Science.gov

Sample records for increased effective beam

  1. Beam Effects from an Increase of LINAC Current from 40 ma to 49 Milliamperes

    SciTech Connect

    Ray Tomlin

    2002-06-05

    On March 25, 2002 the FNAL Linac had been running at a decreased 40 ma of beam current for some time. Both the 400 MeV Linac and the 8GeV Booster had been tuned to optimum running during that time. Optimum running for the Booster was at 4.1e12 per pulse. Losses at injection and at transition were limiting intensity at the time. By March 26, 2002 the Linac beam current had been increased to 49 ma. The optimum Booster intensity immediately jumped to 4.5e12 per pulse and increased in the next few days to 4.8e12 and 5e12 per pulse. Booster was not retuned until early April when a low-loss 5.0e12 was obtained for stacking operations. Linac current had sagged to 47 ma by then. Measurements were made on the 25th at 40 ma and the 26th and 27th at 49 ma. This is a report and discussion of those measurements.

  2. Coherent beam-beam effects, theory & observations

    SciTech Connect

    Yuri I Alexahin

    2003-07-16

    Current theoretical understanding of the coherent beam-beam effect as well as its experimental observations are discussed: conditions under which the coherent beambeam modes may appear, possibility of their resonant interaction (coherent resonances), stability of beam-beam oscillations in the presence of external impedances. A special attention is given to the coherent beam-beam modes of finite length bunches: the synchro-betatron coupling is shown to provide reduction in the coherent tuneshift and--at the synchrotron tune values smaller than the beam-beam parameter--Landau damping by overlapping synchrotron satellites.

  3. Increasing the effective aperture of a detector and enlarging the receiving field of view in a 3D imaging lidar system through hexagonal prism beam splitting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Xiaobao; Wang, Xiaoyi; Cui, Tianxiang; Wang, Chunhui; Li, Yunxi; Li, Hailong; Wang, Qi

    2016-07-11

    The detector in a highly accurate and high-definition scanning 3D imaging lidar system requires high frequency bandwidth and sufficient photosensitive area. To solve the problem of small photosensitive area of an existing indium gallium arsenide detector with a certain frequency bandwidth, this study proposes a method for increasing the receiving field of view (FOV) and enlarging the effective photosensitive aperture of such detector through hexagonal prism beam splitting. The principle and construction of hexagonal prism beam splitting is also discussed in this research. Accordingly, a receiving optical system with two hexagonal prisms is provided and the splitting beam effect of the simulation experiment is analyzed. Using this novel method, the receiving optical system's FOV can be improved effectively up to ±5°, and the effective photosensitive aperture of the detector is increased from 0.5 mm to 1.5 mm.

  4. Range modulation in proton therapy planning: a simple method for mitigating effects of increased relative biological effectiveness at the end-of-range of clinical proton beams.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C; McDonald, Mark W; Johnstone, Peter A S; Hoene, Ted; Mendonca, Marc; Cheng, Chee-Wei; Das, Indra J; McMullen, Kevin P; Wolanski, Mark R

    2014-01-02

    The increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of proton beams at the distal edge of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is a well-known phenomenon that is difficult to quantify accurately in vivo. For purposes of treatment planning, disallowing the distal SOBP to fall within vulnerable tissues hampers sparing to the extent possible with proton beam therapy (PBT). We propose the distal RBE uncertainty may be straightforwardly mitigated with a technique we call "range modulation". With range modulation, the distal falloff is smeared, reducing both the dose and average RBE over the terminal few millimeters of the SOBP. One patient plan was selected to serve as an example for direct comparison of image-guided radiotherapy plans using non-range modulation PBT (NRMPBT), and range-modulation PBT (RMPBT). An additional plan using RMPBT was created to represent a re-treatment scenario (RMPBTrt) using a vertex beam. Planning statistics regarding dose, volume of the planning targets, and color images of the plans are shown. The three plans generated for this patient reveal that in all cases dosimetric and device manufacturing advantages are able to be achieved using RMPBT. Organ at risk (OAR) doses to critical structures such as the cochleae, optic apparatus, hypothalamus, and temporal lobes can be selectively spared using this method. Concerns about the location of the RBE that did significantly impact beam selection and treatment planning no longer have the same impact on the process, allowing these structures to be spared dose and subsequent associated issues. This present study has illustrated that RMPBT can improve OAR sparing while giving equivalent coverage to target volumes relative to traditional PBT methods while avoiding the increased RBE at the end of the beam. It has proven easy to design and implement and robust in our planning process. The method underscores the need to optimize treatment plans in PBT for both traditional energy dose in gray (Gy) and

  5. Approach to increase beam intensity extracted from a cyclotron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, M.; Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Miyahara, N.; Noda, A.; Noda, K.; Sugiura, A.; Wakui, T.; Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.; Goto, A.

    2017-09-01

    To increase the beam intensity of cyclotrons used for producing radionuclides, beam loss during extraction must be reduced. Extraction efficiency is limited by the beam parameters in front of the deflector, especially angular distribution. Computer simulation of the second harmonic mode for 18 MeV protons, which is frequently used, has been carried out to understand beam behavior in a cyclotron. The extraction efficiency is determined by the width of the angular distribution of particles in the phase space plot at the deflector. An effective method to reduce the width is to shorten the bunch at injection. The simulation shows that the bunch phase length at injection must be ⩽30° to realize a 30 μA extraction beam current and satisfy the deflector heat limit of 200 W.

  6. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOEpatents

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  7. Simulation of beam-induced plasma for the mitigation of beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, J.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Yu, K.; Litvinenko, V.

    2015-05-03

    One of the main challenges in the increase of luminosity of circular colliders is the control of the beam-beam effect. In the process of exploring beam-beam mitigation methods using plasma, we evaluated the possibility of plasma generation via ionization of neutral gas by proton beams, and performed highly resolved simulations of the beam-plasma interaction using SPACE, a 3D electromagnetic particle-in-cell code. The process of plasma generation is modelled using experimentally measured cross-section coefficients and a plasma recombination model that takes into account the presence of neutral gas and beam-induced electromagnetic fields. Numerically simulated plasma oscillations are consistent with theoretical analysis. In the beam-plasma interaction process, high-density neutral gas reduces the mean free path of plasma electrons and their acceleration. A numerical model for the drift speed as a limit of plasma electron velocity was developed. Simulations demonstrate a significant reduction of the beam electric field in the presence of plasma. Preliminary simulations using fully-ionized plasma have also been performed and compared with the case of beam-induced plasma.

  8. Increased effective barrier heights in Schottky diodes by molecular-beam epitaxy of CoSi2 and Ga-doped Si on Si(111)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fathauer, R. W.; Lin, T. L.; Grunthaner, P. J.; Andersson, P. O.; Iannelli, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Increasing the effective Schottky-barrier height of epitaxial CoSi2/Si(111) diodes by the use of thin, highly doped Si layers in close proximity to the metal-semiconductor interface has been studied. Intrinsic Si, Si doped by coevaporation of Ga, and epitaxial CoSi2 layers have all been grown in the same molecular-beam epitaxy system. Current-voltage and photoresponse characterization yield barrier heights ranging from 0.61 eV for a sample with no p(+) layer to 0.89 eV for a sample with a 20-nm-thick p(+) layer. These results are compared to theoretical values based on a one-dimensional solution of Poisson's equation under the depletion approximation.

  9. Beam Breakup Effects in Dielectric Based Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Schoessow, P.; Kanareykin, A.; Jing, C.; Kustov, A.; Altmark, A.; Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2009-01-22

    The dynamics of the beam in structure-based wakefield accelerators leads to beam stability issues not ordinarily found in other machines. In particular, the high current drive beam in an efficient wakefield accelerator loses a large fraction of its energy in the decelerator structure, resulting in physical emittance growth, increased energy spread, and the possibility of head-tail instability for an off axis beam, all of which can lead to severe reduction of beam intensity. Beam breakup (BBU) effects resulting from parasitic wakefields provide a potentially serious limitation to the performance of dielectric structure based wakefield accelerators as well. We report on experimental and numerical investigation of BBU and its mitigation. The experimental program focuses on BBU measurements at the AWA facility in a number of high gradient and high transformer ratio wakefield devices. New pickup-based beam diagnostics will provide methods for studying parasitic wakefields that are currently unavailable. The numerical part of this research is based on a particle-Green's function beam breakup code we are developing that allows rapid, efficient simulation of beam breakup effects in advanced linear accelerators. The goal of this work is to be able to compare the results of detailed experimental measurements with the accurate numerical results and to design an external FODO channel for the control of the beam in the presence of strong transverse wakefields.

  10. Using the optical-klystron effect to increase and measure the intrinsic beam energy spread in free-electron-laser facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat, Eduard; Ferrari, Eugenio; Reiche, Sven; Schietinger, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    We present a setup based on the optical klystron concept, consisting of two undulator modules separated by a magnetic chicane, that addresses two issues in free-electron-laser (FEL) facilities. On the one hand, it allows increasing the intrinsic energy spread of the beam at the source, which is useful to counteract the harmful microbunching instability. This represents an alternative method to the more conventional laser heater with the main advantage that no laser system is required. On the other hand, the setup can be used to reconstruct the initial beam energy spread, whose typical values in FEL injectors around 1 keV are very difficult to measure with standard procedures.

  11. Simulations of coherent beam-beam effects with head-on compensation

    SciTech Connect

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo. Y.

    2012-05-20

    Electron lenses are under construction for installation in RHIC in order to mitigate the head-on beam-beam effects. This would allow operation with higher bunch intensity and result in a significant increase in luminosity. We report on recent strong-strong simulations and experiments that were carried out using the RHIC upgrade parameters to assess the impact of coherent beam-beam effects in the presence of head-on compensation.

  12. Magnitude of observer error using cone beam CT for prostate interfraction motion estimation: effect of reducing scan length or increasing exposure.

    PubMed

    McNair, Helen A; Harris, Emma J; Hansen, Vibeke N; Thomas, Karen; South, Christopher; Hafeez, Shaista; Huddart, Robert; Dearnaley, David P

    2015-10-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) enables soft-tissue registration to planning CT for position verification in radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to determine the interobserver error (IOE) in prostate position verification using a standard CBCT protocol, and the effect of reducing CBCT scan length or increasing exposure, compared with standard imaging protocol. CBCT images were acquired using a novel 7 cm length image with standard exposure (1644 mAs) at Fraction 1 (7), standard 12 cm length image (1644 mAs) at Fraction 2 (12) and a 7 cm length image with higher exposure (2632 mAs) at Fraction 3 (7H) on 31 patients receiving radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Eight observers (two clinicians and six radiographers) registered the images. Guidelines and training were provided. The means of the IOEs were compared using a Kruzkal-Wallis test. Levene's test was used to test for differences in the variances of the IOEs and the independent prostate position. No significant difference was found between the IOEs of each image protocol in any direction. Mean absolute IOE was the greatest in the anteroposterior direction. Standard deviation (SD) of the IOE was the least in the left-right direction for each of the three image protocols. The SD of the IOE was significantly less than the independent prostate motion in the anterior-posterior (AP) direction only (1.8 and 3.0 mm, respectively: p = 0.017). IOEs were within 1 SD of the independent prostate motion in 95%, 77% and 96% of the images in the RL, SI and AP direction. Reducing CBCT scan length and increasing exposure did not have a significant effect on IOEs. To reduce imaging dose, a reduction in CBCT scan length could be considered without increasing the uncertainty in prostate registration. Precision of CBCT verification of prostate radiotherapy is affected by IOE and should be quantified prior to implementation. This study shows the importance of quantifying the magnitude of IOEs prior to CBCT implementation.

  13. Beam intensity increases at the intense pulsed neutron source accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Potts, C.; Brumwell, F.; Norem, J.; Rauchas, A.; Stipp, V.; Volk, G.

    1985-01-01

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) accelerator system has managed a 40% increase in time average beam current over the last two years. Currents of up to 15.6..mu..A (3.25 x 10/sup 12/ protons at 30 Hz) have been successfully accelerated and cleanly extracted. Our high current operation demands low loss beam handling to permit hands-on maintenance. Synchrotron beam handling efficiencies of 90% are routine. A new H/sup -/ ion source which was installed in March of 1983 offered the opportunity to get above 8 ..mu..A but an instability caused unacceptable losses when attempting to operate at 10 ..mu..A and above. Simple techniques to control the instabilities were introduced and have worked well. These techniques are discussed below. Other improvements in the regulation of various power supplies have provided greatly improved low energy orbit stability and contributed substantially to the increased beam current.

  14. Possible Quantum Mechanical Effect on Beam Echo

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, Alex

    2000-12-07

    The echo effect in charged particle beams provides a link between macroscopic measurable beam parameters and microscopic phase space motion of the beam. Since quantum mechanics dictates a granularization of the phase space, it influences how the phase space behaves microscopically, and thus potentially affect how the echo effect behaves macroscopically. In this study, we propose to examine the possible measurable macroscopic effects of quantum mechanics on beams through its echo effect.

  15. Effect of beam emittance on self-modulation of long beams in plasma wakefield accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lotov, K. V.

    2015-12-15

    The initial beam emittance determines the maximum wakefield amplitude that can be reached as a result of beam self-modulation in the plasma. The wakefield excited by the fully self-modulated beam decreases linearly with the increase in the beam emittance. There is a value of initial emittance beyond which the self-modulation does not develop even if the instability is initiated by a strong seed perturbation. The emittance scale at which the wakefield is suppressed by a factor of two with respect to the zero-emittance case (the so called critical emittance) is determined by inability of the excited wave to confine beam particles radially and is related to beam and plasma parameters by a simple formula. The effect of beam emittance can be observed in several discussed self-modulation experiments.

  16. Ion beam effects in diacetylenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elman, B. S.; Blackburn, Gary F.; Thakur, M. K.; Sandman, D. J.; Samuelson, L. A.; Kenneson, D. G.

    Due to their unique backbone structure and crystalline organization, polydiacetylenes (PDAs) are considered to be prototype one-dimensional systems. They were shown to have properties considered important to realize concepts of all-optical signal processing. Macroscopic, nearly defect-free, highly anisotropic PDA single crystals are prepared by exposure of diacteylene monomers to various forms of radiation. These materials can also be prepared as thin film crystals and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) assemblies. We have studied and compared the effects of ion beam irradiation on different configurations of diacetylenes: bulk crystals, thin films and LB structures. Exposure of monomeric diacetylene films to very low fiuence ion beams results in their polymerization and in the formation of good quality anisotropic films of controlled thickness. Significant changes in optical and electrical properties of PDAs were observed and studied by optical absorption and do temperature dependent conductivity measurements.

  17. Single Bunch Electron Cloud Effects in the NLC Beam Delivery System(LCC-0126)

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D

    2003-12-08

    A positron beam passing through a linear collider beam delivery beam line is finely focused to desired specifications during collimation and especially in Final Focusing (FFS). Undesired additional focusing is generated by beam-electron cloud interactions, which typically leads to beam size increases at high cloud densities. This paper examines the severity of the electron cloud effects and assesses the critical cloud density.

  18. Interplay of space-charge and beam-beam effects in a collider

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, A.V.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Satogata, T.; Tepikian, S.

    2010-09-27

    Operation of a collider at low energy or use of cooling techniques to increase beam density may result in luminosity limitation due to the space-charge effects. Understanding of such limitation became important for Low-Energy RHIC physics program with heavy ions at the center of mass energies of 5-20 GeV/nucleon. For a collider, we are interested in a long beam lifetime, which limits the allowable space-charge tune shift. An additional complication comes from the fact that ion beams are colliding, which requires careful consideration of the interplay of direct space-charge and beam-beam effects. This paper summarizes the initial observations during experimental studies in RHIC at low energies.

  19. Creep Effects in Pultruded FRP Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boscato, G.; Casalegno, C.; Russo, S.

    2016-03-01

    The paper presents results of two creep tests on pultruded open-section GFRP beams aimed to evaluate the long-term deformations, the residual deflection after unloading, and the influence of creep strains on the flexuraltorsional buckling phenomenon. Two beams were subjected to a constant load for about one year. Then one of the beams was unloaded to evaluate its residual deflection. For the other beam, the load was increased up to failure, and the residual buckling strength was compared with that of a similar beam tested up to failure. The parameters of the Findley power law are evaluated, and the experimental results are compared with those of numerical analyses and with available formulations for prediction of the time-dependent properties of composite beams. Results of the investigation testify, in particular, to a noninsignificant time-dependent increment in deflections of the beams and to a significant reduction in their buckling strength due to creep deformations.

  20. Sealing Force Increasing of ACM Gasket through Electron Beam Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, D. J.; Batalha, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Rubber is an engineering material largely used as sealing parts, in form of O-rings, solid gaskets and liquid gaskets, materials applied in liquid state with posterior vulcanization and sealing. Stress relaxation is a rubber characteristic which impacts negatively in such industrial applications (rings and solid gaskets). This work has the purpose to investigate the use of electron beam radiation (EB) as a technology able to decrease the stress relaxation in acrylic rubber (ACM), consequently increasing the sealing capability of this material. ACM samples were irradiated with dose of 100 kGy and 250 kGy, its behavior was comparatively investigated using, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments. The results obtained by DMA shown an increase of Tg and changes in dynamic mechanical behavior.

  1. OBSERVATION OF STRONG - STRONG AND OTHER BEAM - BEAM EFFECTS IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W; Brennan, J M; Cameron, P; Connolly, R; Montag, C; Peggs, S; Pilat, F; Ptitsyn, V; Tepikian, S; Trbojevic, D; Van Zeijts, J

    2003-05-12

    RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. For the first time, coherent beam-beam modes were observed in a bunched beam hadron collider. Other beam-beam effects in RHIC were observed in operation and in dedicated experiments with gold ions, deuterons and protons. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. During ramps unequal radio frequencies in the two rings cause the crossing points to move longitudinally. Thus bunches experience beam-beam interactions only in intervals and the tunes are modulated. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made so far.

  2. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on Tensile Strength of Polypropylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Masayuki; Shimbo, Minoru; Miyano, Yasushi

    In this paper, the effects of the intensity of electron beam and the variation with time after irradiation of electron beam on the tensile strength of the polypropylene (PP), which is widely used as medicine containers, were investigated. PP with and without colorants were used first and samples irradiated under various intensity of EB. A tensile test on the irradiated samples with elapsed time after the irradiation of the electron beam was carried out. The effects of those factors on the tensile strength were discussed. The following results were obtained (1) The tensile strength of PP decreased due to the influence of the electron beam irradiation, however the rate of the decrease in strength was small compared with the original one. Furthermore, the rate of the decrease in strength was very small owing to the variation with time after the EB irradiation. (2) The tensile rupture strength of PP increased and the rupture strain owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, these rupture strength increased and the rupture strain decreased along with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. (3) The tensile rupture strain energy of PP decreased owing to the influence of the electron beam irradiation compared with the original one. In addition, the strain energy decreases with time after the irradiation of the electron beam. Moreover, the strength characteristics of PP with colorants received greater influence of electron beam compared with the one without colorants.

  3. Analysis of multiwavelength coherent beam combining effect.

    PubMed

    Kai, Han; Xiaojun, Xu; Zejin, Liu

    2012-12-01

    The combination effect of multiwavelength active coherent beam combination (CBC) is investigated theoretically. The dependence of the combination effect on the optical path control precision, spectral width, wavelength number, and channel number is revealed. In the case of small optical path variance, the combination effect approximately decreases in quadratic form with wavelength number N, spectral width Δν, and optical path variance σ increasing. In the case of large optical path variance, the combination effect is independent of the optical path variance and the spectral width. The larger the wavelength number is, the smaller the Strehl ratio expectation is, and it finally degenerates to the incoherent combination. The necessity of optical path control is discussed. This study is helpful for multiwavelength CBC system design and the combination effect estimation.

  4. Electron beam effects in a UV FEL

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, R.K.; Blau, J.; Colson, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    At the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF), a free electron laser (FEL) is designed to produce ultraviolet (UV) light. A four-dimensional FEL simulation studies the effects of betatron oscillations, external focusing, and longitudinal pulse compression of the electron beam on the FEL performance.

  5. Compensation of the beam-beam effect in proton-proton colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Zinchenko, A.

    1993-10-01

    Compensation of the beam-beam effect in high-energy proton-proton colliders using a low-energy electron beam is proposed. It is concluded that such compensation looks feasible. Requirements for such a device are formulated.

  6. Radii effect on the translation spring constant of force transducer beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    Multi-component strain-gage force transducer design requires the designer to determine the spring constant of the numerous beams or flexures incorporated in the transducer. The classical beam deflection formulae that are used in calculating these spring constants typically assume that the beam has a uniform moment of inertia along the entire beam length. In practice all beams have a radius at the end where the beam interfaces with the shoulder of the transducer, and on short beams in particular this increases the beam spring constant considerably. A Basic computer program utilizing numerical integration is presented to determine this effect.

  7. Disruption effects on the beam size measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F.J.; Chen, P.

    1995-06-01

    At the SLC Final Focus with higher currents and smaller beam sizes, the disruption parameter D{sub y} is close to one and so the pinch effect should produce a luminosity enhancement. Since a flat beam-beam function is fit to deflection scan data to measure the beam size, disruption can affect the measurement. Here the authors discuss the quantitative effects of disruption for typical SLC beam parameters. With 3.5 10{sup 10} particles per pulse, bunch length of 0.8 mm and beam sizes of 2.1 {mu}m horizontally and 0.55 {mu}m vertically, the measured vertical size can be as much as 25% bigger than the real one. Furthermore during the collision the spot size actually decrease, producing an enhancement factor H{sub D} of about 1.25. This would yield to a true luminosity which is 1.6 times that which is estimated from the beam-beam deflection fit.

  8. Negative propagation effect in nonparaxial Airy beams.

    PubMed

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2012-11-19

    Negative propagation is an unusual effect concerning the local sign change in the Poynting vector components of an optical beam under free propagation. We report this effect for finite-energy Airy beams in a subwavelength nonparaxial regime. This effect is due to a coupling process between propagating and evanescent plane waves forming the beam in the spectral domain and it is demonstrated for a single TE or TM mode. This is contrary to what happens for vector Bessel beams and vector X-waves, for which a complex superposition of TE and TM modes is mandatory. We also show that evanescent waves cannot contribute to the energy flux density by themselves such that a pure evanescent Airy beam is not physically realizable. The break of the shape-preserving and diffraction-free properties of Airy beams in a nonparaxial regime is exclusively caused by the propagating waves. The negative propagation effect in subwavelength nonparaxial Airy beams opens new capabilities in optical traps and tweezers, optical detection of invisibility cloacks and selective on-chip manipulation of nanoparticles.

  9. Quantum effects in electron beam pumped GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Yahia, M. E.; Azzouz, I. M.; Moslem, W. M.

    2013-08-19

    Propagation of waves in nano-sized GaAs semiconductor induced by electron beam are investigated. A dispersion relation is derived by using quantum hydrodynamics equations including the electrons and holes quantum recoil effects, exchange-correlation potentials, and degenerate pressures. It is found that the propagating modes are instable and strongly depend on the electron beam parameters, as well as the quantum recoil effects and degenerate pressures. The instability region shrinks with the increase of the semiconductor number density. The instability arises because of the energetic electron beam produces electron-hole pairs, which do not keep in phase with the electrostatic potential arising from the pair plasma.

  10. Effect of crosstalk on combined beam characteristics in spectral beam combining systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lei; Wu, Zhen; Zhong, Zheqiang; Zhang, Bin

    2017-02-01

    In a spectral beam combining (SBC) system, crosstalk always happens because stray lights are inevitable due to fabrication errors of optical components and 'smile' effect of laser arrays. Two kinds of crosstalk, including the crosstalk generated between two adjacent emitters of the laser array (ad-crosstalk) and that generated between two non-adjacent emitters (non-ad-crosstalk), have been analyzed. The equivalent light of the crosstalk model has been proposed, and the propagation model of the SBC system with the crosstalk has been built up. On this basis, influences of above two kinds of the crosstalk on the combined beam have been numerically simulated and discussed in detail. The results show that the wavelength composition of the combined beam varies evidently owing to the existence of the crosstalk. With the increasing of the crosstalk intensity, the beam quality of the combined beam degrades, and the side lobes of intensity distribution of the combined beam become more and more obvious. Furthermore, the influence of the non-ad-crosstalk on the beam quality is more serious than that of the ad-crosstalk.

  11. Ion bunch length effects on the beam-beam interaction and its compensation in a high-luminosity ring-ring electron-ion collider

    SciTech Connect

    Montag C.; Oeftiger, A.; Fischer, W.

    2012-05-20

    One of the luminosity limits in a ring-ring electron-ion collider is the beam-beam effect on the electrons. In the limit of short ion bunches, simulation studies have shown that this limit can be significantly increased by head-on beam-beam compensation with an electron lens. However, with an ion bunch length comparable to the beta-function at the IP in conjunction with a large beam-beam parameter, the electrons perform a sizeable fraction of a betatron oscillation period inside the long ion bunches. We present recent simulation results on the compensation of this beam-beam interaction with multiple electron lenses.

  12. Staging Laser Plasma Accelerators for Increased Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, D.; Shu, A. J.; Schroeder, C. B.; Gonsalves, A. J.; Nakamura, K.; Matlis, N. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Plateau, G.; Lin, C.; Toth, C.; Geddes, C. G. R.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2009-01-22

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10 m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  13. Staging laser plasma accelerators for increased beam energy

    SciTech Connect

    Panasenko, Dmitriy; Shu, Anthony; Schroeder, Carl; Gonsalves, Anthony; Nakamura, Kei; Matlis, Nicholas; Cormier-Michel, Estelle; Plateau, Guillaume; Lin, Chen; Toth, Csaba; Geddes, Cameron; Esarey, Eric; Leemans, Wim

    2008-09-29

    Staging laser plasma accelerators is an efficient way of mitigating laser pump depletion in laser driven accelerators and necessary for reaching high energies with compact laser systems. The concept of staging includes coupling of additional laser energy and transporting the electron beam from one accelerating module to another. Due to laser damage threshold constraints, in-coupling laser energy with conventional optics requires distances between the accelerating modules of the order of 10m, resulting in decreased average accelerating gradient and complicated e-beam transport. In this paper we use basic scaling laws to show that the total length of future laser plasma accelerators will be determined by staging technology. We also propose using a liquid jet plasma mirror for in-coupling the laser beam and show that it has the potential to reduce distance between stages to the cm-scale.

  14. EFFECTS OF TRANSFERSE BEAM SIZE IN BEAM POSITIONS MONITORS

    SciTech Connect

    S.S. KURENNOY

    2001-06-01

    The fields produced by a long beam with a given transverse charge distribution in a homogeneous vacuum chamber are studied. Signals induced by the displaced finite-size beam on electrodes of a beam position monitor (BPM) are calculated and compared to those from a pencil beam. The non-linearities and corrections to BPM signals due to a finite transverse beam size are calculated for an arbitrary chamber cross section. Simple analytical expressions are given for a few particular transverse distributions of the beam current in a circular or rectangular chamber. Of particular interest is a general proof that in an arbitrary homogeneous chamber the beam-size corrections vanish for any axisymmetric beam current distribution.

  15. Beam-beam and electron cloud effects in CEPC/FCC-ee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, Kazuhito

    2016-11-01

    We discuss beam dynamics issues in CEPC/FCC-ee, especially focusing on the beam-beam and electron cloud effects. Beamstrahlung is strong in extreme high energy collision such as Higgs and top factory. Beam-beam simulations considering beamstrahlung are now ready. Several points of beam-beam effects for FCC-ee are presented. Electron cloud effects are serious for high current positron machine, especially in Z factory that many bunches are stored. Analytical estimate for threshold of electron density and electron build-up for CEPC are presented.

  16. Effect of dispersion on the spectrum of partially coherent beams.

    PubMed

    Pan, Liuzhan; Yuan, Xiao; Ding, Chaoliang; Lü, Baida

    2008-08-01

    Taking the Gaussian Schell-model (GSM) beam as a typical example of partially coherent beams, the analytical expressions of the spectrum of GSM beams propagating in dispersive media are derived, and the spectral properties are studied in detail. It is shown that, in comparison with propagation in free space and in turbulence, whether or not GSM beams satisfy the scaling law, the normalized spectrum of GSM beams in dispersive media changes on propagation in general, because the dispersive medium affects different spectral components differently. As compared with the free-space propagation, for the scaling-law GSM beams the dispersion results in spectrum change, and for the nonscaling-law GSM beams the dispersion gives rise to a further increase in spectral changes. The structure constant of the dispersive property of the media, the transverse coordinate of the observation point, the spatial correlation length of the source, and the propagation distance affect the spectral behavior of GSM beams; this effect is illustrated numerically.

  17. Electron gun jitter effects on beam bunching

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, M. S.; Iqbal, M.

    2014-02-15

    For routine operation of Beijing Electron Positron Collider II (BEPCII) linac, many factors may affect the beam bunching process directly or indirectly. We present the measurements and analyses of the gun timing jitter, gun high voltage jitter, and beam energy at the exit of the standard acceleration section of the linac quantitatively. Almost 80 mV and more than 200 ps of gun high voltage and time jitters have ever been measured, respectively. It was analyzed that the gun timing jitter produced severe effects on beam energy than the gun high voltage jitter, if the timing jitter exceeded 100 ps which eventually deteriorates both the beam performance and the injection rate to the storage ring.

  18. Experimental Studies of Compensation of Beam-Beam Effects with Tevatron Electron Lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Alexahin, Yu.; Bishofberger, Kip; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.; Reva, V.; Solyak, N.; Wildman, D.; Zhang, X.-L.; Zimmermann, F.; /Fermilab /Los Alamos /Novosibirsk, IYF /CERN

    2008-02-01

    Applying the space-charge forces of a low-energy electron beam can lead to a significant improvement of the beam-particle lifetime limit arising from the beam-beam interaction in a high-energy collider [1]. In this article we present the results of various beam experiments with 'electron lenses', novel instruments developed for the beam-beam compensation at the Tevatron, which collides 980-GeV proton and antiproton beams. We study the dependencies of the particle betatron tunes on the electron beam current, energy and position; we explore the effects of electron-beam imperfections and noises; and we quantify the improvements of the high-energy beam intensity and the collider luminosity lifetime obtained by the action of the Tevatron Electron Lenses.

  19. Undulator Beam Pipe Magnetic Shielding Effect Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Andrew; Wolf, Zachary; /SLAC

    2010-11-23

    The proposed stainless steel beampipe for the LCLS undulator has a measurable shielding effect on the magnetic field of the LCLS undulators. This note describes the tests used to determine the magnitude of the shielding effect, as well as deviations in the shielding effect caused by placing different phase shims in the undulator gap. The effect of the proposed Steel strongback which will be used to support the beam pipe, was also studied. A hall probe on a 3 axis movement system was set up to measure the main component of the magnetic field in the Prototype Undulator. To account for temperature variations of the magnetic field of the undulator for successive tests, a correction is applied which is described in this technical note. Using this method, we found the shielding effect, the amount which the field inside the gap was reduced due to the placement of the beampipe, to be {approx}10 Gauss. A series of tests was also performed to determine the effect of phase shims and X and Y correction shims on the shielding. The largest effect on shielding was found for the .3 mm phase shims. The effect of the .3 mm phase shims was to increase the shielding effect {approx}4 Gauss. The tolerance for the shielding effect of the phase shims is less than 1 gauss. The effect of the strongback was seen in its permanent magnetic field. It introduced a dipole field across the measured section of the undulator of {approx}3 gauss. This note documents the tests performed to determine these effects, as well as the results of those tests.

  20. Simulations and Experiments of Beam-Beam Effects in e+e- Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Seeman, J.; Kozanecki, W.; Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2005-05-16

    Over the past decade, extensive simulations of beam-beam effects in e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders, based on the particle-in-cell method, were developed to explain many complex experimental observations. Recently, such simulations were used to predict the future luminosity performance of e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. Some predictions have been proven to be correct in the existing accelerators. In this paper, many effects such as the beam-beam limit, crossing angle, parasitic collisions, betatron spectrum, and the beam-beam lifetime, will be directly compared between simulations and experiments.

  1. Implementation of depolarization due to beam-beam effects in the beam-beam interaction simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbault, C.; Le Meur, G.; Blampuy, F.; Bambade, P.; Schulte, D.

    2009-12-01

    Depolarization is a new feature in the beam-beam simulation tool GUINEA-PIG++ (GP++). The results of this simulation are studied and compared with another beam-beam simulation tool, CAIN, considering different beam parameters for the International Linear Collider (ILC) with a centre-of-mass energy of 500 GeV.

  2. RHIC PROTON BEAM LIFETIME INCREASE WITH 10- AND 12-POLE CORRECTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, W.

    2010-05-23

    The RHIC beam lifetime in polarized proton operation is dominated by the beam-beam effect, parameter modulations, and nonlinear magnet errors in the interaction region magnets. Sextupole and skew sextupole errors have been corrected deterministically for a number of years based on tune shift measurements with orbit bumps in the triplets. During the most recent polarized proton run 10- and 12- pole correctors were set through an iterative procedure, and used for the first time operationally in one of the beams. We report on the procedure to set these high-order multipole correctors and estimate their effect on the integrated luminosity.

  3. Effect of forming stresses on the strength of curved laminated beams of loblolly pine

    Treesearch

    George E. Woodson; Frederick F. Wangaard

    1969-01-01

    Curvature-stress factors reflecting the effect of forming stresses in producing curved beams of thin vertical-grain laminations of clear wood have been determined for loblolly pine. Strength retention of curved beams decreases with increasing severity of curvature but not to the degree suggested by the Wilson equation commonly used in design. Curved beams loaded on the...

  4. High luminosity operation, beam-beam effects and their compensation in Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01

    Over the past 2 years the Tevatron peak luminosity steadily progressed and reached the level of 3.15 {center_dot} 10{sup 32} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} which exceeds the Run II Upgrade goal. We discuss the collider performance, illustrate limitations and understanding of beam-beam effects and present experimental results of compensation of the beam-beam effects by electron lenses--a technique of great interest for the LHC.

  5. Lifetime and Tail Simulations for Beam-Beam Effects in PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Shatilov, D.N.; Zholents, A.A.

    1994-12-01

    A fast tracking technique for doing beam tail simulations has been applied to a study of beam-beam effects in the SLAC/LBL/LLNL PEP-II B Factory. In particular, the dependence of beam lifetime and particle density distribution due to vacuum pressure, damping times, machine nonlinearity and parasitic crossings has been analyzed. Effects of accidental orbit separation and dispersion function at the interaction point (IP) have also been considered.

  6. Increasing Extracted Beam Current Density in Ion Thrusters through Plasma Potential Modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, Neil; Foster, John

    2015-09-01

    A gridded ion thruster's maximum extractable beam current is determined by the space charge limit. The classical formulation does not take into account finite ion drift into the acceleration gap. It can be shown that extractable beam current can be increased beyond the conventional Child-Langmuir law if the ions enter the gap at a finite drift speed. In this work, ion drift in a 10 cm thruster is varied by adjusting the plasma potential relative to the potential at the extraction plane. Internal plasma potential variations are achieved using a novel approach involving biasing the magnetic cusps. Ion flow variations are assessed using simulated beam extraction in conjunction with a retarding potential analyzer. Ion beam current density changes at a given total beam voltage in full beam extraction tests are characterized as a function of induced ion drift velocity as well.

  7. Beam hardening and partial beam hardening of the bowtie filter: Effects on dosimetric applications in CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Rendon, X.; Zhang, G.; Bosmans, H.; Oyen, R.; Zanca, F.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate the consequences on dosimetric applications when a CT bowtie filter is modeled by means of full beam hardening versus partial beam hardening. Method: A model of source and filtration for a CT scanner as developed by Turner et. al. [1] was implemented. Specific exposures were measured with the stationary CT X-ray tube in order to assess the equivalent thickness of Al of the bowtie filter as a function of the fan angle. Using these thicknesses, the primary beam attenuation factors were calculated from the energy dependent photon mass attenuation coefficients and used to include beam hardening in the spectrum. This was compared to a potentially less computationally intensive approach, which accounts only partially for beam hardening, by giving the photon spectrum a global (energy independent) fan angle specific weighting factor. Percentage differences between the two methods were quantified by calculating the dose in air after passing several water equivalent thicknesses representative for patients having different BMI. Specifically, the maximum water equivalent thickness of the lateral and anterior-posterior dimension and of the corresponding (half) effective diameter were assessed. Results: The largest percentage differences were found for the thickest part of the bowtie filter and they increased with patient size. For a normal size patient they ranged from 5.5% at half effective diameter to 16.1% for the lateral dimension; for the most obese patient they ranged from 7.7% to 19.3%, respectively. For a complete simulation of one rotation of the x-ray tube, the proposed method was 12% faster than the complete simulation of the bowtie filter. Conclusion: The need for simulating the beam hardening of the bow tie filter in Monte Carlo platforms for CT dosimetry will depend on the required accuracy.

  8. Collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power of an ion beam pulse in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Ling-yu; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Qi, Xin E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn Duan, Wen-shan E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn Xiao, Guo-qing; Yang, Lei E-mail: duanws@nwnu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    A two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell simulation is carried out to study the collective effects on the wakefield and stopping power for a hydrogen ion beam pulse propagation in hydrogen plasmas. The dependence of collective effects on the beam velocity and density is obtained and discussed. For the beam velocity, it is found that the collective effects have the strongest impact on the wakefield as well as the stopping power in the case of the intermediate beam velocities, in which the stopping power is also the largest. For the beam density, it is found that at low beam densities, the collective contribution to the stopping power increase linearly with the increase of the beam density, which corresponds well to the results calculated using the dielectric theory. However, at high beam densities, our results show that after reaching a maximum value, the collective contribution to the stopping power starts to decrease significantly with the increase of the beam density. Besides, at high beam densities, the wakefield loses typical V-shaped cone structures, and the wavelength of the oscillation wakefield increases as the beam density increases.

  9. Scrape-off layer-induced beam density fluctuations and their effect on beam emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, D.; Marandet, Y.; Tamain, P.; Dif-Pradalier, G.

    2015-07-01

    A statistical model is presented to calculate the magnitude of beam density fluctuations generated by a turbulent scrape-off layer (SOL). It is shown that the SOL can induce neutral beam density fluctuations of a similar magnitude to the plasma density fluctuations in the core, potentially corrupting beam emission spectroscopy measurements. The degree of corruption is quantified by combining simulations of beam and plasma density fluctuations inside a simulated measurement window. A change in pitch angle from the separatrix to the measurement window is found to reduce the effect of beam fluctuations, whose largest effect is to significantly reduce the measured correlation time.

  10. Smith-Purcell radiation from a ribbon beam as effective THz and X-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tishchenko, A. A.; Sergeeva, D. Yu.; Ponomarenko, A. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the possibility to enhance the THz and X-ray sources based on interaction between an electron beam and a grating using a ribbon beam. Making the beam ribbon, we increase the area of effective interaction between the beam and the grating, which can lead to increasing the number of photons radiated through Smith-Purcell mechanism. The theory of this process is constructed; the fully analytical description is given; the numerical analysis shows that the radiation can be enhanced considerably with use of ribbon beams instead of cylindrical one in case when transversal part of coherent form-factor plays a role.

  11. Radiation effects of ion and electron beams on poly(methylphenylsilane)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seki, Shu; Shibata, Hiromi; Ban, Hiroshi; Ishigure, Kenkichi; Tagawa, Seiichi

    1996-11-01

    Radiation effects of ion beams on poly(methylphenylsilane), PMPS are described in the present paper. PMPS solid films irradiated by high energy H +, He +, N + ion beams and electron beams show changes of solubility with a large LET effects. Ion (2 MeV) and electron (20 and 30 keV) beams induce mainly crosslinking of PMPS, while it was reported that UV light and γ-rays caused predominantly main chain scission on PMPS. The G-values of crosslinking increase with the values of LET of incident beams.

  12. GPU-optimized Code for Long-term Simulations of Beam-beam Effects in Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Roblin, Yves; Morozov, Vasiliy; Terzic, Balsa; Aturban, Mohamed A.; Ranjan, D.; Zubair, Mohammed

    2013-06-01

    We report on the development of the new code for long-term simulation of beam-beam effects in particle colliders. The underlying physical model relies on a matrix-based arbitrary-order symplectic particle tracking for beam transport and the Bassetti-Erskine approximation for beam-beam interaction. The computations are accelerated through a parallel implementation on a hybrid GPU/CPU platform. With the new code, a previously computationally prohibitive long-term simulations become tractable. We use the new code to model the proposed medium-energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) at Jefferson Lab.

  13. Effective beam method for element concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Tolhurst, Thomas; Barbi, Mauricio; Tokaryk, Tim

    2015-01-01

    There is a great diversity of research being conducted at synchrotron facilities around the world and a diverse set of beamlines to accommodate this research. Time is a precious commodity at synchrotron facilities; therefore, methods that can maximize the time spent collecting data are of value. At the same time the incident radiation spectrum, necessary for some research, may not be known on a given beamline. A preliminary presentation of a method applicable to X-ray fluorescence spectrocopic analyses that overcomes the lack of information about the incident beam spectrum that addresses both of these concerns is given here. The method is equally applicable for other X-ray sources so long as local conditions are considered. It relies on replacing the polychromatic spectrum in a standard fundamental parameters analysis with a set of effective monochromatic photon beams. A beam is associated with each element and can be described by an analytical function allowing extension to elements not included in the necessary calibration measurement(s). PMID:25723941

  14. Radio-frequency ion source generating beams with an increased proton content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, A. A.; Podyminogin, A. A.; Shikhovtsev, I. V.

    2007-01-01

    The results of experiments with an rf ion source generating a beam with an improved mass composition are reported. The proton content in the beam is increased by raising the rf power density in the discharge under the antenna and installing a magnetic filter near the plasma grid. Additional steps are taken to prevent the earlier observed degradation of the beam composition because of aluminum reduction on the inner surface of the ceramic discharge chamber and water release. Specifically, the chamber is lined with pyrolytic boron nitride sheets.

  15. Investigation of the effects of beam scattering and beam wandering on laser beams passing thorough the off-gas duct of an Electric Arc Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanzadeh, Amirhossein

    The project sets to determine the effects of scattering and beam wandering on light that passes through the off-gas of EAF. The effects of light scattering from metallic dust and beam wandering due to temperature gradient and turbulence in the medium are investigated. Using Matlab, a model was developed based on Mie theory to calculate light transmission when the optical properties are known; most importantly refractive index of the dust as well as incident wavelength, particle size and concentration of the particles per cm 3 of the gas. The model was validated and was used to show that as the particle size parameter increases, the scattering losses decreases. Turbulence and temperature gradients in the air cause the laser beam to change shape. Using a big collection lens can minimize the signal fluctuation caused by the beam wandering. A thorough understanding of these phenomena helps in designing optical sensors in the industry.

  16. Increase of the beam intensity for BNCT by changing the core configuration at THOR.

    PubMed

    Liu, H M; Peir, J J; Liu, Y H; Tsai, P E; Jiang, S H

    2009-07-01

    In this article, we will consider several core configurations and run the core calculation with MCNP to obtain the neutrons distribution at THOR. The thermal neutron flux inside the vertical tubes (VT-B-VT-E) and the fast neutron flux in the first row facing to the boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility (I3-I5) were tallied for indication. Based on these simulation results, the fuel elements were rearranged during the annual repair period in 2007. The epithermal neutron flux at the center of BNCT beam exit in air was measured again, and the results showed that the beam intensity increased by 50%. Comparing the neutron intensities both in reactor core and at the BNCT beam exit for several core configurations, the results show that the BNCT beam intensity can be increased without decreasing the neutron intensity in core.

  17. Effects of beam irregularity on uniform scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Jang, Sea duk; Yang, Tae-Keun

    2016-09-01

    An active scanning beam delivery method has many advantages in particle beam applications. For the beam is to be successfully delivered to the target volume by using the active scanning technique, the dose uniformity must be considered and should be at least 2.5% in the case of therapy application. During beam irradiation, many beam parameters affect the 2-dimensional uniformity at the target layer. A basic assumption in the beam irradiation planning stage is that the shape of the beam is symmetric and follows a Gaussian distribution. In this study, a pure Gaussian-shaped beam distribution was distorted by adding parasitic Gaussian distribution. An appropriate uniform scanning condition was deduced by using a quantitative analysis based on the gamma value of the distorted beam and 2-dimensional uniformities.

  18. Beam flatness perturbation effects of a perforated thermoplastic immobilization device on 6 and 12 MeV electron beams.

    PubMed

    Van Way, R L; Williams, R O; Johnstone, P A; Papin, P J

    1996-12-01

    Perforated thermoplastic masks are widely used in radiotherapy of head and neck malignancies. They provide for patient immobilization and increase setup reproducibility. Some oncology treatment centers cut mask portals (windows) for the beam to pass through; for those centers that do not, the mask affects beam fluence. The extent to which beam flatness is altered by such a mask is investigated. The effects of perforated thermoplastic on 6 MeV and 12 MeV electron beams was described in terms of optical density differences in a comparative film study. Variations of beam flatness were documented of up to 11.8% at 5 mm depth for 6 MeV, and 8.1% for 12 MeV electrons. The depth at which this effect may be considered insignificant (mean optical density differences < 2%) is approximately 10 mm for both beam energies. For clinical situations where the target volume is superficial, some consideration should be given to beam inhomogeneity caused by the mask.

  19. Numerical Simulation of Beam-Beam Effects in the Proposed Electron-Ion Colider at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Balsa Terzic, Yuhong Zhang

    2010-05-01

    One key limiting factor to a collider luminosity is beam-beam interactions which usually can cause serious emittance growth of colliding beams and fast reduction of luminosity. Such nonlinear collective beam effect can be a very serious design challenge when the machine parameters are pushed into a new regime. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect for a medium energy ring-ring electron-ion collider based on CEBAF.

  20. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D- beams in future neutral beam injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-01

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  1. Fundamental Proximity Effects in Focused electron Beam Induced Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Plank, Harald; Smith, Daryl; Haber, Thomas; Rack, Philip D; Hofer, Ferdinand

    2012-01-01

    Fundamental proximity effects for electron beam induced deposition processes on nonflat surfaces were studied experimentally and via simulation. Two specific effects were elucidated and exploited to considerably increase the volumetric growth rate of this nanoscale direct write method: (1) increasing the scanning electron pitch to the scale of the lateral electron straggle increased the volumetric growth rate by 250% by enhancing the effective forward scattered, backscattered, and secondary electron coefficients as well as by strong recollection effects of adjacent features; and (2) strategic patterning sequences are introduced to reduce precursor depletion effects which increase volumetric growth rates by more than 90%, demonstrating the strong influence of patterning parameters on the final performance of this powerful direct write technique.

  2. The effects of betatron phase advances on beam-beam and its compensation in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2011-03-28

    In this article we perform simulation studies to investigate the effects of betatron phase advances between the beam-beam interaction points on half-integer resonance driving term, second order chromaticty and dynamic aperture in RHIC. The betatron phase advances are adjusted with artificial matrices inserted in the middle of arcs. The lattices for the 2011 RHIC polarized proton (p-p) run and 2010 RHIC Au-Au runs are used in this study. We also scan the betatron phase advances between IP8 and the electron lens for the proposed Blue ring lattice with head-on beam-beam compensation.

  3. f Number Increase of a High-Intensity Green Laser Beam in a Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobble, J. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Mason, R. J.

    1997-11-01

    Earlier(J. A. Cobble, R. P. Johnson, R. J. Mason, Phys. Plasmas 6, 3006 (1997).), we studied the increase in f number of a high-intensity, 1054-nm laser beam passing through a low density, preformed plasma, i. e., an exploding foil. We have extended this work to 527-nm light. Again we find an increase in the f number of the probe beam. Near field imaging of the transmitted green beam shows a factor of four reduction in beam divergence at 8 percent of the critical density. The change is less for lower densities, and the beam compression corresponds to the critical power dropping below the laser power (0.6 TW) as the density increases. The density is estimated from the spectra of stimulated Raman back scatter and from modeling of the target plasma with LASNEX. A CCD camera and a spectrometer with a 200-nm bandwidth were used to record the backscattered spectra. *Work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy.

  4. TRANSIENT BEAM LOADING EFFECTS IN RF SYSTEMS IN JLEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haipeng; Guo, Jiquan; Rimmer, Robert A.; Wang, Shaoheng

    2016-05-01

    The pulsed electron bunch trains generated from the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) linac to inject into the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC) e-ring will produce transient beam loading effects in the Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) systems that, if not mitigated, could cause unacceptably large beam energy deviation in the injection capture, or exceed the energy acceptance of CEBAF’s recirculating arcs. In the electron storage ring, the beam abort or ion clearing gaps or uneven bucket filling can cause large beam phase transients in the (S)RF cavity control systems and even beam loss due to Robinson instability. We have first analysed the beam stability criteria in steady state and estimated the transient effect in Feedforward and Feedback RF controls. Initial analytical models for these effects are shown for the design of the JLEIC e-ring from 3GeV to 12GeV.

  5. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Vincent W.C.; Yang Zhining; Zhang Wuzhe; Wu Lili; Lin Zhixiong

    2012-07-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  6. Effect of beam arrangement on oral cavity dose in external beam radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wu, Vincent W C; Yang, Zhi-Ning; Zhang, Wu-Zhe; Wu, Li-li; Lin, Zhi-xiong

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the oral cavity dose between the routine 7-beam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) beam arrangement and 2 other 7-beam IMRT with the conventional radiotherapy beam arrangements in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ten NPC patients treated by the 7-beam routine IMRT technique (IMRT-7R) between April 2009 and June 2009 were recruited. Using the same computed tomography data, target information, and dose constraints for all the contoured structures, 2 IMRT plans with alternative beam arrangements (IMRT-7M and IMRT-7P) by avoiding the anterior facial beam and 1 conventional radiotherapy plan (CONRT) were computed using the Pinnacle treatment planning system. Dose-volume histograms were generated for the planning target volumes (PTVs) and oral cavity from which the dose parameters and the conformity index of the PTV were recorded for dosimetric comparisons among the plans with different beam arrangements. The dose distributions to the PTVs were similar among the 3 IMRT beam arrangements, whereas the differences were significant between IMRT-7R and CONRT plans. For the oral cavity dose, the 3 IMRT beam arrangements did not show significant difference. Compared with IMRT-7R, CONRT plan showed a significantly lower mean dose, V30 and V-40, whereas the V-60 was significantly higher. The 2 suggested alternative beam arrangements did not significantly reduce the oral cavity dose. The impact of varying the beam angles in IMRT of NPC did not give noticeable effect on the target and oral cavity. Compared with IMRT, the 2-D conventional radiotherapy irradiated a greater high-dose volume in the oral cavity.

  7. LHC cryogenics – new experience of run with increased beam energy and intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodzinski, K.; Claudet, S.; Delikaris, D.; Delprat, L.; Ferlin, G.; Rogez, E.; Tavian, L.

    2017-03-01

    After the LHC first long shut down (LS1), when necessary consolidation and maintenance activities were performed on different technical systems, the Large Hadron Collider was progressively cooled down from ambient to operation temperatures from May of 2014. Prior to physics run with increased beam energy to 6.5 TeV/beam, increased beam intensity and modified beam injection scheme, several qualifications and tests affecting cryogenic system have been performed to ensure stable run of the accelerator. New beam parameters were gradually applied to the accelerator, reducing operational margins of cryogenic capacity from previous run. The process optimization and related updates in the control system were applied. This paper will briefly recall the main consolidations performed on the cryogenic system during LS1. The cool down process and behaviour of the cryogenic system during qualifications and tests will be presented. Difficulties and applied solutions during the run will be discussed. The availability and helium losses statistics for full year operation of 2015 will be given.

  8. Thermal effects in orthotropic porous elastic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iaşan, D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the linear theory of anisotropic porous elastic bodies. The extension and bending of orthotropic porous elastic cylinders subjected to a plane temperature field is investigated. The work is motivated by the recent interest in the using of the orthotropic porous elastic solid as model for bones and various engineering materials. First, the thermoelastic deformation of inhomogeneous beams whose constitutive coefficients are independent of the axial coordinate is studied. Then, the extension and bending effects in orthotropic cylinders reinforced by longitudinal rods are investigated. The three-dimensional problem is reduced to the study of two-dimensional problems. The method is used to solve the problem of an orthotropic porous circular cylinder with a special kind of inhomogeneity.

  9. Increasing Student Engagement through Faculty Development: A Practice Brief Based on BEAMS Project Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malnarich, Gillies

    2008-01-01

    During 2003-07, the Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students (BEAMS) project fostered data-based campus change initiatives at more than 100 four-year Historically Black, Hispanic-Serving, and Tribal colleges and universities to increase student engagement and learning. Each campus made a commitment to analyze the scope and…

  10. Transgenerational effects of proton beam irradiation on Caenorhabditis elegans germline apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Min, Hyemin; Sung, Minhee; Son, Miseol; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2017-08-26

    When treating cancer using radiation therapy, it is critical to increase patient survival rates and to reduce side effects. In this respect, proton beam radiation treatment performs better than other radiation treatments because of its high target specificity. However, complications still remain after proton beam radiation treatment. Among them, the risk to progeny after irradiation of their parents is a major concern. In this study, we analyzed the transgenerational effects of proton beam irradiation using the model organism Caenorhabditis. elegans. We found that germline apoptosis increased after proton beam irradiation and its effects were sustained transgenerationally. Moreover, we identified that a germline-specific histone methyltransferase component, SET-2, has a critical role in transmitting the transgenerational effect on germline apoptosis to the next generation after proton beam irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. SU-E-T-568: Improving Normal Brain Sparing with Increasing Number of Arc Beams for Volume Modulated Arc Beam Radiosurgery of Multiple Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, S; Hildebrand, K; Ahmad, S; Larson, D; Ma, L; Sahgal, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated arc beams have been newly reported for treating multiple brain metastases. The purpose of this study was to determine the variations in the normal brain doses with increasing number of arc beams for multiple brain metastases treatments via the TrueBeam Rapidarc system (Varian Oncology, Palo Alto, CA). Methods: A patient case with 12 metastatic brain lesions previously treated on the Leksell Gamma Knife Perfexion (GK) was used for the study. All lesions and organs at risk were contoured by a senior radiation oncologist and treatment plans for a subset of 3, 6, 9 and all 12 targets were developed for the TrueBeam Rapidarc system via 3 to 7 intensity modulated arc-beams with each target covered by at least 99% of the prescribed dose of 20 Gy. The peripheral normal brain isodose volumes as well as the total beam-on time were analyzed with increasing number of arc beams for these targets. Results: All intensisty modulated arc-beam plans produced efficient treatment delivery with the beam-on time averaging 0.6–1.5 min per lesion at an output of 1200 MU/min. With increasing number of arc beams, the peripheral normal brain isodose volumes such as the 12-Gy isodose line enclosed normal brain tissue volumes were on average decreased by 6%, 11%, 18%, and 28% for the 3-, 6-, 9-, 12-target treatment plans respectively. The lowest normal brain isodose volumes were consistently found for the 7-arc treatment plans for all the cases. Conclusion: With nearly identical beam-on times, the peripheral normal brain dose was notably decreased when the total number of intensity modulated arc beams was increased when treating multiple brain metastases. Dr Sahgal and Dr Ma are currently serving on the board of international society of stereotactic radiosurgery.

  12. Effect of depth span ratio on the behaviour of beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rakesh; Dubey, S. K.; Pathak, K. K.

    2014-06-01

    Behaviour of beam depends on its depth. A beam is considered as deep, if the depth span ratio is 0.5 or more. In the available beam theories, we have to apply correction in case of deep beams. In the present work, method of initial functions (MIF) is used to study the effect of depth on the behaviour of concrete beam. The MIF is an analytical method of elasticity theory. It gives exact solutions of different types of problems without the use of assumptions about the character of stress and strain. In this method, no correction factor is required for beams having larger depth. Results are obtained for three different cases of depth span ratios and compared with available theory and finite element method-based software ANSYS. It is observed that deep beam action starts at depth span ratio equal to 0.25.

  13. Slenderness effects in the free vibration of laminated magnetoelectroelastic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chao; Heyliger, Paul R.

    2017-08-01

    A semi-analytical discrete-layer approach is used to evaluate slenderness effects in the free vibration of laminated magnetoelectroelastic beams under various boundary conditions. Piecewise continuous approximations are used through the thickness direction of the beam and either continuous polynomial or trigonometric functions are used in the axial direction. Conventional beam models, including those of Euler-Bernoulli and Timoshenko, can be recovered to predict frequency estimates and are compared with results of the present model. Numerical examples are used to show the effects of beam slenderness on frequency and modal order for beams under simply-supported, fixed-fixed, and cantilever conditions. The results of these analyses clearly illustrate the thickness effects for axial, torsional, and bending modes and also provide some results useful for comparison for theses laminated beams.

  14. Simulation Studies of Beam-Beam Effects of a Ring-Ring Electron-Ion Collider Based on CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Yuhong Zhang,Ji Qiang

    2009-05-01

    The collective beam-beam effect can potentially cause a rapid growth of beam sizes and reduce the luminosity of a collider to an unacceptably low level. The ELIC, a proposed ultra high luminosity electron-ion collider based on CEBAF, employs high repetition rate crab crossing colliding beams with very small bunch transverse sizes and very short bunch lengths, and collides them at up to 4 interaction points with strong final focusing. All of these features can make the beam-beam effect challenging. In this paper, we present simulation studies of the beam-beam effect in ELIC using a self-consistent strong-strong beam-beam simulation code developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. This simulation study is used for validating the ELIC design and for searching for an optimal parameter set.

  15. Beam and spin dynamics in the fast ramping storage ring ELSA: Concepts and measures to increase beam energy, current and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillert, Wolfgang; Balling, Andreas; Boldt, Oliver; Dieckmann, Andreas; Eberhardt, Maren; Frommberger, Frank; Heiliger, Dominik; Heurich, Nikolas; Koop, Rebecca; Klarner, Fabian; Preisner, Oliver; Proft, Dennis; Pusch, Thorsten; Roth, André; Sauerland, Dennis; Schedler, Manuel; Schmidt, Jan Felix; Switka, Michael; Thiry, Jens-Peter; Wittschen, Jürgen; Zander, Sven

    2017-01-01

    The electron accelerator facility ELSA has been operated for almost 30 years serving nuclear physics experiments investigating the sub-nuclear structure of matter. Within the 12 years funding period of the collaborative research center SFB/TR 16, linearly and circularly polarized photon beams with energies up to more than 3 GeV were successfully delivered to photoproduction experiments. In order to fulfill the increasing demands on beam polarization and intensity, a comprehensive research and upgrade program has been carried out. Beam and spin dynamics have been studied theoretically and experimentally, and sophisticated new devices have been developed and installed. The improvements led to a significant increase of the available beam polarization and intensity. A further increase of beam energy seems feasible with the implementation of superconducting cavities.

  16. Increasing the intensity of an induction accelerator and reduction of the beam breakup instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, J. E.; Moir, D. C.; Ekdahl, C. A.; Johnson, J. B.; McCuistian, B. T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Crawford, M. T.

    2014-03-01

    A 7 cm cathode has been deployed for use on a 3.8 MV, 80 ns (FWHM) Blumlein, to increase the extracted electron current from the nominal 1.7 to 2.9 kA. The intense relativistic electron bunch is accelerated and transported through a nested solenoid and ferrite induction core lattice consisting of 64 elements, exiting the accelerator with a nominal energy of 19.8 MeV. The principal objective of these experiments is to quantify the space-charge limitations on the beam quality, its coupling with the beam breakup (BBU) instability, and provide an independent validation of the BBU theory in a higher current regime, I >2 kA. Time resolved centroid measurements indicate a reduction in BBU >10× with simply a 50% increase in the average B-field used to transport the beam through the accelerator. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, which include time resolved current density distributions, radial BBU amplitude relative to the calculated beam envelope, and frequency analyzed BBU amplitude with different accelerator lattice tunes.

  17. Effects of shutter transients in molecular beam epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Gozu, Shin-Ichiro; Mozume, Teruo; Kuwatsuka, Haruhiko; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2012-11-12

    : We have studied the effects of shutter transients (STs) in molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Two series of samples were grown by MBE and evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) measurements. The effects of STs were evaluated by growth rate (GR) analysis using a combination of growth time (GT) and thickness evaluated by XRD and XRR measurements. We revealed two opposite effects of STs: (1) overshoot of GR and (2) increase in GR with GT and subsequent saturation. Each effect was consistent with the previous studies; however, the previous studies showed no relationships between these two effects. By considering closing time of the shutter, the two opposite effects were well understood.

  18. Space Charge Effect in the Sheet and Solid Electron Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Ho Young; Kim, Hyoung Suk; Ahn, Saeyoung

    1998-11-01

    We analyze the space charge effect of two different types of electron beam ; sheet and solid electron beam. Electron gun simulations are carried out using shadow and control grids for high and low perveance. Rectangular and cylindrical geometries are used for sheet and solid electron beam in planar and disk type cathode. The E-gun code is used to study the limiting current and space charge loading in each geometries.

  19. The dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in FFF SBRT: TrueBEAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawonwong, T.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Sanghangthum, T.; Oonsiri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the dose delivery effect of the different Beam ON interval in Flattening Filter Free Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (FFF-SBRT). The three 10MV-FFF SBRT plans (2 half rotating Rapid Arc, 9 to10 Gray/Fraction) were selected and irradiated in three different intervals (100%, 50% and 25%) using the RPM gating system. The plan verification was performed by the ArcCHECK for gamma analysis and the ionization chamber for point dose measurement. The dose delivery time of each interval were observed. For gamma analysis (2%&2mm criteria), the average percent pass of all plans for 100%, 50% and 25% intervals were 86.1±3.3%, 86.0±3.0% and 86.1±3.3%, respectively. For point dose measurement, the average ratios of each interval to the treatment planning were 1.012±0.015, 1.011±0.014 and 1.011±0.013 for 100%, 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The average dose delivery time was increasing from 74.3±5.0 second for 100% interval to 154.3±12.6 and 347.9±20.3 second for 50% and 25% interval, respectively. The same quality of the dose delivery from different Beam ON intervals in FFF-SBRT by TrueBEAM was illustrated. While the 100% interval represents the breath-hold treatment technique, the differences for the free-breathing using RPM gating system can be treated confidently.

  20. Effect of electron beam irradiation on PMMA films

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Pragya; Srivastava, A. K.; Khattak, B. Q.; Verma, Suveer; Upadhyay, Anuj; Sinha, A. K.; Ganguli, Tapas; Lodha, G. S.; Deb, S. K.

    2012-06-05

    Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) is characterized for electron beam interactions in the resist layer in lithographic applications. PMMA thin films (free standing) were prepared by solvent casting method. These films were irradiated with 30keV electron beam at different doses. Structural and chemical properties of the films were studied by means of X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy The XRD results showed that the amorphization increases with electron beam irradiation dose. FTIR spectroscopic analysis reveals that electron beam irradiation promotes the scission of carbonyl group and depletes hydrogen and converts polymeric structure into hydrogen depleted carbon network.

  1. Effects of parasitic beam-beam interaction during the injection process at the PEP-II B Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, Y.H.

    1992-06-01

    This paper is concerned with beam-beam effects during the injection process at the proposed asymmetric SLAC/LBL/LLNL B-Factory, PEP-II. It is shown that the parasitic beam-beam interaction can lead to a significant blowup in the vertical size of the injected beam. Simulation results for the horizontal and the vertical injection schemes are presented, and their performances are studied.

  2. Future e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders and beam-beam effects

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-05-01

    Numerous concepts, ranging from conventional to highly exotic, hae been proposed for the acceleration of electrons and positrons to very high energies. For any such concept to be viable, it must be possible to produce from it a set of consistent parameters for one of these ''benchmark'' machines. Attention is directed to the choice of parameters for a collider in the 300 GeV energy range, operating at a gradient on the order of 200 MV/m, using X-band power sources to drive a conventional disk-loaded accelerating structure. These rf power sources, while not completely conventional represent a reasonable extrapolation from present technology. The choice of linac parameters is strongly coupled to various beam-beam effects which take place when the electron and positron bunches collide. We summarize these beam-beam effects, and then return to the rf design of a 650 GeV center-of-mass collider. 14 refs.

  3. Beam-beam effects of single ring and partial double ring scheme in CEPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan

    2016-11-01

    After the Higgs discovery, it is believed that a circular e+e- collider could serve as a Higgs factory. The high energy physics community in China launched a study of a 50-100 km ring collider. A preliminary conceptual design report (Pre-CDR) has been published in early 2015. This report is based on a 54-km ring design. Some progress on beam-beam effect study after Pre-CDR is shown in the paper. We estimate the beamstrahlung lifetime using a pure strong-strong code as a comparison with the result obtained using a quasi-strong-strong method. The effect of parasitic crossing in the pretzel scheme is also estimated for the very first time. The feasibility of the main parameters for partial double ring scheme are evaluated from the point view of beam-beam interaction.

  4. Simulations of the performance of the Fusion-FEM, for an increased e-beam emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Tulupov, A.V.; Urbanus, W.H.; Caplan, M.

    1995-12-31

    The original design of the Fusion-FEM, which is under construction at the FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, was based on an electron beam emittance of 50 {pi} mm mrad. Recent measurements of the emittance of the beam emitted by the electron gun showed that the actual emittance is 80 {pi} mm mrad. This results in a 2.5 times lower beam current density inside the undulator. As a result it changes the linear gain, the start-up time, the saturation level and the frequency spectrum. The main goal of the FEM project is to demonstrate a stable microwave output power of at least 1 MW. The decrease of the electron beam current density has to be compensated by variations of the other FEM parameters, such as the reflection (feedback) coefficient of the microwave cavity and the length of the drift gap between the two sections of the step-tapered undulator. All basic dependencies of the linear and nonlinear gain, and of the output power on the main FEM parameters have been simulated numerically with the CRMFEL code. Regimes of stable operation of the FEM with the increased emittance have been found. These regimes could be found because of the original flexibility of the FEM design.

  5. Effects of the circularly polarized beam of linearized gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, W.

    2017-08-01

    Solutions of the linearized Einstein equations are found that describe a transversely confined beam of circularly polarized gravitational waves on a Minkowski backdrop. By evaluating the cycle-averaged stress-energy-momentum pseudotensor of Landau & Lifshitz it is found that the angular momentum density is concentrated in the ‘skin’ at the edge of the beam where the intensity falls, and that the ratio of angular momentum to energy per unit length of the beam is 2/ω , where ω is the wave frequency, as expected for a beam of spin-2 gravitons. For sharply-defined, uniform, axisymmetric beams, the induced background metric is shown to produce the gravitomagnetic field and frame-dragging effects of a gravitational solenoid, whilst the angular momentum current helically twists the space at infinite radius along the beam axis.

  6. Effect of layer length on deflection in sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbu, Muthanna A.; AL-Ameri, Riyadh

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical study has been carried out on sandwich beams strengthened mechanically by two external steel plates attached to their tension and compression sides with so-called "shear connectors ". This study is based on the individual behaviour of each component of the composite sandwich section (i.e. reinforced concrete beam and upper steel plate and lower steel plate). The approach has been developed to simulate the behaviour of such beams, and is based on neglecting the separation between the three layers; i.e., the deflections are equal in each element through the same section. The differential equations reached were solved analytically. Deflection was calculated by using the approach for several beams, tested in two series, and close agreements were obtained with the experimental values. Furthermore, the interaction efficiency between the three elements in a composite sandwich beam has been considered thoroughly, from which the effect of some parameters, such as plate length upon the behaviour of such beams, were studied.

  7. Correction of beam-beam effects in luminosity measurement in the forward region at CLIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukić, S.; Božović-Jelisavčić, I.; Pandurović, M.; Smiljanić, I.

    2013-05-01

    Procedures for correcting the beam-beam effects in luminosity measurements at CLIC at 3 TeV center-of-mass energy are described and tested using Monte Carlo simulations. The angular counting loss due to the combined Beamstrahlung and initial-state radiation effects is corrected based on the reconstructed velocity of the collision frame of the Bhabha scattering. The distortion of the luminosity spectrum due to the initial-state radiation is corrected by deconvolution. At the end, the counting bias due to the finite calorimeter energy resolution is numerically corrected. To test the procedures, BHLUMI Bhabha event generator, and Guinea-Pig beam-beam simulation were used to generate the outgoing momenta of Bhabha particles in the bunch collisions at CLIC. The systematic effects of the beam-beam interaction on the luminosity measurement are corrected with precision of 1.4 permille in the upper 5% of the energy, and 2.7 permille in the range between 80 and 90% of the nominal center-of-mass energy.

  8. Increasing efficiency of BEAMnrc-simulated Co-60 beams using directional source biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This study describes the implementation of a directional source biasing (DSB) scheme for efficiently simulating Cobalt-60 treatment heads using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. Previous simulation of Co-60 beams with BEAMnrc was impractical because of the time required to track photons not directed into the treatment field and to simulate secondary charged particles. Methods: In DSB, efficiency is increased by splitting each photon emitted by the Co-60 source a user-defined number of times. Only those split primary photons directed into a user-defined splitting field (encompassing the treatment field) are sampled, yielding many low-weight photons directed into the field. Efficiency can be further increased by taking advantage of radial symmetry at the top of the treatment head to reduce the number of split primary photons tracked in this portion. There is also an option to generate contaminant electrons in DSB. Results: The DSB scheme in BEAMnrc increases the photon fluence calculation efficiency in a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} Co-60 beam by a factor of 1800 with a concurrent increase in contaminant electron fluence calculation efficiency by a factor of 1200. Implementation of DSB in beampp, a C++ code for accelerator simulations based on EGSnrc and the C++ class library, egspp, increases photon fluence efficiency by a factor of 2800 and contaminant electron fluence efficiency by a factor of 1600. Optimum splitting numbers are in the range of 20 000–40 000. For dose calculations in a water phantom (0.5 × 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 3} voxels) this translates into a factor of ∼400 increase in dose calculation efficiency (all doses > 0.5 × D{sub max}). An example calculation of the ratio of dose to water to dose to chamber (the basis of the beam quality correction factor) to within 0.2% in a realistic chamber using a full simulation of a Co-60 treatment head as a source indicates the practicality of Co-60 simulations with DSB. Conclusions: The efficiency improvement

  9. Effect of ABCD transformations on beam paraxiality.

    PubMed

    Vaveliuk, Pablo; Martinez-Matos, Oscar

    2011-12-19

    The limits of the paraxial approximation for a laser beam under ABCD transformations is established through the relationship between a parameter concerning the beam paraxiality, the paraxial estimator, and the beam second-order moments. The applicability of such an estimator is extended to an optical system composed by optical elements as mirrors and lenses and sections of free space, what completes the analysis early performed for free-space propagation solely. As an example, the paraxiality of a system composed by free space and a spherical thin lens under the propagation of Hermite-Gauss and Laguerre-Gauss modes is established. The results show that the the paraxial approximation fails for a certain feasible range of values of main parameters. In this sense, the paraxial estimator is an useful tool to monitor the limits of the paraxial optics theory under ABCD transformations.

  10. Effect of electron beams during solar flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aboudarham, J.; Henoux, J. C.; Brown, J. C.; van den Oord, J.; van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.

    1990-12-01

    Electron bombardment of the solar atmosphere has two effects: one is to enhance hydrogen recombination emission, the other is to increase the opacity via an increase of H(-) population. The first effect is the most important in the upper part of the atmosphere, and the second in the lower part. It is predicted that, when enhanced absorption dominates in the part of the atmosphere where radiation originates, there will be a decrease in the white-light emission, leading to a 'negative flare', or 'black-light flare' short duration, not more than about 20 sec.

  11. Image effects of cylindrical pipes on continuous beams

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.K.; Reiser, M.

    1996-09-01

    We analyze the image effects of a cylindrical pipe on continuous beams with elliptical symmetry. Differential equations involving the second-order spatial moments of a particle distribution are given. From the moment equations, a set of Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij-type equations is developed, which include the image effects of a cylindrical beam pipe. These equations are used to analyze the image effects for focusing, drift, defocusing, drift channels, sheet beams, and a magnetic quadrupole matching section. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Double compression system to increase beam quality in medical linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.; Ahmadizadeh, Y.

    2017-06-01

    The modern radiation therapy is now one of the most powerful tools for the treatment of tumors and cancers. During these treatments, the quality of the operation and the clinical requirements are critical. Here in the present work, based on the beam dynamics of the electrons in RF cavities, a new design for enhancing the quality of bunches is proposed. The simulation results show that the new design can increase the quality of the output bunches which consequently increase the quality of the radiotherapy treatment.

  13. Effects of proton beam irradiation on mitochondrial biogenesis in a human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Ha, Byung Geun; Jung, Sung Suk; Shon, Yun Hee

    2017-09-01

    Proton beam therapy has recently been used to improve local control of tumor growth and reduce side-effects by decreasing the global dose to normal tissue. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying the physiological role of proton beam radiation are not well understood, and many studies are still being conducted regarding these mechanisms. To determine the effects of proton beams on mitochondrial biogenesis, we investigated: mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mass; the gene expression of mitochondrial transcription factors, functional regulators, and dynamic-related regulators; and the phosphorylation of the signaling molecules that participate in mitochondrial biogenesis. Both the mtDNA/nuclear DNA (nDNA) ratio and the mitochondria staining assays showed that proton beam irradiation increases mitochondrial biogenesis in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced aggressive HT-29 cells. Simultaneously, proton beam irradiation increases the gene expression of the mitochondrial transcription factors PGC-1α, NRF1, ERRα, and mtTFA, the dynamic regulators DRP1, OPA1, TIMM44, and TOM40, and the functional regulators CytC, ATP5B and CPT1-α. Furthermore, proton beam irradiation increases the phosphorylation of AMPK, an important molecule involved in mitochondrial biogenesis that is an energy sensor and is regulated by the AMP/ATP ratio. Based on these findings, we suggest that proton beam irradiation inhibits metastatic potential by increasing mitochondrial biogenesis and function in TPA-induced aggressive HT-29 cells.

  14. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Sheets and Yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Tiffany S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Baker, James S.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets and yarns were irradiated using electron beam (e-beam) energy to determine the effect of irradiation dose on the tensile properties. Results showed that a slight change in tensile strength occurred after irradiating as-received CNT sheets for 20 minutes, and a slight decrease in tensile strength as the irradiation time approached 90 minutes. On the other hand, the addition of small molecules to the CNT sheet surface had a greater effect on the tensile properties of e-beam irradiated CNT sheets. Some functionalized CNT sheets displayed up to a 57% increase in tensile strength following 90 minutes of e-beam exposure. In addition, as-received CNT yarns showed a significant increase in tensile strength as the irradiation time increased.

  15. Cooperative effect of ultraviolet and near-infrared beams in laser-induced condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, M.; Henin, S.; Pomel, F.; Kasparian, J.; Wolf, J.-P.; Théberge, F.; Daigle, J.-F.; Lassonde, P.; Kieffer, J.-C.

    2013-12-23

    We demonstrate the cooperative effect of near infrared (NIR) and ultraviolet (UV) beams on laser-induced condensation. Launching a UV laser after a NIR pulse yields up to a 5-fold increase in the production of nanoparticles (25–300 nm) as compared to a single NIR beam. This cooperative effect exceeds the sum of those from the individual beams and occurs for delays up to 1 μs. We attribute it to the UV photolysis of ozone created by the NIR pulses. The resulting OH radicals oxidize NO{sub 2} and volatile organic compounds, producing condensable species.

  16. Increasing beam power and energy with the SBS forward energy transfer instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, R. K.; London, R. A.; Dunlop, W. H.; Michel, P. A.; Williams, E. A.; Fournier, K. B.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.

    2012-10-01

    The understanding of the exchange of forward going power and energy between two crossing beams in a plasma [1] is now sufficiently developed that it can be used to enable access to new experimental configurations. The existing models of the process allow the design of beam combiners that will produce higher energy in individual beams for new applications in ignition and HED physics. For example the Energy Partitioning and Energy Coupling (EPEC) [2] program is simulating nuclear events in various environments by delivering energy to the center of a chamber through a narrow tube that allows minimal perturbation of the surrounding region. We will describe the design of gas filled targets that will allow a 2x to 5x increase in the energy in a single NIF quad to enable higher yield events to be simulated in EPEC. These designs as well as advanced ignition target designs will require models with improved precision to predict their performance accurately. We will also compare the predictions of existing and emerging models of wave saturation [3] with the existing experimental data to determine the uncertainty in the models.[4pt] [1] P. Michel Physics of Plasmas 2010.[0pt] [2] K. Fournier, these proceedings[0pt] [3] P. Michel, E. Williams, these proceedings.

  17. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Hugo; Kamio, Yuji; Palmans, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Duane, Simon

    2015-10-01

    To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano's theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  18. Detector dose response in megavoltage small photon beams. II. Pencil beam perturbation effects

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo Duane, Simon; Kamio, Yuji; Palmans, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To quantify detector perturbation effects in megavoltage small photon fields and support the theoretical explanation on the nature of quality correction factors in these conditions. Methods: In this second paper, a modern approach to radiation dosimetry is defined for any detector and applied to small photon fields. Fano’s theorem is adapted in the form of a cavity theory and applied in the context of nonstandard beams to express four main effects in the form of perturbation factors. The pencil-beam decomposition method is detailed and adapted to the calculation of perturbation factors and quality correction factors. The approach defines a perturbation function which, for a given field size or beam modulation, entirely determines these dosimetric factors. Monte Carlo calculations are performed in different cavity sizes for different detection materials, electron densities, and extracameral components. Results: Perturbation effects are detailed with calculated perturbation functions, showing the relative magnitude of the effects as well as the geometrical extent to which collimating or modulating the beam impacts the dosimetric factors. The existence of a perturbation zone around the detector cavity is demonstrated and the approach is discussed and linked to previous approaches in the literature to determine critical field sizes. Conclusions: Monte Carlo simulations are valuable to describe pencil beam perturbation effects and detail the nature of dosimetric factors in megavoltage small photon fields. In practice, it is shown that dosimetric factors could be avoided if the field size remains larger than the detector perturbation zone. However, given a detector and beam quality, a full account for the detector geometry is necessary to determine critical field sizes.

  19. BEAM-BEAM 2003 SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.SEN,T.

    2003-05-19

    This paper summarizes the presentations and discussions of the Beam-Beam'03 workshop, held in Montauk, Long Island, from May 19 to 23, 2003. Presentations and discussions focused on halo generation from beam-beam interactions; beam-beam limits, especially coherent limits and their effects on existing and future hadron colliders; beam-beam compensation techniques, particularly for long-range interactions; and beam-beam study tools in theory, simulation, and experiment.

  20. Thermal effect on prebunched two-beam free electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirian, N. S.; Maraghechi, B.

    2013-08-01

    A numerical simulation in one-dimension is conducted to study the two-beam free electron laser. The fundamental resonance of the fast electron beam coincides with the fifth harmonic of the slow electron beam in order to generate extreme ultraviolet radiation. Thermal effect in the form of the longitudinal velocity spread is included in the analysis. In order to reduce the length of the wiggler, prebunched slow electron beam is considered. The evaluation of the radiation power, bunching parameter, distribution function of energy, and the distribution function of the pondermotive phase is studied. Sensitivity of the power of the fifth harmonic to the jitter in the energy difference between the two beams is also studied. A phase space is presented that shows the trapped electrons at the saturation point.

  1. Closed Form Expression for the Geometric Effect of a Beam Scraper on the Transverse Beam Distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef

    2000-08-08

    The geometric effect of a beam scraper on the transverse and longitudinal properties of a charged bunch has been extensively investigated. Analytical expressions have been derived for various asymptotic limits such as small offsets of the beam through the scraper and/or very short or very long bunch lengths compared to the scraper gap. A more general, semi-analytical approach that is valid in the asymptotic limits, and for the intermediate cases is presented in this paper. The relative expressions are compact and easy to evaluate. A comparison is made with numerical simulation results from MAFIA. In addition, estimates of the effect on the higher order moments of the beam distributions are provided for typical SLC parameters.

  2. Closed Form Expression for the Effect of a Beam Scraper on the transverse Beam Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimondi, P.; Decker, F. J.; Ng, C. K.

    1997-05-01

    The effect of a beam scraper on the transverse and longitudinal properties of a charged bunch has been extensively investigated. Analytical expressions have been derived for various asymptotic limits such as small offset of the beam through the scraper and/or very short or very long bunch lengths compared to the scraper gap. A more general, semi-analytical approach that is valid for almost all cases is presented in this paper. The relative expressions are compact and easy to evaluate. A comparison is made with numerical simulation results from MAFIA and TBCI. In addition, estimates of the effect on the higher order moments of the beam distributions are provided for typical SLC parameters.

  3. Polarized beam splitting effect in inhomogeneously magnetized magnetooptic films.

    PubMed

    Waring, M

    1989-10-15

    Linearly polarized light passing through a several micron thick magnetooptic film in the inhomogeneous magnetization state is split into a linearly polarized central beam and linearly polarized first and higher order diverging rings. The polarization of the central output beam lies in the same direction as the linearly polarized input, while the polarization of the diverging rings lies in a direction orthogonal to the input plane of polarization. The effect is described, and applications of the effect are discussed.

  4. Lifetime increased cancer risk in mice following exposure to clinical proton beam-generated neutrons.

    PubMed

    Gerweck, Leo E; Huang, Peigen; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Zhou, Yenong

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the life span and risk of cancer following whole-body exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a passively scattered clinical spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) proton beam. Three hundred young adult female FVB/N mice, 152 test and 148 control, were entered into the experiment. Mice were placed in an annular cassette around a cylindrical phantom, which was positioned lateral to the mid-SOBP of a 165-MeV, clinical proton beam. The average distance from the edge of the mid-SOBP to the conscious active mice was 21.5 cm. The phantom was irradiated with once-daily fractions of 25 Gy, 4 days per week, for 6 weeks. The age at death and cause of death (ie, cancer and type vs noncancer causes) were assessed over the life span of the mice. Exposure of mice to a dose of 600 Gy of proton beam-generated neutrons, reduced the median life span of the mice by 4.2% (Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival, P=.053). The relative risk of death from cancer in neutron exposed versus control mice was 1.40 for cancer of all types (P=.0006) and 1.22 for solid cancers (P=.09). For a typical 60 Gy dose of clinical protons, the observed 22% increased risk of solid cancer would be expected to decrease by a factor of 10. Exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a proton dose that exceeds a typical course of radiation therapy by a factor of 10, resulted in a statistically significant increase in the background incidence of leukemia and a marginally significant increase in solid cancer. The results indicate that the risk of out-of-field second solid cancers from SOBP proton-generated neutrons and typical treatment schedules, is 6 to 10 times less than is suggested by current neutron risk estimates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lifetime increased cancer risk in mice following exposure to clinical proton beam generated neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Gerweck, Leo E.; Huang, Peigen; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Zhou, Yenong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the lifespan and risk of cancer following whole-body exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a passively scattered clinical SOBP proton beam. Methods and Materials Three hundred young adult female FVB/N mice, 152 test and 148 control, were entered into the experiment. Mice were placed in an annular cassette around a cylindrical phantom, which was positioned lateral to the mid SOBP of a 165 MeV, clinical proton beam. The average distance from the edge of the mid SOBP to the conscious active mice was 21.5 cm. The phantom was irradiated with once daily fractions of 25 Gy, 4 days per week, for 6 weeks. The age at death and cause of death, i.e., cancer and type vs. non-cancer causes, were assessed over the lifespan of the mice. Results Exposure of mice to a dose of 600 Gy of proton beam generated neutrons, reduced the median lifespan of the mice by 4.2% (Kaplan-Meier cumulative survival, P = 0.053). The relative risk of death from cancer in neutron exposed vs. control mice was 1.40 for cancer of all types (P = 0.0006) and 1.22 for solid cancers (P = 0.09). For a typical 60 Gy dose of clinical protons, the observed 22% increased risk of solid cancer would be expected to decrease by a factor of 10. Conclusions Exposure of mice to neutrons generated by a proton dose which exceeds a typical course of radiotherapy by a factor of 10, resulted in a statistically significant increase in the background incidence of leukemia and a marginally significant increase in solid cancer. The results indicate that the risk of out-of-field 2nd solid cancers from SOBP proton generated neutrons and typical treatment schedules, is 6 - 10 times less than is suggested by current neutron risk estimates. PMID:24725699

  6. Effects of Particle Beams on Explosives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    azide) and secondary (HMX, RDX, TATB, HNS , NTO and TNT) explosives as well as the oxidizer ammonium perchlorate. During each experiment the explosive...out with HMX, RDX, TNT, TATB, HNS and NTO. During this study, the rate of energy deposition was approximately 1-1.5 cal/gm-s, yielding a temperature...RECRYSTALLIZED HMX PRIMARY EXPLOSIVE - PROTON BEAMS When experiments on primary explosives such as lead azide, lead styphnate, PETN and ammonium perchlorate were

  7. Potential-Well Distortion, Microwave Instability, and Their Effects with Colliding Beams at KEKB

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai; Flanagan, J.; Fukuma, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Ieiri, T.; Ohmi, K.; Oide, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Rorie, Jamal; /Hawaii U.

    2009-04-01

    Microwave instability in the Low Energy Ring of KEKB was studied using a broadband impedance model. The model gave excellent descriptions of longitudinal dynamics for both positive and negative momentum compactions. Moreover, it predicted that the threshold of microwave instability was a factor of two lower than the machine nominal operating bunch current. The prediction was confirmed by a measurement using the Belle detector. Furthermore, we integrated the longitudinal wakefield into the beam-beam simulation and applied it to study the combined effects in KEKB. As a result, the beam-beam simulation became truly three-dimensional with emittance growth in all three dimensions simultaneously as the beam currents increase. In addition, an observed mystery of asymmetry in the horizontal scan could also be explained by our simulations.

  8. Strain improvement of Trichoderma viride for increased cellulase production by irradiation of electron and (12)C(6+)-ion beams.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaozhou; Chen, Xiujin; Li, Zhili; Li, Daomin; Wang, Yao; Gao, Hongli; Cao, Li; Hou, Yuze; Li, Songbiao; Liang, Jianping

    2016-06-01

    To improve cellulase production and activity, Trichoderma viride GSICC 62010 was subjected to mutation involving irradiation with an electron beam and subsequently with a (12)C(6+)-ion beam. Mutant CIT 626 was the most promising cellulase producer after preliminary and secondary screening. Soluble protein production and cellulase activities were increased mutifold. The optimum temperature, pH and culture time for the maximum cellulase production of the selected mutant were 35 °C, pH 5 and 6 days. The highest cellulase production was obtained using wheat bran. The prepared cellulases from T. viride CIT 626 had twice the hydrolytic performance with sawdust (83 %) than that from the parent strain (42.5 %). Furthermore, molecular studies demonstrated that there were some key mutation sites suggesting that some amino acid changes in the protein caused by base mutations had led to the enhanced cellulase production and activity. Mutagenesis with electron and (12)C(6+)-ion beams could be developed as an effective tool for improvement of cellulase producing strains.

  9. Simulating Electron Cloud Effects in Heavy-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Lund, S.W.; Molvik, A.W.; Azevedo, T.; Vay, J.-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2004-08-04

    Stray electrons can be introduced in heavy ion fusion accelerators as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We summarize here results from several studies of electron-cloud accumulation and effects: (1) Calculation of the electron cloud produced by electron desorption from computed beam ion loss; the importance of ion scattering is shown; (2) Simulation of the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on ion beam dynamics. We find electron cloud variations that are resonant with the breathing mode of the beam have the biggest impact on the beam (larger than other resonant and random variations), and that the ion beam is surprisingly robust, with an electron density several percent of the beam density required to produce significant beam degradation in a 200-quadrupole system. We identify a possible instability associated with desorption and resonance with the breathing mode. (3) Preliminary investigations of a long-timestep algorithm for electron dynamics in arbitrary magnetic fields.

  10. HOLLOW ELECTRON BEAM COLLIMATION FOR HL-LHC - EFFECT ON THE BEAM CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Fitterer, M.; Stancari, G.; Valishev, A.; Bruce, R.; Papadopoulou, S.; Papotti, G.; Pellegrini, D.; Pellegrini, S.; Valuch, D.; Wagner, J. F.

    2016-10-05

    Collimation with hollow electron beams or lenses (HEL) is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in HL-LHC. In previous studies it has been shown that the halo can be efficiently removed with a hollow electron lens. Equally important as an efficient removal of the halo, is also to demonstrate that the core stays unperturbed. In this paper, we present a summary of the experiment at the LHC and simulations in view of the effect of the HEL on the beam core in case of a pulsed operation.

  11. The effect of boundaries on the ion acoustic beam-plasma instability in experiment and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rapson, Christopher; Grulke, Olaf; Matyash, Konstantin; Klinger, Thomas

    2014-05-15

    The ion acoustic beam-plasma instability is known to excite strong solitary waves near the Earth's bow shock. Using a double plasma experiment, tightly coupled with a 1-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation, the results presented here show that this instability is critically sensitive to the experimental conditions. Boundary effects, which do not have any counterpart in space or in most simulations, unavoidably excite parasitic instabilities. Potential fluctuations from these instabilities lead to an increase of the beam temperature which reduces the growth rate such that non-linear effects leading to solitary waves are less likely to be observed. Furthermore, the increased temperature modifies the range of beam velocities for which an ion acoustic beam plasma instability is observed.

  12. INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V; Shishlo, Andrei P; Plum, Michael A; Lebedev, Valerie; Laface, Emanuele; Galambos, John D

    2013-01-01

    Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

  13. Statins Increase Rifampin Mycobactericidal Effect

    PubMed Central

    Lobato, Lívia Silva; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Neumann, Arthur da Silva; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barbosa; de Oliveira, Diego Sá Leal; Monteiro, Cláudia Peres; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Duarte, Rafael Silva

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antimicrobial resistance has been followed with great concern during the last years, while the need for new drugs able to control leprosy and tuberculosis, mainly due to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is pressing. Our group recently showed that M. leprae is able to induce lipid body biogenesis and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and Schwann cells, facilitating its viability and replication. Considering these previous results, we investigated the efficacies of two statins on the intracellular viability of mycobacteria within the macrophage, as well as the effect of atorvastatin on M. leprae infections in BALB/c mice. We observed that intracellular mycobacteria viability decreased markedly after incubation with both statins, but atorvastatin showed the best inhibitory effect when combined with rifampin. Using Shepard's model, we observed with atorvastatin an efficacy in controlling M. leprae and inflammatory infiltrate in the BALB/c footpad, in a serum cholesterol level-dependent way. We conclude that statins contribute to macrophage-bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium bovis, M. leprae, and M. tuberculosis. It is likely that the association of statins with the actual multidrug therapy effectively reduces mycobacterial viability and tissue lesion in leprosy and tuberculosis patients, although epidemiological studies are still needed for confirmation. PMID:25049257

  14. Statins increase rifampin mycobactericidal effect.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Lívia Silva; Rosa, Patrícia Sammarco; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Neumann, Arthur da Silva; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; do Nascimento, Dejair Caitano; Soares, Cleverson Teixeira; Pedrini, Silvia Cristina Barbosa; Oliveira, Diego Sá Leal de; Monteiro, Cláudia Peres; Pereira, Geraldo Moura Batista; Ribeiro-Alves, Marcelo; Hacker, Mariana Andrea; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Duarte, Rafael Silva; Lara, Flávio Alves

    2014-10-01

    Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium tuberculosis antimicrobial resistance has been followed with great concern during the last years, while the need for new drugs able to control leprosy and tuberculosis, mainly due to extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), is pressing. Our group recently showed that M. leprae is able to induce lipid body biogenesis and cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and Schwann cells, facilitating its viability and replication. Considering these previous results, we investigated the efficacies of two statins on the intracellular viability of mycobacteria within the macrophage, as well as the effect of atorvastatin on M. leprae infections in BALB/c mice. We observed that intracellular mycobacteria viability decreased markedly after incubation with both statins, but atorvastatin showed the best inhibitory effect when combined with rifampin. Using Shepard's model, we observed with atorvastatin an efficacy in controlling M. leprae and inflammatory infiltrate in the BALB/c footpad, in a serum cholesterol level-dependent way. We conclude that statins contribute to macrophage-bactericidal activity against Mycobacterium bovis, M. leprae, and M. tuberculosis. It is likely that the association of statins with the actual multidrug therapy effectively reduces mycobacterial viability and tissue lesion in leprosy and tuberculosis patients, although epidemiological studies are still needed for confirmation. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Effects of ionization distribution on plasma beam focusing characteristics in Hall thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhongxi; Liu, Hui; Yu, Daren; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2011-11-01

    The relationship between ionization distribution and divergence of plasma beam in a Hall thruster is investigated using spectrum and probe methods. Experimental results indicate that the shift of ionization region towards the exit of channel causes the reduction of accelerating field and the enhancement of electron thermal pressure effect, which result in further deviation of equipotential lines to magnetic field lines and further increase in divergence of plasma beam. It is, therefore, suggested that to put the ionization region deep inside the channel and separate it from the acceleration region at the design, and development stage is helpful to improve the plasma beam focusing characteristics of a Hall thruster.

  16. Effects of ionization distribution on plasma beam focusing characteristics in Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ning Zhongxi; Liu Hui; Yu Daren; Zhou Zhongxiang

    2011-11-28

    The relationship between ionization distribution and divergence of plasma beam in a Hall thruster is investigated using spectrum and probe methods. Experimental results indicate that the shift of ionization region towards the exit of channel causes the reduction of accelerating field and the enhancement of electron thermal pressure effect, which result in further deviation of equipotential lines to magnetic field lines and further increase in divergence of plasma beam. It is, therefore, suggested that to put the ionization region deep inside the channel and separate it from the acceleration region at the design, and development stage is helpful to improve the plasma beam focusing characteristics of a Hall thruster.

  17. Effects of electron beam irradiation on polyamide 12 with fiberglass reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Jeun, Joon-Pyo; Shin, Bum-Sik; Kim, Hyun-Bin; Nho, Young-Chang; Kang, Phil-Hyun

    2010-06-02

    In the present study, the effects of electron beam irradiation of polyamide 12 (PA12) with fiberglass reinforcement on the thermal and wear properties were investigated. Electron beam irradiation of PA 12 was carried out over a range of irradiation doses (100-600 kGy) in air. The gel formation in the presence of a curing agent was dependent on the radiation doses. The thermal properties of irradiated PA 12 were studied in the temperature region 50-250 deg. C to observe the changes in the melting point with radiation dose. The dimensional stability was significantly increased by electron beam irradiation and the related crosslinking of the PA 12.

  18. Effects of electron beam irradiation on polyamide 12 with fiberglass reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeun, Joon-Pyo; Shin, Bum-Sik; Kim, Hyun-Bin; Nho, Young-Chang; Kang, Phil-Hyun

    2010-06-01

    In the present study, the effects of electron beam irradiation of polyamide 12 (PA12) with fiberglass reinforcement on the thermal and wear properties were investigated. Electron beam irradiation of PA 12 was carried out over a range of irradiation doses (100-600 kGy) in air. The gel formation in the presence of a curing agent was dependent on the radiation doses. The thermal properties of irradiated PA 12 were studied in the temperature region 50-250° C to observe the changes in the melting point with radiation dose. The dimensional stability was significantly increased by electron beam irradiation and the related crosslinking of the PA 12.

  19. Effective shielding to measure beam current from an ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Bayle, H.; Delferrière, O.; Gobin, R.; Harrault, F.; Marroncle, J.; Senée, F.; Simon, C.; Tuske, O.

    2014-02-15

    To avoid saturation, beam current transformers must be shielded from solenoid, quad, and RFQ high stray fields. Good understanding of field distribution, shielding materials, and techniques is required. Space availability imposes compact shields along the beam pipe. This paper describes compact effective concatenated magnetic shields for IFMIF-EVEDA LIPAc LEBT and MEBT and for FAIR Proton Linac injector. They protect the ACCT Current Transformers beyond 37 mT radial external fields. Measurements made at Saclay on the SILHI source are presented.

  20. Effect of Contrast Media on Megavoltage Photon Beam Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rankine, Ashley W. Lanzon, Peter J.; Spry, Nigel A.

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantify changes in photon beam dosimetry caused by using contrast media during computed tomography (CT) simulation and determine if the resulting changes are clinically significant. The effect of contrast on dosimetry was first examined for a single 6-MV photon beam incident on a plane phantom with a structure of varying electron densities ({rho}{sub e}) and thickness. Patient studies were then undertaken in which CT data sets were collected with and without contrast for 6 typical patients. Three patients received IV contrast (Optiray-240{sup TM}) only and 3 received IV plus oral (Gastrograffin{sup TM}) contrast. Each patient was planned using conformal multifield techniques in accordance with the department standards. Two methods were used to compare the effect of contrast on dosimetry for each patient. The phantom analysis showed that the change in dose at the isocenter for a single 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} 6-MV photon beam traversing 10 cm of a contrast-enhanced structure with {rho}{sub e} 1.22 was 7.0% (1.22 was the highest average {rho}{sub e} observed in the patient data). As a result of using contrast, increases in {rho}{sub e} were observed in structures for the 6 patients studied. Consequently, when using contrast-enhanced CT data for multifield planning, increases in dose at the isocenter and in critical structures were observed up to 2.1% and 2.5%, respectively. Planning on contrast-enhanced CT images may result in an increase in dose of up to 2.1% at the isocenter, which would generally be regarded as clinically insignificant. If, however, a critical organ is in close proximity to the planning target volume (PTV) and is planned to receive its maximum allowable dose, planning on contrast-enhanced CT images may result in that organ receiving dose beyond the recommended tolerance. In these instances, pre-contrast CT data should be used for dosimetry.

  1. Electron-Cloud Effects on Heavy-Ion Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, T; Friedman, A; Cohen, R; Vay, J

    2004-03-29

    Stray electrons can be introduced in positive-charge accelerators for heavy ion fusion (or other applications) as a result of ionization of ambient gas or gas released from walls due to halo-ion impact, or as a result of secondary-electron emission. We are developing a capability for self-consistent simulation of ion beams with the electron clouds they produce. We report on an ingredient in this capability, the effect of specified electron cloud distributions on the dynamics of a coasting ion beam. We consider here electron distributions with axially varying density, centroid location, or radial shape, and examine both random and sinusoidally varying perturbations. We find that amplitude variations are most effective in spoiling ion beam quality, though for sinusoidal variations which match the natural ion beam centroid oscillation or breathing mode frequencies, the centroid and shape perturbations can also be effective. We identify a possible instability associated with resonance with the beam-envelope ''breathing'' mode. One conclusion from this study is that heavy-ion beams are surprisingly robust to electron clouds, compared to a priori expectations.

  2. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Chaffee, Paul H.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus is disclosed that provides a laser output beam having a broad bandwidth and an intensity smooth over time. The bandwidth of the laser output can be varied easily by varying the intensity of a broadband source. The present invention includes an optical modulation apparatus comprising a narrowband laser that outputs a horizontally polarized beam (a "signal beam") and a broadband laser that outputs a vertically polarized beam (a "pump beam") whose intensity varies rapidly. The two beam are coupled into a birefringent laser material so that the respective polarizations coincide with the principal axes of the material. As the two beams travel through the material, the polarization preserving properties of the birefringent material maintain the respective polarizations of the two beam; however there is coupling between the two beams as a result of cross phase modulations, which induces a bandwidth change of the signal beam. The amount of bandwidth change is dependent upon the average intensity of the pump beam. The beams are coupled out from the birefringent material and the modulated signal beam is separated by a polarization selector. The modulated signal beam now has a wider bandwidth, and its shape remains smooth in time. This signal beam can be applied to incoherence inducing systems. The different bandwidths required by these different incoherence inducing systems can be obtained by varying the intensity of the pump beam. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the United States Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  3. THE EFFECT OF NONLINEAR LANDAU DAMPING ON ULTRARELATIVISTIC BEAM PLASMA INSTABILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Philip; Lamberts, Astrid; Broderick, Avery E.; Shalaby, Mohamad; Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald

    2014-12-20

    Very high energy gamma-rays from extragalactic sources produce pairs from the extragalactic background light, yielding an electron-positron pair beam. This pair beam is unstable to various plasma instabilities, especially the ''oblique'' instability, which can be the dominant cooling mechanism for the beam. However, recently, it has been claimed that nonlinear Landau damping renders it physically irrelevant by reducing the effective damping rate to a low level. Here we show with numerical calculations that the effective damping rate is 8 × 10{sup –4} the growth rate of the linear instability, which is sufficient for the ''oblique'' instability to be the dominant cooling mechanism of these pair beams. In particular, we show that previous estimates of this rate ignored the exponential cutoff in the scattering amplitude at large wave numbers and assumed that the damping of scattered waves entirely depends on collisions, ignoring collisionless processes. We find that the total wave energy eventually grows to approximate equipartition with the beam by increasingly depositing energy into long-wavelength modes. As we have not included the effect of nonlinear wave-wave interactions on these long-wavelength modes, this scenario represents the ''worst case'' scenario for the oblique instability. As it continues to drain energy from the beam at a faster rate than other processes, we conclude that the ''oblique'' instability is sufficiently strong to make it the physically dominant cooling mechanism for high-energy pair beams in the intergalactic medium.

  4. Simple effective tests for beam propagation method programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, Mihail M.; Iancu, Ovidiu D.; Karam, Jean Michel

    2000-02-01

    In view of the increased need of an effective, practical and unified test set to evalute the modeling capabilities of beam propagation method (BPM) based programs, we prose an incident set of tests to be used for a standard evaluation. The proposed test have been chosen to be simple, easy to implement and enable a fairly good evaluation without the need of any experiment. Interesting aspects of the tests' results and some straightforward, practical criteria to estimate program capabilities and to tune the simulation parameters are presented. A cross-checking between 'Mode Solver' based and BPM based programs is also put into discussion. A paraxial error evaluation method is presented and the transverse mesh influence on the paraxial error is analyzed.

  5. Ion beam induced luminescence: Relevance to radiation induced bystander effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, S. B.; McNeill, F. E.; Byun, S. H.; Prestwich, W. V.; Seymour, C.; Mothersill, C. E.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this work is quantify the light emitted as a result of charged particle interaction in materials which may be of relevance to radiation induced "bystander effects" studies. We have developed a system which employs single photon counting to measure the light emitted from samples irradiated under vacuum by a charged particle beam. The system uses a fast photomultiplier tube with a peak cathode response at 420 nm. It has been tested in a proof-of-principle experiment using polystyrene targets. Light output, as a result of irradiation, was measured. The luminescence yield appears to have a non-linear behavior with the incident ion fluence: it rises exponentially to an asymptotic value. The target was irradiated with beam energies varying from 1 to 2 MeV and showed saturation at or before an incident fluence rate of 3 × 1013 H+/cm2 s. The average saturation value for the photon output was found to be 40 × 106 cps. Some measurements were performed using filters to study the emission at specific wavelengths. In the case of filtered light measurements, the photon output was found to saturate at 28 × 103, 10 × 106, and 35 × 106 cps for wavelengths of 280 ± 5 nm, 320 ± 5 nm and 340 ± 5 nm respectively. The light output reaches a maximum value because of damage induced in the polymer. Our measurements indicate a "damage cross section" of the order of 10-14 cm2. The average radiant intensity was found to increase at wavelengths of 280 and 320 nm when the proton energy was increased. This was not found to occur at 340 nm. In conclusion, the light emission at specific wavelengths was found to depend upon the incident proton fluence and the proton energy. The wavelengths of the emitted light measured in this study have significance for the understanding of radiation induced bystander effects.

  6. Effect of noncircularity of experimental beam on CMB parameter estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Santanu; Mitra, Sanjit; Paulson, Sonu Tabitha E-mail: sanjit@iucaa.ernet.in

    2015-03-01

    Measurement of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies has been playing a lead role in precision cosmology by providing some of the tightest constrains on cosmological models and parameters. However, precision can only be meaningful when all major systematic effects are taken into account. Non-circular beams in CMB experiments can cause large systematic deviation in the angular power spectrum, not only by modifying the measurement at a given multipole, but also introducing coupling between different multipoles through a deterministic bias matrix. Here we add a mechanism for emulating the effect of a full bias matrix to the PLANCK likelihood code through the parameter estimation code SCoPE. We show that if the angular power spectrum was measured with a non-circular beam, the assumption of circular Gaussian beam or considering only the diagonal part of the bias matrix can lead to huge error in parameter estimation. We demonstrate that, at least for elliptical Gaussian beams, use of scalar beam window functions obtained via Monte Carlo simulations starting from a fiducial spectrum, as implemented in PLANCK analyses for example, leads to only few percent of sigma deviation of the best-fit parameters. However, we notice more significant differences in the posterior distributions for some of the parameters, which would in turn lead to incorrect errorbars. These differences can be reduced, so that the errorbars match within few percent, by adding an iterative reanalysis step, where the beam window function would be recomputed using the best-fit spectrum estimated in the first step.

  7. Apparatus and method for increasing the bandwidth of a laser beam

    DOEpatents

    Wilcox, Russell B.

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus using sinusoidal cross-phase modulation, provides a laser pulse having a very broad bandwidth while substantially retaining the input laser's temporal shape. The modulator may be used in a master oscillator system for a laser having a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) configration. The modulator utilizes a first laser providing an output wavelength .lambda. and a second laser providing an output wavelength shifted by a small amount to .lambda.+.DELTA..lambda.. Each beam has a single, linear polarization. Each beam is coupled into a length of polarization-preserving optical fiber. The first laser beam is coupled into the optical fiber with the beam's polarization aligned with the fiber's main axis, and the second beam is coupled into the fiber with its polarization rotated from the main axis by a predetermined angle. Within the fiber, the main axis' polarization defines an interference beam and the orthogonal axis' polarization defines a signal beam. In the interference beam, the first laser beam and the parallel polarized vector component of the other beam interfere to create areas of high and low intensity, which modulates the signal beam by cross phase modulation. Upon exit from the optical fiber, the beams are coupled out and the modulated signal beam is separated out by a polarization selector. The signal beam can be applied to coherence reducing systems to provide an output that is temporally and spatially incoherent. The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. W7405-ENG-48 between the U.S. Department of Energy and the University of California for the operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  8. Ionization chamber gradient effects in nonstandard beam configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Bouchard, Hugo; Seuntjens, Jan; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Kawrakow, Iwan

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: For the purpose of nonstandard beam reference dosimetry, the current concept of reporting absorbed dose at a point in water located at a representative position in the chamber volume is investigated in detail. As new nonstandard beam reference dosimetry protocols are under development, an evaluation of the role played by the definition of point of measurement could lead to conceptual improvements prior to establishing measurement procedures. Methods: The present study uses the current definition of reporting absorbed dose to calculate ionization chamber perturbation factors for two cylindrical chamber models (Exradin A12 and A14) using the Monte Carlo method. The EGSnrc based user-code EGS lowbar chamber is used to calculate chamber dose responses of 14 IMRT beams chosen to cause considerable dose gradients over the chamber volume as previously used by Bouchard and Seuntjens [''Ionization chamber-based reference dosimetry of intensity modulated radiation beams,'' Med. Phys. 31(9), 2454-5465 (2004)]. Results: The study shows conclusively the relative importance of each physical effect involved in the nonstandard beam correction factors of 14 IMRT beams. Of all correction factors involved in the dosimetry of the beams studied, the gradient perturbation correction factor has the highest magnitude, on average, 11% higher compared to reference conditions for the Exradin A12 chamber and about 5% higher for the Extradin A14 chamber. Other perturbation correction factors (i.e., P{sub wall}, P{sub stem}, and P{sub cel}) are, on average, less than 0.8% different from reference conditions for the chambers and beams studied. The current approach of reporting measured absorbed dose at a point in water coinciding with the location of the centroid of the chamber is the main factor responsible for large correction factors in nonstandard beam deliveries (e.g., intensity modulated radiation therapy) reported in literature. Conclusions: To reduce or eliminate the magnitude

  9. Synergetic effects of dual-beam implantation on the microstructural development in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Fortuna, F.; Ruault, M.-O.; Oliviero, E.; Borodin, V. A.; Kirk, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    We report a synergy effect on the microstructural development of silicon specimens as a result of dual-beam high temperature irradiation/implantation. In situ transmission electron microscopy experiments using two different experimental setups have been used, where the primary 50 keV Co{sup +} ion implantation beam was supplemented with either a 300 keV electron beam or a 500 keV Si{sup +} ion beam. In both cases, the secondary beam intensity was such that both beams created comparable overall primary damage. Completely different microstructural response has been found in these two cases. An intensive electron irradiation was found to sharply accelerate the evolution of dislocation structure, only weakly affecting the disilicide kinetics. On the contrary, the Si ion beam weakly affected the kinetics of either dislocation loops or coherent CoSi{sub 2} precipitates, but drastically increased the number density of thermodynamically unstable semicoherent precipitates. Possible microstructural reasons for the observed effects and the implications for both dislocation loop and cobalt disilicide nucleation mechanisms in high-temperature implanted TEM samples are discussed and supported by detailed molecular dynamics calculations of annealing of cascade remnants produced by the energetic silicon recoils.

  10. Simulation of the effect of wiggler imperfections on harmonic generation in two-beam free-electron lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahedian, M.; Maraghechi, B.

    2012-05-01

    A three-dimensional simulation of a free-electron laser (FEL) with two beams is used to study the sensitivity of the third harmonic due to wiggler imperfections. In the two-beam FEL, for a fundamental wavelength of 107.5 nm, the power will be converted to the third harmonic at a shorter wavelength, in this case in the extreme ultraviolet at 35.8 nm. In this arrangement, the fundamental resonance of the higher energy beam coincides with the third harmonic of the lower energy beam, for this energy conversion to take place. For enhanced focusing, a planar wiggler with parabolic pole face is considered. Investigation of the effect of wiggler errors on the efficiencies of harmonic and fundamental resonance of the two-beam and the one-beam FEL shows that the average efficiency for the third harmonic in the two-beam FEL is decreased by 36% while the reduction of average efficiency for the fundamental of the two-beam is 55% and for the third harmonic of the one-beam is 48%. This shows that the third harmonic radiation in the two-beam FEL is less sensitive to wiggler imperfection compared to its fundamental as well as the third harmonic in the one-beam FEL. The reason is that the energy that transfers to the third harmonic of the two-beam FEL comes from both electron beams. It was also found that, for almost all cases, standard deviation increases with an increasing level of wiggler imperfection while, for the two-beam FEL, saturation length of the fundamental resonance decreases and the third harmonic increases with increasing wiggler imperfection.

  11. The effect of energy deposition on pattern resolution in electron beam lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunathan, Ananthan

    Electron beam lithography is one of the most important tools for nanofabrication. Electron beam lithography has consistently been able to offer higher resolution, typically better than 10 nm or so, compared to other techniques. In this work the contribution of electron-substrate interaction to pattern resolution is investigated. In electron beam lithography the incident beam is scattered in the resist-substrate stack by a combination of elastic and inelastic events which is described by the point spread function. Using a Vistec VB300 Gaussian beam lithography tool operating at 100 keV the experimental point spread function is investigated by a technique called point exposure distribution measurements. The experimental results indicate that the scattering in the sub-100 nm range shows several orders of the magnitude difference with that obtained via Monte Carlo simulations. In high energy electron beam lithography where forward scattering in small, contribution of secondary electrons generated by the primary beam must be taken into account. The chemical change leading to resist exposure is through bond scission, which is typically a low energy event between 3 -- 5 eV. Compared to the primary beam, the secondary electrons have a significantly higher probability of scission due to their lower energy. These secondary electrons are also generated with large emission angles and can travel several nanometers, leading to an increase in observed line widths compared to the size of the beam. An analytical model developed here, that considers the energy deposited by the secondary electrons, is able to predict the dependence of dose on observed diameter to within a reasonable accuracy. This technique used in conjunction with the knowledge of resist contrast is also indicative of pattern resolution limits in high energy electron beam lithography. It is also found that for negative resists, backscatter effects and resist contrast significantly degrade the resolution for large

  12. Neutral Beam Propagation Effects in the Upper Atmosphere.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    I 7 -AA74 6 NEUTRAL BEAR PROPAGAT ION EFFECTS IN THE UPPER7~ATMOSPHERE(U) B STON C LL CHESTNUT HILL MA DEPT OF~PHYSICS P CARINI ET AL 01 OCT 84...BUREAU OF STANDARDS 2963 A t %. -_- ’o N, r ,._ .~ , AD-A 174 896 AFGL-TR-85-0038 NEUTRAL BEAM PROPAGATION EFFECTS IN THE UPPER ATMOSPHERE P. Carini...ZIP Code) 10 SOURCE OF FUNDING NOS PROGRAM PROJECT TASK( WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO. NO. NO 1j 1 TITLE (Include secuit’iy ClawficaiJon) Neutral Beam

  13. Effective parameters in beam acoustic metamaterials based on energy band structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Li; Wu, Jiu Hui; Guan, Dong; Hou, Mingming; Kuan, Lu; Shen, Li

    2016-07-01

    We present a method to calculate the effective material parameters of beam acoustic metamaterials. The effective material parameters of a periodic beam are calculated as an example. The dispersion relations and energy band structures of this beam are calculated. Subsequently, the effective material parameters of the beam are investigated by using the energy band structures. Then, the modal analysis and transmission properties of the beams with finite cells are simulated in order to confirm the correctness of effective approximation. The results show that the periodic beam can be equivalent to the homogeneous beam with dynamic effective material parameters in passband.

  14. Increased tensile strength of carbon nanotube yarns and sheets through chemical modification and electron beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sandi G; Williams, Tiffany S; Baker, James S; Solá, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S; Wilmoth, Nathan G; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A

    2014-05-14

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of CNT forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated into that of sheets and yarns, where the bulk material strength is limited by intertube electrostatic attractions and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess postprocessing of CNT sheets and yarns to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small-molecule functionalization and electron-beam irradiation were evaluated as means to enhance the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the bulk CNT materials. Mechanical testing revealed a 57% increase in tensile strength of CNT sheets upon functionalization compared with unfunctionalized sheets, while an additional 48% increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated. Similarly, small-molecule functionalization increased tensile strength of yarn by up to 25%, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88% beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  15. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  16. Microbial radio-resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium in egg increases due to repetitive irradiation with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfai, Adiam T.; Beamer, Sarah K.; Matak, Kristen E.; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2011-04-01

    Ionizing radiation improves food safety. However, foodborne pathogens develop increased resistance in response to sub-lethal stresses such as heat, pH, antibiotics, etc. Therefore, it is hypothesized that foodborne pathogens may develop increased radio-resistance to electron beam (e-beam) radiation. The objective was to determine if D10-value for Salmonella Typhimurium in de-shelled raw egg (egg white and yolk mixed together) increases due to repetitive processing with e-beam at sub-lethal doses. Survivors were enumerated on non-selective (TSA) and selective (XLD) media. Survivors from the highest dose were isolated and used in subsequent e-beam cycle. This process was repeated four times for a total of five e-beam cycles. D10-values for S. Typhimurium enumerated on TSA and XLD following each e-beam cycle were calculated as inverse reciprocal of the slope of survivor curves. D10-values for the ATCC strain were 0.59±0.031 and 0.46±0.022 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively. However, following the fifth e-beam cycle, the respective D10-values increased (P<0.05) to 0.69±0.026 and 0.61±0.029 kGy, respectively. S. Typhimurium showed a trend (P>0.05) to develop radio-resistance faster on selective media, likely due to facilitated selection of radio-resistant cells within microbial population following each e-beam cycle. For all five e-beam cycles, S. Typhimurium had higher (P<0.05) D10-values on non-selective media, indicating that sub-lethal injury followed by cellular repair and recovery are important for radio-resistance and inactivation of this microorganism. This study demonstrated that e-beam efficiently inactivates S. Typhimurium in raw egg; however, similar to other inactivation techniques and factors affecting microbial growth, S. Typhimurium develops increased radio-resistance if repetitively processed with e-beam at sub-lethal doses.

  17. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect

    Popple, Richard A. Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify

  18. Scattering effects in passive foil focusing of ion beams

    DOE PAGES

    Yuen, Albert; Lund, Steven M.; Barnard, John J.; ...

    2015-09-11

    A stack of thin, closely spaced conducting foils has been investigated by Lund et al. [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 16, 044202 (2013)] as a passive focusing lens for intense ion beams. The foils mitigate space-charge defocusing forces to enable the beam self-magnetic field to focus. In this study, we analyze possible degradation of focusing due to scattering of beam ions resulting from finite foil thickness using an envelope model and numerical simulations with the particle-in-cell code WARP. Ranges of kinetic energy where scattering effects are sufficient to destroy passive focusing are quantified. The scheme may be utilized to focusmore » protons produced in intense laser-solid accelerator schemes. The spot size of an initially collimated 30 MeV proton beam with initial rms radius 200 μm, perveance Q=1.8×10-2, and initial transverse emittance ϵx,rms=0.87 mm mrad propagating through a stack of 6.4 μm thick foils, spaced 100 μm apart, gives a 127.5 μm spot with scattering and a 81.0 μm spot without scattering, illustrating the importance of including scattering effects.« less

  19. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-09

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  20. Irradiation Effects on RIA Fragmentation CU Beam Dump

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, S; Boles, J L; Ahle, L E; Stein, W; Wirth, B D

    2005-05-20

    Within the scope of conceptual research and development (R&D) activities in support of the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) facility, high priority is given to the development of high-power fragmentation beam dumps. A pre-study was made of a static water-cooled Cu beam dump that can meet requirements for a 400 MeV/u uranium beam. The issue of beam sputtering was addressed and found to be insignificant. Preliminary radiation transport simulations show significant damage (in displacements per atom, DPA) in the vicinity of the Bragg peak of the uranium ions. Experimental data show that defects in Cu following neutron or high-energy particle irradiation tend to saturate at doses between 1 and 5 DPA, and this saturation in defect density also results in saturation of mechanical property degradation. However, effects of swift heavy ion irradiation and the production of gaseous and solid transmutant elements still need to be addressed. Initial calculations indicate that He concentrations on the order of 400 appm are produced in the beam dump after several weeks of continuous operation and He embrittlement may be a concern. Recommendations are made for further investigation of Cu irradiation effects for RIA-relevant conditions.

  1. Charge stripper effects on beam dynamics in the 180-degree bending section of the RISP linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Ji-Ho; Jin, Hyunchang; Song, Jeong Seog

    2016-09-01

    The RAON, a superconducting linear accelerator for RISP (Rare Isotope Science Project), will use a charge stripper in order to increase the charge states of the heavy ions for effective acceleration in the higher energy part of the linac. The charge stripper affects the beam distribution by scattering the heavy ions as they go through the charge stripper. Moreover we have to select and accelerate proper charge states between 77+ and 81+ for the case of a uranium beam in order to satisfy the beam-power requirement at an IF (inflight fragmentation) target. This work focuses on how the beam dynamics are affected by the charge stripper in the 180-dgree bending section.

  2. Simulation Of Electron Cloud Effects On Electron Beam At ERL With Pipelined QuickPIC

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, B.; Muggli, P.; Huang, C.; Decyk, V.; Mori, W. B.; Hoffstaetter, G. H.; Katsouleas, T.

    2009-01-22

    With the successful implementation of pipelining algorithm to the QuickPIC code, the number of processors used is increased by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude, and the speed of the simulation is improved by a similar factor. The pipelined QuickPIC is used to simulate the electron cloud effect on electron beam in the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) due to extremely small emittance and high peak currents anticipated in the machine. A tune shift is found due to electron cloud on electron beams, which is of equal magnitude to that on positron beams but in an opposite direction; however, emittance growth of the electron beam in an electron cloud is not observed for ERL parameters.

  3. A method to increase the hologram viewing angle by the beam reconfiguration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmura, Naoyuki; Kang, Hoonjong; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Yoshikawa, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    A liquid crystal panel is often used for holographic television. However, its pixel size and pixel number are not enough for practical holographic 3D display. Therefore, multi-panel configuration is often used to increase the viewing angle and displayed image size. However, many spatial light modulators should be used in them. In this paper, we propose a novel method to increase the viewing angle of a holographic display system. The proposed method, which is implemented by a mirror module, is to reconfigure the beam shape reflected by a spatial light modulator. In this paper, the equipment is applied to a holographic display system, which has only a single spatial light modulator and can display a hologram in wider viewing angle than that of the conventional method. By the proposed method, the resolution of the reconfigured spatial light modulator has double resolution in horizontal direction. Inversely, the vertical resolution is decreased because the human get more 3D information in horizontal direction. We have experimented using a Liquid Crystal on Silicon, whose resolution is 4,096 x 2,160 pixels. And the reconfigured resolution by the mirror module is 8,192 x 1,080 pixels. From the experimental results, the horizontal viewing angle is almost two times wider than that of the conventional method without the mirror module. We have achieved that the hologram can be observed binocularly.

  4. Thermal effects in high power cavities for photoneutralization of D{sup −} beams in future neutral beam injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorucci, Donatella; Feng, Jiatai; Pichot, Mikhaël; Chaibi, Walid

    2015-04-08

    Photoneutralization may represent a key issue in the neutral beam injectors for future fusion reactors. In fact, photodetachment based neutralization combined with an energy recovery system increase the injector overall efficiency up to 60%. This is the SIPHORE injector concept in which photoneutralization is realized in a refolded cavity [1]. However, about 1 W of the several megaWatts intracavity power is absorbed by the mirrors coatings and gives rise to important thermoelastic distortions. This is expected to change the optical behavior of the mirrors and reduce the enhancement factor of the cavity. In this paper, we estimate these effects and we propose a thermal system to compensate it.

  5. High beam headlamp use rates: Effects of rurality, proximity of other traffic, and roadway curvature.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Ian J; Brumbelow, Matthew L; Flannagan, Michael J; Sullivan, John M

    2017-10-03

    The few observational studies of the prevalence of high beam use indicate the rate of high beam use is about 25% when vehicles are isolated from other vehicles on unlit roads. Recent studies were limited to 2-lane rural roads and used measurement methods that likely overestimated use. The current study examined factors associated with the rate of high beam use of isolated vehicles on a variety of roadways in the Ann Arbor, Michigan area. Twenty observation sites were categorized as urban, rural, or on a rural/urban boundary and selected to estimate the effects of street lighting, road curvature, and direction of travel relative to the city on high beam use. Sites were selected in pairs so that a majority of traffic passing one site also passed through the other. Measurement of high beams relied on video data recorded for 2 nights at each site, and the video data also were used to derive a precise measure of the proximity of other traffic. Nearly 3,200 isolated vehicles (10 s or longer from other vehicles) were observed, representing 1,500-plus vehicle pairs. Across the sample, 18% of the vehicles used high beams. Seventy-three percent of the 1,500-plus vehicle pairs used low beams at each paired site, whereas 9% used high beams at both sites. Vehicles at rural sites and sites at the boundaries of Ann Arbor were more likely to use high beams than vehicles at urban sites, but use in rural areas compared with rural/urban boundary areas did not vary significantly. Rates at all sites were much lower than expected, ranging from 0.9 to 52.9%. High beam use generally increased with greater time between subject vehicles and leading vehicles and vehicles in the opposing lane. There were mixed findings associated with street lighting, road curvature, and direction of travel relative to the city. Maximizing visibility available to drivers from headlights includes addressing the substantial underuse of high beam headlamps. Advanced technologies such as high beam assist, which

  6. Return Current Effects on Electron Beam Focusing in Plasma Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govil, R.; Backhaus, E. Y.; Wurtele, J. S.; Leemans, W. P.

    1998-11-01

    Relativistic electron beams can be focused in field-free plasmas due to magnetic self-pinching(P. Chen, Particle Accelerators, 20, p. 171 (1987).). If the plasma density is sufficiently high, plasma return current can weaken the beam self-pinching by reducing the net current. The return current effect is important when the plasma wavelength is small compared to transverse beam size, namely, k_pσr agt 1. An overdense plasma lens experiment(R. Govil and W.P. Leemans, Proc. of the Advanced Accelerator Workshop, Baltimore, MD (1998), to be published.) was conducted at the Beam Test Facility(W.P. Leemans et al., Proc. of the Particle Accelerator Conference, p. 83 (1993).) at LBNL to examine the reduction in focusing due to return currents induced in the plasma. In the experiment, plasma lenses were produced with k_pσr ranging from 0.3 to 1.1. Simulation results, based on beam envelope model, are shown to agree with measurements in both regimes. In addition, focusing is examined in plasmas with dimensions comparable to transverse bunch size and plasma wavelength.

  7. Nonlinear effects in photothermal-optical-beam-deflection imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetsel, G. C., Jr.; Spicer, J. B.

    1986-09-01

    Nonlinear phenomena have been observed during photothermal-optical-beam-deflection imaging experiments on samples of both high-purity aluminum and aluminum alloys. Evidence for nonlinear optical and thermal effects have been measured. Theoretical models have been developed as aids in understanding the different contrast mechanisms observed in linear and nonlinear photothermal images.

  8. Fast IMRT by increasing the beam number and reducing the number of segments.

    PubMed

    Bratengeier, Klaus; Gainey, Mark B; Flentje, Michael

    2011-12-09

    The purpose of this work is to develop fast deliverable step and shoot IMRT technique. A reduction in the number of segments should theoretically be possible, whilst simultaneously maintaining plan quality, provided that the reduction is accompanied by an increased number of gantry angles. A benefit of this method is that the segment shaping could be performed during gantry motion, thereby reducing the delivery time. The aim was to find classes of such solutions whose plan quality can compete with conventional IMRT. A planning study was performed. Step and shoot IMRT plans were created using direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) as a reference. DMPO plans were compared to an IMRT variant having only one segment per angle ("2-Step Fast"). 2-Step Fast is based on a geometrical analysis of the topology of the planning target volume (PTV) and the organs at risk (OAR). A prostate/rectum case, spine metastasis/spinal cord, breast/lung and an artificial PTV/OAR combination of the ESTRO-Quasimodo phantom were used for the study. The composite objective value (COV), a quality score, and plan delivery time were compared. The delivery time for the DMPO reference plan and the 2-Step Fast IMRT technique was measured and calculated for two different linacs, a twelve year old Siemens Primus™ ("old" linac) and two Elekta Synergy™ "S" linacs ("new" linacs). 2-Step Fast had comparable or better quality than the reference DMPO plan. The number of segments was smaller than for the reference plan, the number of gantry angles was between 23 and 34. For the modern linac the delivery time was always smaller than that for the reference plan. The calculated (measured) values showed a mean delivery time reduction of 21% (21%) for the new linac, and of 7% (3%) for the old linac compared to the respective DMPO reference plans. For the old linac, the data handling time per beam was the limiting factor for the treatment time reduction. 2-Step Fast plans are suited to reduce the

  9. Photoluminescence enhancement in quaternary III-nitrides alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy with increasing Al content

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Pereiro, J.; Gonzalez-Posada, F.; Munoz, E.; Calleja, E.

    2008-02-15

    Room temperature photoluminescence and optical absorption spectra have been measured in wurtzite In{sub x}Al{sub y}Ga{sub 1-x-y}N (x{approx}0.06, 0.02beam epitaxy. Photoluminescence spectra show both an enhancement of the integrated intensity and an increasing Stokes shift with the Al content. Both effects arise from an Al-enhanced exciton localization revealed by the S- and W-shaped temperature dependences of the photoluminescence emission energy and bandwidth, respectively. Present results point to these materials as a promising choice for the active region in efficient light emitters. An In-related bowing parameter of 1.6 eV was derived from optical absorption data.

  10. Effects of long-wavelength dissipation on beam-driven Langmuir turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, P. A.; Newman, D. L.; Rubenchik, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of long-wavelength dissipation on beam-driven Langmuir turbulence are investigated using numerical simulations that include both weak and strong turbulence effects. Strong-turbulence wave collapses occur concurrently with weak-turbulence energy cascades if the long-wavelength damping is sufficiently small relative to the growth rate of the beam-unstable waves. Above a threshold damping level, only the weak-turbulence backscatter cascade is observed, and it becomes increasingly truncated as the damping increases, eventually consisting of only a single backscatter. A simple Lotka-Volterra model gives an excellent description of the periodic evolution observed in the weak-turbulence regime. Suppression of the usual backscatter cascade by long-wavelength damping enables intense beam-aligned density troughs to form, which trap and duct Langmuir waves.

  11. Surface-active element effects on the shape of GTA, laser, and electron-beam welds

    SciTech Connect

    Heiple, C.R.; Roper, J.R.; Stagner, R.T.; Aden, R.J.

    1983-03-01

    Laser and electron-beam welds were passed across selenium-doped zones in 21-6-9 stainless steel. The depth/width (d/w) ratio of a defocused laser weld with a weld pool shape similar to a GTA weld increased by over 200% in a zone where 66 ppm selenium had been added. Smaller increases were observed in selenium-doped zones for a moderately defocused electron beam weld with a higher d/w ratio in undoped base metal. When laser or electron beam weld penetration was by a keyhole mechanism, no change in d/w ratio occurred in selenium-doped zones. The results confirm the surface-tension-driven fluid-flow model for the effect of minor elements on GTA weld pool shape. Other experimental evidence bearing on the effect of minor elements on GTA weld penetration is summarized.

  12. Simulations of Electron Cloud Effects on the Beam Dynamics for theFNAL Main Injector Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnad Kiran G.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, Marco; Celata, Christine M.; Grote, David

    2006-04-15

    The Fermilab main injector (MI) is being considered for an upgrade as part of the high intensity neutrino source (HINS) effort. This upgrade will involve a significant increasing of the bunch intensity relative to its present value. Such an increase will place the MI in a regime in which electron-cloud effects are expected to become important. We have used the electrostatic particle-in-cell code WARP, recently augmented with new modeling capabilities and simulation techniques, to study the dynamics of beam-electron cloud interaction. This work in progress involves a systematic assessment of beam instabilities due to the presence of electron clouds.

  13. Stabilization of a Laser Welding Process Against Focal Shift Effects using Beam Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thiel, C.; Weber, R.; Johannsen, J.; Graf, T.

    Two measures to enhance welding process stability with respect to a varying focal position are presented and discussed with regards to possible effects of laser power efficiency increase. Spatial beam movement was caused by a deflecting mirror and proved to create a welding process with a higher constancy in welding depth when changing focal position. A larger cross sectional area of the weld seam was measured showing increased laser absorption when compared to a static beam. Sinusoidal laser power modulation was tested for varying focus positions and proves to induce a deeper weld seam at moderately increased cross sectional areas. The power modulated welding process is dominated by the influence of melt dynamics which can be guided by choosing suitable modulation parameters. Both systems can be used to stabilize the welding process against loss of joint area or loss of connection which may occur due to focal shift in high brightness laser beam optics.

  14. TU-A-BRE-01: The Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Beams Relative to Photon Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Paganetti, H; Stewart, R; Carabe-Fernandez, A

    2014-06-15

    Proton therapy patients receive a 10% lower physical dose than the dose administered using photons, i.e. the proton relative biological effectiveness (RBE) is 1.1 in comparison to high-energy photons. The use of a generic, spatially invariant RBE within tumor targets and normal tissue structures disregards a large body of evidence indicating that proton RBE tends to increase with increasing linear energy transfer (LET). Because the doseaveraged proton LET in the distal edge of a spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) is larger than the LET in the plateau region or proximal edge of a SOBP, the use of a spatially invariant RBE is not well justified from a mechanistic point of view. On the other hand, the available clinical data on local tumor control rates and early or late side effects do not provide strong evidence against the continued use of a constant and spatially invariant clinical RBE. The only potential downside to the ongoing use of a constant RBE of 1.1 seems to be that we are missing a potential opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio, i.e., design proton therapy treatments in ways that exploit, rather than mitigate, spatial variations in proton RBE. Speakers in this symposium will: 1-review the laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a spatially invariant RBE of 1.1, 2-examine some of the putative mechanisms connecting spatial variations in particle LET to estimates of the proton RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels 3-assess the possible clinical significance of incorporating models for spatial variations in proton RBE into treatment planning systems. 4-discuss treatment planning and delivery techniques that will exploit the spatial variations of RBE within proton beams. Learning Objectives: To review laboratory and clinical evidence for and against the continued use of a constant RBE of 1.1 To understand major mechanisms connecting proton LET to RBE at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. To quantify the

  15. Strict X-ray beam collimation for facial bones examination can increase lens exposure

    PubMed Central

    Powys, R; Robinson, J; Kench, P L; Ryan, J; Brennan, P C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives It is well accepted that collimation is a cost-effective dose-reducing tool for X-ray examinations. This phantom-based study investigated the impact of X-ray beam collimation on radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid along with the effect on image quality in facial bone radiography. Methods A three-view series (occipitomental, occipitomental 30 and lateral) was investigated, and radiation doses to the lenses and thyroid were measured using an Unfors dosemeter. Images were assessed by six experienced observers using a visual grading analysis and a total of 5400 observations were made. Results Strict collimation significantly (p<0.0001) reduced the radiation dose to the lenses of the eyes and thyroid when using a fixed projection-specific exposure. With a variable exposure technique (fixed exit dose, to simulate the behaviour of an automatic exposure control), while strict collimation was again shown to reduce thyroid dose, higher lens doses were demonstrated when compared with larger fields of exposure. Image quality was found to significantly improve using strict collimation, with observer preference being demonstrated using visual grading characteristic curves. Conclusion The complexities of optimising radiographic techniques have been shown and the data presented emphasise the importance of examining dose-reducing strategies in a comprehensive way. PMID:22374279

  16. Effective dose from cone beam CT examinations in dentistry.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J A; Drage, N A; Davies, J; Thomas, D W

    2009-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) is becoming an increasingly utilized imaging modality for dental examinations in the UK. Previous studies have presented little information on patient dose for the range of fields of view (FOVs) that can be utilized. The purpose of the study was therefore to calculate the effective dose delivered to the patient during a selection of CBCT examinations performed in dentistry. In particular, the i-CAT CBCT scanner was investigated for several imaging protocols commonly used in clinical practice. A Rando phantom containing thermoluminescent dosemeters was scanned. Using both the 1990 and recently approved 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection recommended tissue weighting factors, effective doses were calculated. The doses (E(1990), E(2007)) were: full FOV head (92.8 microSv, 206.2 microSv); 13 cm scan of the jaws (39.5 microSv, 133.9 microSv); 6 cm high-resolution mandible (47.2 microSv, 188.5 microSv); 6 cm high-resolution maxilla (18.5 microSv, 93.3 microSv); 6 cm standard mandible (23.9 microSv, 96.2 microSv); and 6 cm standard maxilla (9.7 microSv, 58.9 microSv). The doses from CBCT are low compared with conventional CT but significantly higher than conventional dental radiography techniques.

  17. Experimental investigation of CNT effect on curved beam strength and interlaminar fracture toughness of CFRP laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arca, M. A.; Coker, D.

    2014-06-01

    High mechanical properties and light weight structures of composite materials and advances in manufacturing processes have increased the use of composite materials in the aerospace and wind energy industries as a primary load carrying structures in complex shapes. However, use of composite materials in complex geometries such as L-shaped laminates creates weakness at the radius which causes delamination. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is preferred as a toughening materials in composite matrices due to their high mechanical properties and aspect ratios. However, effect of CNTs on curved beam strength (CBS) is not investigated in literature comprehensively. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of CNT on Mode I and Mode II fracture toughness and CBS. L-shaped beams are fabric carbon/epoxy composite laminates manufactured by hand layup technique. Curved beam composite laminates were subjected to four point bending loading according to ASTM D6415/D6415M-06a. Double cantilever beam (DCB) tests and end notch flexure (ENF) tests were conducted to determine mode-I and mode-II fracture toughness, respectively. Preliminary results show that 3% CNT addition to the resin increased the mode-I fracture toughness by %25 and mode-II fracture toughness by %10 compared to base laminates. In contrast, no effect on curved beam strength was found.

  18. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOEpatents

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  19. Effects of high source flow and high pumping speed on gas source molecular beam epitaxy / chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollum, M. J.; Jackson, S. L.; Szafranek, I.; Stillman, G. E.

    1990-10-01

    We report the growth of GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), gas source molecular beam epitaxy (GSMBE), and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE) in an epitaxial III-V reactor which features high pumping speed. The system is comprised of a modified Perkin-Elmer 430P molecular beam epitaxy system and a custom gas source panel from Emcore. The growth chamber is pumped with a 7000 1/s (He) diffusion pump (Varian VHS-10 with Monsanto Santovac 5 oil). The gas source panel includes pressure based flow controllers (MKS 1150) allowing triethylaluminum (TEA), triethylgallium (TEG), and trimethylindium (TMI) to be supplied without the use of hydrogen. All source lines, including arsine and phosphine, are maintained below atmospheric pressure. The high pumping speed allows total system flow rates as high as 100 SCCM and V/III ratios as high as 100. The purity of GaAs grown by MBE in this system increases with pumping speed. GaAs layers grown by GSMBE with arsine flows of 10 and 20 SCCM have electron concentrations of 1 × 10 15 cm -3 (μ 77=48,000 cm 2/V·) and 2 × 10 14 cm -3 (μ 77=78,000 cm 2/V·s) respectively. El ectron concentration varies with hydride injector temperature such that the minimum in electron concentration occurs for less than complete cracking. The effect of V/III ratio and the use of a metal eutectic bubbler on residual carrier concentration in GaAs grown by CBE is presented. Intentional Si and Be doping of CBE grown GaAs is demonstrated at a high growth rate of 5.4 μm/h.

  20. Acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam in the presence of quantum effects

    SciTech Connect

    Niknam, A. R.; Aki, H.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.

    2013-09-15

    Using the quantum magnetohydrodynamic model and obtaining the dispersion relation of the Cherenkov and cyclotron waves, the acceleration of positrons by a relativistic electron beam is investigated. The Cherenkov and cyclotron acceleration mechanisms of positrons are compared together. It is shown that growth rate and, therefore, the acceleration of positrons can be increased in the presence of quantum effects.

  1. Electronic beam steering used with a toroidal HIFU transducer substantially increases the coagulated volume.

    PubMed

    Vincenot, Jeremy; Melodelima, David; Chavrier, Françoise; Vignot, Alexandre; Kocot, Anthony; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2013-07-01

    Treatment with high-intensity focused ultrasound is well established but requires extended treatment time. A device composed of 256 elements arranged on a toroidal transducer was developed to increase the coagulated volume. When all the elements are working in phase for 40 s, a volume of 6-8 cm(3) can be ablated. However, the mechanical juxtaposition of single lesions is still necessary for treating one tumor with a diameter of 2 cm. The objective of this study was to combine this toroidal transducer geometry with electronic beam steering to ablate tumors with adequate normal tissue margins and without any mechanical displacement of the high-intensity focused ultrasound device. In vitro tests demonstrated that the coagulated volume obtained from 130 s of total exposure has an average diameter of 41.4 ± 4.0 mm and an average length of 53.3 ± 6.1 mm. This single lesion can be used to treat various size of metastasis, located at depths in the liver ranging 5-45 mm.

  2. Protective effects of shikonin on brain injury induced by carbon ion beam irradiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lu; Wang, Zhen Hua; Zhang, Hong; Zhou, Rong; Sun, Chao; Liu, Yang; Si, Jing; Liu, Yuan Yuan; Wang, Zhen Guo

    2015-02-01

    Radiation encephalopathy is the main complication of cranial radiotherapy. It can cause necrosis of brain tissue and cognitive dysfunction. Our previous work had proved that a natural antioxidant shikonin possessed protective effect on cerebral ischemic injury. Here we investigated the effects of shikonin on carbon ion beam induced radiation brain injury in mice. Pretreatment with shikonin significantly increased the SOD and CAT activities and the ratio of GSH/GSSG in mouse brain tissues compared with irradiated group (P<0.01), while obviously reduced the MDA and PCO contents and the ROS levels derived from of the brain mitochondria. The shikonin also noticeably improved the spatial memory deficits caused by carbon ion beam irradiation. All results demonstrated that shikonin could improve the irradiated brain injury which might resulted from its modulation effects on the oxidative stress induced by the 12C6+ ion beam.

  3. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  4. Investigation of effect of solenoid magnet on emittances of ion beam from laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Shunsuke; Romanelli, Mark; Cinquegrani, David; Sekine, Megumi; Kumaki, Masafumi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2014-02-01

    A magnetic field can increase an ion current of a laser ablation plasma and is expected to control the change of the plasma ion current. However, the magnetic field can also make some fluctuations of the plasma and the effect on the beam emittance and the emission surface is not clear. To investigate the effect of a magnetic field, we extracted the ion beams under three conditions where without magnetic field, with magnetic field, and without magnetic field with higher laser energy to measure the beam distribution in phase space. Then we compared the relations between the plasma ion current density into the extraction gap and the Twiss parameters with each condition. We observed the effect of the magnetic field on the emission surface.

  5. Effective NOx remediation from a surrogate flue gas using the US NRL Electra electron beam facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrova, Tz. B.; Petrov, G. M.; Wolford, M. F.; Giuliani, J. L.; Ladouceur, H. D.; Hegeler, F.; Myers, M. C.; Sethian, J. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NOx) emission is under restrictive federal regulations because of its negative impact on atmosphere, biosphere, and human health. Therefore, its removal has been a subject of extensive research to develop new efficient and cost effective techniques that can be applied on an industrial scale. In this work, we study both experimentally and theoretically an effective removal of NOx pollutants from a surrogate flue gas (SFG) using high power electron beam (e-beam) pulses. SFG is a simulant for exhaust from coal combustion power plants (82% N2, 6% O2, 12% CO2, and ˜100 ppm of NOx). The pulsed electron beam is generated using the United States Naval Research Laboratory Electra facility, which delivers e-beams with energies of ˜500 keV and a power pulse duration of ˜140 ns. During the e-beam irradiation, the energetic electrons generate a non-equilibrium plasma containing chemically active species, which then react with NOx to form harmless substances. A non-equilibrium time-dependent model is developed to describe NOx remediation from SFG. The model combines e-beam deposition rates obtained by solving the electron Boltzmann equation and extensive plasma chemistry modeling, which follows the species on a time scale from sub-nanoseconds to a few seconds. NOx decomposition as a function of electron beam parameters is studied. It is demonstrated experimentally that short (ns) pulses are the most efficient for NOx removal. A sharp reduction of NOx was measured with e-beam power deposition increasing, following the trend predicted by the model, achieving a 20 fold reduction to ˜5 ppm at energy deposition ˜20 J/l.

  6. The effects of error augmentation on learning to walk on a narrow balance beam.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Antoinette; Ferris, Daniel P

    2010-10-01

    Error augmentation during training has been proposed as a means to facilitate motor learning due to the human nervous system's reliance on performance errors to shape motor commands. We studied the effects of error augmentation on short-term learning of walking on a balance beam to determine whether it had beneficial effects on motor performance. Four groups of able-bodied subjects walked on a treadmill-mounted balance beam (2.5-cm wide) before and after 30 min of training. During training, two groups walked on the beam with a destabilization device that augmented error (Medium and High Destabilization groups). A third group walked on a narrower beam (1.27-cm) to augment error (Narrow). The fourth group practiced walking on the 2.5-cm balance beam (Wide). Subjects in the Wide group had significantly greater improvements after training than the error augmentation groups. The High Destabilization group had significantly less performance gains than the Narrow group in spite of similar failures per minute during training. In a follow-up experiment, a fifth group of subjects (Assisted) practiced with a device that greatly reduced catastrophic errors (i.e., stepping off the beam) but maintained similar pelvic movement variability. Performance gains were significantly greater in the Wide group than the Assisted group, indicating that catastrophic errors were important for short-term learning. We conclude that increasing errors during practice via destabilization and a narrower balance beam did not improve short-term learning of beam walking. In addition, the presence of qualitatively catastrophic errors seems to improve short-term learning of walking balance.

  7. Statistical effects in high-power microwave beam propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, R. A.; Bolton, P. R.; Sieger, G. E.

    1988-06-01

    At very high power levels pulsed microwave beams can generate air-breakdown plasmas which may limit the fluence that the beam can transport through the atmosphere. Conventional air breakdown is an avalanche process wherein free electrons, driven by the microwave fields, produce ionization through collisions with air molecules. Propagation of a beam is affected when the plasma electron density approaches the critical density for the particular microwave frequency. The rate of growth of the plasma depends on the competition between the ionization probability and electron loss processes such as attachment and diffusion. The physics of the avalanche process is reasonably well understood, and fluence limits can be fairly accurately predicted, so long as there are free seed electrons to initiate the breakdown. At sea level and low altitudes, seed electrons are, in fact, expected to be fairly rare, and air breakdown, and the consequences for beam propagation, must be treated as a statistical problem; the effective fluence limit may be much greater than would be predicted on the basis of conventional breakdown thresholds. The statistical effects are currently being investigated.

  8. Diffraction Effects in Directed Radiation Beams

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-03

    lx cm1 , cm 6.OxlO , z - -3 1.667xi0-3, and a = 1. The spectrum waý: approximacely flat up to 200 GHz, becoming negligible beyond 15 Triz . The pulse...29) wher, 0 =-!, 4 ad k = I . Making use of the method of stat:ionary phase, i t can be s;hown that ik.r _. !i.. k a 1~~~~~~ kneC)i )(,’I in, e " k...ct increase, with r - ct held fixed. In principle, one can now use the inverse source method to determine the sour:ces that lead to the bullet

  9. Spatial correlation for transmitters in spatial MIMO optical wireless links with Gaussian-beam waves and aperture effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhixiao; Yu, Song; Wang, Tianyi; Wu, Guohua; Guo, Hong; Gu, Wanyi

    2013-01-01

    The spatial correlation between signals arising from a pair of constituent transmitters in a spatial multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) system is investigated. General formulations for the spatial correlation functions considering Gaussian-beam waves and receiver aperture effects are given under weak turbulence condition. Based on the analytical expressions, we find that spatial correlation decreases with separation distance, but increases with receiver aperture sizes, turbulence strength and wavelengths. In particular, receiver aperture averaging effects can evidently increase the correlation. It is also shown that decreasing the beam widths can generally reduce the spatial correlation, and convergent beams have lower spatial correlation than their collimated counterparts. It is found that Gaussian beams with the Fresnel ratios larger than 1 have advantages in reducing both the spatial correlation and the beam scintillations.

  10. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment.

  11. An integrating matrix formulation for buckling of rotating beams including the effects of concentrated masses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lakin, William D.; Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1989-01-01

    The integrating matrix technique of computational mechanics is extended to include the effects of concentrated masses. The stability of a flexible rotating beam with discrete masses is analyzed to determine the critical rotational speeds for buckling in the inplane and out-of-plane directions. In this problem, the beam is subjected to compressive centrifugal forces arising from steady rotation about an axis which does not pass through the clamped end of the beam. To determine the eigenvalues from which stability is assessed, the differential equations of motion are solved numerically by combining the extended integrating matrix method with an eigenanalysis. Stability boundaries for a discrete mass representation of a uniform beam are shown to asymptotically approach the stability boundaries for the corresponding continuous mass beam as the number of concentrated masses is increased. An error in the literature is also noted for the discrete mass problem concerning the behavior of the critical rotational speed for inplane buckling as the radius of rotation of the clamped end of the beam is reduced.

  12. Focused Ion Beam Induced Effects on MOS Transistor Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Abramo, Marsha T.; Antoniou, Nicholas; Campbell, Ann N.; Fleetwood, Daniel M.; Hembree, Charles E.; Jessing, Jeffrey R.; Soden, Jerry M.; Swanson, Scot E.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon; Vanderlinde, William E.

    1999-07-28

    We report on recent studies of the effects of 50 keV focused ion beam (FIB) exposure on MOS transistors. We demonstrate that the changes in value of transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, V{sub t}) are essentially the same for exposure to a Ga+ ion beam at 30 and 50 keV under the same exposure conditions. We characterize the effects of FIB exposure on test transistors fabricated in both 0.5 {micro}m and 0.225 {micro}m technologies from two different vendors. We report on the effectiveness of overlying metal layers in screening MOS transistors from FIB-induced damage and examine the importance of ion dose rate and the physical dimensions of the exposed area.

  13. Effect of particle size distribution and chlorophyll content on beam attenuation spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitchen, J. C.; Zaneveld, J. R. V.; Pak, H.

    1982-01-01

    The relationships between beam attenuation spectra, chlorophyll and pheophytin pigment concentrations, and particle size distributions are examined for a coastal region believed to have negligible concentrations of terrestrially derived dissolved organic compounds but large quantities of phytoplankton and resuspended sediments. It was found that the slope of the beam attenuation spectra increases when the hyperbolic slope of the size distribution increases. The magnitude of this increase in slope was consistent with calculations based on a range of particle diameters from 0.5 to 30 microns so that it would be possible to predict the slope of the particle size distribution if the slope of the beam attenuation spectra is known. The ratio of chlorophyll and pheophytin pigments to suspended volume concentrations affected the beam attenuation spectra to a lesser degree and in a more complex manner. Because of the strong effect of slope, it was concluded that the chlorophyll and pheophytin pigment content of suspended particles could not be efficiently predicted by means of beam attenuation measurements.

  14. Experimental determination of the effect of detector size on profile measurements in narrow photon beams.

    PubMed

    Pappas, E; Maris, T G; Papadakis, A; Zacharopoulou, F; Damilakis, J; Papanikolaou, N; Gourtsoyiannis, N

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate experimentally the detector size effect on narrow beam profile measurements. Polymer gel and magnetic resonance imaging dosimetry was used for this purpose. Profile measurements (Pm(s)) of a 5 mm diameter 6 MV stereotactic beam were performed using polymer gels. Eight measurements of the profile of this narrow beam were performed using correspondingly eight different detector sizes. This was achieved using high spatial resolution (0.25 mm) two-dimensional measurements and eight different signal integration volumes A X A X slice thickness, simulating detectors of different size. "A" ranged from 0.25 to 7.5 mm, representing the detector size. The gel-derived profiles exhibited increased penumbra width with increasing detector size, for sizes >0.5 mm. By extrapolating the gel-derived profiles to zero detector size, the true profile (Pt) of the studied beam was derived. The same polymer gel data were also used to simulate a small-volume ion chamber profile measurement of the same beam, in terms of volume averaging. The comparison between these results and actual corresponding small-volume chamber profile measurements performed in this study, reveal that the penumbra broadening caused by both volume averaging and electron transport alterations (present in actual ion chamber profile measurements) is a lot more intense than that resulted by volume averaging effects alone (present in gel-derived profiles simulating ion chamber profile measurements). Therefore, not only the detector size, but also its composition and tissue equivalency is proved to be an important factor for correct narrow beam profile measurements. Additionally, the convolution kernels related to each detector size and to the air ion chamber were calculated using the corresponding profile measurements (Pm(s)), the gel-derived true profile (Pt), and convolution theory. The response kernels of any desired detector can be derived, allowing the elimination of the errors

  15. Effect of plasma rotation on sawtooth stabilization by beam ions

    SciTech Connect

    N. N. Gorelenkov; M. F. F. Nave; R. Budny; C. Z. Cheng; G. Y. Fu; J. Hastie; J. Manickam; W. Park

    2000-06-23

    The sawtooth period in JET ELM-free H-Mode plasmas is increasing with Neutral Beam Injection (NBI) power. For injected power PNBI 12MW no large sawtooth crash is observed during the ELM-free period. However, as the edge stability is improved and external kink modes and ELMs are delayed, a possible sawtooth crash at a high plasma beta becomes a concern. In JET DT experiments, delaying sawteeth was found to be crucial in the quest for high fusion power. Fast particles are known to provide stabilizing effect on sawteeth, however, sawtooth stabilization by NBI ions is not clearly understood, since NBI ions are usually not ''fast'' enough to stabilize the m/n = 1/1 internal kink mode which is believed to cause the crash. In order to understand the observed sawteeth stabilization in tokamak experiments with NBI heating, the internal kink m/n = 1/1 mode stability of JET plasmas was modeled using the NOVA-K code, which is also benchmarked with the nonperturbative version of NOVA and the M3D code. Comparison of m/n = 1/1 mode stabilization by NBI ions in JET and TFTR and application of the nonlinear stabilization criteria is given.

  16. A Study of Effects of Tissue Inhomogeneity on HIFU Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Viren; Roberts, Ron; Long, Tao; Thompson, R. B.; Ryken, Timothy

    2006-05-01

    The potential of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) will not be realized unless the effects of overlaying tissues are understood in such a way that allows for estimation of HIFU dose distribution at a target tissue. We employ computational models to examine the impact of phase aberration on tissue ablation. Thompson and Roberts have recently studied the effects of phase aberration on ultrasound focusing in aerospace engine materials such as titanium alloy, and have developed a computational model to examine these effects. The ultrasound beam observed after transmission through the fused quartz (homogeneous) and that observed after transmission through the titanium (inhomogeneous) demonstrate the severe beam wavefield amplitude distortion introduced by the velocity inhomogeneity-induced phase aberration. We study applicability of this approach to model phase aberration in inhomogeneous tissues and its effect on HIFU dose distribution around the focus. It is hypothesized that the ill-effects of phase aberration accumulate during propagation through intervening tissue in which field intensities are substantially lower than that in the focal zone, and it is therefore appropriate to use a linear acoustic model to describe the transport of energy from the transducer to the volume targeted for ablation. We present initial results of the simulation and experiments of beam measurements under water without and with different tissue layers.

  17. Effect of cumulated dose on hydrogen emission from polyethylene irradiated under oxidative atmosphere using gamma rays and ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, M.; Pellizzi, E.; Boughattas, I.; Fromentin, E.; Dauvois, V.; de Combarieu, G.; Coignet, P.; Cochin, F.; Ngono-Ravache, Y.; Balanzat, E.; Esnouf, S.

    2016-01-01

    This work reports the effect of very high doses, up to 10 MGy, on the H2 emission from high density polyethylene (HDPE) irradiated with gamma rays and ion beams, in the presence of oxygen. This was obtained through a two-step procedure. First, HDPE films were pre-aged, at different doses, using either gamma rays or ion beams. In the second step, the pre-aged samples were irradiated in closed glass ampoules for gas quantification, using the same beam type as for pre-ageing. The hydrogen emission rate decreases when dose increases for both gamma rays and ion beams. However, the decreasing rate appears higher under gamma rays than under ion beam irradiations and this is assigned to a lesser oxidation level under the latter. Herein, we show the effectiveness of the radiation-induced defects scavenging effect under oxidative atmosphere, under low and high excitation densities.

  18. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part II: Thickness length scale effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of the Eringen's nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam model. In literature, most work has taken the axial coordinate derivative in the Laplacian operator presented in nonlocal elasticity. This causes that the non-locality always makes the beam soften as compared to the local counterpart. In this paper, the thickness scale effect is solely considered to investigate if the nonlocal model can simulate stiffening effect. Taking the thickness derivative in the Laplacian operator leads to the presence of a surface stress state. The governing equation derived is compared to that of the EB model with the surface stress. The results obtained reveal that the nonlocality tends to decrease the bending moment stiffness whereas to increase the bending rigidity in the governing equation. This tendency also depends on the surface conditions.

  19. Turbulent effects of strong irradiance fluctuations on the orbital angular momentum mode of fractional Bessel Gauss beams.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Yixin; Dan, Weiyi; Hu, Zhengda

    2015-06-29

    The turbulent effects of strong irradiance fluctuations on the probability densities and the normalized powers of the orbital angular momentum (OAM) modes are modeled for fractional Bessel Gauss beams in paraxial turbulence channel. We find that the probability density of signal OAM modes is a function of position deviation from the beam center, and the farther away from the beam center the detection position is, the smaller the probability density is. For fractional OAM quantum numbers, the average probability densities of signal/crosstalk modes oscillate along the beam radius except the half-integer. When the beam waist of source decreases or the irradiance fluctuation increases, the average probability density of the signal OAM mode drops. The peak of the average probability density of crosstalk modes shifts to outward of the beam center as beam waist gets larger. In the nearby region of beam center, the larger the quantum number deviation of OAM, the smaller the beam waist and the turbulence fluctuations are, the lower average probability densities of crosstalk OAM modes are. Especially, the increase of turbulence fluctuations can make the crosstalk stronger and more concentrated. Lower irradiance fluctuation can give rise to higher the normalized powers of the signal OAM modes, which is opposite to the crosstalk normalized powers.

  20. Effect of electron beam misalignments on the gyrotron efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Dumbrajs, O.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2013-07-15

    The theory describing the operation of gyrotrons with tilted and shifted electron beams has been developed. Effects of the tilt and shift are studied for a 1 MW, 170 GHz gyrotron, which is presently under development in Europe for electron cyclotron resonance plasma heating and current drive in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. It is shown that one should expect significant deterioration of gyrotron operation in such gyrotrons when the tilt angle exceeds 0.4°–0.5° and the parallel shift of the beam axis with respect to the axis of a microwave circuit is larger than 0.4–0.5 mm. At the same time, simultaneous tilting and shifting in a proper manner can mitigate this deteriorating effect.

  1. Effects of dipole magnet inhomogeneities on the beam ellipsoid

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Colman, J.; Levine, M.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.; Ward, T.; Grand, P.

    1986-01-01

    The RAYTRACE computer code has been modified to accept magnetic fields measured in the median plane of a dipole magnet. This modification allows one to study the effects of a non-ideal dipole magnet on the beam ellipsoid (as defined by the TRANSPORT code manual). The effects on the beam ellipsoid are due to: field inhomogeneities in the interior region of the dipole, and discrepancies from design conditions of the magnetic field values in the fringe field region. The results of the RAYTRACE code calculations based on experimentally measured fields will be compared with the results derived using both an ideal (no inhomogeneities) dipole with SCOFF boundaries and an ideal dipole with perfect (according to design) fringe fields.

  2. e-beam irradiation effects on IR absorption bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Nagao, Katsunori; Ikemoto, Yuka; Okazaki, Toshiya; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kawakami, Akira; Kataura, Hiromichi; Umezu, Ikurou; Ando, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the absorption and Raman spectral change induced by the irradiation of e-beam. By the irradiation of e-beam on SWNTs thin films, the intensity of defect related Raman band increase, and the peak energy of IR absorption bands shift to the higher energy side. These results indicate that the origin of infrared band is due to the plasmon resonance of finite-length SWNT. We have estimated the effective tube length and defect density from IR absorption peak energy.

  3. Skin-sparing effects of neutron beam filtering materials.

    PubMed

    Otte, V A; Almond, P R; Smathers, J B; Attix, F H

    1987-01-01

    The skin-sparing effects of several filtering materials for fast neutron beams were studied under various conditions. A parallel-plate ionization chamber was used for the measurements. The parameters which were studied included field size, distance from filter to ion chamber, filter material, and filter thickness. On the basis of this work, Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene) was chosen for fabrication of flattening filters and wedges.

  4. Increase of the uranium release at an UO 2/H 2O interface under He 2+ ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Catherine; Sattonnay, Gaël; Lucchini, Jean-François; Ardois, Christophe; Barthe, Marie-France; Huet, François; Dehaudt, Pierre; Hickel, Bernard; Jegou, Christophe

    2001-07-01

    The release of uranium in aerated deionized water at a uranium oxide/water interface under He 2+ irradiation is investigated as a function of the fluence by using an external ion beam. A high-energy He 2+ beam delivered by a cyclotron (CERI-CNRS) goes through the thin oxide and emerges in the water with 20 MeV energy. First results are reported here showing that the release of uranium increases by three orders of magnitude in aerated deionized water under high flux (⩾ 3.3×10 10 α cm -2 s-1).

  5. Experimental and numerical study of gas dynamic window for electron beam transport into the space with increased pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Skovorodko, P. A.; Sharafutdinov, R. G.

    2014-12-09

    The paper is devoted to experimental and numerical study of the gas jet technical device for obtaining axisymmetric flow with low pressure in its near axis region. The studied geometry of the device is typical of that used in the plasma generator consisting of an electron gun with a hollow (plasma) cathode and a double supersonic ring nozzle. The geometry of the nozzles as well as the relation between the gas flow rates through the nozzles providing the electron beam extraction into the region with increased pressure are tested both experimentally and numerically. The maximum external pressure of about 0.25 bar that does not disturb the electron beam is achieved.

  6. Effect of electron beam on chemical changes of nutrients in infant formula.

    PubMed

    Tesfai, Adiam; Beamer, Sarah K; Matak, Kristen E; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2014-04-15

    Infant milk formula has recently been implicated as a transmission vehicle for an emerging foodborne pathogen, Enterobacter sakazakii, resulting in high mortality rates. Electron beam (e-beam) efficiently and non-thermally inactivates foodborne pathogens, including E. sakazakii, in infant milk formula. However, the effects of e-beam on chemical changes of nutrients in infant formula have not been determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to fulfill this gap. Dehydrated infant milk formula was processed with e-beam at 0 (control) to 25 kGy. Amino acid, fatty acid, and mineral profiles (AAP, FAP, and MP, respectively), as well as protein degradation and lipid oxidation, were determined. There were no differences (P>0.05) in FAP, AAP, and MP. SDS-PAGE electrophoresis qualitatively detected three major protein bands in all samples up to 25 kGy. Densitometry analysis of SDS-PAGE gels confirmed no size degradation (P>0.05) as a function of increased e-beam dose. Totol-volatile-basic-nitrogen (TVBN) excluded (P>0.05) protein degradation due to microbial activity. There was no increase (P>0.05) in lipid oxidation, as assessed with thiobarbituric-reactive-substances (TBARS), except in samples processed at 25 kGy. Dehydrated formula has low water activity, which likely protected nutrients from e-beam-induced chemical changes. This study demonstrates that proteins, lipids, and minerals in infant milk formula are stable when processed with e-beam up to 25 kGy at low temperature and under anaerobic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementing the complete beam hardening effect of the bowtie filter versus scaling beam intensities: effects on dosimetric applications in computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rendon, Xochitl; Zhang, Guozhi; Bosmans, Hilde; Oyen, Raymond; Zanca, Federica

    2014-10-01

    The bowtie filter is an essential element of computed tomography scanners. Implementation of this filter in a Monte Carlo dosimetry platform can be based on Turner's method, which describes how to measure the filter thickness and relate the x-ray beam as a function of bowtie angle to the central beam. In that application, the beam hardening is accounted for by means of weighting factors that are associated to the photons according to their position (fan angle) and energy. We assessed an alternative approximation in which the photon spectrum is given a fan angle-dependent scaling factor. The aim of our investigation was to evaluate the effects on dose accuracy estimation when using the gold standard bowtie filter method versus a beam scaling approximation method. In particular, we wanted to assess the percentage dose differences between the two methods for several water thicknesses representative for different patients of different body mass index. The largest percentage differences were found for the thickest part of the bowtie filter and increased with patient size.

  8. Effect of electron beam on structural, linear and nonlinear properties of nanostructured Fluorine doped ZnO thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antony, Albin; Pramodini, S.; Kityk, I. V.; Abd-Lefdil, M.; Douayar, A.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, F.; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Manjunatha, K. B.; Poornesh, P.

    2017-10-01

    Electron beam induced effects on Fluorine doped ZnO thin films (FZO) grown by chemical spray pyrolysis deposition technique were studied. The samples were exposed to 8 MeV electron beam at different dose rate ranging from 1 kGy to 4 kGy. All films exhibit a polycrystalline nature which shows an increase in crystallanity with irradiation dosages. The electron beam irradiation effectively controls the films surface morphology and its linear optical characteristics. Z-Scan technique was employed to evaluate the sign and magnitude of nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficient using a continuous wave laser at 632.8 nm as light source. Enhancement in the third order nonlinear optical properties was were noted due to electron beam irradiation. Tailoring the physical and NLO properties by electron beam, the FZO thin films becomes a promising candidate for various optoelectronic applications such as phase change memory devices, optical pulse compression, optical switching and laser pulse narrowing.

  9. Increasing Student Success at Minority-Serving Institutions: Findings from the BEAMS Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rios, Melissa; Leegwater, Lacey

    2008-01-01

    This monograph details the process Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students (BEAMS) institutions used to craft data-driven action plans to improve student success. More than 100 four-year Historically Black, Hispanic-Serving, and Tribal colleges and universities participated in the five-year program that produced best practices…

  10. Effect of the spiral phase element on the radial-polarization (0, 1) ∗ LG beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machavariani, G.; Lumer, Y.; Moshe, I.; Jackel, S.

    2007-03-01

    Radially-polarized beams can be strongly amplified without significant birefringent-induced aberrations. However, radially-polarized beam is a high-order beam, and therefore has to be transformed into a fundamental Gaussian beam for reduction the beam-propagation factor M2. In effort to transform the radially-polarized beam to a nearly-Gaussian beam, we consider effect of a spiral phase element (SPE) on the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) (0, 1)∗ beam with radial polarization, and compare this with the case when the input beam is a LG (0, 1)∗ beam with spiral phase and uniform or random polarization. The LG (0, 1)∗ beam with radial polarization, despite its identity in intensity profile to the beam with spiral phase, has distinctly different properties when interacting with the SPE. With the SPE and spatial filter, we transformed the radially-polarized (0, 1)∗ mode with M2 = 2.8 to a nearly-Gaussian beam with M2 = 1.7. Measured transformation efficiency was 50%, and the beam brightness P/(M2)2 was practically unchanged. The SPE affects polarization state of the radially-polarized beam, leading to appearance of spin angular momentum in the beam center at the far-field.

  11. Effect of electron-beam irradiation on graphene field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childres, Isaac; Jauregui, Luis A.; Foxe, Michael; Tian, Jifa; Jalilian, Romaneh; Jovanovic, Igor; Chen, Yong P.

    2010-10-01

    Electron beam exposure is a commonly used tool for fabricating and imaging graphene-based devices. Here, we present a study of the effects of electron-beam irradiation on the electronic transport properties of graphene and the operation of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs). Exposure to a 30 keV electron-beam caused negative shifts in the charge-neutral point (CNP) of the GFET, interpreted as due to n-doping in the graphene from the interaction of the energetic electron beam with the substrate. The shift in the CNP is substantially reduced for suspended graphene devices. The electron beam is seen to also decrease the carrier mobilities and minimum conductivity, indicating defects created in the graphene. The findings are valuable for understanding the effects of radiation damage on graphene and for the development of radiation-hard graphene-based electronics.

  12. Neutralized ion beam modification of cellulose membranes for study of ion charge effect on ion-beam-induced DNA transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Wanichapichart, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    Low-energy ion beam biotechnology (IBBT) has recently been rapidly developed worldwide. Ion-beam-induced DNA transfer is one of the important applications of IBBT. However, mechanisms involved in this application are not yet well understood. In this study plasma-neutralized ion beam was applied to investigate ion charge effect on induction of DNA transfer. Argon ion beam at 7.5 keV was neutralized by RF-driven plasma in the beam path and then bombarded cellulose membranes which were used as the mimetic plant cell envelope. Electrical properties such as impedance and capacitance of the membranes were measured after the bombardment. An in vitro experiment on plasmid DNA transfer through the cellulose membrane was followed up. The results showed that the ion charge input played an important role in the impedance and capacitance changes which would affect DNA transfer. Generally speaking, neutral particle beam bombardment of biologic cells was more effective in inducing DNA transfer than charged ion beam bombardment.

  13. Effects on focused ion beam irradiation on MOS transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, A.N.; Peterson, K.A.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Soden, J.M.

    1997-04-01

    The effects of irradiation from a focused ion beam (FIB) system on MOS transistors are reported systematically for the first time. Three MOS transistor technologies, with 0.5, 1, and 3 {mu}m minimum feature sizes and with gate oxide thicknesses ranging from 11 to 50 nm, were analyzed. Significant shifts in transistor parameters (such as threshold voltage, transconductance, and mobility) were observed following irradiation with a 30 keV Ga{sup +} focused ion beam with ion doses varying by over 5 orders of magnitude. The apparent damage mechanism (which involved the creation of interface traps, oxide trapped charge, or both) and extent of damage were different for each of the three technologies investigated.

  14. Attosecond Lighthouse Effect: from tilted waves to isolated harmonic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Jonathan; Borot, Antonin; Vincenti, Henri; Monchoce, Sylvain; Ricci, Aurelien; Jullien, Aurelie; Malvache, Arnaud; Quere, Fabien; Lopez-Martens, Rodrigo

    2012-06-01

    Spatio-temporal coupling (STC) within a laser pulse is normally a negative feature to be avoided as it leads to non-uniform pulse characteristics and reduced intensity at focus. In this study, STC is purposefully introduced into the laser pulse leading to wavefront rotation at the focus. When such a modified focus is applied to plasma mirror harmonic generation, each harmonic pulse produced from cycle to cycle has a shifted propagation direction. Dependant on the degree of wavefront rotation introduced, this can lead from tilted harmonic spectra due to small displacements of the overlapping beams to fully isolated, individual pulses arising from each cycle of the driving laser pulse, the so-called Attosecond Lighthouse effect. This work discusses the recently measured results of spatially-separated, single harmonic beams from a solid target source obtained with 1kHz, CEP-locked, 800nm laser pulses of both 25 and 5 fs duration.

  15. Effect of beam quality on tilt measurement using cyclic interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretheesh Kumar, V. C.; Ganesan, A. R.; Joenathan, C.; Somasundaram, U.

    2016-08-01

    Accurate measurement of angles is extremely important in various metrological applications. Interferometry has always been an excellent technique for accurate measurements. Several methods have been proposed for accurate tilt measurement using interferometric techniques. Almost all of them use the Michelson configuration which is extremely sensitive to environmental vibrations and turbulences. We know that a cyclic interferometer is extremely stable. Even though it is not sensitive to displacement changes, it is twice sensitive to tilt compared to that of a Michelson interferometer. We have enhanced the sensitivity to measure tilt using multiple reflections in a cyclic interferometer. Since the input beam is collimated, we have studied the effect of aberration of the input beam on the accuracy of tilt measurement. Experimental results on this study are presented in this paper.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron noise effects on beam position determination at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Leach, Richard R.; Datte, Philip; Manuel, Anastacia

    2013-09-01

    Images obtained through charged coupled device (CCD) cameras in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are crucial to precise alignment of the 192 laser beams to the NIF target-chamber center (TCC). Cameras in and around the target chamber are increasingly exposed to the effects of neutron radiation as the laser power is increased for high energy fusion experiments. NIF was carefully designed to operate under these conditions. The present work examines the degradation of the measured TCC camera position accuracy resulting from the effects of neutron radiation on the sensor and verifies operation within design specifications. Both synthetic and real beam images are used for measuring position degradation. Monte Carlo simulations based on camera performance models are used to create images with added neutron noise. These models predict neutron induced camera noise based on exposure estimates of the cumulative single-shot fluence in the NIF environment. The neutron induced noise images are used to measure beam positions on a target calculated from the alignment images with the added noise. The effects of this noise are also determined using noise artifacts from real camera images viewing TCC to estimate beam position uncertainty.

  17. Enhanced biological effect induced by a radioactive 9C-ion beam at the depths around its Bragg peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Q.; Furusawa, Y.; Kanazawa, M.; Kanai, T.; Kitagawa, A.; Aoki, M.; Urakabe, E.; Sato, S.; Wei, Z.

    2006-04-01

    To explore the potential of double irradiation source, radioactive 9C-ion beam, in tumor therapy, a comparative study on the surviving effect of human salivary gland cells at different penetration depths between 9C and 12C-ion beams has been carried out. The 9C-ion beam came out more efficient in cell killing at the depths around its Bragg peak than the 12C beam, especially at the distal side of the Bragg peak. Compared to the 12C beam, an increase in RBE by a factor of up to 2.13 has been observed at the depths distal to the Bragg peak of the 9C beam. The 9C beam showed an enhanced biological effect at the penetration depths around its Bragg peak, corresponding to the stopping region of the incident 9C-ions and where the delayed low-energy particles were emitted. Further analysis revealed that cell lethality by the emitted particles from the stopping 9C-ions is responsible for the excessive biological effect at the penetration depths around the Bragg peak of the 9C beam.

  18. Effect of the transverse parasitic mode on beam performance for the ADS driver linac in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Peng; Pei, Shi-Lun; Wang, Jiu-Qing; Li, Zhi-Hui

    2015-05-01

    The ADS (Accelerator Driven subcritical System) driver linac in China is designed to run in CW (Continuous Wave) mode with 10 mA designed beam current. In this scenario, the beam-induced parasitic modes in the ADS driver linac may make the beam unstable or deteriorate the beam performance. To evaluate the parasitic mode effect on the beam dynamics systematically, simulation studies using the ROOT-based numerical code SMD have been conducted. The longitudinal beam instability induced by the HOMs (High Order Modes) and SOMs (Same Order Modes) has little effect on the longitudinal beam performance for the current ADS driver linac design based on the 10 MeV/325 MHz injector I from previous studies. Here the transverse parasitic mode (i.e., dipole HOM) effect on the transverse beam performance at the ADS driver linac exit is investigated. To more reasonably quantify the dipole mode effect, the multi-bunch effective emittance is introduced in this paper.

  19. Effective Strategies for Increasing Citation Frequency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahim, Nader Ale; Salehi, Hadi; Embi, Mohamed Amin; Tanha, Farid Habibi; Gholizadeh, Hossein; Motahar, Seyed Mohammad; Ordi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Due to the effect of citation impact on The Higher Education (THE) world university ranking system, most of the researchers are looking for some helpful techniques to increase their citation record. This paper by reviewing the relevant articles extracts 33 different ways for increasing the citations possibilities. The results show that the article…

  20. Theoretical modeling on the laser induced effect of liquid crystal optical phased beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaoxian; Wang, Xiangru; Wu, Liang; Tan, Qinggui; Li, Man; Shang, Jiyang; Wu, Shuanghong; Huang, Ziqiang

    2017-01-01

    Non-mechanical laser beam steering has been reported previously in liquid crystal array devices. To be one of the most promising candidates to be practical non-mechanical laser deflector, its laser induced effect still has few theoretical model. In this paper, we propose a theoretical model to analyze this laser induced effect of LC-OPA to evaluate the deterioration on phased beam steering. The model has three parts: laser induced thermal distribution; temperature dependence of material parameters and beam steering deterioration. After these three steps, the far field of laser beam is obtained to demonstrate the steering performance with the respect to the incident laser beam power and beam waist.

  1. The effects of magnetic fringe fields on beam dynamics in a beam transport line of a terahertz FEL source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Han; Xiong, Yongqian; Pei, Yuanji

    2014-11-01

    The transport line used in a terahertz FEL device has to transport electron beam through the entire system efficiently and meet the requirements of the beam parameters at the undulator entrance. Due to space limitations, the size of the magnets (five quadrupoles and two bending magnets) employed in the transport line was limited, and some devices were densely packed. In this paper, analyses of the effect of fringe fields and magnetic interference of magnets are presented. 3D models of these magnets are built and their linear optical properties are compared with those obtained by hard edge models. The results indicated that the effects of these factors are significant and they would cause a mismatch of the beam at the exit of the transport line under the preliminary lattice design. To solve this problem, the beam was re-matched using the particle swarm optimization algorithm.

  2. Beam-Beam Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sramek, Christopher

    2003-09-05

    At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur which are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a ''pinch effect'' which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a beam's disruption parameter is too large, the beam can develop a sinusoidal distortion, or two-stream (kink) instability. This project simulated and studied these effects as they relate to luminosity, deflection angles and energy loss in order to optimize beam parameters for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). Using the simulation program Guinea-Pig, luminosity, deflection angle and beam energy data was acquired for different levels of beam offset and distortion. Standard deflection curves and luminosity plots agreed with theoretical models but also made clear the difficulties of e-e- feedback. Simulations emphasizing kink instability in modulated and straight beam collisions followed qualitative behavioral predictions and roughly fit recent analytic calculations. Finally, a study of e-e- collisions under design constraints for the NLC provided new estimates of how luminosity, beamstrahlung energy loss, upsilon parameter and deflection curve width scale with beam spotsizes.

  3. Modeling of dynamic effects of a low power laser beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, George N.; Scholl, Marija S.; Khatib, AL

    1988-01-01

    Methods of modeling some of the dynamic effects involved in laser beam propagation through the atmosphere are addressed with emphasis on the development of simple but accurate models which are readily implemented in a physical optics code. A space relay system with a ground based laser facility is considered as an example. The modeling of such characteristic phenomena as laser output distribution, flat and curved mirrors, diffraction propagation, atmospheric effects (aberration and wind shear), adaptive mirrors, jitter, and time integration of power on target, is discussed.

  4. Coherent beam-beam effects observation and mitigation at the RHIC collider

    SciTech Connect

    White S.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2012-05-20

    In polarized proton operation in RHIC coherent beam-beam modes are routinely observed with beam transfer function measurements in the vertical plane. With the existence of coherent modes a larger space is required in the tune diagram than without them and stable conditions can be compromised for operation with high intensity beams as foreseen for future luminosity upgrades. We report on experiments and simulations carried out to understand the existence of coherent modes in the vertical plane and their absence in the horizontal plane, and investigate possible mitigation strategies.

  5. Generation of dynamic Bessel beams and dynamic bottle beams using acousto-optic effect.

    PubMed

    Szulzycki, Krzysztof; Savaryn, Viktoriya; Grulkowski, Ireneusz

    2016-10-17

    We present a novel optical configuration that allows for generation of ultra-high speed dynamic Bessel beams and dynamic bottle beams. The method is based on combination of the axisymmetric acousto-optic device and the spatial filtering enabled by a mask or a digital micromirror device. Selected features of dynamic non-diffracting beams and bottle beams are investigated using time-resolved approach with stroboscopic pulsed illumination, including spatial intensity distribution, spatial modulation factors, MHz-range temporal modulation, and scalability. The numerical simulations based on Fourier optics as well as experimental realizations are demonstrated.

  6. Effective dose range for dental cone beam computed tomography scanners.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Ruben; Beinsberger, Jilke; Collaert, Bruno; Theodorakou, Chrysoula; Rogers, Jessica; Walker, Anne; Cockmartin, Lesley; Bosmans, Hilde; Jacobs, Reinhilde; Bogaerts, Ria; Horner, Keith

    2012-02-01

    To estimate the absorbed organ dose and effective dose for a wide range of cone beam computed tomography scanners, using different exposure protocols and geometries. Two Alderson Radiation Therapy anthropomorphic phantoms were loaded with LiF detectors (TLD-100 and TLD-100 H) which were evenly distributed throughout the head and neck, covering all radiosensitive organs. Measurements were performed on 14 CBCT devices: 3D Accuitomo 170, Galileos Comfort, i-CAT Next Generation, Iluma Elite, Kodak 9000 3D, Kodak 9500, NewTom VG, NewTom VGi, Pax-Uni3D, Picasso Trio, ProMax 3D, Scanora 3D, SkyView, Veraviewepocs 3D. Effective dose was calculated using the ICRP 103 (2007) tissue weighting factors. Effective dose ranged between 19 and 368 μSv. The largest contributions to the effective dose were from the remainder tissues (37%), salivary glands (24%), and thyroid gland (21%). For all organs, there was a wide range of measured values apparent, due to differences in exposure factors, diameter and height of the primary beam, and positioning of the beam relative to the radiosensitive organs. The effective dose for different CBCT devices showed a 20-fold range. The results show that a distinction is needed between small-, medium-, and large-field CBCT scanners and protocols, as they are applied to different indication groups, the dose received being strongly related to field size. Furthermore, the dose should always be considered relative to technical and diagnostic image quality, seeing that image quality requirements also differ for patient groups. The results from the current study indicate that the optimisation of dose should be performed by an appropriate selection of exposure parameters and field size, depending on the diagnostic requirements. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-01

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  8. Cationic concentration effects on electron beam cured of carbon-epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishitsuji, D. A.; Marinucci, G.; Evora, M. C.; Silva, L. G. A.

    2010-03-01

    Electron beam (e-beam) curing is a technology that offers advantages over the thermal curing process, that usually requires high temperature and are time-consuming. E-beam curing is faster and occurs at low temperatures that help reduce residual mechanical stresses in a thermoset composite. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of cationic initiator (diaryliodonium hexafluoroantimonate) ranged from 1 to 3 wt% in DGEBA (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) epoxy resin when cured by a 1.5 MeV electron beam. The specimens were cured to a total dose of 200.4 kGy for 40 min. Analyses by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that the e-beam irradiated samples with 2 wt% cationic initiator were 96% cured obtained a glass transition temperature (tan δ) of 167 °C. The same epoxy resin, thermally cured for 16 h with an anhydride hardener, reached a Tg (tan δ) of 136 °C. So, the irradiated sample had its Tg increased approximately 20% and the curing process was much less time consuming.

  9. The effect of electron beams on cyclotron maser emission excited by lower-energy cutoffs

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.

    2016-05-15

    Electron-cyclotron maser (ECM) is one of the most important emission mechanisms in astrophysics and can be excited efficiently by lower-energy cutoffs of power-law electrons. These non-thermal electrons probably propagate as a directed collimated beam along ambient magnetic fields. This paper investigates the ECM, in which the effect of electron beams is emphasized. Results show the dependence of emission properties of the ECM on the beam feature. The maximum growth rate of the extraordinary mode (X2) rapidly decreases as the beam momentum increases, while the growth rate of the ordinary mode (O1) changes slightly. In particular, the ordinary mode can overcome the extraordinary mode and becomes the fastest growth mode once the beam momentum is large enough. This research presents an extension of the conventional studies on ECM driven by lower-energy cutoffs and may be helpful to understand better the emission process of solar type I radio bursts, which are dominated by the ordinary mode emission.

  10. Population effects of increased climate variation.

    PubMed

    Drake, John M

    2005-09-07

    Global circulation models predict and numerous observations confirm that anthropogenic climate change has altered high-frequency climate variability. However, it is not yet well understood how changing patterns of environmental variation will affect wildlife population dynamics and other ecological processes. Theory predicts that a population's long-run growth rate is diminished and the chance of population extinction is increased as environmental variation increases. This results from the fact that population growth is a multiplicative process and that long-run population growth rate is the geometric mean of growth rates over time, which is always less than the arithmetic mean. However, when population growth rates for unstructured populations are related nonlinearly to environmental drivers, increasing environmental variation can increase a population's long-run growth rate. This suggests that patterns of environmental variation associated with different aspects of climate change may affect population dynamics in different ways. Specifically, increasing variation in rainfall might result in diminished long-run growth rates for many animal species while increasing variation in temperature might result in increased long-run growth rates. While the effect of rainfall is theoretically well understood and supported by data, the hypothesized effect of temperature is not. Here, I analyse two datasets to study the effect of fluctuating temperatures on growth rates of zooplankton. Results are consistent with the prediction that fluctuating temperatures should increase long-run growth rates and the frequency of extreme demographic events.

  11. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  12. Self-effect in expanding electron beam plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, M

    1999-05-07

    An analytical model of plasma flow from a metal plate hit by an intense, pulsed, electron beam aims to bridge the gap between radiation-hydrodynamics simulations and experiments, and to quantify the self-effect of the electron beam penetrating the flow. Does the flow disrupt the tight focus of the initial electron bunch, or later pulses in a train? This work aims to model the spatial distribution of plasma speed, density, degree of ionization, and magnetization to inquire. The initial solid density, several eV plasma expands to 1 cm and 10{sup {minus}4} relative density by 2 {micro}s, beyond which numerical simulations are imprecise. Yet, a Faraday cup detector at the ETA-II facility is at 25 cm from the target and observes the flow after 50 {micro}s. The model helps bridge this gap. The expansion of the target plasma into vacuum is so rapid that the ionized portion of the flow departs from local thermodynamic equilibrium. When the temperature (in eV) in a parcel of fluid drops below V{sub i} x [(2{gamma} - 2)/(5{gamma} + 17)], where V{sub i} is the ionization potential of the target metal (7.8 eV for tantalum), and {gamma} is the ratio of specific heats (5/3 for atoms), then the fractional ionization and electron temperature in that parcel remain fixed during subsequent expansion. The freezing temperature as defined here is V{sub i}/19. The balance between the self-pinching force and the space charge repulsion of an electron beam changes on penetrating a flow: (i) the target plasma cancels the space-charge field, (ii) internal eddy currents arise to counter the magnetization of relativistic electrons, and (iii) electron beam heating alters the flow magnetization by changing the plasma density gradient and the magnitude of the conductivity.

  13. Effects of anisotropic turbulence on average polarizability of Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams through ocean link.

    PubMed

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Chen, Minyu

    2016-07-01

    Based on the spatial power spectrum of the refractive index of anisotropic turbulence, the average polarizability of the Gaussian Schell-model quantized beams and lateral coherence length of the spherical wave propagating through the ocean water channel are derived. Numerical results show that, in strong temperature fluctuation, the depolarization effects of anisotropic turbulence are inferior to isotropic turbulence, as the other parameters of two links are the same. The depolarization effects of salinity fluctuation are less than the effects of the temperature fluctuation; the average polarizability of beams increases when increasing the inner scale of turbulence and the source's transverse size; and the larger rate of dissipation of kinetic energy per unit mass of fluid enhances the average polarizability of beams. The region of the receiving radius is smaller than the characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is smaller than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence. However, the receiving radius region is larger than a characteristic radius and the average polarizability of beams in isotropy turbulence is larger than that of beams in anisotropy turbulence.

  14. Effect of image charge on the off-axis transport of intense beams in a small aperture quadrupole lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Goswami, A.; Sing Babu, P.; Pandit, V. S.

    2013-10-15

    This paper investigates the first order image charge effects of circular conducting pipe on an intense off-axis continuous charged particle beam propagating through an alternating-gradient focusing channel. The equations of motion for the centroid and envelopes of slightly off-axis beam are derived and used to determine the equilibrium and stability conditions for the beam transport. The envelope oscillation frequencies of the mismatched beam are obtained by the smooth approximation method and by numerical evaluation of the linearly perturbed envelope equations. Depending on the beam intensity and focusing parameters, it is found that the frequency of the out-of-phase mode of envelope oscillation is reduced due to the presence of the conducting wall. Detailed numerical results for off-axis beam transport in a quadrupole lattice are presented and the stable regimes in the parameter space are determined numerically. It is observed that the unstable region for the envelope evolution with image charge effects depends on beam intensity and external focusing strength and increases with the off centering of the beam.

  15. Lethal and mutagenic effects of ion beams and γ-rays in Aspergillus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Akemi; Tanaka, Hisaki; Watanabe, Jun; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Yamazaki, Tatsuo; Hamada, Ryoko; Iwashita, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Katsuya; Narumi, Issay

    2012-12-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is a fungus that is used widely in traditional Japanese fermentation industries. In this study, the lethal and mutagenic effects of different linear energy transfer (LET) radiation in freeze-dried conidia of A. oryzae were investigated. The lethal effect, which was evaluated by a 90% lethal dose, was dependent on the LET value of the ionizing radiation. The most lethal ionizing radiation among that tested was (12)C(5+) ion beams with an LET of 121keV/μm. The (12)C(5+) ion beams had a 3.6-times higher lethal effect than low-LET (0.2keV/μm) γ-rays. The mutagenic effect was evaluated by the frequency of selenate resistant mutants. (12)C(6+) ion beams with an LET of 86keV/μm were the most effective in inducing selenate resistance. The mutant frequency following exposure to (12)C(6+) ion beams increased with an increase in dose and reached 3.47×10(-3) at 700Gy. In the dose range from 0 to 700Gy, (12)C(5+) ion beams were the second most effective in inducing selenate resistance, the mutant frequency of which reached a maximum peak (1.67×10(-3)) at 400Gy. To elucidate the characteristics of mutation induced by ionizing radiation, mutations in the sulphate permease gene (sB) and ATP sulfurylase gene (sC) loci, the loss of function of which results in a selenate resistant phenotype, were compared between (12)C(5+) ion beams and γ-rays. We detected all types of transversions and transitions. For frameshifts, the frequency of a +1 frameshift was the highest in all cases. Although the incidence of deletions >2bp was generally low, deletions >20bp were characteristic for (12)C(5+) ion beams. γ-rays had a tendency to generate mutants carrying a multitude of mutations in the same locus. Both forms of radiation also induced genome-wide large-scale mutations including chromosome rearrangements and large deletions. These results provide new basic insights into the mutation breeding of A. oryzae using ionizing radiation.

  16. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  17. Prestressing Effects on the Performance of Concrete Beams with Near-surface-mounted Carbon-fiber-reinforced Polymer Bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam; Park, Sun-Kyu

    2016-07-01

    The effects of various prestressing levels on the flexural behavior of concrete beams strengthened with prestressed near-surface-mounted (NSM) carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) bars were investigated in this study. Four-point flexural tests up to failure were performed using a total of six strengthened prestressed and nonprestressed concrete beams. The nonprestressed strengthened beam failed by premature debonding at the interface of concrete and the epoxy adhesive, but the prestressed one failed owing due to rupture of the CFRP bar. As the prestressing level of the CFRP bar increased, the cracking and yield loads of the prestressed beams increased, but its effect on their deflections was insignificant. The ultimate load was constant regardless of prestressing level, but the ultimate deflection was almost inversely proportional to the level.

  18. Propeller modulation effects on a scanning-beam microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. M.; Staehle, W. N.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a systems study and ground test of the effects of propeller modulation on a time-multiplexed, scanning-beam microwave landing system (MLS) are presented. Propeller modulation effects are analyzed in terms of spacing between receiving antenna and propeller, propeller blade width, and propeller speed. Principal study conclusions: (1) scanning beam MLS is susceptible to errors due to synchronous propeller modulation; (2) the number of synchronous interference multiples increases as the number of propeller blades increases and as the data rate decreases; (3) the probability of synchronous interference decreases at higher data rates; and (4) MLS receiver susceptibility to propeller modulation depends upon the dynamic response of the receiver automatic gain control and the respective tracking loops.

  19. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, A. T.; Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Chandran, C. S.; Melnikova, T. V.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the thermal and mechanical properties of epoxy polymer after exposure to different doses of electron beam irradiation. The epoxy polymer was prepared using epoxy-diane resin ED-20 cured by polyethylenepolyamine. The irradiation of the samples was carried out with doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy. The effects of doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy polymer were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The thermal properties of the epoxy polymer slightly increased after irradiation at the heating in air. The tensile strength and Young’s modulus of the epoxy polymer increased by the action of electron beam up to dose of 100 kGy and then decreased. The elongation at break decreased with increasing the irradiation dose.

  20. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason D; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    The present study explores lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. Moreover, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  1. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    DOE PAGES

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to evenmore » more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.« less

  2. Fundamental edge broadening effects during focused electron beam induced nanosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Schmied, Roland; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Winkler, Robert; Rack, Phillip D.; Plank, Harald

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we explore lateral broadening effects of 3D structures fabricated through focused electron beam induced deposition using MeCpPt(IV)Me3 precursor. In particular, the scaling behavior of proximity effects as a function of the primary electron energy and the deposit height is investigated through experiments and validated through simulations. Correlated Kelvin force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy measurements identified conductive and non-conductive proximity regions. It was determined that the highest primary electron energies enable the highest edge sharpness while lower energies contain a complex convolution of broadening effects. In addition, it is demonstrated that intermediate energies lead to even more complex proximity effects that significantly reduce lateral edge sharpness and thus should be avoided if desiring high lateral resolution.

  3. Effects of e-beam parameters on coherent electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, S.D.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Wang, G.

    2011-03-28

    Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) requires detailed control of the phase between the hadron an the FEL-amplified wave packet. This phase depends on local electron beam parameters such as the energy spread and the peak current. In this paper, we examine the effects of local density variations on the cooling rates for CeC. Coherent Electron Cooling (CeC) [1] is a new concept in intense, high energy hadron beamcooling, in which the Debye screened charge perturbation calculated in [2] is used to seed a high-gain free electron laser (FEL). Using delays to give the perturbing hadron an energy-dependent longitudinal displacement relative to its frequencymodulated charge perturbation, the hadron receives an energy-dependent kick which reduces its energy variation from the design energy. The equations of motion in [1] assume that the electron bunch is the same physical size as the hadron bunch, and has a homogeneous charge density across the entire bunch. In practice, the electron bunches will be much shorter than the hadron bunch, and this local spacial inhomogeneity in the charge distribution will alter the gain length of the FEL, resulting in both a change in the amplification of the initial signal and a phase shift. In this paper we consider these inhomogeneity effects, determining cooling equations for bunched beam CeC consistent with these effects and determining thresholds for the cooling parameters.

  4. Effect of Beam Oscillation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316L Electron Beam Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Jyotirmaya; Roy, Sanat Kumar; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2017-04-01

    The properties of electron beam-welded AISI 316L stainless steel butt joints prepared with and without beam oscillation were evaluated by microstructural analysis, mechanical testing like microhardness measurements, tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), three-point bend, and Charpy impact tests. All joints, irrespective of being prepared with or without beam oscillation, were found to be defect free. Welds produced by beam oscillation exhibited narrower fusion zone (FZ) with lathy ferrite morphology, while the weld without beam oscillation was characterized by wider FZ and skeletal ferrite morphology. During tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), all samples fractured in the base metal (BM) and showed almost the same tensile properties as that of the BM. However, the notch tensile tests at room temperature demonstrated higher strength for joints prepared with the oscillating beam. Besides, face and root bend tests, as well as Charpy impact tests, showed higher bending strength and notch toughness, respectively, for joints prepared with beam oscillation.

  5. Effect of Beam Oscillation on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of AISI 316L Electron Beam Welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Jyotirmaya; Roy, Sanat Kumar; Roy, Gour Gopal

    2017-02-01

    The properties of electron beam-welded AISI 316L stainless steel butt joints prepared with and without beam oscillation were evaluated by microstructural analysis, mechanical testing like microhardness measurements, tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), three-point bend, and Charpy impact tests. All joints, irrespective of being prepared with or without beam oscillation, were found to be defect free. Welds produced by beam oscillation exhibited narrower fusion zone (FZ) with lathy ferrite morphology, while the weld without beam oscillation was characterized by wider FZ and skeletal ferrite morphology. During tensile tests at room and elevated temperature 973 K (700 °C), all samples fractured in the base metal (BM) and showed almost the same tensile properties as that of the BM. However, the notch tensile tests at room temperature demonstrated higher strength for joints prepared with the oscillating beam. Besides, face and root bend tests, as well as Charpy impact tests, showed higher bending strength and notch toughness, respectively, for joints prepared with beam oscillation.

  6. Effect of different ion beam energy on properties of amorphous carbon film fabricated by ion beam sputtering deposition (IBSD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Lichun; Zhang, Guangan; Wu, Zhiguo; Wang, Jun; Yan, Pengxun

    2011-09-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) films were fabricated by ion beam sputtering technique. The influence of sputtering ion beam energy on bonding structure, morphologic, mechanical properties, tribological properties and corrosion resistance of a-C films are investigated systematically. Morphology study shows that lowest surface roughness exists for mid-ion beam energy. Improved adhesion is observed for the films that are prepared under high ion beam energy, attributed to film graphitization, low residual stress and mixed interface. Relatively, a-C films prepared with ion beam energy of 2 keV exhibits optimum sp 3 bond content, mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. It is found that the wear rate of DLC films decrease with increased ion beam energy in general, consistent with the varied trend of the H/ E value which has been regarded as a suitable parameter for predicting wear resistance of the coatings. The correlation of the sp 3 bond fraction in the films estimated from Raman spectroscopy with residual stress, nanohardness and corrosion resistance has been established.

  7. The effects of analyte mass and collision gases on ion beam formation in an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica J.; Edmund, Alisa J.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2016-11-01

    Planar laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) was used to evaluate the effect of matrix components on the formation and focusing of a Ba ion beam in a commercial inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. Cross sections of the ion beams were taken in the second vacuum stage, in front of the entrance to the mass analyzer. Under normal operating conditions, the addition of Pb shifted the position of the Ba ion beam to the right. PLIF was also used to evaluate the effect of a collision reaction interface (CRI) on Ca and Ba ion beams. A wider velocity distribution of ions and a decrease in overall intensity were observed for the CRI images. The fluorescence and mass spectrometer signals decreased with increased CRI flow rates. These effects were most obvious for Ca ions with He gas.

  8. Effect of Beam Motion on Observed Image at Imaging Station C

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Martin E.

    2014-01-17

    Imaging Station C on the DARHT II accelerator is used to measure beam spot sizes. Solenoid scans are used to measure the spot sizes as a function of the solenoid current and infer the beam emittance. Beam motion is observed during the measurement window and can contribute to the measured spot size. The effect of beam motion on the observed images at Station C is examined in this note. The variation in the beam position during the kicked beam pulse contributes to the beam spot size as measured at Station C. The beam motion is primarily in the vertical plane and is due to the kicker voltage rise time prior to the solenoid magnet. The effect of beam motion on the spot size is studied using LAMDA. From the measured beam position at BPM28 and BPM29 we determine the beam position and angle at the start of the LAMDA simulation. We then calculate the beam motion at Station C as a function of the S4 solenoid magnet current. The shot-to-shot variation in the beam motion is very small.

  9. Thermomechanical assessment of the effects of a jaw-beam angle during beam impact on Large Hadron Collider collimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauchi, Marija; Assmann, R. W.; Bertarelli, A.; Carra, F.; Lari, L.; Rossi, A.; Mollicone, P.; Sammut, N.

    2015-02-01

    The correct functioning of a collimation system is crucial to safely and successfully operate high-energy particle accelerators, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, the requirements to handle high-intensity beams can be demanding, and accident scenarios must be well studied in order to assess if the collimator design is robust against possible error scenarios. One of the catastrophic, though not very probable, accident scenarios identified within the LHC is an asynchronous beam dump. In this case, one (or more) of the 15 precharged kicker circuits fires out of time with the abort gap, spraying beam pulses onto LHC machine elements before the machine protection system can fire the remaining kicker circuits and bring the beam to the dump. If a proton bunch directly hits a collimator during such an event, severe beam-induced damage such as magnet quenches and other equipment damage might result, with consequent downtime for the machine. This study investigates a number of newly defined jaw error cases, which include angular misalignment errors of the collimator jaw. A numerical finite element method approach is presented in order to precisely evaluate the thermomechanical response of tertiary collimators to beam impact. We identify the most critical and interesting cases, and show that a tilt of the jaw can actually mitigate the effect of an asynchronous dump on the collimators. Relevant collimator damage limits are taken into account, with the aim to identify optimal operational conditions for the LHC.

  10. A symplectic coherent beam-beam model

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, M.A.

    1989-05-01

    We consider a simple one-dimensional model to study the effects of the beam-beam force on the coherent dynamics of colliding beams. The key ingredient is a linearized beam-beam kick. We study only the quadrupole modes, with the dynamical variables being the 2nd-order moments of the canonical variables q, p. Our model is self-consistent in the sense that no higher order moments are generated by the linearized beam-beam kicks, and that the only source of violation of symplecticity is the radiation. We discuss the round beam case only, in which vertical and horizontal quantities are assumed to be equal (though they may be different in the two beams). Depending on the values of the tune and beam intensity, we observe steady states in which otherwise identical bunches have sizes that are equal, or unequal, or periodic, or behave chaotically from turn to turn. Possible implications of luminosity saturation with increasing beam intensity are discussed. Finally, we present some preliminary applications to an asymmetric collider. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  11. Computer-aided modeling of beam propagation effects in diffraction-critical spaceborne instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Martin E.; Gray, Peter F.; McNamara, Paul

    1996-08-01

    This talk concerns applications of a ray-trace model to the computation of the effect of diffraction on beam propagation. It reports the use of the technique in the design of apertures for space-borne instruments having critical diffraction properties. The modeling technique used is that of gaussian beam decomposition, a numerical beam propagation technique incorporated in a commercially available ray-trace program. The result is the powerful capability to model the optical field at any point, in systems of any geometry, with any amount of aberration. The technique is particularly useful for design problems where `non-imaging' effects are important, and examples of its use will be given. Although the computation requirements for such detailed analysis may seem daunting, the continuing increase in readily available computing power is now overcoming this drawback. The application here is to certain `diffraction-critical' situations, where the design of correctly sized apertures is needed for the control of unwanted diffraction effects. Three recent design studies are illustrated: (1) Millimeter wave imaging with off-axis reflectors. Analysis of the effects of aberration on coherent detection efficiency. (2) Long-distance beam propagation in space-borne laser interferometry. This involves the analysis of coherent detection efficiency in the presence of aberrated gaussian beams. (3) Design of a Lyot stop system for an infra-red radiometer which is to view the Earth's limb from space. Here the critical (and unwanted) diffraction is that from the bright Earth disc, lying just outside of the instrument field of view. The analysis technique is explained, and examples given of diffracted energy patterns analyzed at progressive stages in the system. It is shown how these aid the design and analysis of the systems. The aim is to show the range problems in which this method is useful, and to hopefully learn from others at the conference about other cases where such techniques

  12. Propeller modulation effects on a scanning beam microwave landing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pope, J. M.; Staehle, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation to assess the modulation effects on microwave signals transmitted through rotating propeller blades. Interruption of the antenna line-of-sight signal by the rotating propeller causes a variation of path loss, which produces essentially an amplitude modulation of the received signal. This interruption or blockage effect is generally only partial because of edge diffraction around the particular interfering propeller blade. Signals reflected from the rotating propeller will also cause Doppler frequency shifts to be present in the received signals. A scanning beam microwave landing system (MLS) known as MODILS (modular instrument landing system) was used to process the received signals for display. The effects of propeller modulation were studied by varying the following parameters: (1) spacing between propeller and receiving antenna, (2) propeller dimensions, (3) propeller speed (rpm), (4) number of propeller blades, (5) system data rate, (6) receiver response time, and (7) receiver antenna aperture.

  13. Plasma effects on fast pair beams. III. Oblique electrostatic growth rates for perpendicular Maxwellian pair beams

    SciTech Connect

    Supsar, Markus; Schlickeiser, Reinhard E-mail: rsch@tp4.rub.de

    2014-03-10

    The distant universe is opaque to γ radiation from blazars due to gamma-gamma attenuation with extragalactic background light. This process produces electron-positron pair beams that interact with the intergalactic medium and are unstable to linear instabilities, particularly the electrostatic and Weibel instabilities. The electrostatic instability grows faster and so determines the dissipation of the free energy of the beam. Here, we generalize the calculation of the electrostatic growth rate to a beam plasma system with a Maxwellian perpendicular momentum spread and allow for oblique propagation directions. We show that the growth rate for the oblique electrostatic mode has a maximum value that is even higher than for a cold beam or for one with a constant perpendicular momentum spread.

  14. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  15. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Fuoss, P. H.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.

    2010-12-15

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  16. The effect of exit beam phase aberrations on parallel beam coherent x-ray reconstructions.

    SciTech Connect

    Hruszkewycz, S. O.; Harder, R.; Xiao, X.; Fuoss, P. H.

    2010-12-01

    Diffraction artifacts from imperfect x-ray windows near the sample are an important consideration in the design of coherent x-ray diffraction measurements. In this study, we used simulated and experimental diffraction patterns in two and three dimensions to explore the effect of phase imperfections in a beryllium window (such as a void or inclusion) on the convergence behavior of phasing algorithms and on the ultimate reconstruction. A predictive relationship between beam wavelength, sample size, and window position was derived to explain the dependence of reconstruction quality on beryllium defect size. Defects corresponding to this prediction cause the most damage to the sample exit wave and induce signature error oscillations during phasing that can be used as a fingerprint of experimental x-ray window artifacts. The relationship between x-ray window imperfection size and coherent x-ray diffractive imaging reconstruction quality explored in this work can play an important role in designing high-resolution in situ coherent imaging instrumentation and will help interpret the phasing behavior of coherent diffraction measured in these in situ environments.

  17. Double acousto-optic deflector system for increased scanning range of laser beams.

    PubMed

    Kastelik, J-C; Dupont, S; Yushkov, K B; Molchanov, V Ya; Gazalet, J

    2017-09-01

    A new laser scanning system is presented based on two wide-band acousto-optic deflectors. The interaction medium is tellurium dioxide. Anisotropic interactions take place under two different tangential phase matching configurations in such a way that the acousto-optic bandwidths add up. We demonstrate the feasibility of such a cascade deflection system for the wavelength of λ=514nm. The total frequency bandwidth is Δf=100MHz, equally distributed between the two acousto-optic deflectors. The total angular scan at the output is Δθ=4.4° leading to 125 resolvable spots for a 1mm truncated Gaussian beam. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Comparative study on the effect of electron beam irradiation on the physical properties of ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bibo; Hong, Ningning; Shi, Yongqian; Wang, Biao; Sheng, Haibo; Song, Lei; Tang, Qinbo; Hu, Yuan

    2014-04-01

    Ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) flame retarded by a combination of cellulose acetate butyrate (CAB) microencapsulated ammonium polyphosphate (MCAPP) and polyamide-6 (PA-6) have been crosslinked by high energy electron beam irradiation. The effect of high energy electron beam irradiation on the crosslinking degree, mechanical, electrical and thermal properties of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 cable material was studied by gel content, heat extention test, mechanical test, dynamic mechanical analysis, high-insulation resistance meter and thermogravimetric analysis. The gel content and heat extention test results showed that the EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites can be easily crosslinked by electron beam irradiation. The tensile strength of EVA composites was drastically increased from 16.2 to maximum 26.2 MPa as the electron beam irradiation dose increases from 0 to 160 kGy. The volatilized products of EVA/MCAPP/PA-6 composites were analyzed and compared by thermogravimetric analysis/infrared spectrometry (TG-FTIR).

  19. Advanced computations of multi-physics, multi-scale effects in beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, J.F.; Macridin, A.; Spentzouris, P.; Stern, E.G.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    Current state-of-the-art beam dynamics simulations include multiple physical effects and multiple physical length and/or time scales. We present recent developments in Synergia2, an accelerator modeling framework designed for multi-physics, multi-scale simulations. We summarize recent several recent results in multi-physics beam dynamics, including simulations of three Fermilab accelerators: the Tevatron, the Main Injector and the Debuncher. Early accelerator simulations focused on single-particle dynamics. To a first approximation, the forces on the particles in an accelerator beam are dominated by the external fields due to magnets, RF cavities, etc., so the single-particle dynamics are the leading physical effects. Detailed simulations of accelerators must include collective effects such as the space-charge repulsion of the beam particles, the effects of wake fields in the beam pipe walls and beam-beam interactions in colliders. These simulations require the sort of massively parallel computers that have only become available in recent times. We give an overview of the accelerator framework Synergia2, which was designed to take advantage of the capabilities of modern computational resources and enable simulations of multiple physical effects. We also summarize some recent results utilizing Synergia2 and BeamBeam3d, a tool specialized for beam-beam simulations.

  20. Numerical Simulation of the Self-Heating Effect Induced by Electron Beam Plasma in Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yongfeng; Tan, Chang; Han, Xianwei; Tan, Yonghua

    2012-02-01

    For exploiting advantages of electron beam air plasma in some unusual applications, a Monte Carlo (MC) model coupled with heat transfer model is established to simulate the characteristics of electron beam air plasma by considering the self-heating effect. Based on the model, the electron beam induced temperature field and the related plasma properties are investigated. The results indicate that a nonuniform temperature field is formed in the electron beam plasma region and the average temperature is of the order of 600 K. Moreover, much larger volume pear-shaped electron beam plasma is produced in hot state rather than in cold state. The beam ranges can, with beam energies of 75 keV and 80 keV, exceed 1.0 m and 1.2 m in air at pressure of 100 torr, respectively. Finally, a well verified formula is obtained for calculating the range of high energy electron beam in atmosphere.

  1. Effect of crossed beams irradiation on parametric instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Labaune, C., Ecole Polytechnique, France

    1998-04-27

    Modification of the growth of scattering processes in the case of multiple beam irradiation compared to single beam irradiation has been investigated in a preformed plasma using Thomson scattrering of a short wavelength probe beam, and spectral and temporal analysis of reflected and transmitted light. First observations of the reduction of the amplitude of ion acoustic waves associated with stimulated Brillouin scattering, amplification of the amplitude of electron plasma waves associated with stimulated Raman scattering, and transfer of energy between crqssing beams with same frequency in a flowing plasma under crossed beam irradiation are reported.

  2. Acoustic beam splitting in two-dimensional phononic crystals using self-collimation effect

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jing; Wu, Fugen Zhong, Huilin; Yao, Yuanwei; Zhang, Xin

    2015-10-14

    We propose two models of self-collimation-based beam splitters in phononic crystals. The finite element method is used to investigate the propagation properties of acoustic waves in two-dimensional phononic crystals. The calculated results show that the efficiency of the beam splitter can be controlled systematically by varying the radius of the rods or by changing the orientation of the square rods in the line defect. The effect of changing the side length of the square rods on acoustic wave propagation is discussed. The results show that the total transmission/reflection range decreases/increases as the side length increases. We also find that the relationship between the orientation of the transflective point and the side length of the square rods is quasi-linear.

  3. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Ahmad, Pauzi; Zulkafli, Hashim, Siti A'aisah

    2014-09-01

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD5, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  4. Degradation and decoloration of textiles wastewater by electron beam irradiation: Effect of energy, current and absorbed dose

    SciTech Connect

    Bakar, Khomsaton Abu; Zulkafli,; Hashim, Siti A'aisah; Ahmad, Pauzi

    2014-09-03

    In this study, electron beam accelerator (EB) was used to treat textiles wastewater from Rawang Industrial Park, Selangor. The objectives were to determine effective energy, beam current and absorbed dose required for decoloration and degradation of the textiles effluent. The textiles effluent was irradiated in a batch with various energy of 1MeV to 3MeV at constant beam current of 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with higher beam energy. The EB energy of 1MeV effectively to removed 58% color and 19% COD. For textile effluent sample irradiated at fix energy of 1MeV and 3Mev but at different beam current 10mA, 20mA and 30mA. It was observed that removal of color and COD increases with the increased of beam current at each energy. However removal of color was significantly better at 1Mev as compared to 3Mev. In the case of textiles effluent, irradiated at doses of 17, 20,25,30, 35, 100 and 200kGy using 30 kW power of EB (1Mev, 30mA), results shows removal of BOD{sub 5}, COD and color were in the range 9%-33%, 14%-38% and 43%-78% respectively.

  5. Effect of desiccation of marine environment on beam structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Da; Wang, Na; Hou, Li-jun; Liao, Ying-di

    2013-03-01

    This paper presents the study on the effect of desiccation for different part of offshore structure corresponding to the water level. A coupled elastoplastic damage model is proposed to describe the mechanical behavior of cement-based materials under external loading and desiccation, in which both the plastic and damage behaviors under multi-axial stress are considered in composition with the desiccation effect. The comparison between numerical simulation and experimental data indicates that the proposed model can well predict the mechanical characteristics of cement-based materials with different saturations. In addition, a series of small beams subjected to desiccation are further analyzed to reveal the response of structure in the drying process.

  6. The Effect of Increasing Mass upon Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John; Hagan, Donald

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if increasing body mass while maintaining bodyweight would affect ground reaction forces and joint kinetics during walking and running. It was hypothesized that performing gait with increased mass while maintaining body weight would result in greater ground reaction forces, and would affect the net joint torques and work at the ankle, knee and hip when compared to gait with normal mass and bodyweight. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten subjects (5M/5F) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) on a treadmill. Subjects completed one minute of locomotion at normal mass and bodyweight and at four added mass (AM) conditions (10%, 20%, 30% and 40% of body mass) in random order. Three-dimensional joint position data were collected via videography. Walking and running were analyzed separately. The addition of mass resulted in several effects. Peak impact forces and loading rates increased during walking, but decreased during running. Peak propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased and hip extensor angular impulse and positive work increased as mass was added for both styles of locomotion. Work increased at a greater rate during running than walking. The adaptations to additional mass that occur during walking are different than during running. Increasing mass during exercise in microgravity may be beneficial to increasing ground reaction forces during walking and strengthening hip musculature during both walking and running. Future study in true microgravity is required to determine if the adaptations found would be similar in a weightless environment.

  7. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    PubMed Central

    Haney, Paul M.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Gaury, Benoit; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.

    2016-01-01

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells is most consistent with a charged surface, and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials. PMID:27881882

  8. Depletion region surface effects in electron beam induced current measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, Paul M.; Zhitenev, Nikolai B.; Yoon, Heayoung P.; Gaury, Benoit

    2016-09-07

    Electron beam induced current (EBIC) is a powerful characterization technique which offers the high spatial resolution needed to study polycrystalline solar cells. Current models of EBIC assume that excitations in the p-n junction depletion region result in perfect charge collection efficiency. However, we find that in CdTe and Si samples prepared by focused ion beam (FIB) milling, there is a reduced and nonuniform EBIC lineshape for excitations in the depletion region. Motivated by this, we present a model of the EBIC response for excitations in the depletion region which includes the effects of surface recombination from both charge-neutral and charged surfaces. For neutral surfaces, we present a simple analytical formula which describes the numerical data well, while the charged surface response depends qualitatively on the location of the surface Fermi level relative to the bulk Fermi level. We find that the experimental data on FIB-prepared Si solar cells are most consistent with a charged surface and discuss the implications for EBIC experiments on polycrystalline materials.

  9. Effects of gamma and electron beam irradiation on the properties of calendered cord fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aytaç, Ayşe; Deniz, Veli; Şen, Murat; Hegazy, El-Sayed; Güven, Olgun

    2010-03-01

    The effects of gamma and e-beam irradiation on mechanical and structural properties of nylon 66 (Ny 66), nylon 6 (Ny 6) and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) fabrics used in tyres were investigated. The untreated (greige), treated cords and calendered fabrics were irradiated at different doses. It is found that the effects of high energy irradiation on greige, treated cords and calendered fabrics are similar. No protective effect of compounds used in calendering was observed against radiation-induced oxidative degradation. The deterioration effect of gamma irradiation on mechanical properties is much higher than that of e-beam irradiation for all types of samples. Limiting viscosity numbers of both gamma and e-beam irradiated nylon 6 and nylon 66 cords were found to decrease with increasing dose. It is concluded that PET calendered fabric has higher resistance to ionizing radiation. Ny 6 and Ny 66 calendered fabrics are more sensitive even at low doses. Therefore, the effects of high energy irradiation on tyre cords have to be taken into consideration during tyre design reinforced with particularly Ny fabrics if pre-vulcanization with high energy radiation is to be applied.

  10. A manufacturer's role in reducing the dose of cone beam computed tomography examinations: effect of beam filtration.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, J B

    2011-02-01

    The dosimetry of the Kodak 9500 cone beam CT (CBCT) unit (Carestream Health, Rochester, NY) was measured before and after installation of copper filtration. Dosimetry of a pre-production Kodak 9500 CBCT unit was compared with a current production unit with 0.4 mm of added filtration and increased kVp. Thermoluminescent dosimeter 100 chips were placed at 24 locations in a RANDO (radiation analogue dosimetry) head phantom (Nuclear Associates, Hicksville, NY). Small, medium and large adult default exposure settings were used in separate dosimeter runs for large and medium field of view (FOV) examinations with both units. Equivalent dose and effective dose were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 and 2007 tissue weights. Estimations of risk using 2007 ICRP calculations increased by an average of 77% for large FOV scans and 125% for the medium FOV scans in comparison with 1990 calculations. With added filtration, effective dose for medium FOV examinations for default settings were: small adult 76 µSv, medium adult 98 µSv, and large adult 166 µSv. Effective doses for large FOV examinations were: small adult 93 µSv, medium adult 163 µSv, and large adult 260 µSv. Effective dose was reduced by an average of 43% in examinations made with increased filtration and adjusted kVp. The manufacturer's installation of additional filtration with the adjustment of kVp in the Kodak 9500 CBCT unit resulted in significant patient dose reductions for examinations at all adult default settings.

  11. A manufacturer's role in reducing the dose of cone beam computed tomography examinations: effect of beam filtration

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, J B

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The dosimetry of the Kodak 9500 cone beam CT (CBCT) unit (Carestream Health, Rochester, NY) was measured before and after installation of copper filtration. Methods Dosimetry of a pre-production Kodak 9500 CBCT unit was compared with a current production unit with 0.4 mm of added filtration and increased kVp. Thermoluminescent dosimeter 100 chips were placed at 24 locations in a RANDO (radiation analogue dosimetry) head phantom (Nuclear Associates, Hicksville, NY). Small, medium and large adult default exposure settings were used in separate dosimeter runs for large and medium field of view (FOV) examinations with both units. Equivalent dose and effective dose were calculated using International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 and 2007 tissue weights. Results Estimations of risk using 2007 ICRP calculations increased by an average of 77% for large FOV scans and 125% for the medium FOV scans in comparison with 1990 calculations. With added filtration, effective dose for medium FOV examinations for default settings were: small adult 76 µSv, medium adult 98 µSv, and large adult 166 µSv. Effective doses for large FOV examinations were: small adult 93 µSv, medium adult 163 µSv, and large adult 260 µSv. Effective dose was reduced by an average of 43% in examinations made with increased filtration and adjusted kVp. Conclusion The manufacturer's installation of additional filtration with the adjustment of kVp in the Kodak 9500 CBCT unit resulted in significant patient dose reductions for examinations at all adult default settings. PMID:21239575

  12. Effects of ion beam irradiation on size of mutant sector and genetic damage in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Yoshihiro; Nozawa, Shigeki; Narumi, Issay; Oono, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Size of mutant sector and genetic damage were evaluated in Arabidopsis to further our understanding of effective ion beam use in plant mutation breeding. Arabidopsis seeds, heterozygous for the GLABRA1 (GL1) gene (GL1/gl1-1), were irradiated with 15.8 MeV/u neon ions (mean linear energy transfer (LET): 352 keV/μm), 17.3 MeV/u carbon ions (113 keV/μm), or 60Co gamma rays. The frequency and size of glabrous sectors generated because of inactivation of the GL1 allele were examined. The frequency and overall size of large deletions were evaluated based on the loss of heterozygosity of DNA markers using DNA isolated from glabrous tissue. Irrespective of the radiation properties, plants with mutant sectors were obtained at similar frequencies at the same effective dosage necessary for survival reduction. Ion beams tended to induce larger mutant sectors than gamma rays. The frequency of large deletions (>several kbp) increased as the LET value increased, with chromosome regions larger than 100 kbp lost in most large deletions. The distorted segregation ratio of glabrous plants in the progenies of irradiated GL1/gl1-1 plants suggested frequent occurrence of chromosome rearrangement, especially those subjected to neon ions. Exposure to ion beams with moderate LET values (30-110 keV/μm) is thought effective for inducing mutant sectors without causing extensive genetic damage.

  13. Relativistic phase effect in modeling interactions between ultraintense laser beams and electrons plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Alexandru; Stancalie, Viorica

    2017-06-01

    In a series of previous papers we proved an accurate connection between quantum and classical equations in the case of electrodynamic systems. We have used this connection to elaborate simplified models for systems composed of very intense laser beams and electrons or atoms. These models are in good agreement with numerous experimental data from literature. In this paper we develop the above approach for the new field of interactions between ultraintense laser beams, having intensities in the range 1018 - 1022 W/cm2, and electron plasmas. We show that in this case new effects take place, such as the fact that the variation of the phase of the field at the point where the electron is situated, decreases when the intensity of the field increases, due to a strong relativistic behavior. This effect leads to an aperiodic behavior of the radiations generated by above interactions, and to a possible new method for solitary waves generation.

  14. QuickPol: Fast calculation of effective beam matrices for CMB polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hivon, Eric; Mottet, Sylvain; Ponthieu, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Current and planned observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization anisotropies, with their ever increasing number of detectors, have reached a potential accuracy that requires a very demanding control of systematic effects. While some of these systematics can be reduced in the design of the instruments, others will have to be modeled and hopefully accounted for or corrected a posteriori. We propose QuickPol, a quick and accurate calculation of the full effective beam transfer function and of temperature to polarization leakage at the power spectra level, as induced by beam imperfections and mismatches between detector optical and electronic responses. All the observation details such as exact scanning strategy, imperfect polarization measurements, and flagged samples are accounted for. Our results are validated on Planck high frequency instrument (HFI) simulations. We show how the pipeline can be used to propagate instrumental uncertainties up to the final science products, and could be applied to experiments with rotating half-wave plates.

  15. Effect of electron beam irradiation sterilization on the biomedical poly (octene-co-ethylene)/polypropylene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luan, Shifang; Shi, Hengchong; Yao, Zhanhai; Wang, Jianwei; Song, Yongxian; Yin, Jinghua

    2010-05-01

    The effect of electron beam irradiation with the dose ranging from 15 to 40 kGy on poly (octene-co-ethylene) (POE)/polypropylene (PP) films was investigated. Wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), yellowness index testing and mechanical performance measurement were applied to characterize the films. It demonstrated that crystalline structure exhibited little change, and degree of crystallinity slightly change under the irradiation treatment. Irradiation brought about oxidation of the films, forming hydroxyl groups of the peroxides and carbonyl groups. Tensile properties become worse as irradiation dose increased. Electron beam irradiation with the dose of 15-40 kGy has little effect on crystalline performance and a little influence for the POE/PP films, indicating a good irradiation resistance.

  16. Effects of Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation on Human Blood Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Diana I.; Stan, Dana E.; Radu, Roxana R.; Cinca, Sabin A.; Margaritescu, Irina D.; Chirita, Doru I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.

    2007-04-01

    The effects of separated and combined accelerated electron beam (EB) of 6.23 MeV and microwave (MW) of 2.45GHz irradiation on proteins in samples of human serum, human plasma and human integral blood are presented. Also, it was studied the effect of separate and combined EB and MW irradiation on proteins irradiated in samples of human integral blood, without and in the presence of a synthetic compound solution (S.C.S.) which is expected to exhibit various biological actions, such as to diminish or to increase the irradiation effects.

  17. Effects of Electron Beam and Microwave Irradiation on Human Blood Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Diana I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Manaila, Elena N.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Oproiu, Constantin V.; Stan, Dana E.; Radu, Roxana R.; Margaritescu, Irina D.; Chirita, Doru I.

    2007-04-23

    The effects of separated and combined accelerated electron beam (EB) of 6.23 MeV and microwave (MW) of 2.45GHz irradiation on proteins in samples of human serum, human plasma and human integral blood are presented. Also, it was studied the effect of separate and combined EB and MW irradiation on proteins irradiated in samples of human integral blood, without and in the presence of a synthetic compound solution (S.C.S.) which is expected to exhibit various biological actions, such as to diminish or to increase the irradiation effects.

  18. Effect of light source parameters on the polarization properties of the beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Yan; Jiang, Hui-lin; Liu, Zhi; Zhou, Xin; Fang, Hanhan

    2013-08-01

    Polarized laser has been widely used in free space optical communication, laser radar, and laser ranging system because of its advantages of good performance in recent years. The changes of laser polarization properties in the process of transmission in atmospheric turbulence have a certain impact on the system performance. The paper research on the rule of polarization properties changes of Gauss Schell model beam in turbulent conditions. And analysis the main factors to affect the polarization properties by numerical simulation using MATLAB software tools. The factors mainly including: initial polarization, coherence coefficient, spot size and the intensity of the atmospheric turbulent. The simulation results show that, the degree of polarization will converge to the initial polarization when the beam propagation in turbulent conditions. The degrees of polarization change to different value when initial polarization of beam is different in a short distance. And, the degrees of polarization converge to the initial polarization after long distance. Beam coherence coefficient bigger, the degree of polarization and change range increases bigger. The change of polarization more slowly for spot size is bigger. The change of polarization change is faster for longer wavelength. The conclusion of the study indicated that the light source parameters effect the changes of polarization properties under turbulent conditions. The research provides theory basis for the polarization properties of the laser propagation, and it will plays a significant role in optical communication and target recognition.

  19. Beam profile measurements for dental phototherapy: the effect of distance, wavelength and tissue thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palin, William M.; Hadis, Mohammed A.; Milward, Michael R.; Carroll, James D.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-03-01

    Light delivery for potential bacterial disinfection (UV/blue) and photobiomodulation (near-IR) requires specific, concentrated and controllable local irradiance and dose. Dental targets for light irradiation involve dentine, which scatters, absorbs and reflects light, reducing local irradiance. This study compared the effectiveness of LEDs (400-900nm) and lasers (660nm and 810nm) to penetrate dentine. Caries-free wisdom teeth were sectioned through the Pulpchamber by either cutting perpendicular to the crown, the buccal aspect or obliquely. Specimens were wet-polished to 1, 2 or 3mm thicknesses to expose the dentine on opposing surfaces. The beam profile of the LEDs/lasers were measured through dentine specimens (n=5) to obtain beam width following optical calibration, and spatial irradiance distribution following photodiode power calibration. There were no significant differences in the percentage power and irradiance transmitted through different dentine specimens between LEDs and lasers (P>0.05). However, light penetration through tissue was wavelength dependent and highest for red and near-IR wavelengths (P<0.05) for specimens cut perpendicular to the crown compared with buccal and oblique specimens. The beam diameters increased and irradiance decreased significantly (P<0.05) with increasing specimen thickness/distance for both LEDs and lasers. There was a noticeable shift in beam position for all light sources in buccal and oblique specimens. Data indicated that dentine tubule orientation may alter the direction of light through the tissue. Optimal light penetration and distribution through dentine at specific distance is best achieved with a flat-top beam distribution vertically through the crown of the tooth.

  20. Elastic-plastic deformations of a beam with the SD-effect

    SciTech Connect

    Pavilaynen, Galina V.

    2015-03-10

    The results for the bending of a cantilever beam with the SD-effect under a concentrated load are discussed. To solve this problem, the standard Bernoulli-Euler hypotheses for beams and the Ilyushin model of perfect plasticity are used. The problem is solved analytically for structural steel A40X. The SD-effect for elastic-plastic deformations is studied. The solutions for beam made of isotropic material and material with the SD-effect are compared.

  1. Numerical Investigation of Statistical Turbulence Effects on Beam Propagation through 2-D Shear Mixing Layer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF STATISTICAL TURBULENCE EFFECTS ON BEAM PROPAGATION THROUGH 2-D SHEAR MIXING LAYER THESIS James C. Bowers, Captain, USAF...STATISTICAL TURBULENCE EFFECTS ON BEAM PROPAGATION THROUGH 2-D SHEAR MIXING LAYER THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics...robust method for calculating atmospheric turbulence effects on optical beam propagation, which could simplify similar approaches to chaotic aero-optical

  2. High energy cocktail beams for radiation effects studies

    SciTech Connect

    McMahan, M.A.; Argento, D.A.; Gimpel, T.; Guy, A.; Morel, J.; Osborne, K.; Siero, R.; Thatcher, R.; Wutte, D.; Xie, X.Q.; Lyneis, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The 88-Inch Cyclotron facility consists of a sector-focused, variable energy cyclotron fed by two Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) high charge-state sources. The combination of cyclotron and ECR source provides the ability to run ''cocktails'' of ions, mixtures of ions of near-identical charge-to-mass ratio. This concept was developed for detector calibrations soon after the first ECR source came on line. [1] The ions are tuned out of the source together and the cyclotron frequency--acting as a mass analyzer--separates them. This means that within the components of the cocktail, the accelerated ion can be changed in approximately one minute. Intensity variations are compensated for with a series of attenuator grids at the ion source, which allow ion beam intensity adjustments over nine orders of magnitude. The cocktail beam soon became the mainstay of the heavy ion radiation effects program at the Cyclotron, an applied program which is run on a recharge basis and which accounts for about 10% of the annual usage. The largest component of this program is directed at measuring single event effects--a variety of effects, which can occur when a heavy ion traverses a transistor, memory chip or other piece of microelectronics. It can then be determined whether the device is appropriate for use in a satellite or space vehicle in a particular orbit, knowing the distribution of heavy ions expected at that orbit. To first order, the observed single event effects are atomic processes, which depend only on the linear energy transfer (LET), or stopping power, of the ion. The range of the ion is important only to ensure that the ion reaches the correct interaction depth. In the early 90's, two cocktails were developed at the Cyclotron for standard use: a ''light ion'' cocktail for ions up to {sup 36}Ar at high energy and large range, and a ''heavy ion'' cocktail at 4.5 MeV/nucleon, with LETs ranging from 3-60 MeV/mg/cm{sup 2} and ranges from 43-69 {micro}. Using the AECR, Bi

  3. Increasing pandemic vaccination rates with effective communication.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Natalie J

    2011-06-01

    Communicating effectively with the public about the importance of vaccination during a pandemic poses a challenge to health communicators. The public's concerns about the safety, effectiveness and necessity of vaccines lead many people to refuse vaccination and the current communication strategies are often unsuccessful at overcoming the public's resistance to vaccinate. Convincing the public to receive a vaccination, especially during a pandemic when there can be so much uncertainty about the vaccine and the disease, requires a revised communication approach. This revised approach should integrate into messages information that the public identifies as important, as well as presenting messages in a way that is consistent with our evolved social learning biases. These biases will impact both the content of the message and who delivers the message to different target populations. Additionally, an improved understanding between media and health communicators about the role each plays during a crisis may increase the effectiveness of messages disseminated to the public. Lastly, given that the public is increasingly seeking health information from on-line and other electronic sources, health communication needs to continue to find ways to integrate new technologies into communication strategies.

  4. The quantum measurement effect of interaction without interaction for an atomic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yong-Yi

    When an atomic beam collectively and harmonically vibrates perpendicular to the wave vector of the beam, the number of atoms reaching the atomic detector will have a vibrant factor Δt / T if the measurement time interval Δt is shorter than the period T. This new quantum mechanical measurement effect for an atomic beam is called interaction without interaction: though the translational motion of the atomic beam does not interact with its collective and transverse harmonic vibration, the latter will have an effect on the measured number of atoms associated with the former. From the new measurement effect the classical harmonic vibration's period is evaluated. We give a clear physical picture and a satisfactory physical interpretation for the measurement effect based on the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics. We present an experimental proposal to verify this measurement effect for an ion beam instead of an atomic beam.

  5. Incident-beam effects in electron-stimulated Auger-electron diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Y.; Cao, Jianming

    1991-04-01

    We have examined incident-beam effects in electron-stimulated Auger-electron diffraction (AED) on a cleaved GaAs(110) surface. The results indicate that incident-beam diffraction is significant in an AED experiment, and that the dissipative nature of the incident beam in contributing to the Auger process must be accounted for. We have developed a qualitative model that describes the trend of the polar-angle dependence of the Auger intensity for both the incident and exit beams. In calculating the diffraction features, we used a zeroth-order approximation to simulate the dissipation of the incident beam, which is found to adequately describe the experimental data.

  6. The effect of object shape and laser beam shape on lidar system resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In a LIDAR system, a pulsed laser beam is propagated to a scene, and then reflected back by objects. Ideally if the beam diameter and the pulse width are close to zero, then the reflected beam in time domain is similar to a delta function, which can accurately locate an object's position. However, in a practical system, the beam has finite size. Therefore, even if the pulse width is small, an object shape will make the reflected beam stretched along the time axis, then affect system resolution. In this paper, we assume the beam with Gaussian shape. The beam can be formulated as a delta function convolved with a shape function, such as a rectangular function, in time domain. Then the reflected beam can be defined as a system response function convolved with the shape function. We use symmetric objects to analyze the reflected beam. Corn, sphere, and cylinder objects are used to find a LIDAR system's response function. The case for large beam size is discussed. We assume the beam shape is similar to a plane wave. With this assumption, we get the simplified LIDAR system response functions for the three kinds of objects. Then we use tiny spheres to emulate an arbitrary object, and study its effect to the returned beam.

  7. Effects on axial momentum spread on the electron-ion two-stream instability in high-intensity ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    R. Davidso; H. Qin

    2000-06-15

    Use is made of the Vlasov-Maxwell equations to describe the electron-ion two-stream instability driven by the directed axial motion of a high-intensity ion beam propagating through a stationary population of (unwanted) background electrons. The ion beam is treated as continuous in the z-direction, and the electrons are electrostatically confined in the transverse direction by the space-charge potential produced by the excession charge. The analysis is carried out for arbitrary beam intensity, consistent with transverse confinement of the beam particles, and arbitrary fractional charge neutralization by the background electrons. For the case of overlapping step-function ion and electron density profiles, corresponding to monoenergetic electrons and ions in the transverse direction, detailed stability properties are calculated, including the important effects of an axial momentum spread, over a wide range of system parameters for dipole perturbations with azimuthal mode number l=1. The two-stream instability growth rate is found to increase with increasing beam intensity, increasing fractional charge neutralization, and decreasing proximity of the conducting wall. It is shown that Landau damping associated with a modest axial momentum spread of the beam ions and background electrons has a strong stabilizing influence on the instability.

  8. Effects of electron beam irradiation on the structural properties of polylactic acid/polyethylene blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bee, Soo-Tueen; Ratnam, C. T.; Sin, Lee Tin; Tee, Tiam-Ting; Wong, Wai-Kien; Lee, Jiuun-Xiang; Rahmat, A. R.

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of electron beam irradiation on the properties of polylactic acid (PLA) and low density polyethylene (LDPE) blends. The PLA were compounded with 20-80% LDPE and were exposed to electron beam irradiation dosages of 20-120 kGy. The results from gel content and X-ray diffraction analyses showed that the addition of LDPE to PLA effectively increased the gel content and crystallinity. However, an increasing percentage of LDPE reduced the tensile strength and Young's modulus of the PLA/LDPE samples due to the lower intermolecular bonding of LDPE than of PLA. Moreover, an increase in irradiation dosages gradually decreased the mechanical properties of low-LDPE PLA/LDPE. In contrast, the increasing irradiation dosage enhanced the mechanical properties of higher-LDPE PLA/LDPE. These results indicate that higher amounts of LDPE effectively react with the release of free radicals within the amorphous phase if the blends are subjected to irradiation. The higher amounts of free radicals induce the formation of three-dimensional cross-linked networks in the polymer matrix and thus increase the gel content. The irradiation-induced cross-linking in PLA/LDPE samples improves the mechanical properties and crystallinity by promoting a structural rearrangement of the polymer matrix into a highly ordered structure.

  9. Effect of reactive ion beam etching on the photoluminescence of CdTe epitaxial layers

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Pastor, J.; Fuster, D.; Abellan, M.; Anguita, J.; Sochinskii, N. V.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrated the effect of reactive ion beam etching (RIBE) process on the PL properties of CdTe/sapphire metal organic vapor phase epitaxy layers. At optimum conditions, the RIBE attack does not make significant morphological changes but it results in an increase of the concentration of acceptor impurities. This was revealed by an increase of the overall photoluminescence (PL) intensity and, simultaneously, a decrease of the PL decay time, more important on the low energy side of PL spectrum due to the recombination of carriers in acceptor pairs.

  10. Injected-charge-driven increase in electro-optic effect of KTN crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Toyoda, Seiji; Imai, Tadayuki; Miyazu, Jun; Okabe, Yuichi; Ueno, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Junya

    2014-05-15

    We report a significant increase in the electro-optic (EO) effect of KTa{sub x}Nb{sub 1-x}O{sub 3} (KTN) crystals that we achieved by injecting carriers into them. The dielectric constant of KTN was increased approximately twofold by carrier injection. The EO beam scanning performance was effectively improved by the increase in the EO effect resulting from the increased dielectric constant. The estimated densities of the trapped electrons were as small as 5.8 × 10{sup 20}m{sup -3}. The very small quantity of injected electrons greatly affected the dielectric constant and EO effect of the KTN crystals.

  11. Study of crack patterns in beam column joint due to upwards anchoring beam effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabariman, Bambang; Sofianto, Mochamad Firmansyah

    2017-06-01

    Beam-column joint (BCJ) of reinforced concrete is an area of critical which must be carefully designed to absorb the seismic energy. Inability to absorb seismic energy will cause serious damage to structural failure. It will lead to shear failure, i.e. brittle and endanger users of the building if the BCJ area is not designed properly. In order to get a building structure is safe and resistant to disasters, mainly due to the earthquake, the structure must be designed in accordance to the rules of standard construction (eligible detailing). In general, the anchorages (detailing) reinforcement beams to the column is pointing downwards, however, what if the steel anchoring beams are pointing upwards. Different anchoring will result in the behavior of different structures, such as fracturing pattern. This study observes two anchoring model, by making two test specimens of BCJ. One set of reinforcement beams anchored BCJ upward and downward respectively, which are applied with monotonic static load. The study investigated the pattern of cracks and ductility of the beam displacement on BCJ. The results showed that the downward anchoring in the fracturing pattern out of the area BCJ was anchoring upward pattern rift goes deep into the area BCJ, thus anchoring above makes BCJ unsafe. Downward anchoring are more ductile than the upward anchoring, however the deflection of all BJC specimens was higher than the boundaries maximum deflection prediction (Δprediction = 10.45 mm < eksp Δexp-min = 13.15 mm), which can be assumed that all BCJ specimens were ductile, but it still in ductile limited due to displacement ductility μΔ<3,5.

  12. The thermal effects on high-frequency vibration of beams using energy flow analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbo; Chen, Hualing; Zhu, Danhui; Kong, Xiangjie

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, the energy flow analysis (EFA) method is developed to predict the high-frequency response of beams in a thermal environment, which is a topic of concern in aerospace and automotive industries. The temperature load applied on the structures can generate thermal stresses and change material properties. The wavenumber and group velocity associated with the in-plane axial force arising from thermal stresses are included in the derivation of the governing energy equation, and the input power is obtained from the derived effective bending stiffness. In addition, effect of temperature-dependent material properties is considered in the EFA model. To verify the proposed formulation, numerical simulations are performed for a pinned-pinned beam in a uniform thermal environment. The EFA results are compared with the modal solutions for various frequencies and damping loss factors, and good correlations are observed. The results show that the spatial distributions and levels of energy density can be affected by the thermal effects, and the vibration response of beams increases with temperature.

  13. Effective doses from cone beam CT investigation of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    Davies, J; Johnson, B; Drage, NA

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of the study was to calculate the effective dose delivered to the patient undergoing cone beam (CB) CT of the jaws and maxillofacial complex using the i-CAT Next Generation CBCT scanner (Imaging Sciences International, Hatfield, PA). Methods A RANDO® phantom (The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) containing thermoluminence dosemeters were scanned 10 times for each of the 6 imaging protocols. Effective doses for each protocol were calculated using the 1990 and approved 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommended tissue weighting factors (E1990, E2007). Results The effective dose for E1990 and E2007, respectively, were: full field of view (FOV) of the head, 47 μSv and 78 μSv; 13 cm scan of the jaws, 44 μSv and 77 μSv; 6 cm standard mandible, 35 μSv and 58 μSv; 6 cm high resolution mandible, 69 μSv and 113 μSv; 6 cm standard maxilla, 18 μSv and 32 μSv; and 6 cm high resolution maxilla, 35 μSv and 60 μSv. Conclusions Using the new generation of CBCT scanner, the effective dose is lower than the original generation machine for a similar FOV using the ICRP 2007 tissue weighting factors. PMID:22184626

  14. Precessed electron beam electron energy loss spectroscopy of graphene: Beyond channelling effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yedra, Ll.; Estradé, S.; Torruella, P.; Eljarrat, A.; Peiró, F.; Darbal, A. D.; Weiss, J. K.

    2014-08-04

    The effects of beam precession on the Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) signal of the carbon K edge in a 2 monolayer graphene sheet are studied. In a previous work, we demonstrated the use of precession to compensate for the channeling-induced reduction of EELS signal when in zone axis. In the case of graphene, no enhancement of EELS signal is found in the usual experimental conditions, as graphene is not thick enough to present channeling effects. Interestingly, though it is found that precession makes it possible to increase the collection angle, and, thus, the overall signal, without a loss of signal-to-background ratio.

  15. Carbon-Ion Beam Irradiation Effectively Suppresses Migration and Invasion of Human Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Akino, Yuichi; Teshima, Teruki Kihara, Ayaka; Kodera-Suzumoto, Yuko; Inaoka, Miho; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Matsuura, Nariaki

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: Control of cancer metastasis is one of the most important issues in cancer treatment. We previously demonstrated that carbon particle irradiation suppresses the metastatic potential of cancer cells, and many studies have reported that photon irradiation promotes it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of carbon beam on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell aggressiveness and gene expression. Methods and Materials: A549 (lung adenocarcinoma) and EBC-1 (lung squamous cell carcinoma) cells were treated with 290 MeV/nucleon carbon ion beam at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba or with 4-MV X-ray at Osaka University. We tested proliferative, migratory, and invasive activities by cell proliferation assay, Boyden chamber assay, and Matrigel chemoinvasion assay, respectively. cDNA microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were also performed to assess mRNA expression alteration. Results: X-irradiation increased cell proliferation of A549 cells at 0.5 Gy, whereas high-dose X-ray reduced migration and invasion of A549 cells. By contrast, carbon beam irradiation did not enhance proliferation, and it reduced the migration and invasion capabilities of both A549 and EBC-1 cells more effectively than did X-irradiation. Carbon beam irradiation induced alteration of various gene expression profiles differently from X-ray irradiation. mRNA expression of ANLN, a homologue of anillin, was suppressed to 60% levels of basal expression in carbon beam-irradiated A549 cells after 12 h. Conclusion: Carbon beam effectively suppresses the metastatic potential of A549 and EBC-1 cells. Carbon beam also has different effects on gene expressions, and downregulation of ANLN was induced only by carbon beam irradiation.

  16. Effects of high temperature and e-beam irradiation on the stability of refractory thin films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, E. H.; Poppa, H.

    1977-01-01

    Refractory thin films of Al2O3, ZrO2, MgO, ThO2, and BN have been investigated in situ in an UHV transmission electron microscope. The electron transparent refractory films were prepared by electron-beam evaporation, anodization, RF sputtering, and thinning of bulk crystal materials. The study concentrates on monitoring the thermal and mechanical stability of the films, phase and structural changes, and electron irradiation effects as a function of film-preparation conditions. With increasing temperatures, five different crystallographic phases were observed for both anodized and electron-beam-evaporated alumina films. Zirconia films exhibited two phase transitions upon heating to 1200 C and electron-irradiation-induced crystallization of ZrO2 even at room temperature. MgO, ThO2, and BN films did not undergo any noticeable phase transformation but ruptured due to sintering below 1200 C.

  17. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  18. Generation of highly confined optical bottle beams by exploiting the photonic nanojet effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myun-Sik; Scharf, Toralf; Mühlig, Stefan; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2012-03-01

    We report on the generation of photonic nanojets, which resemble optical bottle beams. They are realized by manipulating the illumination of dielectric microspheres. As illumination we use the outer region of deliberately truncated Bessel-Gauss beam or a focused Gaussian beam with intentionally induced spherical aberrations. For the Bessel-Gauss beam possessing a single side lobe only, the nanojet spot resembles an optical bottle beam with a strong confinement due to the nanojet effect. When multiple side lobes of the aberrated focal spot are used, a chain of 3D optical bottle beams appears. We show the 3D intensity distributions close to the spot and discuss the main characteristics of such optical bottle beams.

  19. The damaging effects of nitrogen ion beam implantation on upland cotton ( Gossypium hirsutum L.) pollen grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yanjie; Wu, Lijun; Wu, Yuejin; Wang, Qingya; Tang, Canming

    2008-09-01

    With the aim to study the effects of an ion beam on plant cells, upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) cultivar "Sumian 22" pollen grains were irradiated in vacuum (7.8 × 10-3 Pa) by low-energy nitrogen ions with an energy of 20 keV at various fluences ranging from 0.26 × 1016 to 0.78 × 1016 N+/cm2. The irradiation effects on pollen grains were tested, considering the ultrastructural changes in the exine and interior walls of pollen grains, their germination rate, the growth speed of the pollen tubes in the style, fertilization and boll development after the pistils were pollinated by the pollen grains which had been implanted with nitrogen ions. Nitrogen ions entered the pollen grains by etching and penetrating the exine and interior walls and destroying cell structures. A greater percentage of the pollen grains were destroyed as the fluence of N+ ions increased. Obviously, the nitrogen ion beam penetrated the exine and interior walls of the pollen grains and produced holes of different sizes. As the ion fluence increased, the amount and the density of pollen grain inclusions decreased and the size of the lacuna and starch granules increased. Pollen grain germination rates decreased with increasing ion fluence. The number of pollen tubes in the style declined with increased ion implantation into pollen grains, but the growth speed of the tubes did not change. All of the pollen tubes reached the end of the style at 13 h after pollination. This result was consistent with that of the control. Also, the weight and the diameter of the ovary decreased and shortened with increased ion beam implantation fluence. No evident change in the fecundation time of the ovule was observed. These results indicate that nitrogen ions can enter pollen grains and cause a series of biological changes in pollen grains of upland cotton.

  20. Effect of electron-beam irradiation on antimicrobial, antibiofilm activity, and cytotoxicity of mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Geethashri, A; Kumar, B Mohana; Palaksha, K J; Sridhar, K R; Sanjeev, Ganesh; Shetty, A Veena

    2016-01-01

    Oral health diseases are common in all regions of the world. Mouth rinses are widely used generally by population as a port of daily oral care regimen. In addition to antimicrobial activity, mouth rinses possess certain cytotoxic effects. Electron-beam (E-beam) radiation is a form of ionizing energy known to induce structural, physical, and chemical changes in irradiated products. In this study, the modulatory effects of E-beam in irradiated mouth rinses were evaluated for its biological activities. The antimicrobial activities of nonirradiated and irradiated mouth rinses were evaluated for its antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities against oral pathogens, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus mutans, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion method and antibiofilm activity was evaluated by O'Toole method. The cytotoxicity was evaluated against human gingival fibroblast (HGF) cells by 3-(4, 5 Dimethythiazol-yl)-2,5-Diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay. Colgate Plax (CP) exhibited the antimicrobial activity against the tested pathogens, and a significant (P< 0.05) increase was observed against S. aureus at 750 Gy irradiation. Further, CP significantly (P< 0.05) suppressed S. mutans, S. aureus, and C. albicans biofilm. Listerine (LS) inhibited S. mutans and C. albicans biofilm. Whereas irradiated CP and LS significantly (P< 0.05) suppressed the biofilm formed by oral pathogens. The suppression of biofilm by irradiated mouth rinses was dose- and species-dependent. There was no significant (P > 0.05) difference in the cytotoxicity of irradiated and nonirradiated mouth rinses on HGF cells. However, an increased percentage viability of HGF cells was observed by mouth rinses irradiated at 750 Gy.xs The E-beam irradiation enhanced the antibiofilm activity of mouth rinses without modifying the cytotoxicity.

  1. Temperature dependence of electron-beam induced effects in amorphous apatite

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, In-Tae; Zhang, Yanwen; Weber, William J.; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Higuchi, Mikio

    2008-06-07

    Irradiation effects on pre-amorphized Sr2Nd8(SiO4)6O2 have been investigated under 200 and 300 keV electron-beam irradiation at 130 and 480 K using in situ transmission electron microscopy. At 480 K, recrystallization occurred from the amorphous/crystalline interface under both 200 and 300 keV e-beam irradiation. At 130 K, the 200 keV e-beam irradiation induced recrystallization only; however, 300 keV e-beam irradiation induced both recrystallization and an electron hammering effect in the amorphous material that resulted in radial expansion perpendicular to the incident electron-beam direction and shrinkage parallel to the electron-beam direction. Ionization-induced processes and knock-on displacement damage are suggested to be the mechanisms for the recrystallization and the electron hammering effect, respectively.

  2. The lensing effect of trapped particles in a dual-beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Grosser, Steffen; Fritsch, Anatol W; Kiessling, Tobias R; Stange, Roland; Käs, Josef A

    2015-02-23

    In dual-beam optical traps, two counterpropagating, divergent laser beams emitted from opposing laser fibers trap and manipulate dielectric particles. We investigate the lensing effect that trapped particles have on the beams. Our approach makes use of the intrinsic coupling of a beam to the opposing fiber after having passed the trapped particle. We present measurements of this coupling signal for PDMS particles, as well as a model for its dependence on size and refractive index of the trapped particle. As a more complex sample, the coupling of inhomogeneous biological cells is measured and discussed. We show that the lensing effect is well captured by the simple ray optics approximation. The measurements reveal intricate details, such as the thermal lens effect of the beam propagation in a dual-beam trap. For a particle of known size, the model further allows to infer its refractive index simply from the coupling signal.

  3. The effects of the RHIC E-lenses magnetic structure layout on the proton beam trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Pikin, A.; Luo, Y.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Raparia, D.

    2011-03-28

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed in RHIC IR10. First, the layout of these two E-lenses is introduced. Then the effects of e-lenses on proton beam are discussed. For example, the transverse fields of the e-lens bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. For the effects of the e-lens on proton beam trajectory, we calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera at first. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  4. A comparative study on low-energy ion beam and neutralized beam modifications of naked DNA and biological effect on mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarapirom, S.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Anuntalabhochai, S.; Yu, L. D.

    2012-02-01

    DNA conformation change or damage induced by low-energy ion irradiation has been of great interest owing to research developments in ion beam biotechnology and ion beam application in biomedicine. Mechanisms involved in the induction of DNA damage may account for effect from implanting ion charge. In order to check this effect, we used both ion beam and neutralized beam at keV energy to bombard naked DNA. Argon or nitrogen ion beam was generated and extracted from a radiofrequency (RF) ion source and neutralized by microwave-driven plasma in the beam path. Plasmid DNA pGFP samples were irradiated with the ion or neutralized beam in vacuum, followed by gel electrophoresis to observe changes in the DNA conformations. It was revealed that the ion charge played a certain role in inducing DNA conformation change. The subsequent DNA transfer into bacteria Escherichia coli ( E. coli) for mutation analysis indicated that the charged ion beam induced DNA change had high potential in mutation induction while neutralized beam did not. The intrinsic reason was attributed to additional DNA deformation and contortion caused by ion charge exchange effect so that the ion beam induced DNA damage could hardly be completely repaired, whereas the neutralized beam induced DNA change could be more easily recoverable owing to absence of the additional DNA deformation and contortion.

  5. Effect of N+ Beam Exposure on Superoxide Dismutase and Catalase Activities and Induction of Mn-SOD in Deinococcus Radiodurans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dao-jun; Chen, Ruo-lei; Shao, Chun-lin; Wu, Li-jun; Yu, Zeng-liang

    2000-10-01

    Though bacteria of the radiation-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans have a high resistance to the lethal and mutagenic effects of many DNA-damaging agents, the mechanisms involved in the response of these bacteria to oxidative stress are poorly understood. In this report, the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities produced by these bacteria were measured, and the change of SOD and CAT activities by 20 keV N+ beam exposure was examined. Their activities were increased by N+ beam exposure from 8×1014 ions/cm2 to 6×1015 ions/cm2. The treatment of H2O2 and [CHCl3 +CH3CH2OH] and the measurement of absorption spectrum showed that the increase in SOD activity was resulted from inducible activities of Mn-SOD in D. radiodurans AS1.633 by N+ beam exposure. These results suggested that this bacteria possess inducible defense mechanisms against the deleterious effects of oxidization.

  6. Collinearity alignment of probe beams in a laser-based Faraday effect diagnostica)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, L.; Ding, W. X.; Brower, D. L.

    2012-10-01

    Two counter-rotating circularly polarized beams are used in a laser-based polarimetry diagnostic providing a phase measurement of the Faraday effect. Collinearity of these beams is a key issue that affects measurement accuracy. Spatial offset from even small misalignment induces systematic error due to density gradient and path length difference. Here, we report an alignment technique using a rotating dielectric wedge, which is capable of reducing spatial offset of two probe beams below 0.1 mm for beams with 40 mm diameter. With optimized alignment, 0.05° Faraday effect fluctuations associated with global tearing modes are resolved with an uncertainty below 0.01°.

  7. Green's functions of the forced vibration of Timoshenko beams with damping effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X. Y.; Zhao, X.; Li, Y. H.

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with the dynamic solutions for forced vibrations of Timoshenko beams in a systematical manner. Damping effects on the vibrations of the beam are taken into consideration by introducing two characteristic parameters. Laplace transform method is applied in the present study and corresponding Green's functions are presented explicitly for beams with various boundaries. The present solutions can be readily reduced to those for others classical beam models by setting corresponding parameters to zero or infinite. Numerical calculations are performed to validate the present solutions and the effects of various important physical parameters are investigated.

  8. The Effects of Towfish Motion on Sidescan Sonar Images: Extension to a Multiple-Beam Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Towfish Motion on Sidescan Sonar Images: Extension to a Multiple -Beam Device Acceso NTIS CRA&I S.D. Anstee u; ,-, o* , J.* ttiicatorn By "By...THE EFFECTS OF TOWFISH MOTION ON SIDESCAN SONAR IMAGES: EXTENSION TO A MULTIPLE -BEAM DEVICE S, S.D. ANSTEE 6 2 9 Nm MRL-TN-660 FEBRUARY 1994 Al DTIC...previously used to estimate the geometrical effects oftowjish motion on single-beam sidescan sonar images is modified to simulate a multiple -beam

  9. Assessment of the effective doses from two dental cone beam CT devices

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, R; Geibel, M-A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This study compares the effective dose for different fields of view (FOVs), resolutions and X-ray parameters from two cone beam CT units: the KaVo 3D (three-dimensional) eXam and the KaVo Pan eXam Plus 3D (KaVo Dental, Biberach, Germany). Methods: Measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in a radiation analog dosimetry head and neck phantom. The calculations of effective doses are based on the ICRP 60 and ICRP 103 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Results: Effective doses from the 3D eXam ranged between 32.8 µSv and 169.8 µSv, and for the Pan eXam Plus effective doses ranged between 40.2 µSv and 183.7 µSv; these were measured using ICRP 103 weighting factors in each case. The increase in effective dose between ICRP 60 and ICRP 103 recommendations averaged 157% for all measurements. Conclusions: Effective doses can be reduced significantly with the choice of lower resolutions and mAs settings as well as smaller FOVs to avoid tissues sensitive to radiation being inside the direct beam. Larger FOVs do not necessarily lead to higher effective doses. PMID:23420855

  10. Assessment of the effective doses from two dental cone beam CT devices.

    PubMed

    Schilling, R; Geibel, M-A

    2013-01-01

    This study compares the effective dose for different fields of view (FOVs), resolutions and X-ray parameters from two cone beam CT units: the KaVo 3D (three-dimensional) eXam and the KaVo Pan eXam Plus 3D (KaVo Dental, Biberach, Germany). Measurements were made using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in a radiation analog dosimetry head and neck phantom. The calculations of effective doses are based on the ICRP 60 and ICRP 103 recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Effective doses from the 3D eXam ranged between 32.8 µSv and 169.8 µSv, and for the Pan eXam Plus effective doses ranged between 40.2 µSv and 183.7 µSv; these were measured using ICRP 103 weighting factors in each case. The increase in effective dose between ICRP 60 and ICRP 103 recommendations averaged 157% for all measurements. Effective doses can be reduced significantly with the choice of lower resolutions and mAs settings as well as smaller FOVs to avoid tissues sensitive to radiation being inside the direct beam. Larger FOVs do not necessarily lead to higher effective doses.

  11. New 100 + Year Road RALE System With T-Beam Foundation Saves Energy and Increases Safety by Reducing Work Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pressler, David

    2007-05-01

    Traffic crashes represents a loss of 2.2 percent of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product a year. By reducing congestion and the number of dangerous construction zones it is possible to increase user safety with fewer accidents. This new system once implemented eliminates many major national road preservation projects, which include replacing or reconstructing the highway pavements over the long period. Other included costs like those of lost time and lost fuel incurred by passenger and freight transportation on the section being reconstructed amount to well over 100 billion dollars a year. All other things being equal, thicker concrete highway pavements will last longer, however, thicker pavement costs more. By utilizing the physics of the T-Beam or the ``floor-joist,'' concept where the upper deck of the highway is supported and reinforced by longitude beams or rails that protrude into the soil, there is a great improvement in the strength of the pavement system. The pavement structure configuration of rails supports and carries vehicle loads, which is transferred ``down-the-road.'' Much like a snowshoe or like a rail bridge this device spreads out the applied stresses over a much larger area and the high strength pavement resists flexing of the concrete. Stress reduction reduces concrete fatigue and this allows the highway to last three to four times as long without major road reconstruction. To cite this abstract, use the following reference: http://meetings.aps.org/link/BAPS.2007.OSS07.P1.2

  12. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the structural, thermal and optical properties of poly(vinyl alcohol) thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouh, S. A.; Bahareth, Radiyah A.

    2013-04-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) polymer was prepared using the casting technique. The obtained PVA thin films have been irradiated with electron beam doses ranging from 20 to 300 kGy. The resultant effect of electron beam irradiation on the structural properties of PVA has been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), while the thermal properties have been investigated using thermo-gravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The onset temperature of decomposition T 0 and activation energy of thermal decomposition E a were calculated, results indicate that the PVA thin film decomposes in one main weight loss stage. Also, the electron beam irradiation in dose range 95-210 kGy led to a more compact structure of the PVA polymer, which resulted in an improvement in its thermal stability with an increase in the activation energy of thermal decomposition. The variation of transition temperatures with electron beam dose has been determined using DTA. The PVA thermograms were characterized by the appearance of an endothermic peak due to melting. In addition, the transmission of the PVA samples and any color changes were studied. The color intensity Δ E was greatly increased with increasing electron beam dose, and was accompanied by a significant increase in the blue color component.

  13. Characterization of the effect of a new commercial transmission detector on radiation therapy beams.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Joey P; Perez-Andujar, Angelica; Morin, Olivier

    2017-04-09

    To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiation therapy beams. A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6-MV, 6-flattening filter free, 10-MV, and 10-flattening filter free beams. Measurements of percentage depth doses, in-plane and cross-plane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired with 3 × 3, 5 × 5, 10 × 10, 20 × 20, and 40 × 40 cm(2) field sizes at 100 cm and 80 cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100, 90, and 80 cm SSD using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers and optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters [OSLDs]). Skin dose was also assessed for various patient sample plans with OSLDs. The percentage depth doses showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for 100 cm SSD (≤4 mm depth of maximum dose difference, <1.2% average profile difference) for all field sizes. At 80 cm SSD, the differences were larger (≤8 mm depth of maximum dose difference, <3% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. Field penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the profile central 80% showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 1.0% (2.6%) and 1.4% (6.3%) for 100 and 80 cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose increase at 100 cm (80 cm) SSD for a 10 × 10 cm(2) field size was <4% (<35%) for all energies. For a 40 × 40 cm(2) field size, this increased to <31% (≤63%). For the sample patient plans, the average skin dose difference was 0.53% (range, -6.6% to 10.4%). The transmission detector has minimal effect on clinically relevant radiation therapy beams for

  14. Multiple Beam Effects on Backscatter and its Saturation in Experiments with Conditions Relevant to Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, Robert

    2010-11-01

    The amplification of light when obliquely intersected by laser beams in a plasma has been analyzed for its relevance to the amplification of backscatter in ignition targets. In the targets for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) where the amplification of forward going beams is now well known and controlled [1], a linear model of the 23 quads of beams that intersect the light scattered from a single quad in the interior of the hohlraum has shown that backscatter re-amplification with additional gain exponents as high as 8 can be produced in some targets designs. This could lead to un-acceptable energy coupling if not mitigated by wave saturation or careful target design. A series of experiments [2], and 2D VPIC and fluid simulations [3] have been carried out to demonstrate the following key aspects of the model. Re-amplification of light with wavelengths corresponding to SRS from individual beams, by a single pump beam has been demonstrated in normalized plasma conditions similar to some ignition target designs. Saturation of this re-amplification has been observed to be in good agreement with 2D PIC models of non-linear kinetic effects such as trapping and subsequent wave front bowing, which limits the scattered energy to ˜1% of the pump energy in the cases studied. Re-amplification of light with wavelengths corresponding to SBS by two pumps is shown experimentally to lead to scattered energy that is well above that of a single pump as expected. SRS scatter in ignition scale hohlraums is shown to increase with increased density in the beam crossing region. The relevance of the work to ignition targets will also be discussed. [4pt] [1] P. Michel et al., Physics of Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010) [0pt] [2] R. K. Kirkwood et al., submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. and in preparation. [0pt] [3] Y. Lin L. Yin, B. J. Albright, K. J. Bowers, W. Daughton, and H. A. Rose, Phys. Plasmas, 15, 013109 (2008). and in preparation.

  15. The effect of polarization in passive coherent beam combining of fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Hung-Sheng; Leger, James R.; Huszar, Emese; Nilsson, Johan; Sahu, Jayanta

    2014-03-01

    A Yb-doped, dual-core, double-clad, polarization-maintaining fiber is used to demonstrate passive coherent beam combining. A homemade Dammann grating is employed as a passive beam-combining optical element. Self-phasing is observed in this laser system, where we attribute the self-phasing behavior to the Kramers-Kronig effect. We experimentally demonstrate the importance of polarization on coherent beam combining efficiency as well as on Kramers-Kronig induced self-phasing.

  16. Calculating Variations in Biological Effectiveness for a 62 MeV Proton Beam

    PubMed Central

    Carante, Mario Pietro; Ballarini, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    A biophysical model of radiation-induced cell death and chromosome aberrations [called BIophysical ANalysis of Cell death and chromosome Aberrations (BIANCA)] was further developed and applied to therapeutic protons. The model assumes a pivotal role of DNA cluster damage, which can lead to clonogenic cell death following three main steps: (i) a DNA “cluster lesion” (CL) produces two independent chromosome fragments; (ii) fragment mis-rejoining within a threshold distance d gives rise to chromosome aberrations; (iii) certain aberration types (dicentrics, rings, and large deletions) lead to clonogenic inactivation. The yield of CLs and the probability, f, that a chromosome fragment remains un-rejoined even if other fragment(s) are present within d, were adjustable parameters. The model, implemented as a MC code providing simulated dose–responses directly comparable with experimental data, was applied to pristine and modulated Bragg peaks of the proton beam used to treat eye melanoma at INFN-LNS in Catania, Italy. Experimental survival curves for AG01522 cells exposed to the Catania beam were reproduced, supporting the model assumptions. Furthermore, cell death and chromosome aberrations at different depths along a spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) dose profile were predicted. Both endpoints showed an increase along the plateau, and high levels of damage were found also beyond the distal dose fall-off, due to low-energy protons. Cell death and chromosome aberrations were also predicted for V79 cells, in the same irradiation scenario as that used for AG01522 cells. In line with other studies, this work indicated that assuming a constant relative biological effectiveness (RBE) along a proton SOBP may be sub-optimal. Furthermore, it provided qualitative and quantitative evaluations of the dependence of the beam effectiveness on the considered endpoint and dose. More generally, this work represents an example of therapeutic beam characterization avoiding the use of

  17. Effect of secondary ions on the electron beam optics in the Recycler Electron Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Prost, L.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Antiprotons in Fermilab's Recycler ring are cooled by a 4.3 MeV, 0.1-0.5 A DC electron beam (as well as by a stochastic cooling system). The unique combination of the relativistic energy ({gamma} = 9.49), an Ampere-range DC beam, and a relatively weak focusing makes the cooling efficiency particularly sensitive to ion neutralization. A capability to clear ions was recently implemented by way of interrupting the electron beam for 1-30 {micro}s with a repetition rate of up to 40 Hz. The cooling properties of the electron beam were analyzed with drag rate measurements and showed that accumulated ions significantly affect the beam optics. For a beam current of 0.3 A, the longitudinal cooling rate was increased by factor of {approx}2 when ions were removed.

  18. Evaluation of thermal effects on the beam quality of disk laser with unstable resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayganmanesh, Mahdi; Beirami, Reza

    2017-01-01

    In this paper thermal effects of the disk active medium and associated effects on the beam quality of laser are investigated. Using Collins integral and iterative method, transverse mode of an unstable resonator including a Yb:YAG active medium in disk geometry is calculated. After that the beam quality of the laser is calculated based on the generalized beam characterization method. Thermal lensing of the disk is calculated based on the OPD (Optical Path Difference) concept. Five factors influencing the OPD including temperature gradient, disk thermal expansion, photo-elastic effect, electronic lens and disk deformation are considered in our calculations. The calculations show that the effect of disk deformation factor on the quality of laser beam in the resonator is strong. However the total effect of all the thermal factors on the internal beam quality is fewer. Also it is shown that thermal effects degrade the output power, beam profile and beam quality of the output laser beam severely. As well the magnitude of each of affecting factors is evaluated distinctly.

  19. Effects of the Amount and Shape of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Strengthening Elements on the Ductile Behavior of Reinforced Concrete Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam

    2014-09-01

    A series of beam tests were performed to evaluate the ductility of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) elements. A total of nine RC beams were produced and loaded up to failure in three-point bending under deflection control. In addition, the amount and shape of the CFRP elements (plates/sheets) were considered as the key test variables. Test results revealed that the strengthening with CFRP elements in the width direction was more effective than the strengthening across their height. The energy method used in an analysis showed that the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP plates were half or less than half of the energy ratio of the beams strengthened with CFRP sheets. In addition, the ductility of the beams decreased as the strengthening ratio of the CFRP elements increased.

  20. Effects of nonlinear damping on random response of beams to acoustic loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mei, C.; Prasad, C. B.

    1986-01-01

    Effects of both nonlinear damping and large-deflection are included in the theoretical analysis in an attempt to explain the experimental phenomena of aircraft panels excited at high sound pressure levels; that is the broadening of the strain response peak and the increase of the modal frequency. Two nonlinear damping models are considered in the analysis using a single-mode approach. Mean square maximum deflection, mean square maximum strain, and spectral density function of maximum strain for simply supported and clamped beams are obtained. It is demonstrated that nonlinear damping contributes significantly to the broadening of the response peak and to the mean square maximum deflection and strain.

  1. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams.

    PubMed

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities.

  2. Effects of energy spectrum on dose distribution calculations for high energy electron beams

    PubMed Central

    Toutaoui, Abdelkader; Khelassi-Toutaoui, Nadia; Brahimi, Zakia; Chami, Ahmed Chafik

    2009-01-01

    In an early work we have demonstrated the possibility of using Monte Carlo generated pencil beams for 3D electron beam dose calculations. However, in this model the electron beam was considered as monoenergetic and the effects of the energy spectrum were taken into account by correction factors, derived from measuring central-axis depth dose curves. In the present model, the electron beam is considered as polyenergetic and the pencil beam distribution of a clinical electron beam, of a given nominal energy, is represented as a linear combination of Monte Carlo monoenergetic pencil beams. The coefficients of the linear combination describe the energy spectrum of the clinical electron beam, and are chosen to provide the best-fit between the calculated and measured central axis depth dose, in water. The energy spectrum is determined by the constrained least square method. The angular distribution of the clinical electron beam is determined by in-air penumbra measurements. The predictions of this algorithm agree very well with the measurements in the region near the surface, and the discrepancies between the measured and calculated dose distributions, behind 3D heterogeneities, are reduced to less than 10%. We have demonstrated a new algorithm for 3D electron beam dose calculations, which takes into account the energy spectra. Results indicate that the use of this algorithm leads to a better modeling of dose distributions downstream, from complex heterogeneities. PMID:20126560

  3. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CD efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.

  4. Effective dose span of ten different cone beam CT devices.

    PubMed

    Rottke, D; Patzelt, S; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation and reduction of dose are important issues. Since cone beam CT (CBCT) has been established now not just in dentistry, the number of acquired examinations continues to rise. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to compare the doses of available devices on the market owing to different exposition parameters, volumes and geometries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spans of effective doses (EDs) of ten different CBCT devices. 48 thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed in 24 sites in a RANDO(®) head phantom. Protocols with lowest exposition parameters and protocols with highest exposition parameters were performed for each of the ten devices. The ED was calculated from the measured energy doses according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations for each protocol and device, and the statistical values were evaluated afterwards. The calculation of the ED resulted in values between 17.2 µSv and 396 µSv for the ten devices. The mean values for protocols with lowest and highest exposition parameters were 31.6 µSv and 209 µSv, respectively. It was not the aim of this study to evaluate the image quality depending on different exposition parameters but to define the spans of EDs in which different CBCT devices work. There is a wide span of ED for different CBCT devices depending on the selected exposition parameters, required spatial resolution and many other factors.

  5. Effective dose span of ten different cone beam CT devices

    PubMed Central

    Rottke, D; Patzelt, S; Poxleitner, P; Schulze, D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation and reduction of dose are important issues. Since cone beam CT (CBCT) has been established now not just in dentistry, the number of acquired examinations continues to rise. Unfortunately, it is very difficult to compare the doses of available devices on the market owing to different exposition parameters, volumes and geometries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the spans of effective doses (EDs) of ten different CBCT devices. Methods: 48 thermoluminescent dosemeters were placed in 24 sites in a RANDO® head phantom. Protocols with lowest exposition parameters and protocols with highest exposition parameters were performed for each of the ten devices. The ED was calculated from the measured energy doses according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations for each protocol and device, and the statistical values were evaluated afterwards. Results: The calculation of the ED resulted in values between 17.2 µSv and 396 µSv for the ten devices. The mean values for protocols with lowest and highest exposition parameters were 31.6 µSv and 209 µSv, respectively. Conclusions: It was not the aim of this study to evaluate the image quality depending on different exposition parameters but to define the spans of EDs in which different CBCT devices work. There is a wide span of ED for different CBCT devices depending on the selected exposition parameters, required spatial resolution and many other factors. PMID:23584925

  6. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; ...

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CDmore » efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.« less

  7. The effect of beam directivity on the inspection of anisotropic materials using ultrasonic arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, C. J. L.; Wilcox, P. D.

    2012-05-01

    The beam directivity from an ultrasonic transducer in isotropic materials is well documented. However, beam directivities in elastically anisotropic materials and their effect on ultrasonic NDE inspection has been investigated far less extensively. In this paper, analytical and numerical finite element models are developed to predict the beam directivity in a single crystal nickel-based superalloy. This material is highly anisotropic and is used widely in the gas-turbine industry. The developed models are used to investigate the effect of the crystallographic orientation on the beam directivity. In turn, the effect of beam directivity on defect detection sensitivity and characterization capability using an ultrasonic array is demonstrated. It is shown that the effect is particularly important for the accurate sizing of small defects.

  8. Effect of ultrarelativistic laser beam filamentation on third harmonic spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Ruchika; Sharma, Prerana; Chauhan, Prashant K.; Rafat, M.; Sharma, R. P.

    2009-04-01

    This paper investigates the generation of plasma wave and third harmonic generation in a hot collision less plasma by an intense laser beam. On the account of the V→×B→ force, a plasma wave at 2ω0 (here ω0 is the pump laser frequency) is generated. The solution of the pump laser beam has been obtained within the nonparaxial ray approximation. Filamentary structures of the laser beam are observed due to relativistic nonlinearity. By expanding the eikonal and the other relevant quantities up to the fourth power of r it is observed that the focusing of the laser beams become fast in the nonparaxial region. Interaction of the plasma wave with the incident laser beam generates the third harmonics. The mechanism of the plasma wave, third harmonic generation, and the parameters, which govern the third harmonic yield and hence the spectrum of third harmonics, have been studied in detail. Correlation of the third harmonic spectrum with the filamentation has been pointed out. Therefore, the broadening of the third harmonic spectra can be used as a diagnostic tool to study the presence of the filamentation of laser beams in laser plasma experiments.

  9. Effect of ultrarelativistic laser beam filamentation on third harmonic spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ruchika; Rafat, M.; Sharma, Prerana; Chauhan, Prashant K.; Sharma, R. P.

    2009-04-15

    This paper investigates the generation of plasma wave and third harmonic generation in a hot collision less plasma by an intense laser beam. On the account of the V-vectorxB-vector force, a plasma wave at 2{omega}{sub 0} (here {omega}{sub 0} is the pump laser frequency) is generated. The solution of the pump laser beam has been obtained within the nonparaxial ray approximation. Filamentary structures of the laser beam are observed due to relativistic nonlinearity. By expanding the eikonal and the other relevant quantities up to the fourth power of r it is observed that the focusing of the laser beams become fast in the nonparaxial region. Interaction of the plasma wave with the incident laser beam generates the third harmonics. The mechanism of the plasma wave, third harmonic generation, and the parameters, which govern the third harmonic yield and hence the spectrum of third harmonics, have been studied in detail. Correlation of the third harmonic spectrum with the filamentation has been pointed out. Therefore, the broadening of the third harmonic spectra can be used as a diagnostic tool to study the presence of the filamentation of laser beams in laser plasma experiments.

  10. Interactive effects of pests increase seed yield.

    PubMed

    Gagic, Vesna; Riggi, Laura Ga; Ekbom, Barbara; Malsher, Gerard; Rusch, Adrien; Bommarco, Riccardo

    2016-04-01

    Loss in seed yield and therefore decrease in plant fitness due to simultaneous attacks by multiple herbivores is not necessarily additive, as demonstrated in evolutionary studies on wild plants. However, it is not clear how this transfers to crop plants that grow in very different conditions compared to wild plants. Nevertheless, loss in crop seed yield caused by any single pest is most often studied in isolation although crop plants are attacked by many pests that can cause substantial yield losses. This is especially important for crops able to compensate and even overcompensate for the damage. We investigated the interactive impacts on crop yield of four insect pests attacking different plant parts at different times during the cropping season. In 15 oilseed rape fields in Sweden, we estimated the damage caused by seed and stem weevils, pollen beetles, and pod midges. Pest pressure varied drastically among fields with very low correlation among pests, allowing us to explore interactive impacts on yield from attacks by multiple species. The plant damage caused by each pest species individually had, as expected, either no, or a negative impact on seed yield and the strongest negative effect was caused by pollen beetles. However, seed yield increased when plant damage caused by both seed and stem weevils was high, presumably due to the joint plant compensatory reaction to insect attack leading to overcompensation. Hence, attacks by several pests can change the impact on yield of individual pest species. Economic thresholds based on single species, on which pest management decisions currently rely, may therefore result in economically suboptimal choices being made and unnecessary excessive use of insecticides.

  11. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kyung, Se Jin; Park, Jae Beom; Park, Byung Jae; Min, Kyung Seok; Lee, June Hee; Yeom, Geun Young; Shin, Yong Sook; Park, Chong Yun

    2007-04-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/{mu}m and the emission field at 1 mA/cm{sup 2} decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/{mu}m. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters.

  12. Formation of pn-junction with stable n-doping in graphene field effect transistors using e-beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Anwar, Nadia; Siddique, Salma; Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Hussain, Tassadaq

    2017-07-01

    Graphene an allotrope of carbon having outstanding electronic properties can be used as an alternative material for silicon based technology. We report the influence of electron beam irradiations by exposing graphene device to different doses ranges from 1500 μC/cm2-4500 μC/cm2. The intensity of D peaks obtained from the Raman spectra increases gradually with the increase of e-beam dosage, which indicates that e-beam introduced localized defects in graphene. The effect of irradiations on graphene FET is also performed by studying electrical transport measurements of the device, indicating n-type doping. A decrease in charge carrier mobility upon exposure to e-beam irradiation reveals the strong effect of induced defects. We further investigated that by exposing selected region of graphene to e-beam irradiations results in the formation of pn-junction, which enable us to fabricate graphene based pn-junctions that could be beneficial for future electronics.

  13. Application of nonlocal models to nano beams. Part I: Axial length scale effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Sik

    2014-10-01

    Applicability of nonlocal models to nano-beams is discussed in terms of physical implications via the similarity between a nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli (EB) beam theory and a classical Rankine-Timoshenko (RT) beam theory. The nonlocal EB beam model, Eringen's model, is briefly reviewed and the classical RT beam theory is recast by the primary variables of the EB model. A careful comparison of these two models reveals that the scale parameter used to the Eringen's model has a strike resemblance to the shear flexibility in the RT model. This implies that the nonlocal model employed in literature consider the axial length scale effect only. In addition, the paradox for a cantilevered nano-beam subjected to tip shear force is clearly explained by finding appropriate displacement prescribed boundary conditions.

  14. Boundary effects in finite size plasmonic crystals: focusing and routing of plasmonic beams for optical communications.

    PubMed

    Benetou, M I; Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Thomsen, B C; Bayvel, P; Zayats, A V

    2015-11-06

    Plasmonic crystals, which consist of periodic arrangements of surface features at a metal-dielectric interface, allow the manipulation of optical information in the form of surface plasmon polaritons. Here we investigate the excitation and propagation of plasmonic beams in and around finite size plasmonic crystals at telecom wavelengths, highlighting the effects of the crystal boundary shape and illumination conditions. Significant differences in broad plasmonic beam generation by crystals of different shapes are demonstrated, while for narrow beams, the propagation from a crystal onto the smooth metal film is less sensitive to the crystal boundary shape. We show that by controlling the boundary shape, the size and the excitation beam parameters, directional control of propagating plasmonic modes and their behaviour such as angular beam splitting, focusing power and beam width can be efficiently achieved. This provides a promising route for robust and alignment-independent integration of plasmonic crystals with optical communication components.

  15. Effect of the electron lenses on the RHIC proton beam closed orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Luo, Y.; Pikin, A.; Okamura, M.; Fischer, W.; Montag, C.; Gupta, R.; Hock, J.; Jain, A.; Raparia, D.

    2011-02-01

    We are designing two electron lenses (E-lens) to compensate for the large beam-beam tune spread from proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). They will be installed at RHIC IR10. The transverse fields of the E-lenses bending solenoids and the fringe field of the main solenoids will shift the proton beam. We calculate the transverse kicks that the proton beam receives in the electron lens via Opera. Then, after incorporating the simplified E-lens lattice in the RHIC lattice, we obtain the closed orbit effect with the Simtrack Code.

  16. Effect of Geometric Azimuthal Asymmetries of PPM Stack on Electron Beam Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.; Heinen, Vernon (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) beam optics model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA. The model includes an electron beam with initial transverse velocity distribution focused by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack. All components of the model are simulated in three dimensions allowing several azimuthally asymmetric traveling wave tube (TWT) characteristics to be investigated for the first time. These include C-magnets, shunts, and magnet misalignment and their effects on electron beam behavior. The development of the model is presented and 3D TWT electron beam characteristics are compared in the absence of and under the influence of the azimuthally asymmetric characteristics described.

  17. Polarization of a probe laser beam due to nonlinear QED effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakeri, Soroush; Kalantari, Seyed Zafarollah; Xue, She-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Nonlinear QED interactions induce different polarization properties on a given probe beam. We consider the polarization effects caused by the photon-photon interaction in laser experiments, when a laser beam propagates through a constant magnetic field or collides with another laser beam. We solve the quantum Boltzmann equation within the framework of the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian for both time-dependent and constant background field to explore the time evolution of the Stokes parameters Q, U, and V describing polarization. Assuming an initially linearly polarized probe laser beam, we also calculate the induced ellipticity and rotation of the polarization plane.

  18. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molvik, A. W.; Cohen, R. H.; Lund, S. M.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Lee, E. P.

    2002-05-01

    Heavy-ion accelerators for HIF will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long pulses. This will lead to beam ions impacting walls: liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the approximately 4 kV ion beam potential. Diagnostics are being developed tto measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles, as well as their effect on the ion beam.

  19. Effect of Geometric Azimuthal Asymmetrics of PPM Stack on Electron Beam Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kory, Carol L.

    2000-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) beam optics model has been developed using the electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) code MAFIA. The model includes an electron beam with initial transverse velocity distribution focused by a periodic permanent magnet (PPM) stack. All components of the model are simulated in three dimensions allowing several azimuthally asymmetric traveling wave tube (TWT) characteristics to be investigated for the first time. These include C-magnets, shunts and magnet misalignment and their effects on electron beam behavior. The development of the model is presented and 3D TWT electron beam characteristics are compared in the absence of and under the influence of the azimuthally asymmetric characteristics described.

  20. Study on elucidation of bactericidal effects induced by laser beam irradiation Measurement of dynamic stress on laser irradiated surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furumoto, Tatsuaki; Kasai, Atsushi; Tachiya, Hiroshi; Hosokawa, Akira; Ueda, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    In dental treatment, many types of laser beams have been used for various surgical treatments, and the influences of laser beam irradiation on bactericidal effect have been investigated. However, most of the work has been performed by irradiating to an agar plate with the colony of bacteria, and very few studies have been reported on the physical mechanism of bactericidal effects induced by laser beam irradiation. This paper deals with the measurement of dynamic stress induced in extracted human enamel by irradiation with Nd:YAG laser beams. Laser beams can be delivered to the enamel surface through a quartz optical fiber. Dynamic stress induced in the specimen using elastic wave propagation in a cylindrical long bar made of aluminum alloy is measured. Laser induced stress intensity is evaluated from dynamic strain measured by small semiconductor strain gauges. Carbon powder and titanium dioxide powder were applied to the human enamel surface as absorbents. Additionally, the phenomenon of laser beam irradiation to the human enamel surface was observed with an ultrahigh speed video camera. Results showed that a plasma was generated on the enamel surface during laser beam irradiation, and the melted tissues were scattered in the vertical direction against the enamel surface with a mushroom-like wave. Averaged scattering velocity of the melted tissues was 25.2 m/s. Induced dynamic stress on the enamel surface increased with increasing laser energy in each absorbent. Induced dynamic stresses with titanium dioxide powder were superior to those with carbon powder. Induced dynamic stress was related to volume of prepared cavity, and induced stress for the removal of unit volume of human enamel was 0.03 Pa/mm 3.

  1. Effect of electron beam irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties of aluminum based epoxy composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visakh, P. M.; Nazarenko, O. B.; Sarath Chandran, C.; Melnikova, T. V.; Nazarenko, S. Yu.; Kim, J.-C.

    2017-07-01

    The epoxy resins are widely used in nuclear and aerospace industries. The certain properties of epoxy resins as well as the resistance to radiation can be improved by the incorporation of different fillers. This study examines the effect of electron beam irradiation on the thermal and mechanical properties of the epoxy composites filled with aluminum nanoparticles at percentage of 0.35 wt%. The epoxy composites were exposed to the irradiation doses of 30, 100 and 300 kGy using electron beam generated by the linear electron accelerator ELU-4. The effects of the doses on thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites were investigated by the methods of thermal gravimetric analysis, tensile test, and dynamic mechanical analysis. The results revealed that the studied epoxy composites showed good radiation resistance. The thermal and mechanical properties of the aluminum based epoxy composites increased with increasing the irradiation dose up to 100 kGy and decreased with further increasing the dose.

  2. Effect of continuous longitudinal glass fiber reinforcement on the cantilever beam strength of particulate filler composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hun; Christopher Watts, David

    2006-11-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of continuous longitudinal glass fibers on the bending properties of particulate filler composite resins. Four particulate filler composite resins (Tetric Ceram, Point 4, Z250, P60) and one continuous longitudinal glass fiber material (everStick) as reinforcement were selected. Three groups of beam specimens (5 x 5 x 25 mm) for each material were fabricated. For group I, specimens were not reinforced with fibers and were tested as the control group. For group II, specimens were reinforced with 2 layers of the fiber (6.5 vol%), and for group III with 3 layers (9.8 vol%). The specimens were stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days. One end of the beam specimen (14 mm) was fixed in a device, while the other (11 mm) was left free. Cantilever beam strength was measured using a universal testing machine, loading at a distance of 10 mm from the upright support through a steel ball of 2 mm diameter. The loads and deflection at initial failure and at final failure for each specimen were recorded. The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and the multiple comparison Scheffé test (alpha = 0.05). The bending moments of particulate filler composite at final failure, when reinforced with 3 layers of the glass fibers (272.4-325.2 Ncm), were significantly higher than for the composites without fibers. However, the materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers were not significantly different from the materials reinforced with 2 layers of fibers (234.1-282.6 Ncm). The materials reinforced with 3 layers of fibers exhibited severe deflection at final failure, ranging from 2.8 mm to 3.4 mm. The bending moments of the particulate composites increased linearly with the weight fraction of the fillers, but there was no linear correlation between them when reinforced with fibers. The cantilever beam strength of the particulate filler composites increased significantly when layers of fibers were added and as the

  3. Exergames: Increasing Physical Activity through Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudella, Jennifer L.; Butz, Jennifer V.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States, educators must consider new ways to increase physical activity in an effort to address obesity. There are a variety of ways educators can increase physical activity in the classroom, and exergames--video games that require physical movement in order to play--are a modern-day approach to…

  4. Exergames: Increasing Physical Activity through Effective Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudella, Jennifer L.; Butz, Jennifer V.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the growing obesity epidemic in the United States, educators must consider new ways to increase physical activity in an effort to address obesity. There are a variety of ways educators can increase physical activity in the classroom, and exergames--video games that require physical movement in order to play--are a modern-day approach to…

  5. Effect of CFRP Schemes on the Flexural Behavior of RC Beams Modeled by Using a Nonlinear Finite-element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Rousan, R. Z.

    2015-09-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the effect of the number and schemes of carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets on the capacity of bending moment, the ultimate displacement, the ultimate tensile strain of CFRP, the yielding moment, concrete compression strain, and the energy absorption of RC beams and to provide useful relationships that can be effectively utilized to determine the required number of CFRP sheets for a necessary increase in the flexural strength of the beams without a major loss in their ductility. To accomplish this, various RC beams, identical in their geometric and reinforcement details and having different number and configurations of CFRP sheets, are modeled and analyzed using the ANSYS software and a nonlinear finite-element analysis.

  6. Effect of buckling on the thermal response of microelectromechanical beam resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Hosono, S.; Nagai, N.; Hirakawa, K.

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated the thermal response of the doubly clamped microelectromechanical (MEMS) beam resonators as a function of an input heating power. When a small amount of heat (<1 mW) is applied to the MEMS beam, reduction in resonance frequency is observed. As the heating power is further increased, however, the resonance frequency levels off and starts to increase, which originates from the buckling of the beam. We find that the slope of the frequency increase at large input powers is 2-3 times steeper than that of the frequency decrease at small input powers and that the buckled device can take larger heating powers without degrading the linearity. These observations suggest that both the thermal sensitivity and the dynamic range can be improved by introducing a proper amount of buckling. Using this insight, we have fabricated a buckled MEMS beam resonator by using a strained InxGa1-xAs (x = 0.001) beam structure on a GaAs substrate. We have found that the frequency responsivity of the InxGa1-xAs beam sample is about 3 times higher than that of the GaAs beam sample, demonstrating that the introduction of buckling is useful for achieving higher thermal sensitivity for the MEMS beam resonators.

  7. Evaluation of some scale effects in the response and failure of composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Morton, John

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of using scale model testing for predicting full-scale behavior of composite beams loaded in tension and flexure was investigated. Classical laws of similitude were applied to fabricate and test replica model beams to identify scaling effects in the load response, strength, and mode of failure. Experiments were conducted using graphite-epoxy composite beams having different laminate stacking sequences and a range of scaled sizes. Results indicated that the elastic response of scaled composite beams was independent of specimen size. However, a significant scale effect in strength was observed. In addition, a transition in failure mode was observed among scaled beams of certain laminate stacking sequences. Weibull statistical and fracture mechanics based models were applied to predict the strength scale effect since standard failure criteria cannot account for the influence of absolute specimen size in failure.

  8. Effect of basic physical parameters to control plasma meniscus and beam halo formation in negative ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, K.; Okuda, S.; Nishioka, S.; Hatayama, A.

    2013-09-14

    Our previous study shows that the curvature of the plasma meniscus causes the beam halo in the negative ion sources: the negative ions extracted from the periphery of the meniscus are over-focused in the extractor due to the electrostatic lens effect, and consequently become the beam halo. In this article, the detail physics of the plasma meniscus and beam halo formation is investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is shown that the basic physical parameters such as the H{sup −} extraction voltage and the effective electron confinement time significantly affect the formation of the plasma meniscus and the resultant beam halo since the penetration of electric field for negative ion extraction depends on these physical parameters. Especially, the electron confinement time depends on the characteristic time of electron escape along the magnetic field as well as the characteristic time of electron diffusion across the magnetic field. The plasma meniscus penetrates deeply into the source plasma region when the effective electron confinement time is short. In this case, the curvature of the plasma meniscus becomes large, and consequently the fraction of the beam halo increases.

  9. Effect of femtosecond laser beam angle on bond strength of zirconia-resin cement.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Yusuf Z; Kepceoglu, Abdullah; Yavuz, Tevfik; Aslan, Muhammed A; Demirtag, Zulfikar; Kılıc, Hamdi S; Usumez, Aslihan

    2015-11-01

    Yttrium-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) ceramic is widely used as an all-ceramic core material because of its enhanced mechanical and aesthetic properties. The bond strength of Y-TZP restorations affects long-term success; hence, surface treatment is required on ceramic boundaries. This study evaluated the effect of different laser beam angles on Y-TZP-resin cement shear bond strength (SBS). Forty plates of Y-TZP ceramics were randomly assigned to four groups (n = 10). A femtosecond amplifier laser pulse was applied on Y-TZP surface with different incidence angles (90°, 75°, 60°, 45°). The resin cement was adhered onto the zirconia surfaces. The SBS of each sample was measured using universal testing machine at crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The SBS was analyzed through one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA)/Tukey tests. The results showed that the degree of laser beam angle affects the SBS of resin cement to Y-TZP. The laser beam was applied to a surface with a 45° angle which resulted in significantly higher SBS (18.2 ± 1.43 MPa) than other groups (at 90° angulation (10.79 ± 1.8 MPa), at 75° (13.48 ± 1.2 MPa) and at 60° (15.85 ± 0.81 MPa); p < 0.001). This study shows that decreasing of the angle between the ceramic surface and the laser beam increased the SBS between the resin cement and the ceramic material, as well as the orifice.

  10. Introduction to Ion Beam Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Martisikova, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Presently, ion beam therapy reaches an increasing interest within the field of radiation therapy, which is caused by the promising clinical results obtained in the last decades. Ion beams enable higher dose conformation to the tumor and increased sparing of the surrounding tissue in comparison to the standard therapy using high energy photons. Heavy ions, like carbon, offer in addition increased biological effectiveness, which makes them suitable for treatment of radioresistant tumors. This contribution gives an overview over the physical and biological properties of ion beams. Common fundamental principles of ion beam therapy are summarized and differences between standard therapy with high energy photons, proton and carbon ion therapy are discussed. The technologies used for the beam production and delivery are introduced, with emphasis to the differences between passive and active beam delivery systems. The last part concentrates on the quality assurance in ion therapy. Specialties of dosimetry in medical ion beams are discussed.

  11. Effect of Scanning Beam for Superficial Dose in Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Moskvin, Vadim P; Estabrook, Neil C; Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam delivery technology is under development to minimize the scanning spot size for uniform dose to target, but it is also known that the superficial dose could be as high as the dose at Bragg peak for narrow and small proton beams. The objective of this study is to explore the characteristics of dose distribution at shallow depths using Monte Carlo simulation with the FLUKA code for uniform scanning (US) and discrete spot scanning (DSS) proton beams. The results show that the superficial dose for DSS is relatively high compared to US. Additionally, DSS delivers a highly heterogeneous dose to the irradiated surface for comparable doses at Bragg peak. Our simulation shows that the superficial dose can become as high as the Bragg peak when the diameter of the proton beam is reduced. This may compromise the advantage of proton beam therapy for sparing normal tissue, making skin dose a limiting factor for the clinical use of DSS. Finally, the clinical advantage of DSS may not be essential for treating uniform dose across a large target, as in craniospinal irradiation (CSI).

  12. Self-trapping of optical beams through thermophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lamhot, Yuval; Barak, Assaf; Peleg, Or; Segev, Mordechai

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate, theoretically and experimentally, self-trapping of optical beams in nanoparticle suspensions by virtue of thermophoresis. We use light to control the local concentration of nanoparticles, and increase their density at the center of the optical beam, thereby increasing the effective refractive index in the beam vicinity, causing the beam to self-trap.

  13. The effect of self-induced electric field on Langmuir turbulence formed by a steadily injected electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zharkova, Valentina; Siversky, Taras

    We investigated the stability of a steadily injected electron beam with lower energy knee and its interaction with the ambient plasma via a generation of Langmuir turbulence at various depths of flaring atmospheres. The solutions are sought of simultaneous Fokker-Planck and wave diffusion equations for the atmospheres being a result of hydrodynamic response to electron beam injection. We identify a few time and length scales of the increased Langmuir turbulence and the effect of self-induced electric field on the level of this turbulence at different atmospheric levels.

  14. Maximizing the biological effect of proton dose delivered with scanned beams via inhomogeneous daily dose distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng Chuan; Giantsoudi, Drosoula; Grassberger, Clemens; Goldberg, Saveli; Niemierko, Andrzej; Paganetti, Harald; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Trofimov, Alexei

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Biological effect of radiation can be enhanced with hypofractionation, localized dose escalation, and, in particle therapy, with optimized distribution of linear energy transfer (LET). The authors describe a method to construct inhomogeneous fractional dose (IFD) distributions, and evaluate the potential gain in the therapeutic effect from their delivery in proton therapy delivered by pencil beam scanning. Methods: For 13 cases of prostate cancer, the authors considered hypofractionated courses of 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. (All doses denoted in Gy include the proton's mean relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 1.1.) Two types of plans were optimized using two opposed lateral beams to deliver a uniform dose of 3 Gy per fraction to the target by scanning: (1) in conventional full-target plans (FTP), each beam irradiated the entire gland, (2) in split-target plans (STP), beams irradiated only the respective proximal hemispheres (prostate split sagittally). Inverse planning yielded intensity maps, in which discrete position control points of the scanned beam (spots) were assigned optimized intensity values. FTP plans preferentially required a higher intensity of spots in the distal part of the target, while STP, by design, employed proximal spots. To evaluate the utility of IFD delivery, IFD plans were generated by rearranging the spot intensities from FTP or STP intensity maps, separately as well as combined using a variety of mixing weights. IFD courses were designed so that, in alternating fractions, one of the hemispheres of the prostate would receive a dose boost and the other receive a lower dose, while the total physical dose from the IFD course was roughly uniform across the prostate. IFD plans were normalized so that the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of rectum and bladder did not increase, compared to the baseline FTP plan, which irradiated the prostate uniformly in every fraction. An EUD-based model was then applied to estimate tumor

  15. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and out-of-field cell survival responses to passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton beam deliveries.

    PubMed

    Butterworth, Karl T; McGarry, Conor K; Clasie, Ben; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Schuemann, Jan; Depauw, Nicolas; Tang, Shikui; McMahon, Stephen J; Schettino, Giuseppe; O'Sullivan, Joe M; Lu, Hsaio-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; Paganetti, Harald; Hounsell, Alan R; Held, Kathryn D; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-10-21

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of passive scattered (PS) and pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton beam delivery techniques for uniform beam configurations was determined by clonogenic survival. The radiobiological impact of modulated beam configurations on cell survival occurring in- or out-of-field for both delivery techniques was determined with intercellular communication intact or physically inhibited. Cell survival responses were compared to those observed using a 6 MV photon beam produced with a linear accelerator. DU-145 cells showed no significant difference in survival response to proton beams delivered by PS and PBS or 6 MV photons taking into account a RBE of 1.1 for protons at the centre of the spread out Bragg peak. Significant out-of-field effects similar to those observed for 6 MV photons were observed for both PS and PBS proton deliveries with cell survival decreasing to 50-60% survival for scattered doses of 0.05 and 0.03 Gy for passive scattered and pencil beam scanned beams respectively. The observed out-of-field responses were shown to be dependent on intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a similar RBE between passive and actively scanned proton beams and confirm that out-of-field effects may be important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated photon and proton fields.

  16. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and out-of-field cell survival responses to passive scattering and pencil beam scanning proton beam deliveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butterworth, Karl T.; McGarry, Conor K.; Clasie, Ben; Carabe-Fernandez, Alejandro; Schuemann, Jan; Depauw, Nicolas; Tang, Shikui; McMahon, Stephen J.; Schettino, Giuseppe; O'Sullivan, Joe M.; Lu, Hsaio-Ming; Kooy, Hanne; Paganetti, Harald; Hounsell, Alan R.; Held, Kathryn D.; Prise, Kevin M.

    2012-10-01

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of passive scattered (PS) and pencil beam scanned (PBS) proton beam delivery techniques for uniform beam configurations was determined by clonogenic survival. The radiobiological impact of modulated beam configurations on cell survival occurring in- or out-of-field for both delivery techniques was determined with intercellular communication intact or physically inhibited. Cell survival responses were compared to those observed using a 6 MV photon beam produced with a linear accelerator. DU-145 cells showed no significant difference in survival response to proton beams delivered by PS and PBS or 6 MV photons taking into account a RBE of 1.1 for protons at the centre of the spread out Bragg peak. Significant out-of-field effects similar to those observed for 6 MV photons were observed for both PS and PBS proton deliveries with cell survival decreasing to 50-60% survival for scattered doses of 0.05 and 0.03 Gy for passive scattered and pencil beam scanned beams respectively. The observed out-of-field responses were shown to be dependent on intercellular communication between the in- and out-of-field cell populations. These data demonstrate, for the first time, a similar RBE between passive and actively scanned proton beams and confirm that out-of-field effects may be important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated photon and proton fields

  17. Dynamic Characteristics of Micro-Beams Considering the Effect of Flexible Supports

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Zuo-Yang; Zhang, Wen-Ming; Meng, Guang

    2013-01-01

    Normally, the boundaries are assumed to allow small deflections and moments for MEMS beams with flexible supports. The non-ideal boundary conditions have a significant effect on the qualitative dynamical behavior. In this paper, by employing the principle of energy equivalence, rigorous theoretical solutions of the tangential and rotational equivalent stiffness are derived based on the Boussinesq's and Cerruti's displacement equations. The non-dimensional differential partial equation of the motion, as well as coupled boundary conditions, are solved analytically using the method of multiple time scales. The closed-form solution provides a direct insight into the relationship between the boundary conditions and vibration characteristics of the dynamic system, in which resonance frequencies increase with the nonlinear mechanical spring effect but decrease with the effect of flexible supports. The obtained results of frequencies and mode shapes are compared with the cases of ideal boundary conditions, and the differences between them are contrasted on frequency response curves. The influences of the support material property on the equivalent stiffness and resonance frequency shift are also discussed. It is demonstrated that the proposed model with the flexible supports boundary conditions has significant effect on the rigorous quantitative dynamical analysis of the MEMS beams. Moreover, the proposed analytical solutions are in good agreement with those obtained from finite element analyses.

  18. A laboratory experiment to examine the effect of auroral beams on spacecraft charging in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, M. U.; Gayetsky, L. E.; Mella, M. R.; Lynch, K. A.; Lessard, M. R.

    2011-09-15

    A 2.54 cm diameter conducting electrically isolated Copper sphere is suspended in a low density (10{sup 4} cm{sup -3}), low temperature (T{sub e} = 0.5 eV) Argon plasma, which mimics a spacecraft in an ionospheric plasma. An electron beam with current density of approximately 10{sup -10} A/cm{sup 2} and beam spot of 10.2 cm diameter, which mimics an auroral electron beam, is fired at the sphere while varying the beam energy from 100 eV to 2 keV. The plasma potential in the sheath around the sphere is measured using an emissive probe as the electron beam energy is varied. To observe the effects of the electron beam, the experimental sheath potential profiles are compared to a model of the plasma potential around a spherically symmetric charge distribution in the absence of electron beams. Comparison between the experimental data and the model shows that the sphere is less negative than the model predicts by up to half a volt for beam energies that produce high secondary electron emission from the surface of the sphere. It is shown that this secondary emission can account for changes in potential of spacecraft in the ionosphere as they pass through auroral beams and thus helps to improve interpretations of ionospheric thermal ion distributions.

  19. Dose-Response Effect of Charged Carbon Beam on Normal Rat Retina Assessed by Electroretinography

    SciTech Connect

    Mizota, Atsushi; Tanaka, Minoru; Kubota, Mariko; Negishi, Hisanari; Watanabe, Emiko; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Miyahara, Nobuyuki; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2010-12-01

    Purpose: To compare the effects of carbon beam irradiation with those of proton beam irradiation on the physiology of the retina of rats. Methods and Materials: Eight-week-old Wister rats were used. The right eyes were irradiated with carbon beam (1, 2, 4, 8, and 16 Gy) or proton beam (4, 8, 16, and 24 Gy) with the rats under general anesthesia. Electroretinograms were recorded 1, 3, 6, and 12 months after the irradiation, and the amplitudes of the a and b waves were compared with those of control rats. Results: The amplitude of b waves was reduced more than that of a waves at lower irradiation doses with both types of irradiation. With carbon ion irradiation, the amplitudes of the b wave were significantly reduced after radiation doses of 8 and 16 Gy at 6 months and by radiation doses of 4, 8, and 16 Gy at 12 months. With proton beam irradiation, the b-wave amplitudes were significantly reduced after 16 and 24 Gy at 6 months and with doses of 8 Gy or greater at 12 months. For the maximum b-wave amplitude, a significant difference was observed in rats irradiated with carbon beams of 4 Gy or more and with proton beams of 8 Gy or more at 12 months after irradiation. Conclusions: These results indicate that carbon beam irradiation is about two times more damaging than proton beam irradiation on the rat retina at the same dose.

  20. Viscous Effects in the Elastodynamics of Thick Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, A. R.; Tessler, A.

    1997-01-01

    A viscoelastic higher-order thick beam finite element formulation is extended to include elastodynamic deformations. The material constitutive law is a special differential form of the Maxwell solid. In the constitutive model, the elastic strains and the conjugate viscous strains are coupled through a system of first- order ordinary differential equations. The total time-dependent stress is the superposition of its elastic and viscous components. The elastodynamic equations of motion are derived from the virtual work principle. Computational examples are carried out for a thick orthotropic cantilevered beam. A quasi-static relaxation problem is employed as a validation test for the elastodynamic algorithm. The elastodynamic code is demonstrated by analyzing the damped vibrations of the beam which is deformed and then released to freely vibrate.

  1. Effective point of measurement for parallel plate and cylindrical ion chambers in megavoltage electron beams.

    PubMed

    von Voigts-Rhetz, Philip; Czarnecki, Damian; Zink, Klemens

    2014-09-01

    The presence of an air filled ionization chamber in a surrounding medium introduces several fluence perturbations in high energy photon and electron beams which have to be accounted for. One of these perturbations, the displacement effect, may be corrected in two different ways: by a correction factor pdis or by the application of the concept of the effective point of measurement (EPOM). The latter means, that the volume averaged ionization within the chamber is not reported to the chambers reference point but to a point within the air filled cavity. Within this study the EPOM was determined for four different parallel plate and two cylindrical chambers in megavoltage electron beams using Monte Carlo simulations. The positioning of the chambers with this EPOM at the depth of measurement results in a largely depth independent residual perturbation correction, which is determined within this study for the first time. For the parallel plate chambers the EPOM is independent of the energy of the primary electrons. Whereas for the Advanced Markus chamber the position of the EPOM coincides with the chambers reference point, it is shifted for the other parallel plate chambers several tenths of millimeters downstream the beam direction into the air filled cavity. For the cylindrical chambers there is an increasing shift of the EPOM with increasing electron energy. This shift is in upstream direction, i.e. away from the chambers reference point toward the focus. For the highest electron energy the position of the calculated EPOM is in fairly good agreement with the recommendation given in common dosimetry protocols, for the smallest energy, the calculated EPOM positions deviate about 30% from this recommendation. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. Asymmetry and non-random orientation of the inflight effective beam pattern in the WMAP data

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Lung-Yih

    2014-04-20

    Tentative evidence for statistical anisotropy in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data was alleged to be due to 'insufficient handling of beam asymmetries'. In this paper, we investigate this issue and develop a method to estimate the shape of the inflight effective beam, particularly the asymmetry and azimuthal orientation. We divide the whole map into square patches and exploit the information in the Fourier space. For patches containing bright extragalactic point sources, we can directly estimate their shapes, from which the inflight effective beam can be estimated. For those without, we estimate the pattern from iso-power contours in two-dimensional Fourier space. We show that the inflight effective beam convolving the signal is indeed non-symmetric for most of the sky, and it is not randomly oriented. Around the ecliptic poles, however, the asymmetry is smaller due to the averaging effect from different orientations of the beam from the scan strategy. The orientations of the effective beam with significant asymmetry are parallel to the lines of ecliptic longitude. In the foreground-cleaned Internal Linear Combination map, however, the systematics caused by beam effect is significantly lessened.

  3. Global Effects of Increased Use of Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Alvin M.; Hammond, R. Philip

    1972-01-01

    This paper, which speculates on the effects of man's energy releases on world climate, concludes that global upsets are very unlikely if we are able to distribute the energy widely or into the sea. (AL)

  4. SIMULATION OF RF BREAKDOWN EFFECTS ON NLC BEAM

    SciTech Connect

    Dolgashev, V

    2004-08-24

    The linacs of the Next Linear Collider / Global Linear Collider will contain several thousand traveling wave X-band accelerator structures operating at an input power of about 60 MW. At this input power, prototypes of NLC/GLC structures have breakdown rates lower than one breakdown in ten hours. RF breakdowns disrupt flow of energy inside the structure and create arcs with electron and ion currents. Electromagnetic fields of these currents interact with the NLC beam. The authors simulated the deflection of the NLC beam caused by breakdown currents using the particle-in-cell code MAGIC. In this paper they present modeling considerations and simulation results.

  5. Thermal lensing analysis of TGG and its effect on beam quality.

    PubMed

    Jalali, Amir A; Rybarsyk, James; Rogers, Evan

    2013-06-03

    An analysis is presented of a TGG crystal rod under high power laser operation. A semianalytical thermal analysis is investigated to obtain the temperature profile and thermal lensing effect in a TGG crystal upon incidence of a high power laser light. By solving the heat transfer equation for the TGG crystal and taking the Gaussian beam transverse intensity profile as the heat source, the optical path difference due to induced thermal effects was obtained. Moreover, a detailed model for the dependence of thermal lensing and beam degradation which takes into account up to the fifth-order spherical aberration is presented. Based on this model, it is shown that up to a critical value of the beam power the degradation of the beam is not significant. The experimental results on thermal lensing and degradation on beam quality of a high power laser passing through a TGG crystal rod are in agreement with the main results from our model.

  6. Evidence for anomalous optical transition radiation linear polarization effects in beam-profile monitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumpkin, A. H.; Johnson, A. S.; Ruan, J.; Thurman-Keup, R. M.; Yao, C.-Y.; Evtushenko, P.

    2013-10-01

    Investigations of the effects of optical transition radiation (OTR) polarization components on beam profiles are presented. The transverse profiles are examined using the OTR perpendicular and parallel polarization components with respect to the dimension of interest. We observed ˜15% projected profile size reductions with the perpendicularly polarized components on a 65-μm beam image size case at 14 MeV, a 150-μm beam image size at 4.5 GeV, and a 1100-μm beam image size at 7 GeV. These effects are all several times larger than expected (and anomalous in this sense) when compared to the standard OTR point-spread function calculations. We propose the time-averaged induced-current distribution which generates the OTR represents the actual beam size more faithfully with the perpendicular polarization component and recommend its routine use and subsequent deconvolution.

  7. Effect of spatial coherence on laser beam self-focusing from orbit to the ground in the atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hanling; Ji, Xiaoling; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Xianqu; Zhang, Yuqiu

    2016-06-27

    The effect of spatial coherence on laser beam self-focusing in the atmosphere to assist delivering powerful laser beams from orbit to the ground is studied. It is found that a fully coherent beam is more strongly compressed on the ground than a partially (spatial) coherent beam (PCB), even so, for a PCB the compressed spot size on the ground may be reduced below the diffraction limit due to self-focusing effect, and a PCB has higher threshold critical power than a fully coherent beam. Furthermore, an effective design rule for maximal compression without beam splitting of the transported PCB from orbit to the ground is presented.

  8. Unusual spin Hall effect of a light beam in chiral metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hailei; Zhang Xiangdong

    2011-05-15

    We present a solution to the problem of reflection and refraction of a polarized Gaussian beam at the interface between the transparent medium and the chiral metamaterials. Some unusual spin Hall effects of reflected and transmitted light have been found. It is shown that the spin-dependent displacements of the reflected beam centroid can not only reach several tens of wavelengths at certain incident angles; the reversed effect for the transmitted beams can also be realized by tuning the chiral parameters. These findings provide an alternative pathway for controlling the spin Hall effects of light and thereby open up the possibility for developing new nanophotonic devices.

  9. Effect of wavelength and beam width on penetration in light-tissue interaction using computational methods.

    PubMed

    Ash, Caerwyn; Dubec, Michael; Donne, Kelvin; Bashford, Tim

    2017-09-12

    Penetration depth of ultraviolet, visible light and infrared radiation in biological tissue has not previously been adequately measured. Risk assessment of typical intense pulsed light and laser intensities, spectral characteristics and the subsequent chemical, physiological and psychological effects of such outputs on vital organs as consequence of inappropriate output use are examined. This technical note focuses on wavelength, illumination geometry and skin tone and their effect on the energy density (fluence) distribution within tissue. Monte Carlo modelling is one of the most widely used stochastic methods for the modelling of light transport in turbid biological media such as human skin. Using custom Monte Carlo simulation software of a multi-layered skin model, fluence distributions are produced for various non-ionising radiation combinations. Fluence distributions were analysed using Matlab mathematical software. Penetration depth increases with increasing wavelength with a maximum penetration depth of 5378 μm calculated. The calculations show that a 10-mm beam width produces a fluence level at target depths of 1-3 mm equal to 73-88% (depending on depth) of the fluence level at the same depths produced by an infinitely wide beam of equal incident fluence. Meaning little additional penetration is achieved with larger spot sizes. Fluence distribution within tissue and thus the treatment efficacy depends upon the illumination geometry and wavelength. To optimise therapeutic techniques, light-tissue interactions must be thoroughly understood and can be greatly supported by the use of mathematical modelling techniques.

  10. EFFECTIVENESS OF INCREASED REPETITION IN CLASSROOM LEARNING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Mechanic Course at Fort Jackson. Achievement was measured with multiple choice test items given in regular course examinations two days and 24 days...instructed by the experimental method made passing scores on the test items at both testing times. It is recommended that repetition of major points be increased in classroom instruction. (Author)

  11. The Effect of Oblique Electron Beams to the Surface Dose Under the Bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Demir, Bayram Okutan, Murat; Cakir, Aydin; Goeksel, Evren; Bilge, Hatice

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of bolus to the surface dose in oblique electron incidences. Irradiations with 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, and 12-MeV electron beams were made for the incidence angles of 0 deg., 15 deg., 30 deg., 45 deg., 60 deg., 75 deg. and using 3 different bolus setups: (1) unbolused (no bolus), (2) 5-mm bolus, and (3) 10-mm bolus. A set of EBT gafchromic film pieces placed on the phantom surface was irradiated with a 400-cGy dose at D{sub max} for each setup. Whereas surface dose increased with increasing incidence degrees in the absence of a bolus, it was seen that there was a large surface dose decreasing in the presence of a bolus with increasing incidence angles. For 60 deg. incidence angle, the relative surface doses with unbolused setup were: 88.10%, 90.06%, 89.35%, 90.25%, and 97.10%; with 5-mm bolus: 66.45%, 81.20%, 99.78%, 124.43%, and 116.07%; and with 10-mm bolus: 22.65%, 45.20%, 55.20%, 65.82%, and 90.27% for 4.5, 6, 7.5, 9, and 12 MeV, respectively. The use of bolus in the treatment of highly oblique surfaces with low-energy electron beams significantly decreases the surface dose.

  12. Accurate model of electron beam profiles with emittance effects for pierce guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Peng; Wang, Guangqiang; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Dongyang; Li, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    Accurate prediction of electron beam profile is one of the key objectives of electron optics, and the basis for design of the practical electron gun. In this paper, an improved model describing electron beam in Pierce gun with both space charge effects and emittance effects is proposed. The theory developed by Cutler and Hines is still applied for the accelerating region of the Pierce gun, while the motion equations of the electron beams in the anode aperture and drift tunnel are improved by modifying electron optics theory with emittance. As a result, a more universal and accurate formula of the focal length of the lens for the electron beam with both effects is derived for the anode aperture with finite dimension, and a modified universal spread curve considering beam emittance is introduced in drift tunnel region. Based on these improved motion equations of the electron beam, beam profiles with space charge effects and emittance effects can be theoretically predicted, which are subsequently approved to agree well with the experimentally measured ones. The developed model here is helpful to design more applicable Pierce guns at high frequencies.

  13. Dual energy x-ray absorptiometry: the effects of beam hardening on bone density measurements.

    PubMed

    Blake, G M; McKeeney, D B; Chhaya, S C; Ryan, P J; Fogelman, I

    1992-01-01

    X-ray tubes have superseded radionuclide sources for dual photon absorptiometry of the spine and hip. However, the use of a polyenergetic spectrum is a potential source of error for x-ray absorptiometers since beam hardening may result in a nonlinear measurement scale for bone mineral density (BMD). A quantitative study of the effects of beam hardening on measurements made with a commercial dual energy x-ray scanner has been performed. Bone was represented by layers of aluminum of linearly increasing thickness which were scanned under water thicknesses ranging from 0 to 25 cm to represent different body thicknesses of soft tissue. Beam hardening had two effects on measured BMD: (i) at a constant true BMD, measured BMD varied with water thickness; (ii) at a constant water thickness, the BMD scale was not precisely linear. For conditions appropriate to spine and hip studies (BMD) values in the range 0.7 to 1.4 g/cm2 and body thickness between 15 and 25 cm) the maximum deviation of measured BMD from a linear scale was 0.023 g/cm2, while the root-mean-square deviation (0.01 g/cm2) was comparable to the measurement precision for a spine or femoral neck scan (about 1%). The largest departures from linearity were found to occur at the thinnest water thicknesses for BMD values in the range 0.2 to 0.6 g/cm2. The effect of scale nonlinearity on the results of longitudinal studies was examined: for a spine scan at 20-cm body thickness, measured changes in BMD slightly overestimated the true change and implied an error of 0.15%/year for a measurement of a true rate of loss of 3% year in a postmenopausal woman.

  14. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-10-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 {mu}s before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations.

  15. Effect of transients on the beam in the Superconducting Supercollider Coupled-Cavity Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Young, L.M.; Nath, S.

    1992-01-01

    Each module of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Coupled-Cavity Linac (CCL) consists of eight tanks (10 accelerating cells each) coupled with bridge couplers. The radio frequency (rf) power drive is in the center of the module at the bridge coupler between the fourth and fifth tanks. In this simulation of the beam dynamics, the rf power is turned on 10 {mu}s before the beam is turned on. This time lapse allows the fields to build up and stabilize before they are required by the beam. When the beam is turned on, the beam loading causes the fields to change. This transient state of the fields together with their effect on the beam is presented. A model has been developed to calculate field distribution throughout the module as a function of time. Beam dynamics simulations were run with the results of this model at several times during the beam pulse. An estimate of the effect of the transients is given by the results of these simulations.

  16. The effect of material heterogeneity in curved composite beams for use in aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, Brendan J.; Santare, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    A design tool is presented for predicting the effect of material heterogeneity on the performance of curved composite beams for use in aircraft fuselage structures. Material heterogeneity can be induced during processes such as sheet forming and stretch forming of thermoplastic composites. This heterogeneity can be introduced in the form of fiber realignment and spreading during the manufacturing process causing a gradient in material properties in both the radial and tangential directions. The analysis procedure uses a separate two-dimensional elasticity solution for the stresses in the flanges and web sections of the beam. The separate solutions are coupled by requiring the forces and displacements match at the section boundaries. Analysis is performed for curved beams loaded in pure bending and uniform pressure. The beams can be of any general cross-section such as a hat, T-, I-, or J-beam. Preliminary results show that geometry of the beam dictates the effect of heterogeneity on performance. Heterogeneity plays a much larger role in beams with a small average radius to depth ratio, R/t, where R is the average radius of the beam and t is the difference between the inside and outside radius. Results of the analysis are in the form of stresses and displacements, and they are compared to both mechanics of materials and numerical solutions obtained using finite element analysis.

  17. The effects of x-ray beam hardening on detective quantum efficiency and radiation dose.

    PubMed

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the effects of x-ray beam hardening on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the radiation dose of an inline x-ray imaging system. The ability to decrease the risk of harmful radiation to the patient without compromising the detection capability would more effectively balance the tradeoff between image quality and radiation dose, and therefore benefit the fields of diagnostic x-ray imaging, especially mammography. The DQE and the average glandular dose were both calculated under the same experimental conditions for a range of beam hardening levels, corresponding to no added beam hardening and two thicknesses each of Rhodium (Rh) and Molybdenum (Mo) filters. The dose calculation results demonstrate a reduction of 15% to 24% for the range of beam hardening levels. The comparison of all quantities comprising the DQE exhibit very close correlation between the results obtained without added beam hardening to the results corresponding to the range of beam hardening levels. For the specific experimental conditions utilized in this preliminary study, the results are an indication that the use of beam hardening holds the potential to reduce the radiation dose without decreasing the performance of the system. Future studies will seek to apply this method in a clinical environment and perform a comprehensive image quality evaluation, in an effort to further evaluate the potential of beam hardening to balance the tradeoff between dose and image quality.

  18. Increasing Institutional Effectiveness through Outcomes Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Donna; Green, Peggy

    In 1987, under pressure from its accreditation agency and the state, Broward Community College (BCC) initiated the Institutional Effectiveness and Assessment Project to improve the college through outcomes assessment. The project had four interrelated components: (1) a revision of BCC's mission statement to incorporate a new section on…

  19. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide.

    PubMed

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-21

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold (23)Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  20. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    PubMed Central

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry. PMID:27440516

  1. Quantum coherent tractor beam effect for atoms trapped near a nanowaveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadgrove, Mark; Wimberger, Sandro; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-01

    We propose several schemes to realize a tractor beam effect for ultracold atoms in the vicinity of a few-mode nanowaveguide. Atoms trapped near the waveguide are transported in a direction opposite to the guided mode propagation direction. We analyse three specific examples for ultracold 23Na atoms trapped near a specific nanowaveguide (i.e. an optical nanofibre): (i) a conveyor belt-type tractor beam effect, (ii) an accelerator tractor beam effect, and (iii) a quantum coherent tractor beam effect, all of which can effectively pull atoms along the nanofibre toward the light source. This technique provides a new tool for controlling the motion of particles near nanowaveguides with potential applications in the study of particle transport and binding as well as atom interferometry.

  2. Effects of focused ion beam induced damage on the plasticity of micropillars

    SciTech Connect

    El-Awady, Jaafar A.; Woodward, Christopher; Dimiduk, Dennis M.

    2009-09-01

    The hardening effects of focused ion beam (FIB) induced damage produced during the fabrication of micropillars are examined by introducing a surface layer of nanosized obstacles into a dislocation dynamics simulation. The influence of the depth and strength of the obstacles as a function of pillar diameter is assessed parametrically. We show that for a selected set of sample sizes between 0.5 and 1.0 {mu}m, the flow strength can increase by 10-20 %, for an obstacle strength of 750 MPa, and damage depth of 100 nm. On the other hand, for sizes larger and smaller than this range, the effect of damage is negligible. Results show that the obstacles formed during the FIB milling may be expected to alter the microstructure of micropillars, however, they have a negligible effect on the observed size-strength scaling laws.

  3. Effects of Electron Beam Loading on an Operating Piezoelectric Transformer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    The setup of the optical diagnostic that was used to measure the internal stress and electric field within the PT is shown in Figure 5. A helium ... neon (HeNe) laser with a wavelength of 632.8 nm was used as the light source. A linear polarizer was used to ensure that the beam was linearly

  4. Mutagenic effect of a keV range N + beam on mammalian cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Huiyun; Wu, Lijun; Yu, Lixiang; Han, Wei; Liu, Xuelan; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-07-01

    The radiobiological effects of a keV (5-20 keV) range nitrogen ion (N +) beam on mammalian cells were studied, particularly with regard to the induction of mutation in the cell genome. The experiment demonstrated that the 20 keV N + beam, which resulted in cell death to a certain extent, induced a 2-3 fold increase in the mutation rates at the CD59 gene locus of the mammalian A L cells as compared to the control. Within certain fluence ranges (0-6 × 10 14 N +/cm 2), the cell survival displayed a down-up-down pattern which is similar to the phenomenon known as 'hyper-radiosensitivity' manifested under low-dose irradiation; the CD59 mutation rate firstly showed a gradual rise up to a 3-fold increment above the background level as the ion fluence went up to 4 × 10 14 N +/cm 2, after this peak point however, a downtrend appeared though the ion fluence increased further. It was also observed that the fraction of CD59 mutation bears no proportional relation to ion energy in further experiments of mutation induction by N + beams with the incident energies of 5, 10, 15 and 20 keV at the same fluence of 3 × 10 14 N +/cm 2. Analyses of the deletion patterns of chromosome 11 in CD59- mutants induced by 5-20 keV N + beams showed that these ions did not result in large-size chromosome deletions in this mammalian cell system. A preliminary discussion, suggesting that the mutagenic effect of such low-energy ion influx on mammalian cells could result from multiple processes involving direct collision of particles with cellular DNA, and cascade atomic and molecular reactions due to plentiful primary and secondary particles, was also presented. The study provided the first glimpse into the roles low-energy ions may play in inducing mutagenesis in mammalian cells, and results will be of much value in helping people to understand the contribution of low-energy ions to radiological effects of various ionising radiations.

  5. Hysteresis effects in the formation of a neutralizing beam plasma at low ion energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, the PEGASES II thruster prototype is used as an ion source generating low-energy (<300\\ \\text{eV}) positive Ar ion beam, extracted without an external neutralizer. The ions are extracted and accelerated from the source using a two-grid system. The extracted positive ion beam current is measured on a large beam target that can be translated along the acceleration axis. The ion beam current shows a stepwise transition from a low-current to a high-current extraction regime with hysteresis. The hysteresis region depends strongly upon the beam target position. Langmuir probe measurements in the plume show high plasma potentials and low plasma densities in the low-current mode, while the plasma potential drops and the density increases in the high-current mode. The ion energy distribution functions of the beam are measured for different regimes of ion extraction. The ion beam extracted in the high-current mode is indicated by the presence of an additional low-energy peak corresponding to ions from an ion-beam plasma created in the downstream chamber, as well as 10-20 times higher intensity of the primary ion beam peak. The hysteresis behavior is explained by the formation of a downstream neutralizing beam plasma, that depends on the target position and pressure in agreement with a Paschen-like breakdown by secondary electrons. The obtained results are of high relevance for further development of the PEGASES thruster, as well as for improving existing neutralizer-free concepts of the broad-beam ion sources.

  6. Correction of resist heating effect on variable shaped beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Suganuma, Mizuna; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kato, Yasuo; Kamikubo, Takashi; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Zable, Harold; Masuda, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Aki

    2016-04-01

    The specifications for critical dimension (CD) accuracy and line edge roughness are getting tighter to promote every photomask manufacturer to choose electron beam resists of lower sensitivity. When the resist is exposed by too many electrons, it is excessively heated up to have higher sensitivity at a higher temperature, which results in degraded CD uniformity. This effect is called "resist heating effect" and is now the most critical error source in CD control on a variable shaped beam (VSB) mask writer. We have developed an on-tool, real-time correction system for the resist heating effect. The system is composed of correction software based on a simple thermal diffusion model and computational hardware equipped with more than 100 graphical processing unit chips. We have demonstrated that the designed correction accuracy was obtained and the runtime of correction was sufficiently shorter than the writing time. The system is ready to be deployed for our VSB mask writers to retain the writing time as short as possible for lower sensitivity resists by removing the need for increased pass count.

  7. Effect of surface roughness and size of beam on squeeze-film damping—Molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hojin; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-11-01

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) to characterize fluid damping between a substrate and an approaching beam. We focus on the near contact regime where squeeze film (where fluid gap is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules) and many-body effects in the fluid become dominant. The MD simulations provide explicit description of many-body and non-equilibrium processes in the fluid as well as the surface topography. We study how surface roughness and beam width increases the damping coefficient due to their effect on fluid mobility. We find that the explicit simulations are in good agreement with prior direct simulation Monte Carlo results except at near-contact conditions where many-body effects in the compressed fluid lead the increased damping and weaker dependence on beam width. We also show that velocity distributions near the beam edges and for short gaps deviate from the Boltzmann distribution indicating a degree of local non-equilibrium. These results will be useful to parameterize compact models used for microsystem device-level simulations and provide insight into mesoscale simulations of near-contact damping.

  8. Effect of surface roughness and size of beam on squeeze-film damping—Molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hojin; Strachan, Alejandro

    2015-11-28

    We use large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) to characterize fluid damping between a substrate and an approaching beam. We focus on the near contact regime where squeeze film (where fluid gap is comparable to the mean free path of the gas molecules) and many-body effects in the fluid become dominant. The MD simulations provide explicit description of many-body and non-equilibrium processes in the fluid as well as the surface topography. We study how surface roughness and beam width increases the damping coefficient due to their effect on fluid mobility. We find that the explicit simulations are in good agreement with prior direct simulation Monte Carlo results except at near-contact conditions where many-body effects in the compressed fluid lead the increased damping and weaker dependence on beam width. We also show that velocity distributions near the beam edges and for short gaps deviate from the Boltzmann distribution indicating a degree of local non-equilibrium. These results will be useful to parameterize compact models used for microsystem device-level simulations and provide insight into mesoscale simulations of near-contact damping.

  9. Effects on the photon beam from an electromagnetic array used for patient localization and tumor tracking.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wei; Betancourt, Ricardo; Yin, Lingshu; Metz, James; Avery, Stephen; Kassaee, Alireza

    2013-05-06

    One of the main components in a Calypso 4D localization and tracking system is an electromagnetic array placed above patients that is used for target monitoring during radiation treatment. The beam attenuation and beam spoiling properties of the Calypso electromagnetic array at various beam angles were investigated. Measurements were performed on a Varian Clinac iX linear accelerator with 6 MV and 15 MV photon beams. The narrow beam attenuation properties were measured under a field size of 1 cm × 1 cm, with a photon diode placed in a cylindrical graphite buildup cap. The broad beam attenuation properties were measured under a field size of 10 cm × 10 cm, with a 0.6 cc cylindrical Farmer chamber placed in a polystyrene buildup cap. Beam spoiling properties of the array were studied by measuring depth-dose change from the array under a field size of 10 cm × 10 cm in a water-equivalent plastic phantom with an embedded Markus parallel plate chamber. Change in depth doses were measured with the array placed at distances of 2, 5, and 10 cm from the phantom surface. Narrow beam attenuation and broad beam attenuation from the array were found to be less than 2%-3% for both 6 MV and 15 MV beams at angles less than 40°, and were more pronounced at more oblique angles. Spoiling effects are appreciable at beam buildup region, but are insignificant at depths beyond dmax. Dose measurements in a QA phantom using patient IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were shown to have less than 2.5% dose difference with the Calypso array. The results indicate that the dose difference due to the placement of Calypso array is clinically insignificant.

  10. Investigation of Weakly Relativistic Ponderomotive Effects on Self-Focusing During Interaction of High Power Elliptical Laser Beam with Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walia, Keshav; Tripathi, Deepak; Tyagi, Yachna

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents an investigation of weakly relativistic ponderomotive effects on self-focusing during interaction of high power elliptical laser beam with plasma. The nonlinear differential equations for the beam width parameters of elliptical laser beam have set up by using Wentzal-Krammers-Brillouin (WKB) and paraxial approximations. These equations have been solved numerically by using fourth order Runge-Kutta method to study the variation of these beam width parameters against normalized distance of propagation. Effects of variation in laser beam intensity, plasma density and electron temperature on the beam width parameters are also analyzed.

  11. Interferometric Measurement for Improved Understanding of Boundary Effects in Micromachined Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bitsie, Fernando; Jensen, Brian D.; de Boer, Maarten

    1999-07-15

    Micromachined beams are commonly used to measure material properties in MEMS. Such measurements are complicated by the fact that boundary effects at the ends of the beams have a significant effect on the properties being measured. In an effort to improve the accuracy and resolution of such measurements, we are conducting a study of support post compliance in cantilever and fixed-fixed beams. Three different support post designs have been analyzed by finite element modeling. The results are then compared to measurements made on actual devices using interferometry. Using this technique, the accuracy of measurements of Young's modulus has been improved. Continuing work will also improve the measurement of residual stress.

  12. Compensation of Beam Line Polarizing Effects at UE112 of BESSY II

    SciTech Connect

    Bahrdt, J.; Follath, R.; Frentrup, W.; Gaupp, A.; Scheer, M.

    2010-06-23

    Reflections in synchrotron radiation beam lines tend to change the state of polarization of the radiation. This effect is more pronounced for steep angle of incidence, i.e. at low photon energy (say below 100 eV) beam lines. The APPLE II undulator UE112 at BESSY has all four magnetic rows shiftable and thus generates any state of polarization. To provide any intended polarization state at the sample we perform polarization measurements based on simple and fast linear polarization analysis that together with calculations of the undulator radiation predicts undulator settings that cancel beam line polarization effects.

  13. Study of the beam-beam limit in e{sup +}e{sup -} circular colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmi, K.; Tawada, M.; Cai, Y.; Kamada, S.; Oide, K.; Qiang, J.

    2004-04-02

    Beam-beam effects limit the luminosity of circular colliders. Once the bunch population exceeds a threshold, the luminosity increases at a slower rate. This phenomenon is called the beam-beam limit. Onset of the beam-beam limit has been analyzed with various simulation methods based on the weak-strong and strong-strong models. We have observed that an incoherent phenomenon is mainly concerned in the beam-beam limit. The simulation have shown that equilibrium distributions of the two colliding beams are distorted from Gaussians when the luminosity is limited. The beam-beam limit is estimated to be (xi) {approx} 0.1 for a B factory with damping time of several thousand turns.

  14. Effects of coherence on anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model beams on propagation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Wang, Xiangzhao; Zeng, Aijun; Yang, Kun

    2007-08-01

    An analytical formula for the cross-spectral density matrix of the electric field of anisotropic electromagnetic Gaussian-Schell model beams propagating in free space is derived by using a tensor method. The effects of coherence on those beams are studied. It is shown that two anisotropic stochastic electromagnetic beams that propagate from the source plane z=0 into the half-space z>0 may have different beam shapes (i.e., spectral density) and states of polarization in the half-space, even though they have the same beam shape and states of polarization in the source plane. This fact is due to a difference in the coherence properties of the field in the source plane.

  15. Monitoring electron-beam irradiation effects on graphenes by temporal Auger electron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingsheng; Fujita, Daisuke; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2010-07-02

    Because of its unique electronic transport properties, graphene has attracted an enormous amount of interest recently. By using standard Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, we have studied electron-beam irradiation effects on graphene damage. We have shown that irradiation with an electron-beam can selectively remove graphene layers and induce chemical reactions, as well as possible structural transformations. We have also demonstrated the dependence of damage in graphene on electron-beam dose. Our work provides ideas on how to optimize the experimental conditions for graphene characterization and device fabrication. The results throw light on how energy transfer from the electron beam to graphene layers leads to the removal of carbon atoms from graphene layers and on the possibility of using electron-beam irradiation to locally induce chemical reactions in a controlled manner.

  16. Effect of induced charge at boundaries on transverse dynamics of a space-charge-dominated beam

    SciTech Connect

    Celata, C.M.; Haber, I.; Laslett, L.J.; Smith, L.; Tiefenback, M.G.

    1985-05-01

    A particle simulation code has been used to study the effect of transverse beam dynamics of charge induced on focusing electrodes. A linear transport system was assumed. The initial particle distribution was taken to be that of a uniform elliptical beam with a Gaussian velocity distribution. For misaligned, highly space-charge-dominated beams (betatron phase advance per lattice period less than or equal to 10/sup 0/), a large oscillation of the rms emittance occurred in a beat pattern. Linearized Vlasov analysis shows the oscillation to be a sextupole oscillation, driven by the beam coherent betatron motion. Emittance growth accompanied the oscillation. Preliminary experimental results from the Single Beam Transport Experiment (SBTE) are consistent with the code results. Addition of a dodecapole nonlinearity to the computational focusing field greatly reduces the oscillation amplitude.

  17. [Effects in eyes, caused by laser rays emitted by laser-beam projectors].

    PubMed

    Mal'kova, N Iu; Ushkova, I N; Romanenko, E I

    2014-01-01

    Health assessment of laser radiation emitted by laser-beam projectors used for laser shows in concert and theatrical events was carried out. The effects of various laser radiation wavelengths and regimes on functional state of eye retina were studied.

  18. How to increase meeting effectiveness and efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Grunau, M.; Kurstedt, H.A. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    In this paper, I present a model adapted from control theory to gain insight into the dynamics of meetings. I relate the system controller and feedback sensor in the model to the role of the facilitator in meetings. By drawing parallels between the control theory model and the adapted model for meetings, I came up with an operational definition of a group facilitator and derived the following hypothesis: Providing facilitators with information about group members prior to the meeting will improve their effectiveness and efficiency in facilitating the meeting. Such information, for example, could include the group members' personality types measured with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator or their conflict modes measured through the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  19. The effects of x-ray beam hardening on detective quantum efficiency and radiation dose

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to investigate the effects of x-ray beam hardening on the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) and the radiation dose of an inline x-ray imaging system. The DQE and the average glandular dose were both calculated under the same experimental conditions for a range of beam hardening levels, corresponding to no added beam hardening and two thicknesses each of Rhodium (Rh) and Molybdenum (Mo) filters. The dose calculation results demonstrate a reduction of 15% to 24% for the range of beam hardening levels. The comparison of all quantities comprising the DQE exhibit very close correlation between the results obtained without added beam hardening to the results corresponding to the range of beam hardening levels. For the specific experimental conditions utilized in this preliminary study, the results are an indication that the use of beam hardening holds the potential to reduce the radiation dose without decreasing the performance of the system. Future studies will seek to apply this method in a clinical environment and perform a comprehensive image quality evaluation, in an effort to further evaluate the potential of beam hardening to balance the tradeoff between dose and image quality. PMID:25214383

  20. Effects of Ga ion-beam irradiation on monolayer graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Quan; Mao, Wei; Zhang, Yanmin; Shao, Ying; Ren, Naifei; Ge, Daohan

    2013-08-12

    The effects of Ga ion on the single layer graphene (SLG) have been studied by Raman spectroscopy (RS), SEM, and field-effect characterization. Under vacuum conditions, Ga ion-irradiation can induce disorders and cause red shift of 2D band of RS, rather than lattice damage in high quality SLG. The compressive strain induced by Ga ion decreases the crystalline size in SLG, which is responsible for the variation of Raman scattering and electrical properties. Nonlinear out-put characteristic and resistance increased are also found in the I-V measurement. The results have important implications during CVD graphene characterization and related device fabrication.

  1. Effect of ion compensation of the beam space charge on gyrotron operation

    SciTech Connect

    Fokin, A. P.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2015-04-15

    In gyrotrons, the coherent radiation of electromagnetic waves takes place when the cyclotron resonance condition between the wave frequency and the electron cyclotron frequency or its harmonic holds. The voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field changes the relativistic cyclotron frequency and, hence, can play an important role in the beam-wave interaction process. In long pulse and continuous-wave regimes, the beam space charge field can be partially compensated by the ions, which appear due to the beam impact ionization of neutral molecules of residual gases in the interaction space. In the present paper, the role of this ion compensation of the beam space charge on the interaction efficiency is analyzed. We also analyze the effect of the electron velocity spread on the limiting currents and discuss some effects restricting the ion-to-beam electron density ratio in the saturation stage. It is shown that the effect of the ion compensation on the voltage depression caused by the beam space charge field can cause significant changes in the efficiency of gyrotron operation and, in some cases, even result in the break of oscillations.

  2. BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR DOUBLE-GAUSSIAN BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG, C.; MALITSKY, N.; BEN-ZVI, I.; LITVINENKO, V.

    2005-05-16

    Electron cooling together with intra-beam scattering results in a transverse distribution that can best be described by a sum of two gaussians, one for the high-density core and one for the tails of the distribution. Simulation studies are being performed to understand the beam-beam interaction of these double-gaussian beams. Here we report the effect of low-frequency random tune modulations on diffusion in double-gaussian beams and compare the effects to those in beam-beam interactions with regular gaussian beams and identical tune shift parameters.

  3. Impact of Intrafraction and Residual Interfraction Effect on Prostate Proton Pencil Beam Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Shikui; Deville, Curtiland; Tochner, Zelig; Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin; McDonough, James; Vapiwala, Neha; Both, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively evaluate the impact of interplay effect and plan robustness associated with intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion for pencil beam scanning proton therapy. Methods and Materials: Ten prostate cancer patients with weekly verification CTs underwent pencil beam scanning with the bilateral single-field uniform dose (SFUD) modality. A typical field had 10-15 energy layers and 500-1000 spots. According to their treatment logs, each layer delivery time was <1 s, with average time to change layers of approximately 8 s. Real-time intrafraction prostate motion was determined from our previously reported prospective study using Calypso beacon transponders. Prostate motion and beam delivering sequence of the worst-case scenario patient were synchronized to calculate the “true” dose received by the prostate. The intrafraction effect was examined by applying the worst-case scenario prostate motion on the planning CT, and the residual interfraction effect was examined on the basis of weekly CT scans. The resultant dose variation of target and critical structures was examined to evaluate the interplay effect. Results: The clinical target volume (CTV) coverage was degraded because of both effects. The CTV D{sub 99} (percentage dose to 99% of the CTV) varied up to 10% relative to the initial plan in individual fractions. However, over the entire course of treatment the total dose degradation of D{sub 99} was 2%-3%, with a standard deviation of <2%. Absolute differences between SFUD, intensity modulate proton therapy, and one-field-per-day SFUD plans were small. The intrafraction effect dominated over the residual interfraction effect for CTV coverage. Mean dose to the anterior rectal wall increased approximately 10% because of combined residual interfraction and intrafraction effects, the interfraction effect being dominant. Conclusions: Both intrafraction and residual interfraction prostate motion degrade CTV coverage within a

  4. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers.

    PubMed

    Dowdell, S; Tyler, M; McNamara, J; Sloan, K; Ceylan, A; Rinks, A

    2016-11-15

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm(2)-20  ×  20 cm(2) for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  5. Potential errors in relative dose measurements in kilovoltage photon beams due to polarity effects in plane-parallel ionisation chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdell, S.; Tyler, M.; McNamara, J.; Sloan, K.; Ceylan, A.; Rinks, A.

    2016-12-01

    Plane-parallel ionisation chambers are regularly used to conduct relative dosimetry measurements for therapeutic kilovoltage beams during commissioning and routine quality assurance. This paper presents the first quantification of the polarity effect in kilovoltage photon beams for two types of commercially available plane-parallel ionisation chambers used for such measurements. Measurements were performed at various depths along the central axis in a solid water phantom and for different field sizes at 2 cm depth to determine the polarity effect for PTW Advanced Markus and Roos ionisation chambers (PTW-Freiburg, Germany). Data was acquired for kilovoltage beams between 100 kVp (half-value layer (HVL)  =  2.88 mm Al) and 250 kVp (HVL  =  2.12 mm Cu) and field sizes of 3-15 cm diameter for 30 cm focus-source distance (FSD) and 4  ×  4 cm2-20  ×  20 cm2 for 50 cm FSD. Substantial polarity effects, up to 9.6%, were observed for the Advanced Markus chamber compared to a maximum 0.5% for the Roos chamber. The magnitude of the polarity effect was observed to increase with field size and beam energy but was consistent with depth. The polarity effect is directly influenced by chamber design, with potentially large polarity effects for some plane-parallel ionisation chambers. Depending on the specific chamber used, polarity corrections may be required for output factor measurements of kilovoltage photon beams. Failure to account for polarity effects could lead to an incorrect dose being delivered to the patient.

  6. Inactivation effect of electron beam irradiation on fungal load of naturally contaminated maize seeds.

    PubMed

    Nemţanu, Monica R; Braşoveanu, Mirela; Karaca, Gürsel; Erper, İsmail

    2014-10-01

    This work focuses on the effect of accelerated electrons (0.1-6.2 kGy) on naturally attached fungi on maize seeds. The fungal viability and corresponding inactivation kinetics were determined. The inactivation and radiosensitivity of the most abundant species in the contaminant fungi detected on maize seeds (Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp. and Fusarium spp.) are discussed. Fungal contamination of maize seeds decreased significantly with increasing irradiation dose. The survival curve of total fungi determined by the blotter test showed a sigmoidal pattern that can be attributed to the mixture of fungal subpopulations with different radiation sensitivities. This behaviour could be modelled well (R²  = 0.995) with a modified Gompertz equation. The predicted values for shoulder length and inactivation rate were 0.63 ± 0.10 kGy and 0.44 ± 0.04 kGy⁻¹ respectively. The sensitivity of the most common fungi to electron beam treatment followed the order Penicillium spp. > Fusarium spp. > Aspergillus spp., with total inactivation at irradiation doses of 1.7, 2.5 and 4.8 kGy respectively. The effect of electron beam treatment against fungi on naturally contaminated maize seeds depended on irradiation dose, allowing the control of maize fungal load. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Application of failure mode and effects analysis to treatment planning in scanned proton beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A multidisciplinary and multi-institutional working group applied the Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) approach to the actively scanned proton beam radiotherapy process implemented at CNAO (Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica), aiming at preventing accidental exposures to the patient. Methods FMEA was applied to the treatment planning stage and consisted of three steps: i) identification of the involved sub-processes; ii) identification and ranking of the potential failure modes, together with their causes and effects, using the risk probability number (RPN) scoring system, iii) identification of additional safety measures to be proposed for process quality and safety improvement. RPN upper threshold for little concern of risk was set at 125. Results Thirty-four sub-processes were identified, twenty-two of them were judged to be potentially prone to one or more failure modes. A total of forty-four failure modes were recognized, 52% of them characterized by an RPN score equal to 80 or higher. The threshold of 125 for RPN was exceeded in five cases only. The most critical sub-process appeared related to the delineation and correction of artefacts in planning CT data. Failures associated to that sub-process were inaccurate delineation of the artefacts and incorrect proton stopping power assignment to body regions. Other significant failure modes consisted of an outdated representation of the patient anatomy, an improper selection of beam direction and of the physical beam model or dose calculation grid. The main effects of these failures were represented by wrong dose distribution (i.e. deviating from the planned one) delivered to the patient. Additional strategies for risk mitigation, easily and immediately applicable, consisted of a systematic information collection about any known implanted prosthesis directly from each patient and enforcing a short interval time between CT scan and treatment start. Moreover, (i) the investigation of

  8. Effect of electron beam-cross-linked gels on the rheological properties of raw natural rubber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Suman; Chattopadhyay, Santanu; Bharadwaj, Y. K.; Sabharwal, S.; Bhowmick, Anil K.

    2008-05-01

    Electron beam (EB)-cross-linked natural rubber (NR) gels were prepared from latex and characterized by various techniques. The addition of a small amount of these gels to raw NR was found to reduce the apparent shear viscosity and die swell remarkably. This effect was further enhanced with the addition of butyl acrylate as a sensitizer. The apparent shear viscosity first decreased up to 8 phr of gel loading and then increased. However, the percent die swell value decreased steadily upon gel loading. These were explained by calculating principal normal stress difference, the activation energy of melt flow and characteristics of EB-cross-linked gels. These effects were also reflected in the changes of mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of gel-filled raw NR. Tailoring of the above properties could be done with the help of these gels.

  9. Ion beam mixing effects in Ag precipitates embedded in MgO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, G.; Abouchacra, G.; Treilleux, M.; Thevenard, P.; Serughetti, J.

    1988-05-01

    MgO single crystals have been implanted at room temperature with 8 × 10 16 Ag cm -2 of 180 keV energy. After 973 K thermal annealing, Ag atoms precipitate in the MgO matrix. The MgOAg samples were then irradiated at 77 K with 800 keV xenon up to 1.7 × 10 16 ions cm -2. The modification of the metallic precipitated phase induced by such ionic bombardment, has been characterized by optical absorption spectroscopy (OAS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The evolution of the optical spectra with xenon bombardment has been interpreted in terms of silver precipitate dispersion induced by ion beam mixing effects. The inhibition of atomic diffusion or radiation induced diffusion, due the low sample temperature during irradiation, increases the efficiency of atomic mixing effects. TEM observations confirm this assumption.

  10. Controlling field-effect mobility in pentacene-based transistors by supersonic molecular-beam deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Toccoli, T.; Pallaoro, A.; Coppede, N.; Iannotta, S.; De Angelis, F.; Mariucci, L.; Fortunato, G.

    2006-03-27

    We show that pentacene field-effect transistors, fabricated by supersonic molecular beams, have a performance strongly depending on the precursor's kinetic energy (K{sub E}). The major role played by K{sub E} is in achieving highly ordered and flat films. In the range K{sub E}{approx_equal}3.5-6.5 eV, the organic field effect transistor linear mobility increases of a factor {approx}5. The highest value (1.0 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}) corresponds to very uniform and flat films (layer-by-layer type growth). The temperature dependence of mobility for films grown at K{sub E}>6 eV recalls that of single crystals (bandlike) and shows an opposite trend for films grown at K{sub E}{<=}5.5 eV.

  11. Timoshenko beam model for buckling and vibration of nanowires with surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gang-Feng; Feng, Xi-Qiao

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, surface effects on the axial buckling and the transverse vibration of nanowires are examined by using the refined Timoshenko beam theory. The critical compression force of axial buckling and the natural frequency of nanowires are obtained analytically, in which the impacts of surface elasticity, residual surface stress, transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia have been included. The buckling and vibration behaviour of a nanowire is demonstrated to be size dependent, especially when its cross-sectional dimension reduces to nanometres. The surface effects with positive elastic constants tend to increase the critical compression force and the natural frequency, especially for slender nanowires, while the shear deformation lowers these values for stubby nanowires. This study may be helpful to accurately measure the mechanical properties of nanowires and to design nanowire-based devices and systems.

  12. Mutational effects of γ-rays and carbon ion beams on Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Hase, Yoshihiro; Narumi, Issay; Hidema, Jun; Sakamoto, Ayako N

    2013-11-01

    To assess the mutational effects of radiation on vigorously proliferating plant tissue, the mutation spectrum was analyzed with Arabidopsis seedlings using the plasmid-rescue method. Transgenic plants containing the Escherichia coli rpsL gene were irradiated with γ-rays and carbon ion beams (320-MeV (12)C(6+)), and mutations in the rpsL gene were analyzed. Mutant frequency increased significantly following irradiation by γ-rays, but not by 320-MeV (12)C(6+). Mutation spectra showed that both radiations increased the frequency of frameshifts and other mutations, including deletions and insertions, but only γ-rays increased the frequency of total base substitutions. These results suggest that the type of DNA lesions which cause base substitutions were less often induced by 320-MeV (12)C(6+) than by γ-rays in Arabidopsis seedlings. Furthermore, γ-rays never increased the frequencies of G:C to T:A or A:T to C:G transversions, which are caused by oxidized guanine; 320-MeV (12)C(6+), however, produced a slight increase in both transversions. Instead, γ-rays produced a significant increase in the frequency of G:C to A:T transitions. These results suggest that 8-oxoguanine has little effect on mutagenesis in Arabidopsis cells.

  13. Mutational effects of γ-rays and carbon ion beams on Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Hase, Yoshihiro; Narumi, Issay; Hidema, Jun; Sakamoto, Ayako N.

    2013-01-01

    To assess the mutational effects of radiation on vigorously proliferating plant tissue, the mutation spectrum was analyzed with Arabidopsis seedlings using the plasmid-rescue method. Transgenic plants containing the Escherichia coli rpsL gene were irradiated with γ-rays and carbon ion beams (320-MeV 12C6+), and mutations in the rpsL gene were analyzed. Mutant frequency increased significantly following irradiation by γ-rays, but not by 320-MeV 12C6+. Mutation spectra showed that both radiations increased the frequency of frameshifts and other mutations, including deletions and insertions, but only γ-rays increased the frequency of total base substitutions. These results suggest that the type of DNA lesions which cause base substitutions were less often induced by 320-MeV 12C6+ than by γ-rays in Arabidopsis seedlings. Furthermore, γ-rays never increased the frequencies of G:C to T:A or A:T to C:G transversions, which are caused by oxidized guanine; 320-MeV 12C6+, however, produced a slight increase in both transversions. Instead, γ-rays produced a significant increase in the frequency of G:C to A:T transitions. These results suggest that 8-oxoguanine has little effect on mutagenesis in Arabidopsis cells. PMID:23728320

  14. Laser beam welding of any metal.

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, K. H.

    1998-10-01

    The effect of a metal's thermophysical properties on its weldability are examined. The thermal conductivity, melting point, absorptivity and thermal diffusivity of the metal and the laser beam focused diameter and welding speed influence the minimum beam irradiance required for melting and welding. Beam diameter, surface tension and viscosity of the molten metal affect weld pool stability and weld quality. Lower surface tension and viscosity increases weld pool instability. With larger beam diameters causing wider welds, dropout also increases. Effects of focused beam diameter and joint fitup on weldability are also examined. Small beam diameters are sensitive to beam coupling problems in relation to fitup precision in addition to beam alignment to the seam. Welding parameters for mitigating weld pool instability and increasing weld quality are derived from the above considerations. Guidelines are presented for the tailoring of welding parameters to achieve good welds. Weldability problems can also be anticipated from the properties of a metal.

  15. Beam-Switch Transient Effects in the RF Path of the ICAPA Receive Phased Array Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sands, O. Scott

    2003-01-01

    When the beam of a Phased Array Antenna (PAA) is switched from one pointing direction to another, transient effects in the RF path of the antenna are observed. Testing described in the report has revealed implementation-specific transient effects in the RF channel that are associated with digital clocking pulses that occur with transfer of data from the Beam Steering Controller (BSC) to the digital electronics of the PAA under test. The testing described here provides an initial assessment of the beam-switch phenomena by digitally acquiring time series of the RF communications channel, under CW excitation, during the period of time that the beam switch transient occurs. Effects are analyzed using time-frequency distributions and instantaneous frequency estimation techniques. The results of tests conducted with CW excitation supports further Bit-Error-Rate (BER) testing of the PAA communication channel.

  16. Modeling the biophysical effects in a carbon beam delivery line by using Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Ilsung; Yoo, SeungHoon; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-09-01

    The Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion-beam therapy. In this study, the biological effectiveness of a carbon-ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulations. A carbon-ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon-ion beam transport into media. An incident energy carbon-ion beam with energy in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model was applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary-gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetration depth in the water phantom along the incident beam's direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE-weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the depth in the water phantom.

  17. The effect of beam slope on the perception of melodic contour.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, Warren; Kessler, Yoav

    2017-10-03

    Musical score reading is a complex task, which involves attending and interpreting multiple visual constituents that are graphically congested. The present investigation examined the 'beam', which although consistently found in music notation, is typically considered as providing no more information than marking metric boundaries (i.e., chunking). However, we provide evidence here that beams enhance visual perception of contour. In Study 1, a Stroop-like paradigm was used in which participants were required to judge the direction of notes or the beam in a compound figure; the two dimensions were either congruent or incongruent. A congruency effect was observed in both tasks, confirming that both notes and beam are processed automatically during score reading. In Study 2, an additional auditory stimulus was presented. The results not only replicated the findings of Study 1, but showed that beams affect both visual and auditory perception. Finally, group differences surfaced: musicians were more affected by the direction of notes than non-musicians when attending to beams, but the effect of beams on judging note direction was comparable in both groups. The implications for understanding musical score reading - specifically issues related to melodic contour - are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of beam-driven poloidal rotation on the neoclassical bootstrap current

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Hinton, F.L.

    1996-12-31

    Unbalanced neutral beam injection drives toroidal and poloidal rotations in a tokamak plasma. The beam toroidal momentum input drives the toroidal rotation, and the parallel friction between the thermal ions and fast ions induces the poloidal rotation. A theory of the beam-driven poloidal rotation and its effects on energy transport was given recently by Hinton and Kim. In this work, we extend their considerations to the effects on the neoclassical bootstrap current. For parameters of interest in present neutral beam heated tokamaks, the magnitude of the beam-driven poloidal rotation can be significantly larger than that of the standard neoclassical value due to the ion temperature gradient. The presence of this driven poloidal rotation will manifest itself in modification of the neoclassical bootstrap current. In the case of coinjection, the driven poloidal rotation is in the opposite direction to the rotation driven by the temperature gradient, therefore it enhances the bootstrap current. In comparison with the standard theoretical predictions of the neutral beam-driven current, that enhancement in the bootstrap current varies with the beam and plasma parameters. A calculation of the parallel transport coefficients associated with the driven poloidal flow in finite-aspect ratio tokamaks will be presented. Experimental conditions for observing the enhancement in bootstrap current will be discussed.

  19. Investigating the effect of electron emission pattern on RF gun beam quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A.; Shokri, B.

    2016-05-01

    Thermionic radio frequency gun is one of the most promising choices to gain a high quality electron beam, used in the infrared free electron lasers and synchrotron radiation injectors. To study the quality of the beam in a compact electron source, the emission pattern effect on the beam dynamics should be investigated. In the presented work, we developed a 3D simulation code to model the real process of thermionic emission and to investigate the effect of emission pattern, by considering geometrical constraints, on the beam dynamics. According to the results, the electron bunch emittance varies considerably with the emission pattern. Simulation results have been validated via comparison with the well-known simulation codes such as ASTRA simulation code and CST microwave studio, as well as other simulation results in the literature. It was also demonstrated that by using a continuous wave laser beam for heating the cathode, the emission pattern full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the transverse emission distribution is proportional to FWHM of the Gaussian profile for the laser beam. Additionally, by using the developed code, the effect of wall structure around the cathode on the back bombardment effect has been studied. According to the results, for a stable operation of the RF gun, one should consider the nose cone in vicinity of the cathode surface to reduce the back-bombardment effect.

  20. Numerical investigation on propagation effects of pseudo-partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xianmei; Zhu, Wenyue; Rao, Ruizhong

    2009-03-02

    The propagation effects of spatially pseudo-partially coherent Gaussian Schell-model beams in atmosphere are investigated numerically. The characteristics of beam spreading, beam wandering and intensity scintillation are analyzed respectively. It is found that the degradation of degree of source coherence may cause reductions of relative beam spreading and scintillation index, which indicates that partially coherent beams are more resistant to atmospheric turbulence than fully coherent beams. And beam wandering is not much sensitive to the change of source coherence. However, a partially coherent beam have a larger spreading than the fully coherent beam both in free space and in atmospheric turbulence. The influences of changing frequency of random phase screen which models the source coherence on the final intensity pattern are also discussed.

  1. Toggling between single and multi-beam effects on Stimulated Raman Scattering in a NIF hohlraum plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Strozzi, D. J.; Divol, L.; Michel, P.; Ralph, J.; Berger, R. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Robey, H.; Landen, O. L.; Lepape, S.; Ross, S.; MacGowan, B. J.; Williams, E. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Nikroo, A.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a method for studying single and multi-beam laser-plasma interactions (LPI) in a NIF hohlraum plasma. This method utilizes toggling combinations of beams on and off during the time of high (partly saturated) stimulated Raman backscattering (SRS) and measuring the effects on the SRS. We find that during the high-intensity part of the laser pulse SRS saturates at about 10 - 20% reflectivity for single and multi-beam interactions. In addition, we can place limits on the cross-beam energy transfer and show that re-amplification is small due to multiple beam effects. Spectral measurements indicate that toggling beams creates a <=10% change in the plasma temperature. These results are important for developing models of multi-beam intereactions. We will describe the backscatter measurements and simple models used to constrain the multi-beam effects.

  2. The effect of beam interruption during FFF-VMAT plans for SBRT.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seongjong; Lewis, Benjamin; Watson, Amy; Kim, Siyong; Kim, Taeho

    2017-10-02

    To investigate the dosimetric effect of intended beam interruption during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filter free (FFF) beam for exploring the possibility of deep inspiration breath hold stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). A total of ten SBRT plans with 6 and 10 MV FFF beams were retrospectively selected. All plans consisted of four partial arcs, except one plan with six partial arcs. We delivered the plans using a Varian Truebeam™ with three different scenarios; without interruption (0int), with one intentional interruption (1int), or with two intentional interruptions (2int), per each partial arc. The treatment log files were exported from the treatment console, and the variations in delivered MU were evaluated at the beam interruption angles. The dose distributions were also measured using a 3D cylindrical diode array detector, ArcCHECK™. The 2D global gamma evaluations were performed, compared to the planned dose distribution, with 3%/3 and 4%/2 mm passing criterion. The dose difference (DD) was also determined between uninterrupted and interrupted data with 3, 2, 1, and 0.5% of global maximum dose. The interruption caused a total increase of 0.14 ± 0.05% and 0.25 ± 0.08% of the total planned MU, ranging from 1746 to 3261 MU, at the interrupted angles in 1int and 2int, respectively. All global gamma passing rates satisfied our clinical threshold of 90%, and the differences of passing rates were less than 0.3% on average with both criterions. All measured 1int and 2int data were within 3% DD from 0int measured data. For 6 MV FFF beams, the average passing rate with 2, 1, and 0.5% DD were 99.9 ± 0.2%, 92.3 ± 12.0%, and 81.9 ± 24.9%, respectively, between 0int and 1int, and 99.8 ± 0.4%, 92.1%12.4%, and 80.7 ± 26.5%, respectively, between 0int and 2int. For 10 MV FFF beams, the average passing rate with 2, 1, and 0.5% DD were 100.0 ± 0.2%, 95.4 ± 9.4% and 87.0 ± 19

  3. Effects of beam wander on free-space optical communications through turbulent atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhijun; Liao, Rui

    2010-04-01

    Effects of beam wander on uncoded bit-error-rate (BER) of direct-detection OOK modulated FSO communication systems using collimated and focused Gaussian beams are studied. Channel fading statistics are obtained from large-scale wave optics simulations and compared with the closed-form log-normal and gamma-gamma models. The avalanche photodiode (APD) is chosen for photodetection. The accurate McIntyre-Conradi APD model is adopted for performance evaluation. Results show that large performance gain (more than 15dB) can be achieved with fast-tracked focused beams. The upper bound of higher-order adaptive optics gain beyond tracking gain is also studied.

  4. Effect of collisions on amplification of laser beams by Brillouin scattering in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, K. A.; Speirs, D. C.; Trines, R. M. G. M.; Norreys, P.; Fiuza, F.; Cairns, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2013-10-15

    We report on particle in cell simulations of energy transfer between a laser pump beam and a counter-propagating seed beam using the Brillouin scattering process in uniform plasma including collisions. The results presented show that the ion acoustic waves excited through naturally occurring Brillouin scattering of the pump field are preferentially damped without affecting the driven Brillouin scattering process resulting from the beating of the pump and seed fields together. We find that collisions, including the effects of Landau damping, allow for a more efficient transfer of energy between the laser beams, and a significant reduction in the amount of seed pre-pulse produced.

  5. Effects of transverse electron beam size on transition radiation angular distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiadroni, E.; Castellano, M.; Cianchi, A.; Honkavaara, K.; Kube, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we consider the effect of the transverse electron beam size on the Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) angular distribution in case of both incoherent and coherent emission. Our results confute the theoretical argumentations presented first in Optics Communications 211, 109 (2002), which predicts a dependence of the incoherent OTR angular distribution on the beam size and emission wavelength. We present here theoretical and experimental data not only to validate the well-established Ginzburg-Frank theory, but also to show the impact of the transverse beam size in case of coherent emission.

  6. The effect of radiotherapy beam energy on modern cardiac devices: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Zaremba, Tomas; Jakobsen, Annette Ross; Thøgersen, Anna Margrethe; Oddershede, Lars; Riahi, Sam

    2014-04-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) for malignancies can harm pacemakers (PMs) and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs). There is some evidence that, besides cumulative dose, the damaging radiation effects increase with beam energy. The aim of this study was to determine whether modern PMs and ICDs are more sensitive to high-energy than to low-energy photon beams. Two groups of unused PMs and explanted ICDs (five PMs and one ICD in each) were subjected to irradiations in a phantom with 6 and 18 megavolt (MV) photons, respectively. The devices were exposed to radiation at doses of 2 gray (Gy) daily to simulate two clinical scenarios with the PM/ICD in the RT field. A cumulative dose of 150 Gy was given to each device, corresponding to approximately twice the therapeutic dose. In the 6 MV group, one episode of PM malfunction was detected after reaching 150 Gy. In the 18 MV group, a total of 14 episodes of malfunction were detected starting at 30 Gy in all five PMs. No episodes appeared in the ICD, at the respective treatment groups. This corresponded to a hazard ratio of 9.11 [∼95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-79.69] by Cox regression analysis between the two groups. In a repeated measures logistic regression model comparing the incidence rate of malfunctions, the odds ratio was 18.29 (∼95% CI: 1.52-219.41). Photon beam energy plays a considerable role in inducing implantable cardiac device malfunctions. Low-energy RT may be safer in PM/ICD patients despite relatively high radiation dose to the device.

  7. Effect of beam premodulation on excitation of surface plasma waves in a magnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ruby; Sharma, Suresh C.; Prakash, Ved

    2010-11-15

    A density modulated electron beam propagating through a vacuum magnetized plasma interface drives electromagnetic surface plasma waves (SPWs) to instability via Cerenkov and fast cyclotron interaction. Numerical calculations of the growth rate and unstable mode frequencies have been carried out for the typical parameters of the SPWs. The growth rate {gamma} of the unstable wave instability increases with the modulation index ({Delta}) and is maximized for {Delta}=1. For {Delta}=0, {gamma} turns out to be {approx}4.32x10{sup 10} rad/s for Cerenkov interaction and {approx}6.81x10{sup 10} rad/s for fast cyclotron interaction. The growth rate of the instability increases with the beam density and scales as one-third power of the beam density in Cerenkov interaction and is proportional to the square root of beam density in fast cyclotron interaction. In addition, the real frequency of the unstable wave increases with the beam-energy and scales as almost one-half power of the beam-energy.

  8. Effects of Lateral Bracing and Stiffeners on the CFRP Failure of Strengthened Steel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamruzzaman, M.; Jumaat, M. Z.; Sulong, N. H. R.; Qeshta, I. M. I.; Narmashiri, K.

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the effects of lateral bracing and web stiffeners on the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) failure modes and buckling strength of the CFRP strengthened wide-flange steel I-beams are investigated experimentally. The study consisted of eight beams tested under static gradual load until failure. The main test variables were steel plate stiffeners, lateral bracings, and bonding of CFRP plates to beam soffits. The results showed that the use of steel plate stiffeners did not only prevent stress concentration below the point load, but it could also help to delay debonding of the externally bonded CFRP plate. The use of lateral bracing indicated a significant effect in preventing the CFRP splitting failure mode. In addition, the use of stiffeners with lateral bracing simultaneously, showed improvement in the in-plane flexural strength, stiffness and ductility of the CFRP strengthened I-beams.

  9. Multi-beam effects on backscatter and its saturation in experiments with conditions relevant to ignitiona)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P.; London, R.; Moody, J. D.; Dewald, E.; Yin, L.; Kline, J.; Hinkel, D.; Callahan, D.; Meezan, N.; Williams, E.; Divol, L.; Albright, B. L.; Bowers, K. J.; Bond, E.; Rose, H.; Ping, Y.; Wang, T. L.; Joshi, C.; Seka, W.; Fisch, N. J.; Turnbull, D.; Suckewer, S.; Wurtele, J. S.; Glenzer, S.; Suter, L.; Haynam, C.; Landen, O.; Macgowan, B. J.

    2011-05-01

    To optimize the coupling to indirect drive targets in the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) at the National Ignition Facility [E. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)], a model of stimulated scattering produced by multiple laser beams is used. The model has shown that scatter of the 351 nm beams can be significantly enhanced over single beam predictions in ignition relevant targets by the interaction of the multiple crossing beams with a millimeter scale length, 2.5 keV, 0.02-0.05 × critical density, plasma. The model uses a suite of simulation capabilities and its key aspects are benchmarked with experiments at smaller laser facilities. The model has also influenced the design of the initial targets used for NIC by showing that both the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) can be reduced by the reduction of the plasma density in the beam intersection volume that is caused by an increase in the diameter of the laser entrance hole (LEH). In this model, a linear wave response leads to a small gain exponent produced by each crossing quad of beams (<˜1 per quad) which amplifies the scattering that originates in the target interior where the individual beams are separated and crosses many or all other beams near the LEH as it exits the target. As a result all 23 crossing quads of beams produce a total gain exponent of several or greater for seeds of light with wavelengths in the range that is expected for scattering from the interior (480 to 580 nm for SRS). This means that in the absence of wave saturation, the overall multi-beam scatter will be significantly larger than the expectations for single beams. The potential for non-linear saturation of the Langmuir waves amplifying SRS light is also analyzed with a two dimensional, vectorized, particle in cell code (2D VPIC) that is benchmarked by amplification experiments in a plasma with normalized parameters similar to ignition targets. The physics of cumulative scattering

  10. Cost-Effective Red Water Disposal by Electron Beam Radiolysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-28

    reation and result in water and carbon dioxide as represented by the following chemical reaction I C 7 H 80 3 +15H 20 2 - 7C02 + 4H 20 +15H 20 (3) I In...irradiating the red water with an electron beam, sodium sulfonate of 2,4,5 TNT can be reduced to NaHSO 4, NO2, water and carbon dioxide . The chemical ...be efficiently and completely oxidized to produce carbon dioxide , hydrogen and water. The concentration of organic contaminants in process water varies

  11. Effects of electron beam irradiation of cellulose acetate cigarette filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czayka, M.; Fisch, M.

    2012-07-01

    A method to reduce the molecular weight of cellulose acetate used in cigarette filters by using electron beam irradiation is demonstrated. Radiation levels easily obtained with commercially available electron accelerators result in a decrease in average molecular weight of about six-times with no embrittlement, or significant change in the elastic behavior of the filter. Since a first step in the biodegradation of cigarette filters is reduction in the filter material's molecular weight this invention has the potential to allow the production of significantly faster degrading filters.

  12. A STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF ELECTRON BEAM MELTING ON COMPOUNDS AND METALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A study was made of the effect of the electron beam melting process on B, B-C alloys, B-Si alloys, TaC, TiC, ZrB2, Hf, W, Co, V, and Be. In addition...was reduced by the electron beam melting process. By the addition of deoxidants, the interstitial contents of Mo and Be were reduced. Improvement in

  13. Automatic beam position control at Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF)

    SciTech Connect

    Oothoudt, M.; Pillai, C.; Zumbro, M.

    1997-08-01

    Historically the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) has used manual methods to control the position of the 800 kW, 800 MeV proton beam on targets. New experiments, however, require more stringent position control more frequently than can be done manually for long periods of time. Data from an existing harp is used to automatically adjust steering magnets to maintain beam position to required tolerances.

  14. Effects of misaligned electron beam on inverse free electron laser acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khullar, Roma; Sharma, Geetanjali; Mishra, G.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss the effects of misaligned electron beam on an inverse free electron laser with both an electromagnetic wave wiggler and magnetostatic wiggler acceleration scheme. It is shown analytically that electromagnetic wiggler IFEL energy gain distance is substantially smaller when compared to the standard IFEL i.e. with a magnetostatic wiggler. The analysis further explains a better tolerance of the electromagnetic wiggler IFEL with respect to the misaligned electron beam in comparison to a magnetostatic wiggler IFEL scheme.

  15. Effects of Radiation Damping on Beam Quality in the Inverse Free Electron Laser Accelerator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-07

    Radiation Damping IFEL Accelerator 19 ABSTRA T (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number)I The effect of’ synchrotron radiation...damping on the transverse beam emittance for an inverse free elec- tron laser ( IFEL ) accelerator is studied. A beam envelope equation is derived and...both analytically and numerically for a set of IFEL . accelerator parameters. Our results show that for acceleration distance compar able to the

  16. Polarization beam combination technique for gain saturation effect compensation in high-energy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Junchi; Peng, Yujie; Su, Hongpeng; Leng, Yuxin

    2016-06-01

    To compensate for the gain saturation effect in the high-energy laser amplifier, a modified polarization beam combination (PBC) method is introduced to reshape temporal waveform of the injected laser pulse to obtain a controlled high-energy laser pulse shape after amplification. One linearly polarized beam is divided into two orthogonal polarized beams, which spatially recombine together collinearly after propagating different optical paths with relative time delay in PBC structure. The obtained beam with polarization direction being rotated by the following half wave plate is divided and combined again to reform a new beam in another modified polarization beam structure. The reformed beam is injected into three cascaded laser amplifiers. The amplified pulse shape can be controlled by the incident pulse shape and amplifier gain, which is agreeable to the simulation by the Frank-Nodvik equations. Based on the simple method, the various temporal waveform of output pulse with tunable 7 to 20 ns pulse duration can be obtained without interferometric fringes.

  17. Three-Dimensional Modeling of Polarization Effects on Cross-Beam Energy Transfer in OMEGA Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgell, D. H.; Follett, R. K.; Katz, J.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Froula, D. H.

    2016-10-01

    Beamlet spot images are used to diagnose cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) during OMEGA direct-drive implosions. The spots are, in essence, the end point of beamlets of light originating from different regions of each beam profile and following paths determined by refraction. The intensity of each spot varies because of absorption and CBET along that path. When each beam is linearly polarized, the image is asymmetric in terms of spot intensities. A 3-D CBET postprocessor for hydrodynamics codes is used to model the intensity, wavelength, and polarization of light from each beam. Rotation of polarization caused by CBET is tracked. The model is benchmarked using a 3-D wave-based solver for simplified CBET geometries. For linearly polarized beams in OMEGA implosions, the model predicts that polarization effects will result in asymmetric polarization and unabsorbed light profiles that are different for each beam. An asymmetric beamlet spot image similar to that recorded is predicted by the CBET model for linearly polarized beams. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  18. Thermal effect on the dynamic response of axially functionally graded beam subjected to a moving harmonic load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuewu; Wu, Dafang

    2016-10-01

    Dynamic response of an axially functionally graded (AFG) beam under thermal environment subjected to a moving harmonic load is investigated within the frameworks of classical beam theory (CBT) and Timoshenko beam theory (TBT). The Lagrange method is employed to derive the equations of thermal buckling for AFG beam, and then with the critical buckling temperature as a parameter the Newmark-β method is adopted to evaluate the dynamic response of AFG beam under thermal environments. Admissible functions denoting transverse displacement are expressed in simple algebraic polynomial forms. Temperature-dependency of material constituent is considered. The rule of mixture (Voigt model) and Mori-Tanaka (MT) scheme are used to evaluate the beam's effective material properties. A ceramic-metal AFG beam with immovable boundary condition is considered as numerical illustration to show the thermal effects on the dynamic behaviors of the beam subjected to a moving harmonic load.

  19. Effect of electron beam irradiation on bacterial and Ascaris ova loads and volatile organic compounds in municipal sewage sludge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engohang-Ndong, Jean; Uribe, R. M.; Gregory, Roger; Gangoda, Mahinda; Nickelsen, Mike G.; Loar, Philip

    2015-07-01

    Wastewater treatment plants produce large amounts of biosolids that can be utilized for land applications. However, prior to their use, these biosolids must be treated to eliminate risks of infections and to reduce upsetting odors. In this study, microbiological and chemical analyzes were performed before and after treatment of sewage sludge with 3 MeV of an electron beam accelerator in a pilot processing plant. Thus, we determined that dose 4.5 kGy was required to reduce fecal coliform counts to safe levels for land applications of sludge while, 14.5 kGy was necessary to decrease Ascaris ova counts to safe levels. Furthermore, at low doses, electron beam irradiation showed little effect on the concentrations of volatile organic compounds, while some increase were recorded at high doses. The concentration of dimethyl sulfide was reduced by 50-70% at irradiation doses of 25.7 kGy and 30.7 kGy respectively. By contrast, electron beam irradiation increased dimethyl disulfide concentrations. We also showed that electron beam treatment was less energy-consuming with shorter processing times than conventional techniques used to decontaminate sludge. Hence opening new avenues for large urban agglomerations to save money and time when treating biosolids for land application.

  20. Effects of electron beam irradiation on tribological and physico-chemical properties of Polyoxymethylene copolymer (POM-C)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Md. Shahinur; Shaislamov, Ulugbek; Yang, Jong-Keun; Kim, Jong-Kuk; Yu, Young Hun; Choi, Sooseok; Lee, Heon-Ju

    2016-11-01

    Polyoxymethylene copolymer (POM-C) is an attractive and widely used engineering thermoplastic across many industrial sectors owing to outstanding physical, mechanical, self-lubricating and chemical properties. In this research work, the POM-C blocks were irradiated with 1 MeV electron beam energy in five doses (100, 200, 300, 500 and 700 kGy) in vacuum condition at room temperature. The tribological and physico-chemical properties of electron beam irradiated POM-C blocks have been analyzed using pin on disk tribometer, Raman spectroscopy, FTIR-ATR, gel content analysis, SEM-EDS (scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy), surface profiler and contact angle analyzer. Electron beam irradiation at a dose of 100 kGy resulted in decrease of the friction coefficient of POM-C block due to well suited carbonization, cross-linking, free radicals formation and partial physical modification. It also showed the lowest surface roughness and highest water contact angle among all unirradiated and irradiated POM-C blocks. The irradiation dose at 200 kGy resulted in increase of friction coefficient due to less effective cross-linking, but the irradiation doses at 300, 500 and 700 kGy resulted in increase of the friction coefficient as compared to unirradiated POM-C block due to severe chain scission, chemical and physical structural degradation. The degree of improvement for tribological attribute relies on the electron beam surface dose delivered (energy and dose rate).

  1. Comparative effectiveness of external beam radiation approaches for prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Bruce L.; Zhang, Yun; Skolarus, Ted A.; Wei, John T.; Montie, James E.; Miller, David C.; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is increasingly used for treating localized prostate cancer. While allowing for the delivery of higher doses of radiation to the prostate, its effectiveness compared to the prior standard, 3-dimensional conformal therapy (3D-CRT), is uncertain. Objective To examine the comparative effectiveness of IMRT relative to 3D-CRT. Design, setting, and participants We performed a population-based cohort study using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare data to identify men diagnosed with prostate cancer between 2001 and 2007 who underwent either 3D-CRT (n=6,976) or IMRT (n=11,039). Measurements We assessed our main outcomes (i.e., the adjusted use of salvage therapy with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and risk of a complication requiring an intervention) using Cox proportional-hazards models. Results and limitations The percentage of men receiving IMRT increased from 9% in 2001 to 93% in 2007. Compared to those treated with 3D-CRT, low-risk patients treated with IMRT had similar likelihoods of using salvage therapy with ADT and similar risks of having a complication requiring an intervention (all p>0.05). Conversely, a subset of higher-risk patients treated with IMRT who did not receive concurrent ADT were less likely to use salvage therapy (p=0.02), while maintaining similar complication rates. Since our cohort includes Medicare beneficiaries, our findings may not be generalizable to younger patients. Conclusions For a subset of higher-risk patients, IMRT appears to show a benefit in terms of reduced salvage therapy without an increase in complications. For other patients, the risks of salvage therapy and complications are comparable between the two modalities. PMID:22790288

  2. Characterization and correction of cupping effect artefacts in cone beam CT

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, AK; McDavid, WD

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and correct the cupping effect artefact that occurs owing to the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation during image acquisition in cone beam CT (CBCT). Methods A uniform aluminium cylinder (6061) was used to demonstrate the cupping effect artefact on the Planmeca Promax 3D CBCT unit (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). The cupping effect was studied using a line profile plot of the grey level values using ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). A hardware-based correction method using copper pre-filtration was used to address this artefact caused by beam hardening and a software-based subtraction algorithm was used to address scatter contamination. Results The hardware-based correction used to address the effects of beam hardening suppressed the cupping effect artefact but did not eliminate it. The software-based correction used to address the effects of scatter resulted in elimination of the cupping effect artefact. Conclusion Compensating for the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation improves grey level uniformity in CBCT. PMID:22378754

  3. Characterization and correction of cupping effect artefacts in cone beam CT.

    PubMed

    Hunter, A K; McDavid, W D

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate and correct the cupping effect artefact that occurs owing to the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation during image acquisition in cone beam CT (CBCT). A uniform aluminium cylinder (6061) was used to demonstrate the cupping effect artefact on the Planmeca Promax 3D CBCT unit (Planmeca OY, Helsinki, Finland). The cupping effect was studied using a line profile plot of the grey level values using ImageJ software (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD). A hardware-based correction method using copper pre-filtration was used to address this artefact caused by beam hardening and a software-based subtraction algorithm was used to address scatter contamination. The hardware-based correction used to address the effects of beam hardening suppressed the cupping effect artefact but did not eliminate it. The software-based correction used to address the effects of scatter resulted in elimination of the cupping effect artefact. Compensating for the presence of beam hardening and scatter radiation improves grey level uniformity in CBCT.

  4. Nonlinear hybrid simulation of internal kink with beam ion effects in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Fu, G. Y.; Tobias, Benjamin; Van Zeeland, Michael; Wang, Feng; Sheng, Zheng-Mao

    2015-04-01

    In DIII-D sawteething plasmas, long-lived (1,1) kink modes are often observed between sawtooth crashes. The saturated kink modes have two distinct frequencies. The mode with higher frequency transits to a fishbone-like mode with sufficient on-axis neutral beam power. In this work, hybrid simulations with the global kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K have been carried out to investigate the linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the n = 1 mode with effects of energetic beam ions for a typical DIII-D discharge where both saturated kink mode and fishbone were observed. Linear simulation results show that the n = 1 internal kink mode is unstable in MHD limit. However, with kinetic effects of beam ions, a fishbone-like mode is excited with mode frequency about a few kHz depending on beam pressure profile. The mode frequency is higher at higher beam power and/or narrower radial profile consistent with the experimental observation. Nonlinear simulations have been performed to investigate mode saturation as well as energetic particle transport. The nonlinear MHD simulations show that the unstable kink mode becomes a saturated kink mode after a sawtooth crash. With beam ion effects, the fishbone-like mode can also transit to a saturated kink mode with a small but finite mode frequency. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of saturated kink mode between sawtooth crashes.

  5. Nonlinear hybrid simulation of internal kink with beam ion effects in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Wei; Sheng, Zheng-Mao; Fu, G. Y.; Tobias, Benjamin; Zeeland, Michael Van; Wang, Feng

    2015-04-15

    In DIII-D sawteething plasmas, long-lived (1,1) kink modes are often observed between sawtooth crashes. The saturated kink modes have two distinct frequencies. The mode with higher frequency transits to a fishbone-like mode with sufficient on-axis neutral beam power. In this work, hybrid simulations with the global kinetic-magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hybrid code M3D-K have been carried out to investigate the linear stability and nonlinear dynamics of the n = 1 mode with effects of energetic beam ions for a typical DIII-D discharge where both saturated kink mode and fishbone were observed. Linear simulation results show that the n = 1 internal kink mode is unstable in MHD limit. However, with kinetic effects of beam ions, a fishbone-like mode is excited with mode frequency about a few kHz depending on beam pressure profile. The mode frequency is higher at higher beam power and/or narrower radial profile consistent with the experimental observation. Nonlinear simulations have been performed to investigate mode saturation as well as energetic particle transport. The nonlinear MHD simulations show that the unstable kink mode becomes a saturated kink mode after a sawtooth crash. With beam ion effects, the fishbone-like mode can also transit to a saturated kink mode with a small but finite mode frequency. These results are consistent with the experimental observation of saturated kink mode between sawtooth crashes.

  6. Problems in nonlinear acoustics: Pulsed finite amplitude sound beams, nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a liquid layer, nonlinear effects in asymmetric cylindrical sound beams, effects of absorption on the interaction of sound beams, and parametric receiving arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Mark F.

    1990-12-01

    This report discusses five projects all of which involve basic theoretical research in nonlinear acoustics: (1) pulsed finite amplitude sound beams are studied with a recently developed time domain computer algorithm that solves the KZK nonlinear parabolic wave equation; (2) nonlinear acoustic wave propagation in a liquid layer is a study of harmonic generation and acoustic soliton information in a liquid between a rigid and a free surface; (3) nonlinear effects in asymmetric cylindrical sound beams is a study of source asymmetries and scattering of sound by sound at high intensity; (4) effects of absorption on the interaction of sound beams is a completed study of the role of absorption in second harmonic generation and scattering of sound by sound; and (5) parametric receiving arrays is a completed study of parametric reception in a reverberant environment.

  7. Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  8. Dose effects in electron beam irradiation of DNA-complex thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.; Jones, R.; Spaeth, H.; Steckl, A. J.

    2010-08-09

    Electron beam irradiation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA)-surfactant thin films was investigated. Irradiation caused dissociation, leading to increasing thin film solubility in water and degradation of dsDNA. These two effects produced a maximum concentration of dsDNA in aqueous solution at 400 {mu}C/cm{sup 2} dose. These properties resulted in dual-mode resist characteristics of the DNA-surfactant films. At low dose, the DNA films functioned as positive resist while at high dose they worked as negative resist. The transition between the two regimes also occurred at 400 {mu}C/cm{sup 2}. This implies that the cross-linking process (typical for negative resists) first requires the dissociation of the DNA-surfactant complex.

  9. Beam-Bem interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyung Jin; /Fermilab

    2011-12-01

    In high energy storage-ring colliders, the nonlinear effect arising from beam-beam interactions is a major source that leads to the emittance growth, the reduction of beam life time, and limits the collider luminosity. In this paper, two models of beam-beam interactions are introduced, which are weak-strong and strong-strong beam-beam interactions. In addition, space-charge model is introduced.

  10. Three dimensional approach to investigating biological effects along energetic ion beam pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xinglin; Sun, Shuguang; Wang, Shanying; Li, Wenjian; Qu, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Sun, Tianren; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jufang; Zhou, Guangming; Man, Shuli; Chen, Yi; Lu, Fuping; Wei, Zengquan; Jin, Genming

    2017-01-01

    Heavy ion beams have many exciting applications, including radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors and simulation tests of space irradiation for astronauts. These beams often use a feature that concentrates the energy deposition largely along the end of the energy pathway, leading to different distributions of biological effects along the axial direction. Currently, there is relatively little information regarding the radial directional difference of biological effects along the heavy ion paths. This study utilized a filter membrane that was quantatively applied with cells to demonstrate a 3D distribution model of irradiation on biological effects in living organisms. Some results have indicated that there is excitatory effect on the non-irradiated regions with energetic ions, which may give new insights into the distribution of biological effects along the paths of heavy ion beams with mid-high energy. PMID:28294181

  11. Three dimensional approach to investigating biological effects along energetic ion beam pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinglin; Sun, Shuguang; Wang, Shanying; Li, Wenjian; Qu, Ying; Cui, Weidong; Sun, Tianren; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Jufang; Zhou, Guangming; Man, Shuli; Chen, Yi; Lu, Fuping; Wei, Zengquan; Jin, Genming

    2017-03-01

    Heavy ion beams have many exciting applications, including radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors and simulation tests of space irradiation for astronauts. These beams often use a feature that concentrates the energy deposition largely along the end of the energy pathway, leading to different distributions of biological effects along the axial direction. Currently, there is relatively little information regarding the radial directional difference of biological effects along the heavy ion paths. This study utilized a filter membrane that was quantatively applied with cells to demonstrate a 3D distribution model of irradiation on biological effects in living organisms. Some results have indicated that there is excitatory effect on the non-irradiated regions with energetic ions, which may give new insights into the distribution of biological effects along the paths of heavy ion beams with mid-high energy.

  12. SU-D-213-02: Characterization of the Effect of a New Commercial Transmission Detector On Radiotherapy Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, J; Morin, O

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of a new commercial transmission detector on radiotherapy beams of various energies. Methods: A transmission detector designed for online treatment monitoring was characterized on a TrueBeam STx linear accelerator with 6MV, 6FFF, 10MV, and 10FFF beams. Measurements of beam characteristics including percentage depth doses (PDDs), inplane and crossplane off-axis profiles at different depths, transmission factors, and skin dose were acquired at field sizes of 3×3cm, 5×5m, 10×10cm, and 20×20cm at 100cm and 80cm source-to-surface distance (SSD). All measurements were taken with and without the transmission detector in the path of the beam. A CC04 chamber was used for all profile and transmission factor measurements. Skin dose was assessed at 100cm, 90cm, and 80cm SSD and using a variety of detectors (Roos and Markus parallel-plate chambers, and OSLD). Results: The PDDs showed small differences between the unperturbed and perturbed beams for both 100cm and 80cm SSD (≤4mm dmax difference and <1.2% average profile difference). The differences were larger for the flattened beams and at larger field sizes. The off-axis profiles showed similar trends. The penumbras looked similar with and without the transmission detector. Comparisons in the central 80% of the profile showed a maximum average (maximum) profile difference between all field sizes of 0.756% (1.535%) and 0.739% (3.682%) for 100cm and 80cm SSD, respectively. The average measured skin dose at 100cm (80cm) SSD for 10×10cm field size was <4% (<35%) dose increase for all energies. For 20×20cm field size, this value increased to <10% (≤45%). Conclusion: The transmission detector has minimal effect on the clinically relevant radiotherapy beams for IMRT and VMAT (field sizes 10×10cm and less). For larger field sizes, some perturbations are observable which would need to be assessed for clinical impact. The authors of this publication has research support from IBA Dosimetry.

  13. Effective magnetic fields in degenerate atomic gases induced by light beams with orbital angular momenta

    SciTech Connect

    Juzeliunas, G.; Oehberg, P.; Ruseckas, J.; Klein, A.

    2005-05-15

    We investigate the influence of two resonant laser beams on the mechanical properties of degenerate atomic gases. The control and probe beams of light are considered to have orbital angular momenta (OAM) and act on the three-level atoms in the electromagnetically induced transparency configuration. The theory is based on the explicit analysis of the quantum dynamics of cold atoms coupled with two laser beams. Using the adiabatic approximation, we obtain an effective equation of motion for the atoms driven to the dark state. The equation contains a vector-potential-type interaction as well as an effective trapping potential. The effective magnetic field is shown to be oriented along the propagation direction of the control and probe beams containing OAM. Its spatial profile can be controlled by choosing proper laser beams. We demonstrate how to generate a constant effective magnetic field, as well as a field exhibiting a radial distance dependence. The resulting effective magnetic field can be concentrated within a region where the effective trapping potential holds the atoms. The estimated magnetic length can be considerably smaller than the size of the atomic cloud.

  14. SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.

    2003-05-19

    During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

  15. Studies of the effects of electron cloud formation on beam dynamics at CesrTA

    SciTech Connect

    Crittenden, J. A.; Calvey, J. R.; Dugan, G.; Livezey, J. A.; Kreinick, D.L.; Palmer, M. A.; Rubin, D. L.; Harkay, K.; Holtzapple, R. L.; Ohmi, K.; Furman, M. A.; Penn, G.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring Test Accelerator (CesrTA) has commenced operation as a linear collider damping ring test bed following its conversion from an e{sup +}e{sup -}-collider in 2008. A core component of the research program is the measurement of effects of synchrotron-radiation-induced electron cloud formation on beam dynamics. We have studied the interaction of the beam with the cloud with measurements of coherent tune shifts and emittance growth in various bunch train configurations, bunch currents, beam energies, and bunch lengths, for both e{sup +} and e{sup -} beams. This paper compares a subset of these measurements to modeling results from the two-dimensional cloud simulation packages ECLOUD and POSINST. These codes each model most of the tune shift measurements with remarkable accuracy, while some comparisons merit further investigation.

  16. Effects of Core Thickness and Fiber Orientation on Composite Beam Stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillsman, Vernon S.; Olesak, Patricia J.

    1996-01-01

    This laboratory experiment is intended for students in an introductory polymer materials and processes course or engineering materials course. It can be conducted as an introduction to the hand lay-up process, with additional observations regarding the stiffness of the completed composite beams based on core thickness and fiber orientation. Students gain hands-on experience with the hand lay-up process by constructing glass/epoxy composite panels. Each lab group produces a panel with different core thickness or fiber orientation. The panels are then cut into strips and tested for flexural stiffness in a three-point bending fixture. Students plot deflection versus load data for composite beams with two different fiber orientations, two core thicknesses and one beam with laminate plies only (no core). The deflection plots highlight the effects of core thickness and fiber orientation on composite beam stiffness.

  17. Influence of electron beam and ultraviolet irradiations on graphene field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Siddique, Salma; Anwar, Nadia

    2017-10-01

    Electrical transport properties of graphene can be modulated by different controlled doping methods in order to make it useful for practical applications. Here we report a comparative study of electron-beam (e-beam) irradiated and ultraviolet (UV) irradiated graphene field effect transistors (FETs) for different doses and exposure times. We observed red shift in Raman spectra of graphene under e-beam irradiation which represents n-type doping while a divergent trend has been identified for UV irradiations which signify p-type doping. These results are further confirmed by the electrical transport measurements where the Dirac point shifts towards negative backgate voltage (i.e. n-type doping) upon e-beam exposure and shifted towards positive backgate voltage (i.e. p-type doping) under ultraviolet irradiation. Our approach reveals the dual characteristics of graphene FETs under these irradiation environments.

  18. The Irradiation Effect of a Simultaneous Laser and Electron Dual-beam on Void Formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhanbing; Watanabe, Seiichi; Kato, Takahiko

    2013-01-01

    Randomly distributed lattice point defects such as supersaturated vacancies (SVs) and Frenkel-pairs (FPs, an interstitial and a vacancy) can be simultaneously introduced into the crystal by energetic beam irradiation in outer space and/or nuclear reactors, but their behavior has not been fully understood. Using a high-voltage electron microscope equipped with a laser (laser-HVEM), we show the striking effects of simultaneous laser-electron (photon-electron) dual-beam irradiation on void formation. Our results reveal that during laser-electron sequential irradiation, pre-laser irradiation enhanced void nucleation and subsequent electron irradiation enhanced void growth. However, the laser-electron dual-beam irradiation was analyzed to depress void swelling remarkably because the recombination of SVs and interstitials was enhanced. The results provide insight into the mechanism underlying the dual-beam radiation-induced depression of void swelling in solids. PMID:23383371

  19. Enhanced Acoustic Black Hole effect in beams with a modified thickness profile and extended platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Liling; Cheng, Li

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of Acoustics Black Hole (ABH) benefits from the bending wave propagating properties inside a thin-walled structure with power-law thickness variation to achieve zero reflection when the structural thickness approaches zero in the ideal scenario. However, manufacturing an ideally tailored power-law profile of a structure with embedded ABH feature can hardly be achieved in practice. Past research showed that the inevitable truncation at the wedge tip of the structure can significantly weaken the expected ABH effect by creating wave reflections. On the premise of the minimum achievable truncation thickness by the current manufacturing technology, exploring ways to ensure and achieve better ABH effect becomes important. In this paper, we investigate this issue by using a previously developed wavelet-decomposed semi-analytical model on an Euler-Bernoulli beam with a modified power-law profile and an extended platform of constant thickness. Through comparisons with the conventional ABH profile in terms of system loss factor and energy distribution, numerical results show that the modified thickness profile brings about a systematic increase in the ABH effect at mid-to-high frequencies, especially when the truncation thickness is small and the profile parameter m is large. The use of an extended platform further increases the ABH effect to broader the frequency band whilst providing rooms for catering particular low frequency applications.

  20. Effect of Growth Pause on Indium Gallium Phosphorus/gallium Arsenic Heterointerfaces during Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyong Yong

    Molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of InGaP/GaAs quantum-well structures requires switching of the arsenic and phosphorus beams at each heterointerface. Using in -situ reflection high energy electron diffraction, double crystal X-ray (DCXR) diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy, the effects of a growth pause on the interfacial structure and composition of lattice-matched InGaP/GaAs multiple quantum well structures were studied. For the purpose of this study growth pause at each interface was divided into two time periods: the interval (denoted by t_1) after stopping growth by closing the group-III shutters but before switching the group-V beams, and the interval (t_2) after switching the group-V beams but before recommencing growth. The effect of the As_2 beam on the GaAs growth front and the P_2 beam on the InGaP growth front was first studied. An atomically smooth GaAs surface was obtained with about 30 sec of pause in an As_2 beam. With the experimental methods used, the InGaP growth front did not show any major structural changes with increasing growth pause time. The GaAs-to-InGaP interface is found to be composed of one to two monolayers of GaAs_ {y}P_{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05) and the InGaP-to-GaAs interface is composed of one to two monolayers of In_{.5}Ga_ {.5}As_{y}P _{1-y} (0 < y < 0.05). This requires an exchange of As and P in the uppermost group-V atoms. The effect of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and an P_2 beam on the GaAs surface was next studied. For t _2 < 20 sec, atomically flat heterointerfaces were obtained and both the GaAs-to-InGaP and the InGaP -to-GaAs interfaces were found to be composed of group-V exchange strained layers. For t_2 >=q 60 sec a wavy interface was obtained. The irregularities of the interface may be the result of the As and P exchange mechanism. The experimental results show that a combination of an As_2 beam on the InGaP surface and a P_2 beam on the GaAs surface lasting 2 min produces rougher growth fronts

  1. The Boersch effect in a picosecond pulsed electron beam emitted from a semiconductor photocathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Makoto; Nambo, Yoshito; Aoki, Kota; Sameshima, Kensuke; Jin, Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Asano, Hidefumi; Saitoh, Koh; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2016-07-01

    The space charge effect has been clearly observed in the energy distributions of picosecond pulse beams from a spin-polarized electron microscope, and was found to depend upon the quantity of charge per pulse. The non-linear phenomena associated with this effect have also been replicated in beam simulations that take into account of a three-dimensional space charge. The results show that a charge of 500 aC/pulse provides the highest brightness with a 16-ps pulse duration, a 30-keV beam energy, and an emission spot of 1.8 μm. Furthermore, the degeneracy of the wave packet of the pulsed electron beam has been evaluated to be 1.6 × 10-5 with a charge of 100 aC/pulse, which is higher than that for a continuously emitted electron beam despite the low beam energy of 30 keV. The high degeneracy and high brightness contribute to the realization of high temporal and energy resolutions in low-voltage electron microscopy, which will serve to reduce radiolysis damage and enhance scattering contrast.

  2. The Boersch effect in a picosecond pulsed electron beam emitted from a semiconductor photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Makoto Ujihara, Toru; Saitoh, Koh; Nambo, Yoshito; Aoki, Kota; Sameshima, Kensuke; Asano, Hidefumi; Jin, Xiuguang; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2016-07-04

    The space charge effect has been clearly observed in the energy distributions of picosecond pulse beams from a spin-polarized electron microscope, and was found to depend upon the quantity of charge per pulse. The non-linear phenomena associated with this effect have also been replicated in beam simulations that take into account of a three-dimensional space charge. The results show that a charge of 500 aC/pulse provides the highest brightness with a 16-ps pulse duration, a 30-keV beam energy, and an emission spot of 1.8 μm. Furthermore, the degeneracy of the wave packet of the pulsed electron beam has been evaluated to be 1.6 × 10{sup −5} with a charge of 100 aC/pulse, which is higher than that for a continuously emitted electron beam despite the low beam energy of 30 keV. The high degeneracy and high brightness contribute to the realization of high temporal and energy resolutions in low-voltage electron microscopy, which will serve to reduce radiolysis damage and enhance scattering contrast.

  3. Separation of scatter from small MV beams and its effect on detector response.

    PubMed

    Wegener, Sonja; Sauer, Otto A

    2017-03-01

    Separating the scatter from the primary component of a MV beam to study detector response separately in each case for a better understanding of the role of different effects influencing the response in nonstandard fields. Detector response in three different experimental setups was investigated for a variety of different types (diamond, shielded and unshielded diodes, ionization chamber and film): (a). Detectors positioned in water under a thin steel pole blocking the central part of the beam, yielding only the response to the scatter part of the beam. (b). Detectors positioned in air under a PMMA cap to approximate the contribution of the primary beam without scatter. (c). Detectors positioned in water in the standard open field configuration to obtain a superposition of both. Detector differences became more clearly observable when the primary beam was blocked and detector behavior heavily depended on the construction type. It was possible to calculate the response in the open fields from the values measured in the blocked configuration with 1% accuracy for all studied field sizes between 0.8 and 10 cm and for all detectors. The limitations of clinically used detectors in nonstandard situations were illustrated in the extreme situation of just scattered radiation reaching the detector. By experimentally separating scatter from the primary beam, the roles of different effects on the detector response were observed. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Electron beam radiation effects on UHMWPE: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Brunella, Valentina; Paganini, Maria Cristina

    2011-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique has been employed to detect and characterise a series of different radical species generated in ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) via electron beam irradiation. Three different radical species have been found and assigned on the basis of their EPR spectra and of the related computer simulations. A secondary alkyl species, the prevalent one, is present immediately after irradiation, an allyl species appears only 24 h after irradiation when the alkyl species disappears.The third species, clearly visible at high microwave power only, has been observed for the first time and assigned to a tertiary alkyl carbon radical, whose formation is strictly connected with a Y-shape crosslink and a migration of the unpaired electron on a carbon atom localised in an adjacent position.

  5. Purposeful Co-Curricular Activities Designed to Increase Engagement: A Practice Brief Based on BEAMS Project Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazeur, Camille

    2008-01-01

    One of a series highlighting key practices undertaken by some of the many successful BEAMS (Building Engagement and Attainment for Minority Students) schools during the project's five years of data collection and action plan implementation, this practice brief demonstrates how emphasis on co-curricular activities can ultimately result in increased…

  6. Electron cloud effects on an intense ion beam in a four solenoid lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley,; 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA-94720, USA.; University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3511, USA.; Lawrence Liveremore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA.; Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA.; Coleman, Josh; Coleman, J.E.; Seidl, P.A.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Vay, J.L.; Haber, I.; Molvik, A.W.; Sharp, W.M.; Welch, D.R.

    2007-07-01

    The Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at LBNL successfully demonstrated the transport of a space-charge dominated ion beam in a two-solenoid lattice. Initial experiments showed a strong dependence of electron cloud effects on solenoid field strength. A current-reducing aperture, two solenoids and in-bore diagnostics were added to the two-solenoid lattice in order to study electron cloud effects more closely. Experiments were conducted with a 10 {micro}s, singly charged potassium ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV and currents of 26 mA and 45 mA. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including a comparison of the effects of manipulating electrons on the beam dynamics, quantifying beam-induced gas desorption, ionization, and electron effects.

  7. Comparative effects of gamma rays and electron beams on spores of Bacillus pumilus

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Toru; Todoriki, Setsuko ); Takizawa, Hironobu; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Takama, Kozo )

    1994-02-01

    The effects of [gamma] rays and electron beams on the germination, outgrowth and the synthesis of protein and RNA of Bacillus pumilus spores were investigated to clarify the difference in the effects of the two types of radiations on bacterial spores. Gamma irradiation facilitated the germination to a slightly larger degree than electron irradiation. The outgrowth, growth and the synthesis of protein and RNA were inhibited by [gamma] irradiation to a greater extent than electron irradiation, when the spores were irradiated at the same dose. However, the effects of the two types of radiations were the same when the spores were irradiated with electron beams at a dose 30% higher than [gamma] rays. The results indicate that the effects of electron beams on bacterial spores and those of [gamma] rays are qualitatively the same but quantitatively different. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Effects of focused ion beam milling on austenite stability in ferrous alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Knipling, K.E.; Rowenhorst, D.J.; Fonda, R.W.; Spanos, G.

    2010-01-15

    The susceptibility of fcc austenite to transform to bcc during focused ion beam milling was studied in three commercial stainless steels. The alloys investigated, in order of increasing austenite stability, were: (i) a model maraging steel, Sandvik 1RK91; (ii) an AISI 304 austenitic stainless steel; and (iii) AL-6XN, a super-austenitic stainless steel. Small trenches were milled across multiple austenite grains in each alloy using a 30 kV Ga{sup +} ion beam at normal incidence to the specimen surface. The ion beam dose was controlled by varying the trench depth and the beam current. The factors influencing the transformation of fcc austenite to bcc (listed in order of decreasing influence) were found to be: (i) alloy composition (i.e., austenite stability), (ii) ion beam dose (or trench depth), and (iii) crystallographic orientation of the austenite grains. The ion beam current had a negligible influence on the FIB-induced transformation of austenite in these alloys.

  9. Effects of the imposed magnetic field on the production and transport of relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hong-bo; Zhu, Shao-ping; He, X. T.

    2013-07-01

    The effects of the imposed uniform magnetic field, ranging from 1 MG up to 50 MG, on the production and transport of relativistic electron beams (REBs) in overdense plasmas irradiated by ultraintense laser pulse are investigated with two-dimensional particle-in-cell numerical simulations. This study gives clear evidence that the imposed magnetic field is capable of effectively confining the relativistic electrons in space even when the source is highly divergent since it forces the electrons moving helically. In comparison, the spontaneous magnetic fields, generated by the helically moving electrons interplaying with the current filamentation instability, are dominant in scattering the relativistic electrons. As the imposed magnetic field was increased from 1 MG to 50 MG, overall coupling from laser to the relativistic electrons which have the potential to heat the compressed core in fast ignition was found to increase from 6.9% to 21.3% while the divergence of the REB increases significantly from 64° to 90°. The simulations show that imposed magnetic field of the value of 3-30 MG could be more suitable to fast-ignition inertial fusion.

  10. Effects of electron beam irradiation (EBI) on structure characteristics and thermal properties of walnut protein flour.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Sun, Na; Li, Yong; Cheng, Sheng; Jiang, Chengyao; Lin, Songyi

    2017-10-01

    The effects of electron beam irradiation (EBI) on structure characteristics and thermal properties of walnut protein flour (WPF) were evaluated. The WPF was irradiated by 0-15.0kGy of the EBI. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the EBI irradiation could not change the amorphous structure of WPF but resulted in puncture pores and fragmentation on microcosmic surface of WPF. Besides, low-field nuclear magnetic resonance results showed the EBI irradiation had effects on increasing denaturation temperature of WPF to 70°C, and the particle size of WPF hydrolysates (WPFHs) irradiated by EBI at dose of 5.0kGy significantly (P<0.05) increased to 753.8±21.0nm. The molecular weight of WPFHs at dose of 5.0kGy increased compared with that of non-irradiated sample. These revealed that EBI irradiation led to aggregation or cross-linking of the walnut protein. In addition, thermogravimetric analysis and zeta potential values indicated that the EBI enhanced thermal stability of WPF and didn't affect the physical stability of the WPFHs. Therefore, these results provided a theoretical foundation that the EBI applies on improving the properties of protein in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Beam wander of partially coherent array beams through non-Kolmogorov turbulence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongping; Zeng, Anping; Gao, Zenghui; Zhang, Bin

    2015-04-15

    Based on the theory of second moments and non-Kolmogorov spectrum, the beam wander theory is extend to non-Kolmogorov turbulence, the general analytical expression of beam wander in non-Kolmogorov turbulence is derived. Beam wander depends on the non-Kolmogorov turbulence parameters and the initial second moments of the laser beam at the input plane. Taking the Gaussian Schell model array beams as an example, the effects of the generalized exponent parameter, inner scale, and outer scale of non-Kolmogorov turbulence and the beam separation distance, beam number, and coherence degree on the beam wander are studied in detail. It has been shown that the beam wander varies non-monotonically with increasing generalized exponent parameter of the turbulence. Furthermore, it increases as the inner scale decreases or outer scale increases, and decreases as the beam separation distance and beam number increase and the coherence of the beam becomes weaker. Our results also indicate that the beam wander could be reduced by adjusting the beam parameters appropriately.

  12. Effects of polarization and coherence on the propagation and the detection of stochastic electromagnetic beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Mohamed

    Most of the physically realizable optical sources are radiating in a random manner given the random nature of the radiation of a large number of atoms that constitute the source. Besides, a lot of natural and synthetic materials are fluctuating randomly. Hence, the optical fields that one encounters, in most of the applications are fluctuating and must be treated using random or stochastic functions. Within the framework of the scalar-coherence theory, one can describe changes of the properties of any stochastic field such as the spectral density and the spectral degree of coherence on propagation in any linear medium, deterministic or random. One of the frequently encountered random media is the atmospheric turbulence, where the fluctuating refractive index of such medium severely degrades any signal propagating through it; especially it causes intensity fades of the signal. The usage of stochastic beams at the transmitter instead of deterministic ones has been suggested sometime ago to suppress the severe effects of intensity fluctuations caused by the atmospheric turbulence. In this dissertation, we study the usage of partially coherent beams in long path propagation schemes through turbulent atmosphere such as one frequently encounters in remote sensing, in the use of communication systems, and in guiding. Also the used detection scheme at the receiver is important to quantify the received signal efficiently, hence we compare the performance of incoherent (direct) detection versus coherent (heterodyne) detection upon the use of either one of them at the receiver of the communication system of beams propagating in turbulent atmosphere and namely we evaluate the signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) for each case. The scalar-coherence theory ignored the vector nature of stochastic fields, which should be taken into account for some applications such as the ones that depend on the change of the polarization of the field. Recently generalization for the scalar

  13. THE EFFECT OF ASYMMETRIC BEAMS IN THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Wehus, I. K.; Ackerman, L.; Eriksen, H. K.; Groeneboom, N. E. E-mail: lotty@caltech.ed E-mail: leuat@irio.co.u

    2009-12-10

    We generate simulations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature field as observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite, taking into account the detailed shape of the asymmetric beams and scanning strategy of the experiment, and use these to re-estimate the WMAP beam transfer functions. This method avoids the need of artificially symmetrizing the beams, as done in the baseline WMAP approach, and instead measures the total convolution effect by direct simulation. We find only small differences with respect to the nominal transfer functions, typically less than 1% everywhere, and less than 0.5% at l < 400. The net effect on the CMB power spectrum is less than 0.6%. The effect on all considered cosmological parameters is negligible. For instance, we find that the spectral index of scalar perturbations after taking into account the beam asymmetries is n {sub s} = 0.964 +- 0.014, corresponding to a negative shift of -0.1sigma compared to the previously released WMAP results. Our CMB sky simulations are made publicly available and can be used for general studies of asymmetric beam effects in the WMAP data.

  14. The effect of the iBEAM Evo carbon fiber tabletop on skin sparing.

    PubMed

    Simpson, John B; Godwin, Guy A

    2011-01-01

    Replicating the attenuation properties of the treatment tabletop are of primary importance for accurate treatment planning; however, the effect of the tabletop on the skin-sparing properties of x-rays can be overlooked. Under some conditions, the reaction of skin to the radiation can be so serious as to be the dose-limiting organ for radiotherapy treatment. Hence, an understanding of the magnitude of the reduction in skin sparing is important. Because of the development of image-guided radiotherapy, modern tabletops have been developed without the use of metal supports that otherwise provided the necessary level of rigidity. Rigidity is instead provided by compressed foam within a carbon-fiber shell, which, although it provides artefact-free imaging and high levels of rigidity, has an adverse affect on the dose in the build-up region. Representative of this type is the iBEAM evo tabletop, whose effect on the skin dose was determined at 6-MV, 10-MV, and 18-MV x-rays. Skin dose was found to increase by 60-70% owing to the tabletop, with the effect increasing with field size and decreasing with energy. By considering an endpoint of erythema, a radiobiological advantage of selecting 10 MV over 6 MV for applicable treatments was demonstrated.

  15. Reduction of Focal Shift Effects in Industrial Laser Beam Welding by Means of Innovative Protection Glass Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmerich, Malte; Thiel, Christiane; Lupp, Friedrich; Hanebuth, Henning; Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas

    High-power laser beam welding in industrial environment often suffers from process induced contamination of laser focusing optics. Especially exposed to this contamination is the plane protection glass which is positioned directly above the process to protect the expensive lenses from contaminations such as spatter and metal vapor. Locally increased absorption due to con-tamination leads to a temperature rise in the protection glass and a corresponding change of its optical characteristics. This results in a reduced beam quality and a shift of the focus position. Both effects lead to a reduced intensity of radiation on the workpiece causing a lower welding penetration depth. In this article we present laser beam measurements using laser processing optics with protection glasses of different materials and different grades of contamination. Welds in mild steel illustrate the extraordinary advantage of sapphire protection glasses, allowing a constant welding depth even when they are strongly contaminated. Welding results, beam caustic measurements and an estimation of economic efficiency will be shown.

  16. Effects of beam steering in pulsed-wave ultrasound velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Aaron H; Yu, Alfred C H; Johnston, K Wayne; Cobbold, Richard S C

    2005-08-01

    Experimental and computer simulation methods have been used to investigate the significance of beam steering as a potential source of error in pulsed-wave flow velocity estimation. By simulating a typical linear-array transducer system as used for spectral flow estimation, it is shown that beam steering can cause an angle offset resulting in a change in the effective beam-flow angle. This offset primarily depends on the F-number and the nominal steering angle. For example, at an F-number of 3 and a beam-flow angle of 70 degrees , the velocity error changed from -5% to + 5% when the steering angle changed from -20 degrees to + 20 degrees . Much higher errors can occur at higher beam-flow angles, with smaller F-numbers and greater steering. Our experimental study used a clinical ultrasound system, a tissue-mimicking phantom and a pulsatile waveform to determine peak flow velocity errors for various steering and beam-flow angles. These errors were found to be consistent with our simulation results.

  17. Nonlinear delta(f) Simulations of Collective Effects in Intense Charged Particle Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Hong Qin

    2003-01-21

    A nonlinear delta(f) particle simulation method based on the Vlasov-Maxwell equations has been recently developed to study collective processes in high-intensity beams, where space-charge and magnetic self-field effects play a critical role in determining the nonlinear beam dynamics. Implemented in the Beam Equilibrium, Stability and Transport (BEST) code [H. Qin, R.C. Davidson, and W.W. Lee, Physical Review -- Special Topics on Accelerator and Beams 3 (2000) 084401; 3 (2000) 109901.], the nonlinear delta(f) method provides a low-noise and self-consistent tool for simulating collective interactions and nonlinear dynamics of high-intensity beams in modern and next-generation accelerators and storage rings, such as the Spallation Neutron Source and heavy ion fusion drivers. A wide range of linear eigenmodes of high-intensity charged-particle beams can be systematically studied using the BEST code. Simulation results for the electron-proton two-stream instability in the Proton Storage Ring experiment [R. Macek, et al., in Proc. of the Particle Accelerator Conference, Chicago, 2001 (IEEE, Piscataway, NJ, 2001), Vol. 1, p. 688.] at the Los Alamos National Laboratory agree well with experimental observations. Large-scale parallel simulations have also been carried out for the ion-electron two-stream instability in the very-high-intensity heavy ion beams envisioned for heavy ion fusion applications. In both cases, the simulation results indicate that the dominant two-stream instability has a dipole-mode (hose-like) structure and can be stabilized by a modest axial momentum spread of the beam particles.

  18. External beam irradiation in angioplasted arteries of hypercholesterolemic rabbits The dose and time effect

    SciTech Connect

    Kalef-Ezra, J.; Michalis, L.K.; Malamou-Mitsi, V.; Tsekeris, P.; Katsouras, C.; Boziari, A.; Toumpoulis, I.; Bozios, G.; Charchanti, A.; Sideris, D.A

    2002-03-01

    Purpose: To study the dose and time effect of external beam irradiation on the morphometry of both angioplasted and nonangioplasted arteries in a hypercholesterolemic rabbit model. Methods and materials: Eight groups of rabbit femoral arteries were studied: arteries (a) with no intervention, (b) irradiated with a 12-Gy 6 MV X-ray dose, (c) with a 18-Gy, (d) treated with balloon angioplasty, (e) dosed with 12-Gy half an hour post-angioplasty, (f) dosed with 18-Gy half an hour post-angioplasty, (g) dosed with 12-Gy 48 h post angioplasty, (g) dosed with 18-Gy 48 h post angioplasty. Results: External irradiation at either 12 or 18 Gy was not found to change vessel morphometry in noninjured arteries. The 12-Gy dose given soon after angioplasty further increased percentage stenosis (63% on the average), despite the preservation of the lumen cross-sectional area. Positive remodeling was not observed in arteries given 18-Gy half an hour post angioplasty to counterbalance the increased neointimal formation. Therefore, this treatment resulted in a drastic reduction in lumen area and in enhancement of percentage stenosis (84% on the average). On the contrary, the delayed irradiation of the angioplasted arteries at either 12 or 18 Gy was not found to influence any of the studied morphometric parameters 5 weeks after angioplasty. Conclusions: Uniform external beam irradiation up to 18 Gy was well tolerated by intact femoral arteries. Prompt 12- or 18-Gy irradiations accentuated percentage stenosis. However the lumen cross-sectional area was preserved only at the lower dose point. Delayed irradiation at any dose did not influence the restenosis process.

  19. Effect of electron beam irradiation on developmental stages of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Junheon; Chung, Soon-Oh; Jang, Sin Ae; Jang, Miyeon; Park, Chung Gyoo

    2015-07-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), is an economically important and polyphagous pest, which harms various kinds of food crops and important agricultural plants, such as cotton and paprika. Effects of electron beam irradiation at six dose levels between 50 and 350 Gy on the egg (24-48 h old), the larval (4-5th instar), and the pupal (7-d old for female, 5-d old for male) development, and on the adult (1-d old) reproduction were tested to identify a potential quarantine treatment dose. Increased doses of irradiation on eggs decreased egg hatchability, pupation and adult emergence and increased larval period. ED99 values for inhibition of hatching, pupation and emergence were 460.6, 236.9 and 197.8 Gy, respectively. When larvae were irradiated with more than 280 Gy, no larvae could develop into pupae. ED99 values for inhibition of pupation and adult emergence were 265.6 and 189.6 Gy, respectively. Even though the irradiation on pupa did not completely inhibit adult emergence, most of the pupae emerged to deformed adults. When adults were irradiated, fecundity was not affected. However, F1 egg hatching was completely inhibited at the dose of 350 Gy. ED99 value for inhibition of adult emergence was estimated at 366.5 Gy. Our results suggest that electron beam irradiation could be recommendable as an alternative to MB and as a phytosanitary treatment for quarantine. A treatment dose of less than or equal to 220 Gy is suggested as a potential quarantine treatment to H. armigera egg for prevention of pupation and to larva for prevention of adult emerge.

  20. Geometrical optics of beams with vortices: Berry phase and orbital angular momentum Hall effect.

    PubMed

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  1. Studies on transmitted beam modulation effect from laser induced damage on fused silica optics.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Ma, Ping; Li, Haibo; Liu, Zhichao; Chen, Songlin

    2013-07-15

    UV laser induced damage (LID) on exit surface of fused silica could cause modulation effect to transmitted beam and further influence downstream propagation properties. This paper presents our experimental and analytical studies on this topic. In experiment, a series of measurement instruments are applied, including beam profiler, interferometer, microscope, and optical coherent tomography (OCT). Creating and characterizing of LID on fused silica sample have been implemented. Morphological features are studied based on their particular modulation effects on transmitted beam. In theoretical investigation, analytical modeling and numerical simulation are performed. Modulation effects from amplitude, phase, and size factors are analyzed respectively. Furthermore, we have novelly designed a simplified polygon model to simulate actual damage site with multiform modulation features, and the simulation results demonstrate that the modeling is usable and representative.

  2. Geometrical Optics of Beams with Vortices: Berry Phase and Orbital Angular Momentum Hall Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Bliokh, Konstantin Yu.

    2006-07-28

    We consider propagation of a paraxial beam carrying the spin angular momentum (polarization) and intrinsic orbital angular momentum (IOAM) in a smoothly inhomogeneous isotropic medium. It is shown that the presence of IOAM can dramatically enhance and rearrange the topological phenomena that previously were considered solely in connection to the polarization of transverse waves. In particular, the appearance of a new type of Berry phase that describes the parallel transport of the beam structure along a curved ray is predicted. We derive the ray equations demonstrating the splitting of beams with different values of IOAM. This is the orbital angular momentum Hall effect, which resembles the Magnus effect for optical vortices. Unlike the spin Hall effect of photons, it can be much larger in magnitude and is inherent to waves of any nature. Experimental means to detect the phenomena are discussed.

  3. Design and development of a new micro-beam treatment planning system: effectiveness of algorithms of optimization and dose calculations and potential of micro-beam treatment.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hidenobu; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Yusa, Noritaka; Miyajima, Satoshi; Tsuda, Akihisa; Yamashita, Takashi

    2012-07-01

    A new treatment planning system (TPS) was designed and developed for a new treatment system, which consisted of a micro-beam-enabled linac with robotics and a real-time tracking system. We also evaluated the effectiveness of the implemented algorithms of optimization and dose calculations in the TPS for the new treatment system. In the TPS, the optimization procedure consisted of the pseudo Beam's-Eye-View method for finding the optimized beam directions and the steepest-descent method for determination of beam intensities. We used the superposition-/convolution-based (SC-based) algorithm and Monte Carlo-based (MC-based) algorithm to calculate dose distributions using CT image data sets. In the SC-based algorithm, dose density scaling was applied for the calculation of inhomogeneous corrections. The MC-based algorithm was implemented with Geant4 toolkit and a phase-based approach using a network-parallel computing. From the evaluation of the TPS, the system can optimize the direction and intensity of individual beams. The accuracy of the dose calculated by the SC-based algorithm was less than 1% on average with the calculation time of 15 s for one beam. However, the MC-based algorithm needed 72 min for one beam using the phase-based approach, even though the MC-based algorithm with the parallel computing could decrease multiple beam calculations and had 18.4 times faster calculation speed using the parallel computing. The SC-based algorithm could be practically acceptable for the dose calculation in terms of the accuracy and computation time. Additionally, we have found a dosimetric advantage of proton Bragg peak-like dose distribution in micro-beam treatment.

  4. Return current effects in passive plasma lenses for relativistic electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govil, Richa

    This thesis presents results of an experimental study of return currents effects on beam focusing in plasma lenses conducted at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). Relativistic electron beams can be focused in field-free plasmas due to magnetic self-pinching. However, plasma return currents induced by the changing magnetic flux of a propagating bunch can reduce the total magnetic field and focusing force (Ampere's law). The experiment covered a parameter regime not observed previously, namely, the return current regime, where the collisionless plasma skindepth is small compared to the electron beam size and the focusing strength of the plasma lens is reduced due to return currents. A relativistic electron beam from the BTF, which utilizes the Advanced Light Source (ALS) injector, was used to study the properties of return currents in plasmas. The beam-transport line and experimental chamber were designed to allow measurement of electron beam size continuously along its path, before and after it passed through plasma lenses. For this purpose, an optical transition radiation (OTR) based diagnostic was developed. To ensure plasmas free of external fields, laser- ionization was chosen as the plasma production method. The dependence of plasma density on fill pressure and laser intensity was studied with an in-quadrature Mach- Zehnder radio frequency interferometer. A novel interferometry technique based on evanescent wave detection was developed to measure plasma densities above the cutoff density, for plasmas with a thickness less than the collisionless skin depth. Plasma density was controlled by changing the fill-pressure in the chamber, while the plasma profile was adjusted through the laser intensity. For typical experimental parameters, the electron beam size was observed to reduce in the presence of plasma. Plasma lenses were produced in the return current regime with the ratio of beam size to collisionless plasma

  5. Verification of metric theory of gravitation using beam width correction for Sagnac effect

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Weihan; Song Xiaojue; Gu Zhichong

    1983-10-01

    The effect of finite beam width on the Sagnac frequency shift has been calculated by Zhbairy and Scully. However, their analysis is somewhat incorrect. In the present paper, we point out the questions included in their article and give a new analysis on this subject and the corrected equations for Sagnac effect for square ring lasers.

  6. Increasing the spectral coverage of interferometric integrated optics: K/L and N-laser-written beam combiners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, Jan; Diener, Romina; Labadie, Lucas; Minardi, Stefano; Muthusubramanian, Balaji; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Nolte, Stefan; Arriola, Alexander; Madden, Gillian; Choudhury, Debaditya; MacPherson, William N.; Thomson, Robert R.

    2016-08-01

    Integrated optics (IO) has proven to be a competitive solution for beam combination in the context of astronomical interferometry (e.g. GRAVITY at the VLTI). However, conventional silica-based lithographic IO is limited to wavelengths shorter than 2.2μm. We report in this paper the progress on our attempt to extend the operation of IO to longer wavelengths. Previous work has demonstrated the suitability of chalcogenide devices in the MID-IR in the N band and monochromatically at 3.39 μm. Here, we continue this effort with the manufacturing of new laser written GLS IO as beam combiners designed for the astronomical L band and characterized interferometrically at 3.39 μm. In the era of multi-telescope interferometers, we present a promising solution to strengthen the potential of IO for new wavelength ranges.

  7. Simulations of the effects of mobile ions on the relativistic beam-plasma instability for intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, M.E.; Lemons, D.S.; Lee, H.

    1983-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations of the beam-plasma instability for intense relativistic electron beams in dense plasmas show rapid heating of the electrons to multi-kilovolt temperatures. The resulting hydrodynamic motion of the plasma results in density gradients that degrade the interaction. Heat flow out of the plasma is found in some instances to limit the gradient formation process.

  8. Kinetic Effects in Multiple Intra-Beam Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkevich, P.; Bolshakov, A.; Boine-Frankenheim, O.

    2005-06-08

    The analysis of the evolution in phase space induced by multiple intra-beam scattering (IBS) requires the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation (FPE) or of similar kinetic equations. The FPE is formulated in coordinate-momentum space (6 variables). Using the 'semi-Gaussian model' this equation is reduced to the longitudinal FPE that depends on longitudinal momentum and coordinate; drift and diffusion coefficients in this equation are presented as integrals on distribution function with kernels expressed in analytical form. The number of variables in the FPE can be reduced to three by reformulation in the space of invariants. The invariant-vector has the following components: a longitudinal energy (for the longitudinal degree of freedom) and the Courant-Snyder invariants (for the transverse motion). The coefficients of the FPE in invariant space are in the form of integrals over the distribution function and the invariants with the kernel in the form of many-dimensional integrals over the longitudinal variable and over the oscillation phases. The three-dimensional FPE can be solved numerically by application of macro-particle codes using the different methods: 1) Langevin method; 2) binary collision map. The last method is used in the code 'MOCAC' (MOnte CArlo Code) for IBS simulation. Examples of code validation and application are discussed.

  9. A model for the beam-filling effect associated with the microwave retrieval of rain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graves, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Estimating rain rate from environmental microwave emissions is hampered by several difficulties. One of these difficulties is known as the beam-filling effect. Beam filling is the systematic error introduced when the microwave radiometer's field of view is not filled with uniform rain. Beam filling can have dramatic effects on rain-rate estimation, causing rain rates to be underestimated by as much as a factor of 2. The present study derives an approximate expression for beam filling that provides, in principle, a way to estimate this effect. In addition, this study deals only with single-channel microwave rain estimation over the ocean. The final results reveal that beam filling is essentially determined by the freezing level, the mean fraction of the footprint raining, and the footprint-averaged rain rate. Also, the numerical results appear to agree with other empirical studies. Furthermore, the analysis brings to light an interesting connection with rain threshold techniques for estimating area-averaged rain rates.

  10. Compensation of non-ideal beam splitter polarization distortion effect in Michelson interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yeng-Cheng; Lo, Yu-Lung; Liao, Chia-Chi

    2016-02-01

    A composite optical structure consisting of two quarter-wave plates and a single half-wave plate is proposed for compensating for the polarization distortion induced by a non-ideal beam splitter in a Michelson interferometer. In the proposed approach, the optimal orientations of the optical components within the polarization compensator are determined using a genetic algorithm (GA) such that the beam splitter can be treated as a free-space medium and modeled using a unit Mueller matrix accordingly. Two implementations of the proposed polarization controller are presented. In the first case, the compensator is placed in the output arm of Michelson interferometer such that the state of polarization of the interfered output light is equal to that of the input light. However, in this configuration, the polarization effects induced by the beam splitter in the two arms of the interferometer structure cannot be separately addressed. Consequently, in the second case, compensator structures are placed in the Michelson interferometer for compensation on both the scanning and reference beams. The practical feasibility of the proposed approach is introduced by considering a Mueller polarization-sensitive (PS) optical coherence tomography (OCT) structure with three polarization controllers in the input, reference and sample arms, respectively. In general, the results presented in this study show that the proposed polarization controller provides an effective and experimentally-straightforward means of compensating for the polarization distortion effects induced by the non-ideal beam splitters in Michelson interferometers and Mueller PS-OCT structures.

  11. Interaction of two neighboring laser beams taking into account the effects of plasma hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Hueller, S.; Mounaix, P.; Tikhonchuk, V.T.; Pesme, D.

    1997-07-01

    The interaction between two neighboring laser beams focused in a hot underdense homogeneous plasma is investigated using the non-paraxial wave coupling code KOLIBRI [S. H{umlt u}ller {ital et al.}, Phys. Scr. {bold T63}, 151 (1996)] in two and three spatial dimensions. Both the plasma hydrodynamic evolution and the stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) aspects are studied in the case of strongly damped ion sound waves. The hydrodynamic effects consist in ponderomotively driven density perturbations located between the beams which may, in turn, influence strongly the light propagation through the plasma. The two beams are found to merge whenever the distance between them is smaller than or of the order of their diameter. Concerning the SBS aspect, it is found that due to interference effects between the beams, the spatial amplification of the backscattered light is asymmetric with respect to the laser axis. SBS can also enforce the hydrodynamic effects and the beam merging. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Beam tail effect of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Tong-Ning; Pei, Yuan-Ji; Qin, Bin; Chen, Qu-Shan

    2013-12-01

    The beam tail effect of multi-bunches will influence the electron beam performance in a high intensity thermionic RF gun. Beam dynamic calculations that illustrate the working states of single beam tail and multi-pulse feed-in of a performance-enhanced EC-ITC (external cathode independent tunable cavity) RF gun for an FEL (free electron laser) injector are performed to estimate the extracted bunch properties. By using both Parmela and homemade MATLAB codes, the effects of a single beam tail as well as interactions of multi-pulses are analyzed, where a ring-based electron algorithm is adopted to calculated RF fields and the space-charge field. Furthermore, the procedure of unexpected deviated-energy particles mixed with an effective bunch head is described by the MATLAB code as well. As a result, the performance-enhanced EC-ITC RF gun is proved to have the capability to extract continual stable bunches suitable for a high requirement THz-FEL.

  13. Interaction of the focused laser beam with the grooved surface of optical disk: Evanescent coupling and vector diffraction effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeh, Wei-Hung

    1999-10-01

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to present a clear physical picture and useful insights of polarization effects in the diffraction of focused beams by grooved, multilayer-coated disks. The reading process of optical disk systems significantly relies on the reaction of the incident focused beam to the disk structure, may it be the groove profile or coating materials. The resulting complex-amplitude from diffraction is the main source for the readout signal. In the presence of the periodic pattern and the focused beam, however, different polarization states usually result in different complex-amplitudes. A good understanding of polarization effects in grooved multilayer disks is thus required for the optimum design of optical data storage systems. The pursuit of high-density recording inevitably drives the optical data storage industry to reduce the wavelength of light sources, decrease the track pitch of optical disks, and increase the numerical aperture of objective lenses. The track pitch and the size of the focused spot gradually approach the optical wavelength. Under these circumstances, the analysis of the interaction of focused beams with this type of high- frequency periodic disk using conventional scalar diffraction theory is no longer adequate. Only through vector diffraction study of polarization effects in the interaction of the focused beam with the periodic pattern can the characteristics of an optical disk system be fully understood and improved. Starting from the introduction of various polarization effects in optical disk systems and basic concepts of both scalar and vector diffraction theory, we then focus on the studies of diffraction patterns at the exit pupil of the objective lens and on the disk surface. Different behavior on the baseball pattern and in the effective groove depth is observed for the two polarization states. The use of the solid immersion lens to extensively increase the area density of optical disk systems prompts

  14. Effect of axial load on mode shapes and frequencies of beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaker, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the effect of axial load on the natural frequencies and mode shapes of uniform beams and of a cantilevered beam with a concentrated mass at the tip is presented. Characteristic equations which yield the frequencies and mode shape functions for the various cases are given. The solutions to these equations are presented by a series of graphs so that frequency as a function of axial load can readily be determined. The effect of axial load on the mode shapes are also depicted by another series of graphs.

  15. Cloud Cover Increase with Increasing Aerosol Absorptivity: A Counterexample to the Conventional Semidirect Aerosol Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, Jan; Miller, Ron L.

    2010-01-01

    We reexamine the aerosol semidirect effect using a general circulation model and four cases of the single-scattering albedo of dust aerosols. Contrary to the expected decrease in low cloud cover due to heating by tropospheric aerosols, we find a significant increase with increasing absorptivity of soil dust particles in regions with high dust load, except during Northern Hemisphere winter. The strongest sensitivity of cloud cover to dust absorption is found over land during Northern Hemisphere summer. Here even medium and high cloud cover increase where the dust load is highest. The cloud cover change is directly linked to the change in relative humidity in the troposphere as a result of contrasting changes in specific humidity and temperature. More absorption by aerosols leads to larger diabatic heating and increased warming of the column, decreasing relative humidity. However, a corresponding increase in the specific humidity exceeds the temperature effect on relative humidity. The net effect is more low cloud cover with increasing aerosol absorption. The higher specific humidity where cloud cover strongly increases is attributed to an enhanced convergence of moisture driven by dust radiative heating. Although in some areas our model exhibits a reduction of low cloud cover due to aerosol heating consistent with the conventional description of the semidirect effect, we conclude that the link between aerosols and clouds is more varied, depending also on changes in the atmospheric circulation and the specific humidity induced by the aerosols. Other absorbing aerosols such as black carbon are expected to have a similar effect.

  16. The effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model, for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with the increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  17. Effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Roberts, G. D.; Papadopoulos, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  18. Effect of contact stresses in four-point bend testing of graphite/epoxy and graphite/PMR-15 composite beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Roberts, G. D.; Papadopoulos, D. S.

    1992-01-01

    The results of in-plane four-point bend experiments on unidirectionally reinforced composite beams are presented for graphite/epoxy (T300/934) and graphite/polyimide (G30-500/PMR-15) composites. The maximum load and the location of cracks formed during failure were measured for testpieces with fibers oriented at various angles to the beam axis. Since most of the beams failed near one or more of the load points, the strength of the beams was evaluated in terms of a proposed model for the local stress distribution. In this model, an exact solution to the problem of a localized contact force acting on a unidirectionally reinforced half plane is used to describe the local stress field. The stress singularity at the load points is treated in a manner similar to the stress singularity at a crack tip in fracture mechanisms problems. Using this approach, the effect of fiber angle and elastic material properties on the strength of the beam is described in terms of a load intensity factor. For fiber angles less than 45 deg from the beam axis, a single crack is initiated near one of the load points at a critical value of the load intensity factor. The critical load intensity factor decreases with increasing fiber angle. For larger fiber angles, multiple cracks occur at locations both near and away from the load points, and the load intensity factor at failure increases sharply with increasing fiber angle.

  19. Effectiveness of high energy electron beam against spore forming bacteria and viruses in slurry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skowron, Krzysztof; Paluszak, Zbigniew; Olszewska, Halina; Wieczorek, Magdalena; Zimek, Zbigniew; Śrutek, Mścisław

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of high energy electron beam effect against the most resistant indicators - spore forming bacteria (Clostridium sporogenes) and viruses (BPV) - which may occur in slurry. The applied doses of electron beam were 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 10 and 12 kGy. The theoretic inactivating dose of high energy electron beam for Clostridium sporogenes spores calculated based on the polynomial curve equation was 11.62 kGy, and determined on the basis of regression line equation for BPV virus was equal 23.49 kGy. The obtained results showed a quite good effectiveness of irradiation in bacterial spores inactivation, whereas relatively poor against viruses.

  20. Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on the Beam Size in Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.

    2004-08-05

    In this paper, the authors discuss the optics effects of the realistic detector solenoid field on beam size at the Interaction Point (IP) of a future Linear Collider and their compensation. It is shown that most of the adverse effects on the IP beam size arise only from the part of the solenoid field which overlaps and extends beyond the final focusing quadrupoles. It is demonstrated that the most efficient and local compensation can be achieved using weak antisolenoids near the IP, while a correction scheme which employs only skew quadrupoles is less efficient, and compensation with strong antisolenoids is not appropriate. One of the advantages of the proposed antisolenoid scheme is that this compensation works well over a large range of the beam energy

  1. Effect of Intermediate Crack Debonding on the Flexural Strength of CFRP-Strengthened RC Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungnam

    2014-09-01

    The flexural strength of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer plate, which fails by intermediate crack debonding, is evaluated. To consider the effect of debonding at the interface between the concrete and the CFRP plate, due to a flexural crack at the midspan, on the flexural strength of the beams, a strength reduction factor is proposed. This factor is derived from the results of flexural tests by using the model of effective strains and is defined as the ratio of the debonding strain to the ultimate strain of the CFRP plate. The validity, accuracy, and efficiency of the factor is verified by comparing analytical results with experimental data. The results of this study revealed that the strength reduction factor proposed can be used to efficiently assess the flexural strength of CFRP-strengthened RC beams with intermediate crack debonding.

  2. Spatial mapping of the biologic effectiveness of scanned particle beams: towards biologically optimized particle therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Fada; Bronk, Lawrence; Titt, Uwe; Lin, Steven H.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Kerr, Matthew D.; Zhu, X. Ronald; Dinh, Jeffrey; Sobieski, Mary; Stephan, Clifford; Peeler, Christopher R.; Taleei, Reza; Mohan, Radhe; Grosshans, David R.

    2015-01-01

    The physical properties of particles used in radiation therapy, such as protons, have been well characterized, and their dose distributions are superior to photon-based treatments. However, proton therapy may also have inherent biologic advantages that have not been capitalized on. Unlike photon beams, the linear energy transfer (LET) and hence biologic effectiveness of particle beams varies along the beam path. Selective placement of areas of high effectiveness could enhance tumor cell kill and simultaneously spare normal tissues. However, previous methods for mapping spatial variations in biologic effectiveness are time-consuming and often yield inconsistent results with large uncertainties. Thus the data needed to accurately model relative biological effectiveness to guide novel treatment planning approaches are limited. We used Monte Carlo modeling and high-content automated clonogenic survival assays to spatially map the biologic effectiveness of scanned proton beams with high accuracy and throughput while minimizing biological uncertainties. We found that the relationship between cell kill, dose, and LET, is complex and non-unique. Measured biologic effects were substantially greater than in most previous reports, and non-linear surviving fraction response was observed even for the highest LET values. Extension of this approach could generate data needed to optimize proton therapy plans incorporating variable RBE. PMID:25984967

  3. Ultra-low-energy (<10 eV/u) ion beam bombardment effect on naked DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thopan, P.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L. D.

    2014-05-01

    Since ion energy deposition in the ion-bombarded materials dominantly occurs in the low-energy range, it is very interesting to know effects from ultra-low-energy ion interaction with DNA for understanding ion-beam-induced genetic mutation. Tens-keV Ar- and N-ion beams were decelerated to ultra-low energy ranging from 20 to 100 eV, or only a few to 10 eV/u, to bombard naked plasmid DNA. The bombarded DNA was analyzed using gel electrophoresis for DNA form changes. The original DNA supercoiled form was found to change to relaxed and linear forms, indicating single or double strand breaks after bombarded by tens-eV ion beam. N-ion beam was found more effective in inducing DNA change and mutation than Ar-ion beam. The study demonstrated that the ion bombardment with energy as low as several-tens eV was able to break DNA strands and thus potentially to cause genetic modification of biological cells. The experimental results were discussed in terms of direct atomic collision between the ions and DNA atoms.

  4. Effects of electron beam pinching on microwave emission in a vircator

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.; Ishihara, O.; Yatsuzuka, M.

    1995-12-31

    Electron beam pinching in relativistic diodes has been widely observed. This pinching of electrons is understood to be caused by the flow of ions from the anode together with the flow of electrons from the cathode. The anode flow is created by the heating of the anode by the electron beam. Such a counter flow of electrons and ions is known as a bipolar flow. A vircator experiment at the Himeji Institute of Technology suggested that microwave emission in the vircator was due to a strongly pinched electron beam caused by bipolar flow. A MAGIC particle-in-cell simulation is being developed to study the effects of electron beam pinching on microwave emission in a vircator. Cathode emission from an annular cathode is modeled in the simulation by placing a plasma on the surface of the cathode and an electric field is applied to accelerate the electrons extracted from the plasma. To model the anode emission, the anode is divided into segments. The ion current is then taken to be a fraction of the electron current through each segment. Preliminary results suggest that the pinched electron beam would form a larger virtual cathode potential inside the waveguide behind the diode which should enhance microwave production. The effect of an axially applied magnetic field will also be studied to determine if the magnetic field would suppress electron pinching and microwave emission as was observed in the Himeji experiment.

  5. Effect of local buckling and work-hardening properties of the material on the hysteretic behavior of cantilever I-beam subjected to lateral cyclic load

    SciTech Connect

    Shaker, R.E.; Murakawa, Hidekazu; Ueda, Yukio

    1993-12-31

    The hysteretic behavior of cantilever I-beam subjected to cyclic lateral loads is investigated in this paper. Finite Element Method (FEM) considering the geometrical and material non-linearities is utilized in this study. Special attention is paid to the effects of local buckling occurring in the flanges and the web, and the material work-hardening properties on the performance of I-beam in view of a seismic design considerations. The behavior of I-beam subjected to cyclic lateral loads is closely examined with respect to the ductility, strength and absorbed energy. From this study, it is found that smaller slenderness ratios of the flange and web are recommended for improving the ductility, strength and absorbed energy. Also, the material having lower yield-to-tensile strength improves the ductility of I-beam under cyclic lateral loads as well as monotonically increasing load.

  6. Effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Babitha, K.K.; Priyanka, K.P.; Sreedevi, A.; Ganesh, S.; Varghese, Thomas

    2014-12-15

    The effect of 8 MeV electron beam irradiation on the structural and optical properties of cerium oxide nanoparticles was investigated. Ceria nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical precipitation method, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible, photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Ultraviolet–visible absorption spectra, photoluminescence and Raman spectra of beam irradiated samples were modified, and shifted to blue region, which were attributed to quantum size effect. Systematic observations found that nonstoichiometry, defects and size reduction caused by beam irradiation have great influence on optical band gap, blue shift, photoluminescence and Raman band modifications. Moreover, electron beam irradiation is a suitable technique to enhance the structural and optical properties of nanoceria by controlling the particle size, which may lead to potentially useful technological applications. - Highlights: • Investigated effect of beam irradiation on CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles • Beam irradiation caused size reduction and surface modification. • It increases microstrain, decreases d-spacing and broadens XRD peaks. • It also modifies optical band gap, absorption, PL and Raman bands.

  7. Optimization of a ribbon diode with magnetic insulation for increasing the current density in a high-current relativistic electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrelin, V. T.; Arzhannikov, A. V.; Burdakov, A. V.; Sinitskii, S. L.; Stepanov, V. D.

    2009-05-01

    The geometry of the ribbon diode of the U-2 accelerator is optimized to increase both the current density and the total current of the relativistic electron beam for its subsequent injection into the plasma of a multimirror GOL-3 trap. Beam simulation in the diode was performed using the POISSON-2 applied software modified on the basis of the results obtained using the theory of a planar diode in an inclined magnetic field. As a result of the optimization, the diode geometry and the magnetic field configuration were found that should provide a factor of 1.5-2 increase in the current density in experiments with a small angular divergence of electron velocities.

  8. Effect of the beam-beam interactions on the dynamic aperture and amplitude growth in the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    C. Johnstone and W. Wan; N. Gelfand; T. Sen

    1999-06-17

    The dynamic aperture at collision energy is determined pri-marily by the nonlinear fields of the IR quadrupoles but is also influenced by the beam-beam interactions. We revisit the choice of the crossing angle that maximizes the dynamic aperture with an accurate modeling of the long-range inter-actions and use of the present values of the IR quadrupole field harmonics. A separate but related issue we address is the amplitude growth of particles in the beam halo due to the long-range interactions.

  9. Effect of the focal plane position on CO2 laser beam cutting of injection molded polycarbonate sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Mehrabi, Omid; Azdast, Taher; Benyounis, Khaled Y.

    2016-11-01

    In the present research, the effect of laser beam focal plane position (FPP) on the kerf quality of the polycarbonate laser cutting is investigated. Low power CO2 laser is used as the heat source of the cutting runs. In the experiments, FPP is varied from 0 to -4mm while other processing parameters (i.e. laser power, cutting speed and gas pressure) are considered constant. Upper and lower kerf width, kerf taper, upper heat affected zone and surface roughness of the kerf wall are also considered as the responses. Observations signified that reducing the position of the laser beam focal point from zero to - 3mm reduces the upper and lower kerf width. However reducing FPP below -3mm leads to an increase in the kerf width. Results also reveals that upper heat affected zone value reduces by reduction in FPP. Moreover the best kerf wall surface roughness occurred at FPP= -3mm.

  10. A Case Report on the Effect of Fan Beam Thickness in Helical Tomotherapy of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, W.C. Vincent; Mui, Wing Lun A.

    2011-04-01

    The fan beam thickness (FBT) in helical tomotherapy is defined by a pair of collimators parallel to the rotational orbit of the radiation beam and is fixed for a specific patient treatment. The aim of this case study is to evaluate the dosimetric influence of changing the FBT in the treatment of a nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patient. The subject was a T2N1M0 stage NPC patient. The planning target volumes (PTVs) of the primary nasopharyngeal tumor and the left and right cervical lymphatics were delineated along with the organs at risk (OARs) in the corresponding computed tomography slices. Three treatment plans with FBT of 1.0 cm, 2.5 cm, and 5.0 cm (FBT-10, FBT-25, and FBT-50) were generated separately based on similar dose constraints and planning parameters. The dosimetric results of the PTV and OARs were collected and compared among the 3 treatment plans. The differences in the dose parameters of the PTVs were small among the 3 plans. The FBT-10 plan demonstrated the most homogeneous PTV doses with the smallest homogeneity indices (HIs). The FBT-50 plan delivered the highest dose to the OARs and the FBT-10 plan delivered the lowest. The differences between the 2 plans were more significant in the spinal cord, optic chiasm, optic nerves, and lens. This case study demonstrated that the variation of FBT in tomotherapy affected the quality of the treatment plan mainly in the OAR doses, but not so much in the PTV. Increasing the FBT reduced the effectiveness in the sparing of OARs.

  11. Electron Cloud Effects in Intense, Ion Beam Linacs Theory and Experimental Planning for HIF

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Lund, S M; Bieniosek, F M; Lee, E P; Prost, L R; Seidl, P A; Vay, P-A

    2002-05-23

    Heavy-ion accelerators for heavy-ion inertial fusion energy (HIF) will operate at high aperture-fill factors with high beam current and long durations. (Injected currents of order 1 A and 20 {micro}s at a few MeV for each of {approx}100 beams, will be compressed to the order of 100 A and 0.2 {micro}s, reaching GeV energies in a power plant driver.) This will be accompanied by beam ions impacting walls, liberating gas molecules and secondary electrons. Without special preparation, the {approx}10% electron population predicted for driver-scale experiments will affect beam transport; but wall conditioning and other mitigation techniques should result in substantial reduction. Theory and particle-in-cell simulations suggest that electrons, from ionization of residual and desorbed gas and secondary electrons from vacuum walls, will be radially trapped in the {approx}4 kV ion beam potential. Trapped electrons can modify the beam space charge, vacuum pressure, ion transport dynamics, and halo generation, and can potentially cause ion-electron instabilities. Within quadrupole (and dipole) magnets, the longitudinal electron velocity is limited to drift velocities (E x B and {del}B) and the electron density can vary azimuthally, radially, and longitudinally. These variations can cause centroid misalignment, emittance growth and halo growth. Diagnostics are being developed to measure the energy and flux of electrons and gas evolved from walls, and the net charge and gas density within magnetic quadrupoles. We will also measure the depth of trapping of electrons, their axial and radial transport, and the effects of electrons on the ion beam.

  12. The optimization of incident angles of low-energy oxygen ion beams for increasing sputtering rate on silicon samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, N.; Takahashi, M.; Tomita, M.

    2008-12-01

    In order to determine an appropriate incident angle of low-energy (350-eV) oxygen ion beam for achieving the highest sputtering rate without degradation of depth resolution in SIMS analysis, a delta-doped sample was analyzed with incident angles from 0° to 60° without oxygen bleeding. As a result, 45° incidence was found to be the best analytical condition, and it was confirmed that surface roughness did not occur on the sputtered surface at 100-nm depth by using AFM. By applying the optimized incident angle, sputtering rate becomes more than twice as high as that of the normal incident condition.

  13. SU-E-T-143: Effect of Physical and Virtual Wedges on the Surface Dose at Various SSD for 6 and 15 MV Photon Beam.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Girigesh; Sinha, S N; Ashokkumar, S; Raman, Kothanda; Mishra, M; Thiyagarajan, Rajesh; Yadav, R S

    2012-06-01

    To study the effect of the virtual wedge and physical wedge filters on the surface and build-up region doses for 6 and 15MV high-energy photon beams for different field sizes and various source to surface distance(SSD). The measurements were made in water equivalent (PMMA) solid phantom in the build-up region at various SSD for various field sizes using virtual and physical wedge filters having different angles. A parallel-plate ion chamber (Markus) was used to measure the percent depth doses at surface and buildup region. Plane parallel ion chamber with fixed plate separation on the surface and buildup region would perturbate the dose measured, to get the proper dose over response correction factor was used. The percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) increased as the field size increased for open, virtual, and physical wedged beams. For open, 30 degree physical, and virtual wedged beams, the surface doses were found to be 15.4%, 11.2%, and 15.2% with 6-MV photons and 11.2%, 9.4%, 11.2% with 15-MV photons, respectively, at 10 × 10 cm(2) field size at 100cm SSD.As SSD increases percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) decreases for open,physical and virtual wedge field. Percentage depth dose at surface (PDD0) of virtual wedged beams were similar to those of open beams. PDD0 of physical wedged beams were lower than those of open and virtual wedged beams. Surface doses for both PW and VW increases with field size and small increase in surface dose for both PW and VW fields as wedge angle increases especially for large fields. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of small OpenPET prototype with (11)C beam irradiation: effects of secondary particles on in-beam imaging.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kinouchi, Shoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadma, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-04-07

    In-beam positron emission tomography (PET) can enable visualization of an irradiated field using positron emitters (β+ decay). In particle therapies, many kinds of secondary particles are produced by nuclear interactions, which affect PET imaging. Our purpose in this work was to evaluate effects of secondary particles on in-beam PET imaging using the Monte Carlo simulation code, Geant4, by reproducing an experiment with a small OpenPET prototype in which a PMMA phantom was irradiated by a (11)C beam. The number of incident particles to the detectors and their spectra, background coincidence for the PET scan, and reconstructed images were evaluated for three periods, spill-time (beam irradiation), pause-time (accelerating the particles) and beam-off time (duration after the final spill). For spill-time, we tested a background reduction technique in which coincidence events correlated with the accelerator radiofrequency were discarded (RF gated) that has been proposed in the literature. Also, background generation processes were identified. For spill-time, most background coincidences were caused by prompt gamma rays, and only 1.4% of the total coincidences generated β+ signals. Differently, for pause-time and beam-off time, more than 75% of the total coincidence events were signals. Using these coincidence events, we failed to reconstruct images during the spill-time, but we obtained successful reconstructions for the pause-time and beam-off time, which was consistent with the experimental results. From the simulation, we found that the absence of materials in the beam line and using the RF gated technique improved the signal-to-noise ratio for the spill-time. From an additional simulation with range shifter-less irradiation and the RF gated technique, we showed the feasibility of image reconstruction during the spill-time.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of small OpenPET prototype with 11C beam irradiation: effects of secondary particles on in-beam imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Yoshida, Eiji; Kinouchi, Shoko; Nishikido, Fumihiko; Inadma, Naoko; Murayama, Hideo; Yamaya, Taiga

    2014-04-01

    In-beam positron emission tomography (PET) can enable visualization of an irradiated field using positron emitters (β+ decay). In particle therapies, many kinds of secondary particles are produced by nuclear interactions, which affect PET imaging. Our purpose in this work was to evaluate effects of secondary particles on in-beam PET imaging using the Monte Carlo simulation code, Geant4, by reproducing an experiment with a small OpenPET prototype in which a PMMA phantom was irradiated by a 11C beam. The number of incident particles to the detectors and their spectra, background coincidence for the PET scan, and reconstructed images were evaluated for three periods, spill-time (beam irradiation), pause-time (accelerating the particles) and beam-off time (duration after the final spill). For spill-time, we tested a background reduction technique in which coincidence events correlated with the accelerator radiofrequency were discarded (RF gated) that has been proposed in the literature. Also, background generation processes were identified. For spill-time, most background coincidences were caused by prompt gamma rays, and only 1.4% of the total coincidences generated β+ signals. Differently, for pause-time and beam-off time, more than 75% of the total coincidence events were signals. Using these coincidence events, we failed to reconstruct images during the spill-time, but we obtained successful reconstructions for the pause-time and beam-off time, which was consistent with the experimental results. From the simulation, we found that the absence of materials in the beam line and using the RF gated technique improved the signal-to-noise ratio for the spill-time. From an additional simulation with range shifter-less irradiation and the RF gated technique, we showed the feasibility of image reconstruction during the spill-time.

  16. Modification of PVC/ENR blend by electron beam irradiation: effect of crosslinking agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnam, C. T.; Zaman, K.

    1999-05-01

    In order to improve the mechanical properties of PVC/ENR blends, they were irradiated by using a 3.0 MeV electron beam machine with doses ranging from 20 to 200 kGy. Changes in mechanical properties of the blends with increasing irradiation dose were investigated. In an attempt to maximize the beneficial effect of irradiation, the influence of multifunctional acrylates (MFA) such as TMPTA, HDDA and EHA on the 70/30 PVC/ENR blend was investigated. The properties studied include hardness, gel fraction, tensile strength, elongation at break and glass transition temperature. The results revealed that all mechanical properties increased with increasing irradiation dose with exception of elongation at break. The enhancement in blend properties was further improved by addition of MFA. This is attributed to the increase in crosslink density. The steady increase in gel fraction with irradiation dose and the shifting of the irradiation those towards a lower value to achieve 70% gel fraction upon addition of MFA has provided evidence for significant increase in crosslink density. Among the MFA employed in this studies, TMPTA was found to render highest mechanical properties to the blend with irradiation. Thus, TMPTA can be useful as an efficient crosslink enhancer to PVC/ENR blends. Results from Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) indicated radiation-induced crosslinks formed in PVC/ENR blends sensitized by TMPTA. The single glass transition temperature obtained confirms that the blend remains miscible upon irradiation with the presence of TMPTA. The changes in blend properties upon irradiation with the addition of acrylated polyurethene (PU) oligomer are also presented in this paper.

  17. The Effect of p53 Status of Tumor Cells on Radiosensitivity of Irradiated Tumors With Carbon-Ion Beams Compared With γ-Rays or Reactor Neutron Beams.

    PubMed

    Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Uzawa, Akiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Tano, Keizo; Sanada, Yu; Suzuki, Minoru; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to clarify the effect of p53 status of tumor cells on radiosensitivity of solid tumors following accelerated carbon-ion beam irradiation compared with γ-rays or reactor neutron beams, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells transfected with mutant TP53 (SAS/mp53) or with neo vector (SAS/neo) were injected subcutaneously into hind legs of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumor proliferating (P) cells. They received γ-rays or accelerated carbon-ion beams at a high or reduced dose-rate. Other tumor-bearing mice received reactor thermal or epithermal neutrons at a reduced dose-rate. Immediately or 9 hours after the high dose-rate irradiation (HDRI), or immediately after the reduced dose-rate irradiation (RDRI), the tumor cells were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker, and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The difference in radiosensitivity between the total (P + Q) and Q cells after γ-ray irradiation was markedly reduced with reactor neutron beams or carbon-ion beams, especially with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) value. Following γ-ray irradiation, SAS/neo tumor cells, especially intratumor Q cells, showed a marked reduction in sensitivity due to the recovery from radiation-induced damage, compared with the total or Q cells within SAS/mp53 tumors that showed little repair capacity. In both total and Q cells within both SAS/neo and SAS/mp53 tumors, carbon-ion beam irradiation, especially with a higher LET, showed little recovery capacity through leaving an interval between HDRI and the assay or decreasing the dose-rate. The recovery from radiation-induced damage after γ-ray irradiation was a p53-dependent event, but little recovery was found after carbon-ion beam irradiation. With RDRI

  18. The Effect of p53 Status of Tumor Cells on Radiosensitivity of Irradiated Tumors With Carbon-Ion Beams Compared With γ-Rays or Reactor Neutron Beams

    PubMed Central

    Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Uzawa, Akiko; Hirayama, Ryoichi; Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Tano, Keizo; Sanada, Yu; Suzuki, Minoru; Maruhashi, Akira; Ono, Koji

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to clarify the effect of p53 status of tumor cells on radiosensitivity of solid tumors following accelerated carbon-ion beam irradiation compared with γ-rays or reactor neutron beams, referring to the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. Methods Human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells transfected with mutant TP53 (SAS/mp53) or with neo vector (SAS/neo) were injected subcutaneously into hind legs of nude mice. Tumor-bearing mice received 5-bromo-2’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumor proliferating (P) cells. They received γ-rays or accelerated carbon-ion beams at a high or reduced dose-rate. Other tumor-bearing mice received reactor thermal or epithermal neutrons at a reduced dose-rate. Immediately or 9 hours after the high dose-rate irradiation (HDRI), or immediately after the reduced dose-rate irradiation (RDRI), the tumor cells were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker, and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. Results The difference in radiosensitivity between the total (P + Q) and Q cells after γ-ray irradiation was markedly reduced with reactor neutron beams or carbon-ion beams, especially with a higher linear energy transfer (LET) value. Following γ-ray irradiation, SAS/neo tumor cells, especially intratumor Q cells, showed a marked reduction in sensitivity due to the recovery from radiation-induced damage, compared with the total or Q cells within SAS/mp53 tumors that showed little repair capacity. In both total and Q cells within both SAS/neo and SAS/mp53 tumors, carbon-ion beam irradiation, especially with a higher LET, showed little recovery capacity through leaving an interval between HDRI and the assay or decreasing the dose-rate. The recovery from radiation-induced damage after γ-ray irradiation was a p53-dependent event, but little recovery was found after carbon

  19. Bunch beam cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryzgunov, M. I.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Li, J.; Mao, L. J.; Parkhomchuk, V. V.; Reva, V. B.; Yang, X. D.; Zhao, H.

    2017-07-01

    Electron cooling is used for damping both transverse and longitudinal oscillations of heavy particle. The cooling of bunch ion beam (with RF voltage on) is important part of experiments with inner target, ion collision system, stacking and RF manipulation. The short length of an ion bunch increases the peak luminosity, gives a start-time point for using of the time-of-flight methods and obtains a short extraction beam pulse. This article describes the review of last experiments with electron cooling carried out on the CSRm, CSRe (China) and COSY (Germany) storage rings. The accumulated experience may be used for the project of electron cooler on 2.5 MeV (NICA) and 0.5 MeV HIAF for obtaining high luminosity, depressing beam-beam effects and RF manipulation.

  20. Oxide degradation effects in dry patterning of resist using neutral oxygen beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynko, W.E.; Kasi, S.R.; Manos, D.

    1992-07-01

    Novel processing methods are being studied to address the highly selective and directional etch requirements of the ULSI manufacturing era; neutral molecular and atomic beams are two promising candidates. In this study, the potential of 5 eV neutral atomic oxygen beams for dry development of photoresist is demonstrated for application in patterning of CMOS devices. The patterning of photoresist directly on polysilicon gate layers enables the use of a self-contained dry processing strategy, with oxygen beams for resist etching and chlorine beams for polysilicon etching. Exposure to such reactive low-energy species and to the UV radiation from the line-of-sight, high-density plasma source can, however, after MOSFET gate oxide quality, impacting device performance and reliability. We have studied this processing related device integrity issue by subjecting polysilicon gas MOS structures to exposure treatments similar to those used in resist patterning using low energy oxygen beams. Electrical C-V characterization shows a significant increase in the oxide trapped charge and interface state density upon low energy exposure. I-V and dielectric breakdown characterization show increased low-field leakage characteristics for the same exposure. High-field electron injection studies reveal that the 0.25-V to 0.5-V negative flatband shifts can be partially annealed by the carrier injection. This could be due to positive charge annihilation or electron trapping, or some combination of both. Physical and analysis of patterned resist layers and electrical characterization data of MOS structures exposed to different neutral beam processing environments and following thermal annealing treatments is presented.