and tests will be presented. Difficulties and applied solutions during the run will be discussed. The availability and helium losses statistics for full year operation of 2015 will be given.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Yuhong Zhang

    2010-05-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  7. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D- beams in future neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-01

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  8. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  9. TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING EFFECTS IN RF SYSTEMS IN JLEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haipeng; Guo, Jiquan; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Shaoheng

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed electron bunch trains generated from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) linac to inject into the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) e-ring will produce transient beam loading effects in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) systems that, if not mitigated, could cause unacceptably large beam energy deviation in the injection capture, or exceed the energy acceptance of CEBAF’s recirculating arcs. In the electron storage ring, the beam abort or ion clearing gaps or uneven bucket filling can cause large beam phase transients in the (S)RF cavity control systems and even beam loss due to Robinson instability. We have first analysed the beam stability criteria in steady state and estimated the transient effect in Feedforward and Feedback RF controls. Initial analytical models for these effects are shown for the design of the JLEIC e-ring from 3GeV to 12GeV.

  10. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  11. Thermal effects in orthotropic porous elastic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaşan, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the linear theory of anisotropic porous elastic bodies. The extension and bending of orthotropic porous elastic cylinders subjected to a plane temperature field is investigated. The work is motivated by the recent interest in the using of the orthotropic porous elastic solid as model for bones and various engineering materials. First, the thermoelastic deformation of inhomogeneous beams whose constitutive coefficients are independent of the axial coordinate is studied. Then, the extension and bending effects in orthotropic cylinders reinforced by longitudinal rods are investigated. The three-dimensional problem is reduced to the study of two-dimensional problems. The method is used to solve the problem of an orthotropic porous circular cylinder with a special kind of inhomogeneity.

  12. Increasing the intensity of an induction accelerator and reduction of the beam breakup instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Johnson, J. B.; McCuistian, B. T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

    2014-03-01

    A 7 cm cathode has been deployed for use on a 3.8 MV, 80 ns (FWHM) Blumlein, to increase the extracted electron current from the nominal 1.7 to 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the space-charge limitations on the beam quality, its coupling with the beam breakup (BBU) instability, and provide an independent validation of the BBU theory in a higher current regime, I >2 kA. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in BBU >10× with simply a 50% increase in the average B-field used to transport the beam through the accelerator. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved current density distributions, radial BBU amplitude relative to the calculated beam envelope, and frequency analyzed BBU amplitude with different accelerator lattice tunes.

  13. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  14. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Yang, Zhi-Ning; Zhang, Wu-Zhe; Wu, Li-li; Lin, Zhi-xiong

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  15. Beam and spin dynamics in the fast ramping storage ring ELSA: Concepts and measures to increase beam energy, current and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, Wolfgang; Balling, Andreas; Boldt, Oliver; Dieckmann, Andreas; Eberhardt, Maren; Frommberger, Frank; Heiliger, Dominik; Heurich, Nikolas; Koop, Rebecca; Klarner, Fabian; Preisner, Oliver; Proft, Dennis; Pusch, Thorsten; Roth, André; Sauerland, Dennis; Schedler, Manuel; Schmidt, Jan Felix; Switka, Michael; Thiry, Jens-Peter; Wittschen, Jürgen; Zander, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The electron accelerator facility ELSA has been operated for almost 30 years serving nuclear physics experiments investigating the sub-nuclear structure of matter. Within the 12 years funding period of the collaborative research center SFB/TR 16, linearly and circularly polarized photon beams with energies up to more than 3 GeV were successfully delivered to photoproduction experiments. In order to fulfill the increasing demands on beam polarization and intensity, a comprehensive research and upgrade program has been carried out. Beam and spin dynamics have been studied theoretically and experimentally, and sophisticated new devices have been developed and installed. The improvements led to a significant increase of the available beam polarization and intensity. A further increase of beam energy seems feasible with the implementation of superconducting cavities.

  16. Effect of depth span ratio on the behaviour of beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rakesh; Dubey, S. K.; Pathak, K. K.

    2014-06-01

    Behaviour of beam depends on its depth. A beam is considered as deep, if the depth span ratio is 0.5 or more. In the available beam theories, we have to apply correction in case of deep beams. In the present work, method of initial functions (MIF) is used to study the effect of depth on the behaviour of concrete beam. The MIF is an analytical method of elasticity theory. It gives exact solutions of different types of problems without the use of assumptions about the character of stress and strain. In this method, no correction factor is required for beams having larger depth. Results are obtained for three different cases of depth span ratios and compared with available theory and finite element method-based software ANSYS. It is observed that deep beam action starts at depth span ratio equal to 0.25.

  17. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  18. Effects of shutter transients in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gozu, Shin-Ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-11-12

    : We have studied the effects of shutter transients (STs) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Two series of samples were grown by MBE and evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements. The effects of STs were evaluated by growth rate (GR) analysis using a combination of growth time (GT) and thickness evaluated by XRD and XRR measurements. We revealed two opposite effects of STs: (1) overshoot of GR and (2) increase in GR with GT and subsequent saturation. Each effect was consistent with the previous studies; however, the previous studies showed no relationships between these two effects. By considering closing time of the shutter, the two opposite effects were well understood.

  19. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  20. Increasing efficiency of BEAMnrc-simulated Co-60 beams using directional source biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This study describes the implementation of a directional source biasing (DSB) scheme for efficiently simulating Cobalt-60 treatment heads using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. Previous simulation of Co-60 beams with BEAMnrc was impractical because of the time required to track photons not directed into the treatment field and to simulate secondary charged particles. Methods: In DSB, efficiency is increased by splitting each photon emitted by the Co-60 source a user-defined number of times. Only those split primary photons directed into a user-defined splitting field (encompassing the treatment field) are sampled, yielding many low-weight photons directed into the field. Efficiency can be further increased by taking advantage of radial symmetry at the top of the treatment head to reduce the number of split primary photons tracked in this portion. There is also an option to generate contaminant electrons in DSB. Results: The DSB scheme in BEAMnrc increases the photon fluence calculation efficiency in a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} Co-60 beam by a factor of 1800 with a concurrent increase in contaminant electron fluence calculation efficiency by a factor of 1200. Implementation of DSB in beampp, a C++ code for accelerator simulations based on EGSnrc and the C++ class library, egspp, increases photon fluence efficiency by a factor of 2800 and contaminant electron fluence efficiency by a factor of 1600. Optimum splitting numbers are in the range of 20 000–40 000. For dose calculations in a water phantom (0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 3} voxels) this translates into a factor of ∼400 increase in dose calculation efficiency (all doses > 0.5 × D{sub max}). An example calculation of the ratio of dose to water to dose to chamber (the basis of the beam quality correction factor) to within 0.2% in a realistic chamber using a full simulation of a Co-60 treatment head as a source indicates the practicality of Co-60 simulations with DSB. Conclusions: The efficiency improvement

  1. The dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in FFF SBRT: TrueBEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawonwong, T.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in Flattening Filter Free Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (FFF-SBRT). The three 10MV-FFF SBRT plans (2 half rotating Rapid Arc, 9 to10 Gray/Fraction) were selected and irradiated in three different intervals (100%, 50% and 25%) using the RPM gating system. The plan verification was performed by the ArcCHECK for gamma analysis and the ionization chamber for point dose measurement. The dose delivery time of each interval were observed. For gamma analysis (2%&2mm criteria), the average percent pass of all plans for 100%, 50% and 25% intervals were 86.1±3.3%, 86.0±3.0% and 86.1±3.3%, respectively. For point dose measurement, the average ratios of each interval to the treatment planning were 1.012±0.015, 1.011±0.014 and 1.011±0.013 for 100%, 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The average dose delivery time was increasing from 74.3±5.0 second for 100% interval to 154.3±12.6 and 347.9±20.3 second for 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The same quality of the dose delivery from different Beam ON intervals in FFF-SBRT by TrueBEAM was illustrated. While the 100% interval represents the breath-hold treatment technique, the differences for the free-breathing using RPM gating system can be treated confidently.

  2. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  3. Statins Increase Rifampin Mycobactericidal Effect

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Lívia Silva; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Neumann, Arthur da Silva; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barbosa; de Oliveira, Diego Sá Leal; Monteiro, Cláudia Peres; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antimicrobial resistance has been followed with great concern during the last years, while the need for new drugs able to control leprosy and tuberculosis, mainly due to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is pressing. Our group recently showed that M. leprae is able to induce lipid body biogenesis and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and Schwann cells, facilitating its viability and replication. Considering these previous results, we investigated the efficacies of two statins on the intracellular viability of mycobacteria within the macrophage, as well as the effect of atorvastatin on M. leprae infections in BALB/c mice. We observed that intracellular mycobacteria viability decreased markedly after incubation with both statins, but atorvastatin showed the best inhibitory effect when combined with rifampin. Using Shepard's model, we observed with atorvastatin an efficacy in controlling M. leprae and inflammatory infiltrate in the BALB/c footpad, in a serum cholesterol level-dependent way. We conclude that statins contribute to macrophage-bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium bovis, M. leprae, and M. tuberculosis. It is likely that the association of statins with the actual multidrug therapy effectively reduces mycobacterial viability and tissue lesion in leprosy and tuberculosis patients, although epidemiological studies are still needed for confirmation. PMID:25049257

  4. Effect of electron beam irradiation on PMMA films

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Khattak, B. Q.; Verma, Suveer; Upadhyay, Anuj; Sinha, A. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Deb, S. K.

    2012-06-05

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is characterized for electron beam interactions in the resist layer in lithographic applications. PMMA thin films (free standing) were prepared by solvent casting method. These films were irradiated with 30keV electron beam at different doses. Structural and chemical properties of the films were studied by means of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy The XRD results showed that the amorphization increases with electron beam irradiation dose. FTIR spectroscopic analysis reveals that electron beam irradiation promotes the scission of carbonyl group and depletes hydrogen and converts polymeric structure into hydrogen depleted carbon network.

  5. Future e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders and beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-05-01

    Numerous concepts, ranging from conventional to highly exotic, hae been proposed for the acceleration of electrons and positrons to very high energies. For any such concept to be viable, it must be possible to produce from it a set of consistent parameters for one of these ''benchmark'' machines. Attention is directed to the choice of parameters for a collider in the 300 GeV energy range, operating at a gradient on the order of 200 MV/m, using X-band power sources to drive a conventional disk-loaded accelerating structure. These rf power sources, while not completely conventional represent a reasonable extrapolation from present technology. The choice of linac parameters is strongly coupled to various beam-beam effects which take place when the electron and positron bunches collide. We summarize these beam-beam effects, and then return to the rf design of a 650 GeV center-of-mass collider. 14 refs.

  6. Beam-beam effects of single ring and partial double ring scheme in CEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    After the Higgs discovery, it is believed that a circular e+e- collider could serve as a Higgs factory. The high energy physics community in China launched a study of a 50-100 km ring collider. A preliminary conceptual design report (Pre-CDR) has been published in early 2015. This report is based on a 54-km ring design. Some progress on beam-beam effect study after Pre-CDR is shown in the paper. We estimate the beamstrahlung lifetime using a pure strong-strong code as a comparison with the result obtained using a quasi-strong-strong method. The effect of parasitic crossing in the pretzel scheme is also estimated for the very first time. The feasibility of the main parameters for partial double ring scheme are evaluated from the point view of beam-beam interaction.

  7. Effects of parasitic beam-beam interaction during the injection process at the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Y.H.

    1992-06-01

    This paper is concerned with beam-beam effects during the injection process at the proposed asymmetric SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-Factory, PEP-II. It is shown that the parasitic beam-beam interaction can lead to a significant blowup in the vertical size of the injected beam. Simulation results for the horizontal and the vertical injection schemes are presented, and their performances are studied.

  8. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, S.; Božović-Jelisavčić, I.; Pandurović, M.; Smiljanić, I.

    2013-05-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurements at CLIC at 3 TeV center-of-mass energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations. The angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation effects is corrected based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. The distortion of the luminosity spectrum due to the initial-state radiation is corrected by deconvolution. At the end, the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution is numerically corrected. To test the procedures, BHLUMI Bhabha event generator, and Guinea-Pig beam-beam simulation were used to generate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. The systematic effects of the beam-beam interaction on the luminosity measurement are corrected with precision of 1.4 permille in the upper 5% of the energy, and 2.7 permille in the range between 80 and 90% of the nominal center-of-mass energy.

  9. Increasing beam power and energy with the SBS forward energy transfer instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, R. K.; London, R. A.; Dunlop, W. H.; Michel, P. A.; Williams, E. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of the exchange of forward going power and energy between two crossing beams in a plasma [1] is now sufficiently developed that it can be used to enable access to new experimental configurations. The existing models of the process allow the design of beam combiners that will produce higher energy in individual beams for new applications in ignition and HED physics. For example the Energy Partitioning and Energy Coupling (EPEC) [2] program is simulating nuclear events in various environments by delivering energy to the center of a chamber through a narrow tube that allows minimal perturbation of the surrounding region. We will describe the design of gas filled targets that will allow a 2x to 5x increase in the energy in a single NIF quad to enable higher yield events to be simulated in EPEC. These designs as well as advanced ignition target designs will require models with improved precision to predict their performance accurately. We will also compare the predictions of existing and emerging models of wave saturation [3] with the existing experimental data to determine the uncertainty in the models.[4pt] [1] P. Michel Physics of Plasmas 2010.[0pt] [2] K. Fournier, these proceedings[0pt] [3] P. Michel, E. Williams, these proceedings.

  10. Effect of electron beams during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudarham, J.; Henoux, J. C.; Brown, J. C.; van den Oord, J.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    1990-12-01

    Electron bombardment of the solar atmosphere has two effects: one is to enhance hydrogen recombination emission, the other is to increase the opacity via an increase of H(-) population. The first effect is the most important in the upper part of the atmosphere, and the second in the lower part. It is predicted that, when enhanced absorption dominates in the part of the atmosphere where radiation originates, there will be a decrease in the white-light emission, leading to a 'negative flare', or 'black-light flare' short duration, not more than about 20 sec.

  11. Effect of ABCD transformations on beam paraxiality.

    PubMed

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2011-12-19

    The limits of the paraxial approximation for a laser beam under ABCD transformations is established through the relationship between a parameter concerning the beam paraxiality, the paraxial estimator, and the beam second-order moments. The applicability of such an estimator is extended to an optical system composed by optical elements as mirrors and lenses and sections of free space, what completes the analysis early performed for free-space propagation solely. As an example, the paraxiality of a system composed by free space and a spherical thin lens under the propagation of Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss modes is established. The results show that the the paraxial approximation fails for a certain feasible range of values of main parameters. In this sense, the paraxial estimator is an useful tool to monitor the limits of the paraxial optics theory under ABCD transformations.

  12. Increasing the Brightness of Cold Ion Beams by Suppressing Disorder-Induced Heating with Rydberg Blockade.

    PubMed

    Murphy, D; Scholten, R E; Sparkes, B M

    2015-11-20

    A model for the equilibrium coupling of an ion system with varying initial hard-sphere Rydberg blockade correlations is used to quantify the suppression of disorder-induced heating in Coulomb-expanding cold ion bunches. We show that bunches with experimentally achievable blockade parameters have an emittance reduced by a factor of 2.6 and increased focusability and brightness compared to a disordered bunch. Demonstrating suppression of disorder-induced heating is an important step in the development of techniques for the creation of beam sources with sufficient phase-space density for ultrafast, single-shot coherent diffractive imaging.

  13. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Sheets and Yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Baker, James S.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets and yarns were irradiated using electron beam (e-beam) energy to determine the effect of irradiation dose on the tensile properties. Results showed that a slight change in tensile strength occurred after irradiating as-received CNT sheets for 20 minutes, and a slight decrease in tensile strength as the irradiation time approached 90 minutes. On the other hand, the addition of small molecules to the CNT sheet surface had a greater effect on the tensile properties of e-beam irradiated CNT sheets. Some functionalized CNT sheets displayed up to a 57% increase in tensile strength following 90 minutes of e-beam exposure. In addition, as-received CNT yarns showed a significant increase in tensile strength as the irradiation time increased.

  14. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  15. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.; Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  16. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo Duane, Simon; Kamio, Yuji; Palmans, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  17. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-08-01

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  18. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Chaffee, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed that provides a laser output beam having a broad bandwidth and an intensity smooth over time. The bandwidth of the laser output can be varied easily by varying the intensity of a broadband source. The present invention includes an optical modulation apparatus comprising a narrowband laser that outputs a horizontally polarized beam (a "signal beam") and a broadband laser that outputs a vertically polarized beam (a "pump beam") whose intensity varies rapidly. The two beam are coupled into a birefringent laser material so that the respective polarizations coincide with the principal axes of the material. As the two beams travel through the material, the polarization preserving properties of the birefringent material maintain the respective polarizations of the two beam; however there is coupling between the two beams as a result of cross phase modulations, which induces a bandwidth change of the signal beam. The amount of bandwidth change is dependent upon the average intensity of the pump beam. The beams are coupled out from the birefringent material and the modulated signal beam is separated by a polarization selector. The modulated signal beam now has a wider bandwidth, and its shape remains smooth in time. This signal beam can be applied to incoherence inducing systems. The different bandwidths required by these different incoherence inducing systems can be obtained by varying the intensity of the pump beam. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the United States Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  19. Effects of Particle Beams on Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    azide) and secondary (HMX, RDX, TATB, HNS , NTO and TNT) explosives as well as the oxidizer ammonium perchlorate. During each experiment the explosive...out with HMX, RDX, TNT, TATB, HNS and NTO. During this study, the rate of energy deposition was approximately 1-1.5 cal/gm-s, yielding a temperature...RECRYSTALLIZED HMX PRIMARY EXPLOSIVE - PROTON BEAMS When experiments on primary explosives such as lead azide, lead styphnate, PETN and ammonium perchlorate were

  20. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  1. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Christopher; Grulke, Olaf; Matyash, Konstantin; Klinger, Thomas

    2014-05-15

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  2. Simulating Electron Cloud Effects in Heavy-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S.W.; Molvik, A.W.; Azevedo, T.; Vay, J.-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-04

    Stray electrons can be introduced in heavy ion fusion accelerators as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize here results from several studies of electron-cloud accumulation and effects: (1) Calculation of the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam ion loss; the importance of ion scattering is shown; (2) Simulation of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We find electron cloud variations that are resonant with the breathing mode of the beam have the biggest impact on the beam (larger than other resonant and random variations), and that the ion beam is surprisingly robust, with an electron density several percent of the beam density required to produce significant beam degradation in a 200-quadrupole system. We identify a possible instability associated with desorption and resonance with the breathing mode. (3) Preliminary investigations of a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics in arbitrary magnetic fields.

  3. HOLLOW ELECTRON BEAM COLLIMATION FOR HL-LHC - EFFECT ON THE BEAM CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Fitterer, M.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Bruce, R.; Papadopoulou, S.; Papotti, G.; Pellegrini, D.; Pellegrini, S.; Valuch, D.; Wagner, J. F.

    2016-10-05

    Collimation with hollow electron beams or lenses (HEL) is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in HL-LHC. In previous studies it has been shown that the halo can be efficiently removed with a hollow electron lens. Equally important as an efficient removal of the halo, is also to demonstrate that the core stays unperturbed. In this paper, we present a summary of the experiment at the LHC and simulations in view of the effect of the HEL on the beam core in case of a pulsed operation.

  4. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus using sinusoidal cross-phase modulation, provides a laser pulse having a very broad bandwidth while substantially retaining the input laser's temporal shape. The modulator may be used in a master oscillator system for a laser having a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) configration. The modulator utilizes a first laser providing an output wavelength .lambda. and a second laser providing an output wavelength shifted by a small amount to .lambda.+.DELTA..lambda.. Each beam has a single, linear polarization. Each beam is coupled into a length of polarization-preserving optical fiber. The first laser beam is coupled into the optical fiber with the beam's polarization aligned with the fiber's main axis, and the second beam is coupled into the fiber with its polarization rotated from the main axis by a predetermined angle. Within the fiber, the main axis' polarization defines an interference beam and the orthogonal axis' polarization defines a signal beam. In the interference beam, the first laser beam and the parallel polarized vector component of the other beam interfere to create areas of high and low intensity, which modulates the signal beam by cross phase modulation. Upon exit from the optical fiber, the beams are coupled out and the modulated signal beam is separated out by a polarization selector. The signal beam can be applied to coherence reducing systems to provide an output that is temporally and spatially incoherent. The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  5. Effects of electron beam irradiation on polyamide 12 with fiberglass reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeun, Joon-Pyo; Shin, Bum-Sik; Kim, Hyun-Bin; Nho, Young-Chang; Kang, Phil-Hyun

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, the effects of electron beam irradiation of polyamide 12 (PA12) with fiberglass reinforcement on the thermal and wear properties were investigated. Electron beam irradiation of PA 12 was carried out over a range of irradiation doses (100-600 kGy) in air. The gel formation in the presence of a curing agent was dependent on the radiation doses. The thermal properties of irradiated PA 12 were studied in the temperature region 50-250° C to observe the changes in the melting point with radiation dose. The dimensional stability was significantly increased by electron beam irradiation and the related crosslinking of the PA 12.

  6. Effects of ionization distribution on plasma beam focusing characteristics in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhongxi; Liu, Hui; Yu, Daren; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2011-11-01

    The relationship between ionization distribution and divergence of plasma beam in a Hall thruster is investigated using spectrum and probe methods. Experimental results indicate that the shift of ionization region towards the exit of channel causes the reduction of accelerating field and the enhancement of electron thermal pressure effect, which result in further deviation of equipotential lines to magnetic field lines and further increase in divergence of plasma beam. It is, therefore, suggested that to put the ionization region deep inside the channel and separate it from the acceleration region at the design, and development stage is helpful to improve the plasma beam focusing characteristics of a Hall thruster.

  7. Effects of ionization distribution on plasma beam focusing characteristics in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Zhongxi; Liu Hui; Yu Daren; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2011-11-28

    The relationship between ionization distribution and divergence of plasma beam in a Hall thruster is investigated using spectrum and probe methods. Experimental results indicate that the shift of ionization region towards the exit of channel causes the reduction of accelerating field and the enhancement of electron thermal pressure effect, which result in further deviation of equipotential lines to magnetic field lines and further increase in divergence of plasma beam. It is, therefore, suggested that to put the ionization region deep inside the channel and separate it from the acceleration region at the design, and development stage is helpful to improve the plasma beam focusing characteristics of a Hall thruster.

  8. Simple effective tests for beam propagation method programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Mihail M.; Iancu, Ovidiu D.; Karam, Jean Michel

    2000-02-01

    In view of the increased need of an effective, practical and unified test set to evalute the modeling capabilities of beam propagation method (BPM) based programs, we prose an incident set of tests to be used for a standard evaluation. The proposed test have been chosen to be simple, easy to implement and enable a fairly good evaluation without the need of any experiment. Interesting aspects of the tests' results and some straightforward, practical criteria to estimate program capabilities and to tune the simulation parameters are presented. A cross-checking between 'Mode Solver' based and BPM based programs is also put into discussion. A paraxial error evaluation method is presented and the transverse mesh influence on the paraxial error is analyzed.

  9. Electron-Cloud Effects on Heavy-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, T; Friedman, A; Cohen, R; Vay, J

    2004-03-29

    Stray electrons can be introduced in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We are developing a capability for self-consistent simulation of ion beams with the electron clouds they produce. We report on an ingredient in this capability, the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on the dynamics of a coasting ion beam. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also be effective. We identify a possible instability associated with resonance with the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations.

  10. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  11. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  12. Effect of noncircularity of experimental beam on CMB parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santanu; Mitra, Sanjit; Paulson, Sonu Tabitha E-mail: sanjit@iucaa.ernet.in

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies has been playing a lead role in precision cosmology by providing some of the tightest constrains on cosmological models and parameters. However, precision can only be meaningful when all major systematic effects are taken into account. Non-circular beams in CMB experiments can cause large systematic deviation in the angular power spectrum, not only by modifying the measurement at a given multipole, but also introducing coupling between different multipoles through a deterministic bias matrix. Here we add a mechanism for emulating the effect of a full bias matrix to the PLANCK likelihood code through the parameter estimation code SCoPE. We show that if the angular power spectrum was measured with a non-circular beam, the assumption of circular Gaussian beam or considering only the diagonal part of the bias matrix can lead to huge error in parameter estimation. We demonstrate that, at least for elliptical Gaussian beams, use of scalar beam window functions obtained via Monte Carlo simulations starting from a fiducial spectrum, as implemented in PLANCK analyses for example, leads to only few percent of sigma deviation of the best-fit parameters. However, we notice more significant differences in the posterior distributions for some of the parameters, which would in turn lead to incorrect errorbars. These differences can be reduced, so that the errorbars match within few percent, by adding an iterative reanalysis step, where the beam window function would be recomputed using the best-fit spectrum estimated in the first step.

  13. Microbial radio-resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium in egg increases due to repetitive irradiation with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfai, Adiam T.; Beamer, Sarah K.; Matak, Kristen E.; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2011-04-01

    Ionizing radiation improves food safety. However, foodborne pathogens develop increased resistance in response to sub-lethal stresses such as heat, pH, antibiotics, etc. Therefore, it is hypothesized that foodborne pathogens may develop increased radio-resistance to electron beam (e-beam) radiation. The objective was to determine if D10-value for Salmonella Typhimurium in de-shelled raw egg (egg white and yolk mixed together) increases due to repetitive processing with e-beam at sub-lethal doses. Survivors were enumerated on non-selective (TSA) and selective (XLD) media. Survivors from the highest dose were isolated and used in subsequent e-beam cycle. This process was repeated four times for a total of five e-beam cycles. D10-values for S. Typhimurium enumerated on TSA and XLD following each e-beam cycle were calculated as inverse reciprocal of the slope of survivor curves. D10-values for the ATCC strain were 0.59±0.031 and 0.46±0.022 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively. However, following the fifth e-beam cycle, the respective D10-values increased (P<0.05) to 0.69±0.026 and 0.61±0.029 kGy, respectively. S. Typhimurium showed a trend (P>0.05) to develop radio-resistance faster on selective media, likely due to facilitated selection of radio-resistant cells within microbial population following each e-beam cycle. For all five e-beam cycles, S. Typhimurium had higher (P<0.05) D10-values on non-selective media, indicating that sub-lethal injury followed by cellular repair and recovery are important for radio-resistance and inactivation of this microorganism. This study demonstrated that e-beam efficiently inactivates S. Typhimurium in raw egg; however, similar to other inactivation techniques and factors affecting microbial growth, S. Typhimurium develops increased radio-resistance if repetitively processed with e-beam at sub-lethal doses.

  14. Synergetic effects of dual-beam implantation on the microstructural development in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, F.; Ruault, M.-O.; Oliviero, E.; Borodin, V. A.; Kirk, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    We report a synergy effect on the microstructural development of silicon specimens as a result of dual-beam high temperature irradiation/implantation. In situ transmission electron microscopy experiments using two different experimental setups have been used, where the primary 50 keV Co{sup +} ion implantation beam was supplemented with either a 300 keV electron beam or a 500 keV Si{sup +} ion beam. In both cases, the secondary beam intensity was such that both beams created comparable overall primary damage. Completely different microstructural response has been found in these two cases. An intensive electron irradiation was found to sharply accelerate the evolution of dislocation structure, only weakly affecting the disilicide kinetics. On the contrary, the Si ion beam weakly affected the kinetics of either dislocation loops or coherent CoSi{sub 2} precipitates, but drastically increased the number density of thermodynamically unstable semicoherent precipitates. Possible microstructural reasons for the observed effects and the implications for both dislocation loop and cobalt disilicide nucleation mechanisms in high-temperature implanted TEM samples are discussed and supported by detailed molecular dynamics calculations of annealing of cascade remnants produced by the energetic silicon recoils.

  15. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P{sub wall}, P{sub stem}, and P{sub cel}) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude

  16. Simulation of the effect of wiggler imperfections on harmonic generation in two-beam free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedian, M.; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-05-01

    A three-dimensional simulation of a free-electron laser (FEL) with two beams is used to study the sensitivity of the third harmonic due to wiggler imperfections. In the two-beam FEL, for a fundamental wavelength of 107.5 nm, the power will be converted to the third harmonic at a shorter wavelength, in this case in the extreme ultraviolet at 35.8 nm. In this arrangement, the fundamental resonance of the higher energy beam coincides with the third harmonic of the lower energy beam, for this energy conversion to take place. For enhanced focusing, a planar wiggler with parabolic pole face is considered. Investigation of the effect of wiggler errors on the efficiencies of harmonic and fundamental resonance of the two-beam and the one-beam FEL shows that the average efficiency for the third harmonic in the two-beam FEL is decreased by 36% while the reduction of average efficiency for the fundamental of the two-beam is 55% and for the third harmonic of the one-beam is 48%. This shows that the third harmonic radiation in the two-beam FEL is less sensitive to wiggler imperfection compared to its fundamental as well as the third harmonic in the one-beam FEL. The reason is that the energy that transfers to the third harmonic of the two-beam FEL comes from both electron beams. It was also found that, for almost all cases, standard deviation increases with an increasing level of wiggler imperfection while, for the two-beam FEL, saturation length of the fundamental resonance decreases and the third harmonic increases with increasing wiggler imperfection.

  17. A method to increase the hologram viewing angle by the beam reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Naoyuki; Kang, Hoonjong; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    A liquid crystal panel is often used for holographic television. However, its pixel size and pixel number are not enough for practical holographic 3D display. Therefore, multi-panel configuration is often used to increase the viewing angle and displayed image size. However, many spatial light modulators should be used in them. In this paper, we propose a novel method to increase the viewing angle of a holographic display system. The proposed method, which is implemented by a mirror module, is to reconfigure the beam shape reflected by a spatial light modulator. In this paper, the equipment is applied to a holographic display system, which has only a single spatial light modulator and can display a hologram in wider viewing angle than that of the conventional method. By the proposed method, the resolution of the reconfigured spatial light modulator has double resolution in horizontal direction. Inversely, the vertical resolution is decreased because the human get more 3D information in horizontal direction. We have experimented using a Liquid Crystal on Silicon, whose resolution is 4,096 x 2,160 pixels. And the reconfigured resolution by the mirror module is 8,192 x 1,080 pixels. From the experimental results, the horizontal viewing angle is almost two times wider than that of the conventional method without the mirror module. We have achieved that the hologram can be observed binocularly.

  18. The effect of energy deposition on pattern resolution in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Ananthan

    Electron beam lithography is one of the most important tools for nanofabrication. Electron beam lithography has consistently been able to offer higher resolution, typically better than 10 nm or so, compared to other techniques. In this work the contribution of electron-substrate interaction to pattern resolution is investigated. In electron beam lithography the incident beam is scattered in the resist-substrate stack by a combination of elastic and inelastic events which is described by the point spread function. Using a Vistec VB300 Gaussian beam lithography tool operating at 100 keV the experimental point spread function is investigated by a technique called point exposure distribution measurements. The experimental results indicate that the scattering in the sub-100 nm range shows several orders of the magnitude difference with that obtained via Monte Carlo simulations. In high energy electron beam lithography where forward scattering in small, contribution of secondary electrons generated by the primary beam must be taken into account. The chemical change leading to resist exposure is through bond scission, which is typically a low energy event between 3 -- 5 eV. Compared to the primary beam, the secondary electrons have a significantly higher probability of scission due to their lower energy. These secondary electrons are also generated with large emission angles and can travel several nanometers, leading to an increase in observed line widths compared to the size of the beam. An analytical model developed here, that considers the energy deposited by the secondary electrons, is able to predict the dependence of dose on observed diameter to within a reasonable accuracy. This technique used in conjunction with the knowledge of resist contrast is also indicative of pattern resolution limits in high energy electron beam lithography. It is also found that for negative resists, backscatter effects and resist contrast significantly degrade the resolution for large

  19. Photoluminescence enhancement in quaternary III-nitrides alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy with increasing Al content

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Pereiro, J.; Gonzalez-Posada, F.; Munoz, E.; Calleja, E.

    2008-02-15

    Room temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption spectra have been measured in wurtzite In{sub x}Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x-y}N (x{approx}0.06, 0.02beam epitaxy. Photoluminescence spectra show both an enhancement of the integrated intensity and an increasing Stokes shift with the Al content. Both effects arise from an Al-enhanced exciton localization revealed by the S- and W-shaped temperature dependences of the photoluminescence emission energy and bandwidth, respectively. Present results point to these materials as a promising choice for the active region in efficient light emitters. An In-related bowing parameter of 1.6 eV was derived from optical absorption data.

  20. Strict X-ray beam collimation for facial bones examination can increase lens exposure

    PubMed Central

    Powys, R; Robinson, J; Kench, P L; Ryan, J; Brennan, P C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It is well accepted that collimation is a cost-effective dose-reducing tool for X-ray examinations. This phantom-based study investigated the impact of X-ray beam collimation on radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid along with the effect on image quality in facial bone radiography. Methods A three-view series (occipitomental, occipitomental 30 and lateral) was investigated, and radiation doses to the lenses and thyroid were measured using an Unfors dosemeter. Images were assessed by six experienced observers using a visual grading analysis and a total of 5400 observations were made. Results Strict collimation significantly (p<0.0001) reduced the radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid when using a fixed projection-specific exposure. With a variable exposure technique (fixed exit dose, to simulate the behaviour of an automatic exposure control), while strict collimation was again shown to reduce thyroid dose, higher lens doses were demonstrated when compared with larger fields of exposure. Image quality was found to significantly improve using strict collimation, with observer preference being demonstrated using visual grading characteristic curves. Conclusion The complexities of optimising radiographic techniques have been shown and the data presented emphasise the importance of examining dose-reducing strategies in a comprehensive way. PMID:22374279

  1. Electronic beam steering used with a toroidal HIFU transducer substantially increases the coagulated volume.

    PubMed

    Vincenot, Jeremy; Melodelima, David; Chavrier, Françoise; Vignot, Alexandre; Kocot, Anthony; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-01

    Treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound is well established but requires extended treatment time. A device composed of 256 elements arranged on a toroidal transducer was developed to increase the coagulated volume. When all the elements are working in phase for 40 s, a volume of 6-8 cm(3) can be ablated. However, the mechanical juxtaposition of single lesions is still necessary for treating one tumor with a diameter of 2 cm. The objective of this study was to combine this toroidal transducer geometry with electronic beam steering to ablate tumors with adequate normal tissue margins and without any mechanical displacement of the high-intensity focused ultrasound device. In vitro tests demonstrated that the coagulated volume obtained from 130 s of total exposure has an average diameter of 41.4 ± 4.0 mm and an average length of 53.3 ± 6.1 mm. This single lesion can be used to treat various size of metastasis, located at depths in the liver ranging 5-45 mm.

  2. Effective parameters in beam acoustic metamaterials based on energy band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Hou, Mingming; Kuan, Lu; Shen, Li

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to calculate the effective material parameters of beam acoustic metamaterials. The effective material parameters of a periodic beam are calculated as an example. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of this beam are calculated. Subsequently, the effective material parameters of the beam are investigated by using the energy band structures. Then, the modal analysis and transmission properties of the beams with finite cells are simulated in order to confirm the correctness of effective approximation. The results show that the periodic beam can be equivalent to the homogeneous beam with dynamic effective material parameters in passband.

  3. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-20

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  4. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-09

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  5. Simulation Of Electron Cloud Effects On Electron Beam At ERL With Pipelined QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, B.; Muggli, P.; Huang, C.; Decyk, V.; Mori, W. B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.; Katsouleas, T.

    2009-01-22

    With the successful implementation of pipelining algorithm to the QuickPIC code, the number of processors used is increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude, and the speed of the simulation is improved by a similar factor. The pipelined QuickPIC is used to simulate the electron cloud effect on electron beam in the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) due to extremely small emittance and high peak currents anticipated in the machine. A tune shift is found due to electron cloud on electron beams, which is of equal magnitude to that on positron beams but in an opposite direction; however, emittance growth of the electron beam in an electron cloud is not observed for ERL parameters.

  6. Charge stripper effects on beam dynamics in the 180-degree bending section of the RISP linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Song, Jeong Seog

    2016-09-01

    The RAON, a superconducting linear accelerator for RISP (Rare Isotope Science Project), will use a charge stripper in order to increase the charge states of the heavy ions for effective acceleration in the higher energy part of the linac. The charge stripper affects the beam distribution by scattering the heavy ions as they go through the charge stripper. Moreover we have to select and accelerate proper charge states between 77+ and 81+ for the case of a uranium beam in order to satisfy the beam-power requirement at an IF (inflight fragmentation) target. This work focuses on how the beam dynamics are affected by the charge stripper in the 180-dgree bending section.

  7. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment.

  8. Effective Strategies for Increasing Citation Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale; Salehi, Hadi; Embi, Mohamed Amin; Tanha, Farid Habibi; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Motahar, Seyed Mohammad; Ordi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Due to the effect of citation impact on The Higher Education (THE) world university ranking system, most of the researchers are looking for some helpful techniques to increase their citation record. This paper by reviewing the relevant articles extracts 33 different ways for increasing the citations possibilities. The results show that the article…

  9. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D{sup −} beams in future neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-08

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  10. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  11. Surface-active element effects on the shape of GTA, laser, and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Roper, J.R.; Stagner, R.T.; Aden, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Laser and electron-beam welds were passed across selenium-doped zones in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The depth/width (d/w) ratio of a defocused laser weld with a weld pool shape similar to a GTA weld increased by over 200% in a zone where 66 ppm selenium had been added. Smaller increases were observed in selenium-doped zones for a moderately defocused electron beam weld with a higher d/w ratio in undoped base metal. When laser or electron beam weld penetration was by a keyhole mechanism, no change in d/w ratio occurred in selenium-doped zones. The results confirm the surface-tension-driven fluid-flow model for the effect of minor elements on GTA weld pool shape. Other experimental evidence bearing on the effect of minor elements on GTA weld penetration is summarized.

  12. Simulations of Electron Cloud Effects on the Beam Dynamics for theFNAL Main Injector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnad Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine M.; Grote, David

    2006-04-15

    The Fermilab main injector (MI) is being considered for an upgrade as part of the high intensity neutrino source (HINS) effort. This upgrade will involve a significant increasing of the bunch intensity relative to its present value. Such an increase will place the MI in a regime in which electron-cloud effects are expected to become important. We have used the electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP, recently augmented with new modeling capabilities and simulation techniques, to study the dynamics of beam-electron cloud interaction. This work in progress involves a systematic assessment of beam instabilities due to the presence of electron clouds.

  13. Stabilization of a Laser Welding Process Against Focal Shift Effects using Beam Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, C.; Weber, R.; Johannsen, J.; Graf, T.

    Two measures to enhance welding process stability with respect to a varying focal position are presented and discussed with regards to possible effects of laser power efficiency increase. Spatial beam movement was caused by a deflecting mirror and proved to create a welding process with a higher constancy in welding depth when changing focal position. A larger cross sectional area of the weld seam was measured showing increased laser absorption when compared to a static beam. Sinusoidal laser power modulation was tested for varying focus positions and proves to induce a deeper weld seam at moderately increased cross sectional areas. The power modulated welding process is dominated by the influence of melt dynamics which can be guided by choosing suitable modulation parameters. Both systems can be used to stabilize the welding process against loss of joint area or loss of connection which may occur due to focal shift in high brightness laser beam optics.

  14. Population effects of increased climate variation.

    PubMed

    Drake, John M

    2005-09-07

    Global circulation models predict and numerous observations confirm that anthropogenic climate change has altered high-frequency climate variability. However, it is not yet well understood how changing patterns of environmental variation will affect wildlife population dynamics and other ecological processes. Theory predicts that a population's long-run growth rate is diminished and the chance of population extinction is increased as environmental variation increases. This results from the fact that population growth is a multiplicative process and that long-run population growth rate is the geometric mean of growth rates over time, which is always less than the arithmetic mean. However, when population growth rates for unstructured populations are related nonlinearly to environmental drivers, increasing environmental variation can increase a population's long-run growth rate. This suggests that patterns of environmental variation associated with different aspects of climate change may affect population dynamics in different ways. Specifically, increasing variation in rainfall might result in diminished long-run growth rates for many animal species while increasing variation in temperature might result in increased long-run growth rates. While the effect of rainfall is theoretically well understood and supported by data, the hypothesized effect of temperature is not. Here, I analyse two datasets to study the effect of fluctuating temperatures on growth rates of zooplankton. Results are consistent with the prediction that fluctuating temperatures should increase long-run growth rates and the frequency of extreme demographic events.

  15. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  16. Experimental investigation of CNT effect on curved beam strength and interlaminar fracture toughness of CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca, M. A.; Coker, D.

    2014-06-01

    High mechanical properties and light weight structures of composite materials and advances in manufacturing processes have increased the use of composite materials in the aerospace and wind energy industries as a primary load carrying structures in complex shapes. However, use of composite materials in complex geometries such as L-shaped laminates creates weakness at the radius which causes delamination. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is preferred as a toughening materials in composite matrices due to their high mechanical properties and aspect ratios. However, effect of CNTs on curved beam strength (CBS) is not investigated in literature comprehensively. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of CNT on Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness and CBS. L-shaped beams are fabric carbon/epoxy composite laminates manufactured by hand layup technique. Curved beam composite laminates were subjected to four point bending loading according to ASTM D6415/D6415M-06a. Double cantilever beam (DCB) tests and end notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine mode-I and mode-II fracture toughness, respectively. Preliminary results show that 3% CNT addition to the resin increased the mode-I fracture toughness by %25 and mode-II fracture toughness by %10 compared to base laminates. In contrast, no effect on curved beam strength was found.

  17. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  18. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  19. Protective effects of shikonin on brain injury induced by carbon ion beam irradiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Wang, Zhen Hua; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Rong; Sun, Chao; Liu, Yang; Si, Jing; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Wang, Zhen Guo

    2015-02-01

    Radiation encephalopathy is the main complication of cranial radiotherapy. It can cause necrosis of brain tissue and cognitive dysfunction. Our previous work had proved that a natural antioxidant shikonin possessed protective effect on cerebral ischemic injury. Here we investigated the effects of shikonin on carbon ion beam induced radiation brain injury in mice. Pretreatment with shikonin significantly increased the SOD and CAT activities and the ratio of GSH/GSSG in mouse brain tissues compared with irradiated group (P<0.01), while obviously reduced the MDA and PCO contents and the ROS levels derived from of the brain mitochondria. The shikonin also noticeably improved the spatial memory deficits caused by carbon ion beam irradiation. All results demonstrated that shikonin could improve the irradiated brain injury which might resulted from its modulation effects on the oxidative stress induced by the 12C6+ ion beam.

  20. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  1. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  2. The effects of error augmentation on learning to walk on a narrow balance beam.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-10-01

    Error augmentation during training has been proposed as a means to facilitate motor learning due to the human nervous system's reliance on performance errors to shape motor commands. We studied the effects of error augmentation on short-term learning of walking on a balance beam to determine whether it had beneficial effects on motor performance. Four groups of able-bodied subjects walked on a treadmill-mounted balance beam (2.5-cm wide) before and after 30 min of training. During training, two groups walked on the beam with a destabilization device that augmented error (Medium and High Destabilization groups). A third group walked on a narrower beam (1.27-cm) to augment error (Narrow). The fourth group practiced walking on the 2.5-cm balance beam (Wide). Subjects in the Wide group had significantly greater improvements after training than the error augmentation groups. The High Destabilization group had significantly less performance gains than the Narrow group in spite of similar failures per minute during training. In a follow-up experiment, a fifth group of subjects (Assisted) practiced with a device that greatly reduced catastrophic errors (i.e., stepping off the beam) but maintained similar pelvic movement variability. Performance gains were significantly greater in the Wide group than the Assisted group, indicating that catastrophic errors were important for short-term learning. We conclude that increasing errors during practice via destabilization and a narrower balance beam did not improve short-term learning of beam walking. In addition, the presence of qualitatively catastrophic errors seems to improve short-term learning of walking balance.

  3. Effective NOx remediation from a surrogate flue gas using the US NRL Electra electron beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Giuliani, J. L.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Hegeler, F.; Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NOx) emission is under restrictive federal regulations because of its negative impact on atmosphere, biosphere, and human health. Therefore, its removal has been a subject of extensive research to develop new efficient and cost effective techniques that can be applied on an industrial scale. In this work, we study both experimentally and theoretically an effective removal of NOx pollutants from a surrogate flue gas (SFG) using high power electron beam (e-beam) pulses. SFG is a simulant for exhaust from coal combustion power plants (82% N2, 6% O2, 12% CO2, and ˜100 ppm of NOx). The pulsed electron beam is generated using the United States Naval Research Laboratory Electra facility, which delivers e-beams with energies of ˜500 keV and a power pulse duration of ˜140 ns. During the e-beam irradiation, the energetic electrons generate a non-equilibrium plasma containing chemically active species, which then react with NOx to form harmless substances. A non-equilibrium time-dependent model is developed to describe NOx remediation from SFG. The model combines e-beam deposition rates obtained by solving the electron Boltzmann equation and extensive plasma chemistry modeling, which follows the species on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to a few seconds. NOx decomposition as a function of electron beam parameters is studied. It is demonstrated experimentally that short (ns) pulses are the most efficient for NOx removal. A sharp reduction of NOx was measured with e-beam power deposition increasing, following the trend predicted by the model, achieving a 20 fold reduction to ˜5 ppm at energy deposition ˜20 J/l.

  4. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-09

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  5. Statistical effects in high-power microwave beam propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, R. A.; Bolton, P. R.; Sieger, G. E.

    1988-06-01

    At very high power levels pulsed microwave beams can generate air-breakdown plasmas which may limit the fluence that the beam can transport through the atmosphere. Conventional air breakdown is an avalanche process wherein free electrons, driven by the microwave fields, produce ionization through collisions with air molecules. Propagation of a beam is affected when the plasma electron density approaches the critical density for the particular microwave frequency. The rate of growth of the plasma depends on the competition between the ionization probability and electron loss processes such as attachment and diffusion. The physics of the avalanche process is reasonably well understood, and fluence limits can be fairly accurately predicted, so long as there are free seed electrons to initiate the breakdown. At sea level and low altitudes, seed electrons are, in fact, expected to be fairly rare, and air breakdown, and the consequences for beam propagation, must be treated as a statistical problem; the effective fluence limit may be much greater than would be predicted on the basis of conventional breakdown thresholds. The statistical effects are currently being investigated.

  6. Effect of plasma rotation on sawtooth stabilization by beam ions

    SciTech Connect

    N. N. Gorelenkov; M. F. F. Nave; R. Budny; C. Z. Cheng; G. Y. Fu; J. Hastie; J. Manickam; W. Park

    2000-06-23

    The sawtooth period in JET ELM-free H-Mode plasmas is increasing with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) power. For injected power PNBI 12MW no large sawtooth crash is observed during the ELM-free period. However, as the edge stability is improved and external kink modes and ELMs are delayed, a possible sawtooth crash at a high plasma beta becomes a concern. In JET DT experiments, delaying sawteeth was found to be crucial in the quest for high fusion power. Fast particles are known to provide stabilizing effect on sawteeth, however, sawtooth stabilization by NBI ions is not clearly understood, since NBI ions are usually not ''fast'' enough to stabilize the m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode which is believed to cause the crash. In order to understand the observed sawteeth stabilization in tokamak experiments with NBI heating, the internal kink m/n = 1/1 mode stability of JET plasmas was modeled using the NOVA-K code, which is also benchmarked with the nonperturbative version of NOVA and the M3D code. Comparison of m/n = 1/1 mode stabilization by NBI ions in JET and TFTR and application of the nonlinear stabilization criteria is given.

  7. Effect of particle size distribution and chlorophyll content on beam attenuation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.; Zaneveld, J. R. V.; Pak, H.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships between beam attenuation spectra, chlorophyll and pheophytin pigment concentrations, and particle size distributions are examined for a coastal region believed to have negligible concentrations of terrestrially derived dissolved organic compounds but large quantities of phytoplankton and resuspended sediments. It was found that the slope of the beam attenuation spectra increases when the hyperbolic slope of the size distribution increases. The magnitude of this increase in slope was consistent with calculations based on a range of particle diameters from 0.5 to 30 microns so that it would be possible to predict the slope of the particle size distribution if the slope of the beam attenuation spectra is known. The ratio of chlorophyll and pheophytin pigments to suspended volume concentrations affected the beam attenuation spectra to a lesser degree and in a more complex manner. Because of the strong effect of slope, it was concluded that the chlorophyll and pheophytin pigment content of suspended particles could not be efficiently predicted by means of beam attenuation measurements.

  8. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  9. A Study of Effects of Tissue Inhomogeneity on HIFU Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Viren; Roberts, Ron; Long, Tao; Thompson, R. B.; Ryken, Timothy

    2006-05-01

    The potential of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) will not be realized unless the effects of overlaying tissues are understood in such a way that allows for estimation of HIFU dose distribution at a target tissue. We employ computational models to examine the impact of phase aberration on tissue ablation. Thompson and Roberts have recently studied the effects of phase aberration on ultrasound focusing in aerospace engine materials such as titanium alloy, and have developed a computational model to examine these effects. The ultrasound beam observed after transmission through the fused quartz (homogeneous) and that observed after transmission through the titanium (inhomogeneous) demonstrate the severe beam wavefield amplitude distortion introduced by the velocity inhomogeneity-induced phase aberration. We study applicability of this approach to model phase aberration in inhomogeneous tissues and its effect on HIFU dose distribution around the focus. It is hypothesized that the ill-effects of phase aberration accumulate during propagation through intervening tissue in which field intensities are substantially lower than that in the focal zone, and it is therefore appropriate to use a linear acoustic model to describe the transport of energy from the transducer to the volume targeted for ablation. We present initial results of the simulation and experiments of beam measurements under water without and with different tissue layers.

  10. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part II: Thickness length scale effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of the Eringen's nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam model. In literature, most work has taken the axial coordinate derivative in the Laplacian operator presented in nonlocal elasticity. This causes that the non-locality always makes the beam soften as compared to the local counterpart. In this paper, the thickness scale effect is solely considered to investigate if the nonlocal model can simulate stiffening effect. Taking the thickness derivative in the Laplacian operator leads to the presence of a surface stress state. The governing equation derived is compared to that of the EB model with the surface stress. The results obtained reveal that the nonlocality tends to decrease the bending moment stiffness whereas to increase the bending rigidity in the governing equation. This tendency also depends on the surface conditions.

  11. Turbulent effects of strong irradiance fluctuations on the orbital angular momentum mode of fractional Bessel Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yixin; Dan, Weiyi; Hu, Zhengda

    2015-06-29

    The turbulent effects of strong irradiance fluctuations on the probability densities and the normalized powers of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes are modeled for fractional Bessel Gauss beams in paraxial turbulence channel. We find that the probability density of signal OAM modes is a function of position deviation from the beam center, and the farther away from the beam center the detection position is, the smaller the probability density is. For fractional OAM quantum numbers, the average probability densities of signal/crosstalk modes oscillate along the beam radius except the half-integer. When the beam waist of source decreases or the irradiance fluctuation increases, the average probability density of the signal OAM mode drops. The peak of the average probability density of crosstalk modes shifts to outward of the beam center as beam waist gets larger. In the nearby region of beam center, the larger the quantum number deviation of OAM, the smaller the beam waist and the turbulence fluctuations are, the lower average probability densities of crosstalk OAM modes are. Especially, the increase of turbulence fluctuations can make the crosstalk stronger and more concentrated. Lower irradiance fluctuation can give rise to higher the normalized powers of the signal OAM modes, which is opposite to the crosstalk normalized powers.

  12. e-beam irradiation effects on IR absorption bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Nagao, Katsunori; Ikemoto, Yuka; Okazaki, Toshiya; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kawakami, Akira; Kataura, Hiromichi; Umezu, Ikurou; Ando, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the absorption and Raman spectral change induced by the irradiation of e-beam. By the irradiation of e-beam on SWNTs thin films, the intensity of defect related Raman band increase, and the peak energy of IR absorption bands shift to the higher energy side. These results indicate that the origin of infrared band is due to the plasmon resonance of finite-length SWNT. We have estimated the effective tube length and defect density from IR absorption peak energy.

  13. Effects of dipole magnet inhomogeneities on the beam ellipsoid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Colman, J.; Levine, M.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Ward, T.; Grand, P.

    1986-01-01

    The RAYTRACE computer code has been modified to accept magnetic fields measured in the median plane of a dipole magnet. This modification allows one to study the effects of a non-ideal dipole magnet on the beam ellipsoid (as defined by the TRANSPORT code manual). The effects on the beam ellipsoid are due to: field inhomogeneities in the interior region of the dipole, and discrepancies from design conditions of the magnetic field values in the fringe field region. The results of the RAYTRACE code calculations based on experimentally measured fields will be compared with the results derived using both an ideal (no inhomogeneities) dipole with SCOFF boundaries and an ideal dipole with perfect (according to design) fringe fields.

  14. Skin-sparing effects of neutron beam filtering materials.

    PubMed

    Otte, V A; Almond, P R; Smathers, J B; Attix, F H

    1987-01-01

    The skin-sparing effects of several filtering materials for fast neutron beams were studied under various conditions. A parallel-plate ionization chamber was used for the measurements. The parameters which were studied included field size, distance from filter to ion chamber, filter material, and filter thickness. On the basis of this work, Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) was chosen for fabrication of flattening filters and wedges.

  15. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  16. Implementing the complete beam hardening effect of the bowtie filter versus scaling beam intensities: effects on dosimetric applications in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Zhang, Guozhi; Bosmans, Hilde; Oyen, Raymond; Zanca, Federica

    2014-10-01

    The bowtie filter is an essential element of computed tomography scanners. Implementation of this filter in a Monte Carlo dosimetry platform can be based on Turner's method, which describes how to measure the filter thickness and relate the x-ray beam as a function of bowtie angle to the central beam. In that application, the beam hardening is accounted for by means of weighting factors that are associated to the photons according to their position (fan angle) and energy. We assessed an alternative approximation in which the photon spectrum is given a fan angle-dependent scaling factor. The aim of our investigation was to evaluate the effects on dose accuracy estimation when using the gold standard bowtie filter method versus a beam scaling approximation method. In particular, we wanted to assess the percentage dose differences between the two methods for several water thicknesses representative for different patients of different body mass index. The largest percentage differences were found for the thickest part of the bowtie filter and increased with patient size.

  17. Effect of electron-beam irradiation on graphene field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childres, Isaac; Jauregui, Luis A.; Foxe, Michael; Tian, Jifa; Jalilian, Romaneh; Jovanovic, Igor; Chen, Yong P.

    2010-10-01

    Electron beam exposure is a commonly used tool for fabricating and imaging graphene-based devices. Here, we present a study of the effects of electron-beam irradiation on the electronic transport properties of graphene and the operation of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs). Exposure to a 30 keV electron-beam caused negative shifts in the charge-neutral point (CNP) of the GFET, interpreted as due to n-doping in the graphene from the interaction of the energetic electron beam with the substrate. The shift in the CNP is substantially reduced for suspended graphene devices. The electron beam is seen to also decrease the carrier mobilities and minimum conductivity, indicating defects created in the graphene. The findings are valuable for understanding the effects of radiation damage on graphene and for the development of radiation-hard graphene-based electronics.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron noise effects on beam position determination at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Leach, Richard R.; Datte, Philip; Manuel, Anastacia

    2013-09-01

    Images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are crucial to precise alignment of the 192 laser beams to the NIF target-chamber center (TCC). Cameras in and around the target chamber are increasingly exposed to the effects of neutron radiation as the laser power is increased for high energy fusion experiments. NIF was carefully designed to operate under these conditions. The present work examines the degradation of the measured TCC camera position accuracy resulting from the effects of neutron radiation on the sensor and verifies operation within design specifications. Both synthetic and real beam images are used for measuring position degradation. Monte Carlo simulations based on camera performance models are used to create images with added neutron noise. These models predict neutron induced camera noise based on exposure estimates of the cumulative single-shot fluence in the NIF environment. The neutron induced noise images are used to measure beam positions on a target calculated from the alignment images with the added noise. The effects of this noise are also determined using noise artifacts from real camera images viewing TCC to estimate beam position uncertainty.

  19. Attosecond Lighthouse Effect: from tilted waves to isolated harmonic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Borot, Antonin; Vincenti, Henri; Monchoce, Sylvain; Ricci, Aurelien; Jullien, Aurelie; Malvache, Arnaud; Quere, Fabien; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2012-06-01

    Spatio-temporal coupling (STC) within a laser pulse is normally a negative feature to be avoided as it leads to non-uniform pulse characteristics and reduced intensity at focus. In this study, STC is purposefully introduced into the laser pulse leading to wavefront rotation at the focus. When such a modified focus is applied to plasma mirror harmonic generation, each harmonic pulse produced from cycle to cycle has a shifted propagation direction. Dependant on the degree of wavefront rotation introduced, this can lead from tilted harmonic spectra due to small displacements of the overlapping beams to fully isolated, individual pulses arising from each cycle of the driving laser pulse, the so-called Attosecond Lighthouse effect. This work discusses the recently measured results of spatially-separated, single harmonic beams from a solid target source obtained with 1kHz, CEP-locked, 800nm laser pulses of both 25 and 5 fs duration.

  20. Effect of beam quality on tilt measurement using cyclic interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretheesh Kumar, V. C.; Ganesan, A. R.; Joenathan, C.; Somasundaram, U.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate measurement of angles is extremely important in various metrological applications. Interferometry has always been an excellent technique for accurate measurements. Several methods have been proposed for accurate tilt measurement using interferometric techniques. Almost all of them use the Michelson configuration which is extremely sensitive to environmental vibrations and turbulences. We know that a cyclic interferometer is extremely stable. Even though it is not sensitive to displacement changes, it is twice sensitive to tilt compared to that of a Michelson interferometer. We have enhanced the sensitivity to measure tilt using multiple reflections in a cyclic interferometer. Since the input beam is collimated, we have studied the effect of aberration of the input beam on the accuracy of tilt measurement. Experimental results on this study are presented in this paper.

  1. Determination of surface dose and the effect of bolus to surface dose in electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Guenhan, Basri; Kemikler, Goenuel; Koca, Ayse

    2003-09-30

    When treating tumors from surface to a certain depth (< 5 cm), electron beams are preferred in radiotherapy. To increase the surface doses of lower electron beams, tissue-equivalent bolus materials are often used. We observed that the surface doses increased with increasing field sizes and electron energies. At the same time, we also observed that all electron parameters were shifted toward the skin as much as the thickness of the bolus used. The effect of bolus to the surface doses was more significant at low electron energies than at higher electron energies. Rando phantom measurements at 6-, 7.5-, and 9-MeV were slightly lower than the solid phantom measurements, which could only be explained by the inverse square law effect and the Rando phantom contour irregularity.

  2. Increasing pandemic vaccination rates with effective communication.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Natalie J

    2011-06-01

    Communicating effectively with the public about the importance of vaccination during a pandemic poses a challenge to health communicators. The public's concerns about the safety, effectiveness and necessity of vaccines lead many people to refuse vaccination and the current communication strategies are often unsuccessful at overcoming the public's resistance to vaccinate. Convincing the public to receive a vaccination, especially during a pandemic when there can be so much uncertainty about the vaccine and the disease, requires a revised communication approach. This revised approach should integrate into messages information that the public identifies as important, as well as presenting messages in a way that is consistent with our evolved social learning biases. These biases will impact both the content of the message and who delivers the message to different target populations. Additionally, an improved understanding between media and health communicators about the role each plays during a crisis may increase the effectiveness of messages disseminated to the public. Lastly, given that the public is increasingly seeking health information from on-line and other electronic sources, health communication needs to continue to find ways to integrate new technologies into communication strategies.

  3. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  4. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Pei, Shi-Lun; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-05-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper.

  5. Modeling of dynamic effects of a low power laser beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, George N.; Scholl, Marija S.; Khatib, AL

    1988-01-01

    Methods of modeling some of the dynamic effects involved in laser beam propagation through the atmosphere are addressed with emphasis on the development of simple but accurate models which are readily implemented in a physical optics code. A space relay system with a ground based laser facility is considered as an example. The modeling of such characteristic phenomena as laser output distribution, flat and curved mirrors, diffraction propagation, atmospheric effects (aberration and wind shear), adaptive mirrors, jitter, and time integration of power on target, is discussed.

  6. Theoretical modeling on the laser induced effect of liquid crystal optical phased beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoxian; Wang, Xiangru; Wu, Liang; Tan, Qinggui; Li, Man; Shang, Jiyang; Wu, Shuanghong; Huang, Ziqiang

    2017-01-01

    Non-mechanical laser beam steering has been reported previously in liquid crystal array devices. To be one of the most promising candidates to be practical non-mechanical laser deflector, its laser induced effect still has few theoretical model. In this paper, we propose a theoretical model to analyze this laser induced effect of LC-OPA to evaluate the deterioration on phased beam steering. The model has three parts: laser induced thermal distribution; temperature dependence of material parameters and beam steering deterioration. After these three steps, the far field of laser beam is obtained to demonstrate the steering performance with the respect to the incident laser beam power and beam waist.

  7. The effects of magnetic fringe fields on beam dynamics in a beam transport line of a terahertz FEL source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Han; Xiong, Yongqian; Pei, Yuanji

    2014-11-01

    The transport line used in a terahertz FEL device has to transport electron beam through the entire system efficiently and meet the requirements of the beam parameters at the undulator entrance. Due to space limitations, the size of the magnets (five quadrupoles and two bending magnets) employed in the transport line was limited, and some devices were densely packed. In this paper, analyses of the effect of fringe fields and magnetic interference of magnets are presented. 3D models of these magnets are built and their linear optical properties are compared with those obtained by hard edge models. The results indicated that the effects of these factors are significant and they would cause a mismatch of the beam at the exit of the transport line under the preliminary lattice design. To solve this problem, the beam was re-matched using the particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  8. Coherent beam-beam effects observation and mitigation at the RHIC collider

    SciTech Connect

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2012-05-20

    In polarized proton operation in RHIC coherent beam-beam modes are routinely observed with beam transfer function measurements in the vertical plane. With the existence of coherent modes a larger space is required in the tune diagram than without them and stable conditions can be compromised for operation with high intensity beams as foreseen for future luminosity upgrades. We report on experiments and simulations carried out to understand the existence of coherent modes in the vertical plane and their absence in the horizontal plane, and investigate possible mitigation strategies.

  9. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  10. Intensity Effects of the FACET Beam in the SLAC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, F.-J.; Lipkowitz, N.; Sheppard, J.; White, G.R.; Wienands, U.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2012-07-03

    The beam for FACET (Facility for Advanced aCcelerator Experimental Tests) at SLAC requires an energy-time correlation ('chirp') along the linac, so it can be compressed in two chicanes, one at the midpoint in sector 10 and one W-shaped chicane just before the FACET experimental area. The induced correlation has the opposite sign to the typical used for BNS damping, and therefore any orbit variations away from the center kick the tail of the beam more than the head, causing a shear in the beam and emittance growth. Any dispersion created along the linac has similar effects due to the high (>1.2% rms) energy spread necessary for compression. The initial huge emittances could be reduced by a factor of 10, but were still bigger than expected by a factor of 2-3. Normalized emittance of 3 {micro}m-rad in Sector 2 blew up to 150 {micro}m-rad in Sector 11 but could be reduced to about 6-12 {micro}m-rad, for the vertical plane although the results were not very stable. Investigating possible root causes for this, we found locations where up to 10 mm dispersion was created along the linac, which were finally verified with strong steering and up to 7 mm settling of the linac accelerator at these locations.

  11. Self-effect in expanding electron beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-05-07

    An analytical model of plasma flow from a metal plate hit by an intense, pulsed, electron beam aims to bridge the gap between radiation-hydrodynamics simulations and experiments, and to quantify the self-effect of the electron beam penetrating the flow. Does the flow disrupt the tight focus of the initial electron bunch, or later pulses in a train? This work aims to model the spatial distribution of plasma speed, density, degree of ionization, and magnetization to inquire. The initial solid density, several eV plasma expands to 1 cm and 10{sup {minus}4} relative density by 2 {micro}s, beyond which numerical simulations are imprecise. Yet, a Faraday cup detector at the ETA-II facility is at 25 cm from the target and observes the flow after 50 {micro}s. The model helps bridge this gap. The expansion of the target plasma into vacuum is so rapid that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. When the temperature (in eV) in a parcel of fluid drops below V{sub i} x [(2{gamma} - 2)/(5{gamma} + 17)], where V{sub i} is the ionization potential of the target metal (7.8 eV for tantalum), and {gamma} is the ratio of specific heats (5/3 for atoms), then the fractional ionization and electron temperature in that parcel remain fixed during subsequent expansion. The freezing temperature as defined here is V{sub i}/19. The balance between the self-pinching force and the space charge repulsion of an electron beam changes on penetrating a flow: (i) the target plasma cancels the space-charge field, (ii) internal eddy currents arise to counter the magnetization of relativistic electrons, and (iii) electron beam heating alters the flow magnetization by changing the plasma density gradient and the magnitude of the conductivity.

  12. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  13. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-12-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was (12)C(5+) ion beams with an LET of 121keV/μm. The (12)C(5+) ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. (12)C(6+) ion beams with an LET of 86keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to (12)C(6+) ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47×10(-3) at 700Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700Gy, (12)C(5+) ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67×10(-3)) at 400Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between (12)C(5+) ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2bp was generally low, deletions >20bp were characteristic for (12)C(5+) ion beams. γ-rays had a tendency to generate mutants carrying a multitude of mutations in the same locus. Both forms of radiation also induced genome-wide large-scale mutations including chromosome rearrangements and large deletions. These results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae using ionizing radiation.

  14. Effect of image charge on the off-axis transport of intense beams in a small aperture quadrupole lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    This paper investigates the first order image charge effects of circular conducting pipe on an intense off-axis continuous charged particle beam propagating through an alternating-gradient focusing channel. The equations of motion for the centroid and envelopes of slightly off-axis beam are derived and used to determine the equilibrium and stability conditions for the beam transport. The envelope oscillation frequencies of the mismatched beam are obtained by the smooth approximation method and by numerical evaluation of the linearly perturbed envelope equations. Depending on the beam intensity and focusing parameters, it is found that the frequency of the out-of-phase mode of envelope oscillation is reduced due to the presence of the conducting wall. Detailed numerical results for off-axis beam transport in a quadrupole lattice are presented and the stable regimes in the parameter space are determined numerically. It is observed that the unstable region for the envelope evolution with image charge effects depends on beam intensity and external focusing strength and increases with the off centering of the beam.

  15. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  16. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. T.; Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Chandran, C. S.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy polymer after exposure to different doses of electron beam irradiation. The epoxy polymer was prepared using epoxy-diane resin ED-20 cured by polyethylenepolyamine. The irradiation of the samples was carried out with doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy. The effects of doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy polymer were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal properties of the epoxy polymer slightly increased after irradiation at the heating in air. The tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the epoxy polymer increased by the action of electron beam up to dose of 100 kGy and then decreased. The elongation at break decreased with increasing the irradiation dose.

  17. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason D; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. Moreover, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  18. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D.; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  19. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to evenmore » more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.« less

  20. Injected-charge-driven increase in electro-optic effect of KTN crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Seiji; Imai, Tadayuki; Miyazu, Jun; Okabe, Yuichi; Ueno, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Junya

    2014-05-15

    We report a significant increase in the electro-optic (EO) effect of KTa{sub x}Nb{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (KTN) crystals that we achieved by injecting carriers into them. The dielectric constant of KTN was increased approximately twofold by carrier injection. The EO beam scanning performance was effectively improved by the increase in the EO effect resulting from the increased dielectric constant. The estimated densities of the trapped electrons were as small as 5.8 × 10{sup 20}m{sup -3}. The very small quantity of injected electrons greatly affected the dielectric constant and EO effect of the KTN crystals.

  1. Effects of e-beam parameters on coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) requires detailed control of the phase between the hadron an the FEL-amplified wave packet. This phase depends on local electron beam parameters such as the energy spread and the peak current. In this paper, we examine the effects of local density variations on the cooling rates for CeC. Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) [1] is a new concept in intense, high energy hadron beamcooling, in which the Debye screened charge perturbation calculated in [2] is used to seed a high-gain free electron laser (FEL). Using delays to give the perturbing hadron an energy-dependent longitudinal displacement relative to its frequencymodulated charge perturbation, the hadron receives an energy-dependent kick which reduces its energy variation from the design energy. The equations of motion in [1] assume that the electron bunch is the same physical size as the hadron bunch, and has a homogeneous charge density across the entire bunch. In practice, the electron bunches will be much shorter than the hadron bunch, and this local spacial inhomogeneity in the charge distribution will alter the gain length of the FEL, resulting in both a change in the amplification of the initial signal and a phase shift. In this paper we consider these inhomogeneity effects, determining cooling equations for bunched beam CeC consistent with these effects and determining thresholds for the cooling parameters.

  2. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  3. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  4. Effect of Beam Oscillation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316L Electron Beam Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Jyotirmaya; Roy, Sanat Kumar; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2017-04-01

    The properties of electron beam-welded AISI 316L stainless steel butt joints prepared with and without beam oscillation were evaluated by microstructural analysis, mechanical testing like microhardness measurements, tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), three-point bend, and Charpy impact tests. All joints, irrespective of being prepared with or without beam oscillation, were found to be defect free. Welds produced by beam oscillation exhibited narrower fusion zone (FZ) with lathy ferrite morphology, while the weld without beam oscillation was characterized by wider FZ and skeletal ferrite morphology. During tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), all samples fractured in the base metal (BM) and showed almost the same tensile properties as that of the BM. However, the notch tensile tests at room temperature demonstrated higher strength for joints prepared with the oscillating beam. Besides, face and root bend tests, as well as Charpy impact tests, showed higher bending strength and notch toughness, respectively, for joints prepared with beam oscillation.

  5. Effect of Beam Oscillation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316L Electron Beam Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Jyotirmaya; Roy, Sanat Kumar; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2017-02-01

    The properties of electron beam-welded AISI 316L stainless steel butt joints prepared with and without beam oscillation were evaluated by microstructural analysis, mechanical testing like microhardness measurements, tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), three-point bend, and Charpy impact tests. All joints, irrespective of being prepared with or without beam oscillation, were found to be defect free. Welds produced by beam oscillation exhibited narrower fusion zone (FZ) with lathy ferrite morphology, while the weld without beam oscillation was characterized by wider FZ and skeletal ferrite morphology. During tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), all samples fractured in the base metal (BM) and showed almost the same tensile properties as that of the BM. However, the notch tensile tests at room temperature demonstrated higher strength for joints prepared with the oscillating beam. Besides, face and root bend tests, as well as Charpy impact tests, showed higher bending strength and notch toughness, respectively, for joints prepared with beam oscillation.

  6. Computer-aided modeling of beam propagation effects in diffraction-critical spaceborne instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Martin E.; Gray, Peter F.; McNamara, Paul

    1996-08-01

    This talk concerns applications of a ray-trace model to the computation of the effect of diffraction on beam propagation. It reports the use of the technique in the design of apertures for space-borne instruments having critical diffraction properties. The modeling technique used is that of gaussian beam decomposition, a numerical beam propagation technique incorporated in a commercially available ray-trace program. The result is the powerful capability to model the optical field at any point, in systems of any geometry, with any amount of aberration. The technique is particularly useful for design problems where `non-imaging' effects are important, and examples of its use will be given. Although the computation requirements for such detailed analysis may seem daunting, the continuing increase in readily available computing power is now overcoming this drawback. The application here is to certain `diffraction-critical' situations, where the design of correctly sized apertures is needed for the control of unwanted diffraction effects. Three recent design studies are illustrated: (1) Millimeter wave imaging with off-axis reflectors. Analysis of the effects of aberration on coherent detection efficiency. (2) Long-distance beam propagation in space-borne laser interferometry. This involves the analysis of coherent detection efficiency in the presence of aberrated gaussian beams. (3) Design of a Lyot stop system for an infra-red radiometer which is to view the Earth's limb from space. Here the critical (and unwanted) diffraction is that from the bright Earth disc, lying just outside of the instrument field of view. The analysis technique is explained, and examples given of diffracted energy patterns analyzed at progressive stages in the system. It is shown how these aid the design and analysis of the systems. The aim is to show the range problems in which this method is useful, and to hopefully learn from others at the conference about other cases where such techniques

  7. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  8. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  9. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Fuoss, P. H.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.

    2010-12-15

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  10. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.; Fuoss, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  11. Comparative study on the effect of electron beam irradiation on the physical properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bibo; Hong, Ningning; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Biao; Sheng, Haibo; Song, Lei; Tang, Qinbo; Hu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) flame retarded by a combination of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) and polyamide-6 (PA-6) have been crosslinked by high energy electron beam irradiation. The effect of high energy electron beam irradiation on the crosslinking degree, mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 cable material was studied by gel content, heat extention test, mechanical test, dynamic mechanical analysis, high-insulation resistance meter and thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content and heat extention test results showed that the EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can be easily crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength of EVA composites was drastically increased from 16.2 to maximum 26.2 MPa as the electron beam irradiation dose increases from 0 to 160 kGy. The volatilized products of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites were analyzed and compared by thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR).

  12. Acoustic beam splitting in two-dimensional phononic crystals using self-collimation effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing; Wu, Fugen Zhong, Huilin; Yao, Yuanwei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-10-14

    We propose two models of self-collimation-based beam splitters in phononic crystals. The finite element method is used to investigate the propagation properties of acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals. The calculated results show that the efficiency of the beam splitter can be controlled systematically by varying the radius of the rods or by changing the orientation of the square rods in the line defect. The effect of changing the side length of the square rods on acoustic wave propagation is discussed. The results show that the total transmission/reflection range decreases/increases as the side length increases. We also find that the relationship between the orientation of the transflective point and the side length of the square rods is quasi-linear.

  13. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  14. Interactive effects of pests increase seed yield.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Vesna; Riggi, Laura Ga; Ekbom, Barbara; Malsher, Gerard; Rusch, Adrien; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Loss in seed yield and therefore decrease in plant fitness due to simultaneous attacks by multiple herbivores is not necessarily additive, as demonstrated in evolutionary studies on wild plants. However, it is not clear how this transfers to crop plants that grow in very different conditions compared to wild plants. Nevertheless, loss in crop seed yield caused by any single pest is most often studied in isolation although crop plants are attacked by many pests that can cause substantial yield losses. This is especially important for crops able to compensate and even overcompensate for the damage. We investigated the interactive impacts on crop yield of four insect pests attacking different plant parts at different times during the cropping season. In 15 oilseed rape fields in Sweden, we estimated the damage caused by seed and stem weevils, pollen beetles, and pod midges. Pest pressure varied drastically among fields with very low correlation among pests, allowing us to explore interactive impacts on yield from attacks by multiple species. The plant damage caused by each pest species individually had, as expected, either no, or a negative impact on seed yield and the strongest negative effect was caused by pollen beetles. However, seed yield increased when plant damage caused by both seed and stem weevils was high, presumably due to the joint plant compensatory reaction to insect attack leading to overcompensation. Hence, attacks by several pests can change the impact on yield of individual pest species. Economic thresholds based on single species, on which pest management decisions currently rely, may therefore result in economically suboptimal choices being made and unnecessary excessive use of insecticides.

  15. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Zulkafli,; Hashim, Siti A'aisah; Ahmad, Pauzi

    2014-09-03

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD{sub 5}, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  16. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Ahmad, Pauzi; Zulkafli, Hashim, Siti A'aisah

    2014-09-01

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD5, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  17. Advanced computations of multi-physics, multi-scale effects in beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, J.F.; Macridin, A.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art beam dynamics simulations include multiple physical effects and multiple physical length and/or time scales. We present recent developments in Synergia2, an accelerator modeling framework designed for multi-physics, multi-scale simulations. We summarize recent several recent results in multi-physics beam dynamics, including simulations of three Fermilab accelerators: the Tevatron, the Main Injector and the Debuncher. Early accelerator simulations focused on single-particle dynamics. To a first approximation, the forces on the particles in an accelerator beam are dominated by the external fields due to magnets, RF cavities, etc., so the single-particle dynamics are the leading physical effects. Detailed simulations of accelerators must include collective effects such as the space-charge repulsion of the beam particles, the effects of wake fields in the beam pipe walls and beam-beam interactions in colliders. These simulations require the sort of massively parallel computers that have only become available in recent times. We give an overview of the accelerator framework Synergia2, which was designed to take advantage of the capabilities of modern computational resources and enable simulations of multiple physical effects. We also summarize some recent results utilizing Synergia2 and BeamBeam3d, a tool specialized for beam-beam simulations.

  18. Effect of desiccation of marine environment on beam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Wang, Na; Hou, Li-jun; Liao, Ying-di

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the study on the effect of desiccation for different part of offshore structure corresponding to the water level. A coupled elastoplastic damage model is proposed to describe the mechanical behavior of cement-based materials under external loading and desiccation, in which both the plastic and damage behaviors under multi-axial stress are considered in composition with the desiccation effect. The comparison between numerical simulation and experimental data indicates that the proposed model can well predict the mechanical characteristics of cement-based materials with different saturations. In addition, a series of small beams subjected to desiccation are further analyzed to reveal the response of structure in the drying process.

  19. Effects of Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation on Human Blood Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Diana I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.; Stan, Dana E.; Radu, Roxana R.; Margaritescu, Irina D.; Chirita, Doru I.

    2007-04-23

    The effects of separated and combined accelerated electron beam (EB) of 6.23 MeV and microwave (MW) of 2.45GHz irradiation on proteins in samples of human serum, human plasma and human integral blood are presented. Also, it was studied the effect of separate and combined EB and MW irradiation on proteins irradiated in samples of human integral blood, without and in the presence of a synthetic compound solution (S.C.S.) which is expected to exhibit various biological actions, such as to diminish or to increase the irradiation effects.

  20. Effects of Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation on Human Blood Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Diana I.; Stan, Dana E.; Radu, Roxana R.; Cinca, Sabin A.; Margaritescu, Irina D.; Chirita, Doru I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.

    2007-04-01

    The effects of separated and combined accelerated electron beam (EB) of 6.23 MeV and microwave (MW) of 2.45GHz irradiation on proteins in samples of human serum, human plasma and human integral blood are presented. Also, it was studied the effect of separate and combined EB and MW irradiation on proteins irradiated in samples of human integral blood, without and in the presence of a synthetic compound solution (S.C.S.) which is expected to exhibit various biological actions, such as to diminish or to increase the irradiation effects.

  1. Effect of crossed beams irradiation on parametric instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Labaune, C., Ecole Polytechnique, France

    1998-04-27

    Modification of the growth of scattering processes in the case of multiple beam irradiation compared to single beam irradiation has been investigated in a preformed plasma using Thomson scattrering of a short wavelength probe beam, and spectral and temporal analysis of reflected and transmitted light. First observations of the reduction of the amplitude of ion acoustic waves associated with stimulated Brillouin scattering, amplification of the amplitude of electron plasma waves associated with stimulated Raman scattering, and transfer of energy between crqssing beams with same frequency in a flowing plasma under crossed beam irradiation are reported.

  2. Effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the properties of calendered cord fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytaç, Ayşe; Deniz, Veli; Şen, Murat; Hegazy, El-Sayed; Güven, Olgun

    2010-03-01

    The effects of gamma and e-beam irradiation on mechanical and structural properties of nylon 66 (Ny 66), nylon 6 (Ny 6) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics used in tyres were investigated. The untreated (greige), treated cords and calendered fabrics were irradiated at different doses. It is found that the effects of high energy irradiation on greige, treated cords and calendered fabrics are similar. No protective effect of compounds used in calendering was observed against radiation-induced oxidative degradation. The deterioration effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties is much higher than that of e-beam irradiation for all types of samples. Limiting viscosity numbers of both gamma and e-beam irradiated nylon 6 and nylon 66 cords were found to decrease with increasing dose. It is concluded that PET calendered fabric has higher resistance to ionizing radiation. Ny 6 and Ny 66 calendered fabrics are more sensitive even at low doses. Therefore, the effects of high energy irradiation on tyre cords have to be taken into consideration during tyre design reinforced with particularly Ny fabrics if pre-vulcanization with high energy radiation is to be applied.

  3. Effects of ion beam irradiation on size of mutant sector and genetic damage in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Yoshihiro; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay; Oono, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Size of mutant sector and genetic damage were evaluated in Arabidopsis to further our understanding of effective ion beam use in plant mutation breeding. Arabidopsis seeds, heterozygous for the GLABRA1 (GL1) gene (GL1/gl1-1), were irradiated with 15.8 MeV/u neon ions (mean linear energy transfer (LET): 352 keV/μm), 17.3 MeV/u carbon ions (113 keV/μm), or 60Co gamma rays. The frequency and size of glabrous sectors generated because of inactivation of the GL1 allele were examined. The frequency and overall size of large deletions were evaluated based on the loss of heterozygosity of DNA markers using DNA isolated from glabrous tissue. Irrespective of the radiation properties, plants with mutant sectors were obtained at similar frequencies at the same effective dosage necessary for survival reduction. Ion beams tended to induce larger mutant sectors than gamma rays. The frequency of large deletions (>several kbp) increased as the LET value increased, with chromosome regions larger than 100 kbp lost in most large deletions. The distorted segregation ratio of glabrous plants in the progenies of irradiated GL1/gl1-1 plants suggested frequent occurrence of chromosome rearrangement, especially those subjected to neon ions. Exposure to ion beams with moderate LET values (30-110 keV/μm) is thought effective for inducing mutant sectors without causing extensive genetic damage.

  4. Effect of electron beam irradiation sterilization on the biomedical poly (octene-co-ethylene)/polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shifang; Shi, Hengchong; Yao, Zhanhai; Wang, Jianwei; Song, Yongxian; Yin, Jinghua

    2010-05-01

    The effect of electron beam irradiation with the dose ranging from 15 to 40 kGy on poly (octene-co-ethylene) (POE)/polypropylene (PP) films was investigated. Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), yellowness index testing and mechanical performance measurement were applied to characterize the films. It demonstrated that crystalline structure exhibited little change, and degree of crystallinity slightly change under the irradiation treatment. Irradiation brought about oxidation of the films, forming hydroxyl groups of the peroxides and carbonyl groups. Tensile properties become worse as irradiation dose increased. Electron beam irradiation with the dose of 15-40 kGy has little effect on crystalline performance and a little influence for the POE/PP films, indicating a good irradiation resistance.

  5. QuickPol: Fast calculation of effective beam matrices for CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivon, Eric; Mottet, Sylvain; Ponthieu, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Current and planned observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization anisotropies, with their ever increasing number of detectors, have reached a potential accuracy that requires a very demanding control of systematic effects. While some of these systematics can be reduced in the design of the instruments, others will have to be modeled and hopefully accounted for or corrected a posteriori. We propose QuickPol, a quick and accurate calculation of the full effective beam transfer function and of temperature to polarization leakage at the power spectra level, as induced by beam imperfections and mismatches between detector optical and electronic responses. All the observation details such as exact scanning strategy, imperfect polarization measurements, and flagged samples are accounted for. Our results are validated on Planck high frequency instrument (HFI) simulations. We show how the pipeline can be used to propagate instrumental uncertainties up to the final science products, and could be applied to experiments with rotating half-wave plates.

  6. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Chang; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2012-02-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  7. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Gaury, Benoit; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2016-01-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells is most consistent with a charged surface, and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials. PMID:27881882

  8. Exergames: Increasing Physical Activity through Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudella, Jennifer L.; Butz, Jennifer V.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States, educators must consider new ways to increase physical activity in an effort to address obesity. There are a variety of ways educators can increase physical activity in the classroom, and exergames--video games that require physical movement in order to play--are a modern-day approach to…

  9. Beam profile measurements for dental phototherapy: the effect of distance, wavelength and tissue thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, William M.; Hadis, Mohammed A.; Milward, Michael R.; Carroll, James D.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-03-01

    Light delivery for potential bacterial disinfection (UV/blue) and photobiomodulation (near-IR) requires specific, concentrated and controllable local irradiance and dose. Dental targets for light irradiation involve dentine, which scatters, absorbs and reflects light, reducing local irradiance. This study compared the effectiveness of LEDs (400-900nm) and lasers (660nm and 810nm) to penetrate dentine. Caries-free wisdom teeth were sectioned through the Pulpchamber by either cutting perpendicular to the crown, the buccal aspect or obliquely. Specimens were wet-polished to 1, 2 or 3mm thicknesses to expose the dentine on opposing surfaces. The beam profile of the LEDs/lasers were measured through dentine specimens (n=5) to obtain beam width following optical calibration, and spatial irradiance distribution following photodiode power calibration. There were no significant differences in the percentage power and irradiance transmitted through different dentine specimens between LEDs and lasers (P>0.05). However, light penetration through tissue was wavelength dependent and highest for red and near-IR wavelengths (P<0.05) for specimens cut perpendicular to the crown compared with buccal and oblique specimens. The beam diameters increased and irradiance decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing specimen thickness/distance for both LEDs and lasers. There was a noticeable shift in beam position for all light sources in buccal and oblique specimens. Data indicated that dentine tubule orientation may alter the direction of light through the tissue. Optimal light penetration and distribution through dentine at specific distance is best achieved with a flat-top beam distribution vertically through the crown of the tooth.

  10. Elastic-plastic deformations of a beam with the SD-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pavilaynen, Galina V.

    2015-03-10

    The results for the bending of a cantilever beam with the SD-effect under a concentrated load are discussed. To solve this problem, the standard Bernoulli-Euler hypotheses for beams and the Ilyushin model of perfect plasticity are used. The problem is solved analytically for structural steel A40X. The SD-effect for elastic-plastic deformations is studied. The solutions for beam made of isotropic material and material with the SD-effect are compared.

  11. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt / T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration's period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam.

  12. Effects of electron beam irradiation on the structural properties of polylactic acid/polyethylene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen; Ratnam, C. T.; Sin, Lee Tin; Tee, Tiam-Ting; Wong, Wai-Kien; Lee, Jiuun-Xiang; Rahmat, A. R.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) blends. The PLA were compounded with 20-80% LDPE and were exposed to electron beam irradiation dosages of 20-120 kGy. The results from gel content and X-ray diffraction analyses showed that the addition of LDPE to PLA effectively increased the gel content and crystallinity. However, an increasing percentage of LDPE reduced the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the PLA/LDPE samples due to the lower intermolecular bonding of LDPE than of PLA. Moreover, an increase in irradiation dosages gradually decreased the mechanical properties of low-LDPE PLA/LDPE. In contrast, the increasing irradiation dosage enhanced the mechanical properties of higher-LDPE PLA/LDPE. These results indicate that higher amounts of LDPE effectively react with the release of free radicals within the amorphous phase if the blends are subjected to irradiation. The higher amounts of free radicals induce the formation of three-dimensional cross-linked networks in the polymer matrix and thus increase the gel content. The irradiation-induced cross-linking in PLA/LDPE samples improves the mechanical properties and crystallinity by promoting a structural rearrangement of the polymer matrix into a highly ordered structure.

  13. Effect of reactive ion beam etching on the photoluminescence of CdTe epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Pastor, J.; Fuster, D.; Abellan, M.; Anguita, J.; Sochinskii, N. V.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrated the effect of reactive ion beam etching (RIBE) process on the PL properties of CdTe/sapphire metal organic vapor phase epitaxy layers. At optimum conditions, the RIBE attack does not make significant morphological changes but it results in an increase of the concentration of acceptor impurities. This was revealed by an increase of the overall photoluminescence (PL) intensity and, simultaneously, a decrease of the PL decay time, more important on the low energy side of PL spectrum due to the recombination of carriers in acceptor pairs.

  14. Incident-beam effects in electron-stimulated Auger-electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Cao, Jianming

    1991-04-01

    We have examined incident-beam effects in electron-stimulated Auger-electron diffraction (AED) on a cleaved GaAs(110) surface. The results indicate that incident-beam diffraction is significant in an AED experiment, and that the dissipative nature of the incident beam in contributing to the Auger process must be accounted for. We have developed a qualitative model that describes the trend of the polar-angle dependence of the Auger intensity for both the incident and exit beams. In calculating the diffraction features, we used a zeroth-order approximation to simulate the dissipation of the incident beam, which is found to adequately describe the experimental data.

  15. Effects on axial momentum spread on the electron-ion two-stream instability in high-intensity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    R. Davidso; H. Qin

    2000-06-15

    Use is made of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations to describe the electron-ion two-stream instability driven by the directed axial motion of a high-intensity ion beam propagating through a stationary population of (unwanted) background electrons. The ion beam is treated as continuous in the z-direction, and the electrons are electrostatically confined in the transverse direction by the space-charge potential produced by the excession charge. The analysis is carried out for arbitrary beam intensity, consistent with transverse confinement of the beam particles, and arbitrary fractional charge neutralization by the background electrons. For the case of overlapping step-function ion and electron density profiles, corresponding to monoenergetic electrons and ions in the transverse direction, detailed stability properties are calculated, including the important effects of an axial momentum spread, over a wide range of system parameters for dipole perturbations with azimuthal mode number l=1. The two-stream instability growth rate is found to increase with increasing beam intensity, increasing fractional charge neutralization, and decreasing proximity of the conducting wall. It is shown that Landau damping associated with a modest axial momentum spread of the beam ions and background electrons has a strong stabilizing influence on the instability.

  16. Global Effects of Increased Use of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Hammond, R. Philip

    1972-01-01

    This paper, which speculates on the effects of man's energy releases on world climate, concludes that global upsets are very unlikely if we are able to distribute the energy widely or into the sea. (AL)

  17. The effect of object shape and laser beam shape on lidar system resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In a LIDAR system, a pulsed laser beam is propagated to a scene, and then reflected back by objects. Ideally if the beam diameter and the pulse width are close to zero, then the reflected beam in time domain is similar to a delta function, which can accurately locate an object's position. However, in a practical system, the beam has finite size. Therefore, even if the pulse width is small, an object shape will make the reflected beam stretched along the time axis, then affect system resolution. In this paper, we assume the beam with Gaussian shape. The beam can be formulated as a delta function convolved with a shape function, such as a rectangular function, in time domain. Then the reflected beam can be defined as a system response function convolved with the shape function. We use symmetric objects to analyze the reflected beam. Corn, sphere, and cylinder objects are used to find a LIDAR system's response function. The case for large beam size is discussed. We assume the beam shape is similar to a plane wave. With this assumption, we get the simplified LIDAR system response functions for the three kinds of objects. Then we use tiny spheres to emulate an arbitrary object, and study its effect to the returned beam.

  18. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  19. New 100 + Year Road RALE System With T-Beam Foundation Saves Energy and Increases Safety by Reducing Work Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressler, David

    2007-05-01

    Traffic crashes represents a loss of 2.2 percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product a year. By reducing congestion and the number of dangerous construction zones it is possible to increase user safety with fewer accidents. This new system once implemented eliminates many major national road preservation projects, which include replacing or reconstructing the highway pavements over the long period. Other included costs like those of lost time and lost fuel incurred by passenger and freight transportation on the section being reconstructed amount to well over 100 billion dollars a year. All other things being equal, thicker concrete highway pavements will last longer, however, thicker pavement costs more. By utilizing the physics of the T-Beam or the ``floor-joist,'' concept where the upper deck of the highway is supported and reinforced by longitude beams or rails that protrude into the soil, there is a great improvement in the strength of the pavement system. The pavement structure configuration of rails supports and carries vehicle loads, which is transferred ``down-the-road.'' Much like a snowshoe or like a rail bridge this device spreads out the applied stresses over a much larger area and the high strength pavement resists flexing of the concrete. Stress reduction reduces concrete fatigue and this allows the highway to last three to four times as long without major road reconstruction. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.P1.2

  20. The thermal effects on high-frequency vibration of beams using energy flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Kong, Xiangjie

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the energy flow analysis (EFA) method is developed to predict the high-frequency response of beams in a thermal environment, which is a topic of concern in aerospace and automotive industries. The temperature load applied on the structures can generate thermal stresses and change material properties. The wavenumber and group velocity associated with the in-plane axial force arising from thermal stresses are included in the derivation of the governing energy equation, and the input power is obtained from the derived effective bending stiffness. In addition, effect of temperature-dependent material properties is considered in the EFA model. To verify the proposed formulation, numerical simulations are performed for a pinned-pinned beam in a uniform thermal environment. The EFA results are compared with the modal solutions for various frequencies and damping loss factors, and good correlations are observed. The results show that the spatial distributions and levels of energy density can be affected by the thermal effects, and the vibration response of beams increases with temperature.

  1. Effective doses from cone beam CT investigation of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J; Johnson, B; Drage, NA

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the study was to calculate the effective dose delivered to the patient undergoing cone beam (CB) CT of the jaws and maxillofacial complex using the i-CAT Next Generation CBCT scanner (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA). Methods A RANDO® phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) containing thermoluminence dosemeters were scanned 10 times for each of the 6 imaging protocols. Effective doses for each protocol were calculated using the 1990 and approved 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended tissue weighting factors (E1990, E2007). Results The effective dose for E1990 and E2007, respectively, were: full field of view (FOV) of the head, 47 μSv and 78 μSv; 13 cm scan of the jaws, 44 μSv and 77 μSv; 6 cm standard mandible, 35 μSv and 58 μSv; 6 cm high resolution mandible, 69 μSv and 113 μSv; 6 cm standard maxilla, 18 μSv and 32 μSv; and 6 cm high resolution maxilla, 35 μSv and 60 μSv. Conclusions Using the new generation of CBCT scanner, the effective dose is lower than the original generation machine for a similar FOV using the ICRP 2007 tissue weighting factors. PMID:22184626

  2. Effects of high temperature and e-beam irradiation on the stability of refractory thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, E. H.; Poppa, H.

    1977-01-01

    Refractory thin films of Al2O3, ZrO2, MgO, ThO2, and BN have been investigated in situ in an UHV transmission electron microscope. The electron transparent refractory films were prepared by electron-beam evaporation, anodization, RF sputtering, and thinning of bulk crystal materials. The study concentrates on monitoring the thermal and mechanical stability of the films, phase and structural changes, and electron irradiation effects as a function of film-preparation conditions. With increasing temperatures, five different crystallographic phases were observed for both anodized and electron-beam-evaporated alumina films. Zirconia films exhibited two phase transitions upon heating to 1200 C and electron-irradiation-induced crystallization of ZrO2 even at room temperature. MgO, ThO2, and BN films did not undergo any noticeable phase transformation but ruptured due to sintering below 1200 C.

  3. Increasing Institutional Effectiveness through Outcomes Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Donna; Green, Peggy

    In 1987, under pressure from its accreditation agency and the state, Broward Community College (BCC) initiated the Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment Project to improve the college through outcomes assessment. The project had four interrelated components: (1) a revision of BCC's mission statement to incorporate a new section on…

  4. Carbon-Ion Beam Irradiation Effectively Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Human Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Teshima, Teruki Kihara, Ayaka; Kodera-Suzumoto, Yuko; Inaoka, Miho; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Control of cancer metastasis is one of the most important issues in cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated that carbon particle irradiation suppresses the metastatic potential of cancer cells, and many studies have reported that photon irradiation promotes it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carbon beam on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell aggressiveness and gene expression. Methods and Materials: A549 (lung adenocarcinoma) and EBC-1 (lung squamous cell carcinoma) cells were treated with 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ion beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba or with 4-MV X-ray at Osaka University. We tested proliferative, migratory, and invasive activities by cell proliferation assay, Boyden chamber assay, and Matrigel chemoinvasion assay, respectively. cDNA microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were also performed to assess mRNA expression alteration. Results: X-irradiation increased cell proliferation of A549 cells at 0.5 Gy, whereas high-dose X-ray reduced migration and invasion of A549 cells. By contrast, carbon beam irradiation did not enhance proliferation, and it reduced the migration and invasion capabilities of both A549 and EBC-1 cells more effectively than did X-irradiation. Carbon beam irradiation induced alteration of various gene expression profiles differently from X-ray irradiation. mRNA expression of ANLN, a homologue of anillin, was suppressed to 60% levels of basal expression in carbon beam-irradiated A549 cells after 12 h. Conclusion: Carbon beam effectively suppresses the metastatic potential of A549 and EBC-1 cells. Carbon beam also has different effects on gene expressions, and downregulation of ANLN was induced only by carbon beam irradiation.

  5. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  6. Generation of highly confined optical bottle beams by exploiting the photonic nanojet effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Mühlig, Stefan; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2012-03-01

    We report on the generation of photonic nanojets, which resemble optical bottle beams. They are realized by manipulating the illumination of dielectric microspheres. As illumination we use the outer region of deliberately truncated Bessel-Gauss beam or a focused Gaussian beam with intentionally induced spherical aberrations. For the Bessel-Gauss beam possessing a single side lobe only, the nanojet spot resembles an optical bottle beam with a strong confinement due to the nanojet effect. When multiple side lobes of the aberrated focal spot are used, a chain of 3D optical bottle beams appears. We show the 3D intensity distributions close to the spot and discuss the main characteristics of such optical bottle beams.

  7. The effects of the RHIC E-lenses magnetic structure layout on the proton beam trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Luo, Y.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed in RHIC IR10. First, the layout of these two E-lenses is introduced. Then the effects of e-lenses on proton beam are discussed. For example, the transverse fields of the e-lens bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. For the effects of the e-lens on proton beam trajectory, we calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera at first. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  8. Temperature dependence of electron-beam induced effects in amorphous apatite

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, In-Tae; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Higuchi, Mikio

    2008-06-07

    Irradiation effects on pre-amorphized Sr2Nd8(SiO4)6O2 have been investigated under 200 and 300 keV electron-beam irradiation at 130 and 480 K using in situ transmission electron microscopy. At 480 K, recrystallization occurred from the amorphous/crystalline interface under both 200 and 300 keV e-beam irradiation. At 130 K, the 200 keV e-beam irradiation induced recrystallization only; however, 300 keV e-beam irradiation induced both recrystallization and an electron hammering effect in the amorphous material that resulted in radial expansion perpendicular to the incident electron-beam direction and shrinkage parallel to the electron-beam direction. Ionization-induced processes and knock-on displacement damage are suggested to be the mechanisms for the recrystallization and the electron hammering effect, respectively.

  9. The lensing effect of trapped particles in a dual-beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Steffen; Fritsch, Anatol W; Kiessling, Tobias R; Stange, Roland; Käs, Josef A

    2015-02-23

    In dual-beam optical traps, two counterpropagating, divergent laser beams emitted from opposing laser fibers trap and manipulate dielectric particles. We investigate the lensing effect that trapped particles have on the beams. Our approach makes use of the intrinsic coupling of a beam to the opposing fiber after having passed the trapped particle. We present measurements of this coupling signal for PDMS particles, as well as a model for its dependence on size and refractive index of the trapped particle. As a more complex sample, the coupling of inhomogeneous biological cells is measured and discussed. We show that the lensing effect is well captured by the simple ray optics approximation. The measurements reveal intricate details, such as the thermal lens effect of the beam propagation in a dual-beam trap. For a particle of known size, the model further allows to infer its refractive index simply from the coupling signal.

  10. How to increase meeting effectiveness and efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Grunau, M.; Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, I present a model adapted from control theory to gain insight into the dynamics of meetings. I relate the system controller and feedback sensor in the model to the role of the facilitator in meetings. By drawing parallels between the control theory model and the adapted model for meetings, I came up with an operational definition of a group facilitator and derived the following hypothesis: Providing facilitators with information about group members prior to the meeting will improve their effectiveness and efficiency in facilitating the meeting. Such information, for example, could include the group members' personality types measured with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or their conflict modes measured through the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  11. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  12. Collinearity alignment of probe beams in a laser-based Faraday effect diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    Two counter-rotating circularly polarized beams are used in a laser-based polarimetry diagnostic providing a phase measurement of the Faraday effect. Collinearity of these beams is a key issue that affects measurement accuracy. Spatial offset from even small misalignment induces systematic error due to density gradient and path length difference. Here, we report an alignment technique using a rotating dielectric wedge, which is capable of reducing spatial offset of two probe beams below 0.1 mm for beams with 40 mm diameter. With optimized alignment, 0.05° Faraday effect fluctuations associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty below 0.01°.

  13. The Effects of Towfish Motion on Sidescan Sonar Images: Extension to a Multiple-Beam Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Towfish Motion on Sidescan Sonar Images: Extension to a Multiple -Beam Device Acceso NTIS CRA&I S.D. Anstee u; ,-, o* , J.* ttiicatorn By "By...THE EFFECTS OF TOWFISH MOTION ON SIDESCAN SONAR IMAGES: EXTENSION TO A MULTIPLE -BEAM DEVICE S, S.D. ANSTEE 6 2 9 Nm MRL-TN-660 FEBRUARY 1994 Al DTIC...previously used to estimate the geometrical effects oftowjish motion on single-beam sidescan sonar images is modified to simulate a multiple -beam

  14. Green's functions of the forced vibration of Timoshenko beams with damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Zhao, X.; Li, Y. H.

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic solutions for forced vibrations of Timoshenko beams in a systematical manner. Damping effects on the vibrations of the beam are taken into consideration by introducing two characteristic parameters. Laplace transform method is applied in the present study and corresponding Green's functions are presented explicitly for beams with various boundaries. The present solutions can be readily reduced to those for others classical beam models by setting corresponding parameters to zero or infinite. Numerical calculations are performed to validate the present solutions and the effects of various important physical parameters are investigated.

  15. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the structural, thermal and optical properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Bahareth, Radiyah A.

    2013-04-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymer was prepared using the casting technique. The obtained PVA thin films have been irradiated with electron beam doses ranging from 20 to 300 kGy. The resultant effect of electron beam irradiation on the structural properties of PVA has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while the thermal properties have been investigated using thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The onset temperature of decomposition T 0 and activation energy of thermal decomposition E a were calculated, results indicate that the PVA thin film decomposes in one main weight loss stage. Also, the electron beam irradiation in dose range 95-210 kGy led to a more compact structure of the PVA polymer, which resulted in an improvement in its thermal stability with an increase in the activation energy of thermal decomposition. The variation of transition temperatures with electron beam dose has been determined using DTA. The PVA thermograms were characterized by the appearance of an endothermic peak due to melting. In addition, the transmission of the PVA samples and any color changes were studied. The color intensity Δ E was greatly increased with increasing electron beam dose, and was accompanied by a significant increase in the blue color component.

  16. Calculating Variations in Biological Effectiveness for a 62 MeV Proton Beam

    PubMed Central

    Carante, Mario Pietro; Ballarini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of radiation-induced cell death and chromosome aberrations [called BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations (BIANCA)] was further developed and applied to therapeutic protons. The model assumes a pivotal role of DNA cluster damage, which can lead to clonogenic cell death following three main steps: (i) a DNA “cluster lesion” (CL) produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d gives rise to chromosome aberrations; (iii) certain aberration types (dicentrics, rings, and large deletions) lead to clonogenic inactivation. The yield of CLs and the probability, f, that a chromosome fragment remains un-rejoined even if other fragment(s) are present within d, were adjustable parameters. The model, implemented as a MC code providing simulated dose–responses directly comparable with experimental data, was applied to pristine and modulated Bragg peaks of the proton beam used to treat eye melanoma at INFN-LNS in Catania, Italy. Experimental survival curves for AG01522 cells exposed to the Catania beam were reproduced, supporting the model assumptions. Furthermore, cell death and chromosome aberrations at different depths along a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose profile were predicted. Both endpoints showed an increase along the plateau, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the distal dose fall-off, due to low-energy protons. Cell death and chromosome aberrations were also predicted for V79 cells, in the same irradiation scenario as that used for AG01522 cells. In line with other studies, this work indicated that assuming a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along a proton SOBP may be sub-optimal. Furthermore, it provided qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the dependence of the beam effectiveness on the considered endpoint and dose. More generally, this work represents an example of therapeutic beam characterization avoiding the use of

  17. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  18. Evaluation of thermal effects on the beam quality of disk laser with unstable resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Beirami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper thermal effects of the disk active medium and associated effects on the beam quality of laser are investigated. Using Collins integral and iterative method, transverse mode of an unstable resonator including a Yb:YAG active medium in disk geometry is calculated. After that the beam quality of the laser is calculated based on the generalized beam characterization method. Thermal lensing of the disk is calculated based on the OPD (Optical Path Difference) concept. Five factors influencing the OPD including temperature gradient, disk thermal expansion, photo-elastic effect, electronic lens and disk deformation are considered in our calculations. The calculations show that the effect of disk deformation factor on the quality of laser beam in the resonator is strong. However the total effect of all the thermal factors on the internal beam quality is fewer. Also it is shown that thermal effects degrade the output power, beam profile and beam quality of the output laser beam severely. As well the magnitude of each of affecting factors is evaluated distinctly.

  19. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CD efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.

  20. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; ...

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CDmore » efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.« less

  1. Effects of the Amount and Shape of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Strengthening Elements on the Ductile Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam

    2014-09-01

    A series of beam tests were performed to evaluate the ductility of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) elements. A total of nine RC beams were produced and loaded up to failure in three-point bending under deflection control. In addition, the amount and shape of the CFRP elements (plates/sheets) were considered as the key test variables. Test results revealed that the strengthening with CFRP elements in the width direction was more effective than the strengthening across their height. The energy method used in an analysis showed that the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP plates were half or less than half of the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP sheets. In addition, the ductility of the beams decreased as the strengthening ratio of the CFRP elements increased.

  2. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities.

  3. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities. PMID:20126560

  4. Effect of ultrarelativistic laser beam filamentation on third harmonic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ruchika; Sharma, Prerana; Chauhan, Prashant K.; Rafat, M.; Sharma, R. P.

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the generation of plasma wave and third harmonic generation in a hot collision less plasma by an intense laser beam. On the account of the V→×B→ force, a plasma wave at 2ω0 (here ω0 is the pump laser frequency) is generated. The solution of the pump laser beam has been obtained within the nonparaxial ray approximation. Filamentary structures of the laser beam are observed due to relativistic nonlinearity. By expanding the eikonal and the other relevant quantities up to the fourth power of r it is observed that the focusing of the laser beams become fast in the nonparaxial region. Interaction of the plasma wave with the incident laser beam generates the third harmonics. The mechanism of the plasma wave, third harmonic generation, and the parameters, which govern the third harmonic yield and hence the spectrum of third harmonics, have been studied in detail. Correlation of the third harmonic spectrum with the filamentation has been pointed out. Therefore, the broadening of the third harmonic spectra can be used as a diagnostic tool to study the presence of the filamentation of laser beams in laser plasma experiments.

  5. The effect of beam directivity on the inspection of anisotropic materials using ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    The beam directivity from an ultrasonic transducer in isotropic materials is well documented. However, beam directivities in elastically anisotropic materials and their effect on ultrasonic NDE inspection has been investigated far less extensively. In this paper, analytical and numerical finite element models are developed to predict the beam directivity in a single crystal nickel-based superalloy. This material is highly anisotropic and is used widely in the gas-turbine industry. The developed models are used to investigate the effect of the crystallographic orientation on the beam directivity. In turn, the effect of beam directivity on defect detection sensitivity and characterization capability using an ultrasonic array is demonstrated. It is shown that the effect is particularly important for the accurate sizing of small defects.

  6. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kyung, Se Jin; Park, Jae Beom; Park, Byung Jae; Min, Kyung Seok; Lee, June Hee; Yeom, Geun Young; Shin, Yong Sook; Park, Chong Yun

    2007-04-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/{mu}m and the emission field at 1 mA/cm{sup 2} decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/{mu}m. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters.

  7. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part I: Axial length scale effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of physical implications via the similarity between a nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam theory and a classical Rankine-Timoshenko (RT) beam theory. The nonlocal EB beam model, Eringen's model, is briefly reviewed and the classical RT beam theory is recast by the primary variables of the EB model. A careful comparison of these two models reveals that the scale parameter used to the Eringen's model has a strike resemblance to the shear flexibility in the RT model. This implies that the nonlocal model employed in literature consider the axial length scale effect only. In addition, the paradox for a cantilevered nano-beam subjected to tip shear force is clearly explained by finding appropriate displacement prescribed boundary conditions.

  8. Polarization of a probe laser beam due to nonlinear QED effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Soroush; Kalantari, Seyed Zafarollah; Xue, She-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear QED interactions induce different polarization properties on a given probe beam. We consider the polarization effects caused by the photon-photon interaction in laser experiments, when a laser beam propagates through a constant magnetic field or collides with another laser beam. We solve the quantum Boltzmann equation within the framework of the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian for both time-dependent and constant background field to explore the time evolution of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V describing polarization. Assuming an initially linearly polarized probe laser beam, we also calculate the induced ellipticity and rotation of the polarization plane.

  9. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Cohen, R. H.; Lund, S. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Lee, E. P.

    2002-05-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the approximately 4 kV ion beam potential. Diagnostics are being developed tto measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as their effect on the ion beam.

  10. Effect of the electron lenses on the RHIC proton beam closed orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2011-02-01

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed at RHIC IR10. The transverse fields of the E-lenses bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. We calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  11. Effect of CFRP Schemes on the Flexural Behavior of RC Beams Modeled by Using a Nonlinear Finite-element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rousan, R. Z.

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of the number and schemes of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets on the capacity of bending moment, the ultimate displacement, the ultimate tensile strain of CFRP, the yielding moment, concrete compression strain, and the energy absorption of RC beams and to provide useful relationships that can be effectively utilized to determine the required number of CFRP sheets for a necessary increase in the flexural strength of the beams without a major loss in their ductility. To accomplish this, various RC beams, identical in their geometric and reinforcement details and having different number and configurations of CFRP sheets, are modeled and analyzed using the ANSYS software and a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  12. Effect of basic physical parameters to control plasma meniscus and beam halo formation in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2013-09-14

    Our previous study shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources: the negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. In this article, the detail physics of the plasma meniscus and beam halo formation is investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the basic physical parameters such as the H{sup −} extraction voltage and the effective electron confinement time significantly affect the formation of the plasma meniscus and the resultant beam halo since the penetration of electric field for negative ion extraction depends on these physical parameters. Especially, the electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of electron diffusion across the magnetic field. The plasma meniscus penetrates deeply into the source plasma region when the effective electron confinement time is short. In this case, the curvature of the plasma meniscus becomes large, and consequently the fraction of the beam halo increases.

  13. Evaluation of some scale effects in the response and failure of composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Morton, John

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using scale model testing for predicting full-scale behavior of composite beams loaded in tension and flexure was investigated. Classical laws of similitude were applied to fabricate and test replica model beams to identify scaling effects in the load response, strength, and mode of failure. Experiments were conducted using graphite-epoxy composite beams having different laminate stacking sequences and a range of scaled sizes. Results indicated that the elastic response of scaled composite beams was independent of specimen size. However, a significant scale effect in strength was observed. In addition, a transition in failure mode was observed among scaled beams of certain laminate stacking sequences. Weibull statistical and fracture mechanics based models were applied to predict the strength scale effect since standard failure criteria cannot account for the influence of absolute specimen size in failure.

  14. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  15. The effect of self-induced electric field on Langmuir turbulence formed by a steadily injected electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Siversky, Taras

    We investigated the stability of a steadily injected electron beam with lower energy knee and its interaction with the ambient plasma via a generation of Langmuir turbulence at various depths of flaring atmospheres. The solutions are sought of simultaneous Fokker-Planck and wave diffusion equations for the atmospheres being a result of hydrodynamic response to electron beam injection. We identify a few time and length scales of the increased Langmuir turbulence and the effect of self-induced electric field on the level of this turbulence at different atmospheric levels.

  16. Effect of Scanning Beam for Superficial Dose in Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Moskvin, Vadim P; Estabrook, Neil C; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam delivery technology is under development to minimize the scanning spot size for uniform dose to target, but it is also known that the superficial dose could be as high as the dose at Bragg peak for narrow and small proton beams. The objective of this study is to explore the characteristics of dose distribution at shallow depths using Monte Carlo simulation with the FLUKA code for uniform scanning (US) and discrete spot scanning (DSS) proton beams. The results show that the superficial dose for DSS is relatively high compared to US. Additionally, DSS delivers a highly heterogeneous dose to the irradiated surface for comparable doses at Bragg peak. Our simulation shows that the superficial dose can become as high as the Bragg peak when the diameter of the proton beam is reduced. This may compromise the advantage of proton beam therapy for sparing normal tissue, making skin dose a limiting factor for the clinical use of DSS. Finally, the clinical advantage of DSS may not be essential for treating uniform dose across a large target, as in craniospinal irradiation (CSI).

  17. Dynamic Characteristics of Micro-Beams Considering the Effect of Flexible Supports

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zuo-Yang; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Normally, the boundaries are assumed to allow small deflections and moments for MEMS beams with flexible supports. The non-ideal boundary conditions have a significant effect on the qualitative dynamical behavior. In this paper, by employing the principle of energy equivalence, rigorous theoretical solutions of the tangential and rotational equivalent stiffness are derived based on the Boussinesq's and Cerruti's displacement equations. The non-dimensional differential partial equation of the motion, as well as coupled boundary conditions, are solved analytically using the method of multiple time scales. The closed-form solution provides a direct insight into the relationship between the boundary conditions and vibration characteristics of the dynamic system, in which resonance frequencies increase with the nonlinear mechanical spring effect but decrease with the effect of flexible supports. The obtained results of frequencies and mode shapes are compared with the cases of ideal boundary conditions, and the differences between them are contrasted on frequency response curves. The influences of the support material property on the equivalent stiffness and resonance frequency shift are also discussed. It is demonstrated that the proposed model with the flexible supports boundary conditions has significant effect on the rigorous quantitative dynamical analysis of the MEMS beams. Moreover, the proposed analytical solutions are in good agreement with those obtained from finite element analyses.

  18. Introduction to Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martisikova, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Presently, ion beam therapy reaches an increasing interest within the field of radiation therapy, which is caused by the promising clinical results obtained in the last decades. Ion beams enable higher dose conformation to the tumor and increased sparing of the surrounding tissue in comparison to the standard therapy using high energy photons. Heavy ions, like carbon, offer in addition increased biological effectiveness, which makes them suitable for treatment of radioresistant tumors. This contribution gives an overview over the physical and biological properties of ion beams. Common fundamental principles of ion beam therapy are summarized and differences between standard therapy with high energy photons, proton and carbon ion therapy are discussed. The technologies used for the beam production and delivery are introduced, with emphasis to the differences between passive and active beam delivery systems. The last part concentrates on the quality assurance in ion therapy. Specialties of dosimetry in medical ion beams are discussed.

  19. Self-trapping of optical beams through thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lamhot, Yuval; Barak, Assaf; Peleg, Or; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, self-trapping of optical beams in nanoparticle suspensions by virtue of thermophoresis. We use light to control the local concentration of nanoparticles, and increase their density at the center of the optical beam, thereby increasing the effective refractive index in the beam vicinity, causing the beam to self-trap.

  20. Viscous Effects in the Elastodynamics of Thick Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. R.; Tessler, A.

    1997-01-01

    A viscoelastic higher-order thick beam finite element formulation is extended to include elastodynamic deformations. The material constitutive law is a special differential form of the Maxwell solid. In the constitutive model, the elastic strains and the conjugate viscous strains are coupled through a system of first- order ordinary differential equations. The total time-dependent stress is the superposition of its elastic and viscous components. The elastodynamic equations of motion are derived from the virtual work principle. Computational examples are carried out for a thick orthotropic cantilevered beam. A quasi-static relaxation problem is employed as a validation test for the elastodynamic algorithm. The elastodynamic code is demonstrated by analyzing the damped vibrations of the beam which is deformed and then released to freely vibrate.

  1. The Effect of Oblique Electron Beams to the Surface Dose Under the Bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Demir, Bayram Okutan, Murat; Cakir, Aydin; Goeksel, Evren; Bilge, Hatice

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of bolus to the surface dose in oblique electron incidences. Irradiations with 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, and 12-MeV electron beams were made for the incidence angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg., 60 deg., 75 deg. and using 3 different bolus setups: (1) unbolused (no bolus), (2) 5-mm bolus, and (3) 10-mm bolus. A set of EBT gafchromic film pieces placed on the phantom surface was irradiated with a 400-cGy dose at D{sub max} for each setup. Whereas surface dose increased with increasing incidence degrees in the absence of a bolus, it was seen that there was a large surface dose decreasing in the presence of a bolus with increasing incidence angles. For 60 deg. incidence angle, the relative surface doses with unbolused setup were: 88.10%, 90.06%, 89.35%, 90.25%, and 97.10%; with 5-mm bolus: 66.45%, 81.20%, 99.78%, 124.43%, and 116.07%; and with 10-mm bolus: 22.65%, 45.20%, 55.20%, 65.82%, and 90.27% for 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, and 12 MeV, respectively. The use of bolus in the treatment of highly oblique surfaces with low-energy electron beams significantly decreases the surface dose.

  2. A laboratory experiment to examine the effect of auroral beams on spacecraft charging in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M. U.; Gayetsky, L. E.; Mella, M. R.; Lynch, K. A.; Lessard, M. R.

    2011-09-15

    A 2.54 cm diameter conducting electrically isolated Copper sphere is suspended in a low density (10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}), low temperature (T{sub e} = 0.5 eV) Argon plasma, which mimics a spacecraft in an ionospheric plasma. An electron beam with current density of approximately 10{sup -10} A/cm{sup 2} and beam spot of 10.2 cm diameter, which mimics an auroral electron beam, is fired at the sphere while varying the beam energy from 100 eV to 2 keV. The plasma potential in the sheath around the sphere is measured using an emissive probe as the electron beam energy is varied. To observe the effects of the electron beam, the experimental sheath potential profiles are compared to a model of the plasma potential around a spherically symmetric charge distribution in the absence of electron beams. Comparison between the experimental data and the model shows that the sphere is less negative than the model predicts by up to half a volt for beam energies that produce high secondary electron emission from the surface of the sphere. It is shown that this secondary emission can account for changes in potential of spacecraft in the ionosphere as they pass through auroral beams and thus helps to improve interpretations of ionospheric thermal ion distributions.

  3. Dose-Response Effect of Charged Carbon Beam on Normal Rat Retina Assessed by Electroretinography

    SciTech Connect

    Mizota, Atsushi; Tanaka, Minoru; Kubota, Mariko; Negishi, Hisanari; Watanabe, Emiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of carbon beam irradiation with those of proton beam irradiation on the physiology of the retina of rats. Methods and Materials: Eight-week-old Wister rats were used. The right eyes were irradiated with carbon beam (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) or proton beam (4, 8, 16, and 24 Gy) with the rats under general anesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the irradiation, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves were compared with those of control rats. Results: The amplitude of b waves was reduced more than that of a waves at lower irradiation doses with both types of irradiation. With carbon ion irradiation, the amplitudes of the b wave were significantly reduced after radiation doses of 8 and 16 Gy at 6 months and by radiation doses of 4, 8, and 16 Gy at 12 months. With proton beam irradiation, the b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced after 16 and 24 Gy at 6 months and with doses of 8 Gy or greater at 12 months. For the maximum b-wave amplitude, a significant difference was observed in rats irradiated with carbon beams of 4 Gy or more and with proton beams of 8 Gy or more at 12 months after irradiation. Conclusions: These results indicate that carbon beam irradiation is about two times more damaging than proton beam irradiation on the rat retina at the same dose.

  4. Projection imaging of photon beams by the Cerenkov effect

    SciTech Connect

    Glaser, Adam K.; Davis, Scott C.; McClatchy, David M.; Zhang, Rongxiao; Pogue, Brian W.; Gladstone, David J.

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: A novel technique for beam profiling of megavoltage photon beams was investigated for the first time by capturing images of the induced Cerenkov emission in water, as a potential surrogate for the imparted dose in irradiated media. Methods: A high-sensitivity, intensified CCD camera (ICCD) was configured to acquire 2D projection images of Cerenkov emission from a 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 cm{sup 2} 6 MV linear accelerator (LINAC) x-ray photon beam operating at a dose rate of 400 MU/min incident on a water tank with transparent walls. The ICCD acquisition was gated to the LINAC sync pulse to reduce background light artifacts, and the measurement quality was investigated by evaluating the signal to noise ratio and measurement repeatability as a function of delivered dose. Monte Carlo simulations were used to derive a calibration factor for differences between the optical images and deposited dose arising from the anisotropic angular dependence of Cerenkov emission. Finally, Cerenkov-based beam profiles were compared to a percent depth dose (PDD) and lateral dose profile at a depth of d{sub max} from a reference dose distribution generated from the clinical Varian ECLIPSE treatment planning system (TPS). Results: The signal to noise ratio was found to be 20 at a delivered dose of 66.6 cGy, and proportional to the square root of the delivered dose as expected from Poisson photon counting statistics. A 2.1% mean standard deviation and 5.6% maximum variation in successive measurements were observed, and the Monte Carlo derived calibration factor resulted in Cerenkov emission images which were directly correlated to deposited dose, with some spatial issues. The dose difference between the TPS and PDD predicted by Cerenkov measurements was within 20% in the buildup region with a distance to agreement (DTA) of 1.5-2 mm and {+-}3% at depths beyond d{sub max}. In the lateral profile, the dose difference at the beam penumbra was within {+-}13% with a DTA of 0-2 mm

  5. SIMULATION OF RF BREAKDOWN EFFECTS ON NLC BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-08-24

    The linacs of the Next Linear Collider / Global Linear Collider will contain several thousand traveling wave X-band accelerator structures operating at an input power of about 60 MW. At this input power, prototypes of NLC/GLC structures have breakdown rates lower than one breakdown in ten hours. RF breakdowns disrupt flow of energy inside the structure and create arcs with electron and ion currents. Electromagnetic fields of these currents interact with the NLC beam. The authors simulated the deflection of the NLC beam caused by breakdown currents using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. In this paper they present modeling considerations and simulation results.

  6. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and out-of-field cell survival responses to passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton beam deliveries.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Karl T; McGarry, Conor K; Clasie, Ben; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Schuemann, Jan; Depauw, Nicolas; Tang, Shikui; McMahon, Stephen J; Schettino, Giuseppe; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Lu, Hsaio-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; Paganetti, Harald; Hounsell, Alan R; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-10-21

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of passive scattered (PS) and pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton beam delivery techniques for uniform beam configurations was determined by clonogenic survival. The radiobiological impact of modulated beam configurations on cell survival occurring in- or out-of-field for both delivery techniques was determined with intercellular communication intact or physically inhibited. Cell survival responses were compared to those observed using a 6 MV photon beam produced with a linear accelerator. DU-145 cells showed no significant difference in survival response to proton beams delivered by PS and PBS or 6 MV photons taking into account a RBE of 1.1 for protons at the centre of the spread out Bragg peak. Significant out-of-field effects similar to those observed for 6 MV photons were observed for both PS and PBS proton deliveries with cell survival decreasing to 50-60% survival for scattered doses of 0.05 and 0.03 Gy for passive scattered and pencil beam scanned beams respectively. The observed out-of-field responses were shown to be dependent on intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a similar RBE between passive and actively scanned proton beams and confirm that out-of-field effects may be important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated photon and proton fields.

  7. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and out-of-field cell survival responses to passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton beam deliveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Clasie, Ben; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Schuemann, Jan; Depauw, Nicolas; Tang, Shikui; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Lu, Hsaio-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; Paganetti, Harald; Hounsell, Alan R.; Held, Kathryn D.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-10-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of passive scattered (PS) and pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton beam delivery techniques for uniform beam configurations was determined by clonogenic survival. The radiobiological impact of modulated beam configurations on cell survival occurring in- or out-of-field for both delivery techniques was determined with intercellular communication intact or physically inhibited. Cell survival responses were compared to those observed using a 6 MV photon beam produced with a linear accelerator. DU-145 cells showed no significant difference in survival response to proton beams delivered by PS and PBS or 6 MV photons taking into account a RBE of 1.1 for protons at the centre of the spread out Bragg peak. Significant out-of-field effects similar to those observed for 6 MV photons were observed for both PS and PBS proton deliveries with cell survival decreasing to 50-60% survival for scattered doses of 0.05 and 0.03 Gy for passive scattered and pencil beam scanned beams respectively. The observed out-of-field responses were shown to be dependent on intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a similar RBE between passive and actively scanned proton beams and confirm that out-of-field effects may be important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated photon and proton fields

  8. Unusual spin Hall effect of a light beam in chiral metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hailei; Zhang Xiangdong

    2011-05-15

    We present a solution to the problem of reflection and refraction of a polarized Gaussian beam at the interface between the transparent medium and the chiral metamaterials. Some unusual spin Hall effects of reflected and transmitted light have been found. It is shown that the spin-dependent displacements of the reflected beam centroid can not only reach several tens of wavelengths at certain incident angles; the reversed effect for the transmitted beams can also be realized by tuning the chiral parameters. These findings provide an alternative pathway for controlling the spin Hall effects of light and thereby open up the possibility for developing new nanophotonic devices.

  9. Evidence for anomalous optical transition radiation linear polarization effects in beam-profile monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Johnson, A. S.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R. M.; Yao, C.-Y.; Evtushenko, P.

    2013-10-01

    Investigations of the effects of optical transition radiation (OTR) polarization components on beam profiles are presented. The transverse profiles are examined using the OTR perpendicular and parallel polarization components with respect to the dimension of interest. We observed ˜15% projected profile size reductions with the perpendicularly polarized components on a 65-μm beam image size case at 14 MeV, a 150-μm beam image size at 4.5 GeV, and a 1100-μm beam image size at 7 GeV. These effects are all several times larger than expected (and anomalous in this sense) when compared to the standard OTR point-spread function calculations. We propose the time-averaged induced-current distribution which generates the OTR represents the actual beam size more faithfully with the perpendicular polarization component and recommend its routine use and subsequent deconvolution.

  10. Thermal lensing analysis of TGG and its effect on beam quality.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Amir A; Rybarsyk, James; Rogers, Evan

    2013-06-03

    An analysis is presented of a TGG crystal rod under high power laser operation. A semianalytical thermal analysis is investigated to obtain the temperature profile and thermal lensing effect in a TGG crystal upon incidence of a high power laser light. By solving the heat transfer equation for the TGG crystal and taking the Gaussian beam transverse intensity profile as the heat source, the optical path difference due to induced thermal effects was obtained. Moreover, a detailed model for the dependence of thermal lensing and beam degradation which takes into account up to the fifth-order spherical aberration is presented. Based on this model, it is shown that up to a critical value of the beam power the degradation of the beam is not significant. The experimental results on thermal lensing and degradation on beam quality of a high power laser passing through a TGG crystal rod are in agreement with the main results from our model.

  11. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry: the effects of beam hardening on bone density measurements.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; McKeeney, D B; Chhaya, S C; Ryan, P J; Fogelman, I

    1992-01-01

    X-ray tubes have superseded radionuclide sources for dual photon absorptiometry of the spine and hip. However, the use of a polyenergetic spectrum is a potential source of error for x-ray absorptiometers since beam hardening may result in a nonlinear measurement scale for bone mineral density (BMD). A quantitative study of the effects of beam hardening on measurements made with a commercial dual energy x-ray scanner has been performed. Bone was represented by layers of aluminum of linearly increasing thickness which were scanned under water thicknesses ranging from 0 to 25 cm to represent different body thicknesses of soft tissue. Beam hardening had two effects on measured BMD: (i) at a constant true BMD, measured BMD varied with water thickness; (ii) at a constant water thickness, the BMD scale was not precisely linear. For conditions appropriate to spine and hip studies (BMD) values in the range 0.7 to 1.4 g/cm2 and body thickness between 15 and 25 cm) the maximum deviation of measured BMD from a linear scale was 0.023 g/cm2, while the root-mean-square deviation (0.01 g/cm2) was comparable to the measurement precision for a spine or femoral neck scan (about 1%). The largest departures from linearity were found to occur at the thinnest water thicknesses for BMD values in the range 0.2 to 0.6 g/cm2. The effect of scale nonlinearity on the results of longitudinal studies was examined: for a spine scan at 20-cm body thickness, measured changes in BMD slightly overestimated the true change and implied an error of 0.15%/year for a measurement of a true rate of loss of 3% year in a postmenopausal woman.

  12. Correction of resist heating effect on variable shaped beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Suganuma, Mizuna; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kato, Yasuo; Kamikubo, Takashi; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Zable, Harold; Masuda, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Aki

    2016-04-01

    The specifications for critical dimension (CD) accuracy and line edge roughness are getting tighter to promote every photomask manufacturer to choose electron beam resists of lower sensitivity. When the resist is exposed by too many electrons, it is excessively heated up to have higher sensitivity at a higher temperature, which results in degraded CD uniformity. This effect is called "resist heating effect" and is now the most critical error source in CD control on a variable shaped beam (VSB) mask writer. We have developed an on-tool, real-time correction system for the resist heating effect. The system is composed of correction software based on a simple thermal diffusion model and computational hardware equipped with more than 100 graphical processing unit chips. We have demonstrated that the designed correction accuracy was obtained and the runtime of correction was sufficiently shorter than the writing time. The system is ready to be deployed for our VSB mask writers to retain the writing time as short as possible for lower sensitivity resists by removing the need for increased pass count.

  13. Mutagenic effect of a keV range N + beam on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huiyun; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Lixiang; Han, Wei; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-07-01

    The radiobiological effects of a keV (5-20 keV) range nitrogen ion (N +) beam on mammalian cells were studied, particularly with regard to the induction of mutation in the cell genome. The experiment demonstrated that the 20 keV N + beam, which resulted in cell death to a certain extent, induced a 2-3 fold increase in the mutation rates at the CD59 gene locus of the mammalian A L cells as compared to the control. Within certain fluence ranges (0-6 × 10 14 N +/cm 2), the cell survival displayed a down-up-down pattern which is similar to the phenomenon known as 'hyper-radiosensitivity' manifested under low-dose irradiation; the CD59 mutation rate firstly showed a gradual rise up to a 3-fold increment above the background level as the ion fluence went up to 4 × 10 14 N +/cm 2, after this peak point however, a downtrend appeared though the ion fluence increased further. It was also observed that the fraction of CD59 mutation bears no proportional relation to ion energy in further experiments of mutation induction by N + beams with the incident energies of 5, 10, 15 and 20 keV at the same fluence of 3 × 10 14 N +/cm 2. Analyses of the deletion patterns of chromosome 11 in CD59- mutants induced by 5-20 keV N + beams showed that these ions did not result in large-size chromosome deletions in this mammalian cell system. A preliminary discussion, suggesting that the mutagenic effect of such low-energy ion influx on mammalian cells could result from multiple processes involving direct collision of particles with cellular DNA, and cascade atomic and molecular reactions due to plentiful primary and secondary particles, was also presented. The study provided the first glimpse into the roles low-energy ions may play in inducing mutagenesis in mammalian cells, and results will be of much value in helping people to understand the contribution of low-energy ions to radiological effects of various ionising radiations.

  14. Accurate model of electron beam profiles with emittance effects for pierce guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Wang, Guangqiang; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Dongyang; Li, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of electron beam profile is one of the key objectives of electron optics, and the basis for design of the practical electron gun. In this paper, an improved model describing electron beam in Pierce gun with both space charge effects and emittance effects is proposed. The theory developed by Cutler and Hines is still applied for the accelerating region of the Pierce gun, while the motion equations of the electron beams in the anode aperture and drift tunnel are improved by modifying electron optics theory with emittance. As a result, a more universal and accurate formula of the focal length of the lens for the electron beam with both effects is derived for the anode aperture with finite dimension, and a modified universal spread curve considering beam emittance is introduced in drift tunnel region. Based on these improved motion equations of the electron beam, beam profiles with space charge effects and emittance effects can be theoretically predicted, which are subsequently approved to agree well with the experimentally measured ones. The developed model here is helpful to design more applicable Pierce guns at high frequencies.

  15. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-21

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold (23)Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  16. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    PubMed Central

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  17. Effects of Electron Beam Loading on an Operating Piezoelectric Transformer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    The setup of the optical diagnostic that was used to measure the internal stress and electric field within the PT is shown in Figure 5. A helium ... neon (HeNe) laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm was used as the light source. A linear polarizer was used to ensure that the beam was linearly

  18. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-10-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 {mu}s before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations.

  19. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-01-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 {mu}s before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations.

  20. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  1. The effects of x-ray beam hardening on detective quantum efficiency and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the effects of x-ray beam hardening on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the radiation dose of an inline x-ray imaging system. The ability to decrease the risk of harmful radiation to the patient without compromising the detection capability would more effectively balance the tradeoff between image quality and radiation dose, and therefore benefit the fields of diagnostic x-ray imaging, especially mammography. The DQE and the average glandular dose were both calculated under the same experimental conditions for a range of beam hardening levels, corresponding to no added beam hardening and two thicknesses each of Rhodium (Rh) and Molybdenum (Mo) filters. The dose calculation results demonstrate a reduction of 15% to 24% for the range of beam hardening levels. The comparison of all quantities comprising the DQE exhibit very close correlation between the results obtained without added beam hardening to the results corresponding to the range of beam hardening levels. For the specific experimental conditions utilized in this preliminary study, the results are an indication that the use of beam hardening holds the potential to reduce the radiation dose without decreasing the performance of the system. Future studies will seek to apply this method in a clinical environment and perform a comprehensive image quality evaluation, in an effort to further evaluate the potential of beam hardening to balance the tradeoff between dose and image quality.

  2. Effect of surface roughness and size of beam on squeeze-film damping—Molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hojin; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-11-28

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) to characterize fluid damping between a substrate and an approaching beam. We focus on the near contact regime where squeeze film (where fluid gap is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules) and many-body effects in the fluid become dominant. The MD simulations provide explicit description of many-body and non-equilibrium processes in the fluid as well as the surface topography. We study how surface roughness and beam width increases the damping coefficient due to their effect on fluid mobility. We find that the explicit simulations are in good agreement with prior direct simulation Monte Carlo results except at near-contact conditions where many-body effects in the compressed fluid lead the increased damping and weaker dependence on beam width. We also show that velocity distributions near the beam edges and for short gaps deviate from the Boltzmann distribution indicating a degree of local non-equilibrium. These results will be useful to parameterize compact models used for microsystem device-level simulations and provide insight into mesoscale simulations of near-contact damping.

  3. Hysteresis effects in the formation of a neutralizing beam plasma at low ion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the PEGASES II thruster prototype is used as an ion source generating low-energy (<300\\ \\text{eV}) positive Ar ion beam, extracted without an external neutralizer. The ions are extracted and accelerated from the source using a two-grid system. The extracted positive ion beam current is measured on a large beam target that can be translated along the acceleration axis. The ion beam current shows a stepwise transition from a low-current to a high-current extraction regime with hysteresis. The hysteresis region depends strongly upon the beam target position. Langmuir probe measurements in the plume show high plasma potentials and low plasma densities in the low-current mode, while the plasma potential drops and the density increases in the high-current mode. The ion energy distribution functions of the beam are measured for different regimes of ion extraction. The ion beam extracted in the high-current mode is indicated by the presence of an additional low-energy peak corresponding to ions from an ion-beam plasma created in the downstream chamber, as well as 10-20 times higher intensity of the primary ion beam peak. The hysteresis behavior is explained by the formation of a downstream neutralizing beam plasma, that depends on the target position and pressure in agreement with a Paschen-like breakdown by secondary electrons. The obtained results are of high relevance for further development of the PEGASES thruster, as well as for improving existing neutralizer-free concepts of the broad-beam ion sources.

  4. Effects of Ga ion-beam irradiation on monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Quan; Mao, Wei; Zhang, Yanmin; Shao, Ying; Ren, Naifei; Ge, Daohan

    2013-08-12

    The effects of Ga ion on the single layer graphene (SLG) have been studied by Raman spectroscopy (RS), SEM, and field-effect characterization. Under vacuum conditions, Ga ion-irradiation can induce disorders and cause red shift of 2D band of RS, rather than lattice damage in high quality SLG. The compressive strain induced by Ga ion decreases the crystalline size in SLG, which is responsible for the variation of Raman scattering and electrical properties. Nonlinear out-put characteristic and resistance increased are also found in the I-V measurement. The results have important implications during CVD graphene characterization and related device fabrication.

  5. Effects on the photon beam from an electromagnetic array used for patient localization and tumor tracking.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Betancourt, Ricardo; Yin, Lingshu; Metz, James; Avery, Stephen; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-05-06

    One of the main components in a Calypso 4D localization and tracking system is an electromagnetic array placed above patients that is used for target monitoring during radiation treatment. The beam attenuation and beam spoiling properties of the Calypso electromagnetic array at various beam angles were investigated. Measurements were performed on a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator with 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. The narrow beam attenuation properties were measured under a field size of 1 cm × 1 cm, with a photon diode placed in a cylindrical graphite buildup cap. The broad beam attenuation properties were measured under a field size of 10 cm × 10 cm, with a 0.6 cc cylindrical Farmer chamber placed in a polystyrene buildup cap. Beam spoiling properties of the array were studied by measuring depth-dose change from the array under a field size of 10 cm × 10 cm in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with an embedded Markus parallel plate chamber. Change in depth doses were measured with the array placed at distances of 2, 5, and 10 cm from the phantom surface. Narrow beam attenuation and broad beam attenuation from the array were found to be less than 2%-3% for both 6 MV and 15 MV beams at angles less than 40°, and were more pronounced at more oblique angles. Spoiling effects are appreciable at beam buildup region, but are insignificant at depths beyond dmax. Dose measurements in a QA phantom using patient IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were shown to have less than 2.5% dose difference with the Calypso array. The results indicate that the dose difference due to the placement of Calypso array is clinically insignificant.

  6. Interferometric Measurement for Improved Understanding of Boundary Effects in Micromachined Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bitsie, Fernando; Jensen, Brian D.; de Boer, Maarten

    1999-07-15

    Micromachined beams are commonly used to measure material properties in MEMS. Such measurements are complicated by the fact that boundary effects at the ends of the beams have a significant effect on the properties being measured. In an effort to improve the accuracy and resolution of such measurements, we are conducting a study of support post compliance in cantilever and fixed-fixed beams. Three different support post designs have been analyzed by finite element modeling. The results are then compared to measurements made on actual devices using interferometry. Using this technique, the accuracy of measurements of Young's modulus has been improved. Continuing work will also improve the measurement of residual stress.

  7. Compensation of Beam Line Polarizing Effects at UE112 of BESSY II

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrdt, J.; Follath, R.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2010-06-23

    Reflections in synchrotron radiation beam lines tend to change the state of polarization of the radiation. This effect is more pronounced for steep angle of incidence, i.e. at low photon energy (say below 100 eV) beam lines. The APPLE II undulator UE112 at BESSY has all four magnetic rows shiftable and thus generates any state of polarization. To provide any intended polarization state at the sample we perform polarization measurements based on simple and fast linear polarization analysis that together with calculations of the undulator radiation predicts undulator settings that cancel beam line polarization effects.

  8. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shikui; Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D{sub 99} (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D{sub 99} was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a

  9. Effects of coherence on anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model beams on propagation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Xiangzhao; Zeng, Aijun; Yang, Kun

    2007-08-01

    An analytical formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of the electric field of anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model beams propagating in free space is derived by using a tensor method. The effects of coherence on those beams are studied. It is shown that two anisotropic stochastic electromagnetic beams that propagate from the source plane z=0 into the half-space z>0 may have different beam shapes (i.e., spectral density) and states of polarization in the half-space, even though they have the same beam shape and states of polarization in the source plane. This fact is due to a difference in the coherence properties of the field in the source plane.

  10. Mutational effects of γ-rays and carbon ion beams on Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Hase, Yoshihiro; Narumi, Issay; Hidema, Jun; Sakamoto, Ayako N

    2013-11-01

    To assess the mutational effects of radiation on vigorously proliferating plant tissue, the mutation spectrum was analyzed with Arabidopsis seedlings using the plasmid-rescue method. Transgenic plants containing the Escherichia coli rpsL gene were irradiated with γ-rays and carbon ion beams (320-MeV (12)C(6+)), and mutations in the rpsL gene were analyzed. Mutant frequency increased significantly following irradiation by γ-rays, but not by 320-MeV (12)C(6+). Mutation spectra showed that both radiations increased the frequency of frameshifts and other mutations, including deletions and insertions, but only γ-rays increased the frequency of total base substitutions. These results suggest that the type of DNA lesions which cause base substitutions were less often induced by 320-MeV (12)C(6+) than by γ-rays in Arabidopsis seedlings. Furthermore, γ-rays never increased the frequencies of G:C to T:A or A:T to C:G transversions, which are caused by oxidized guanine; 320-MeV (12)C(6+), however, produced a slight increase in both transversions. Instead, γ-rays produced a significant increase in the frequency of G:C to A:T transitions. These results suggest that 8-oxoguanine has little effect on mutagenesis in Arabidopsis cells.

  11. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, S; Tyler, M; McNamara, J; Sloan, K; Ceylan, A; Rinks, A

    2016-11-15

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm(2)-20  ×  20 cm(2) for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  12. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdell, S.; Tyler, M.; McNamara, J.; Sloan, K.; Ceylan, A.; Rinks, A.

    2016-12-01

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm2-20  ×  20 cm2 for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  13. Timoshenko beam model for buckling and vibration of nanowires with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang-Feng; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, surface effects on the axial buckling and the transverse vibration of nanowires are examined by using the refined Timoshenko beam theory. The critical compression force of axial buckling and the natural frequency of nanowires are obtained analytically, in which the impacts of surface elasticity, residual surface stress, transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia have been included. The buckling and vibration behaviour of a nanowire is demonstrated to be size dependent, especially when its cross-sectional dimension reduces to nanometres. The surface effects with positive elastic constants tend to increase the critical compression force and the natural frequency, especially for slender nanowires, while the shear deformation lowers these values for stubby nanowires. This study may be helpful to accurately measure the mechanical properties of nanowires and to design nanowire-based devices and systems.

  14. Effect of electron beam-cross-linked gels on the rheological properties of raw natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Suman; Chattopadhyay, Santanu; Bharadwaj, Y. K.; Sabharwal, S.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2008-05-01

    Electron beam (EB)-cross-linked natural rubber (NR) gels were prepared from latex and characterized by various techniques. The addition of a small amount of these gels to raw NR was found to reduce the apparent shear viscosity and die swell remarkably. This effect was further enhanced with the addition of butyl acrylate as a sensitizer. The apparent shear viscosity first decreased up to 8 phr of gel loading and then increased. However, the percent die swell value decreased steadily upon gel loading. These were explained by calculating principal normal stress difference, the activation energy of melt flow and characteristics of EB-cross-linked gels. These effects were also reflected in the changes of mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of gel-filled raw NR. Tailoring of the above properties could be done with the help of these gels.

  15. Ion beam mixing effects in Ag precipitates embedded in MgO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, G.; Abouchacra, G.; Treilleux, M.; Thevenard, P.; Serughetti, J.

    1988-05-01

    MgO single crystals have been implanted at room temperature with 8 × 10 16 Ag cm -2 of 180 keV energy. After 973 K thermal annealing, Ag atoms precipitate in the MgO matrix. The MgOAg samples were then irradiated at 77 K with 800 keV xenon up to 1.7 × 10 16 ions cm -2. The modification of the metallic precipitated phase induced by such ionic bombardment, has been characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The evolution of the optical spectra with xenon bombardment has been interpreted in terms of silver precipitate dispersion induced by ion beam mixing effects. The inhibition of atomic diffusion or radiation induced diffusion, due the low sample temperature during irradiation, increases the efficiency of atomic mixing effects. TEM observations confirm this assumption.

  16. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  17. Beam-Switch Transient Effects in the RF Path of the ICAPA Receive Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sands, O. Scott

    2003-01-01

    When the beam of a Phased Array Antenna (PAA) is switched from one pointing direction to another, transient effects in the RF path of the antenna are observed. Testing described in the report has revealed implementation-specific transient effects in the RF channel that are associated with digital clocking pulses that occur with transfer of data from the Beam Steering Controller (BSC) to the digital electronics of the PAA under test. The testing described here provides an initial assessment of the beam-switch phenomena by digitally acquiring time series of the RF communications channel, under CW excitation, during the period of time that the beam switch transient occurs. Effects are analyzed using time-frequency distributions and instantaneous frequency estimation techniques. The results of tests conducted with CW excitation supports further Bit-Error-Rate (BER) testing of the PAA communication channel.

  18. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  19. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  20. Investigating the effect of electron emission pattern on RF gun beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.

    2016-05-01

    Thermionic radio frequency gun is one of the most promising choices to gain a high quality electron beam, used in the infrared free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation injectors. To study the quality of the beam in a compact electron source, the emission pattern effect on the beam dynamics should be investigated. In the presented work, we developed a 3D simulation code to model the real process of thermionic emission and to investigate the effect of emission pattern, by considering geometrical constraints, on the beam dynamics. According to the results, the electron bunch emittance varies considerably with the emission pattern. Simulation results have been validated via comparison with the well-known simulation codes such as ASTRA simulation code and CST microwave studio, as well as other simulation results in the literature. It was also demonstrated that by using a continuous wave laser beam for heating the cathode, the emission pattern full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transverse emission distribution is proportional to FWHM of the Gaussian profile for the laser beam. Additionally, by using the developed code, the effect of wall structure around the cathode on the back bombardment effect has been studied. According to the results, for a stable operation of the RF gun, one should consider the nose cone in vicinity of the cathode surface to reduce the back-bombardment effect.

  1. Effects of beam-driven poloidal rotation on the neoclassical bootstrap current

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Hinton, F.L.

    1996-12-31

    Unbalanced neutral beam injection drives toroidal and poloidal rotations in a tokamak plasma. The beam toroidal momentum input drives the toroidal rotation, and the parallel friction between the thermal ions and fast ions induces the poloidal rotation. A theory of the beam-driven poloidal rotation and its effects on energy transport was given recently by Hinton and Kim. In this work, we extend their considerations to the effects on the neoclassical bootstrap current. For parameters of interest in present neutral beam heated tokamaks, the magnitude of the beam-driven poloidal rotation can be significantly larger than that of the standard neoclassical value due to the ion temperature gradient. The presence of this driven poloidal rotation will manifest itself in modification of the neoclassical bootstrap current. In the case of coinjection, the driven poloidal rotation is in the opposite direction to the rotation driven by the temperature gradient, therefore it enhances the bootstrap current. In comparison with the standard theoretical predictions of the neutral beam-driven current, that enhancement in the bootstrap current varies with the beam and plasma parameters. A calculation of the parallel transport coefficients associated with the driven poloidal flow in finite-aspect ratio tokamaks will be presented. Experimental conditions for observing the enhancement in bootstrap current will be discussed.

  2. Modeling the biophysical effects in a carbon beam delivery line by using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ilsung; Yoo, SeungHoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    The Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion-beam therapy. In this study, the biological effectiveness of a carbon-ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. A carbon-ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon-ion beam transport into media. An incident energy carbon-ion beam with energy in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model was applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary-gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetration depth in the water phantom along the incident beam's direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE-weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the depth in the water phantom.

  3. Toggling between single and multi-beam effects on Stimulated Raman Scattering in a NIF hohlraum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Strozzi, D. J.; Divol, L.; Michel, P.; Ralph, J.; Berger, R. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Robey, H.; Landen, O. L.; Lepape, S.; Ross, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Williams, E. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Nikroo, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a method for studying single and multi-beam laser-plasma interactions (LPI) in a NIF hohlraum plasma. This method utilizes toggling combinations of beams on and off during the time of high (partly saturated) stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS) and measuring the effects on the SRS. We find that during the high-intensity part of the laser pulse SRS saturates at about 10 - 20% reflectivity for single and multi-beam interactions. In addition, we can place limits on the cross-beam energy transfer and show that re-amplification is small due to multiple beam effects. Spectral measurements indicate that toggling beams creates a <=10% change in the plasma temperature. These results are important for developing models of multi-beam intereactions. We will describe the backscatter measurements and simple models used to constrain the multi-beam effects.

  4. Numerical investigation on propagation effects of pseudo-partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xianmei; Zhu, Wenyue; Rao, Ruizhong

    2009-03-02

    The propagation effects of spatially pseudo-partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams in atmosphere are investigated numerically. The characteristics of beam spreading, beam wandering and intensity scintillation are analyzed respectively. It is found that the degradation of degree of source coherence may cause reductions of relative beam spreading and scintillation index, which indicates that partially coherent beams are more resistant to atmospheric turbulence than fully coherent beams. And beam wandering is not much sensitive to the change of source coherence. However, a partially coherent beam have a larger spreading than the fully coherent beam both in free space and in atmospheric turbulence. The influences of changing frequency of random phase screen which models the source coherence on the final intensity pattern are also discussed.

  5. Effect of collisions on amplification of laser beams by Brillouin scattering in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, K. A.; Speirs, D. C.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Norreys, P.; Fiuza, F.; Cairns, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2013-10-15

    We report on particle in cell simulations of energy transfer between a laser pump beam and a counter-propagating seed beam using the Brillouin scattering process in uniform plasma including collisions. The results presented show that the ion acoustic waves excited through naturally occurring Brillouin scattering of the pump field are preferentially damped without affecting the driven Brillouin scattering process resulting from the beating of the pump and seed fields together. We find that collisions, including the effects of Landau damping, allow for a more efficient transfer of energy between the laser beams, and a significant reduction in the amount of seed pre-pulse produced.

  6. Effects of transverse electron beam size on transition radiation angular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadroni, E.; Castellano, M.; Cianchi, A.; Honkavaara, K.; Kube, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we consider the effect of the transverse electron beam size on the Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) angular distribution in case of both incoherent and coherent emission. Our results confute the theoretical argumentations presented first in Optics Communications 211, 109 (2002), which predicts a dependence of the incoherent OTR angular distribution on the beam size and emission wavelength. We present here theoretical and experimental data not only to validate the well-established Ginzburg-Frank theory, but also to show the impact of the transverse beam size in case of coherent emission.

  7. Effects of beam wander on free-space optical communications through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2010-04-01

    Effects of beam wander on uncoded bit-error-rate (BER) of direct-detection OOK modulated FSO communication systems using collimated and focused Gaussian beams are studied. Channel fading statistics are obtained from large-scale wave optics simulations and compared with the closed-form log-normal and gamma-gamma models. The avalanche photodiode (APD) is chosen for photodetection. The accurate McIntyre-Conradi APD model is adopted for performance evaluation. Results show that large performance gain (more than 15dB) can be achieved with fast-tracked focused beams. The upper bound of higher-order adaptive optics gain beyond tracking gain is also studied.

  8. Cost-Effective Red Water Disposal by Electron Beam Radiolysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-28

    reation and result in water and carbon dioxide as represented by the following chemical reaction I C 7 H 80 3 +15H 20 2 - 7C02 + 4H 20 +15H 20 (3) I In...irradiating the red water with an electron beam, sodium sulfonate of 2,4,5 TNT can be reduced to NaHSO 4, NO2, water and carbon dioxide . The chemical ...be efficiently and completely oxidized to produce carbon dioxide , hydrogen and water. The concentration of organic contaminants in process water varies

  9. Effects of electron beam irradiation of cellulose acetate cigarette filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czayka, M.; Fisch, M.

    2012-07-01

    A method to reduce the molecular weight of cellulose acetate used in cigarette filters by using electron beam irradiation is demonstrated. Radiation levels easily obtained with commercially available electron accelerators result in a decrease in average molecular weight of about six-times with no embrittlement, or significant change in the elastic behavior of the filter. Since a first step in the biodegradation of cigarette filters is reduction in the filter material's molecular weight this invention has the potential to allow the production of significantly faster degrading filters.

  10. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  11. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial and Ascaris ova loads and volatile organic compounds in municipal sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engohang-Ndong, Jean; Uribe, R. M.; Gregory, Roger; Gangoda, Mahinda; Nickelsen, Mike G.; Loar, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Wastewater treatment plants produce large amounts of biosolids that can be utilized for land applications. However, prior to their use, these biosolids must be treated to eliminate risks of infections and to reduce upsetting odors. In this study, microbiological and chemical analyzes were performed before and after treatment of sewage sludge with 3 MeV of an electron beam accelerator in a pilot processing plant. Thus, we determined that dose 4.5 kGy was required to reduce fecal coliform counts to safe levels for land applications of sludge while, 14.5 kGy was necessary to decrease Ascaris ova counts to safe levels. Furthermore, at low doses, electron beam irradiation showed little effect on the concentrations of volatile organic compounds, while some increase were recorded at high doses. The concentration of dimethyl sulfide was reduced by 50-70% at irradiation doses of 25.7 kGy and 30.7 kGy respectively. By contrast, electron beam irradiation increased dimethyl disulfide concentrations. We also showed that electron beam treatment was less energy-consuming with shorter processing times than conventional techniques used to decontaminate sludge. Hence opening new avenues for large urban agglomerations to save money and time when treating biosolids for land application.

  12. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tribological and physico-chemical properties of Polyoxymethylene copolymer (POM-C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Shahinur; Shaislamov, Ulugbek; Yang, Jong-Keun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Young Hun; Choi, Sooseok; Lee, Heon-Ju

    2016-11-01

    Polyoxymethylene copolymer (POM-C) is an attractive and widely used engineering thermoplastic across many industrial sectors owing to outstanding physical, mechanical, self-lubricating and chemical properties. In this research work, the POM-C blocks were irradiated with 1 MeV electron beam energy in five doses (100, 200, 300, 500 and 700 kGy) in vacuum condition at room temperature. The tribological and physico-chemical properties of electron beam irradiated POM-C blocks have been analyzed using pin on disk tribometer, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR-ATR, gel content analysis, SEM-EDS (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy), surface profiler and contact angle analyzer. Electron beam irradiation at a dose of 100 kGy resulted in decrease of the friction coefficient of POM-C block due to well suited carbonization, cross-linking, free radicals formation and partial physical modification. It also showed the lowest surface roughness and highest water contact angle among all unirradiated and irradiated POM-C blocks. The irradiation dose at 200 kGy resulted in increase of friction coefficient due to less effective cross-linking, but the irradiation doses at 300, 500 and 700 kGy resulted in increase of the friction coefficient as compared to unirradiated POM-C block due to severe chain scission, chemical and physical structural degradation. The degree of improvement for tribological attribute relies on the electron beam surface dose delivered (energy and dose rate).

  13. Polarization beam combination technique for gain saturation effect compensation in high-energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junchi; Peng, Yujie; Su, Hongpeng; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-06-01

    To compensate for the gain saturation effect in the high-energy laser amplifier, a modified polarization beam combination (PBC) method is introduced to reshape temporal waveform of the injected laser pulse to obtain a controlled high-energy laser pulse shape after amplification. One linearly polarized beam is divided into two orthogonal polarized beams, which spatially recombine together collinearly after propagating different optical paths with relative time delay in PBC structure. The obtained beam with polarization direction being rotated by the following half wave plate is divided and combined again to reform a new beam in another modified polarization beam structure. The reformed beam is injected into three cascaded laser amplifiers. The amplified pulse shape can be controlled by the incident pulse shape and amplifier gain, which is agreeable to the simulation by the Frank-Nodvik equations. Based on the simple method, the various temporal waveform of output pulse with tunable 7 to 20 ns pulse duration can be obtained without interferometric fringes.

  14. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Polarization Effects on Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Beamlet spot images are used to diagnose cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) during OMEGA direct-drive implosions. The spots are, in essence, the end point of beamlets of light originating from different regions of each beam profile and following paths determined by refraction. The intensity of each spot varies because of absorption and CBET along that path. When each beam is linearly polarized, the image is asymmetric in terms of spot intensities. A 3-D CBET postprocessor for hydrodynamics codes is used to model the intensity, wavelength, and polarization of light from each beam. Rotation of polarization caused by CBET is tracked. The model is benchmarked using a 3-D wave-based solver for simplified CBET geometries. For linearly polarized beams in OMEGA implosions, the model predicts that polarization effects will result in asymmetric polarization and unabsorbed light profiles that are different for each beam. An asymmetric beamlet spot image similar to that recorded is predicted by the CBET model for linearly polarized beams. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  15. Characterization and correction of cupping effect artefacts in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, AK; McDavid, WD

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and correct the cupping effect artefact that occurs owing to the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation during image acquisition in cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods A uniform aluminium cylinder (6061) was used to demonstrate the cupping effect artefact on the Planmeca Promax 3D CBCT unit (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). The cupping effect was studied using a line profile plot of the grey level values using ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). A hardware-based correction method using copper pre-filtration was used to address this artefact caused by beam hardening and a software-based subtraction algorithm was used to address scatter contamination. Results The hardware-based correction used to address the effects of beam hardening suppressed the cupping effect artefact but did not eliminate it. The software-based correction used to address the effects of scatter resulted in elimination of the cupping effect artefact. Conclusion Compensating for the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation improves grey level uniformity in CBCT. PMID:22378754

  16. Thermal effect on the dynamic response of axially functionally graded beam subjected to a moving harmonic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuewu; Wu, Dafang

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic response of an axially functionally graded (AFG) beam under thermal environment subjected to a moving harmonic load is investigated within the frameworks of classical beam theory (CBT) and Timoshenko beam theory (TBT). The Lagrange method is employed to derive the equations of thermal buckling for AFG beam, and then with the critical buckling temperature as a parameter the Newmark-β method is adopted to evaluate the dynamic response of AFG beam under thermal environments. Admissible functions denoting transverse displacement are expressed in simple algebraic polynomial forms. Temperature-dependency of material constituent is considered. The rule of mixture (Voigt model) and Mori-Tanaka (MT) scheme are used to evaluate the beam's effective material properties. A ceramic-metal AFG beam with immovable boundary condition is considered as numerical illustration to show the thermal effects on the dynamic behaviors of the beam subjected to a moving harmonic load.

  17. Nonlinear hybrid simulation of internal kink with beam ion effects in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Fu, G. Y.; Tobias, Benjamin; Van Zeeland, Michael; Wang, Feng; Sheng, Zheng-Mao

    2015-04-01

    In DIII-D sawteething plasmas, long-lived (1,1) kink modes are often observed between sawtooth crashes. The saturated kink modes have two distinct frequencies. The mode with higher frequency transits to a fishbone-like mode with sufficient on-axis neutral beam power. In this work, hybrid simulations with the global kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K have been carried out to investigate the linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the n = 1 mode with effects of energetic beam ions for a typical DIII-D discharge where both saturated kink mode and fishbone were observed. Linear simulation results show that the n = 1 internal kink mode is unstable in MHD limit. However, with kinetic effects of beam ions, a fishbone-like mode is excited with mode frequency about a few kHz depending on beam pressure profile. The mode frequency is higher at higher beam power and/or narrower radial profile consistent with the experimental observation. Nonlinear simulations have been performed to investigate mode saturation as well as energetic particle transport. The nonlinear MHD simulations show that the unstable kink mode becomes a saturated kink mode after a sawtooth crash. With beam ion effects, the fishbone-like mode can also transit to a saturated kink mode with a small but finite mode frequency. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of saturated kink mode between sawtooth crashes.

  18. Nonlinear hybrid simulation of internal kink with beam ion effects in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Tobias, Benjamin; Zeeland, Michael Van; Wang, Feng

    2015-04-15

    In DIII-D sawteething plasmas, long-lived (1,1) kink modes are often observed between sawtooth crashes. The saturated kink modes have two distinct frequencies. The mode with higher frequency transits to a fishbone-like mode with sufficient on-axis neutral beam power. In this work, hybrid simulations with the global kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K have been carried out to investigate the linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the n = 1 mode with effects of energetic beam ions for a typical DIII-D discharge where both saturated kink mode and fishbone were observed. Linear simulation results show that the n = 1 internal kink mode is unstable in MHD limit. However, with kinetic effects of beam ions, a fishbone-like mode is excited with mode frequency about a few kHz depending on beam pressure profile. The mode frequency is higher at higher beam power and/or narrower radial profile consistent with the experimental observation. Nonlinear simulations have been performed to investigate mode saturation as well as energetic particle transport. The nonlinear MHD simulations show that the unstable kink mode becomes a saturated kink mode after a sawtooth crash. With beam ion effects, the fishbone-like mode can also transit to a saturated kink mode with a small but finite mode frequency. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of saturated kink mode between sawtooth crashes.

  19. Enhanced Acoustic Black Hole effect in beams with a modified thickness profile and extended platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of Acoustics Black Hole (ABH) benefits from the bending wave propagating properties inside a thin-walled structure with power-law thickness variation to achieve zero reflection when the structural thickness approaches zero in the ideal scenario. However, manufacturing an ideally tailored power-law profile of a structure with embedded ABH feature can hardly be achieved in practice. Past research showed that the inevitable truncation at the wedge tip of the structure can significantly weaken the expected ABH effect by creating wave reflections. On the premise of the minimum achievable truncation thickness by the current manufacturing technology, exploring ways to ensure and achieve better ABH effect becomes important. In this paper, we investigate this issue by using a previously developed wavelet-decomposed semi-analytical model on an Euler-Bernoulli beam with a modified power-law profile and an extended platform of constant thickness. Through comparisons with the conventional ABH profile in terms of system loss factor and energy distribution, numerical results show that the modified thickness profile brings about a systematic increase in the ABH effect at mid-to-high frequencies, especially when the truncation thickness is small and the profile parameter m is large. The use of an extended platform further increases the ABH effect to broader the frequency band whilst providing rooms for catering particular low frequency applications.

  20. Increasing the spectral coverage of interferometric integrated optics: K/L and N-laser-written beam combiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Jan; Diener, Romina; Labadie, Lucas; Minardi, Stefano; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Nolte, Stefan; Arriola, Alexander; Madden, Gillian; Choudhury, Debaditya; MacPherson, William N.; Thomson, Robert R.

    2016-08-01

    Integrated optics (IO) has proven to be a competitive solution for beam combination in the context of astronomical interferometry (e.g. GRAVITY at the VLTI). However, conventional silica-based lithographic IO is limited to wavelengths shorter than 2.2μm. We report in this paper the progress on our attempt to extend the operation of IO to longer wavelengths. Previous work has demonstrated the suitability of chalcogenide devices in the MID-IR in the N band and monochromatically at 3.39 μm. Here, we continue this effort with the manufacturing of new laser written GLS IO as beam combiners designed for the astronomical L band and characterized interferometrically at 3.39 μm. In the era of multi-telescope interferometers, we present a promising solution to strengthen the potential of IO for new wavelength ranges.

  1. Three dimensional approach to investigating biological effects along energetic ion beam pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinglin; Sun, Shuguang; Wang, Shanying; Li, Wenjian; Qu, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Sun, Tianren; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jufang; Zhou, Guangming; Man, Shuli; Chen, Yi; Lu, Fuping; Wei, Zengquan; Jin, Genming

    2017-03-01

    Heavy ion beams have many exciting applications, including radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors and simulation tests of space irradiation for astronauts. These beams often use a feature that concentrates the energy deposition largely along the end of the energy pathway, leading to different distributions of biological effects along the axial direction. Currently, there is relatively little information regarding the radial directional difference of biological effects along the heavy ion paths. This study utilized a filter membrane that was quantatively applied with cells to demonstrate a 3D distribution model of irradiation on biological effects in living organisms. Some results have indicated that there is excitatory effect on the non-irradiated regions with energetic ions, which may give new insights into the distribution of biological effects along the paths of heavy ion beams with mid-high energy.

  2. Three dimensional approach to investigating biological effects along energetic ion beam pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinglin; Sun, Shuguang; Wang, Shanying; Li, Wenjian; Qu, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Sun, Tianren; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jufang; Zhou, Guangming; Man, Shuli; Chen, Yi; Lu, Fuping; Wei, Zengquan; Jin, Genming

    2017-01-01

    Heavy ion beams have many exciting applications, including radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors and simulation tests of space irradiation for astronauts. These beams often use a feature that concentrates the energy deposition largely along the end of the energy pathway, leading to different distributions of biological effects along the axial direction. Currently, there is relatively little information regarding the radial directional difference of biological effects along the heavy ion paths. This study utilized a filter membrane that was quantatively applied with cells to demonstrate a 3D distribution model of irradiation on biological effects in living organisms. Some results have indicated that there is excitatory effect on the non-irradiated regions with energetic ions, which may give new insights into the distribution of biological effects along the paths of heavy ion beams with mid-high energy. PMID:28294181

  3. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J; Morin, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry.

  4. How increasing CO2 leads to an increased negative greenhouse effect in Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmithüsen, Holger; Notholt, Justus; König-Langlo, Gert; Lemke, Peter; Jung, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    CO2 is the strongest anthropogenic forcing agent for climate change since preindustrial times. Like other greenhouse gases, CO2 absorbs terrestrial surface radiation and causes emission from the atmosphere to space. As the surface is generally warmer than the atmosphere, the total long-wave emission to space is commonly less than the surface emission. However, this does not hold true for the high elevated areas of central Antarctica. For this region, the emission to space is higher than the surface emission; and the greenhouse effect of CO2 is around zero or even negative, which has not been discussed so far. We investigated this in detail and show that for central Antarctica an increase in CO2 concentration leads to an increased long-wave energy loss to space, which cools the Earth-atmosphere system. These findings for central Antarctica are in contrast to the general warming effect of increasing CO2.

  5. Effectiveness of rf phase modulation for increasing bunch length in electron storage rings

    PubMed

    Orsini; Mosnier

    2000-04-01

    Aiming at increasing the apparent bunch length and hence the beam lifetime in electron storage rings, rf phase modulation near one parametric resonance has been experimentally investigated. Since the possible benefit of this technique depends greatly on the ring parameters, we studied the effect of such a modulation for different rf parameters on the longitudinal emittance. Theoretical predictions and results of simulations are compared and discussed. It is shown that synchrotron radiation tends to spoil the parametric resonance. In particular, a criterion for island survival has been found.

  6. The Irradiation Effect of a Simultaneous Laser and Electron Dual-beam on Void Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhanbing; Watanabe, Seiichi; Kato, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Randomly distributed lattice point defects such as supersaturated vacancies (SVs) and Frenkel-pairs (FPs, an interstitial and a vacancy) can be simultaneously introduced into the crystal by energetic beam irradiation in outer space and/or nuclear reactors, but their behavior has not been fully understood. Using a high-voltage electron microscope equipped with a laser (laser-HVEM), we show the striking effects of simultaneous laser-electron (photon-electron) dual-beam irradiation on void formation. Our results reveal that during laser-electron sequential irradiation, pre-laser irradiation enhanced void nucleation and subsequent electron irradiation enhanced void growth. However, the laser-electron dual-beam irradiation was analyzed to depress void swelling remarkably because the recombination of SVs and interstitials was enhanced. The results provide insight into the mechanism underlying the dual-beam radiation-induced depression of void swelling in solids. PMID:23383371

  7. Studies of the effects of electron cloud formation on beam dynamics at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, J. A.; Calvey, J. R.; Dugan, G.; Livezey, J. A.; Kreinick, D.L.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D. L.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R. L.; Ohmi, K.; Furman, M. A.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) has commenced operation as a linear collider damping ring test bed following its conversion from an e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider in 2008. A core component of the research program is the measurement of effects of synchrotron-radiation-induced electron cloud formation on beam dynamics. We have studied the interaction of the beam with the cloud with measurements of coherent tune shifts and emittance growth in various bunch train configurations, bunch currents, beam energies, and bunch lengths, for both e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams. This paper compares a subset of these measurements to modeling results from the two-dimensional cloud simulation packages ECLOUD and POSINST. These codes each model most of the tune shift measurements with remarkable accuracy, while some comparisons merit further investigation.

  8. Electron beam radiation effects on UHMWPE: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Brunella, Valentina; Paganini, Maria Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique has been employed to detect and characterise a series of different radical species generated in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) via electron beam irradiation. Three different radical species have been found and assigned on the basis of their EPR spectra and of the related computer simulations. A secondary alkyl species, the prevalent one, is present immediately after irradiation, an allyl species appears only 24 h after irradiation when the alkyl species disappears.The third species, clearly visible at high microwave power only, has been observed for the first time and assigned to a tertiary alkyl carbon radical, whose formation is strictly connected with a Y-shape crosslink and a migration of the unpaired electron on a carbon atom localised in an adjacent position.

  9. Effect of Growth Pause on Indium Gallium Phosphorus/gallium Arsenic Heterointerfaces during Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyong Yong

    Molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of InGaP/GaAs quantum-well structures requires switching of the arsenic and phosphorus beams at each heterointerface. Using in -situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, double crystal X-ray (DCXR) diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, the effects of a growth pause on the interfacial structure and composition of lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs multiple quantum well structures were studied. For the purpose of this study growth pause at each interface was divided into two time periods: the interval (denoted by t_1) after stopping growth by closing the group-III shutters but before switching the group-V beams, and the interval (t_2) after switching the group-V beams but before recommencing growth. The effect of the As_2 beam on the GaAs growth front and the P_2 beam on the InGaP growth front was first studied. An atomically smooth GaAs surface was obtained with about 30 sec of pause in an As_2 beam. With the experimental methods used, the InGaP growth front did not show any major structural changes with increasing growth pause time. The GaAs-to-InGaP interface is found to be composed of one to two monolayers of GaAs_ {y}P_{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05) and the InGaP-to-GaAs interface is composed of one to two monolayers of In_{.5}Ga_ {.5}As_{y}P _{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05). This requires an exchange of As and P in the uppermost group-V atoms. The effect of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and an P_2 beam on the GaAs surface was next studied. For t _2 < 20 sec, atomically flat heterointerfaces were obtained and both the GaAs-to-InGaP and the InGaP -to-GaAs interfaces were found to be composed of group-V exchange strained layers. For t_2 >=q 60 sec a wavy interface was obtained. The irregularities of the interface may be the result of the As and P exchange mechanism. The experimental results show that a combination of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and a P_2 beam on the GaAs surface lasting 2 min produces rougher growth fronts

  10. The Boersch effect in a picosecond pulsed electron beam emitted from a semiconductor photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Makoto; Nambo, Yoshito; Aoki, Kota; Sameshima, Kensuke; Jin, Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Asano, Hidefumi; Saitoh, Koh; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2016-07-01

    The space charge effect has been clearly observed in the energy distributions of picosecond pulse beams from a spin-polarized electron microscope, and was found to depend upon the quantity of charge per pulse. The non-linear phenomena associated with this effect have also been replicated in beam simulations that take into account of a three-dimensional space charge. The results show that a charge of 500 aC/pulse provides the highest brightness with a 16-ps pulse duration, a 30-keV beam energy, and an emission spot of 1.8 μm. Furthermore, the degeneracy of the wave packet of the pulsed electron beam has been evaluated to be 1.6 × 10-5 with a charge of 100 aC/pulse, which is higher than that for a continuously emitted electron beam despite the low beam energy of 30 keV. The high degeneracy and high brightness contribute to the realization of high temporal and energy resolutions in low-voltage electron microscopy, which will serve to reduce radiolysis damage and enhance scattering contrast.

  11. Electron cloud effects on an intense ion beam in a four solenoid lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley,; 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA-94720, USA.; University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3511, USA.; Lawrence Liveremore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA.; Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA.; Coleman, Josh; Coleman, J.E.; Seidl, P.A.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Vay, J.L.; Haber, I.; Molvik, A.W.; Sharp, W.M.; Welch, D.R.

    2007-07-01

    The Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at LBNL successfully demonstrated the transport of a space-charge dominated ion beam in a two-solenoid lattice. Initial experiments showed a strong dependence of electron cloud effects on solenoid field strength. A current-reducing aperture, two solenoids and in-bore diagnostics were added to the two-solenoid lattice in order to study electron cloud effects more closely. Experiments were conducted with a 10 {micro}s, singly charged potassium ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV and currents of 26 mA and 45 mA. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including a comparison of the effects of manipulating electrons on the beam dynamics, quantifying beam-induced gas desorption, ionization, and electron effects.

  12. Comparative effects of gamma rays and electron beams on spores of Bacillus pumilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko ); Takizawa, Hironobu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Takama, Kozo )

    1994-02-01

    The effects of [gamma] rays and electron beams on the germination, outgrowth and the synthesis of protein and RNA of Bacillus pumilus spores were investigated to clarify the difference in the effects of the two types of radiations on bacterial spores. Gamma irradiation facilitated the germination to a slightly larger degree than electron irradiation. The outgrowth, growth and the synthesis of protein and RNA were inhibited by [gamma] irradiation to a greater extent than electron irradiation, when the spores were irradiated at the same dose. However, the effects of the two types of radiations were the same when the spores were irradiated with electron beams at a dose 30% higher than [gamma] rays. The results indicate that the effects of electron beams on bacterial spores and those of [gamma] rays are qualitatively the same but quantitatively different. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  13. The effect of the iBEAM Evo carbon fiber tabletop on skin sparing.

    PubMed

    Simpson, John B; Godwin, Guy A

    2011-01-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  14. Effects of focused ion beam milling on austenite stability in ferrous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knipling, K.E.; Rowenhorst, D.J.; Fonda, R.W.; Spanos, G.

    2010-01-15

    The susceptibility of fcc austenite to transform to bcc during focused ion beam milling was studied in three commercial stainless steels. The alloys investigated, in order of increasing austenite stability, were: (i) a model maraging steel, Sandvik 1RK91; (ii) an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel; and (iii) AL-6XN, a super-austenitic stainless steel. Small trenches were milled across multiple austenite grains in each alloy using a 30 kV Ga{sup +} ion beam at normal incidence to the specimen surface. The ion beam dose was controlled by varying the trench depth and the beam current. The factors influencing the transformation of fcc austenite to bcc (listed in order of decreasing influence) were found to be: (i) alloy composition (i.e., austenite stability), (ii) ion beam dose (or trench depth), and (iii) crystallographic orientation of the austenite grains. The ion beam current had a negligible influence on the FIB-induced transformation of austenite in these alloys.

  15. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  16. Optimization of a ribbon diode with magnetic insulation for increasing the current density in a high-current relativistic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrelin, V. T.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.; Sinitskii, S. L.; Stepanov, V. D.

    2009-05-01

    The geometry of the ribbon diode of the U-2 accelerator is optimized to increase both the current density and the total current of the relativistic electron beam for its subsequent injection into the plasma of a multimirror GOL-3 trap. Beam simulation in the diode was performed using the POISSON-2 applied software modified on the basis of the results obtained using the theory of a planar diode in an inclined magnetic field. As a result of the optimization, the diode geometry and the magnetic field configuration were found that should provide a factor of 1.5-2 increase in the current density in experiments with a small angular divergence of electron velocities.

  17. External beam irradiation in angioplasted arteries of hypercholesterolemic rabbits The dose and time effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kalef-Ezra, J.; Michalis, L.K.; Malamou-Mitsi, V.; Tsekeris, P.; Katsouras, C.; Boziari, A.; Toumpoulis, I.; Bozios, G.; Charchanti, A.; Sideris, D.A

    2002-03-01

    Purpose: To study the dose and time effect of external beam irradiation on the morphometry of both angioplasted and nonangioplasted arteries in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model. Methods and materials: Eight groups of rabbit femoral arteries were studied: arteries (a) with no intervention, (b) irradiated with a 12-Gy 6 MV X-ray dose, (c) with a 18-Gy, (d) treated with balloon angioplasty, (e) dosed with 12-Gy half an hour post-angioplasty, (f) dosed with 18-Gy half an hour post-angioplasty, (g) dosed with 12-Gy 48 h post angioplasty, (g) dosed with 18-Gy 48 h post angioplasty. Results: External irradiation at either 12 or 18 Gy was not found to change vessel morphometry in noninjured arteries. The 12-Gy dose given soon after angioplasty further increased percentage stenosis (63% on the average), despite the preservation of the lumen cross-sectional area. Positive remodeling was not observed in arteries given 18-Gy half an hour post angioplasty to counterbalance the increased neointimal formation. Therefore, this treatment resulted in a drastic reduction in lumen area and in enhancement of percentage stenosis (84% on the average). On the contrary, the delayed irradiation of the angioplasted arteries at either 12 or 18 Gy was not found to influence any of the studied morphometric parameters 5 weeks after angioplasty. Conclusions: Uniform external beam irradiation up to 18 Gy was well tolerated by intact femoral arteries. Prompt 12- or 18-Gy irradiations accentuated percentage stenosis. However the lumen cross-sectional area was preserved only at the lower dose point. Delayed irradiation at any dose did not influence the restenosis process.

  18. Effect of electron beam irradiation on developmental stages of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junheon; Chung, Soon-Oh; Jang, Sin Ae; Jang, Miyeon; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2015-07-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an economically important and polyphagous pest, which harms various kinds of food crops and important agricultural plants, such as cotton and paprika. Effects of electron beam irradiation at six dose levels between 50 and 350 Gy on the egg (24-48 h old), the larval (4-5th instar), and the pupal (7-d old for female, 5-d old for male) development, and on the adult (1-d old) reproduction were tested to identify a potential quarantine treatment dose. Increased doses of irradiation on eggs decreased egg hatchability, pupation and adult emergence and increased larval period. ED99 values for inhibition of hatching, pupation and emergence were 460.6, 236.9 and 197.8 Gy, respectively. When larvae were irradiated with more than 280 Gy, no larvae could develop into pupae. ED99 values for inhibition of pupation and adult emergence were 265.6 and 189.6 Gy, respectively. Even though the irradiation on pupa did not completely inhibit adult emergence, most of the pupae emerged to deformed adults. When adults were irradiated, fecundity was not affected. However, F1 egg hatching was completely inhibited at the dose of 350 Gy. ED99 value for inhibition of adult emergence was estimated at 366.5 Gy. Our results suggest that electron beam irradiation could be recommendable as an alternative to MB and as a phytosanitary treatment for quarantine. A treatment dose of less than or equal to 220 Gy is suggested as a potential quarantine treatment to H. armigera egg for prevention of pupation and to larva for prevention of adult emerge.

  19. The optimization of incident angles of low-energy oxygen ion beams for increasing sputtering rate on silicon samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, N.; Takahashi, M.; Tomita, M.

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine an appropriate incident angle of low-energy (350-eV) oxygen ion beam for achieving the highest sputtering rate without degradation of depth resolution in SIMS analysis, a delta-doped sample was analyzed with incident angles from 0° to 60° without oxygen bleeding. As a result, 45° incidence was found to be the best analytical condition, and it was confirmed that surface roughness did not occur on the sputtered surface at 100-nm depth by using AFM. By applying the optimized incident angle, sputtering rate becomes more than twice as high as that of the normal incident condition.

  20. Effects of polarization and coherence on the propagation and the detection of stochastic electromagnetic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed

    Most of the physically realizable optical sources are radiating in a random manner given the random nature of the radiation of a large number of atoms that constitute the source. Besides, a lot of natural and synthetic materials are fluctuating randomly. Hence, the optical fields that one encounters, in most of the applications are fluctuating and must be treated using random or stochastic functions. Within the framework of the scalar-coherence theory, one can describe changes of the properties of any stochastic field such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence on propagation in any linear medium, deterministic or random. One of the frequently encountered random media is the atmospheric turbulence, where the fluctuating refractive index of such medium severely degrades any signal propagating through it; especially it causes intensity fades of the signal. The usage of stochastic beams at the transmitter instead of deterministic ones has been suggested sometime ago to suppress the severe effects of intensity fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence. In this dissertation, we study the usage of partially coherent beams in long path propagation schemes through turbulent atmosphere such as one frequently encounters in remote sensing, in the use of communication systems, and in guiding. Also the used detection scheme at the receiver is important to quantify the received signal efficiently, hence we compare the performance of incoherent (direct) detection versus coherent (heterodyne) detection upon the use of either one of them at the receiver of the communication system of beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere and namely we evaluate the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) for each case. The scalar-coherence theory ignored the vector nature of stochastic fields, which should be taken into account for some applications such as the ones that depend on the change of the polarization of the field. Recently generalization for the scalar

  1. The Effect of Tuition Increases on Business Student Decisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godek, John; Murray, Kyle B.; Karns, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Tuition increases have become all too common as states have cut spending to public institutions and private schools face declining enrollments. As such, understanding the effects of various methods of framing tuition increases is an important, but infrequently researched topic. The authors examine different ways to frame tuition increases…

  2. Effects of beam steering in pulsed-wave ultrasound velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Aaron H; Yu, Alfred C H; Johnston, K Wayne; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2005-08-01

    Experimental and computer simulation methods have been used to investigate the significance of beam steering as a potential source of error in pulsed-wave flow velocity estimation. By simulating a typical linear-array transducer system as used for spectral flow estimation, it is shown that beam steering can cause an angle offset resulting in a change in the effective beam-flow angle. This offset primarily depends on the F-number and the nominal steering angle. For example, at an F-number of 3 and a beam-flow angle of 70 degrees , the velocity error changed from -5% to + 5% when the steering angle changed from -20 degrees to + 20 degrees . Much higher errors can occur at higher beam-flow angles, with smaller F-numbers and greater steering. Our experimental study used a clinical ultrasound system, a tissue-mimicking phantom and a pulsatile waveform to determine peak flow velocity errors for various steering and beam-flow angles. These errors were found to be consistent with our simulation results.

  3. Studies on transmitted beam modulation effect from laser induced damage on fused silica optics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Ma, Ping; Li, Haibo; Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin

    2013-07-15

    UV laser induced damage (LID) on exit surface of fused silica could cause modulation effect to transmitted beam and further influence downstream propagation properties. This paper presents our experimental and analytical studies on this topic. In experiment, a series of measurement instruments are applied, including beam profiler, interferometer, microscope, and optical coherent tomography (OCT). Creating and characterizing of LID on fused silica sample have been implemented. Morphological features are studied based on their particular modulation effects on transmitted beam. In theoretical investigation, analytical modeling and numerical simulation are performed. Modulation effects from amplitude, phase, and size factors are analyzed respectively. Furthermore, we have novelly designed a simplified polygon model to simulate actual damage site with multiform modulation features, and the simulation results demonstrate that the modeling is usable and representative.

  4. Geometrical optics of beams with vortices: Berry phase and orbital angular momentum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  5. Geometrical Optics of Beams with Vortices: Berry Phase and Orbital Angular Momentum Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  6. Beam wander of partially coherent array beams through non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongping; Zeng, Anping; Gao, Zenghui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-04-15

    Based on the theory of second moments and non-Kolmogorov spectrum, the beam wander theory is extend to non-Kolmogorov turbulence, the general analytical expression of beam wander in non-Kolmogorov turbulence is derived. Beam wander depends on the non-Kolmogorov turbulence parameters and the initial second moments of the laser beam at the input plane. Taking the Gaussian Schell model array beams as an example, the effects of the generalized exponent parameter, inner scale, and outer scale of non-Kolmogorov turbulence and the beam separation distance, beam number, and coherence degree on the beam wander are studied in detail. It has been shown that the beam wander varies non-monotonically with increasing generalized exponent parameter of the turbulence. Furthermore, it increases as the inner scale decreases or outer scale increases, and decreases as the beam separation distance and beam number increase and the coherence of the beam becomes weaker. Our results also indicate that the beam wander could be reduced by adjusting the beam parameters appropriately.

  7. Kinetic Effects in Multiple Intra-Beam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkevich, P.; Bolshakov, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2005-06-08

    The analysis of the evolution in phase space induced by multiple intra-beam scattering (IBS) requires the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) or of similar kinetic equations. The FPE is formulated in coordinate-momentum space (6 variables). Using the 'semi-Gaussian model' this equation is reduced to the longitudinal FPE that depends on longitudinal momentum and coordinate; drift and diffusion coefficients in this equation are presented as integrals on distribution function with kernels expressed in analytical form. The number of variables in the FPE can be reduced to three by reformulation in the space of invariants. The invariant-vector has the following components: a longitudinal energy (for the longitudinal degree of freedom) and the Courant-Snyder invariants (for the transverse motion). The coefficients of the FPE in invariant space are in the form of integrals over the distribution function and the invariants with the kernel in the form of many-dimensional integrals over the longitudinal variable and over the oscillation phases. The three-dimensional FPE can be solved numerically by application of macro-particle codes using the different methods: 1) Langevin method; 2) binary collision map. The last method is used in the code 'MOCAC' (MOnte CArlo Code) for IBS simulation. Examples of code validation and application are discussed.

  8. Return current effects in passive plasma lenses for relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govil, Richa

    This thesis presents results of an experimental study of return currents effects on beam focusing in plasma lenses conducted at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Relativistic electron beams can be focused in field-free plasmas due to magnetic self-pinching. However, plasma return currents induced by the changing magnetic flux of a propagating bunch can reduce the total magnetic field and focusing force (Ampere's law). The experiment covered a parameter regime not observed previously, namely, the return current regime, where the collisionless plasma skindepth is small compared to the electron beam size and the focusing strength of the plasma lens is reduced due to return currents. A relativistic electron beam from the BTF, which utilizes the Advanced Light Source (ALS) injector, was used to study the properties of return currents in plasmas. The beam-transport line and experimental chamber were designed to allow measurement of electron beam size continuously along its path, before and after it passed through plasma lenses. For this purpose, an optical transition radiation (OTR) based diagnostic was developed. To ensure plasmas free of external fields, laser- ionization was chosen as the plasma production method. The dependence of plasma density on fill pressure and laser intensity was studied with an in-quadrature Mach- Zehnder radio frequency interferometer. A novel interferometry technique based on evanescent wave detection was developed to measure plasma densities above the cutoff density, for plasmas with a thickness less than the collisionless skin depth. Plasma density was controlled by changing the fill-pressure in the chamber, while the plasma profile was adjusted through the laser intensity. For typical experimental parameters, the electron beam size was observed to reduce in the presence of plasma. Plasma lenses were produced in the return current regime with the ratio of beam size to collisionless plasma

  9. Interaction of the focused laser beam with the grooved surface of optical disk: Evanescent coupling and vector diffraction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Hung

    1999-10-01

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to present a clear physical picture and useful insights of polarization effects in the diffraction of focused beams by grooved, multilayer-coated disks. The reading process of optical disk systems significantly relies on the reaction of the incident focused beam to the disk structure, may it be the groove profile or coating materials. The resulting complex-amplitude from diffraction is the main source for the readout signal. In the presence of the periodic pattern and the focused beam, however, different polarization states usually result in different complex-amplitudes. A good understanding of polarization effects in grooved multilayer disks is thus required for the optimum design of optical data storage systems. The pursuit of high-density recording inevitably drives the optical data storage industry to reduce the wavelength of light sources, decrease the track pitch of optical disks, and increase the numerical aperture of objective lenses. The track pitch and the size of the focused spot gradually approach the optical wavelength. Under these circumstances, the analysis of the interaction of focused beams with this type of high- frequency periodic disk using conventional scalar diffraction theory is no longer adequate. Only through vector diffraction study of polarization effects in the interaction of the focused beam with the periodic pattern can the characteristics of an optical disk system be fully understood and improved. Starting from the introduction of various polarization effects in optical disk systems and basic concepts of both scalar and vector diffraction theory, we then focus on the studies of diffraction patterns at the exit pupil of the objective lens and on the disk surface. Different behavior on the baseball pattern and in the effective groove depth is observed for the two polarization states. The use of the solid immersion lens to extensively increase the area density of optical disk systems prompts

  10. Increasing ‘ease of sliding’ also increases friction: when is a lubricant effective?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annunziata, M. A.; Baldassarri, A.; Dalton, F.; Petri, A.; Pontuale, G.

    2016-04-01

    We investigate experimentally the effective Coulomb friction exerted by a granular medium on a shearing plate, varying the medium depth. The plate is driven by a spring connected to a motor turning at a constant speed and, depending on the system configuration, performs continuous sliding or stick and slip in different proportions. We introduce an order parameter which discriminates between the different regimes expressing the fraction of time spent in slipping. At low driving speed, starting from zero layers of interstitial granular material, the average friction coefficient decreases when a few layers are added, while the order parameter stays close to zero. By further increasing the granular depth, the friction undergoes a sudden increase but the order parameter does not change notably. At an intermediate driving speed, however, both the friction and the order parameter undergo a sudden increase, which for the order parameter amounts to several orders of magnitude, indicating that the plate is more braked but nevertheless keeps sliding more easily. For medium-high driving speeds, full sliding is obtained for only one layer of interstitial matter, where friction has a minimum, and is maintained for all increasing depths while friction increases. These observations show that the ease of slipping is not determined by friction alone, rather by the highly complex interplay between driving velocity, friction, and the depth of the medium.

  11. Interaction of two neighboring laser beams taking into account the effects of plasma hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hueller, S.; Mounaix, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Pesme, D.

    1997-07-01

    The interaction between two neighboring laser beams focused in a hot underdense homogeneous plasma is investigated using the non-paraxial wave coupling code KOLIBRI [S. H{umlt u}ller {ital et al.}, Phys. Scr. {bold T63}, 151 (1996)] in two and three spatial dimensions. Both the plasma hydrodynamic evolution and the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) aspects are studied in the case of strongly damped ion sound waves. The hydrodynamic effects consist in ponderomotively driven density perturbations located between the beams which may, in turn, influence strongly the light propagation through the plasma. The two beams are found to merge whenever the distance between them is smaller than or of the order of their diameter. Concerning the SBS aspect, it is found that due to interference effects between the beams, the spatial amplification of the backscattered light is asymmetric with respect to the laser axis. SBS can also enforce the hydrodynamic effects and the beam merging. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Beam tail effect of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Ning; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Qin, Bin; Chen, Qu-Shan

    2013-12-01

    The beam tail effect of multi-bunches will influence the electron beam performance in a high intensity thermionic RF gun. Beam dynamic calculations that illustrate the working states of single beam tail and multi-pulse feed-in of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC (external cathode independent tunable cavity) RF gun for an FEL (free electron laser) injector are performed to estimate the extracted bunch properties. By using both Parmela and homemade MATLAB codes, the effects of a single beam tail as well as interactions of multi-pulses are analyzed, where a ring-based electron algorithm is adopted to calculated RF fields and the space-charge field. Furthermore, the procedure of unexpected deviated-energy particles mixed with an effective bunch head is described by the MATLAB code as well. As a result, the performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun is proved to have the capability to extract continual stable bunches suitable for a high requirement THz-FEL.

  13. A model for the beam-filling effect associated with the microwave retrieval of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Estimating rain rate from environmental microwave emissions is hampered by several difficulties. One of these difficulties is known as the beam-filling effect. Beam filling is the systematic error introduced when the microwave radiometer's field of view is not filled with uniform rain. Beam filling can have dramatic effects on rain-rate estimation, causing rain rates to be underestimated by as much as a factor of 2. The present study derives an approximate expression for beam filling that provides, in principle, a way to estimate this effect. In addition, this study deals only with single-channel microwave rain estimation over the ocean. The final results reveal that beam filling is essentially determined by the freezing level, the mean fraction of the footprint raining, and the footprint-averaged rain rate. Also, the numerical results appear to agree with other empirical studies. Furthermore, the analysis brings to light an interesting connection with rain threshold techniques for estimating area-averaged rain rates.

  14. Compensation of non-ideal beam splitter polarization distortion effect in Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yeng-Cheng; Lo, Yu-Lung; Liao, Chia-Chi

    2016-02-01

    A composite optical structure consisting of two quarter-wave plates and a single half-wave plate is proposed for compensating for the polarization distortion induced by a non-ideal beam splitter in a Michelson interferometer. In the proposed approach, the optimal orientations of the optical components within the polarization compensator are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) such that the beam splitter can be treated as a free-space medium and modeled using a unit Mueller matrix accordingly. Two implementations of the proposed polarization controller are presented. In the first case, the compensator is placed in the output arm of Michelson interferometer such that the state of polarization of the interfered output light is equal to that of the input light. However, in this configuration, the polarization effects induced by the beam splitter in the two arms of the interferometer structure cannot be separately addressed. Consequently, in the second case, compensator structures are placed in the Michelson interferometer for compensation on both the scanning and reference beams. The practical feasibility of the proposed approach is introduced by considering a Mueller polarization-sensitive (PS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) structure with three polarization controllers in the input, reference and sample arms, respectively. In general, the results presented in this study show that the proposed polarization controller provides an effective and experimentally-straightforward means of compensating for the polarization distortion effects induced by the non-ideal beam splitters in Michelson interferometers and Mueller PS-OCT structures.

  15. Reducing consistency in human realism increases the uncanny valley effect; increasing category uncertainty does not.

    PubMed

    MacDorman, Karl F; Chattopadhyay, Debaleena

    2016-01-01

    Human replicas may elicit unintended cold, eerie feelings in viewers, an effect known as the uncanny valley. Masahiro Mori, who proposed the effect in 1970, attributed it to inconsistencies in the replica's realism with some of its features perceived as human and others as nonhuman. This study aims to determine whether reducing realism consistency in visual features increases the uncanny valley effect. In three rounds of experiments, 548 participants categorized and rated humans, animals, and objects that varied from computer animated to real. Two sets of features were manipulated to reduce realism consistency. (For humans, the sets were eyes-eyelashes-mouth and skin-nose-eyebrows.) Reducing realism consistency caused humans and animals, but not objects, to appear eerier and colder. However, the predictions of a competing theory, proposed by Ernst Jentsch in 1906, were not supported: The most ambiguous representations-those eliciting the greatest category uncertainty-were neither the eeriest nor the coldest.

  16. Simulations of the effects of mobile ions on the relativistic beam-plasma instability for intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Lee, H.

    1983-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of the beam-plasma instability for intense relativistic electron beams in dense plasmas show rapid heating of the electrons to multi-kilovolt temperatures. The resulting hydrodynamic motion of the plasma results in density gradients that degrade the interaction. Heat flow out of the plasma is found in some instances to limit the gradient formation process.

  17. Selection for niche differentiation in plant communities increases biodiversity effects.

    PubMed

    Zuppinger-Dingley, Debra; Schmid, Bernhard; Petermann, Jana S; Yadav, Varuna; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Flynn, Dan F B

    2014-11-06

    In experimental plant communities, relationships between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning have been found to strengthen over time, a fact often attributed to increased resource complementarity between species in mixtures and negative plant-soil feedbacks in monocultures. Here we show that selection for niche differentiation between species can drive this increasing biodiversity effect. Growing 12 grassland species in test monocultures and mixtures, we found character displacement between species and increased biodiversity effects when plants had been selected over 8 years in species mixtures rather than in monocultures. When grown in mixtures, relative differences in height and specific leaf area between plant species selected in mixtures (mixture types) were greater than between species selected in monocultures (monoculture types). Furthermore, net biodiversity and complementarity effects were greater in mixtures of mixture types than in mixtures of monoculture types. Our study demonstrates a novel mechanism for the increase in biodiversity effects: selection for increased niche differentiation through character displacement. Selection in diverse mixtures may therefore increase species coexistence and ecosystem functioning in natural communities and may also allow increased mixture yields in agriculture or forestry. However, loss of biodiversity and prolonged selection of crops in monoculture may compromise this potential for selection in the longer term.

  18. Effect of axial load on mode shapes and frequencies of beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of axial load on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of uniform beams and of a cantilevered beam with a concentrated mass at the tip is presented. Characteristic equations which yield the frequencies and mode shape functions for the various cases are given. The solutions to these equations are presented by a series of graphs so that frequency as a function of axial load can readily be determined. The effect of axial load on the mode shapes are also depicted by another series of graphs.

  19. The effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model, for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with the increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  20. Effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Roberts, G. D.; Papadopoulos, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  1. Spatial mapping of the biologic effectiveness of scanned particle beams: towards biologically optimized particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fada; Bronk, Lawrence; Titt, Uwe; Lin, Steven H.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kerr, Matthew D.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dinh, Jeffrey; Sobieski, Mary; Stephan, Clifford; Peeler, Christopher R.; Taleei, Reza; Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of particles used in radiation therapy, such as protons, have been well characterized, and their dose distributions are superior to photon-based treatments. However, proton therapy may also have inherent biologic advantages that have not been capitalized on. Unlike photon beams, the linear energy transfer (LET) and hence biologic effectiveness of particle beams varies along the beam path. Selective placement of areas of high effectiveness could enhance tumor cell kill and simultaneously spare normal tissues. However, previous methods for mapping spatial variations in biologic effectiveness are time-consuming and often yield inconsistent results with large uncertainties. Thus the data needed to accurately model relative biological effectiveness to guide novel treatment planning approaches are limited. We used Monte Carlo modeling and high-content automated clonogenic survival assays to spatially map the biologic effectiveness of scanned proton beams with high accuracy and throughput while minimizing biological uncertainties. We found that the relationship between cell kill, dose, and LET, is complex and non-unique. Measured biologic effects were substantially greater than in most previous reports, and non-linear surviving fraction response was observed even for the highest LET values. Extension of this approach could generate data needed to optimize proton therapy plans incorporating variable RBE. PMID:25984967

  2. Effectiveness of high energy electron beam against spore forming bacteria and viruses in slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Olszewska, Halina; Wieczorek, Magdalena; Zimek, Zbigniew; Śrutek, Mścisław

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high energy electron beam effect against the most resistant indicators - spore forming bacteria (Clostridium sporogenes) and viruses (BPV) - which may occur in slurry. The applied doses of electron beam were 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 kGy. The theoretic inactivating dose of high energy electron beam for Clostridium sporogenes spores calculated based on the polynomial curve equation was 11.62 kGy, and determined on the basis of regression line equation for BPV virus was equal 23.49 kGy. The obtained results showed a quite good effectiveness of irradiation in bacterial spores inactivation, whereas relatively poor against viruses.

  3. Effect of Intermediate Crack Debonding on the Flexural Strength of CFRP-Strengthened RC Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam

    2014-09-01

    The flexural strength of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer plate, which fails by intermediate crack debonding, is evaluated. To consider the effect of debonding at the interface between the concrete and the CFRP plate, due to a flexural crack at the midspan, on the flexural strength of the beams, a strength reduction factor is proposed. This factor is derived from the results of flexural tests by using the model of effective strains and is defined as the ratio of the debonding strain to the ultimate strain of the CFRP plate. The validity, accuracy, and efficiency of the factor is verified by comparing analytical results with experimental data. The results of this study revealed that the strength reduction factor proposed can be used to efficiently assess the flexural strength of CFRP-strengthened RC beams with intermediate crack debonding.

  4. Lunar Noise-Temperature Increase Measurements at S-Band, X-Band, and Ka-Band Using a 34-Meter-Diameter Beam-Waveguide Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2006-08-01

    The Moon radiates energy at infrared and microwave wavelengths, in addition to reflecting sunlight at optical wavelengths. As a result, an antenna pointed at or near the Moon will cause an increase in receiver noise temperature that needs to be accounted for in telemetry, radio science, or ranging link budgets. The Deep Space Network may be required to use its antennas in future lunar robotic or human missions, and thus it is important to understand the nature of this temperature increase as a function of observing frequency, lunar phase, and angular offset of the antenna beam from the center of the lunar disk. This article quantifies such a set of measurements acquired at DSS 13, a 34-m-diameter research and development beam-waveguide antenna located at Goldstone, California, at three different telecommunication frequencies, S-band (2.3 GHz), X-band (8.4 GHz), and Ka-band (32 GHz), over a wide range of lunar phase, for both disk-centered and limb-centered positions of the antenna beam.

  5. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2014-05-01

    Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  6. Modification of PVC/ENR blend by electron beam irradiation: effect of crosslinking agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, C. T.; Zaman, K.

    1999-05-01

    In order to improve the mechanical properties of PVC/ENR blends, they were irradiated by using a 3.0 MeV electron beam machine with doses ranging from 20 to 200 kGy. Changes in mechanical properties of the blends with increasing irradiation dose were investigated. In an attempt to maximize the beneficial effect of irradiation, the influence of multifunctional acrylates (MFA) such as TMPTA, HDDA and EHA on the 70/30 PVC/ENR blend was investigated. The properties studied include hardness, gel fraction, tensile strength, elongation at break and glass transition temperature. The results revealed that all mechanical properties increased with increasing irradiation dose with exception of elongation at break. The enhancement in blend properties was further improved by addition of MFA. This is attributed to the increase in crosslink density. The steady increase in gel fraction with irradiation dose and the shifting of the irradiation those towards a lower value to achieve 70% gel fraction upon addition of MFA has provided evidence for significant increase in crosslink density. Among the MFA employed in this studies, TMPTA was found to render highest mechanical properties to the blend with irradiation. Thus, TMPTA can be useful as an efficient crosslink enhancer to PVC/ENR blends. Results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated radiation-induced crosslinks formed in PVC/ENR blends sensitized by TMPTA. The single glass transition temperature obtained confirms that the blend remains miscible upon irradiation with the presence of TMPTA. The changes in blend properties upon irradiation with the addition of acrylated polyurethene (PU) oligomer are also presented in this paper.

  7. Effect of the focal plane position on CO2 laser beam cutting of injection molded polycarbonate sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Mehrabi, Omid; Azdast, Taher; Benyounis, Khaled Y.

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, the effect of laser beam focal plane position (FPP) on the kerf quality of the polycarbonate laser cutting is investigated. Low power CO2 laser is used as the heat source of the cutting runs. In the experiments, FPP is varied from 0 to -4mm while other processing parameters (i.e. laser power, cutting speed and gas pressure) are considered constant. Upper and lower kerf width, kerf taper, upper heat affected zone and surface roughness of the kerf wall are also considered as the responses. Observations signified that reducing the position of the laser beam focal point from zero to - 3mm reduces the upper and lower kerf width. However reducing FPP below -3mm leads to an increase in the kerf width. Results also reveals that upper heat affected zone value reduces by reduction in FPP. Moreover the best kerf wall surface roughness occurred at FPP= -3mm.

  8. Effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Babitha, K.K.; Priyanka, K.P.; Sreedevi, A.; Ganesh, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2014-12-15

    The effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles was investigated. Ceria nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical precipitation method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Ultraviolet–visible absorption spectra, photoluminescence and Raman spectra of beam irradiated samples were modified, and shifted to blue region, which were attributed to quantum size effect. Systematic observations found that nonstoichiometry, defects and size reduction caused by beam irradiation have great influence on optical band gap, blue shift, photoluminescence and Raman band modifications. Moreover, electron beam irradiation is a suitable technique to enhance the structural and optical properties of nanoceria by controlling the particle size, which may lead to potentially useful technological applications. - Highlights: • Investigated effect of beam irradiation on CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles • Beam irradiation caused size reduction and surface modification. • It increases microstrain, decreases d-spacing and broadens XRD peaks. • It also modifies optical band gap, absorption, PL and Raman bands.

  9. A Case Report on the Effect of Fan Beam Thickness in Helical Tomotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.C. Vincent; Mui, Wing Lun A.

    2011-04-01

    The fan beam thickness (FBT) in helical tomotherapy is defined by a pair of collimators parallel to the rotational orbit of the radiation beam and is fixed for a specific patient treatment. The aim of this case study is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of changing the FBT in the treatment of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patient. The subject was a T2N1M0 stage NPC patient. The planning target volumes (PTVs) of the primary nasopharyngeal tumor and the left and right cervical lymphatics were delineated along with the organs at risk (OARs) in the corresponding computed tomography slices. Three treatment plans with FBT of 1.0 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5.0 cm (FBT-10, FBT-25, and FBT-50) were generated separately based on similar dose constraints and planning parameters. The dosimetric results of the PTV and OARs were collected and compared among the 3 treatment plans. The differences in the dose parameters of the PTVs were small among the 3 plans. The FBT-10 plan demonstrated the most homogeneous PTV doses with the smallest homogeneity indices (HIs). The FBT-50 plan delivered the highest dose to the OARs and the FBT-10 plan delivered the lowest. The differences between the 2 plans were more significant in the spinal cord, optic chiasm, optic nerves, and lens. This case study demonstrated that the variation of FBT in tomotherapy affected the quality of the treatment plan mainly in the OAR doses, but not so much in the PTV. Increasing the FBT reduced the effectiveness in the sparing of OARs.

  10. Marginal effect of increasing ageing drivers on injury crashes.

    PubMed

    Tay, Richard

    2008-11-01

    The safety effects of the ageing driving population have been a topic of research interests in health and transportation economics in recent years due to the ageing of the baby boomers. This study adds to the current knowledge by examining the marginal effects of changing the driver mix on injury crashes using data from the Canadian Province of Alberta between 1990 and 2004. Results from a Poisson regression model reveal that increasing the number of young and ageing drivers will result in an increase in the number of injury crashes whereas increasing the number of middle-aged drivers will result in a reduction. These results are in contrast to those obtained in a previous study on the marginal effects of changing the driver mix on fatal crashes in the Australian State of Queensland and some possible explanations for the differing results are provided.

  11. Making sense by making sentient: effectance motivation increases anthropomorphism.

    PubMed

    Waytz, Adam; Morewedge, Carey K; Epley, Nicholas; Monteleone, George; Gao, Jia-Hong; Cacioppo, John T

    2010-09-01

    People commonly anthropomorphize nonhuman agents, imbuing everything from computers to pets to gods with humanlike capacities and mental experiences. Although widely observed, the determinants of anthropomorphism are poorly understood and rarely investigated. We propose that people anthropomorphize, in part, to satisfy effectance motivation-the basic and chronic motivation to attain mastery of one's environment. Five studies demonstrated that increasing effectance motivation by manipulating the perceived unpredictability of a nonhuman agent or by increasing the incentives for mastery increases anthropomorphism. Neuroimaging data demonstrated that the neural correlates of this process are similar to those engaged when mentalizing other humans. A final study demonstrated that anthropomorphizing a stimulus makes it appear more predictable and understandable, suggesting that anthropomorphism satisfies effectance motivation. Anthropomorphizing nonhuman agents seems to satisfy the basic motivation to make sense of an otherwise uncertain environment.

  12. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Lund, S M; Bieniosek, F M; Lee, E P; Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Vay, P-A

    2002-05-23

    Heavy-ion accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long durations. (Injected currents of order 1 A and 20 {micro}s at a few MeV for each of {approx}100 beams, will be compressed to the order of 100 A and 0.2 {micro}s, reaching GeV energies in a power plant driver.) This will be accompanied by beam ions impacting walls, liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation, the {approx}10% electron population predicted for driver-scale experiments will affect beam transport; but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron velocity is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles. We will also measure the depth of trapping of electrons, their axial and radial transport, and the effects of electrons on the ion beam.

  13. Oxide degradation effects in dry patterning of resist using neutral oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynko, W.E.; Kasi, S.R.; Manos, D.

    1992-07-01

    Novel processing methods are being studied to address the highly selective and directional etch requirements of the ULSI manufacturing era; neutral molecular and atomic beams are two promising candidates. In this study, the potential of 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams for dry development of photoresist is demonstrated for application in patterning of CMOS devices. The patterning of photoresist directly on polysilicon gate layers enables the use of a self-contained dry processing strategy, with oxygen beams for resist etching and chlorine beams for polysilicon etching. Exposure to such reactive low-energy species and to the UV radiation from the line-of-sight, high-density plasma source can, however, after MOSFET gate oxide quality, impacting device performance and reliability. We have studied this processing related device integrity issue by subjecting polysilicon gas MOS structures to exposure treatments similar to those used in resist patterning using low energy oxygen beams. Electrical C-V characterization shows a significant increase in the oxide trapped charge and interface state density upon low energy exposure. I-V and dielectric breakdown characterization show increased low-field leakage characteristics for the same exposure. High-field electron injection studies reveal that the 0.25-V to 0.5-V negative flatband shifts can be partially annealed by the carrier injection. This could be due to positive charge annihilation or electron trapping, or some combination of both. Physical and analysis of patterned resist layers and electrical characterization data of MOS structures exposed to different neutral beam processing environments and following thermal annealing treatments is presented.

  14. Oxide degradation effects in dry patterning of resist using neutral oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynko, W.E.; Kasi, S.R. ); Manos, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1992-01-01

    Novel processing methods are being studied to address the highly selective and directional etch requirements of the ULSI manufacturing era; neutral molecular and atomic beams are two promising candidates. In this study, the potential of 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams for dry development of photoresist is demonstrated for application in patterning of CMOS devices. The patterning of photoresist directly on polysilicon gate layers enables the use of a self-contained dry processing strategy, with oxygen beams for resist etching and chlorine beams for polysilicon etching. Exposure to such reactive low-energy species and to the UV radiation from the line-of-sight, high-density plasma source can, however, after MOSFET gate oxide quality, impacting device performance and reliability. We have studied this processing related device integrity issue by subjecting polysilicon gas MOS structures to exposure treatments similar to those used in resist patterning using low energy oxygen beams. Electrical C-V characterization shows a significant increase in the oxide trapped charge and interface state density upon low energy exposure. I-V and dielectric breakdown characterization show increased low-field leakage characteristics for the same exposure. High-field electron injection studies reveal that the 0.25-V to 0.5-V negative flatband shifts can be partially annealed by the carrier injection. This could be due to positive charge annihilation or electron trapping, or some combination of both. Physical and analysis of patterned resist layers and electrical characterization data of MOS structures exposed to different neutral beam processing environments and following thermal annealing treatments is presented.

  15. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  16. Bending of I-beam with the transvers shear effect included - FEM calculated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygorowicz, Magdalena; Lewiński, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    The paper is devoted to three-point bending of an I-beam with include of transvers shear effect. Numerical calculations were conducted independently with the use of the SolidWorks system and the multi-purpose software package ANSYS The results of FEM study conducted with the use of two systems were compared and presented in tables and figures.

  17. Correction for beam divergence effect in a NRSE spectrometer with high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitaguchi, M.; Hino, M.; Kawabata, Y.; Hayashida, H.; Tasaki, S.; Maruyama, R.; Ebisawa, T.

    2008-03-01

    A correction for the beam divergence effect in a neutron resonance spin echo (NRSE) spectrometer will be discussed. The new type of device called 'coupling coils' is proposed to change the spin quantization axis for the correction. The feasibility of correction for the vertical divergence has been demonstrated by numerical calculations and Monte Carlo simulations.

  18. Atmospheric effects on laser beams. Citations from the NTIS data base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-08-01

    The compilation cites recent research on laser beam transmission through the atmosphere. Studies on molecular attenuation turbulence, thermal blooming atmospheric window flows, atmospheric composition, aerosols, infrared lasers, computerized simulation, and water vapor are included. The effects of attenuation on optical radar, optical communications, and infrared detection are covered. This updated bibliography contains 260 citations, 14 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  19. Study of the effect of scattering from turbid water on the polarization of a laser beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, R. G.; Hovanlou, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation method was used to determine the effect of scattering from turbid water on the polarization of a backscattered beam of laser light. The relationship between the polarization and the type and amount of suspended particulates in the water was investigated.

  20. Effects of underwater turbulence on laser beam propagation and coupling into single-mode optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Frank; Lasher, Mark

    2010-06-01

    We characterize and compare the effects of turbulence on underwater laser propagation with theory. Measurements of the coupling efficiency of the focused beam into a single-mode fiber are reported. A simple tip-tilt control system, based on the position of the image centroid in the focal plane, was shown to maintain good coupling efficiency for a beam radius equal to the transverse coherence length, r(0). These results are relevant to high bandwidth communication technology that requires good spatial mode quality.

  1. Effect of electron beam pulse width on time-of-flight spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misakian, M.; Mumma, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    A simple but useful formula describing the effect of electron gun pulse width on the time of flight (TOF) spectra measured in translational spectroscopy experiments is developed. An approximately monoenergetic pulsed electrostatically focused electron beam traverses a scattering cell filled with a Maxwellian gas. Inelastic electron collisions with the gas produce metastable particles, ions, scattered electrons, and photons which then pass through a collimating slit system at right angles to the electron beam. TOF techniques are used to separate the photon signal from the metastable particle signal and to measure the TOF distribution of the metastable species.

  2. Plasma effects on extragalactic ultra-high-energy cosmic ray hadron beams in cosmic voids

    SciTech Connect

    Krakau, S.; Schlickeiser, R. E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2014-07-01

    The linear instability of an ultrarelativistic hadron beam (Γ {sub b} ≈ 10{sup 6}) in the unmagnetized intergalactic medium (IGM) is investigated with respect to the excitation of collective electrostatic and aperiodic electromagnetic fluctuations. This analysis is important for the propagation of extragalactic ultrarelativistic cosmic rays (E > 10{sup 15} eV) from their distant sources to Earth. We calculate minimum instability growth times that are orders of magnitude shorter than the cosmic ray propagation time in the IGM. Due to nonlinear effects, especially the modulation instability, the cosmic ray beam stabilizes and can propagate with nearly no energy loss through the IGM.

  3. An optimization approach for design of RC beams subjected to flexural and shear effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigdeli, Sinan Melih; Bekdaş, Gebrail

    2013-10-01

    A random search technique (RST) is proposed for the optimum design of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with minimum material cost. Cross-sectional dimensions and reinforcement bars are optimized for different flexural moments and shear forces. The optimization of reinforcement bars includes number and diameter of longitudinal bars for flexural moments. Also, stirrup reinforcements are designed for shear forces. The optimization is performed according to design procedure given in ACI-318 (Building Code Requirements for Structural Concrete). The approach is effective for the detailed design of RC beams ensuring safety and application conditions.

  4. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Based on Single Beam Splitting and Geometric Configuration for Effective Signal Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guang; Lin, Qingyu; Ding, Yu; Tian, Di; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-01-01

    A new laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) based on single-beam-splitting (SBS) and proper optical geometric configuration has been initially explored in this work for effective signal enhancement. In order to improve the interaction efficiency of laser energy with the ablated material, a laser beam operated in pulse mode was divided into two streams to ablate/excite the target sample in different directions instead of the conventional one beam excitation in single pulse LIBS (SP-LIBS). In spatial configuration, the laser beam geometry plays an important role in the emission signal enhancement. Thus, an adjustable geometric configuration with variable incident angle between the two splitted laser beams was constructed for achieving maximum signal enhancement. With the optimized angles of 60° and 70° for Al and Cu atomic emission lines at 396.15 nm and 324.75 nm respectively, about 5.6- and 4.8-folds signal enhancements were achieved for aluminum alloy and copper alloy samples compared to SP-LIBS. Furthermore, the temporal analysis, in which the intensity of atomic lines in SP-LIBS decayed at least ten times faster than the SBS-LIBS, proved that the energy coupling efficiency of SBS-LIBS was significantly higher than that of SP-LIBS. PMID:25557721

  5. Effect of ribs in HIFU beam path on formation of coagulative necrosis in goat liver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Gong, Xiaobo; Hu, Kai; Li, Chongyan; Wang, Zhibiao

    2006-05-01

    The motives of the work are to explore the effect of ribs in HIFU beam path on HIFU ablation goat liver. A model-JC Focused Ultrasound Tumor Therapeutic System was used. A 0.75 MHz focused transducer with 150mm aperture and 120mm focal length was used in all experiment. Acoustical power can be adjusted. 30 goats were divided into control group (HIFU beam through rib cage, HIFU alone), experiment group 1(HIFU beam through rib cage, HIFU combined with microbubble) and experiment group 2(Ribs in HIFU beam path were surgically removed, HIFU alone). 20 targeted regions at 5cm away from skin surface were applied for creating necrosis with linear scanning of 15mm length using HIFU in 3 groups. All animals were sacrificed two days later and exposed organs were dissected. After obtaining the maximal section, the volumes of the necrotic regions were measured, then to calculate Energy Efficiency Factor (EEF). Researched results showed that Ribs in HIFU beam path affected the formation of coagulative necrosis and enhanced EEF in control group. HIFU combined with microbubble could enhance the formation of coagulative necrosis and decrease EEF.

  6. Low-Pressure Gas Effects on the Potency of an Electron Beam Against Ceramic Cloth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, A. C., Jr.; Russell, C. K.; Zimmerman, F. R.; Fragomeni, J. M.

    1999-01-01

    An 8-kv electron beam with a current in the neighborhood of 100 mA from the Ukrainian space welding "Universal Hand Tool" (UHT) burned holes in Nextel AF-62 ceramic cloth designed to withstand temperatures up to 1,427 C. The burnthrough time was on the order of 8 scc at standoff distances between UHT and cloth ranging from 6-24 in. At both closer (2 in.) and farther (48 in.) standoff distances the potency of the beam against the cloth declined and the burnthrough time went up significantly. Prior to the test it had been expected that the beam would lay down a static charge on the cloth and be deflected without damaging the cloth. The burnthrough is thought to be an effect of partial transmission of beam power by a stream of positive ions generated by the high-voltage electron beam from contaminant gas in the "vacuum" chamber. A rough quantitative theoretical computation appears to substantiate this possibility.

  7. Distributed beam loss monitor based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maltseva, Yu; Emanov, F. A.; Petrenko, A. V.; Prisekin, V. G.

    2015-05-01

    This review discusses a distributed beam loss monitor which is based on the Cherenkov effect in an optical fiber and which has been installed at the VEPP-5 Injection Complex at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics. The principle of the device operation consists in detecting the Cherenkov radiation generated in an optical fiber by relativistic charged particles that are produced in an electromagnetic shower when highly relativistic beam particles (electrons or positrons) hit the accelerator vacuum chamber wall. Our experiments used a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to detect the Cherenkov light. Knowing when the PMT signal arrives tells us where the beam loss occurs. Using a 20-m-long optical fiber allowed a detector spatial resolution of 3 m. The way to improve the resolution is to optimize the monitor working conditions and optical fiber and PMT parameters, potentially leading to a resolution of as fine as 0.5 m according to our estimates.

  8. Quantification of optical turbulence in the ocean and its effects on beam propagation.

    PubMed

    Nootz, Gero; Jarosz, Ewa; Dalgleish, Fraser R; Hou, Weilin

    2016-11-01

    The influence of optically active turbulence on the propagation of laser beams is investigated in clear ocean water over a path length of 8.75 m. The measurement apparatus is described and the effects of optical turbulence on the laser beam are presented. The index of refraction structure constant is extracted from the beam deflection and the results are compared to independently made measures of the turbulence strength (Cn2) by a vertical microstructure profiler. Here we present values of Cn2 taken from aboard the R/V Walton Smith during the Bahamas optical turbulence exercise (BOTEX) in the Tongue of the Ocean between June 30 and July 12, 2011, spanning a range from 10-14 to 10-10  m-2/3. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time such measurements are reported for the ocean.

  9. Determination of the effects of wind-induced vibration on cylindrical beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Artusa, E. A.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the analysis was to determine the critical length to diameter ratio (L/Do) of a hollow, cylindrical beam subjected to wind-induced vibration. The sizes of beams ranged from 4 to 24 inches and were composed of ASTM grade A and grade B and American Petroleum Institute grade X42 steels. Calculations used maximum steady-state wind speeds of 130 mph associated with hurricane conditions possible at the Kennedy Space Center. The study examined the effect that different end support and load conditions have on the natural frequencies of the beams. Finally, methods of changing the frequency of the wind-induced vibration were examined. The conclusions drawn were that the greatest possible L/Do is achieved using welded supports and limiting the maximum applied axial and bending loads to less than 50 percent.

  10. Radiobiological effectiveness of laser accelerated electrons in comparison to electron beams from a conventional linear accelerator.

    PubMed

    Laschinsky, Lydia; Baumann, Michael; Beyreuther, Elke; Enghardt, Wolfgang; Kaluza, Malte; Karsch, Leonhard; Lessmann, Elisabeth; Naumburger, Doreen; Nicolai, Maria; Richter, Christian; Sauerbrey, Roland; Schlenvoigt, Hans-Peter; Pawelke, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    The notable progress in laser particle acceleration technology promises potential medical application in cancer therapy through compact and cost effective laser devices that are suitable for already existing clinics. Previously, consequences on the radiobiological response by laser driven particle beams characterised by an ultra high peak dose rate have to be investigated. Therefore, tumour and non-malignant cells were irradiated with pulsed laser accelerated electrons at the JETI facility for the comparison with continuous electrons of a conventional therapy LINAC. Dose response curves were measured for the biological endpoints clonogenic survival and residual DNA double strand breaks. The overall results show no significant differences in radiobiological response for in vitro cell experiments between laser accelerated pulsed and clinical used electron beams. These first systematic in vitro cell response studies with precise dosimetry to laser driven electron beams represent a first step toward the long term aim of the application of laser accelerated particles in radiotherapy.

  11. Longitudinal Space Charge Effects in Bunched Electron Beams Travelling through a Malmberg-Penning Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Rome, M.; Cavaliere, F.; De Luca, F.; Pozzoli, R.; Cavenago, M.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.

    2010-06-16

    Nanosecond pulsed electron beams in the 1-10 keV energy range have been characterized by means of an electrostatic diagnostic in the Malmberg-Penning trap ELTRAP. The beam length has been inferred through the numerical analysis of the signals measured across the overall load impedance of a planar charge collector. The presence of space charge effects leading to a longitudinal spread of the beam during its transport are evidenced at low injection energies. This feature has also been tested with the use of a one-dimensional fluid model and with two-dimensional, cylindrically-symmetric Particle-In-Cell simulations, whose results are compared to the experimental observations.

  12. Effect of Surface Treatments on Electron Beam Freeform Fabricated Aluminum Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M. B.; Hafley, Robert A.; Fahringer, David T.; Martin, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) parts exhibit a ridged surface finish typical of many layer-additive processes. This, post-processing is required to produce a net shape with a smooth surface finish. High speed milling wire electrical discharge machining (EDM), electron beam glazing, and glass bead blasting were performed on EBF3-build 2219 aluminum alloy parts to reduce or eliminate the ridged surface features. Surface roughness, surface residual stress state, and microstructural characteristics were examined for each of the different surface treatment to assess the quality and effect of the surface treatments on the underlying material. The analysis evaluated the effectivenes of the different surface finishing techniques for achieving a smooth surface finish on an electron beam freeform fabricated part.

  13. Improving the Odds: Increasing the Effectiveness of Publicly Funded Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnow, Burt S., Ed.; King, Christopher T., Ed.

    This book, which is intended for policymakers, administrators, and researchers, contains 13 research papers and reviews of the literature on increasing the effectiveness of publicly funded training. The following papers are included: "Publicly Funded Training in a Changing Labor Market" (Burt S. Barnow, Christopher T. King); "The…

  14. Programmatic research to increase the effectiveness of health communication campaigns.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Nancy Grant; Palmgreen, Philip C; Donohew, Lewis

    2014-12-01

    This article reviews a long program of research designed to investigate ways to increase the effectiveness of televised antidrug public service announcements. The review highlights the importance of audience targeting (adolescent and young adult high sensation seekers) and message design (message sensation value) in campaign research. It also emphasizes the role of theory and evaluation in programmatic research.

  15. Increasing the Effective Number of Neutrinos with Decaying Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kazuhide; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Senami, Masato; Takahashi, Fuminobu

    2007-11-20

    We present a model of decaying particles to increase the effective number of neutrinos N{sub {nu}} after big bang nucleosynthesis but before the structure formation begins. We point out that our scenario solves the discrepancy between the constraints on N{sub {nu}} from these two epochs, As an example, we consider saxion decay into two axions.

  16. Effect of electron beam radio sterilization on cyclic olefin copolymers used as pharmaceutical storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Hala; Aymes-Chodur, Caroline; Saunier, Johanna; Yagoubi, Najet

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of radio-sterilization on cyclo olefin copolymers (COC), that can be used as pharmaceutical storage materials, both on the surface and in the volume of the material, and to investigate the impact of the presence of a lubricant. A cyclo olefin copolymer (TOPAS® 8007) was treated with an electron beam radio-sterilization at different doses ranging from 25 to 150 kGy. Polymer structure and bulk properties were evaluated by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). A good correlation between those analytical techniques was observed: oxidation products were formed and crosslinking of chains occured. Although these modifications were important, the effect on the thermal properties was weak. The analysis by Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) of extraction's solutions of COC after irradiation showed both a remarkable decrease of the extractable amount of polyphenolic antioxidant (Irganox 1010®) initially present in the matrix, and a generation of an important number of degradation products that represent potential migrants for pharmaceutical formulations. Surface modifications were evidenced by both (FTIR/ATR) and contact angle measurements of COC films. An increase in surface polarity of COC after radio-sterilization was observed.

  17. Study of Collective Beam Effects in Energy Recovery Linac Driven Free Electron Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Christpher C.

    Collective beam effects such as coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) and longitudinal space charge (LSC) can degrade the quality of high-energy electron beams used for applications such as free-electron lasers (FELs). The advent of energy recovery linac (ERL)-based FELs brings exciting possibilities for very high-average current FELs that can operate with greater efficiency. However, due to the structure of ERLs, they may be even more susceptible to CSR. It is therefore necessary that these collective beam effects be well understood if future ERL-based designs are to be successful. The Jefferson Laboratory ERL driven IR FEL provides an ideal test-bed for looking at how CSR impacts the electron beam. Due to its novel design we can easily test how CSR's impact on the beam varies as a function of compression within the machine. In this work we will look at measurements of both average energy loss and energy spectrum fragmentation as a function of bunch compression. These results are compared to particle tracking simulations including a 1D CSR model and, in general, good agreement is seen between simulation and measurement. Of particular interest is fragmentation of the energy spectrum that is observed due to CSR and LSC. We will also show how this fragmentation develops and how it can be mitigated through use of the sextupoles in the JLab FEL. Finally, a more complete 2D model is used to simulate CSR-beam interaction. Due to the parameters of the experiment it is expected that a 2D CSR model would yield different results than the 1D CSR model. However, excellent agreement is seen between the two CSR model results.

  18. Low-energy ion beam bombardment effect on the plant-cell-envelope mimetic membrane for DNA transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-09-01

    This study is a systematic analysis of the mechanisms involved in ion-beam induced DNA transfer, an important application of ion beam biotechnology. Cellulose membranes were used to mimic the plant cell envelope. Ion beams of argon (Ar) or nitrogen (N) at an energy of 25 keV bombarded the cellulose membranes at fluences ranging from 1015 to 1016 ions/cm2. The damage to the ion-beam-bombarded membranes was characterized using infrared spectroscopy, a micro tensile test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Chain scission was the dominant radiation damage type in the membrane. DNA diffusion across the membrane was significantly increased after ion beam bombardment. The increase in DNA transfer is therefore attributed to chain scission, which increases the permeability by increasing the number of pores in the membrane.

  19. Dosimetric effects on small-field beam-modeling for stereotactic body radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Woong; Kim, Suzy; Kim, Jung-In; Wu, Hong-Gyun; Jung, Joo-Young; Kim, Min-Joo; Suh, Tae-Suk; Kim, Jin-Young; Kim, Jong Won

    2015-02-01

    The treatment planning of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) requires high accuracy of dosimetric data for small radiation fields. The dosimetric effects on the beam-modeling process of a treatment planning system (TPS) were investigated using different measured small-field data sets. We performed small-field dosimetry with three detectors: a CC13 ion chamber, a CC01 ion chamber, and an edge detector. Percentage depth doses (PDDs) and dose profiles for field sizes given by 3 × 3 cm2, 2 × 2 cm2, and 1 × 1 cm2 were obtained for 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. Each measured data set was used as data input for a TPS, in which a beam-modeling process was implemented using the collapsed cone convolution (CCC) algorithm for dose calculation. The measured data were used to generate six beam-models based on each combination of detector type and photon energy, which were then used to calculate the corresponding PDDs and dose profiles for various depths and field sizes. Root mean square differences (RMSDs) between the calculated and the measured doses were evaluated for the PDDs and the dose profiles. The RMSDs of PDDs beyond the maximum dose depth were within an accuracy of 0.2-0.6%, being clinically acceptable. The RMSDs of the dose profiles corresponding to the CC13, the CC01, and the edge detector were 2.80%, 1.49%, and 1.46% for a beam energy of 6 MV and 2.34%, 1.15%, and 1.44% for a beam energy of 15 MV, respectively. The calculated results for the CC13 ion chamber showed the most discrepancy compared to the measured data, due to the relatively large sensitive volume of this detector. However, the calculated dose profiles for the detectors were not significantly different from another. The physical algorithm used in the beam-modeling process did not seem to be sensitive to blurred data measured with detectors with large sensitive volumes. Each beam-model was used to clinically evaluate lung and lymphatic node SBRT plans

  20. Quantifying effects of lead shielding in electron beams: a Monte Carlo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Buffa, Francesca M.; Deehan, Charles

    2001-03-01

    Lead shielding in contact with the patient's skin is often encountered in radiotherapy with electron beams. The influence of the lead shielding on dose distributions in the patient cannot fully be assessed using modern treatment planning systems. In this work the problem of quantifying the effect of lead shielding on dose distributions is addressed. Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed in a half-blocked water phantom shielded by lead, using a realistic model for the fluence of an electron linear accelerator. Electron beam energies of 6-20 MeV and lead thicknesses of 1-7 mm are used for 10×10 cm2 and 5×5 cm2 fields. The perturbation of the particle fluence and dose distributions in water introduced by the lead shielding is quantified. The effect of oblique electron beams on the dose perturbation is shown. A fictitious clinical example, the shielding of an eye in electron beam treatment, is used to demonstrate the usefulness of Monte Carlo based treatment planning algorithms that can incorporate the effects of lead shielding.

  1. Quantifying effects of lead shielding in electron beams: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, F; Buffa, F M; Deehan, C

    2001-03-01

    Lead shielding in contact with the patient's skin is often encountered in radiotherapy with electron beams. The influence of the lead shielding on dose distributions in the patient cannot fully be assessed using modern treatment planning systems. In this work the problem of quantifying the effect of lead shielding on dose distributions is addressed. Monte Carlo dose calculations were performed in a half-blocked water phantom shielded by lead, using a realistic model for the fluence of an electron linear accelerator. Electron beam energies of 6-20 MeV and lead thicknesses of 1-7 mm are used for 10 x 10 cm2 and 5 x 5 cm2 fields. The perturbation of the particle fluence and dose distributions in water introduced by the lead shielding is quantified. The effect of oblique electron beams on the dose perturbation is shown. A fictitious clinical example, the shielding of an eye in electron beam treatment, is used to demonstrate the usefulness of Monte Carlo based treatment planning algorithms that can incorporate the effects of lead shielding.

  2. Effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Le; Li, Dayou; Wang, Zuobin Yue, Yong; Zhang, Jinjin; Yu, Miao; Li, Siwei

    2015-12-21

    This paper discusses the effects of laser fluence on silicon modification by four-beam laser interference. In this work, four-beam laser interference was used to pattern single crystal silicon wafers for the fabrication of surface structures, and the number of laser pulses was applied to the process in air. By controlling the parameters of laser irradiation, different shapes of silicon structures were fabricated. The results were obtained with the single laser fluence of 354 mJ/cm{sup 2}, 495 mJ/cm{sup 2}, and 637 mJ/cm{sup 2}, the pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz, the laser exposure pulses of 30, 100, and 300, the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, and the pulse duration of 7–9 ns. The effects of the heat transfer and the radiation of laser interference plasma on silicon wafer surfaces were investigated. The equations of heat flow and radiation effects of laser plasma of interfering patterns in a four-beam laser interference distribution were proposed to describe their impacts on silicon wafer surfaces. The experimental results have shown that the laser fluence has to be properly selected for the fabrication of well-defined surface structures in a four-beam laser interference process. Laser interference patterns can directly fabricate different shape structures for their corresponding applications.

  3. The effects of increasing heel height on forefoot peak pressure.

    PubMed

    Mandato, M G; Nester, E

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of increasing heel height on peak forefoot pressure. Thirty-five women were examined while wearing sneakers and shoes with 2-inch and 3-inch heels. An in-shoe pressure-measurement system was used to document the magnitude and location of plantar peak pressures. Pressure under the forefoot was found to increase significantly with increasing heel height. As the heel height increased, the peak pressure shifted toward the first metatarsal and the hallux. The reproducibility of data obtained with the in-shoe pressure-measurement system was tested in five subjects; the data were found to be reproducible to within approximately 3% of measured pressures.

  4. Marine algal toxins: origins, health effects, and their increased occurrence.

    PubMed Central

    Van Dolah, F M

    2000-01-01

    Certain marine algae produce potent toxins that impact human health through the consumption of contaminated shellfish and finfish and through water or aerosol exposure. Over the past three decades, the frequency and global distribution of toxic algal incidents appear to have increased, and human intoxications from novel algal sources have occurred. This increase is of particular concern, since it parallels recent evidence of large-scale ecologic disturbances that coincide with trends in global warming. The extent to which human activities have contributed to their increase therefore comes into question. This review summarizes the origins and health effects of marine algal toxins, as well as changes in their current global distribution, and examines possible causes for the recent increase in their occurrence. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:10698729

  5. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  6. Estimating the effectiveness of human-cell irradiation by protons of a therapeutic beam of the joint institute for nuclear research phasotron using cytogenetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytseva, E. M.; Govorun, R. D.; Mitsin, G. V.; Molokanov, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of the impact of therapeutic proton beams in human cells with respect to the criterion of formation of chromosome aberrations in human-blood lymphocytes is estimated. The physical characteristics of radiation (proton LET at the input of the object and in the region of the modified Bragg peak) and the role of the biological factor (the differences in the radiosensitivity of nondividing cells corresponding to the irradiation of normal tissues along the proton-beam path and tumor tissues) are taken into account. The relative biological effectiveness of protons is ˜1 at the beam input of the object and ˜1.2 in the Bragg peak region. Taking into account the higher radiosensitivity of dividing cells in the G 2 phase of the cell cycle, the irradiation effectiveness increases to ˜1.4.

  7. Evaluation of the effect of patient dose from cone beam computed tomography on prostate IMRT using Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, James C. L.; Leung, Michael K. K.; Islam, Mohammad K.; Norrlinger, Bernhard D.; Jaffray, David A.

    2008-01-15

    prescribed dose, it was found that there is about a 5% increase of dose at the femur head. Still, such an increase in the femur head dose is well below the dose limit of the bone in our IMRT plans. Therefore, under these dose fractionation conditions, it is concluded that, though CBCT causes a higher dose deposited at the bones, there may be no significant effect in the DVHs of critical tissues in the prostate IMRT.

  8. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  9. IKK inhibition increases bortezomib effectiveness in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Singha, Bipradeb; Gatla, Himavanth Reddy; Phyo, Sai; Patel, Atish; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Vancurova, Ivana

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is associated with increased expression of the pro-angiogenic chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8, CXCL8), which induces tumor cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Even though bortezomib (BZ) has shown remarkable anti-tumor activity in hematological malignancies, it has been less effective in ovarian cancer; however, the mechanisms are not understood. We have recently shown that BZ unexpectedly induces the expression of IL-8 in ovarian cancer cells in vitro, by IκB kinase (IKK)-dependent mechanism. Here, we tested the hypothesis that IKK inhibition reduces the IL-8 production and increases BZ effectiveness in reducing ovarian tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrate that the combination of BZ and the IKK inhibitor Bay 117085 significantly reduces the growth of ovarian tumor xenografts in nude mice when compared to either drug alone. Mice treated with the BZ/Bay 117085 combination exhibit smallest tumors, and lowest levels of IL-8. Furthermore, the reduced tumor growth in the combination group is associated with decreased tumor levels of S536P-p65 NFκB and its decreased recruitment to IL-8 promoter in tumor tissues. These data provide the first in vivo evidence that combining BZ with IKK inhibitor is effective, and suggest that using IKK inhibitors may increase BZ effectiveness in ovarian cancer treatment. PMID:26267322

  10. Mitigating chromatic effects for the transverse focusing of intense charged particle beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrani, James; Kaganovich, Igor; Davidson, Ronald

    2013-09-01

    A final focusing scheme designed to minimize chromatic effects is discussed. Solenoids are often used for transverse focusing in accelerator systems that require a charged particle beam with a small focal spot and/or large energy density A sufficiently large spread in axial momentum will reduce the effectiveness of transverse focusing, and result in chromatic effects on the final focal spot. Placing a weaker solenoid upstream of a stronger final focusing solenoid (FFS) mitigates chromatic effects on transverse beam focusing. J.M. Mitrani et al., Nucl. Inst. Meth. Phys. Res. A (2013) http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nima.2013.05.09 This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  11. Electrostatic propulsion beam divergence effects on spacecraft surfaces, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. F.

    1973-01-01

    The third phase of a program to develop understanding of and tolerance-level criteria for the deleterious effects of electrostatic rocket exhaust (Cs, Cs(+), Hg, Hg(+)) and materials of rocket construction impinging on typical classes of spacecraft (S/C) surfaces was completed. Models of ion engine effluents and models describing the degradation of S/C surfaces by these effluents are presented. Experimental data from previous phases are summarized and Phase 2 data and analysis are presented in detail. The spacecraft design implications of ion engine contaminants are discussed.

  12. On beam quality and flatness of radiotherapy megavoltage photon beams

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Murshed; Rhoades, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Ratio of percentage depth dose (PDD) at two depths, PDD at a depth of 10 cm (PDD10), and beam flatness are monitored regularly for radiotherapy beams for quality assurance. The purpose of this study is to understand the effects of changes in one of these parameters on the other. Is it possible to monitor only the beam flatness and not PDD? The investigation has two components. Naturally occurring i.e., unintended changes in PDD ratio and in-plane flatness for 6 and 10 MV photon beams for one particular Siemens Artiste Linac are monitored for a period of about 4 years. Secondly, deliberate changes in the beam parameters are induced by changing the bending magnet current (BMI). Relationships between various beam parameters for unintended changes as well as deliberate changes are characterized. Long term unintentional changes of PDD ratio are found to have no systematic trend. The flatness in the inplane direction for 6 and 10 MV beams show slow increase of 0.43% and 0.75% respectively in about 4 years while the changes in the PDD ratio show no such trend. Over 10% changes in BMI are required to induce changes in the beam quality indices at 2% level. PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam is found to be less sensitive, while the depth of maximum dose, dmax, is more sensitive to the changes in BMI compared to the 6 MV beam. Tolerances are more stringent for PDD10 than PDD ratio for the 10 MV beam. PDD ratio, PDD10, and flatness must be monitored independently. Furthermore, off axis ratio alone cannot be used to monitor flatness. The effect of beam quality change in the absolute dose is clinically insignificant. PMID:26634604

  13. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-01

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10-4 millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (˜pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  14. Effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kausik, S. S.; Kakati, B.; Saikia, B. K.

    2013-05-15

    The effect of confining wall potential on charged collimated dust beam in low-pressure plasma has been studied in a dusty plasma experimental setup by applying electrostatic field to each channel of a multicusp magnetic cage. Argon plasma is produced by hot cathode discharge method at a pressure of 5×10{sup −4} millibars and is confined by a full line cusped magnetic field confinement system. Silver dust grains are produced by gas-evaporation technique and move upward in the form of a collimated dust beam due to differential pressure maintained between the dust and plasma chambers. The charged grains in the beam after coming out from the plasma column enter into the diagnostic chamber and are deflected by a dc field applied across a pair of deflector plates at different confining potentials. Both from the amount of deflection and the floating potential, the number of charges collected by the dust grains is calculated. Furthermore, the collimated dust beam strikes the Faraday cup, which is placed above the deflector plates, and the current (∼pA) so produced is measured by an electrometer at different confining potentials. The experimental results demonstrate the significant effect of confining wall potential on charging of dust grains.

  15. Effect of concentration of polyfunctional monomers on physical properties of acrylonitrile butadiene rubber under electron-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasin, Tariq; Ahmed, Shamshad; Ahmed, Munir; Yoshii, Fumio

    2005-06-01

    An investigation has been undertaken to find out the effect of concentration of different polyfunctional monomers (PFMs) on the physical properties of the acrylonitrile-butadiene rubber (NBR) crosslinked by electron beam (EB). The PFMs used were diethylene glycol dimethacrylate, trimethylol propane trimethacrylate and trimethylol propane triacrylate. The physical properties of EB-irradiated NBR sheets were evaluated by measuring the tensile strength, elongation percent at break, hardness and gel fraction. The results showed a remarkable increase in tensile strength, hardness and gel fraction as the concentration of PFMs was increased from 1 part per hundred (phr) to 5 phr in the NBR samples whereas elongation percent decreased in a steady manner. The improvement in physical properties of radiation crosslinked NBR in the presence of PFMs may be attributed to its increased crosslinking density as observed by the corresponding increase in gel content.

  16. Readiness and Retention: Effects of Downsizing and Increased Operations Tempo

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    AU/ACSC/120/1999-04 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY READINESS AND RETENTION: EFFECTS OF DOWNSIZING AND INCREASED OPERATIONS TEMPO by...1999 2. REPORT TYPE Thesis 3. DATES COVERED (FROM - TO) xx-xx-1999 to xx-xx-1999 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Readiness and Retention: Effects of Downsizing ...to reduce defense spending created a period of downsizing . Since 1989 the U.S. Air Force has reduced its force by one-third and experienced 12 years of

  17. GeV electron acceleration by a Gaussian field laser with effect of beam width parameter in magnetized plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotra, Harjit Singh; Kant, Niti

    2017-01-01

    Electron acceleration due to a circularly polarized (CP) Gaussian laser field has been investigated theoretically in magnetized plasma. A Gaussian laser beam possesses trapping forces on electrons during its propagation through plasma. A single particle simulation indicates a resonant enhancement of electron acceleration with a Gaussian laser beam. The plasma is magnetized with an axial magnetic field in same direction as that of laser beam propagation. The dependence of laser beam width parameter on electron energy gain with propagation distance has been presented graphically for different values of laser intensity. Electron energy gain is relatively high where the laser beam parameter is at its minimum value. Enhanced energy gain of the order of GeV is reported with magnetic field under 20 MG in plasma. It is also seen that the axial magnetic field maintains the electron acceleration for large propagation distance even with an increasing beam width parameter.

  18. Individual increase in inbreeding allows estimating effective sizes from pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Cervantes, Isabel; Molina, Antonio; Valera, Mercedes; Goyache, Félix

    2008-01-01

    We present here a simple approach to obtain reliable estimates of the effective population size in real world populations via the computation of the increase in inbreeding for each individual (delta Fi) in a given population. The values of delta Fi are computed as t-root of 1 - (1 - Fi) where Fi is the inbreeding coefficient and t is the equivalent complete generations for each individual. The values of delta F computed for a pre-defined reference subset can be averaged and used to estimate effective size. A standard error of this estimate of Ne can be further computed from the standard deviation of the individual increase in inbreeding. The methodology is demonstrated by applying it to several simulated examples and to a real pedigree in which other methodologies fail when considering reference subpopulations. The main characteristics of the approach and its possible use are discussed both for predictive purposes and for analyzing genealogies. PMID:18558071

  19. Effect of recycled light in two-beam interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cavagnero, Giovanni; Mana, Giovanni; Massa, Enrico

    2005-05-15

    We developed a laser interferometer allowing parts per million resolution to be achieved in fringe division for the measurement of the Si (220) lattice spacing by combined x-ray and optical interferometry. With the aim of obtaining 10{sup -9} measurement uncertainty, we pursued the study of a troublesome noise in interferometer operation and eventually identified its origin in a minute interferometer optical feedback. We investigated mathematically the feedback effect and verified predictions experimentally. Imperfect isolation and light recycling having been identified and subsequently experimentally proved, we took remedial steps in order to improve measurement capabilities. This investigation has brought into light and has made it possible to quantify an interferometer noise up to now overlooked.

  20. Enhanced radiobiological effects at the distal end of a clinical proton beam: in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Matsuura, Taeko; Wada, Mami; Egashira, Yusuke; Nishio, Teiji; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2014-01-01

    In the clinic, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 1.1 has usually been used in relation to the whole depth of the spread-out Bragg-peak (SOBP) of proton beams. The aim of this study was to confirm the actual biological effect in the SOBP at the very distal end of clinical proton beams using an in vitro cell system. A human salivary gland tumor cell line, HSG, was irradiated with clinical proton beams (accelerated by 190 MeV/u) and examined at different depths in the distal part and the center of the SOBP. Surviving fractions were analyzed with the colony formation assay. Cell survival curves and the survival parameters were obtained by fitting with the linear–quadratic (LQ) model. The RBE at each depth of the proton SOBP compared with that for X-rays was calculated by the biological equivalent dose, and the biological dose distribution was calculated from the RBE and the absorbed dose at each position. Although the physical dose distribution was flat in the SOBP, the RBE values calculated by the equivalent dose were significantly higher (up to 1.56 times) at the distal end than at the center of the SOBP. Additionally, the range of the isoeffective dose was extended beyond the range of the SOBP (up to 4.1 mm). From a clinical point of view, this may cause unexpected side effects to normal tissues at the distal position of the beam. It is important that the beam design and treatment planning take into consideration the biological dose distribution. PMID:24824674

  1. Interference effects in phased beam tracing using exact half-space solutions.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Matthew A; Pluymers, Bert; Desmet, Wim

    2016-12-01

    Geometrical acoustics provides a correct solution to the wave equation for rectangular rooms with rigid boundaries and is an accurate approximation at high frequencies with nearly hard walls. When interference effects are important, phased geometrical acoustics is employed in order to account for phase shifts due to propagation and reflection. Error increases, however, with more absorption, complex impedance values, grazing incidence, smaller volumes and lower frequencies. Replacing the plane wave reflection coefficient with a spherical one reduces the error but results in slower convergence. Frequency-dependent stopping criteria are then applied to avoid calculating higher order reflections for frequencies that have already converged. Exact half-space solutions are used to derive two additional spherical wave reflection coefficients: (i) the Sommerfeld integral, consisting of a plane wave decomposition of a point source and (ii) a line of image sources located at complex coordinates. Phased beam tracing using exact half-space solutions agrees well with the finite element method for rectangular rooms with absorbing boundaries, at low frequencies and for rooms with different aspect ratios. Results are accurate even for long source-to-receiver distances. Finally, the crossover frequency between the plane and spherical wave reflection coefficients is discussed.

  2. Effects of EoS in viscous hydro + cascade model for the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpenko, Iu.; Bleicher, M.; Huovinen, P.; Petersen, H.

    2016-12-01

    A state-of-the-art 3+1 dimensional cascade + viscous hydro + cascade model vHLLE+UrQMD has been applied to heavy ion collisions in RHIC Beam Energy Scan range √{sNN} = 7.7 , … , 200 GeV. Based on comparison to available experimental data it was estimated that an effective value of shear viscosity over entropy density ratio η / s in hydrodynamic stage has to decrease from η / s = 0.2 to 0.08 as collision energy increases from √{sNN} = 7.7 to 39 GeV, and to stay at η / s = 0.08 for 39 ≤√{ s} ≤ 200 GeV. In this work we show how an equation of state with first order phase transition affects the hydrodynamic evolution at those collision energies and changes the results of the model as compared to "default scenario" with a crossover type EoS from chiral model.

  3. SU-E-T-665: Radiochromic Film Quenching Effect Reduction for Proton Beam Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Aldelaijan, S; Alzorkany, F; Moftah, B; Alrumayan, F; Seuntjens, J; Lewis, D; Devic, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Depending on the useful dose range in which radiochromic films operate, number of different radiochromic film models have been designed. The impact of different film models on quenching effect for percent depth dose (PDD) measurements in proton beams has been investigated. Methods: Calibrated PTW Markus ionization chamber was used to measure PDD and beam output for 26.5 MeV protons produced by CS30 cyclotron. An aluminum cylinder was added in front of the beam exit serving as a radiation shutter. The measured signal was normalized to a monitor chamber reading and subsequently scaled by ratio of water-to-air stopping powers at given depth, while the effective depth of measurements was scaled by ratios of material-to-water physical densities and CSDA ranges. Output was measured in water at 2.1 mm reference-depth in the plateau upstream from the Bragg peak. Following the TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol for proton beams, the output was calibrated in water. Three radiochromic film models (EBT, EBT3 and HD-V2) were calibrated within Lexan phantom positioned at the same water-equivalent depth. Thicknesses of films sensitive layers were 34 µm, 30 µm and 8 µm, respectively. Small film pieces (1 x 2 cm{sup 2}) were positioned within polyethylene phantom along the beam central axis with an angulation of 5° for PDD measurements. Results: While the output of the proton beam was found to be around 7 Gy/sec, the actual value of the output per monitor chamber reading (2.32 Gy/nC) was used for reference-dose irradiations during film calibration. Dose ratios at the Bragg peak relative to the reference-depth were 3.88, 2.52, 2.19, and 2.02 for the Markus chamber, HD-V2, EBT3, and EBT film models, respectively. Conclusion: Results at hand suggest that quenching effect is reduced when a radiochromic film model with smaller sensitive layer thickness is used for PDD measurements in proton beams. David Lewis is the owner of RCF Consulting, LLC.

  4. Effects On Beam Alignment Due To Neutron-Irradiated CCD Images At The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A; Manuel, A; Datte, P; Burkhart, S

    2011-02-28

    The 192 laser beams in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are automatically aligned to the target-chamber center using images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras. Several of these cameras are in and around the target chamber during an experiment. Current experiments for the National Ignition Campaign are attempting to achieve nuclear fusion. Neutron yields from these high energy fusion shots expose the alignment cameras to neutron radiation. The present work explores modeling and predicting laser alignment performance degradation due to neutron radiation effects, and demonstrates techniques to mitigate performance degradation. Camera performance models have been created based on the measured camera noise from the cumulative single-shot fluence at the camera location. We have found that the effect of the neutron-generated noise for all shots to date have been well within the alignment tolerance of half a pixel, and image processing techniques can be utilized to reduce the effect even further on the beam alignment.

  5. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    SciTech Connect

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  6. Report on health and environmental effects of increased coal utilization*

    PubMed Central

    1980-01-01

    The National Energy Plan announced by President Carter on April 29, 1977 proposed a significant increase in the utilization of the vast domestic deposits of coal to replace the dwindling supplies of oil and natural gas, and increasingly expensive oil from foreign sources, to meet national energy needs. At the same time, in recognition of possible adverse health and ecological consequences of increased coal production and use, the President announced that a special committee would be formed to study this aspect of the National Energy Plan. The Committee held a series of public meetings during November and December 1977 to review a number of special papers on particular problems associated with increased coal utilization. These papers, which were prepared by scientists of the US Environmental Protection Agency; the Department of Energy; the HEW National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; New York University; and Vanderbilt University; provided essential background information for the deliberations of the Committee and were published in EHP Vol. 33, pp. 127–314, 1979. One paper by A. P. Altschuler et al. is published in this volume of EHP. The Committee's basic finding was that it is safe to proceed with plans to increase the utilization of coal if the following environmental and safety policies are adhered to: • Compliance with Federal and State air, water, and solid waste regulations • Universal adoption and successful operation of best available control technology on new facilities • Compliance with reclamation standards • Compliance with mine health and safety standards • Judicious siting of coal-fired facilities The Committee concluded that, even with the best mitigation policies, there will be some adverse health and environmental effects from the dramatic increase in coal use. However, these will not impact all regions and individuals uniformly. The Committee identified six

  7. Ponderomotive and weakly relativistic self-focusing of Gaussian laser beam in plasma: Effect of light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, S. D.; Takale, M. V.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an influence of light absorption on self-focusing of laser beam propagation in plasma. The differential equation for beam-width parameter is obtained using the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin and paraxial approximations through parabolic equation approach. The nonlinearity in dielectric function is assumed to be aroused due to the combined effect of weakly relativistic and ponderomotive regime. To highlight the nature of propagation, behavior of beam-width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation is presented graphically and discussed. The present work is helpful to understand issues related to the beam propagation in laser plasma interaction experiments where light absorption plays a vital role.

  8. Contrast Enhancement of the LOASIS CPA Laser and Effects on Electron Beam Performance of LWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, Csaba; Gonsalves, Anthony J.; Panasenko, Dmitriy; Matlis, Nicholas H.; Leemans, Wim P.; Albert, Olivier; Canova, Lorenzo; Plateau, Guillaume

    2009-01-22

    A nonlinear optical pulse cleaning technique based on cross-polarized wave (XPW) generation filtering [1] has been implemented to improve laser pulse contrast, and consequently to control pre-ionization in laser-plasma accelerator experiments. Three orders of magnitude improvement in pre-pulse contrast has been achieved, resulting in 4-fold increase in electron charge and improved stability of both the electron beam energy and THz radiation generated as a secondary process in the gas-jet-based LWFA experiments.

  9. Effective beam separation schemes for the measurement of the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect in an ion interferometer.

    PubMed

    Schütz, G; Rembold, A; Pooch, A; Prochel, H; Stibor, A

    2015-11-01

    We propose an experiment for the first proof of the type I electric Aharonov-Bohm effect in an ion interferometer for hydrogen. The performances of three different beam separation schemes are simulated and compared. The coherent ion beam is generated by a single atom tip (SAT) source and separated by either two biprisms with a quadrupole lens, two biprisms with an einzel-lens or three biprisms. The beam path separation is necessary to introduce two metal tubes that can be pulsed with different electric potentials. The high time resolution of a delay line detector allows to work with a continuous ion beam and circumvents the pulsed beam operation as originally suggested by Aharonov and Bohm. We demonstrate that the higher mass and therefore lower velocity of ions compared to electrons combined with the high expected SAT ion emission puts the direct proof of this quantum effect for the first time into reach of current technical possibilities. Thereby a high detection rate of coherent ions is crucial to avoid long integration times that allow the influence of dephasing noise from the environment. We can determine the period of the expected matter wave interference pattern and the signal on the detector by determining the superposition angle of the coherent partial beams. Our simulations were tested with an electron interferometer setup and agree with the experimental results. We determine the separation scheme with three biprisms to be most efficient and predict a total signal acquisition time of only 80s to measure a phase shift from 0 to 2π due to the electric Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  10. Evidence for the suppression of incident beam effects in Auger electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davoli, I.; Gunnella, R.; Bernardini, R.; De Crescenzi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Auger electron diffraction (AED) of the Cu(100) surface has been studied through the anisotropy of the elastic backdiffused beam electrons, the L 2,3M 4,5M 4,5 (LVV) and the M 2,3M 4,5M 4,5 (MVV) transitions in polar scan along the two main directions [001], [011] and in azimuth scan at normal emission. The intensity anisotropies of the low and high kinetic energy Auger lines are in antiphase to each other as in experiments in which these transitions are excited by X-ray photons. This behaviour has been exploited to single out the origin of the physical mechanisms accompanying the diffraction of the emitted electrons. Incident beam effects appear to be sizeable only when the collection of the AED spectra are made with an angle integrating electron analyser (cylindrical mirror analyser or low electron energy diffraction apparatus), but they appear negligible when electron collection is performed through a small solid-angle detector. The conclusions reached by our measurements are supported by good agreement with experimental and theoretical X-ray photoelectron diffraction data and demonstrate that, when the incident beam energy is sufficiently higher than the kinetic energy of the Auger electron detected, the influence of the incident beam on AED is negligible.

  11. Non-Maxwellian effects in underdense plasmas heated by non-uniform laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matte, Jean-Pierre

    2005-10-01

    The collisionl heating of plasmas by intense laser beams is known to drive the electron distribution function into a super-Gaussian [1] or ``DLM'' [2] shape. This reduces the absorption [1], and the reduction is stronger if the beam is very non-uniform, for a given average intensity, as there is a depletion of slow electrons, compared to a Maxwellian of the same density and average energy. If the beam irradiates most or a good fraction of the plasma volume, these non-Maxwellian effects also imply a depletion of high energy electrons, with the resulting strong reduction of Landau damping of Langmuir waves [2], contrary to the results of Brunner and Valeo [3] which were obtained in the limit of a narrow beam heating a wide plasma. The depletion of fast electrons depends essentially on the average laser intensity. We will show how these two aspects vary with the laser and plasma parameters.[1] A.B. Langdon, Phys. Rev. Lett. 44, 575 (1980) [2] B.B. Afeyan, A.E. Chou, J.P. Matte et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 2322 (1998). [3] S. Brunner and E. Valeo, Phys. Plasmas 9, 923 (2002).

  12. Focusing Intense Charged Particle Beams with Achromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrani, James; Kaganovich, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Final focusing systems designed to minimize the effects of chromatic aberrations in the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment (NDCX-II) are described. NDCX-II is a linear induction accelerator, designed to accelerate short bunches at high current. Previous experiments showed that neutralized drift compression significantly compresses the beam longitudinally (˜60x) in the z-direction, resulting in a narrow distribution in z-space, but a wide distribution in pz-space. Using simple lenses (e.g., solenoids, quadrupoles) to focus beam bunches with wide distributions in pz-space results in chromatic aberrations, leading to lower beam intensities (J/cm^2). Therefore, the final focusing system must be designed to compensate for chromatic aberrations. The paraxial ray equations and beam envelope equations are numerically solved for parameters appropriate to NDCX-II. Based on these results, conceptual designs for final focusing systems using a combination of solenoids and/or quadrupoles are optimized to compensate for chromatic aberrations. Lens aberrations and emittance growth will be investigated, and analytical results will be compared with results from numerical particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation codes.

  13. Effect of 3D Polarization profiles on polarization measurements and colliding beam experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.; Bazilevsky, A.

    2011-08-18

    The development of polarization profiles are the primary reason for the loss of average polarization. Polarization profiles have been parametrized with a Gaussian distribution. We derive the effect of 3-dimensional polarization profiles on the measured polarization in polarimeters, as well as the observed polarization and the figure of merit in single and double spin experiments. Examples from RHIC are provided. The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is the only collider of spin polarized protons. During beam acceleration and storage profiles of the polarization P develop, which affect the polarization measured in a polarimeter, and the polarization and figure of merit (FOM) in colliding beam experiments. We calculate these for profiles in all dimensions, and give examples for RHIC. Like in RHIC we call the two colliding beams Blue and Yellow. We use the overbar to designate intensity-weighted averages in polarimeters (e.g. {bar P}), and angle brackets to designate luminosity-weighted averages in colliding beam experiments (e.g.

    ).

  14. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching.

    PubMed

    Liebes, Yael; Hadad, Binyamin; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2011-07-15

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  15. Effects of electrons on the shape of nanopores prepared by focused electron beam induced etching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebes, Yael; Hadad, Binyamin; Ashkenasy, Nurit

    2011-07-01

    The fabrication of nanometric pores with controlled size is important for applications such as single molecule detection. We have recently suggested the use of focused electron beam induced etching (FEBIE) for the preparation of such nanopores in silicon nitride membranes. The use of a scanning probe microscope as the electron beam source makes this technique comparably accessible, opening the way to widespread fabrication of nanopores. Since the shape of the nanopores is critically important for their performance, in this work we focus on its analysis and study the dependence of the nanopore shape on the electron beam acceleration voltage. We show that the nanopore adopts a funnel-like shape, with a central pore penetrating the entire membrane, surrounded by an extended shallow-etched region at the top of the membrane. While the internal nanopore size was found to depend on the electron acceleration voltage, the nanopore edges extended beyond the primary electron beam spot size due to long-range effects, such as radiolysis and diffusion. Moreover, the size of the peripheral-etched region was found to be less dependent on the acceleration voltage. We also found that chemical etching is the rate-limiting step of the process and is only slightly dependent on the acceleration voltage. Furthermore, due to the chemical etch process the chemical composition of the nanopore rims was found to maintain the bulk membrane composition.

  16. Nonlocal beam model for axial buckling of carbon nanotubes with surface effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yu-Gang; Yao, Xiao-Hu; Liang, Ying-Jing; Han, Qiang

    2012-09-01

    Small-size effect and surface effect are two of the most specific intrinsic properties of nanostructures, both of which are of great significance to the related applications. In this letter, the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model, together with surface elasticity and surface tension are implemented to investigate the buckling behavior of axially compressed carbon nanotubes. Explicit expression of solutions to the critical buckling loads corresponding to typical boundary conditions is presented. Through contrast to molecular dynamics results, it is vitally important to note that both small-size effect and surface effect have a profound consequence and should be taken into account thoroughly.

  17. Tissue-Sparing Effect of X-ray Microplanar Beams Particulary in the CNS: Is a Bystander Effect Involved?

    SciTech Connect

    Dilmanian,A.; Qu, Y.; Feinendegen, L.; Pena, L.; Bacarian, T.; Henn, F.; Kalef-Ezra, J.; Liu, S.; Zhong, Z.; McDonald, J.

    2007-01-01

    Normal tissues, including the central nervous system, tolerate single exposures to narrow planes of synchrotron-generated x-rays (microplanar beams; microbeams) up to several hundred Gy. The repairs apparently involve the microvasculature and the glial system. We evaluate a hypothesis on the involvement of bystander effects in these repairs.

  18. Electromagnetic Transponders Indicate Prostate Size Increase Followed by Decrease During the Course of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Benjamin L.; Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Kurko, Brian S.; Reed, Joshua L.; Murray, Brian C.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: Real-time image guidance enables more accurate radiation therapy by tracking target movement. This study used transponder positions to monitor changes in prostate volume that may be a source of dosimetric and target inaccuracy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four men with biopsy-proven T1c-T3a prostate cancer each had three electromagnetic transponders implanted transperineally. Their coordinates were recorded by the Calypso system, and the perimeter of the triangle formed by the transponders was used to calculate prostate volumes at sequential time points throughout the course of radiation therapy to a dose of 81 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Results: There was a significant decrease in mean prostate volume of 10.9% from the first to the final day of radiation therapy. The volume loss did not occur monotonically but increased in most patients (75%) during the first several weeks to a median maximum on Day 7. The volume increased by a mean of 6.1% before decreasing by a mean maximum difference of 18.4% to nadir (p < 0.001 for both increase and decrease). Glandular shrinkage was asymmetric, with the apex to right base dimension varying more than twice that of the lateral dimension. For all dimensions, the mean change was <0.5 cm. Conclusion: Real-time transponder positions indicated a volume increase during the initial days of radiation therapy and then significant and asymmetric shrinkage by the final day. Understanding and tracking volume fluctuations of the prostate during radiation therapy can help real-time imaging technology perform to its fullest potential.

  19. Effects of multi-scattering on the performance of a single-beam acoustic manipulation device.

    PubMed

    Azarpeyvand, Mahdi; Alibakhshi, Mohammad Amin; Self, Rod

    2012-08-01

    The effects of multiple scattering on acoustic manipulation of spherical particles using helicoidal Bessel-beams are discussed. A closed-form analytical solution is developed to calculate the acoustic radiation force resulting from a Bessel-beam on an acoustically reflective sphere, in the presence of an adjacent spherical particle, immersed in an unbounded fluid medium. The solution is based on the standard Fourier decomposition method and the effect of multi-scattering is taken into account using the addition theorem for spherical coordinates. Of particular interest here is the investigation of the effects of multiple scattering on the emergence of negative axial forces. To investigate the effects, the radiation force applied on the target particle resulting from a helicoidal Bessel-beam of different azimuthal indexes (m = 1 to 4), at different conical angles, is computed. Results are presented for soft and rigid spheres of various sizes, separated by a finite distance. Results have shown that the emergence of negative force regions is very sensitive to the level of cross-scattering between the particles. It has also been shown that in multiple scattering media, the negative axial force may occur at much smaller conical angles than previously reported for single particles, and that acoustic manipulation of soft spheres in such media may also become possible.

  20. Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

  1. Streamlining: Reducing costs and increasing STS operations effectiveness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersburg, R. K.

    1985-01-01

    The development of streamlining as a concept, its inclusion in the space transportation system engineering and operations support (STSEOS) contract, and how it serves as an incentive to management and technical support personnel is discussed. The mechanics of encouraging and processing streamlining suggestions, reviews, feedback to submitters, recognition, and how individual employee performance evaluations are used to motivation are discussed. Several items that were implemented are mentioned. Information reported and the methodology of determining estimated dollar savings are outlined. The overall effect of this activity on the ability of the McDonnell Douglas flight preparation and mission operations team to support a rapidly increasing flight rate without a proportional increase in cost is illustrated.

  2. The effect of eye orientation on slowly increasing pain.

    PubMed

    Naveteur, Janick; Mars, Franck; Crombez, Geert

    2005-02-01

    The present study investigated the influence of eye orientation upon the experience of pain. Quasi continuous electrocutaneous stimuli which slowly increased in intensity were delivered to 32 healthy females volunteers. Participants were instructed to direct the eyes at locations that were ipsilateral or contralateral to the stimulated hand. Unpleasantness threshold and pain threshold were significantly higher when the eyes were oriented ipsilateral towards the stimulated hand. In a second experiment phase, the pain intensity increased until tolerance. There was no effect of eye orientation upon pain threshold and tolerance. Results of the first experimental part are in line with the counterintuitive idea that selective monitoring reduces pain distress. The lack of significant results in the second experiment phase is discussed in terms of statistical power and a change in coping induced by the expectation of high intensity pain.

  3. Increased consumption and vasodilatory effect of nitrite during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Yuen Yi; Lin, Elaina E.; Tian, Xin; Yang, Yang; Sun, He; Swenson, Erik R.; Taveira-Dasilva, Angelo M.; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of aerobic-to-anaerobic exercise on nitrite stores in the human circulation and evaluated the effects of systemic nitrite infusion on aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity and hemodynamics. Six healthy volunteers were randomized to receive sodium nitrite or saline for 70 min in two separate occasions in an exercise study. Subjects cycled on an upright electronically braked cycle ergometer 30 min into the infusion according to a ramp protocol designed to attain exhaustion in 10 min. They were allowed to recover for 30 min thereafter. The changes of whole blood nitrite concentrations over the 70-min study period were analyzed by pharmacokinetic modeling. Longitudinal measurements of hemodynamic and clinical variables were analyzed by fitting nonparametric regression spline models. During exercise, nitrite consumption/elimination rate was increased by ∼137%. Cardiac output (CO), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were increased, but smaller elevation of MAP and larger increases of CO and PAP were found during nitrite infusion compared with placebo control. The higher CO and lower MAP during nitrite infusion were likely attributed to vasodilation and a trend toward decrease in systemic vascular resistance. In contrast, there were no significant changes in mean pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance. These findings, together with the increased consumption of nitrite and production of iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin during exercise, support the notion of nitrite conversion to release NO resulting in systemic vasodilatation. However, at the dosing used in this protocol achieving micromolar plasma concentrations of nitrite, exercise capacity was not enhanced, as opposed to other reports using lower dosing. PMID:26684248

  4. Increased consumption and vasodilatory effect of nitrite during exercise.

    PubMed

    Hon, Yuen Yi; Lin, Elaina E; Tian, Xin; Yang, Yang; Sun, He; Swenson, Erik R; Taveira-Dasilva, Angelo M; Gladwin, Mark T; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-15

    This study investigated the effects of aerobic-to-anaerobic exercise on nitrite stores in the human circulation and evaluated the effects of systemic nitrite infusion on aerobic and anaerobic exercise capacity and hemodynamics. Six healthy volunteers were randomized to receive sodium nitrite or saline for 70 min in two separate occasions in an exercise study. Subjects cycled on an upright electronically braked cycle ergometer 30 min into the infusion according to a ramp protocol designed to attain exhaustion in 10 min. They were allowed to recover for 30 min thereafter. The changes of whole blood nitrite concentrations over the 70-min study period were analyzed by pharmacokinetic modeling. Longitudinal measurements of hemodynamic and clinical variables were analyzed by fitting nonparametric regression spline models. During exercise, nitrite consumption/elimination rate was increased by ∼137%. Cardiac output (CO), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) were increased, but smaller elevation of MAP and larger increases of CO and PAP were found during nitrite infusion compared with placebo control. The higher CO and lower MAP during nitrite infusion were likely attributed to vasodilation and a trend toward decrease in systemic vascular resistance. In contrast, there were no significant changes in mean pulmonary artery pressures and pulmonary vascular resistance. These findings, together with the increased consumption of nitrite and production of iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin during exercise, support the notion of nitrite conversion to release NO resulting in systemic vasodilatation. However, at the dosing used in this protocol achieving micromolar plasma concentrations of nitrite, exercise capacity was not enhanced, as opposed to other reports using lower dosing.

  5. Reduction of Non-uniform Beam Filling Effects by Vertical Decorrelation: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Short, David; Nakagawa, Katsuhiro; Iguchi, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Algorithms for estimating precipitation rates from spaceborne radar observations of apparent radar reflectivity depend on attenuation correction procedures. The algorithm suite for the Ku-band precipitation radar aboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite is one such example. The well-known problem of nonuniform beam filling is a source of error in the estimates, especially in regions where intense deep convection occurs. The error is caused by unresolved horizontal variability in precipitation characteristics such as specific attenuation, rain rate, and effective reflectivity factor. This paper proposes the use of vertical decorrelation for correcting the nonuniform beam filling error developed under the assumption of a perfect vertical correlation. Empirical tests conducted using ground-based radar observations in the current simulation study show that decorrelation effects are evident in tilted convective cells. However, the problem of obtaining reasonable estimates of a governing parameter from the satellite data remains unresolved.

  6. Magnetic field effects on buckling behavior of smart size-dependent graded nanoscale beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, Farzad; Reza Barati, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    In this article, buckling behavior of nonlocal magneto-electro-elastic functionally graded (MEE-FG) beams is investigated based on a higher-order beam model. Material properties of smart nanobeam are supposed to change continuously throughout the thickness based on the power-law model. Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory is adopted to capture the small size effects. Nonlocal governing equations of MEE-FG nanobeam are obtained employing Hamilton's principle and they are solved using the Navier solution. Numerical results are presented to indicate the effects of magnetic potential, electric voltage, nonlocal parameter and material composition on buckling behavior of MEE-FG nanobeams. Therefore, the present study makes the first attempt in analyzing the buckling responses of higher-order shear deformable (HOSD) MEE-FG nanobeams.

  7. Investigation of Fully Three-Dimensional Helical RF Field Effects on TWT Beam/Circuit Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2000-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional (3D), time-dependent, helical traveling wave-tube (TWT) interaction model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA. The model includes a short section of helical slow-wave circuit with excitation fed by RF input/output couplers, and electron beam contained by periodic permanent magnet (PPM) focusing. All components of the model are simulated in three dimensions allowing the effects of the fully 3D helical fields on RF circuit/beam interaction to be investigated for the first time. The development of the interaction model is presented, and predicted TWT performance using 2.5D and 3D models is compared to investigate the effect of conventional approximations used in TWT analyses.

  8. Telecommunication using muon beams

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Richard C.

    1976-01-01

    Telecommunication is effected by generating a beam of mu mesons or muons, varying a property of the beam at a modulating rate to generate a modulated beam of muons, and detecting the information in the modulated beam at a remote location.

  9. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D

    1985-12-01

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  10. Transitory and permanent effects of electron beam irradiation on insulating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oproiu, C.; Martin, D.; Toma, M.; Marghitu, S.; Jianu, A.

    2000-05-01

    Transitory and permanent effects of electron beam irradiation on mechanical and electrical properties of a large list of organic insulating materials, such as: polyethylene (PE), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), polystyrene (PS), terephtalated polyethylene (PET), stratified phenol-paper (SPP), methylsthyrene butadiene rubber (MeStB), silicon rubber (SR), polyester resin (UPR) are presented. The principal mechanical and electrical properties analyzed were: tensile strength, elongation at break, sharing strength, dielectric strength, electrical resistivity, dielectric constant, dissipation factor.

  11. Quantum electrodynamics analysis of optical binding in counterpropagating beams and effect of particle size.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Justo

    2008-10-01

    A general expression for optical binding energy between particles of any size, in counterpropagating beams with and without interference, is derived using quantum electrodynamics. The effect of particle size on the optically induced interparticle energy surface, which has been the subject of recent research, is explored. Significant changes in this surface when particle size approaches the wavelength of the optical field are revealed. Finally, optically induced particle arrays that may be fabricated with these potentials are briefly discussed.

  12. The Martyrdom Effect: When Pain and Effort Increase Prosocial Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Olivola, Christopher Y; Shafir, Eldar

    2013-01-01

    Most theories of motivation and behavior (and lay intuitions alike) consider pain and effort to be deterrents. In contrast to this widely held view, we provide evidence that the prospect of enduring pain and exerting effort for a prosocial cause can promote contributions to the cause. Specifically, we show that willingness to contribute to a charitable or collective cause increases when the contribution process is expected to be painful and effortful rather than easy and enjoyable. Across five experiments, we document this “martyrdom effect,” show that the observed patterns defy standard economic and psychological accounts, and identify a mediator and moderator of the effect. Experiment 1 showed that people are willing to donate more to charity when they anticipate having to suffer to raise money. Experiment 2 extended these findings to a non-charity laboratory context that involved real money and actual pain. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the martyrdom effect is not the result of an attribute substitution strategy (whereby people use the amount of pain and effort involved in fundraising to determine donation worthiness). Experiment 4 showed that perceptions of meaningfulness partially mediate the martyrdom effect. Finally, Experiment 5 demonstrated that the nature of the prosocial cause moderates the martyrdom effect: the effect is strongest for causes associated with human suffering. We propose that anticipated pain and effort lead people to ascribe greater meaning to their contributions and to the experience of contributing, thereby motivating higher prosocial contributions. We conclude by considering some implications of this puzzling phenomenon. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23559692

  13. Reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts in spectral CT using Medipix3RX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajendran, K.; Walsh, M. F.; de Ruiter, N. J. A.; Chernoglazov, A. I.; Panta, R. K.; Butler, A. P. H.; Butler, P. H.; Bell, S. T.; Anderson, N. G.; Woodfield, T. B. F.; Tredinnick, S. J.; Healy, J. L.; Bateman, C. J.; Aamir, R.; Doesburg, R. M. N.; Renaud, P. F.; Gieseg, S. P.; Smithies, D. J.; Mohr, J. L.; Mandalika, V. B. H.; Opie, A. M. T.; Cook, N. J.; Ronaldson, J. P.; Nik, S. J.; Atharifard, A.; Clyne, M.; Bones, P. J.; Bartneck, C.; Grasset, R.; Schleich, N.; Billinghurst, M.

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses methods for reducing beam hardening effects and metal artefacts using spectral x-ray information in biomaterial samples. A small-animal spectral scanner was operated in the 15 to 80 keV x-ray energy range for this study. We use the photon-processing features of a CdTe-Medipix3RX ASIC in charge summing mode to reduce beam hardening and associated artefacts. We present spectral data collected for metal alloy samples, its analysis using algebraic 3D reconstruction software and volume visualisation using a custom volume rendering software. The cupping effect and streak artefacts are quantified in the spectral datasets. The results show reduction in beam hardening effects and metal artefacts in the narrow high energy range acquired using the spectroscopic detector. A post-reconstruction comparison between CdTe-Medipix3RX and Si-Medipix3.1 is discussed. The raw data and processed data are made available (http://hdl.handle.net/10092/8851) for testing with other software routines.

  14. Goos-Hänchen effect and bending of spin wave beams in thin magnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszecki, P. Krawczyk, M.; Romero-Vivas, J.; Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.

    2014-12-15

    For magnon spintronic applications, the detailed knowledge of spin wave (SW) beam dispersion, transmission (reflection) of SWs passing through (reflected from) interfaces, or borders or the scattering of SWs by inhomogeneities is crucial. These wave properties are decisive factors on the usefulness of a particular device. Here, we demonstrate, using micromagnetic simulations supported by an analytical model, that the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift exists for SW reflecting from thin film edge and that with the effect becomes observable. We show that this effect will exist for a broad range of frequencies in the dipole-exchange range, with the magnetization degree of pinning at the film edge as the crucial parameter, whatever its nature. Moreover, we have also found that the GH effect can be accompanied or even dominating by a bending of the SW beam due to the inhomogeneity of the internal magnetic field. This inhomogeneity, created by demagnetizing field taking place at the film edge, causes gradual change of SWs refractive index. The refraction of the SW beams by the non-uniformity of the magnetic field enables the exploration of graded index magnonics and metamaterial properties for the transmission and processing of information at nanoscale.

  15. Effects of Flux and Energy of Neutral Beam on Hydrogenation of Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Takeru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2015-09-01

    Hydrogen modification, hydrogenation, of graphene, has attracted due to the possibility of hydrogen storage. Chemisorbed hydrogen has strong interaction with graphene surface and sp3 bond forms. Surprisingly, ideal structure of graphene shows reversible absorption of hydrogen and it leads to effective designing of hydrogen storage material. In this paper, we have demonstrated neutral beam (NB) technique for hydrogenation of graphene instead of conventional plasma method. NB system consists of a plasma generation chamber and a process chamber, which are separated by a carbon plate with many apertures. The charged particles can be effectively neutralized by collision with the sidewall of the apertures when passing through them to the process chamber. Development of the D-band and blue shift of G-band were observed after hydrogen NB irradiation by Raman spectroscopy. FTIR analysis reveals CH bending mode was appeared and it depends on beam energy, thus CH formation has reaction threshold and potential to control it. In addition, it is shown that beam flux affects hydrogenation and additional effect is also included in reaction process. We believe our investigation will provide development of hydrogenated graphene applications.

  16. Goos-Hänchen effect and bending of spin wave beams in thin magnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszecki, P.; Romero-Vivas, J.; Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.; Krawczyk, M.

    2014-12-01

    For magnon spintronic applications, the detailed knowledge of spin wave (SW) beam dispersion, transmission (reflection) of SWs passing through (reflected from) interfaces, or borders or the scattering of SWs by inhomogeneities is crucial. These wave properties are decisive factors on the usefulness of a particular device. Here, we demonstrate, using micromagnetic simulations supported by an analytical model, that the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift exists for SW reflecting from thin film edge and that with the effect becomes observable. We show that this effect will exist for a broad range of frequencies in the dipole-exchange range, with the magnetization degree of pinning at the film edge as the crucial parameter, whatever its nature. Moreover, we have also found that the GH effect can be accompanied or even dominating by a bending of the SW beam due to the inhomogeneity of the internal magnetic field. This inhomogeneity, created by demagnetizing field taking place at the film edge, causes gradual change of SWs refractive index. The refraction of the SW beams by the non-uniformity of the magnetic field enables the exploration of graded index magnonics and metamaterial properties for the transmission and processing of information at nanoscale.

  17. Recent Progress of Neutral Beam Injector and Beam Emission Diagnosis in LHD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsunori, Ikeda; Kenichi, Nagaoka; Yasuhiko, Takeiri; Masaki, Osakabe; Katsuyoshi, Tsumori; Osamu, Kaneko

    2009-08-01

    Large size hydrogen neutral beam injectors (NBI) used a negative ion source (NNBI) as well as a proton source (PNBI) were developed for the large helical device (LHD). The injected power from NNBI and PNBI have reached 16 MW and 6.8 MW, respectively. These injected powers have outstripped the nominal beam powers. A diagnostic system of beam-emitted hydrogen visible spectrum has been installed along the beam injection axis to estimate the energy fraction on PNBI. The full energy beam component is about half which is equivalent to 70% of injected beam power. The attenuation of high energy neutral beam is also observed on NNBI. The peak density distribution is effective to increase beam deposition power.

  18. The effect of increased gravitational stress on bone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riggins, R. S.; Chacko, K. A.

    1977-01-01

    A group of 34 adult male chickens were chronically accelerated over an 18-week period; for the last 4 weeks the surviving animals were subjected to a 3-g field. Males of a similar weight and age were used as static controls. The objective was to evaluate the effects of an altered gravitational state on the physical properties of the tibia bone tested for torsional fracture. Of the 34 initial animals, 15 survived for the entire period and were subjected to analysis. The results suggest that the altered morphology produced by increased gravitational fields does not materially affect bone strength, at least in torsion. Decreased bone diameters were accompanied by increased cortical thickness without change in the bone resistance to torsion. The findings of increased cortical thickness with decreased bone diameter suggest reversal of the usual cellular dynamics of adult bone. Data on bone ash and density failed to reveal any substantial changes in bone mineral or organic content. Histological examination of the cortical bone did not disclose any evidence of pathology.

  19. Radiosensitizing effect of carboplatin and paclitaxel to carbon-ion beam irradiation in the non-small-cell lung cancer cell line H460.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Nobuteru; Noda, Shin-ei; Takahashi, Akihisa; Yoshida, Yukari; Oike, Takahiro; Murata, Kazutoshi; Musha, Atsushi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Ohno, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-03-01

    The present study investigated the ability of carboplatin and paclitaxel to sensitize human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to carbon-ion beam irradiation. NSCLC H460 cells treated with carboplatin or paclitaxel were irradiated with X-rays or carbon-ion beams, and radiosensitivity was evaluated by clonogenic survival assay. Cell proliferation was determined by counting the number of viable cells using Trypan blue. Apoptosis and senescence were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining and senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, respectively. The expression of cleaved caspase-3, Bax, p53 and p21 was analyzed by western blotting. Clonogenic survival assays demonstrated a synergistic radiosensitizing effect of carboplatin and paclitaxel with carbon-ion beams; the sensitizer enhancement ratios (SERs) at the dose giving a 10% survival fraction (D10) were 1.21 and 1.22, respectively. Similarly, carboplatin and paclitaxel showed a radiosensitizing effect with X-rays; the SERs were 1.41 and 1.29, respectively. Cell proliferation assays validated the radiosensitizing effect of carboplatin and paclitaxel with both carbon-ion beam and X-ray irradiation. Carboplatin and paclitaxel treatment combined with carbon-ion beams increased TUNEL-positive cells and the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, indicating the enhancement of apoptosis. The combined treatment also increased SA-β-gal-positive cells and the expression of p53 and p21, indicating the enhancement of senescence. In summary, carboplatin and paclitaxel radiosensitized H460 cells to carbon-ion beam irradiation by enhancing irradiation-induced apoptosis and senescence.

  20. Traverse Focusing of Intense Charged Particle Beams with Chromatic Effects for Heavy Ion Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    James M. Mitrani, Igor D. Kaganovich, Ronald C. Davidson

    2013-01-28

    A fi nal focusing scheme designed to minimize chromatic effects is discussed. The Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment-II (NDCX-II) will apply a velocity tilt for longitudinal bunch compression, and a fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) for transverse bunch compression. In the beam frame, neutralized drift compression causes a suffi ciently large spread in axial momentum, pz , resulting in chromatic effects to the fi nal focal spot during transverse bunch compression. Placing a weaker solenoid upstream of a stronger fi nal focusing solenoid (FFS) mitigates chromatic effects and improves transverse focusing by a factor of approximately 2-4 for appropriate NDCX-II parameters.

  1. Beam-broadening effects in STEM/EDS measurement of radiation-induced segregation in high-purity 304L stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, J.T.; Was, G.S.; Allen, T.R. |; Kenik, E.A.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1997-10-01

    Radiation-induced segregation (RIS) is the spatial redistribution of elements at defect sinks such as grain boundaries and free surfaces during irradiation. This phenomenon has been studied in a wide variety of alloys and has been linked to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of nuclear reactor core components. Therefore, accurate determination of the grain boundary composition is important in understanding its effects on environmental cracking. Radiation-induced segregation profiles are routinely measured by scanning-transmission electron microscopy using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Because of the narrow width of the segregation profile (typically less than 10-nm full width at half-maximum), the accuracy of grain boundary concentration measurements using STEM/EDS depends on the characteristics of the analyzing instrument, specifically, the excited volume in which x-rays are generated. This excited volume is determined by both electron beam diameter and the primary electron beam energy. Increasing the primary beam energy in STEM/EDS produces greater measured grain boundary segregation, as the reduced electron beam broadening a smaller excited volume. In this work, the effect of beam broadening is assessed on segregation measurements in a 304L stainless steel sample irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons at 400 C to doses of 3.0 and 0.1 dpa. The STEM/EDS measurements are also compared to measurements made using AES.

  2. Effects of a dielectric material in an ion source on the ion beam current density and ion beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y. Sakakita, H.; Nakamiya, A.; Hirano, Y.; Kiyama, S.

    2016-02-15

    To understand a strong focusing phenomenon that occurs in a low-energy hydrogen ion beam, the electron temperature, the electron density, and the space potential in an ion source with cusped magnetic fields are measured before and after the transition to the focusing state using an electrostatic probe. The experimental results show that no significant changes are observed before or after the transition. However, we found unique phenomena that are characterized by the position of the electrostatic probe in the ion source chamber. Specifically, the extracted ion beam current density and energy are obviously enhanced in the case where the electrostatic probe, which is covered by a dielectric material, is placed close to an acceleration electrode.

  3. Effects of errors in velocity tilt on maximum longitudinal compression during neutralized drift compression of intense beam pulses: I. general description

    SciTech Connect

    Kaganovich, Igor D.; Massidda, Scottt; Startsev, Edward A.; Davidson, Ronald C.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Friedman, Alex

    2012-06-21

    Neutralized drift compression offers an effective means for particle beam pulse compression and current amplification. In neutralized drift compression, a linear longitudinal velocity tilt (head-to-tail gradient) is applied to the non-relativistic beam pulse, so that the beam pulse compresses as it drifts in the focusing section. The beam current can increase by more than a factor of 100 in the longitudinal direction. We have performed an analytical study of how errors in the velocity tilt acquired by the beam in the induction bunching module limit the maximum longitudinal compression. It is found that the compression ratio is determined by the relative errors in the velocity tilt. That is, one-percent errors may limit the compression to a factor of one hundred. However, a part of the beam pulse where the errors are small may compress to much higher values, which are determined by the initial thermal spread of the beam pulse. It is also shown that sharp jumps in the compressed current density profile can be produced due to overlaying of different parts of the pulse near the focal plane. Examples of slowly varying and rapidly varying errors compared to the beam pulse duration are studied. For beam velocity errors given by a cubic function, the compression ratio can be described analytically. In this limit, a significant portion of the beam pulse is located in the broad wings of the pulse and is poorly compressed. The central part of the compressed pulse is determined by the thermal spread. The scaling law for maximum compression ratio is derived. In addition to a smooth variation in the velocity tilt, fast-changing errors during the pulse may appear in the induction bunching module if the voltage pulse is formed by several pulsed elements. Different parts of the pulse compress nearly simultaneously at the target and the compressed profile may have many peaks. The maximum compression is a function of both thermal spread and the velocity errors. The effects of the

  4. Effective source size, radial, angular and energy spread of therapeutic 11C positron emitter beams produced by 12C fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeroni, Marta; Brahme, Anders

    2014-02-01

    The use of positron emitter light ion beams in combination with PET (Positron Emission Tomography) and PET-CT (Computed Tomography) imaging could significantly improve treatment verification and dose delivery imaging during radiation therapy. The present study is dedicated to the analysis of the beam quality in terms of the effective source size, as well as radial, angular and energy spread of the 11C ion beam produced by projectile fragmentation of a primary point monodirectional and monoenergetic 12C ion beam in a dedicated range shifter of different materials. This study was performed combining analytical methods describing the transport of particles in matter and the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT+. A high brilliance and production yield of 11C fragments with a small effective source size and emittance is best achieved with a decelerator made of two media: a first liquid hydrogen section of about 20 cm followed by a hydrogen rich section of variable length. The calculated intensity of the produced 11C ion beam ranges from about 5% to 8% of the primary 12C beam intensity depending on the exit energy and the acceptance of the beam transport system. The angular spread is lower than 1 degree for all the materials studied, but the brilliance of the beam is the highest with the proposed mixed decelerator.

  5. Investigating the Relative Biological Effectiveness of a Hydrogen Plasma Beam on Breast Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donovan, Kelly; Thomas, Susan; Huggler, Kate; O'Donnell, Robert; Padalino, Stephen

    2008-11-01

    Proton therapy has become an accepted form of radiation therapy for tumors in the head, brain, neck, lung and prostate. Compared to other forms of radiation, protons can be applied to a more localized area. Due to the unique energy deposition of the proton beam which produces a flattened Bragg peak in the energy spectrum, it is possible to avoid damaging healthy tissue around the tumor. Past studies have consistently shown survival curves for healthy tissue which indicate effective doses in the range of 2-20 Gy. This study utilized a NEC 5SDH Tandem Pelletron Accelerator in the investigation of the irradiation effects on breast cancer cells. A 3 MeV proton beam passed through a 25 micron thick Kapton window which allowed the cells to remain in atmosphere while being irradiated. Proton energy loss and beam straggling through Kapton and air were determined theoretically using TRIM and confirmed by calibration experiments. A shutter system placed between the window and the cell sample was used to control radiation exposure time. A range of radiation exposure times were tested in an attempt to find the optimal dose.

  6. The effect of density fluctuations on ECRH beam broadening and implications to NTM mitigation on ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snicker, Antti; Guidi, Lorenzo; Kohn, Alf; Maj, Omar; Weber, Hannes; Poli, Emanuele

    2016-10-01

    We present state-of-the-art computations of propagation and absorption of electron cyclotron waves, retaining the effects of scattering due to density fluctuations. In ITER, injected microwaves are foreseen to suppress NTMs by driving current at the resonant surface(s). The good localization of the absorption profile can be spoiled by beam scattering and impair the NTM control capabilities. A novel tool based on the wave kinetic equation has been developed, which retains diffraction, an integral form of the scattering operator assuming the Born scattering approximation, full tokamak geometry and determination of the power absorption profile. This approach has been implemented in the code WKBeam, which has been benchmarked against the beam-tracing code TORBEAM and the full-wave code IPF-FDMC, in particular to verify usage of the Born approximation for ITER parameters. We show that in ITER the radiation transport is diffusive unlike in existing machines. Using WKBeam we demonstrate through parameter scans that the width of the deposition profile in ITER depends on the assumptions on the fluctuations and beam parameters: the effect can be of the order of 100%. A method to quantify mode-to-mode scattering induced by fluctuations has been developed and first results are presented.

  7. The Neutral Beam Test Facility and Radiation Effects Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McKenzie-Wilson, R.B.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has constructed a Neutral Beam Test Facility (NBTF) and a Radiation Effects Facility (REF). These two facilities use the surplus capacity of the 200-MeV Linac injector for the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The REF can be used to simulate radiation damage effects in space from both natural and man made radiation sources. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can be varied over a wide range leading to a broad field of application. The NBTF has been designed to carry out high precision experiments and contains an absolute reference target system for the on-line calibration of measurements carried out in the experimental hall. The H{sup {minus}} beam energy, current and dimensions can also be varied over a wide range but with tradeoffs depending on the required accuracy. Both facilities are fully operational and will be described together with details of the associated experimental programs.

  8. Beam-induced Electron Loading Effects in High Pressure Cavities for a Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, M.; Tollestrup, A.; Jansson, A.; Yonehara, K.; Insepov, Z.; /Argonne

    2010-05-01

    Ionization cooling is a critical building block for the realization of a muon collider. To suppress breakdown in the presence of the external magnetic field, an idea of using an RF cavity filled with high pressure hydrogen gas is being considered for the cooling channel design. One possible problem expected in the high pressure RF cavity is, however, the dissipation of significant RF power through the beam-induced electrons accumulated inside the cavity. To characterize this detrimental loading effect, we develop a simplified model that relates the electron density evolution and the observed pickup voltage signal in the cavity, with consideration of several key molecular processes such as the formation of the polyatomic molecules, recombination and attachment. This model is expected to be compared with the actual beam test of the cavity in the MuCool Test Area (MTA) of Fermilab.

  9. Effect of an electron scattering cloud on X-ray oscillations produced by beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brainerd, J.; Lamb, F. K.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of a scattering cloud on the amplitude of oscillations produced by a rotating beam of X-rays is investigated using analytical and Monte Carlo methods. The scattering cloud was modeled as a uniform density sphere, and the source was represented as an anistropic distribution of radiation emerging from a point at the center of the scattering cloud. The intensity distribution produced by the source beam is examined as a function of optical depth. The relation between electron scattering optical depth and the forward-backward ratio is studied. It is observed that the scattering in a central corona of various optical depths reduces the amplitude of the oscillation. The data suggest that the quasi-periodic oscillations observed in the X-ray intensities of some luminous low-mass X-ray binaries are caused by oscillations in the luminosity of the X-ray star.

  10. Metabolic effects of fructose and the worldwide increase in obesity.

    PubMed

    Tappy, Luc; Lê, Kim-Anne

    2010-01-01

    While virtually absent in our diet a few hundred years ago, fructose has now become a major constituent of our modern diet. Our main sources of fructose are sucrose from beet or cane, high fructose corn syrup, fruits, and honey. Fructose has the same chemical formula as glucose (C(6)H(12)O(6)), but its metabolism differs markedly from that of glucose due to its almost complete hepatic extraction and rapid hepatic conversion into glucose, glycogen, lactate, and fat. Fructose was initially thought to be advisable for patients with diabetes due to its low glycemic index. However, chronically high consumption of fructose in rodents leads to hepatic and extrahepatic insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and high blood pressure. The evidence is less compelling in humans, but high fructose intake has indeed been shown to cause dyslipidemia and to impair hepatic insulin sensitivity. Hepatic de novo lipogenesis and lipotoxicity, oxidative stress, and hyperuricemia have all been proposed as mechanisms responsible for these adverse metabolic effects of fructose. Although there is compelling evidence that very high fructose intake can have deleterious metabolic effects in humans as in rodents, the role of fructose in the development of the current epidemic of metabolic disorders remains controversial. Epidemiological studies show growing evidence that consumption of sweetened beverages (containing either sucrose or a mixture of glucose and fructose) is associated with a high energy intake, increased body weight, and the occurrence of metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. There is, however, no unequivocal evidence that fructose intake at moderate doses is directly related with adverse metabolic effects. There has also been much concern that consumption of free fructose, as provided in high fructose corn syrup, may cause more adverse effects than consumption of fructose consumed with sucrose. There is, however, no direct evidence for more serious metabolic

  11. Prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi SMA fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Kim, Dong Joo; Hwang, Jin-Ha; Kim, Woo Jin

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the prestressing effect of cold-drawn short NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) fibres in steel reinforced mortar beams. The SMA fibres were mixed with 1.5% volume content in a mortar matrix with the compressive strength of 50 MPa. The SMA fibres had an average length of 34 mm, and they were manufactured with a dog-bone shape: the diameters of the end- and middle-parts were 1.024 and 1.0 mm, respectively. Twenty mortar beams with the dimensions of 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm (B × H × L) were prepared. Two types of tests were conducted. One was to investigate the prestressing effect of the SMA fibres, and the beams with the SMA fibres were heated at the bottom. The other was to assess the bending behaviour of the beams prestressed by the SMA fibres. The SMA fibres induced upward deflection and cracking at the top surface by heating at the bottom; thus, they achieved an obvious prestressing effect. The beams that were prestressed by the SMA fibres did not show a significant difference in bending behaviour from that of the SMA fibre reinforced beams that were not subjected to heating. Stress analysis of the beams indicated that the prestressing effect decreased in relation to the cooling temperature.

  12. Effects of Light and Electron Beam Irradiation on Halide Perovskites and Their Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Klein-Kedem, Nir; Cahen, David; Hodes, Gary

    2016-02-16

    Hybrid alkylammonium lead halide perovskite solar cells have, in a very few years of research, exceeded a light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 20%, not far behind crystalline silicon cells. These perovskites do not contain any rare element, the amount of toxic lead used is very small, and the cells can be made with a low energy input. They therefore already conform to two of the three requirements for viable, commercial solar cells-efficient and cheap. The potential deal-breaker is their long-term stability. While reasonable short-term (hours) and even medium term (months) stability has been demonstrated, there is concern whether they will be stable for the two decades or more expected from commercial cells in view of the intrinsically unstable nature of these materials. In particular, they have a tendency to be sensitive to various types of irradiation, including sunlight, under certain conditions. This Account focuses on the effect of irradiation on the hybrid (and to a small degree, all-inorganic) lead halide perovskites and their solar cells. It is split up into two main sections. First, we look at the effect of electron beams on the materials. This is important, since such beams are used for characterization of both the perovskites themselves and cells made from them (electron microscopy for morphological and compositional characterization; electron beam-induced current to study cell operation mechanism; cathodoluminescence for charge carrier recombination studies). Since the perovskites are sensitive to electron beam irradiation, it is important to minimize beam damage to draw valid conclusions from such measurements. The second section treats the effect of visible and solar UV irradiation on the perovskites and their cells. As we show, there are many such effects. However, those affecting the perovskite directly need not necessarily always be detrimental to the cells, while those affecting the solar cells, which are composed of several other phases

  13. Effect of Increased Water Vapor Levels on TBC Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Pint, Bruce A; Garner, George Walter; Lowe, Tracie M; Haynes, James A; Zhang, Ying

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of increased water vapor levels on thermal barrier coating (TBC) lifetime, furnace cycle tests were performed at 1150 C in air with 10 vol.% water vapor (similar to natural gas combustion) and 90 vol.%. Either Pt diffusion or Pt-modified aluminide bond coatings were applied to specimens from the same batch of a commercial second-generation single-crystal superalloy and commercial vapor-deposited yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats were applied. Three coatings of each type were furnace cycled to failure to compare the average lifetimes obtained in dry O{sub 2}, using the same superalloy batch and coating types. Average lifetimes with Pt diffusion coatings were unaffected by the addition of water vapor. In contrast, the average lifetime of Pt-modified aluminide coatings was reduced by more than 50% with 10% water vapor but only slightly reduced by 90% water vapor. Based on roughness measurements from similar specimens without a YSZ coating, the addition of 10% water vapor increased the rate of coating roughening more than 90% water vapor. Qualitatively, the amount of {beta}-phase depletion in the coatings exposed in 10% water vapor did not appear to be accelerated.

  14. Assessing the effect of increased managed care on hospitals.

    PubMed

    Mowll, C A

    1998-01-01

    This study uses a new relative risk methodology developed by the author to assess and compare certain performance indicators to determine a hospital's relative degree of financial vulnerability, based on its location, to the effects of increased managed care market penetration. The study also compares nine financial measures to determine whether hospital in states with a high degree of managed-care market penetration experience lower levels of profitability, liquidity, debt service, and overall viability than hospitals in low managed care states. A Managed Care Relative Financial Risk Assessment methodology composed of nine measures of hospital financial and utilization performance is used to develop a high managed care state Composite Index and to determine the Relative Financial Risk and the Overall Risk Ratio for hospitals in a particular state. Additionally, financial performance of hospitals in the five highest managed care states is compared to hospitals in the five lowest states. While data from Colorado and Massachusetts indicates that hospital profitability diminishes as the level of managed care market penetration increases, the overall study results indicate that hospitals in high managed care states demonstrate a better cash position and higher profitability than hospitals in low managed care states. Hospitals in high managed care states are, however, more heavily indebted in relation to equity and have a weaker debt service coverage capacity. Moreover, the overall financial health and viability of hospitals in high managed care states is superior to that of hospitals in low managed care states.

  15. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Garibay, Erin J.

    2014-01-01

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to “push more with your foot when you walk”. We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects’ trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual 3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to “push more with your foot when you walk” reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces was 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain. PMID:25468661

  16. Effect of increased pushoff during gait on hip joint forces.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Garibay, Erin J

    2015-01-02

    Anterior acetabular labral tears and anterior hip pain may result from high anteriorly directed forces from the femur on the acetabulum. While providing more pushoff is known to decrease sagittal plane hip moments, it is unknown if this gait modification also decreases hip joint forces. The purpose of this study was to determine if increasing pushoff decreases hip joint forces. Nine healthy subjects walked on an instrumented force treadmill at 1.25 m/s under two walking conditions. For the natural condition, subjects were instructed to walk as they normally would. For the increased pushoff condition, subjects were instructed to "push more with your foot when you walk". We collected motion data of markers placed on the subjects' trunk and lower extremities to capture trunk and leg kinematics and ground reaction force data to determine joint moments. Data were processed in Visual3D to produce the inverse kinematics and model scaling files. In OpenSim, the generic gait model (Gait2392) was scaled to the subject, and hip joint forces were calculated for the femur on the acetabulum after computing the muscle activations necessary to reproduce the experimental data. The instruction to "push more with your foot when you walk" reduced the maximum hip flexion and extension moment compared to the natural condition. The average reduction in the hip joint forces were 12.5%, 3.2% and 9.6% in the anterior, superior and medial directions respectively and 2.3% for the net resultant force. Increasing pushoff may be an effective gait modification for people with anterior hip pain.

  17. Results of autologous transplantation in lymphoma are not improved by increasing the dose of etoposide in the BEAM regimen: a single-centre sequential-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Martín, A; Caballero, M D; Pérez-Simón, J A; López-Holgado, N; Mateos, M V; Cañizo, M C; Miguel, J F San

    2004-10-01

    We have undertaken a retrospective sequential-cohort analysis of 131 lymphoma patients treated with the BEAM regimen and autologous stem cell transplantation, to compare BEAM at standard doses (sBEAM; n = 67 from May 1990 to April 1995) and BEAM with escalated etoposide dose from 800 to 1600 mg/m(2) (eBEAM; n = 64 from May 1995 to June 1999). Transplant-related mortality and incidence of secondary malignancies were similar in both groups. Disease progression was significantly lower in indolent lymphoma (IL) patients receiving eBEAM (7 vs 43%), although survival was comparable due to a higher toxic mortality in the eBEAM group. The 5-year event-free survival and overall survival were better in Hodgkin's disease (HD) patients treated with eBEAM (70 and 77%, respectively) compared to sBEAM (58 and 69%, respectively), but the difference was not statistically significant. In aggressive lymphomas, no difference was detected between groups. Our results indicate that while escalation of the etoposide doses in the BEAM conditioning regimen does not appear to improve outcome, encouraging results in IL and HD may warrant further studies.

  18. Focused ion beam milling of diamond : effects of H2O on yield, surface morphology and microstructure.

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Thomas Michael; Hodges, V. Carter; Adams, David Price; Vasile, Michael J.

    2003-06-01

    The effects of H{sub 2}O vapor introduced during focused ion beam (FIB) milling of diamond(100) are examined. In particular, we determine the yield, surface morphology, and microstructural damage that results from FIB sputtering and H{sub 2}O-assisted FIB milling processes. Experiments involving 20 keV Ga{sup +} bombardment to doses {approx}10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2} are conducted at a number of fixed ion incidence angles, {theta}. For each {theta} selected, H{sub 2}O-assisted ion milling shows an increased material removal rate compared with FIB sputtering (no gas assist). The amount by which the yield is enhanced depends on the angle of incidence with the largest difference occurring at {theta} = 75{sup o}. Experiments that vary pixel dwell time from 3 {micro}s to 20 ms while maintaining a fixed H{sub 2}O gas pressure demonstrate the additional effect of beam scan rate on yield for gas-assisted processes. Different surface morphologies develop during ion bombardment depending on the angle of ion incidence and the presence/absence of H{sub 2}O. In general, a single mode of ripples having a wave vector aligned with the projection of the ion beam vector forms for {theta} as high as 70{sup o}. H{sub 2}O affects this morphology by lowering the ripple onset angle and decreasing the ripple wavelength. At high angles of incidence ({theta} > 70{sup o}) a step/terrace morphology is observed. H{sub 2}O-assisted milling at {theta} > 70{sup o} results in a smoother stepped surface compared with FIB sputtering. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the amorphized thickness is reduced by 20% when using H{sub 2}O-assisted FIB milling.

  19. Investigating the effects of laser beams (532 and 660 nm) in annihilation of pistachio mould fungus using spectrophotometry analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghafi, S.; Penjweini, R.; Becker, K.; Kratky, K. W.; Dodt, H.-U.

    2010-09-01

    When moulds are illuminated by visible electromagnetic-EM radiations, several effects on nucleus materials and nucleotides can be detected. These effects have a significant influence on mould generation or destruction. This paper presents the effects and implications of a red diode laser beam (660 nm), a second-harmonics of a Nd:YAG laser emitting green beam (532 nm), or the combination of both, on the eradication of Pistachio mould fungus. Incident doses (ID) of both beams are kept identical throughout the experiment. The absorption spectrums of irradiated mouldy samples and the bright-greenish-yellow-fluorescence (BGYF) of fungus occurring in mould texture due to electronic excitation are investigated. We found that a combination of a green and a red laser beam with an ID of 0.5 J/cm2 provides the optimal effects on Pistachio mould fungus eradication.

  20. Modulatory frequency of lasers in connection to laser beam therapeutic effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucerova, Hana; Bartova, Jirina; Himmlova, Lucia; Dostalova, Tatjana; Mazanek, Jiri

    1998-04-01

    The subject of this work follows changes of the sIgA and albumin levels in the saliva of 48 patients treated after the extraction of their lower molars with either diode or He-Ne biostimulatory laser, using different modulatory frequencies (5 Hz, 292 Hz, 9000 Hz). The results were compared to the sIgA and albumin levels in the saliva of the control, i.e. not- treated group. For the tests radial immunodiffusion (RID) method was used (commercial RID kit of the Binding Site, Birmingham, Great Britain). Appropriately chosen laser beam modulatory frequency should influence the increase in the sIgA and albumin levels against the base level. In our study, this hypothesis was confirmed in the group treated with the frequency of 292 Hz and 9000 Hz (both diode GaAIAs, 670 nm, red, 20 mW, energy density 1.5 Jcm2) on albumin levels and 9000 Hz on sIgA levels. The changes of the levels of the watched markers versus the control group were at this frequencies (292 Hz and 9000 Hz) statistically significant. At the others used frequencies (5 Hz diode laser and 5 Hz He-Ne laser) the changes of the levels of the watched markers versus control group were statistically insignificant. The aim of this study was to contribute to the evaluation of specific modulatory frequencies (5 Hz, 292 Hz, 9000 Hz) for therapeutical use in a given pathological case of the oral cavity. We can conclude that using frequency 9000 Hz had best immunomodulatory effect.

  1. Solving the charging effect in insulating materials probed by a variable monoenergy slow positron beam.

    PubMed

    Hung, Wei-Song; De Guzman, Manuel; An, Quanfu; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Jean, Yan-Ching; Lai, Juin-Yih

    2011-03-15

    A variable monoenergy slow positron beam (VMSPB) operating at a high vacuum on insulating materials encounters a problem of significant surface charging effect with time. As a result, positronium formation is inhibited, and the positron annihilation radiation counting rate is reduced; these consequently distorted the experimental positron annihilation and results. To solve such problems, a technique of depositing an ultrathin layer of sputtering noble metals on insulators is developed. We report a successful method of sputtering a few atomic layers of platinum (∼1 nm) on a polyamide membrane to completely remove the charging effect for VMSPB applications in insulators.

  2. Timoshenko beam model for buckling of piezoelectric nanowires with surface effects.

    PubMed

    Samaei, Arash Tourki; Bakhtiari, Majid; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2012-03-27

    This paper investigates the buckling behavior of piezoelectric nanowires under distributed transverse loading, within the framework of the Timoshenko beam theory, and in the presence of surface effects. Analytical relations are given for the critical force of axial buckling of nanowires by accounting for the effects of surface elasticity, residual surface tension, and transverse shear deformation. Through an example, it is shown that the critical electric potential of buckling depends on both the surface stresses and piezoelectricity. This study may be helpful in the characterization of the mechanical properties of nanowires and in the calibration of the nanowire-based force sensors.

  3. Timoshenko beam model for buckling of piezoelectric nanowires with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samaei, Arash Tourki; Bakhtiari, Majid; Wang, Gang-Feng

    2012-03-01

    This paper investigates the buckling behavior of piezoelectric nanowires under distributed transverse loading, within the framework of the Timoshenko beam theory, and in the presence of surface effects. Analytical relations are given for the critical force of axial buckling of nanowires by accounting for the effects of surface elasticity, residual surface tension, and transverse shear deformation. Through an example, it is shown that the critical electric potential of buckling depends on both the surface stresses and piezoelectricity. This study may be helpful in the characterization of the mechanical properties of nanowires and in the calibration of the nanowire-based force sensors.

  4. Effect of astigmatism on states of polarization of aberrant stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Chen, Yanru; Zhao, Qi; Zhou, Muchun

    2009-10-01

    The effect of astigmatism on states of polarization of aberrant stochastic electromagnetic beams in turbulent atmosphere is investigated. Using the Gaussian-Schell model source with astigmatism, the analytical formula for the degree of polarization, the orientation angle, and the degree of polarization ellipse are derived. Analytical results show that different strengths of astigmatism have different effects on states of polarization on propagation. It is also shown that when the astigmatic coefficient of sources is large enough, states of polarization are hardly affected by atmospheric turbulence and the free-space diffraction phenomenon. The sufficient conditions for propagating with invariant polarization are derived and discussed.

  5. Effect of e-beam irradiation and microwave heating on the fatty acid composition and volatile compound profile of grass carp surimi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongfei; Wang, Wei; Wang, Haiyan; Ye, Qingfu

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of e-beam irradiation(1-7 kGy) and irradiation coupled to microwave heating (e-I-MC, 70 °C internal temperature) on the fatty acid composition and volatile compound profile of grass carp surimi. Compared to control samples, e-beam irradiation generated three novel volatile compounds (heptane, 2,6-dimethyl-nonane, and dimethyl disulfide) and increased the relative proportions of alcohols, aldehydes, and ketones. Meanwhile, e-I-MC significantly increased aldehyde levels and generated five heterocyclic compounds along with these three novel compounds. No significant difference in volatile compounds were detected in e-I-MC samples with increasing irradiation dose (p>0.05), comparing to the control group. E-beam irradiation at 5 and 7 kGy increased the levels of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and decreased the levels of unsaturated fatty acids (p≤0.05), but did not affect the content of trans fatty acid levels (p>0.05). Irradiation, which had no significant effects on (Eicosapentaenoic acid) EPA, decreased (Docose Hexaenoie Acid) DHA levels. In the e-I-MC group, SFA levels increased and PUFA levels decreased. Additionally, MUFA levels were unaffected and trans fatty acid levels increased slightly following e-I-MC.

  6. Effects of vacuum annealing and oxygen ion beam bombarding on the electrical and optical properties of ITO films deposited by E-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongqiang; Hang, Lingxia

    2012-10-01

    Tin doped indium oxide (ITO) transparent conductive thin films with composition of 10 wt% SnO2 and 89.8 wt% In2O3 have been deposited by electron beam evaporation technique on K9 glass substrates at room temperature. The post annealing processes are done in vacuum with different annealing temperature at 100, 200, 300 and 350 ° for 1 hour, respectively. The oxygen ion energy is 800 eV; oxygen ion beam bombarding time is 10,20,30,40 and 50min, respectively. The results show that conductivity of ITO thin films are improved by increasing annealing temperature. The resistivity of the ITO thin films decrease from 5.2×10-3Ω •cm at room temperature to 1.3×10-3Ω •cm(350 °C). The transmittance values of all samples in the visible range have been increased. As the oxygen ion beam bombarding time increases the resistivity reduce from 5.2×10-3Ω •cm to 9×10-4Ω •cm, the transmittance value improve from 66% to 82% at 550nm. Finally, the vacuum annealing and oxygen ion beam bombarding are done simultaneously, at temperature of 350 °C for 1 hours, ion bombardment time for 40 min. The resistivity of obtained ITO thin film is 7×10-4Ω •cm. The maximum transmittance value is above 89% in the visible wavelength region.

  7. Pathology effects at radiation doses below those causing increased mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Gavrilova, Natalia; Grahn, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Mortality data from experiments conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on the long-term effects of external whole-body irradiation on B6CF(1) mice were used to investigate radiation-induced effects at intermediate doses of (60)Co gamma rays or fission-spectrum neutrons either delivered as a single exposure or protracted over 60 once-weekly exposures. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify the lowest dose in the ANL data (within radiation quality, pattern of exposure, and sex) at which radiation-induced mortality caused by primary tumors could be detected (approximately 1-2 Gy for gamma rays and 10-15 cGy for neutrons). Doses at and below these levels were then examined for radiation-induced shifts in the spectrum of pathology detected at death. To do this, specific pathology events were pooled into larger assemblages based on whether they were cancer, cardiovascular disease or non-neoplastic diseases detected within the lungs and pleura, liver and biliary tract, reproductive organs, or urinary tract. Cancer and cardiovascular disease were further subdivided into categories based on whether they caused death, contributed to death, or were simply observed at death. Counts of how often events falling within each of these combined pathology categories occurred within a mouse were then used as predictor variables in logistic regression to determine whether irradiated mice could be distinguished from control mice. Increased pathology burdens were detected in irradiated mice at doses lower than those causing detectable shifts in mortality-22 cGy for gamma rays and 2 cGy for neutrons. These findings suggest that (1) models based on mortality data alone may underestimate radiation effects, (2) radiation may have adverse health consequences (i.e. elevated health risks) even when mortality risks are not detected, and (3) radiation-induced pathologies other than cancer do occur, and they involve multiple organ systems.

  8. Effects of electron beam irradiation on chemical composition, antinutritional factors, ruminal degradation and in vitro protein digestibility of canola meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghinejad-Roudbaneh, M.; Ebrahimi, S. R.; Azizi, S.; Shawrang, P.

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of electron beam (EB) irradiation at doses of 15, 30 and 45 kGy on the nutritional value of canola meal. The phytic acid and total glucosinolate content of EB-irradiated canola meal decreased as irradiation doses increased ( P<0.01). From in situ results, irradiation of canola meal at doses of 45 kGy decreased ( P<0.05) the effective degradibility of crude protein (CP) by 14%, compared with an untreated sample. In vitro CP digestibility of EB-irradiated canola meal at doses of 15 and 30 kGy was improved ( P<0.05). Electrophoresis results showed that napin and cruciferin sub-units of 30 and 45 kGy EB-irradiated canola meal were more resistant to degradation, compared with an untreated sample. Electron beam irradiation was effective in protecting CP from ruminal degradation and reducing antinutritional factors of irradiated canola meal.

  9. Improving directivity of laser beams by employing the effect of conical refraction in biaxial crystals.

    PubMed

    Peet, V

    2010-09-13

    The far-field pattern of Gaussian beams transformed by conical refraction in biaxial crystal is analyzed. It is shown that one of the two outgoing beam components acquires, under certain conditions, a profile with a dominating central peak. The width of this peak can be made significantly smaller than the width of the parent diffraction-limited Gaussian beam at the same propagation distance. The formation of such structurally-stable sub-diffraction beam core improves the beam directivity. Another component is a charge-one optical vortex, that forms the annular shell of the beam and carries the rest of the beam power.

  10. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE041-like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code "CST Particle Studio" has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ˜108 kW with ˜15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE041-like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  11. Effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on radio frequency output of a photonic band gap cavity gyrotron oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Ashutosh; Jain, P. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the effects of electron beam parameters and velocity spread on the RF behavior of a metallic photonic band gap (PBG) cavity gyrotron operating at 35 GHz with TE{sub 041}–like mode have been theoretically demonstrated. PBG cavity is used here to achieve a single mode operation of the overmoded cavity. The nonlinear time-dependent multimode analysis has been used to observe the beam-wave interaction behavior of the PBG cavity gyrotron, and a commercially available PIC code “CST Particle Studio” has been reconfigured to obtain 3D simulation results in order to validate the analytical values. The output power for this typical PBG gyrotron has been obtained ∼108 kW with ∼15.5% efficiency in a well confined TE{sub 041}–like mode, while all other competing modes have significantly low values of power output. The output power and efficiency of a gyrotron depend highly on the electron beam parameters and velocity spread. The influence of several electron beam parameters, e.g., beam voltage, beam current, beam velocity pitch factor, and DC magnetic field, on the PBG gyrotron operations has been investigated. This study would be helpful in optimising the electron beam parameters and estimating accurate RF output power of the high frequency PBG cavity based gyrotron oscillators.

  12. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Hong; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-15

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz{sup 1/2}, which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  13. In situ magnetic compensation for potassium spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer considering probe beam pumping effect.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Tao; Quan, Wei; Yuan, Heng; Zhang, Hong; Li, Yang; Zou, Sheng

    2014-06-01

    A novel method to compensate the residual magnetic field for an atomic magnetometer consisting of two perpendicular beams of polarizations was demonstrated in this paper. The method can realize magnetic compensation in the case where the pumping rate of the probe beam cannot be ignored. In the experiment, the probe beam is always linearly polarized, whereas, the probe beam contains a residual circular component due to the imperfection of the polarizer, which leads to the pumping effect of the probe beam. A simulation of the probe beam's optical rotation and pumping rate was demonstrated. At the optimized points, the wavelength of the probe beam was optimized to achieve the largest optical rotation. Although, there is a small circular component in the linearly polarized probe beam, the pumping rate of the probe beam was non-negligible at the optimized wavelength which if ignored would lead to inaccuracies in the magnetic field compensation. Therefore, the dynamic equation of spin evolution was solved by considering the pumping effect of the probe beam. Based on the quasi-static solution, a novel magnetic compensation method was proposed, which contains two main steps: (1) the non-pumping compensation and (2) the sequence compensation with a very specific sequence. After these two main steps, a three-axis in situ magnetic compensation was achieved. The compensation method was suitable to design closed-loop spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer. By a combination of the magnetic compensation and the optimization, the magnetic field sensitivity was approximately 4 fT/Hz(1/2), which was mainly dominated by the noise of the magnetic shield.

  14. Effect of background rotation on the evolution of 3D internal gravity wave beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Boyu; Akylas, T. R.

    2016-11-01

    The effect of background rotation on the 3D propagation of internal gravity wave beams (IGWB) is studied, assuming that variations in the along-beam and transverse directions are of long length scale relative to the beam width. The present study generalizes the asymptotic model of KA (Kataoka & Akylas 2015) who considered the analogous problem in the absence of rotation. It is shown that the role of mean vertical vorticity in the earlier analysis is now taken by the flow mean potential vorticity (MPV). Specifically, 3D variations enable resonant transfer of energy to the flow MPV, resulting in strong nonlinear coupling between a 3D IGWB and its induced mean flow. This coupling mechanism is governed by a system of two nonlinear equations of the same form as those derived in KA. Accordingly, the induced mean flow features a purely inviscid modulational component, as well as a viscous one akin to acoustic streaming; the latter grows linearly with time for a quasi-steady IGWB. On the other hand, owing to background rotation, the induced mean flow in the vicinity of the IGWB is no longer purely horizontal and develops an asymmetric behavior. Supported by NSF.

  15. Effective beam pattern of the Blainville's beaked whale (Mesoplodon densirostris) and implications for passive acoustic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Shaffer, Jessica Ward; Moretti, David; Jarvis, Susan; Tyack, Peter; Johnson, Mark

    2013-03-01

    The presence of beaked whales in mass-strandings coincident with navy maneuvers has prompted the development of methods to detect these cryptic animals. Blainville's beaked whales, Mesoplodon densirostris, produce distinctive echolocation clicks during long foraging dives making passive acoustic detection a possibility. However, performance of passive acoustic monitoring depends upon the source level, beam pattern, and clicking behavior of the whales. In this study, clicks recorded from Digital acoustic Tags (DTags) attached to four M. densirostris were linked to simultaneous recordings from an 82-hydrophone bottom-mounted array to derive the source level and beam pattern of the clicks, as steps towards estimating their detectability. The mean estimated on-axis apparent source level for the four whales was 201 dBrms97. The mean 3 dB beamwidth and directivity index, estimated from sequences of clicks directed towards the far-field hydrophones, were 13° and 23 dB, respectively. While searching for prey, Blainville's beaked whales scan their heads horizontally at a mean rate of 3.6°/s over an angular range of some +/-10°. Thus, while the DI indicates a narrow beam, the area of ensonification over a complete foraging dive is large given the combined effects of body and head movements associated with foraging.

  16. Effect of acid solutions on plants studied by the optical beam deflection method.

    PubMed

    Nie, Liangjiao; Kuboda, Mitsutoshi; Inoue, Tomomi; Wu, Xingzheng

    2013-12-01

    The optical beam deflection method was applied to study the effects of acid solution on both a terrestial and aquatic plants Egeria and Cerastium, which are common aquatic plant and terrestial weed respectively. A probe beam from a He-Ne laser was passed through a vicinity of a leaf of the plants, which were put in culture dishes filled with acid solutions. Deflection signals of the probe beam were monitored and compared for acid solutions with different pH values. The results of Egria showed that the deflection signals changed dramatically when pH values of acid solutions were 2.0 and 3.0, while little at pH of 4.0 and 5.0. For Cerastium when pH were below 3.0, deflection signals changed greatly with time at the begining. After a certain period of time, deflection signals changed little with time. When pH value was above 4.0, deflection signals of Cerastium were still changing with time even after 20 hours. The results suggested that the damage threshold of pH was between 3.0 and 4.0 for both the land and aquatic plants.

  17. Focused helium-ion beam irradiation effects on electrical properties of multi-layer WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Stanford, Michael; Cross, Nick; Duscher, Gerd; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are currently receiving great attention due to their excellent opto-electronic properties. Tuning optical and electrical properties of mono and few layers TMDs, such as Tungsten diselenide (WSe2), by controlling the defects, is an intriguing opportunity to fabricate the next generation opto-electronic devices. Here, we report the effects of focused helium ion beam irradiation on structural, optical and electrical properties of few layer WSe2, via high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electrical measurements. By controlling the ion irradiation dose, we selectively introduced precise defects in few layer WSe2 thereby locally tuning the electrically resistivity of the material. Hole transport in the few layer WSe2 is severely affected compared to electron transport for the same dose of helium ion beam irradiation studied. Furthermore, by selectively exposing the ion beams, we demonstrate the lateral p-n junction in few layer WSe2 flakes, which constitute an important advance towards two dimensional opto-electronic devices. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  18. Effects of ultrasound beam angle and surface roughness on the quantitative ultrasound parameters of articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Kaleva, E; Saarakkala, S; Jurvelin, J S; Virén, T; Töyräs, J

    2009-08-01

    High-resolution arthroscopic ultrasound imaging provides a potential quantitative technique for the diagnostics of early osteoarthritis. However, an uncontrolled, nonperpendicular angle of an ultrasound beam or the natural curvature of the cartilage surface may jeopardize the reliability of the ultrasound measurements. We evaluated systematically the effect of inclining an articular surface on the quantitative ultrasound parameters. Visually intact (n = 8) and mechanically degraded (n = 6) osteochondral bovine patella samples and spontaneously fibrillated (n = 1) and spontaneously proteoglycan depleted (n = 1) osteochondral human tibial samples were imaged using a 50-MHz scanning acoustic system. The surface of each sample was adjusted to predetermined inclination angles (0, 2, 5 and 7 degrees ) and five ultrasound scan lines along the direction of the inclination were analyzed. For each scan line, reflection coefficient (R), integrated reflection coefficient (IRC) and ultrasound roughness index (URI) were calculated. Nonperpendicularity of the cartilage surface was found to affect R, IRC and URI significantly (p < 0.05). Importantly, all ultrasound parameters were able to distinguish (p < 0.05) the mechanically degraded samples from the intact ones even though the angle of incidence of the ultrasound beam varied between 0 and 5 degrees among the samples. Diagnostically, the present findings are important because the natural curvature of the articular surface varies, and a perfect perpendicularity between the ultrasound beam and the surface of the cartilage may be challenging to achieve in a clinical measurement.

  19. Mutagenic effects of carbon ion beam irradiations on dry Lotus japonicus seeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Shanwei; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Du, Yan; Yu, Lixia; Feng, Hui; Mu, Jinhu; Chen, Yuze

    2016-09-01

    Carbon ion beam irradiation is a powerful method for creating mutants and has been used in crop breeding more and more. To investigate the effects of carbon ion beams on Lotus japonicus, dry seeds were irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam at dosages of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy. The germination rate, survival rate and root length of M1 populations were explored and the dose of 400 Gy was selected as the median lethal dose (LD50) for a large-scale mutant screening. Among 2472 M2 plants, 127 morphological mutants including leaf, stem, flower and fruit phenotypic variation were found, and the mutation frequency was approximately 5.14%. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) assays were utilized to investigate the DNA polymorphism between seven mutants and eight plants without phenotypic variation from M2 populations. No remarkable differences were detected between these two groups, and the total polymorphic rate was 0.567%.

  20. Relationship between the increase of effectiveness indexes and the increase of muscular efficiency with cycling power.

    PubMed

    Zameziati, Karim; Mornieux, Guillaume; Rouffet, David; Belli, Alain

    2006-02-01

    We determined the index of effectiveness (IE), as defined by the ratio of the tangential (effective force) to the total force applied on the pedals, using a new method proposed by Mornieux et al. (J Biomech, 2005), while simultaneously measuring the muscular efficiency during sub-maximal cycling tests of different intensities. This allowed us to verify whether part of the changes in muscular efficiency could be explained by a better orientation of the force applied on the pedals. Ten subjects were asked to perform an incremental test to exhaustion, starting at 100 W and with 30 W increments every 5 min, at 80 rpm. Gross (GE) and net (NE) efficiencies were calculated from the oxygen uptake and W(Ext) measurements. From the three-dimensional force's measurements, it was possible to measure the total force (F(Tot)), including the effective (F(Tang)) and ineffective force (F (Rad + Lat)). IE has been determined as the ratio between F(Tang) and F(Tot), applied on the pedals for three different time intervals, i.e., during the full revolution (IE(360 degrees)), the downstroke phase (IE(180 degrees Desc)) and the upstroke phase (IE(180 degrees Asc)). IE(360 degrees) and IE(180 degrees Asc) were significantly correlated with GE (r = 0.79 and 0.66, respectively) and NE (r = 0.66 and 0.99, respectively). In contrast, IE(180 degrees Desc) was not correlated to GE or to NE. From a mechanical point of view, during the upstroke, the subject was able to reduce the non-propulsive forces applied by an active muscle contraction, contrary to the downstroke phase. As a consequence, the term 'passive phase', which is currently used to characterize the upstroke phase, seems to be obsolete. The IE(180 degrees Asc) could also explain small variations of GE and NE for a recreational group.

  1. Effects of external beam radiotherapy on endocrine function in patients with carcinoma of the prostate

    SciTech Connect

    Grigsby, P.W.; Perez, C.A.

    1986-04-01

    Serum levels of testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormones were determined prospectively in 59 patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated curatively with external beam radiotherapy. Hormone levels were determined before the initiation of therapy and up to 2 years following completion of therapy. Testosterone levels remained unchanged but dihydrotestosterone levels decreased slightly. Follicle-stimulating and luteinizing hormone levels increased significantly during therapy and remained elevated for up to 2 years after therapy. These findings are consistent with low dose irradiation of the testis.

  2. Supersonic Molecular Beam Injection Effects on Tokamak Plasma Applied Non-axisymmetric Magnetic Perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; in, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-10-01

    In KSTAR experiments, the change of tokamak plasma behavior by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was investigated by applying resonant magnetic perturbations(RMP) that could suppress edge localized modes (ELMs). When the SMBI is applied, the symptom representing ELM suppression by RMP is disappeared. The SMBI acts as a cold pulse on the plasma keeping the total confinement engergy constant. However, it makes plasma density increase and change the plasama collisionality which can play a role in the edge-pedestal build-up processing. This work was supported by Project PG1201-2 and the KSTAR research project funded by Korea Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.

  3. Supersonic molecular beam injection effects on tokamak plasma applied non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hyunsun; In, Y.; Jeon, Y. M.; Lee, H. Y.; Hahn, S. H.; Lee, K. D.; Nam, Y. U.; Yoon, S. W.

    2016-08-01

    The change of tokamak plasma behavior by supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) was investigated by applying a three-dimensional magnetic perturbation that could suppress edge localized modes (ELMs). From the time trace of decreasing electron temperature and with increasing plasma density keeping the total confined energy constant, the SMBI seems to act as a cold pulse on the plasma. However, the ELM behaviors were changed drastically (i.e., the symptom of ELM suppression has disappeared). The plasma collisionality in the edge-pedestal region could play a role in the change of the ELM behaviors.

  4. Effect of beam channel plugging on the outcome of gamma knife radiosurgery for trigeminal neuralgia

    SciTech Connect

    Massager, Nicolas . E-mail: nmassage@ulb.ac.be; Nissim, Ouzi; Murata, Noriko; Devriendt, Daniel; Desmedt, Francoise; Vanderlinden, Bruno; Regis, Jean; Levivier, Marc

    2006-07-15

    Purpose: We studied the influence of using plugs for brainstem protection during gamma knife radiosurgery (GKR) of trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with special emphasis on irradiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve, pain outcomes, and incidence of trigeminal dysfunction. Methods and Materials: A GKR procedure for TN using an anterior cisternal target and a maximum dose of 90 Gy was performed in 109 patients. For 49 patients, customized beam channel blocking (plugs) were used to reduce the dose delivered to the brainstem. We measured the mean and integrated radiation doses delivered to the trigeminal nerve and the clinical course of patients treated with and without plugs. Results: We found that blocking increases the length of trigeminal nerve exposed to high-dose radiation, resulting in a significantly higher mean dose to the trigeminal nerve. Significantly more of the patients with blocking achieved excellent pain outcomes (84% vs. 62%), but with higher incidences of moderate and bothersome trigeminal nerve dysfunction (37% mild/10% bothersome with plugs vs. 30% mild/2% bothersome without). Conclusions: The use of plugs to protect the brainstem during GKR treatment for TN increases the dose of irradiation delivered to the intracisternal trigeminal nerve root and is associated with an important increase in the incidence of trigeminal nerve dysfunction. Therefore, beam channel blocking should be avoided for 90 Gy-GKR of TN.

  5. Surface diffusion effects on growth of nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, A. I.; Froeberg, L. E.; Jeppesen, S.; Bjoerk, M. T.; Samuelson, L.

    2007-02-01

    Surface processes play a large role in the growth of semiconductor nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy. In particular, for III-V nanowires the surface diffusion of group-III species is important to understand in order to control the nanowire growth. In this paper, we have grown InAs-based nanowires positioned by electron beam lithography and have investigated the dependence of the diffusion of In species on temperature, group-III and -V source pressure and group-V source combinations by measuring nanowire growth rate for different nanowire spacings. We present a model which relates the nanowire growth rate to the migration length of In species. The model is fitted to the experimental data for different growth conditions, using the migration length as fitting parameter. The results show that the migration length increases with decreasing temperature and increasing group-V/group-III source pressure ratio. This will most often lead to an increase in growth rate, but deviations will occur due to incomplete decomposition and changes in sticking coefficient for group-III species. The results also show that the introduction of phosphorous precursor for growth of InAs{sub 1-x}P{sub x} nanowires decreases the migration length of the In species followed by a decrease in nanowire growth rate.

  6. Surface diffusion effects on growth of nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, A. I.; Fröberg, L. E.; Jeppesen, S.; Björk, M. T.; Samuelson, L.

    2007-02-01

    Surface processes play a large role in the growth of semiconductor nanowires by chemical beam epitaxy. In particular, for III-V nanowires the surface diffusion of group-III species is important to understand in order to control the nanowire growth. In this paper, we have grown InAs-based nanowires positioned by electron beam lithography and have investigated the dependence of the diffusion of In species on temperature, group-III and -V source pressure and group-V source combinations by measuring nanowire growth rate for different nanowire spacings. We present a model which relates the nanowire growth rate to the migration length of In species. The model is fitted to the experimental data for different growth conditions, using the migration length as fitting parameter. The results show that the migration length increases with decreasing temperature and increasing group-V/group-III source pressure ratio. This will most often lead to an increase in growth rate, but deviations will occur due to incomplete decomposition and changes in sticking coefficient for group-III species. The results also show that the introduction of phosphorous precursor for growth of InAs1-xPx nanowires decreases the migration length of the In species followed by a decrease in nanowire growth rate.

  7. Subliminal messages for increasing self-esteem: placebo effect.

    PubMed

    Froufe, M; Schwartz, C

    2001-05-01

    Although experimental research has confirmed the capacity of the human cognitive system to process information that does not reach consciousness (unconscious perception), empirical evidence of the incidence of subliminal verbal messages included on audiotapes claiming to improve human resources and correct some behavioral problems is meager and inconsistent. Our study assesses the influence of "subliminal tapes" designed to increase self-esteem. Participants were randomly assigned to four experimental conditions. One group listened to a tape of music with supra- and subliminal messages; another listened to a tape of music with only subliminal messages; the third group's tape had only music, although the participants believed that it also included subliminal messages; a fourth ("waiting") group heard no tapes, but filled in the same self-esteem scales. Participants in the first three groups filled in the Tennessee Self-Concept Scale (Fitts, 1965) before and after listening to the tape for several days. All groups showed a similar pretest-posttest improvement in self-esteem (p < or = .003), except for the waiting group, which did not improve (p = .311). This implies that only a placebo effect took place. Our data are not in accordance with those obtained by other authors. We comment upon the possible reasons for these discrepancies.

  8. Effect of increasing CO2 on the terrestrial carbon cycle.

    PubMed

    Schimel, David; Stephens, Britton B; Fisher, Joshua B

    2015-01-13

    Feedbacks from the terrestrial carbon cycle significantly affect future climate change. The CO2 concentration dependence of global terrestrial carbon storage is one of the largest and most uncertain feedbacks. Theory predicts the CO2 effect should have a tropical maximum, but a large terrestrial sink has been contradicted by analyses of atmospheric CO2 that do not show large tropical uptake. Our results, however, show significant tropical uptake and, combining tropical and extratropical fluxes, suggest that up to 60% of the present-day terrestrial sink is caused by increasing atmospheric CO2. This conclusion is consistent with a validated subset of atmospheric analyses, but uncertainty remains. Improved model diagnostics and new space-based observations can reduce the uncertainty of tropical and temperate zone carbon flux estimates. This analysis supports a significant feedback to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations from carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems caused by rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This feedback will have substantial tropical contributions, but the magnitude of future carbon uptake by tropical forests also depends on how they respond to climate change and requires their protection from deforestation.

  9. Effect of increasing CO2 on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schimel, David; Fisher, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    Feedbacks from the terrestrial carbon cycle significantly affect future climate change. The CO2 concentration dependence of global terrestrial carbon storage is one of the largest and most uncertain feedbacks. Theory predicts the CO2 effect should have a tropical maximum, but a large terrestrial sink has been contradicted by analyses of atmospheric CO2 that do not show large tropical uptake. Our results, however, show significant tropical uptake and, combining tropical and extratropical fluxes, suggest that up to 60% of the present-day terrestrial sink is caused by increasing atmospheric CO2. This conclusion is consistent with a validated subset of atmospheric analyses, but uncertainty remains. Improved model diagnostics and new space-based observations can reduce the uncertainty of tropical and temperate zone carbon flux estimates. This analysis supports a significant feedback to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations from carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems caused by rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This feedback will have substantial tropical contributions, but the magnitude of future carbon uptake by tropical forests also depends on how they respond to climate change and requires their protection from deforestation. PMID:25548156

  10. Effect of increasing CO2 on the terrestrial carbon cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimel, David; Stephens, Britton B.; Fisher, Joshua B.

    2015-01-01

    Feedbacks from the terrestrial carbon cycle significantly affect future climate change. The CO2 concentration dependence of global terrestrial carbon storage is one of the largest and most uncertain feedbacks. Theory predicts the CO2 effect should have a tropical maximum, but a large terrestrial sink has been contradicted by analyses of atmospheric CO2 that do not show large tropical uptake. Our results, however, show significant tropical uptake and, combining tropical and extratropical fluxes, suggest that up to 60% of the present-day terrestrial sink is caused by increasing atmospheric CO2. This conclusion is consistent with a validated subset of atmospheric analyses, but uncertainty remains. Improved model diagnostics and new space-based observations can reduce the uncertainty of tropical and temperate zone carbon flux estimates. This analysis supports a significant feedback to future atmospheric CO2 concentrations from carbon uptake in terrestrial ecosystems caused by rising atmospheric CO2 concentrations. This feedback will have substantial tropical contributions, but the magnitude of future carbon uptake by tropical forests also depends on how they respond to climate change and requires their protection from deforestation.

  11. Effects of gamma ray and electron beam irradiation on the mechanical, thermal, structural and physicochemical properties of poly (ether-block-amide) thermoplastic elastomers.

    PubMed

    Murray, Kieran A; Kennedy, James E; McEvoy, Brian; Vrain, Olivier; Ryan, Damien; Cowman, Richard; Higginbotham, Clement L

    2013-01-01

    Both gamma ray and electron beam irradiation are widely used as a means of medical device sterilisation. However, it is known that the radiation produced by both processes can lead to undesirable changes within biomedical polymers. The main objective of this research was to conduct a comparative study on the two key radiosterilisation methods (gamma ray and electron beam) in order to identify the more detrimental process in terms of the mechanical, structural, chemical and thermal properties of a common biomedical grade polymer. Poly (ether-block-amide) (PEBA) was prepared by injection moulding ASTM testing specimens and these were exposed to an extensive range of irradiation doses (5-200 kGy) in an air atmosphere. The effect of varying the irradiation dose concentration on the resultant PEBA properties was apparent. For instance, the tensile strength, percentage elongation at break and shore D hardness can be increased/decreased by controlling the aforementioned criteria. In addition, it was observed that the stiffness of the material increased with incremental irradiation doses as anticipated. Melt flow index demonstrated a dramatic increase in the melting strength of the material indicating a sharp increase in molecular weight. Conversely, modulated differential scanning calorimetry established that there were no significant alterations to the thermal transitions. Noteworthy trends were observed for the dynamic frequency sweeps of the material, where the crosslink density increased according to an increase in electron beam irradiation dose. Trans-vinylene unsaturations and the carbonyl group concentration increased with an increment in irradiation dose for both processes when observed by FTIR. The relationship between the irradiation dose rate, mechanical properties and the subsequent surface properties of PEBA material is further elucidated throughout this paper. This study revealed that the gamma irradiation process produced more adverse effects in the PEBA

  12. Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers for high-energy photon and electron beams.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanxiao; Willomitzer, Christian; Zakaria, Golam Abu; Hartmann, Guenther H

    2010-01-01

    Measurements of depth-dose curves in water phantom using a cylindrical ionization chamber require that its effective point of measurement is located at the measuring depth. Recommendations for the position of the effective point of measurement with respect to the central axis valid for high-energy electron and photon beams are given in dosimetry protocols. According to these protocols, the use of a constant shift P(eff) is currently recommended. However, this is still based on a very limited set of experimental results. It is therefore expected that an improved knowledge of the exact position of the effective point of measurement will further improve the accuracy of dosimetry. Recent publications have revealed that the position of the effective point of measurement is indeed varying with beam energy, field size and also with chamber geometry. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the shift of P(eff) can be taken to be constant and independent from the beam energy. An experimental determination of the effective point of measurement is presented based on a comparison between cylindrical chambers and a plane-parallel chamber using conventional dosimetry equipment. For electron beams, the determination is based on the comparison of halfvalue depth R(50) between the cylindrical chamber of interest and a well guarded plane-parallel Roos chamber. For photon beams, the depth of dose maximum, d(max), the depth of 80% dose, d(80), and the dose parameter PDD(10) were used. It was again found that the effective point of measurement for both, electron and photon beams Dosimetry, depends on the beam energy. The deviation from a constant value remains very small for photons, whereas significant deviations were found for electrons. It is therefore concluded that use of a single upstream shift value from the centre of the cylindrical chamber as recommended in current dosimetry protocols is adequate for photons, however inadequate for accurate electron beam dosimetry.

  13. Vibration and buckling of rotating, pretwisted, preconed beams including Cooriolis effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle and Coriolis forces on the vibration and buckling behavior of rotating, torsionally rigid, cantilevered beams were studied. The beam is considered to be clamped on the axis of rotation in one case, and off the axis of rotation in the other. Two methods are employed for the solution of the vibration problem: (1) one based upon a finite-difference approach using second order central differences for solution of the equations of motion, and (2) based upon the minimum of the total potential energy functional with a Ritz type of solution procedure making use of complex forms of shape functions for the dependent variables. The individual and collective effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle, thickness ratio and Coriolis forces on the natural frequencies and the buckling boundaries are presented. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis effects is necessary for blades of moderate to large thickness ratios while these effects are not so important for small thickness ratio blades. The possibility of buckling due to centrifugal softening terms for large values of precone and rotation is shown.

  14. Dose rate effect of pulsed electron beam on micronucleus frequency in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Santhosh; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Bhat, Nagesh N; Narayana, Yerol

    2010-03-01

    The micronucleus assay in human peripheral blood lymphocytes is a sensitive indicator of radiation damage and could serve as a biological dosimeter in evaluating suspected overexposure to ionising radiation. Micronucleus (MN) frequency as a measure of chromosomal damage has also extensively been employed to quantify the effects of radiation dose rate on biological systems. Here we studied the effects of 8 MeV pulsed electron beam emitted by Microtron electron accelerator on MN induction at dose rates between 35 Gy min-1 and 352.5 Gy min-1. These dose rates were achieved by varying the pulse repetition rate (PRR). Fricke dosimeter was employed to measure the absorbed dose at different PRR and to ensure uniform dose distribution of the electron beam. To study the dose rate effect, blood samples were irradiated to an absorbed dose of (4.7+/-0.2) Gy at different rates and cytogenetic damage was quantified using the micronucleus assay. The obtained MN frequency showed no dose rate dependence within the studied dose rate range. Our earlier dose effect study using 8 MeV electrons revealed that the response of MN was linear-quadratic. Therefore, in the event of an accident, dose estimation can be made using linear-quadratic dose response parameters, without adding dose rate as a correction factor.

  15. Vibration and buckling of rotating, pretwisted, preconed beams including Coriolis effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Subrahmanyam, K. B.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle and Coriolis forces on the vibration and buckling behavior of rotating, torsionally rigid, cantilevered beams were studied. The beam is considered to be clamped on the axis of rotation in one case, and off the axis of rotation in the other. Two methods are employed for the solution of the vibration problem: (1) one based upon a finite-difference approach using second order central differences for solution of the equations of motion, and (2) based upon the minimum of the total potential energy functional with a Ritz type of solution procedure making use of complex forms of shape functions for the dependent variables. The individual and collective effects of pretwist, precone, setting angle, thickness ratio and Coriolis forces on the natural frequencies and the buckling boundaries are presented. It is shown that the inclusion of Coriolis effects is necessary for blades of moderate to large thickness ratios while these effects are not so important for small thickness ratio blades. The possibility of buckling due to centrifugal softening terms for large values of precone and rotation is shown.

  16. Effect of Electrospun Nanofibers on the Short Beam Strength of Laminated Fiberglass Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinde, Dattaji K.

    High specific modulus and strength are the most desirable properties for the material used in structural applications. Composite materials exhibit these properties and over the last decade, their usage has increased significantly, particularly in automotive, defense, and aerospace applications. The major cause of failures in composite laminates is due to delaminations. Delamination in composite laminates can occur due to fatigue, low velocity impact and other loadings modes. Conventional methods like "through-the-thickness stitching" or "Z-Pinning" have limitations for improving flexural and interlaminar properties in woven composites due to the fact that while improving interlaminar properties, the presence of stitches or Z pins affects in-plane properties. This study investigates the flexural behavior of fiberglass composites interleaved with non-woven Tetra Ethyl Orthosilicate (TEOS) electrsopsun nanofibers (ENFs). TEOS ENFs were manufactured using an electrospinning technique and then sintered. Nanoengineered beams were fabricated by interleaving TEOS ENFs between the laminated fiberglass composites to improve the flexural properties. TEOS ENFs, resin film, and failed fiberglass laminated composites with and without nanofibers were characterized using SEM Imaging and ASTM standard testing methods. A hybrid composite was made by interleaving a non-woven sheet of TEOS ENFs between the fiberglass laminates with additional epoxy resin film and fabricated using the out of autoclave vacuum bagging method. Four commonly used stacking sequences of fiberglass laminates with and without nanofibers were used to study the progressive failure and deformation mechanics under flexural loadings. The experimental study has shown significant improvements in short beam strength and strain energy absorption in the nanoengineered laminated fiberglass composites before complete failure. The modes were investigated by performing detailed fractographic examination of failed specimens

  17. Theoretical substantiation of biological efficacy enhancement for β-delayed particle decay {sup 9}C beam: A Monte Carlo study in combination with analysis with the local effect model approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Liheng; Yan, Yuanlin; Ma, Yuanyuan; Huang, Qiyan; Li, Qiang Liu, Xinguo; Dai, Zhongying; Fu, Tingyan; He, Pengbo

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To improve the efficacy of heavy ion therapy, β-delayed particle decay {sup 9}C beam as a double irradiation source for cancer therapy has been proposed. The authors’ previous experiment showed that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values at the depths around the Bragg peak of a {sup 9}C beam were enhanced and compared to its stable counterpart {sup 12}C beam. The purpose of this study was to explore the nature of the biological efficacy enhancement theoretically. Methods: A Monte Carlo simulation study was conducted in this study. First a simplified cell model was established so as to form a tumor tissue. Subsequently, the tumor tissue was imported into the Monte Carlo simulation software package GATE and then the tumor cells were virtually irradiated with comparable {sup 9}C and {sup 12}C beams, respectively, in the simulations. The transportation and particle deposition data of the {sup 9}C and {sup 12}C beams, derived from the GATE simulations, were analyzed with the authors’ local effect model implementation so as to deduce cell survival fractions. Results: The particles emitted from the decay process of deposited {sup 9}C particles around a cell nucleus increased the dose delivered to the nucleus and elicited clustered damages around the secondary particles’ trajectories. Therefore, compared to the {sup 12}C beam, the RBE value of the {sup 9}C beam increased at the depths around their Bragg peaks. Conclusions: Collectively, the increased local doses and clustered damages due to the decayed particles emitted from deposited {sup 9}C particles led to the RBE enhancement in contrast with the {sup 12}C beam. Thus, the enhanced RBE effect of a {sup 9}C beam for a simplified tumor model was shown theoretically in this study.

  18. Apparent absence of a proton beam dose rate effect and possible differences in RBE between Bragg peak and plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, Taeko; Egashira, Yusuke; Nishio, Teiji; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Wada, Mami; Koike, Sachiko; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Kohno, Ryosuke; Nishioka, Shie; Kameoka, Satoru; Tsuchihara, Katsuya; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ogino, Takashi

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: Respiration-gated irradiation for a moving target requires a longer time to deliver single fraction in proton radiotherapy (PRT). Ultrahigh dose rate (UDR) proton beam, which is 10-100 times higher than that is used in current clinical practice, has been investigated to deliver daily dose in single breath hold duration. The purpose of this study is to investigate the survival curve and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of such an ultrahigh dose rate proton beam and their linear energy transfer (LET) dependence. Methods: HSG cells were irradiated by a spatially and temporally uniform proton beam at two different dose rates: 8 Gy/min (CDR, clinical dose rate) and 325 Gy/min (UDR, ultrahigh dose rate) at the Bragg peak and 1.75 (CDR) and 114 Gy/min (UDR) at the plateau. To study LET dependence, the cells were positioned at the Bragg peak, where the absorbed dose-averaged LET was 3.19 keV/{mu}m, and at the plateau, where it was 0.56 keV/{mu}m. After the cell exposure and colony assay, the measured data were fitted by the linear quadratic (LQ) model and the survival curves and RBE at 10% survival were compared. Results: No significant difference was observed in the survival curves between the two proton dose rates. The ratio of the RBE for CDR/UDR was 0.98{+-}0.04 at the Bragg peak and 0.96{+-}0.06 at the plateau. On the other hand, Bragg peak/plateau RBE ratio was 1.15{+-}0.05 for UDR and 1.18{+-}0.07 for CDR. Conclusions: Present RBE can be consistently used in treatment planning of PRT using ultrahigh dose rate radiation. Because a significant increase in RBE toward the Bragg peak was observed for both UDR and CDR, further evaluation of RBE enhancement toward the Bragg peak and beyond is required.

  19. Relative biologic effectiveness determination in mouse intestine for scanning proton beam at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. Influence of motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gueulette, John . E-mail: gueulette@rbnt.ucl.ac.be; Blattmann, Hans; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, A.; Coster, Blanche de; Mahy, Pierre; Wambersie, Andre; Goitein, Gudrun

    2005-07-01

    Purpose To determine the relative biologic effectiveness (RBE) of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) scanning proton beam in reference conditions and to evaluate the influence of intestine motion on the proton dose homogeneity. Methods and Materials: First, RBE was determined for crypt regeneration in mice after irradiation in a single fraction. Irradiation was performed at the middle of a 7-cm spread out Bragg peak (SOBP; reference position), as well as in the proximal part of the plateau and at the distal end of the SOBP. Control {gamma}-irradiation was randomized with proton irradiation and performed simultaneously. Second, motion of mouse intestine was determined by radiographs after copper wire markers had been placed on the jejunum and intestinal wall. Results: Proton RBE (reference {sup 60}Co {gamma}) was equal to 1.16 for irradiation at the middle of the SOBP and to 1.11 and 1.21 for irradiation in the initial plateau and end of the SOBP, respectively. The confidence intervals for these RBE values were much larger than those obtained in the other proton beams we have tested so far. They exceeded {+-}0.20 (compared with the usual value of {+-}0.07), which resulted from the unusually large dispersion of the individual proton data. The instantaneous positions of the mice intestines varied by {+-}2 mm in the course of irradiation. Conclusion: The results of this study have shown that the RBE of the PSI proton beam is in total accordance with the RBE obtained at the other centers. This experiment has corroborated that proton RBE at the middle of the SOBP is slightly larger than the generic value of 1.10 and that there is a slight tendency for the RBE to increase close to the end of the SOBP. Also, excessive dispersion of individual proton data may be considered to result from intestine motion, taking into account that irradiation at the PSI is delivered dynamically by scanning the target volume with a pencil proton beam ('spot scanning'). Because 2-mm movements

  20. Effective Teaching Results in Increased Science Achievement for All Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Carla C.; Kahle, Jane Butler; Fargo, Jamison D.

    2007-01-01

    This study of teacher effectiveness and student achievement in science demonstrated that effective teachers positively impact student learning. A general linear mixed model was used to assess change in student scores on the Discovery Inquiry Test as a function of time, race, teacher effectiveness, gender, and impact of teacher effectiveness in…