Science.gov

Sample records for increased myc gene

  1. A phosphorylation site located in the NH2-terminal domain of c-Myc increases transactivation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Seth, A; Alvarez, E; Gupta, S; Davis, R J

    1991-12-15

    The c-myc gene encodes a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein (c-Myc) that forms leucine zipper complexes and can act as a transcription factor. Growth factor stimulation of cells causes the phosphorylation of the c-Myc transcriptional activation domain at Ser62 within a proline-rich region that is highly conserved among members of the Myc family (Alvarez, E., Northwood, I.C., Gonzalez, F. A., Latour, D. A., Seth, A., Abate, C., Curran, T., and Davis, R. J. (1991) J. Biol. Chem. 266, 15277-15285). This phosphorylation site is a substrate for growth factor-regulated MAP kinases and for the cell cycle-dependent protein kinase p34cdc2. We report that serum treatment of cells results in a marked increase in the transactivation of gene expression mediated by the c-Myc transcriptional activation domain. A point mutation at the site of growth factor-stimulated phosphorylation (Ser62) decreases the serum induction of transactivation. These data indicate that the c-Myc transcriptional activation domain may be a direct target of signal transduction pathways. PMID:1748630

  2. Structure and expression of canary myc family genes.

    PubMed Central

    Collum, R G; Clayton, D F; Alt, F W

    1991-01-01

    We found that the canary N-myc gene is highly related to mammalian N-myc genes in both the protein-coding region and the long 3' untranslated region. Examined coding regions of the canary c-myc gene were also highly related to their mammalian counterparts, but in contrast to N-myc, the canary and mammalian c-myc genes were quite divergent in their 3' untranslated regions. We readily detected N-myc and c-myc expression in the adult canary brain and found N-myc expression both at sites of proliferating neuronal precursors and in mature neurons. Images PMID:1996121

  3. Increased N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 expression is associated with breast atypia-to-carcinoma progression.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiao-Yun; Fan, Chui-Feng; Wei, Jing; Liu, Cong; Zheng, Hua-Chuan; Yao, Fan; Jin, Feng

    2011-12-01

    N-myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) has been identified as a protein involved in the differentiation of epithelial cells. As a newly metastasis suppressor gene, whether it contributes to carcinogenesis of breast cancer is still unknown. This study aimed to clarify the possible role of NDRG1 for breast cancer carcinogenesis, and further to investigate its clinicopathological significance in invasive breast cancer. We examined the expression of NDRG1 in normal epithelium of breast (n = 35), usual ductal hyperplasia (n = 22), atypical ductal hyperplasia (n = 33), atypical lobular hyperplasia (n = 8), ductal carcinoma in situ (n = 16), lobular carcinoma in situ (n = 6), invasive ductal carcinoma (n = 50), and invasive lobular carcinoma (n = 45) by immunohistochemistry and analyzed the correlation between NDRG expression and clinicopathological features of invasive breast cancer. Western blot analysis was carried out to investigate the expression of NDRG1 in 20 invasive ductal breast cancer and the paired non-tumor portion of the same case. NDRG1 expression in invasive breast cancer (70/95, 73.7%) was higher than that in noninvasive breast lesions (29/85, 34.1%; p < 0.05) which was higher than that in normal breast epithelium (5/35, 14.3%; p < 0.05). Statistical analysis revealed a significant correlation between NDRG1 expression with tumor stage in invasive breast cancer, and its expression in invasive ductal carcinoma is significantly higher than invasive lobular carcinoma (p < 0.05). It was not associated with age, menopausal status, tumor size, and lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 protein levels were significantly higher in invasive ductal breast cancer compared to the paired non-tumor portion of the same case by Western blot analysis (p < 0.05). Increased NDRG-1 expression is associated with breast atypia-to-carcinoma progression. NDRG1 expression might participate in the carcinogenesis and progression of invasive

  4. Using myc genes to search for stem cells in the ciliary margin of the Xenopus retina.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xiao Yan; Harris, William A

    2012-04-01

    The ciliary marginal zone (CMZ) of fish and frog retinas contains cells that proliferate throughout postembryonic development as the retina grows with increasing body size, indicating the presence of stem cells in this region. However, neither the location nor the molecular identity of retinal stem cells has been identified. Here, we show in Xenopus that c-myc and n-myc are sequentially expressed both during development and in the post-embryonic retina. The c-myc+/n-myc- cells near the extreme periphery of the CMZ cycle more slowly and preferentially retain DNA label compared to their more central cmyc+/n-myc+ neighbors which cycle rapidly and preferentially dilute DNA label. During retinal development c-myc is functionally required earlier than n-myc, and n-myc expression depends on earlier c-myc expression. The expression of c-myc but not n-myc in the CMZ depends on growth factor signaling. Our results suggest that c-myc+/n-myc- cells in the far peripheral CMZ are candidates for a niche-dependent population of retinal stem cells that give rise to more centrally located and rapidly dividing n-myc+ progenitors of more limited proliferative potential. Analysis of homologues of these genes in the zebrafish CMZ suggests that the transition from c-myc to n-myc expression might be conserved in other lower vertebrates whose retinas growth throughout life.

  5. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  6. Cis activation of the c-myc gene in bovine papilloma virus type 1/human c-myc hybrid plasmids

    SciTech Connect

    Modjtahedi, N.; Feunteun, J.; Brison, O. )

    1988-01-01

    The c-myc gene amplification observed in human tumors is likely to represent an activation mechanism aiming at an increased transcription level. In order to evaluate the biological significance of this amplification in the malignant transformation the authors designed an experimental model that could possibly mimic this situation in vitro. They have constructed a series of plasmids which physically link the human c-myc gene to the bovine papilloma virus type 1 genome (BPV1) and therefore should be maintained as amplified episomes upon transformation of rodent cells. Anticipating that the high copy number will bring about the immortalizing capacity of the c-myc gene, the constructions were introduced into primary rat embryo cells. Immortal cell lines were established by transfection of the hybrid plasmids carrying either the complete BPV1 genome or the transforming region of the viral genome. The BPV1 DNA alone or the c-myc gene alone has no activity in this assay. The analysis of the established cell lines demonstrates that the transfected plasmids are present not as free copies as anticipated but rather integrated as tandem repeats. They present data which strongly suggest that the immortalization capacity of the hybrid plasmids reflects the activation of the c-myc gene by the transactivable BPV1 enhancer. Although both the BPV1 early genes and the c-myc gene are actively transcribed, most of the cell lines do not display a transformed phenotype.

  7. Burkitt’s lymphoma-associated c-Myc mutations converge on a dramatically altered target gene response and implicate Nol5a/Nop56 in oncogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Turner, Scott A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Burkitt’s Lymphomas (BLs) acquire consistent point mutations in a conserved domain of Myc, Myc Box I. We report that the enhanced transforming activity of BL-associated Myc mutants can be uncoupled from loss of phosphorylation and increased protein stability. Furthermore, two different BL-associated Myc mutations induced similar gene expression profiles independently of T58 phosphorylation, and these profiles are dramatically different from MycWT. Nol5a/Nop56, which is required for rRNA methylation, was identified as a gene hyperactivated by the BL-associated Myc mutants. We show that Nol5a is necessary for Myc-induced cell transformation, enhances MycWT-induced cell transformation, and increases the size of MycWT induced tumors. Thus, Nol5a expands the link between Myc-induced regulation of nucleolar target genes which are rate-limiting for cell transformation and tumor growth. PMID:24013231

  8. Kinetics of myc-max-mad gene expression during hepatocyte proliferation in vivo: Differential regulation of mad family and stress-mediated induction of c-myc.

    PubMed

    Mauleon, Itsaso; Lombard, Marie-Noëlle; Muñoz-Alonso, Maria J; Cañelles, Matilde; Leon, Javier

    2004-02-01

    Mad proteins (Mad1, Mxi1, Mad3, Mad4, Mnt/Rox) are biochemical and biological antagonists of c-Myc oncoprotein. Mad-Max dimers repress the transcription of the same target genes activated by Myc-Max dimers. Despite the critical role of Max and Mad proteins as modulators of c-Myc functions, there are no comparative data on their regulation in vivo. We carried out a systematic analysis of c-myc, max, and mad family expression in a model of synchronized cell proliferation in vivo in adult tissues, that is, rat hepatocytes after partial hepatectomy. We confirmed the previously reported early peak of c-myc expression after hepatectomy but we show that it did not correlate with hepatocyte proliferation as it also occurred in sham-operated animals as a result of surgical stresses. A second peak of c-myc expression was observed later, at the time of the wave of DNA synthesis. No such expression was detected in sham-operated rat quiescent hepatocytes. max expression increased around 4-16 h after hepatectomy, before the peaks of c-myc and DNA synthesis. mxi1 and mad4 were slightly downregulated during liver regeneration. mnt/rox expression did not change. These expression patterns suggest a role of Myc-Max for efficient mitogenic response of hepatocytes. We also analyzed the effects of Myc and Max ectopic expression on the clonogenic growth of the rat hepatoma cells. Expression of c-Myc and Max increased clonogenic growth, whereas the reduction of c-Myc levels by an antisense vector decreased growth. The results suggest nonredundant roles for mad genes in hepatocyte proliferation and point to c-Myc as a putative target for anticancer therapy of liver cancer.

  9. c-myc can induce expression of G0/G1 transition genes.

    PubMed Central

    Schweinfest, C W; Fujiwara, S; Lau, L F; Papas, T S

    1988-01-01

    The human c-myc oncogene was linked to the heat shock-inducible Drosophila hsp70 promoter and used to stably transfect mouse BALB/c 3T3 cells. Heat shock of the transfectants at 42 degrees C followed by recovery at 37 degrees C resulted in the appearance of the human c-myc protein which was appropriately localized to the nuclear fraction. Two-dimensional analysis of the proteins of density-arrested cells which had been heat shock treated revealed the induction of eight protein species and the repression of five protein species. All of the induced and repressed proteins were nonabundant. cDNA clones corresponding to genes induced during the G0/G1 transition were used as probes to assay for c-myc inducibility of these genes. Two anonymous sequences previously identified as serum inducible (3CH77 and 3CH92) were induced when c-myc was expressed. In response to serum stimulation, 3CH77 and 3CH92 were expressed before c-myc mRNA levels increased. However, in response to specific induction of c-myc by heat shock of serum arrested cells, 3CH77 and 3CH92 mRNA levels increased after the rise in c-myc mRNA. Therefore, we hypothesize that abnormal expression of c-myc can induce genes involved in the proliferative response. Images PMID:3211137

  10. Drosophila Myc is required for normal DREF gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Dang Thi Phuong Thao; Seto, Hirokazu; Yamaguchi, Masamitsu

    2008-01-01

    The Drosophila DNA replication-related element-binding factor (dDREF) is required for the expression of many proliferation-related genes carrying the DRE sequence, 5'-TATCGATA. Finding a canonical E-box, 5'-CACGTG, in the dDREF gene promoter prompted us to explore the possibility that the dDREF gene is a target of Drosophila Myc (dMyc). Luciferase transient expression assays combined with RNA interference in Drosophila S2 cells revealed that knockdown of dmyc reduced dDREF gene promoter activity by 35% to 82%, an effect at least partly mediated by the E-box in the promoter. dm{sup 4}/Y hemizygous mutant larvae demonstrated no maternal dMyc and severe impairment of dDREF mRNA transcription. dMyc loss of function in dm{sup 2}/dm{sup 2} homozygous mutant follicle cell clones also resulted in loss of anti-dDREF immunostaining in nuclei. In contrast, co-expression of dMyc-dMax up-regulated dDREF promoter activity in S2 cells. Furthermore, dMyc over-expressing clones exhibited a high level of dDREF gene expression in wing and eye discs. These results taken together indicate that dMyc is indeed required for dDREF gene expression.

  11. Arabidopsis MYC2 Interacts with DELLA Proteins in Regulating Sesquiterpene Synthase Gene Expression[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Gao-Jie; Xue, Xue-Yi; Mao, Ying-Bo; Wang, Ling-Jian; Chen, Xiao-Ya

    2012-01-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana flowers emit volatile terpenes, which may function in plant–insect interactions. Here, we report that Arabidopsis MYC2, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, directly binds to promoters of the sesquiterpene synthase genes TPS21 and TPS11 and activates their expression. Expression of TPS21 and TPS11 can be induced by the phytohormones gibberellin (GA) and jasmonate (JA), and both inductions require MYC2. The induction of TPS21 and TPS11 results in increased emission of sesquiterpene, especially (E)-β-caryophyllene. DELLAs, the GA signaling repressors, negatively affect sesquiterpene biosynthesis, as the sesquiterpene synthase genes were repressed in plants overaccumulating REPRESSOR OF GA1-3 (RGA), one of the Arabidopsis DELLAs, and upregulated in a penta DELLA-deficient mutant. Yeast two-hybrid and coimmunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that DELLAs, represented by RGA, directly interact with MYC2. In yeast cells, the N terminus of MYC2 was responsible for binding to RGA. MYC2 has been proposed as a major mediator of JA signaling and crosstalk with abscisic acid, ethylene, and light signaling pathways. Our results demonstrate that MYC2 is also connected to GA signaling in regulating a subset of genes. In Arabidopsis inflorescences, it integrates both GA and JA signals into transcriptional regulation of sesquiterpene synthase genes and promotes sesquiterpene production. PMID:22669881

  12. INSM1 increases N-myc stability and oncogenesis via a positive-feedback loop in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Insulinoma associated-1 (IA-1/INSM1) gene is exclusively expressed during early embryonic development, but has been found to be re-expressed at high levels in neuroendocrine tumors including neuroblastoma. Using over-expression and knockdown experiments in neuroblastoma cells, we showed that INSM1 is critical for cell proliferation, BME-coated invasion, and soft agar colony formation. Here, we identified INSM1 as a novel target gene activated by N-myc in N-myc amplified neuroblastoma cells. The Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway induced INSM1 by increasing N-myc expression. INSM1 activated PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathways to suppress N-myc phosphorylation (Thr-58) and inhibited degradation of N-myc. Inversely, N-myc protein bound to the E2-box region of the INSM1 promoter and activated INSM1 expression. The invasion assay and the xenograft nude mouse tumor model revealed that the INSM1 factor facilitated growth and oncogenesis of neuroblastoma. The current data supports our hypothesis that a positive-feedback loop of sonic hedgehog signaling induced INSM1 through N-myc and INSM1 enhanced N-myc stability contributing to the transformation of human neuroblastoma. PMID:26456864

  13. INSM1 increases N-myc stability and oncogenesis via a positive-feedback loop in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Insulinoma associated-1 (IA-1/INSM1) gene is exclusively expressed during early embryonic development, but has been found to be re-expressed at high levels in neuroendocrine tumors including neuroblastoma. Using over-expression and knockdown experiments in neuroblastoma cells, we showed that INSM1 is critical for cell proliferation, BME-coated invasion, and soft agar colony formation. Here, we identified INSM1 as a novel target gene activated by N-myc in N-myc amplified neuroblastoma cells. The Sonic hedgehog signaling pathway induced INSM1 by increasing N-myc expression. INSM1 activated PI3K/AKT/GSK3β pathways to suppress N-myc phosphorylation (Thr-58) and inhibited degradation of N-myc. Inversely, N-myc protein bound to the E2-box region of the INSM1 promoter and activated INSM1 expression. The invasion assay and the xenograft nude mouse tumor model revealed that the INSM1 factor facilitated growth and oncogenesis of neuroblastoma. The current data supports our hypothesis that a positive-feedback loop of sonic hedgehog signaling induced INSM1 through N-myc and INSM1 enhanced N-myc stability contributing to the transformation of human neuroblastoma. PMID:26456864

  14. Amino-terminal domains of c-myc and N-myc proteins mediate binding to the retinoblastoma gene product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustgi, Anil K.; Dyson, Nicholas; Bernards, Rene

    1991-08-01

    THE proteins encoded by the myc gene family are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, and aberrant expression of myc proteins has been implicated in the genesis of a variety of neoplasms1. In the carboxyl terminus, myc proteins have two domains that encode a basic domain/helix-loop-helix and a leucine zipper motif, respectively. These motifs are involved both in DNA binding and in protein dimerization2-5. In addition, myc protein family members share several regions of highly conserved amino acids in their amino termini that are essential for transformation6,7. We report here that an N-terminal domain present in both the c-myc and N-myc proteins mediates binding to the retinoblastoma gene product, pRb. We show that the human papilloma virus E7 protein competes with c-myc for binding to pRb, indicating that these proteins share overlapping binding sites on pRb. Furthermore, a mutant Rb protein from a human tumour cell line that carried a 35-amino-acid deletion in its C terminus failed to bind to c-myc. Our results suggest that c-myc and pRb cooperate through direct binding to control cell proliferation.

  15. Increased metastasis with loss of E2F2 in Myc-driven tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yuwanita, Inez; Barnes, Danielle; Monterey, Michael D.; O'Reilly, Sandra; Andrechek, Eran R.

    2015-01-01

    In human breast cancer, mortality is associated with metastasis to distant sites. Therefore, it is critical to elucidate the biological mechanisms that underlie tumor progression and metastasis. Using signaling pathway signatures we previously predicted a role for E2F transcription factors in Myc induced tumors. To test this role we interbred MMTV-Myc transgenic mice with E2F knockouts. Surprisingly, we observed that the loss of E2F2 sharply increased the percentage of lung metastasis in MMTV-Myc transgenic mice. Examining the gene expression profile from these tumors, we identified genetic components that were potentially involved in mediating metastasis. These genes were filtered to uncover the genes involved in metastasis that also impacted distant metastasis free survival in human breast cancer. In order to elucidate the mechanism by which E2F2 loss enhanced metastasis we generated knockdowns of E2F2 in MDA-MB-231 cells and observed increased migration in vitro and increased lung colonization in vivo. We then examined genes that were differentially regulated between tumors from MMTV-Myc, MMTV-Myc E2F2−/−, and lung metastases samples and identified PTPRD. To test the role of PTPRD in E2F2-mediated breast cancer metastasis, we generated a knockdown of PTPRD in MDA-MB-231 cells. We noted that decreased levels of PTPRD resulted in decreased migration in vitro and decreased lung colonization in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that E2F2 loss results in increased metastasis in breast cancer, potentially functioning through a PTPRD dependent mechanism. PMID:26474282

  16. Increased metastasis with loss of E2F2 in Myc-driven tumors.

    PubMed

    Yuwanita, Inez; Barnes, Danielle; Monterey, Michael D; O'Reilly, Sandra; Andrechek, Eran R

    2015-11-10

    In human breast cancer, mortality is associated with metastasis to distant sites. Therefore, it is critical to elucidate the biological mechanisms that underlie tumor progression and metastasis. Using signaling pathway signatures we previously predicted a role for E2F transcription factors in Myc induced tumors. To test this role we interbred MMTV-Myc transgenic mice with E2F knockouts. Surprisingly, we observed that the loss of E2F2 sharply increased the percentage of lung metastasis in MMTV-Myc transgenic mice. Examining the gene expression profile from these tumors, we identified genetic components that were potentially involved in mediating metastasis. These genes were filtered to uncover the genes involved in metastasis that also impacted distant metastasis free survival in human breast cancer. In order to elucidate the mechanism by which E2F2 loss enhanced metastasis we generated knockdowns of E2F2 in MDA-MB-231 cells and observed increased migration in vitro and increased lung colonization in vivo. We then examined genes that were differentially regulated between tumors from MMTV-Myc, MMTV-Myc E2F2-/-, and lung metastases samples and identified PTPRD. To test the role of PTPRD in E2F2-mediated breast cancer metastasis, we generated a knockdown of PTPRD in MDA-MB-231 cells. We noted that decreased levels of PTPRD resulted in decreased migration in vitro and decreased lung colonization in vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that E2F2 loss results in increased metastasis in breast cancer, potentially functioning through a PTPRD dependent mechanism.

  17. Increased radiation-induced transformation in C3H/10T1/2 cells after transfer of an exogenous c-myc gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, V; Drozdoff, V; Zeitz, L; Fleissner, E

    1987-01-01

    C3H/10T1/2 cells were infected with a retroviral vector expressing a mouse c-myc oncogene and a drug-selection marker. The resulting cells, morphologically indistinguishable from C3H/10T1/2, displayed a greatly enhanced sensitivity to neoplastic transformation by ionizing radiation or by a chemical carcinogen. Constitutive expression of myc therefore appears to synergize with an initial carcinogenic event, providing a function analogous to a subsequent event that apparently is required for the neoplastic transformation of these cells. This cell system should prove useful in exploring early stages in radiation-induced transformation. Images PMID:3473497

  18. Interaction with WDR5 Promotes Target Gene Recognition and Tumorigenesis by MYC

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lance R.; Wang, Qingguo; Grieb, Brian C.; Phan, Jason; Foshage, Audra M.; Sun, Qi; Olejniczak, Edward T.; Clark, Travis; Dey, Soumyadeep; Lorey, Shelly; Alicie, Bethany; Howard, Gregory C.; Cawthon, Bryan; Ess, Kevin C.; Eischen, Christine M.; Zhao, Zhongming; Fesik, Stephen W.; Tansey, William P.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY MYC is an oncoprotein transcription factor that is overexpressed in the majority of malignancies. The oncogenic potential of MYC stems from its ability to bind regulatory sequences in thousands of target genes, which depends on interaction of MYC with its obligate partner, MAX. Here, we show that broad association of MYC with chromatin also depends on interaction with the WD40-repeat protein WDR5. MYC binds WDR5 via an evolutionarily conserved “MYC box IIIb” motif that engages a shallow, hydrophobic, cleft on the surface of WDR5. Structure-guided mutations in MYC that disrupt interaction with WDR5 attenuate binding of MYC to ~80% of its chromosomal locations and disable its ability to promote induced pluripotent stem cell formation and drive tumorigenesis. Our data reveal WDR5 as a key determinant for MYC recruitment to chromatin and uncover a tractable target for the discovery of anti-cancer therapies against MYC-driven tumors. PMID:25818646

  19. C-myc can induce expression of G/sub 0//G/sub 1/ transition genes

    SciTech Connect

    Schweinfest, C.W.; Fujiwara, S.; Lau, L.F.; Papas, T.S.

    1988-08-01

    The human c-myc oncogene was linked to the heat shock-inducible Drosophila hsp70 promoter and used to stably transfect mouse BALB/c 3T3 cells. Heat shock of the transfectants at 42/sup 0/C followed by recovery at 37/sup 0/C resulted in the appearance of the human c-myc protein which was appropriately localized to the nuclear fraction. Two-dimensional analysis of the proteins of density-arrested cells which had been heat shock treated revealed the induction of eight protein species and the repression of five protein species. All of the induced and repressed proteins were nonabundant. cDNA clones corresponding to genes induced during the G/sub 0//G/sub 1/ transition were used as probes to assay for c-myc inducibility of these genes. Two anonymous sequences previously identified as serum inducible (3CH77 and 3CH92) were induced when c-myc was expressed. In response to serum stimulation, 3CH77 and 3CH92 were expressed before c-myc mRNA levels increased. However, in response to specific induction of c-myc by heat shock of serum arrested cells, 3CH77 and 3CH92 mRNA levels increased after the rise in c-myc mRNA. Therefore, the authors hypothesize that abnormal expression of c-myc can induce genes involved in the proliferative response.

  20. Differential expression of myc, max and RB1 genes in human gliomas and glioma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Hirvonen, H. E.; Salonen, R.; Sandberg, M. M.; Vuorio, E.; Västrik, I.; Kotilainen, E.; Kalimo, H.

    1994-01-01

    Deregulated expression of myc proto-oncogenes is implicated in several human neoplasias. We analysed the expression of c-myc, N-myc, L-myc, max and RB1 mRNAs in a panel of human gliomas and glioma cell lines and compared the findings with normal neural cells. The max and RB1 genes were included in the study because their protein products can interact with the Myc proteins, being thus putative modulators of Myc activity. Several gliomas contained c/L-myc mRNAs at levels higher than those in fetal brain, L-myc predominantly in grade II/III and c-myc in grade III gliomas. High-level N-myc expression was detected. In one small-cell glioblastoma and lower levels in five other gliomas. In contrast, glioma cell lines totally lacked N/L-myc expression. The in situ hybridisations revealed mutually exclusive topographic distribution of myc and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNAs, and a lack of correlation between myc expression and proliferative activity, max and RB1 mRNAs were detected in most tumours and cell lines. The glioma cells displayed interesting alternative splicing patterns of max mRNAs encoding Max proteins which either suppress (Max) or augment (delta Max) the transforming activity of Myc. We conclude that (1) glioma cells in vivo may coexpress several myc genes, thus resembling fetal neural cells; but (2) cultured glioma cells expression only c-myc; (3) myc, max and RB1 are regulated independently in glioma cells; and (4) alternative processing of max mRNA in some glioma cells results in delta Max encoding mRNAs not seen in normal fetal brain. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8286200

  1. Kinetic profiling of the c-Myc transcriptome and bioinformatic analysis of repressed gene promoters.

    PubMed

    Yap, Chui-Sun; Peterson, Abigail L; Castellani, Gastone; Sedivy, John M; Neretti, Nicola

    2011-07-01

    Mammalian c-Myc is a member of a small family of three related proto-oncogenic transcription factors. c-Myc has an unusually broad array of regulatory functions, which include roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, a variety of metabolic functions, cell differentiation, senescence, and stem cell maintenance. c-Myc modulates the expression of a very large number of genes, but the magnitude of the majority of the regulatory effects is only 2-fold or less. c-Myc can both activate and repress the promoters of its target genes. Identification of genes directly regulated by c-Myc has been an enduring question in the field. We report here microarray expression profiling of a high resolution time course of c-Myc induction, using fibroblast cells in which c-Myc activity can be modulated from null to physiological. The c-Myc transcriptome dataset presented is the largest reported to date with 4,186 differentially regulated genes (1,826 upregulated, 2,360 downregulated, 1% FDR). The gene expression patterns fit well with the known biological functions of c-Myc. We describe several novel findings and present tools for further data mining. Although the mechanisms of transcriptional activation by c-Myc are well understood, how c-Myc represses an even greater number of genes remains incompletely described. One mechanism involves the binding of c-Myc to other, positively acting transcription factors, and interfering with their activities. We identified rapid-response genes likely to be direct c-Myc targets, and analyzed the promoters of the repressed genes to identify transcription factors that could be targets of c-Myc repression.

  2. Repression of SRF target genes is critical for Myc-dependent apoptosis of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Katrin E; Haikala, Heidi M; von Eyss, Björn; Wolf, Elmar; Esnault, Cyril; Rosenwald, Andreas; Treisman, Richard; Klefström, Juha; Eilers, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic levels of Myc expression sensitize cells to multiple apoptotic stimuli, and this protects long-lived organisms from cancer development. How cells discriminate physiological from supraphysiological levels of Myc is largely unknown. Here, we show that induction of apoptosis by Myc in breast epithelial cells requires association of Myc with Miz1. Gene expression and ChIP-Sequencing experiments show that high levels of Myc invade target sites that lack consensus E-boxes in a complex with Miz1 and repress transcription. Myc/Miz1-repressed genes encode proteins involved in cell adhesion and migration and include several integrins. Promoters of repressed genes are enriched for binding sites of the serum-response factor (SRF). Restoring SRF activity antagonizes Myc repression of SRF target genes, attenuates Myc-induced apoptosis, and reverts a Myc-dependent decrease in Akt phosphorylation and activity, a well-characterized suppressor of Myc-induced apoptosis. We propose that high levels of Myc engage Miz1 in repressive DNA binding complexes and suppress an SRF-dependent transcriptional program that supports survival of epithelial cells. PMID:25896507

  3. Dual roles of c-Myc in the regulation of hTERT gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuanjun; Cheng, De; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue

    2014-01-01

    Human telomerase gene hTERT is important for cancer and aging. hTERT promoter is regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs) and its activity is dependent on the chromatin environment. However, it remains unsolved how the interplay between TFs and chromatin environment controls hTERT transcription. In this study, we employed the recombinase-mediated BAC targeting and BAC recombineering techniques to dissect the functions of two proximal E-box sites at −165 and +44 nt in regulating the hTERT promoter in the native genomic contexts. Our data showed that mutations of these sites abolished promoter binding by c-Myc/Max, USF1 and USF2, decreased hTERT promoter activity, and prevented its activation by overexpressed c-Myc. Upon inhibition of histone deacetylases, mutant and wildtype promoters were induced to the same level, indicating that the E-boxes functioned to de-repress the hTERT promoter and allowed its transcription in a repressive chromatin environment. Unexpectedly, knockdown of endogenous c-Myc/Max proteins activated hTERT promoter. This activation did not require the proximal E-boxes but was accompanied by increased promoter accessibility, as indicated by augmented active histone marks and binding of multiple TFs at the promoter. Our studies demonstrated that c-Myc/Max functioned in maintaining chromatin-dependent repression of the hTERT gene in addition to activating its promoter. PMID:25170084

  4. IκB kinases increase Myc protein stability and enhance progression of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Both IκB kinase (IKK) complex and oncgenic protein Myc play important roles in cancer progression, including cancer cell invasiveness and metastasis. The levels of Myc is regulated by the phosphorylation of Myc at Thr58 and Ser62. Results In this study, we show that the expression of Myc is associated with IKKα and IKKβ in breast cancers and that Myc is an IKKs substrate. Suppression of IKK activity by either chemical inhibitor or transfection of kinase-dead mutants decreases the phosphorylation of Myc at Ser62 and enhances the degradation of Myc. Consequently, these treatments decrease the tumorigenic and invasive ability of breast cancer cells. Furthermore, doxorubicin, a frequently used anticancer drug in breast cancer, activates IKKs and Myc, thereby increasing invasiveness and tumorigenesis of breast carcinoma MCF7 cells. Inhibition of IKKs prevents these doxorubicin-induced effects. Conclusions Our study indicates that IKKs tightly regulate Myc expression through prolonging protein stability, and suggests that IKKs are potentially therapeutic targets and that suppression of IKKs may be used following chemotherapy to reduce the risk of treatment-induced tumor progression. PMID:21575199

  5. MYC, Metabolism, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Zachary E.; Walton, Zandra E.; Altman, Brian J.; Hsieh, Annie L.; Dang, Chi V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The MYC oncogene encodes a transcription factor, MYC, whose broad effects make its precise oncogenic role enigmatically elusive. The evidence to date suggests that MYC triggers selective gene expression amplification to promote cell growth and proliferation. Through its targets, MYC coordinates nutrient acquisition to produce ATP and key cellular building blocks that increase cell mass and trigger DNA replication and cell division. In cancer, genetic and epigenetic derangements silence checkpoints and unleash MYC’s cell growth- and proliferation-promoting metabolic activities. Unbridled growth in response to deregulated MYC expression creates dependence on MYC-driven metabolic pathways, such that reliance on specific metabolic enzymes provides novel targets for cancer therapy. PMID:26382145

  6. Different promoter affinities account for specificity in MYC-dependent gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzin, Francesca; Benary, Uwe; Baluapuri, Apoorva; Walz, Susanne; Jung, Lisa Anna; von Eyss, Björn; Kisker, Caroline; Wolf, Jana; Eilers, Martin; Wolf, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced expression of the MYC transcription factor is observed in the majority of tumors. Two seemingly conflicting models have been proposed for its function: one proposes that MYC enhances expression of all genes, while the other model suggests gene-specific regulation. Here, we have explored the hypothesis that specific gene expression profiles arise since promoters differ in affinity for MYC and high-affinity promoters are fully occupied by physiological levels of MYC. We determined cellular MYC levels and used RNA- and ChIP-sequencing to correlate promoter occupancy with gene expression at different concentrations of MYC. Mathematical modeling showed that binding affinities for interactions of MYC with DNA and with core promoter-bound factors, such as WDR5, are sufficient to explain promoter occupancies observed in vivo. Importantly, promoter affinity stratifies different biological processes that are regulated by MYC, explaining why tumor-specific MYC levels induce specific gene expression programs and alter defined biological properties of cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15161.001 PMID:27460974

  7. Evaluation of myc E-box phylogenetic footprints in glycolytic genes by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-whan; Zeller, Karen I; Wang, Yunyue; Jegga, Anil G; Aronow, Bruce J; O'Donnell, Kathryn A; Dang, Chi V

    2004-07-01

    Prediction of gene regulatory sequences using phylogenetic footprinting has advanced considerably but lacks experimental validation. Here, we report whether transcription factor binding sites predicted by dot plotting or web-based Trafac analysis could be validated by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. MYC overexpression enhances glycolysis without hypoxia and hence may contribute to altered tumor metabolism. Because the full spectrum of glycolytic genes directly regulated by Myc is not known, we chose Myc as a model transcription factor to determine whether it binds target glycolytic genes that have conserved canonical Myc binding sites or E boxes (5'-CACGTG-3'). Conserved canonical E boxes in ENO1, HK2, and LDHA occur in 31- to 111-bp islands with high interspecies sequence identity (>65%). Trafac analysis revealed another region in ENO1 that corresponds to a murine region with a noncanonical E box. Myc bound all these conserved regions well in the human P493-6 B lymphocytes. We also determined whether Myc could bind nonconserved canonical E boxes found in the remaining human glycolytic genes. Myc bound PFKM, but it did not significantly bind GPI, PGK1, and PKM2. Binding to BPGM, PGAM2, and PKLR was not detected. Both GAPD and TPI1 do not have conserved E boxes but are induced and bound by Myc through regions with noncanonical E boxes. Our results indicate that Myc binds well to conserved canonical E boxes, but not nonconserved E boxes. However, the binding of Myc to unpredicted genomic regions with noncanonical E boxes reveals a limitation of phylogenetic footprinting. In aggregate, these observations indicate that Myc is an important regulator of glycolytic genes, suggesting that MYC plays a key role in a switch to glycolytic metabolism during cell proliferation or tumorigenesis.

  8. SerpinB3 and Yap Interplay Increases Myc Oncogenic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Turato, Cristian; Cannito, Stefania; Simonato, Davide; Villano, Gianmarco; Morello, Elisabetta; Terrin, Liliana; Quarta, Santina; Biasiolo, Alessandra; Ruvoletto, Mariagrazia; Martini, Andrea; Fasolato, Silvano; Zanus, Giacomo; Cillo, Umberto; Gatta, Angelo; Parola, Maurizio; Pontisso, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    SerpinB3 has been recently described as an early marker of liver carcinogenesis, but the potential mechanistic role of this serpin in tumor development is still poorly understood. Overexpression of Myc often correlates with more aggressive tumour forms, supporting its involvement in carcinogenesis. Yes-associated protein (Yap), the main effector of the Hippo pathway, is a central regulator of proliferation and it has been found up-regulated in hepatocellular carcinomas. The study has been designed to investigate and characterize the interplay and functional modulation of Myc by SerpinB3 in liver cancer. Results from this study indicate that Myc was up-regulated by SerpinB3 through calpain and Hippo-dependent molecular mechanisms in transgenic mice and hepatoma cells overexpressing human SerpinB3, and also in human hepatocellular carcinomas. Human recombinant SerpinB3 was capable to inhibit the activity of Calpain in vitro, likely reducing its ability to cleave Myc in its non oncogenic Myc-nick cytoplasmic form. SerpinB3 indirectly increased the transcription of Myc through the induction of Yap pathway. These findings provide for the first time evidence that SerpinB3 can improve the production of Myc through direct and indirect mechanisms that include the inhibition of generation of its cytoplasmic form and the activation of Yap pathway. PMID:26634820

  9. Structure and transforming function of transduced mutant alleles of the chicken c-myc gene.

    PubMed Central

    Patschinsky, T; Jansen, H W; Blöcker, H; Frank, R; Bister, K

    1986-01-01

    A small retroviral vector carrying an oncogenic myc allele was isolated as a spontaneous variant (MH2E21) of avian oncovirus MH2. The MH2E21 genome, measuring only 2.3 kilobases, can be replicated like larger retroviral genomes and hence contains all cis-acting sequence elements essential for encapsidation and reverse transcription of retroviral RNA or for integration and transcription of proviral DNA. The MH2E21 genome contains 5' and 3' noncoding retroviral vector elements and a coding region comprising the first six codons of the viral gag gene and 417 v-myc codons. The gag-myc junction corresponds precisely to the presumed splice junction on subgenomic MH2 v-myc mRNA, the possible origin of MH2E21. Among the v-myc codons, the first 5 are derived from the noncoding 5' terminus of the second c-myc exon, and 412 codons correspond to the c-myc coding region. The predicted sequence of the MH2E21 protein product differs from that of the chicken c-myc protein by 11 additional amino-terminal residues and by 25 amino acid substitutions and a deletion of 4 residues within the shared domains. To investigate the functional significance of these structural changes, the MH2E21 genome was modified in vitro. The gag translational initiation codon was inactivated by oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis. Furthermore, all but two of the missense mutations were reverted, and the deleted sequences were restored by replacing most of the MH2E21 v-myc allele by the corresponding segment of the CMII v-myc allele which is isogenic to c-myc in that region. The remaining two mutations have not been found in the v-myc alleles of avian oncoviruses MC29, CMII, and OK10. Like MH2 and MH2E21, modified MH2E21 (MH2E21m1c1) transforms avian embryo cells. Like c-myc, it encodes a 416-amino-acid protein initiated at the myc translational initiation codon. We conclude that neither major structural changes, such as in-frame fusion with virion genes or internal deletions, nor specific, if any

  10. Posttranscriptional regulation of cellular gene expression by the c-myc oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Prendergast, G.C.; Cole, M.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1989-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been implicated in the development of many different cancers, yet the mechanism by which the c-myc protein alters cellular growth control has proven elusive. The authors used a cDNA hybridization difference assay to isolate two genes, mr1 and mr2, that were constitutively expressed (i.e., deregulated) in rodent fibroblast cell lines immortalized by transfection of a viral promoter-linked c-myc gene. Both cDNAs were serum inducible in quiescent G/sub o/ fibroblasts, suggesting that they are functionally related to cellular proliferative processes. Although there were significant differences in cytoplasmic mRNA levels between myc-immortalized and control cells, the rates of transcription and mRNA turnover of both genes were similar, suggesting that c-myc regulates mr1 and mr2 expression by some nuclear posttranscriptional mechanism. Their results provide evidence that c-myc can rapidly modulate cellular gene expression and suggest that c-myc may function in gene regulation at the level of RNA export, splicing, or nuclear RNA turnover.

  11. Amplification of the MYC Gene in Osteosarcoma Secondary to Paget's Disease of Bone

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Takafumi; Healey, John H.; Huvos, Andrew G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. In a previous series of 25 human osteosarcoma samples studied for MYC gene amplification, we found amplification in two cases (8%), including one arising in association with Paget's disease (pagetic osteosarcoma). Based on this observation, we further investigated the prevalence of MYC gene amplification in pagetic osteosarcomas. Methods. MYC gene amplification was assessed by Southern blot analysis using frozen tissue samples in five cases of pagetic osteosarcoma and 53 cases of primary (non-pagetic) osteosarcoma. Amplification was considered present if the MYC copy number was six or greater. Results. Three out of five patients (60%) with pagetic osteosarcoma showed MYC gene amplification, whereas it was present in only 5/53 patients (9.4%) with primary osteosarcoma. The incidence of MYC amplification in pagetic osteosarcoma was thus significantly higher than that in primary osteosarcoma (p = 0.016). Discussion. The finding that MYC gene amplification may be more common in pagetic than primary osteosarcoma warrants further study and suggests pathogenetic differences between primary osteosarcomas and those arising in the setting of Paget's disease. Three of the four pagetic osteosarcomas from the present study were previously shown to be immunoreactive for p53, suggesting that p53 mutation may also be a frequent genetic lesion in these tumors. PMID:18521214

  12. Evidence that the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colon cancers with a complementable defect in c-myc regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Erisman, M.D.; Scott, J.K.; Astrin, S.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas frequently express elevated levels of c-myc mRNA in the absence of a gross genetic change at the c-myc locus. To test the hypothesis that these tumors are defective in a gene function necessary for the regulation of c-myc expression, the authors fused an osteosarcoma cell line that exhibits normal c-myc regulation with two colon carcinoma cell lines that express deregulated levels of c-myc mRNA. Since rates of c-myc mRNA turnover in the colon carcinoma cells were found to be comparable to those in normal cells, increased message stability cannot account for the increased steady-state levels of transcripts. These finding suggest that loss of function of a trans-acting regulator is responsible for the deregulation of c-myc expression in a major fraction of colorectal carcinomas. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in tumor/normal tissue pairs from patients with primary colorectal lesions indicated that deregulation of c-myc expression in the tumors is correlated with frequent loss of alleles of syntenic markers on chromosome 5q. Chromosome 5q is the region known to contain the gene for familial adenomatous polyposis, an inherited predisposition to colon cancer. These findings, together with the arlier finding that the colonic distribution of tumors exhibiting deregulated c-myc expression is similar to that reported for familial polyposis, provide evidence that loss of function of the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colorectal cancers in which c-myc expression is deregulated.

  13. Myc oncogenes: the enigmatic family.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, K M; Birnie, G D

    1996-01-01

    The myc family of proto-oncogenes is believed to be involved in the establishment of many types of human malignancy. The members of this family have been shown to function as transcription factors, and through a designated target sequence bring about continued cell-cycle progression, cellular immortalization and blockages to differentiation in many lineages. However, while much of the recent work focusing on the c-myc oncogene has provided some very important advances, it has also brought to light a large amount of conflicting data as to the mechanism of action of the gene product. In this regard, it has now been shown that c-myc is effective in transcriptional repression as well as transcriptional activation and, perhaps more paradoxically, that it has a role in programmed cell death (apoptosis) as well as in processes of cell-cycle progression. In addition, particular interest has surrounded the distinct roles of the two alternative translation products of the c-myc gene, c-Myc 1 and c-Myc 2. The intriguing observation that the ratio of c-Myc 1 to c-Myc 2 increases markedly upon cellular quiescence led to the discovery that the enforced expression of the two proteins individually showed that c-Myc 2 stimulates cell growth, whereas c-Myc 1 appears to be growth suppressing. Clearly, the disparities in the activities of c-Myc, together with the consistent occurrence of mutations of c-myc in human malignancies, means that, although reaching an understanding of the functions of the myc gene family might not be simple, it remains well worthy of pursuit. PMID:8615760

  14. Eradication of Myc-overexpressing small cell lung cancer cells transfected with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene containing Myc-Max response elements.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, T; Tanio, Y; Osaki, T; Hosoe, S; Tachibana, I; Ueno, K; Kijima, T; Horai, T; Kishimoto, T

    1996-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene was ligated with four repeats of the Myc-Max response elements (a core nucleotide sequence CACGTG), and its utility for gene therapy was examined by the treatment of either c-, L- or N-myc-overexpressing the small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line with ganciclovir (GCV). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay demonstrated that the overexpression of any myc genes activated transcription from the CAT gene depending on the Myc-Max binding sites. The transduction of the HSV-TK gene ligated with the CACGTG core rendered all three SCLC lines to be more sensitive to GCV than parental ones in vitro. In addition, the growth of c- or L-myc-overexpressing SCLC cells containing the hybrid HSV-TK gene were significantly suppressed by GCV in vivo. When parental SCLC cells were mixed with HSV-TK-expressing tumor cells at a ratio of 1:3, GCV treatment inhibited tumor growth by 90% compared with parental cells only, indicating the existence of the "bystander effect." These data suggest that the CACGTG-driven HSV-TK gene may be useful for the treatment of SCLC overexpressing any type of myc family oncogenes.

  15. MYC gene rearrangements detected by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Misharina, J A; Sitko, V V; Klymenko, S V; Minchenko, J A; Kurchenko, A I; Silaev, Y O; Lyashenko, L O; Polyanska, V M; Bebeshko, V G

    2014-09-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of lymphoma, including approximately 30-40% of all B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHL). Chromosomal translocations are the hallmark of genetic aberrations in B-lymphoma and are often associated with a specific subtype of B-NHL. MYC gene dysregulation due to chromosomal translocations is characteristic for the most cases of Burkitt's lymphoma. Objective. The goal of this study was to improve the diagnostic accuracy of DLBCL. Identification of chromosome 8 and 14 abnormalities including the translocation of MYC gene t(8; 14)(q24; q32) in substrate cells of lymph nodes was applied using the method of tri-color interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH). Materials and methods. Lymph node biopsy specimens of 17 patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and three patients with Burkitt's lymphoma (including one participant of liquidation of consequences of the catastrophe at the Chornobyl NPP) were studied. The age of patients ranged from 10 to 66 years old (41.3 ± 3.7 average). Biopsy specimens fixed in paraffin. I-FISH-analysis was performed using the commercial test Vysis IGH/MYC, CEP 8 tri-color, dual fusion translocation probe (Abbott Molecular, USA). Results and conclusions. MYC gene and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene translocations were found in four out of twenty persons. Consequently the I-FISH method allows identification of of MYC and IGH gene rearrangements in tissue cells substrate of lymphoma fixed in paraffin. Using this method the molecular-cytogenetic abnormalities were found in eight of twenty patients with B-cell lymphoma providing verification of the lymphoma diagnosis, prediction of their clinical course and advance in management i.e increase the effectiveness of therapy, in refractory lymphoma cases among others.

  16. Regulation of MYC gene expression by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll, Sherri; Yochum, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway controls intestinal homeostasis and mutations in components of this pathway are prevalent in human colorectal cancers (CRCs). These mutations lead to inappropriate expression of genes controlled by Wnt responsive DNA elements (WREs). T-cell factor/Lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors bind WREs and recruit the β-catenin transcriptional co-activator to activate target gene expression. Deregulated expression of the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC) by aberrant Wnt/β-catenin signaling drives colorectal carcinogenesis. In this review, we discuss the current literature pertaining to the identification and characterization of WREs that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRCs. A common theme has emerged whereby these WREs often map distally to the MYC genomic locus and control MYC gene expression through long-range chromatin loops with the MYC proximal promoter. We propose that by determining which of these WREs is critical for CRC pathogenesis, novel strategies can be developed to treat individuals suffering from this disease. PMID:26629312

  17. N-Myc regulates expression of pluripotency genes in neuroblastoma including lif, klf2, klf4, and lin28b.

    PubMed

    Cotterman, Rebecca; Knoepfler, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    myc genes are best known for causing tumors when overexpressed, but recent studies suggest endogenous myc regulates pluripotency and self-renewal of stem cells. For example, N-myc is associated with a number of tumors including neuroblastoma, but also plays a central role in the function of normal neural stem and precursor cells (NSC). Both c- and N-myc also enhance the production of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and are linked to neural tumor stem cells. The mechanisms by which myc regulates normal and neoplastic stem-related functions remain largely open questions. Here from a global, unbiased search for N-Myc bound genes using ChIP-chip assays in neuroblastoma, we found lif as a putative N-Myc bound gene with a number of strong N-Myc binding peaks in the promoter region enriched for E-boxes. Amongst putative N-Myc target genes in expression microarray studies in neuroblastoma we also found lif and three additional important embryonic stem cell (ESC)-related factors that are linked to production of iPSC: klf2, klf4, and lin28b. To examine the regulation of these genes by N-Myc, we measured their expression using neuroblastoma cells that contain a Tet-regulatable N-myc transgene (TET21N) as well as NSC with a nestin-cre driven N-myc knockout. N-myc levels closely correlated with the expression of all of these genes in neuroblastoma and all but lif in NSC. Direct ChIP assays also indicate that N-Myc directly binds the lif promoter. N-Myc regulates trimethylation of lysine 4 of histone H3 in the promoter of lif and possibly in the promoters of several other stem-related genes. Together these findings indicate that N-Myc regulates overlapping stem-related gene expression programs in neuroblastoma and NSC, supporting a novel model by which amplification of the N-myc gene may drive formation of neuroblastoma. They also suggest mechanisms by which Myc proteins more generally contribute to maintenance of pluripotency and self-renewal of ESC as well as to i

  18. Complex intrachromosomal rearrangement in the process of amplification of the L-myc gene in small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sekido, Yoshitaka; Shimokata, Kaoru; Hibi, Kenji ); Takahashi, Takashi; Ueda, Ryuzo; Hida, Toyoaki; Takahashi, Toshitada ); Maekelae, T.P.; Alitalo, K. )

    1992-04-01

    The L-myc gene was first isolated from a human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell line on the basis of its amplification and sequence similarity to c-myc and N-myc. A new mechanism of L-myc activation which results from the production of rlf-L-myc fusion protein was recently reported. On the basis of our earlier observation of a rearrangement involving amplified L-myc in an SCLC cell line, ACC-LC-49, we decided to investigate this rearrangement in detail along with the structure of L-myc amplification units in five additional SCLC cell lines. We report the identification of a novel genomic region, termed jal, which is distinct from rlf and is juxtaposed to and amplified with L-myc during the process of DNA amplification of the region encompassing L-myc. Long-range analysis using pulse-field gel electrophoresis revealed that the amplified L-myc locus is involved in highly complex intrachromosomal rearrangements with jal and/or rlf. Our results also suggest that the simultaneous presence of rearrangements both in rlf intron 1 and in regions immediately upstream of L-myc may be necessary for the expression of rlf-L-myc chimeric transcripts. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Extinction of expression of the translocated myc gene in somatic cell hybrids between mouse myeloma and L-cells.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, A; Hijazzi, M; Sharir, H; Cohen, L; Bergman, Y; Ber, R; Laskov, R

    1989-01-15

    Most murine plasma-cell tumors show a t(12;15) reciprocal chromosomal translocation which truncates the first exon of one of the myc gene alleles and fuses it to one of the switch regions of the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain locus. This results in constitutive activation of the translocated myc gene and the production of smaller-sized mRNA molecules, which are initiated at new sites in the first myc intron. The normal myc allele is not expressed in these myeloma cells. We have studied the expression of the translocated myc gene in somatic cell hybrids between mouse myeloma and L-cells. Our previous findings show that Ig gene expression is extinguished in such hybrids. In the present work we found that the hybrids contain the normal and translocated myc genes. In contrast to the myeloma parental cells which express the translocated myc gene, the hybrids are similar to the L-cells in expressing only the normal myc allele. Our results suggest that the L-cell, fibroblast-like phenotype, is dominant in these hybrids, and show that the translocated myc gene is expressed in a tissue-specific manner in the context of the myeloma cell, and is not expressed when subjected to a fibroblast-like cellular environment.

  20. Transcriptional control of DNA replication licensing by Myc.

    PubMed

    Valovka, Taras; Schönfeld, Manuela; Raffeiner, Philipp; Breuker, Kathrin; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Hartl, Markus; Bister, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The c-myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor, a global regulator of fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of c-myc leads to tumorigenesis, and c-myc is an important driver in human cancer. Myc and its dimerization partner Max are bHLH-Zip DNA binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation of target genes. Non-transcriptional functions have also been attributed to the Myc protein, notably direct interaction with the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) controlling the initiation of DNA replication. A key component of the pre-RC is the Cdt1 protein, an essential factor in origin licensing. Here we present data suggesting that the CDT1 gene is a transcriptional target of the Myc-Max complex. Expression of the CDT1 gene in v-myc-transformed cells directly correlates with myc expression. Also, human tumor cells with elevated c-myc expression display increased CDT1 expression. Occupation of the CDT1 promoter by Myc-Max is demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transactivation by Myc-Max is shown in reporter assays. Ectopic expression of CDT1 leads to cell transformation. Our results provide a possible direct mechanistic link of Myc's canonical function as a transcription factor to DNA replication. Furthermore, we suggest that aberrant transcriptional activation of CDT1 by deregulated myc alleles contributes to the genomic instabilities observed in tumor cells.

  1. Transcriptional control of DNA replication licensing by Myc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovka, Taras; Schönfeld, Manuela; Raffeiner, Philipp; Breuker, Kathrin; Dunzendorfer-Matt, Theresia; Hartl, Markus; Bister, Klaus

    2013-12-01

    The c-myc protooncogene encodes the Myc transcription factor, a global regulator of fundamental cellular processes. Deregulation of c-myc leads to tumorigenesis, and c-myc is an important driver in human cancer. Myc and its dimerization partner Max are bHLH-Zip DNA binding proteins involved in transcriptional regulation of target genes. Non-transcriptional functions have also been attributed to the Myc protein, notably direct interaction with the pre-replicative complex (pre-RC) controlling the initiation of DNA replication. A key component of the pre-RC is the Cdt1 protein, an essential factor in origin licensing. Here we present data suggesting that the CDT1 gene is a transcriptional target of the Myc-Max complex. Expression of the CDT1 gene in v-myc-transformed cells directly correlates with myc expression. Also, human tumor cells with elevated c-myc expression display increased CDT1 expression. Occupation of the CDT1 promoter by Myc-Max is demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation, and transactivation by Myc-Max is shown in reporter assays. Ectopic expression of CDT1 leads to cell transformation. Our results provide a possible direct mechanistic link of Myc's canonical function as a transcription factor to DNA replication. Furthermore, we suggest that aberrant transcriptional activation of CDT1 by deregulated myc alleles contributes to the genomic instabilities observed in tumor cells.

  2. Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy specific for small cell lung cancer cells using a Myc-Max binding motif.

    PubMed

    Nishino, K; Osaki, T; Kumagai, T; Kijima, T; Tachibana, I; Goto, H; Arai, T; Kimura, H; Funakoshi, T; Takeda, Y; Tanio, Y; Hayashi, S

    2001-03-15

    Recent clinical trials of gene therapy for patients with thoracic cancers have shown that these treatments were well tolerated with minimal side effects and that we need to further enhance specificity as well as efficiency of gene transfer to target cancer cells. We previously reported that myc-overexpressing SCLC cell lines became selectively sensitive to ganciclovir (GCV) by transducing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene under the control of the Myc-Max response elements (a core nucleotide sequence, CACGTG) and that this construct (MycTK) could be utilized to develop a novel treatment against chemo-radio-resistant SCLC. We report here in vivo antitumor effects and safety of a replication-deficient adenoviral vector containing the Myc-Max binding motif (AdMycTK) on SCLC cells. In vitro infection with AdMycTK selectively rendered myc-overexpressing SCLC cell lines 63- to 307-fold more sensitive to GCV. In vivo injections with AdMycTK followed by GCV administration markedly suppressed the growth of myc-overexpressing tumors established in the subcutis or in the peritoneal cavity of athymic mice. On the other hand, infection with AdMycTK did not significantly affect either in vitro GCV sensitivity of the cells expressing very low levels of the myc genes or the growth of their subcutaneous tumors. Moreover, we observed no apparent side effects of this treatment including body weight loss or biochemical abnormalities in contrast to the treatment with AdCATK that conferred strong but nonspecific expression of the HSV-TK gene. These results suggested that AdMycTK/GCV therapy is effective on SCLC patients whose tumors overexpress myc family oncogenes.

  3. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    SciTech Connect

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  4. Distinct nuclear arrangement of active and inactive c-myc genes in control and differentiated colon carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Harnicarova, Andrea; Kozubek, Stanislav . E-mail: kozubek@ibp.cz; Pachernik, Jiri; Krejci, Jana; Bartova, Eva

    2006-12-10

    Using sequential RNA-DNA fluorescence in situ hybridization, the nuclear arrangement of both the active and inactive c-myc gene as well as its transcription was investigated in colon cancer HT-29 cells induced to differentiate into enterocytes. Cytogenetic studies revealed the presence of two chromosomes 8 in HT-29 cells, of which the one containing c-myc gene amplicons was substantially larger and easily distinguished from the normal chromosome. This observation enabled detection of both activity and nuclear localization of c-myc genes in single cells and in individual chromosome territories. Similar transcriptional activity of the c-myc gene was observed in both the normal and derivative chromosome 8 territories showing no influence of the amplification on the c-myc gene expression. Our experiments demonstrate strikingly specific nuclear and territorial arrangements of active genes as compared with inactive ones: on the periphery of their territories facing to the very central region of the cell nucleus. Nuclear arrangement of c-myc genes and transcripts was conserved during cell differentiation and, therefore, independent of the level of differentiation-specific c-myc gene expression. However, after the induction of differentiation, a more internal territorial location was found for the single copy c-myc gene of normal chromosome 8, while amplicons conserved their territorial topography.

  5. Gene expression profiling of MYC-driven tumor signatures in porcine liver stem cells by transcriptome sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is now well-established that cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive tumor growth and that the cancer gene, c-Myc, plays a critical role in converting cells to CSCs. However, little is known about the genes that are induced and regulated by c-Myc to generate tumors, and, in particular, tumors of the live...

  6. Two N-myc polypeptides with distinct amino termini encoded by the second and third exons of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, T P; Saksela, K; Alitalo, K

    1989-01-01

    The N-myc and c-myc genes encode closely related nuclear phosphoproteins. We found that the N-myc protein from human tumor cell lines appears as four closely migrating polypeptide bands (p58 to p64) in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. This and the recent finding that the c-myc protein is synthesized from two translational initiation sites located in the first and second exons of the gene (S. R. Hann, M. W. King, D. L. Bentley, C. W. Anderson, and R. N. Eisenman, Cell 52:185-195, 1988) prompted us to study the molecular basis of the N-myc protein heterogeneity. Dephosphorylation by alkaline phosphatase reduced the four polypeptide bands to a doublet with an electrophoretic mobility corresponding to the two faster-migrating N-myc polypeptides (p58 and p60). When expressed transiently in COS cells, an N-myc deletion construct lacking the first exon produced polypeptides similar to the wild-type N-myc protein, indicating that the first exon of the N-myc gene is noncoding. Furthermore, mutants deleted of up to two thirds of C-terminal coding domains still retained the capacity to produce a doublet of polypeptides, suggesting distinct amino termini for the two N-myc polypeptides. The amino-terminal primary structure of the N-myc protein was studied by site-specific point mutagenesis of the 5' end of the long open reading frame and by N-terminal radiosequencing of the two polypeptides. Our results show that the N-myc polypeptides are initiated from two alternative in-phase AUG codons located 24 base pairs apart at the 5' end of the second exon. Both of these polypeptides are phosphorylated and localized to the nucleus even when expressed separately. Interestingly, DNA rearrangements activating the c-myc gene are often found in the 1.7-kilobase-pair region between the two c-myc translational initiation sites and correlate with the loss of the longer c-myc polypeptide. Thus the close spacing of the two N-myc initiation codons could explain the relative resistance

  7. Liver tumor formation by a mutant retinoblastoma protein in the transgenic mice is caused by an upregulation of c-Myc target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bo; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Sultana, Nishat; Sharkar, Mohammad Tofael Kabir; Noritake, Hidenao; Kimura, Wataru; Wu, Yi-Xin; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Uezato, Tadayoshi; Miura, Naoyuki

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fifty percent of the mutant Rb transgenic mice produced liver tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the tumor, Foxm1, Skp2, Bmi1 and AP-1 mRNAs were up-regulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No increase in expression of the Myc-target genes was observed in the non-tumorous liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor formation depends on up-regulation of the Myc-target genes. -- Abstract: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates cellular proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. In order to adapt itself to these biological functions, Rb is subjected to modification cycle, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. To directly determine the effect of phosphorylation-resistant Rb on liver development and function, we generated transgenic mice expressing phosphorylation-resistant human mutant Rb (mt-Rb) under the control of the rat hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 gene promoter/enhancer. Expression of mt-Rb in the liver resulted in macroscopic neoplastic nodules (adenomas) with {approx}50% incidence within 15 months old. Interestingly, quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that c-Myc was up-regulated in the liver of mt-Rb transgenic mice irrespective of having tumor tissues or no tumor. In tumor tissues, several c-Myc target genes, Foxm1, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bmi1 and Skp2, were also up-regulated dramatically. We determined whether mt-Rb activated the Myc promoter in the HTP9 cells and demonstrated that mt-Rb acted as an inhibitor of wild-type Rb-induced repression on the Myc promoter. Our results suggest that continued upregulation of c-Myc target genes promotes the liver tumor formation after about 1 year of age.

  8. C-Myc induced compensated cardiac hypertrophy increases free fatty acid utilization for the citric acid cycle.

    PubMed

    Olson, Aaron K; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam) injections. Isolated working hearts and (13)Carbon ((13)C)-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing (13)C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (Cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was assessed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contributions in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus Cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc versus Cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to Cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes for the citric acid cycle did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the

  9. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  10. The c-myc-regulated gene mrl encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor 1.

    PubMed Central

    Prendergast, G C; Diamond, L E; Dahl, D; Cole, M D

    1990-01-01

    The DNA sequence of the c-myc-regulated gene mrl (G. C. Prendergast and M. D. Cole, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:124-134, 1989) reveals that it encodes plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), a regulator of extracellular proteolysis. Comparison of the human and mouse PAI-1 promoters and cDNA 3' noncoding regions revealed several highly conserved sequence domains, potential targets for c-myc and other factors influencing PAI-1 expression. We discuss possible roles for PAI-1 in normal and neoplastic cell growth control. PMID:2406566

  11. Differential Regulation of N-Myc and c-Myc Synthesis, Degradation, and Transcriptional Activity by the Ras/Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Kapeli, Katannya; Hurlin, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Myc transcription factors are important regulators of proliferation and can promote oncogenesis when deregulated. Deregulated Myc expression in cancers can result from MYC gene amplification and translocation but also from alterations in mitogenic signaling pathways that affect Myc levels through both transcriptional and post-transcription mechanisms. For example, mutations in Ras family GTPase proteins that cause their constitutive activation can increase cellular levels of c-Myc by interfering with its rapid proteasomal degradation. Although enhanced protein stability is generally thought to be applicable to other Myc family members, here we show that c-Myc and its paralog N-Myc respond to oncogenic H-Ras (H-RasG12V) in very different ways. H-RasG12V promotes accumulation of both c-Myc and N-Myc, but although c-Myc accumulation is achieved by enhanced protein stability, N-Myc accumulation is associated with an accelerated rate of translation that overcomes a surprising H-RasG12V-mediated destabilization of N-Myc. We show that H-RasG12V-mediated degradation of N-Myc functions independently of key phosphorylation sites in the highly conserved Myc homology box I region that controls c-Myc protein stability by oncogenic Ras. Finally, we found that N-Myc and c-Myc transcriptional activity is associated with their proteasomal degradation but that N-Myc may be uniquely dependent on Ras-stimulated proteolysis for target gene expression. Taken together, these studies provide mechanistic insight into how oncogenic Ras augments N-Myc levels in cells and suggest that enhanced N-Myc translation and degradation-coupled transactivation may contribute to oncogenesis. PMID:21908617

  12. Absence of missense mutations in activated c-myc genes in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, M.; Hayward, W.S.

    1988-06-01

    The authors determined the nucleotide sequences of two independent DNA clones which contained the activated c-myc genes from avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas. Neither of these c-myce genes contained missense mutations. This strongly supports the notion that the c-myc photo-oncogene in avian leukosis virus-induced B-cell lymphomas can be oncogenically activated by altered expression of the gene without a change in the primary structure of the gene product.

  13. Myc-Max heterodimers activate a DEAD box gene and interact with multiple E box-related sites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grandori, C; Mac, J; Siëbelt, F; Ayer, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1996-08-15

    The c-Myc protein is involved in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis though heterodimerization with Max to form a transcriptionally active sequence-specific DNA binding complex. By means of sequential immunoprecipitation of chromatin using anti-Max and anti-Myc antibodies, we have identified a Myc-regulated gene and genomic sites occupied by Myc-Max in vivo. Four of 27 sites recovered by this procedure corresponded to the highest affinity 'canonical' CACGTG sequence. However, the most common in vivo binding sites belonged to the group of 'non-canonical' E box-related binding sites previously identified by in vitro selection. Several of the genomic fragments isolated contained transcribed sequences, including one, MrDb, encoding an evolutionarily conserved RNA helicase of the DEAD box family. The corresponding mRNA was induced following activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor fusion protein (Myc-ER) in the presence of a protein synthesis inhibitor, consistent with this helicase gene being a direct target of Myc-Max. In addition, as for c-Myc, the expression of MrDb is induced upon proliferative stimulation of primary human fibroblasts as well as B cells and down-regulated during terminal differentiation of HL60 leukemia cells. Our results indicate that Myc-Max heterodimers interact in vivo with a specific set of E box-related DNA sequences and that Myc is likely to activate multiple target genes including a highly conserved DEAD box protein. Therefore, Myc may exert its effects on cell behavior through proteins that affect RNA structure and metabolism.

  14. MYC/MIZ1-dependent gene repression inversely coordinates the circadian clock with cell cycle and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Shostak, Anton; Ruppert, Bianca; Ha, Nati; Bruns, Philipp; Toprak, Umut H.; Lawerenz, Chris; Lichter, Peter; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Eils, Jürgen; Brors, Benedikt; Radomski, Sylwester; Scholz, Ingrid; Richter, Gesine; Siebert, Reiner; Wagner, Susanne; Haake, Andrea; Richter, Julia; Aukema, Sietse; Ammerpohl, Ole; Lopez, Christina; Nagel, Inga; Vater, Inga; Wagner, Rabea; Borst, Christoph; Haas, Siegfried; Rohde, Marius; Burkhardt, Birgit; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Claviez, Alexander; Dreyling, Martin; Eberth, Sonja; Trümper, Lorenz; Kube, Dieter; Stadler, Christina; Einsele, Hermann; Frickhofen, Norbert; Hansmann, Martin-Leo; Karsch, Dennis; Kneba, Michael; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Staib, Peter; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Ott, German; Küppers, Ralf; Weniger, Marc; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Szczepanowski, Monika; Klapper, Wolfram; Kostezka, Ulrike; Möller, Peter; Rosenwald, Andreas; Leich, Ellen; Pischimariov, Jordan; Binder, Vera; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hezaveh, Kebria; Hoell, Jessica; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schilhabel, Markus; Schreiber, Stefan; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Doose, Gero; Hoffmann, Steve; Kretzmer, Helene; Langenberger, David; Binder, Hans; Hopp, Lydia; Kreuz, Markus; Loeffler, Markus; Rosolowski, Maciej; Korbel, Jan; Sungalee, Stefanie; Stadler, Peter F.; Zenz, Thorsten; Eils, Roland; Schlesner, Matthias; Diernfellner, Axel; Brunner, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and the cell cycle are major cellular systems that organize global physiology in temporal fashion. It seems conceivable that the potentially conflicting programs are coordinated. We show here that overexpression of MYC in U2OS cells attenuates the clock and conversely promotes cell proliferation while downregulation of MYC strengthens the clock and reduces proliferation. Inhibition of the circadian clock is crucially dependent on the formation of repressive complexes of MYC with MIZ1 and subsequent downregulation of the core clock genes BMAL1 (ARNTL), CLOCK and NPAS2. We show furthermore that BMAL1 expression levels correlate inversely with MYC levels in 102 human lymphomas. Our data suggest that MYC acts as a master coordinator that inversely modulates the impact of cell cycle and circadian clock on gene expression. PMID:27339797

  15. Role of calcium in prolactin-stimulated c-myc gene expression and mitogenesis in Nb2 lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, P.R.; DiMattia, G.E.; Friesen, H.G.

    1988-06-01

    Receptor-activated transmembrane calcium flux has been implicated as a mediator of the actions of many growth factors and hormones. We examined the effects of PRL, calcium ionophores, and calcium antagonists on /sup 45/Ca2+ flux, c-myc gene expression, and DNA synthesis in the PRL-dependent rat Nb2 lymphoma cell line. PRL had no detectable effects on /sup 45/Ca2+ uptake or efflux, and the mitogenic effects of PRL could not be reproduced by the calcium ionophore A23187 alone or in combination with the tumor-promoting phorbol ester 12-O-tetra-decanoyl-phorbol-13 acetate (TPA). PRL, but not A23187 or TPA, stimulated c-myc gene expression in quiescent Nb2 cells. Exposure to PRL for brief periods (15 min to 4 h), followed by extensive washing, resulted in a time- and dose-dependent activation of DNA synthesis measured 16 h later. This activation was not blocked by addition of excess anti-PRL antiserum after the wash steps, indicating that the observed stimulation was not due to residual PRL. Despite the marked increase in DNA synthesis, removal of PRL after 4 h prevented mitosis, suggesting that PRL may be required throughout the cell cycle for Nb2 cell proliferation. Although continuous incubation with calcium antagonists resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of PRL-stimulated DNA synthesis, activation of DNA synthesis by brief exposure to PRL was not inhibited by the presence of EGTA, calcium channel blockers (nifedipine, cobalt chloride), or calmodulin inhibitors (trifluoperazine, N-6-aminohexyl-5-chloronaphthalene sulfonamide). PRL-stimulated c-myc expression was attenuated, but not blocked, by the calcium channel antagonists. However, the putative intracellular calcium antagonist TMB-8 inhibited both c-myc expression and DNA synthesis in a dose-dependent manner (IC50 = 16 microM).

  16. Enhanced expression of apoptin by the Myc-Max binding motif and SV40 enhancer for SCLC gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Song, Joon-Seok

    2005-01-01

    Apoptin is derived from chicken anemia virus (CAV) and known to induce tumor specific apoptosis but not normal cells. The aim of this study was to use increased expression of apoptin by the Myc-Max response element (MMRE) and SV40 enhancer in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) gene therapy. To investigate the possibility of the utilization of the MMRE, apoptin, and SV40 promoter/enhancer in targeted cancer gene therapy, adenovirus vector expressing apoptin controlled by the MMRE, and SV40 promoter/enhancer was constructed. Ad-MMRE-apoptin-enh infected SCLC cells were significantly suppressed and induced apoptosis more than those of Ad-apoptin or Ad-apoptin-enh. Infection with Ad-MMRE-apoptin-enh of normal cells did not increase apoptosis. About 85% of SCLC tumors show overexpression of the myc family, so the increased expression of apoptin by MMRE and SV40 enhancer can be used in targeted SCLC gene therapy. These results indicate that apoptin expression was increased by the MMRE and SV40 promoter/enhancer, and that this strategy can be used in SCLC targeted cancer gene therapy.

  17. Gene expression profiling of MYC-driven tumor signatures in porcine liver stem cells by transcriptome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Aravalli, Rajagopal N; Talbot, Neil C; Steer, Clifford J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify the genes induced and regulated by the MYC protein in generating tumors from liver stem cells. METHODS: In this study, we have used an immortal porcine liver stem cell line, PICM-19, to study the role of c-MYC in hepatocarcinogenesis. PICM-19 cells were converted into cancer cells (PICM-19-CSCs) by overexpressing human MYC. To identify MYC-driven differential gene expression, transcriptome sequencing was carried out by RNA sequencing, and genes identified by this method were validated using real-time PCR. In vivo tumorigenicity studies were then conducted by injecting PICM-19-CSCs into the flanks of immunodeficient mice. RESULTS: Our results showed that MYC-overexpressing PICM-19 stem cells formed tumors in immunodeficient mice demonstrating that a single oncogene was sufficient to convert them into cancer cells (PICM-19-CSCs). By using comparative bioinformatics analyses, we have determined that > 1000 genes were differentially expressed between PICM-19 and PICM-19-CSCs. Gene ontology analysis further showed that the MYC-induced, altered gene expression was primarily associated with various cellular processes, such as metabolism, cell adhesion, growth and proliferation, cell cycle, inflammation and tumorigenesis. Interestingly, six genes expressed by PICM-19 cells (CDO1, C22orf39, DKK2, ENPEP, GPX6, SRPX2) were completely silenced after MYC-induction in PICM-19-CSCs, suggesting that the absence of these genes may be critical for inducing tumorigenesis. CONCLUSION: MYC-driven genes may serve as promising candidates for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma therapeutics that would not have deleterious effects on other cell types in the liver. PMID:25717234

  18. Myc post-transcriptionally induces HIF1 protein and target gene expression in normal and cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Doe, Megan R.; Ascano, Janice; Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    c-Myc is frequently overexpressed in tumors and plays an important role in the regulation of cancer metabolism. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF1), the master regulator of the hypoxic response, enhances tumorigenesis and influences metabolism via upregulation of the glycolytic pathway and suppression of mitochondrial respiration. Together, deregulated Myc and HIF1 cooperate to lend metabolic advantages to proliferating cancer cells and contribute to the Warburg Effect. Here we show that overexpression of Myc significantly stabilizes the alpha subunit of HIF1 (HIF1alpha) under normoxic conditions and enhances HIF1alpha accumulation under hypoxic conditions in cells. Post-transcriptional regulation of HIF1α by Myc led to the induction of HIF1α gene targets. Normoxic HIF1α protein expression was also dependent on Myc. Functionally; HIF1α expression was required for Myc-induced anchorage-independent growth and cell proliferation. Myc-dependent stabilization of HIF1α involved either disruption of binding to the VHL complex or post-translational protein modifications. Taken together, our findings uncover a previously uncharacterized regulatory relationship between Myc and HIF1 that has important implications for cancer metabolism and development. PMID:22186139

  19. Site-Specific Oligonucleotide Binding Represses Transcription of the Human c-myc Gene in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Michael; Czernuszewicz, Graznya; Postel, Edith H.; Flint, S. Jane; Hogan, Michael E.

    1988-07-01

    A 27-base-long DNA oligonucleotide was designed that binds to duplex DNA at a single site within the 5' end of the human c-myc gene, 115 base pairs upstream from the transcription origin P1. On the basis of the physical properties of its bound complex, it was concluded that the oligonucleotide forms a colinear triplex with the duplex binding site. By means of an in vitro assay system, it was possible to show a correlation between triplex formation at -115 base pairs and repression of c-myc transcription. The possibility is discussed that triplex formation (site-specific RNA binding to a DNA duplex) could serve as the basis for an alternative program of gene control in vivo.

  20. Structure and expression of the human L-myc gene reveal a complex pattern of alternative mRNA processing

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, F.; Battey, J.; Nau, M.; Brooks, B.; Seifter, E.; De Greve, J.; Birrer, M.; Sausville, E.; Minna, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors' analyzed in detail the structure of the L-myc gene isolated from human placental DNA and characterized its expression in several small-cell lung cancer cell lines. The gene is composed of three exons and two introns spanning 6.6 kilobases in human DNA. Several distinct mRNA species are produced in all small-cell lung cancer cell lines that express L-myc. These transcripts are generated from a single gene by alternative splicing of introns 1 and 2 and by use of alternative polyadenylation signals. In some mRNAs that is a long open reading frame with a predicted translated protein of 364 residues. Amino acid sequence comparison with c-myc and N-myc demonstrated multiple discrete regions with extensive homology. In contrast, other mRNA transcripts, generated by alternative processing, could encode a truncated protein with a novel carboxy-terminal end.

  1. The oncogene c-Myc coordinates regulation of metabolic networks to enable rapid cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Neretti, Nicola; Sedivy, John M; Hockenbery, David M

    2008-04-15

    The c-myc proto-oncogene is rapidly activated by serum and regulates genes involved in metabolism and cell cycle progression. This gene is thereby uniquely poised to coordinate both the metabolic and cell cycle regulatory events required for cell cycle entry. However, this function of Myc has not been evaluated. Using a rat fibroblast model of isogenic cell lines, myc(-/-), myc(+/-), myc(+/+) and myc(-/-) cells with an inducible c-myc transgene (mycER), we show that the Myc protein programs cells to utilize both oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis to drive cell cycle progression. We demonstrate this coordinate regulation of metabolic networks is essential, as specific inhibitors of these pathways block Myc-induced proliferation. Metabolic events temporally correlated with cell cycle entry include increased oxygen consumption, mitochondrial function, pyruvate and lactate production, and ATP generation. Treatment of normal cells with inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation recapitulates the myc(-/-) phenotype, resulting in impaired cell cycle entry and reduced metabolism. Combined with a kinetic expression profiling analysis of genes linked to mitochondrial function, our study indicates that Myc's ability to coordinately regulate the mitochondrial metabolic network transcriptome is required for rapid cell cycle entry. This function of Myc may underlie the pervasive presence of Myc in many human cancers.

  2. Promiscuous Rearrangements of the MYC Locus Hijack Enhancers and Super-Enhancers to Dysregulate MYC Expression in Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Affer, Maurizio; Chesi, Marta; Chen, Wei-Dong G.; Keats, Jonathan J.; Demchenko, Yulia N.; Roschke, Anna V.; Van Wier, Scott; Fonseca, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    MYC locus rearrangements – often complex combinations of translocations, insertions, deletions, and inversions - in multiple myeloma (MM) were thought to be a late progression event, which often did not involve immunoglobulin genes. Yet germinal center activation of MYC expression has been reported to cause progression to MM in an MGUS prone mouse strain. Although previously detected in 16% of MM, we find MYC rearrangements in nearly 50% of MM, including smoldering MM, and they are heterogeneous in some cases. Rearrangements reposition MYC near a limited number of genes associated with conventional enhancers, but mostly with super-enhancers (e.g., IGH, IGL, IGK, NSMCE2, TXNDC5, FAM46C, FOXO3, IGJ, PRDM1). MYC rearrangements are associated with a significant increase of MYC expression that is monoallelic, but MM tumors lacking a rearrangement have bi-allelic MYC expression at significantly higher levels than in MGUS. We also show that germinal center activation of MYC does not cause MM in a mouse strain that rarely develops spontaneous MGUS. It appears that increased MYC expression at the MGUS/MM transition usually is bi-allelic, but sometimes can be mono-allelic if there is a MYC rearrangement. Our data suggests that MYC rearrangements, regardless of when they occur during MM pathogenesis, provide one event that contributes to tumor autonomy. PMID:24518206

  3. hnRNP U interacts with the c-Myc-Max complex on the E-box promoter region inducing the ornithine decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yoichiro; Uehara, Norihisa; Tsubura, Airo

    2009-08-01

    The promoter of the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene contains two E-boxes, which are critical sites for transcriptional activation by the binding of c-Myc-Max heterodimers. We have identified heterogeneous nuclear ribonuclear protein U (hnRNP U) as a component of the complex formed on the E-box-containing promoter region of the ODC gene by using DNA-affinity chromatography, immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. The N-terminal domain of hnRNP U was responsible for the association with c-Myc-Max complex. Down-regulation of hnRNP U with RNA interference blocked the induction of the ODC gene and cell growth by serum stimulation, suggesting that hnRNP U is a coactivator of the c-Myc-Max complex and essential for cell proliferation. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays revealed that the segment between the two E-boxes in the promoter is the primary binding site of hnRNP U. The putative binding sequence was narrowed-down to a 13-nucleotide segment by comparing the sequence between the E-boxes with the binding sites of hnRNP U, which were recently identified in the promoter of Bmal1, a core component of the circadian molecular oscillator. These findings increase our knowledge of how the c-Myc-Max complex exerts its transcriptional regulatory role and suggest that hnRNP U may be a coactivator of this transcriptional activator complex.

  4. Cloning and characterization of different human sequences related to the onc gene (v-myc) of avian myelocytomatosis virus (MC29).

    PubMed Central

    Dalla-Favera, R; Gelmann, E P; Martinotti, S; Franchini, G; Papas, T S; Gallo, R C; Wong-Staal, F

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the genomic organization of human cellular sequences (c-myc) homologous to the transforming gene (v-myc) of avian myelocytomatosis virus (MC29). Southern blotting experiments using v-myc probes showed that several fragments of the human genome contain sequences related to the central part of v-myc but only few of them are homologous to the 3' portion of the viral gene. Several recombinant phages which represent different regions of the genome containing c-myc-related sequences were isolated from a human DNA library. Two clones (lambda-LMC-12 and -41) overlap over approximately 17 kilobases of DNA where a sequence homologous to that of the entire v-myc is present. Restriction mapping experiments and heteroduplex analysis show that c-myc sequences of this locus are interrupted by one intron, suggesting that lambda-LMC-12 and -41 contain the complete functional c-myc gene. Three other clones (lambda-LMC-3, -4, and -26) do not overlap and contain sequences related to only approximately 0.3 kilobase of v-myc but lack 5' and 3' portions of the gene. These sequences are not interrupted by introns and are more divergent from v-myc than is the complete gene, suggesting that they may represent either pseudogenes or parts of distantly related genes. Images PMID:6292905

  5. A Functional Screen for Myc-Responsive Genes Reveals Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase, a Major Source of the One-Carbon Unit for Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Chandriani, Sanjay; O'Connell, Brenda; Petrenko, Oleksi; Kotenko, Iulia; Beavis, Andrew; Sedivy, John M.; Cole, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    A cDNA library enriched with Myc-responsive cDNAs but depleted of myc cDNAs was used in a functional screen for growth enhancement in c-myc-null cells. A cDNA clone for mitochondrial serine hydroxymethyltransferase (mSHMT) that was capable of partial complementation of the growth defects of c-myc-null cells was identified. Expression analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that mSHMT is a direct Myc target gene. Furthermore, a separate gene encoding the cytoplasmic isoform of the same enzyme is also a direct target of Myc regulation. SHMT enzymes are the major source of the one-carbon unit required for folate metabolism and for the biosynthesis of nucleotides and amino acids. Our data establish a novel functional link between Myc and the regulation of cellular metabolism. PMID:12138190

  6. Overexpression of Mxi1 inhibits the induction of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene by the Myc/Max protein complex.

    PubMed

    Wu, S; Peña, A; Korcz, A; Soprano, D R; Soprano, K J

    1996-02-01

    We have previously shown that the Myc/Max protein complex plays a role in the growth-associated expression of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene. Mxi1 and Mad, novel Max-associated proteins have been identified and shown to form heterodimers with Max which bind efficiently to the Myc/Max consensus recognition sequence, CACGTG, in vitro. However, formation of Max/Mxi1 or Max/Mad heterodimers results in a reduction in Myc/Max dependent transcriptional activation of reporter plasmid constructs containing the consensus element. In light of the evidence that ODC is transcriptionally regulated in vitro and in vivo by the Myc/Max protein complex and the potential role of Mxi1 and Mad as antagonists of Myc transactivation activity, we set out to determine if one of these Max associated proteins, Mxi1, could affect the regulation of ODC expression by Myc/Max and if this regulation was correlated to growth status. Our results show that overexpression of Mxi1 does in fact inhibit ODC gene expression in a dose-dependent manner both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, evidence is presented which shows that levels of Mxi1 are up-regulated during long term quiescence and down-regulated following growth stimulation by serum. These results suggest that alterations in the levels of Max-associated proteins such as Mxi1 can modulate critical levels of functional Myc/Max protein complexes. This can alter transcriptional transactivation of Myc-regulated targets and as a consequence affect levels of genes essential for initiation and/or maintenance of growth.

  7. MYC acts via the PTEN tumor suppressor to elicit autoregulation and genome-wide gene repression by activation of the Ezh2 methyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The control of normal cell growth is a balance between stimulatory and inhibitory signals. MYC is a pleiotropic transcription factor that both activates and represses a broad range of target genes and is indispensable for cell growth. While much is known about gene activation by MYC, there is no established mechanism for the majority of MYC repressed genes. We report that MYC transcriptionally activates the PTEN tumor suppressor in normal cells to inactivate the PI3K pathway, thus suppressing AKT activation. Suppression of AKT enhances the activity of the EZH2 histone methyltransferase, a subunit of the epigenetic repressor Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), while simultaneously stabilizing the protein. MYC mediated enhancement in EZH2 protein level and activity results in local and genome-wide elevation in the repressive H3K27me3 histone modification, leading to widespread gene repression including feedback autoregulation of the MYC gene itself. Depletion of either PTEN or EZH2 and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway leads to gene derepression. Importantly, expression of a phospho-defective EZH2 mutant is sufficient to recapitulate nearly half of all MYC-mediated gene repression. We present a novel epigenetic model for MYC-mediated gene repression and propose that PTEN and MYC exist in homeostatic balance to control normal growth which is disrupted in cancer cells. PMID:23135913

  8. Joint Binding of OTX2 and MYC in Promotor Regions Is Associated with High Gene Expression in Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Zwijnenburg, Danny A.; Koster, Jan; Versteeg, Rogier; Kool, Marcel

    2011-01-01

    Both OTX2 and MYC are important oncogenes in medulloblastoma, the most common malignant brain tumor in childhood. Much is known about MYC binding to promoter regions, but OTX2 binding is hardly investigated. We used ChIP-on-chip data to analyze the binding patterns of both transcription factors in D425 medulloblastoma cells. When combining the data for all promoter regions in the genome, OTX2 binding showed a remarkable bi-modal distribution pattern with peaks around −250 bp upstream and +650 bp downstream of the transcription start sites (TSSs). Indeed, 40.2% of all OTX2-bound TSSs had more than one significant OTX2-binding peak. This OTX2-binding pattern was very different from the TSS-centered single peak binding pattern observed for MYC and other known transcription factors. However, in individual promoter regions, OTX2 and MYC have a strong tendency to bind in proximity of each other. OTX2-binding sequences are depleted near TSSs in the genome, providing an explanation for the observed bi-modal distribution of OTX2 binding. This contrasts to the enrichment of E-box sequences at TSSs. Both OTX2 and MYC binding independently correlated with higher gene expression. Interestingly, genes of promoter regions with multiple OTX2 binding as well as MYC binding showed the highest expression levels in D425 cells and in primary medulloblastomas. Genes within this class of promoter regions were enriched for medulloblastoma and stem cell specific genes. Our data suggest an important functional interaction between OTX2 and MYC in regulating gene expression in medulloblastoma. PMID:22016811

  9. Surface IgM mediated regulation of RAG gene expression in E mu-N-myc B cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, A; Fisher, P; Dildrop, R; Oltz, E; Rathbun, G; Achacoso, P; Stall, A; Alt, F W

    1992-01-01

    Transgenic mice carrying either the c-myc or N-myc oncogene deregulated by the immunoglobulin heavy chain enhancer element (E mu) develop both pre-B and B cell lymphomas (E mu-c-myc and E mu-N-myc lymphomas). We report here that B cell lines derived from these tumors, as well as a line derived from v-myc retroviral transformation, simultaneously express surface immunoglobulin (a hallmark of mature B cells) as well as a common subset of genes normally restricted to the pre-B stage of development-including the recombinase activating genes RAG-1 and RAG-2. Continued RAG-1 and RAG-2 expression in these lines is associated with VDJ recombinase activity detected with a VDJ recombination substrate. Cross-linking of the surface immunoglobulin on these lines with an anti-mu antibody leads to rapid, specific and reversible down-regulation of RAG-1 and RAG-2 gene expression. We also find that a small but significant percentage of normal surface immunoglobulin bearing bone marrow B cells express the RAG-1 gene. These findings are discussed in the context of their possible implications for the control of specific gene expression during the pre-B to B cell transition. Images PMID:1628630

  10. CSN6 drives carcinogenesis by positively regulating Myc stability

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian; Shin, Ji-Hyun; Zhao, Ruiying; Phan, Liem; Wang, Hua; Xue, Yuwen; Post, Sean M.; Choi, Hyun-Ho; Wang, Edward; Zhou, Zhongguo; Tseng, Chieh; Gully, Christopher; Velazquez-Torres, Guermarie; Fuentes-Mattei, Enrique; Yeung, Giselle; Qiao, Yi; Chou, Ping-Chieh; Su, Chun-Hui; Hsieh, Yun-Chih; Hsu, Shih-Lan; Ohshiro, Kazufumi; Shaikenov, Tattym; Wang, Huamin; Yeung, Sai-Ching Jim; Lee, Mong-Hong

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligases (CRL) are critical in ubiquitinating Myc, while COP9 signalosome (CSN) controls neddylation of Cullin in CRL. The mechanistic link between Cullin neddylation and Myc ubiquitination/degradation is unclear. Here we show that Myc is a target of the CSN subunit 6 (CSN6)–Cullin signaling axis and that CSN6 is a positive regulator of Myc. CSN6 enhanced neddylation of Cullin-1 and facilitated auto-ubiquitination/degradation of Fbxw7, a component of CRL involved in Myc ubiquitination, thereby stabilizing Myc. Csn6 haplo-insufficiency decreased Cullin-1 neddylation but increased Fbxw7 stability to compromise Myc stability and activity in an Eµ-Myc mouse model, resulting in decelerated lymphomagenesis. We found that CSN6 overexpression, which leads to aberrant expression of Myc target genes, is frequent in human cancers. Together, these results define a mechanism for the regulation of Myc stability through the CSN-Cullin-Fbxw7 axis and provide insights into the correlation of CSN6 overexpression with Myc stabilization/activation during tumorigenesis. PMID:25395170

  11. A study of myc-related gene expression in small cell lung cancer by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, J.; Linnoila, R. I.; Seibel, N. L.; Gazdar, A. F.; Minna, J. D.; Brooks, B. J.; Hollis, G. F.; Kirsch, I. R.

    1988-01-01

    The expression of myc-related genes (c-myc, N-myc, and L-myc) in small cell lung cancer (SCLC) was studied by RNA-RNA tissue in situ hybridization. The tissues investigated included cytospins of ten cell lines derived from patients with SCLC, four corresponding nude mouse xenografts from cell lines, and metastatic tumor tissue obtained by surgical biopsy and at autopsy. The probes were prepared as 35S labeled complementary RNA. The expression of each gene was demonstrated specifically by autoradiography in the cytoplasm of the neoplastic cell samples. The average levels of oncogene expression in each specimen corroborated previous data obtained by Northern blot assays. In addition, heterogeneity in gene expression from cell to cell in each sample was noted. This study represents the first attempt to demonstrate oncogene expression in lung cancer cell lines and tissues in situ, and confirms that the expression of these myc related genes can be seen in the primary tumor. The technique of RNA-RNA tissue in situ hybridization has great potential in answering fundamental questions of tumor cell heterogeneity and progression in SCLC. It should be useful in both prospective and retrospective studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2456019

  12. The interaction of MYC with the trithorax protein ASH2L promotes gene transcription by regulating H3K27 modification.

    PubMed

    Ullius, Andrea; Lüscher-Firzlaff, Juliane; Costa, Ivan G; Walsemann, Gesa; Forst, Alexandra H; Gusmao, Eduardo G; Kapelle, Karsten; Kleine, Henning; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Vervoorts, Jörg; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2014-06-01

    The appropriate expression of the roughly 30,000 human genes requires multiple layers of control. The oncoprotein MYC, a transcriptional regulator, contributes to many of the identified control mechanisms, including the regulation of chromatin, RNA polymerases, and RNA processing. Moreover, MYC recruits core histone-modifying enzymes to DNA. We identified an additional transcriptional cofactor complex that interacts with MYC and that is important for gene transcription. We found that the trithorax protein ASH2L and MYC interact directly in vitro and co-localize in cells and on chromatin. ASH2L is a core subunit of KMT2 methyltransferase complexes that target histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4), a mark associated with open chromatin. Indeed, MYC associates with H3K4 methyltransferase activity, dependent on the presence of ASH2L. MYC does not regulate this methyltransferase activity but stimulates demethylation and subsequently acetylation of H3K27. KMT2 complexes have been reported to associate with histone H3K27-specific demethylases, while CBP/p300, which interact with MYC, acetylate H3K27. Finally WDR5, another core subunit of KMT2 complexes, also binds directly to MYC and in genome-wide analyses MYC and WDR5 are associated with transcribed promoters. Thus, our findings suggest that MYC and ASH2L-KMT2 complexes cooperate in gene transcription by controlling H3K27 modifications and thereby regulate bivalent chromatin. PMID:24782528

  13. The interaction of MYC with the trithorax protein ASH2L promotes gene transcription by regulating H3K27 modification

    PubMed Central

    Ullius, Andrea; Lüscher-Firzlaff, Juliane; Costa, Ivan G.; Walsemann, Gesa; Forst, Alexandra H.; Gusmao, Eduardo G.; Kapelle, Karsten; Kleine, Henning; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Vervoorts, Jörg; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2014-01-01

    The appropriate expression of the roughly 30,000 human genes requires multiple layers of control. The oncoprotein MYC, a transcriptional regulator, contributes to many of the identified control mechanisms, including the regulation of chromatin, RNA polymerases, and RNA processing. Moreover, MYC recruits core histone-modifying enzymes to DNA. We identified an additional transcriptional cofactor complex that interacts with MYC and that is important for gene transcription. We found that the trithorax protein ASH2L and MYC interact directly in vitro and co-localize in cells and on chromatin. ASH2L is a core subunit of KMT2 methyltransferase complexes that target histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4), a mark associated with open chromatin. Indeed, MYC associates with H3K4 methyltransferase activity, dependent on the presence of ASH2L. MYC does not regulate this methyltransferase activity but stimulates demethylation and subsequently acetylation of H3K27. KMT2 complexes have been reported to associate with histone H3K27-specific demethylases, while CBP/p300, which interact with MYC, acetylate H3K27. Finally WDR5, another core subunit of KMT2 complexes, also binds directly to MYC and in genome-wide analyses MYC and WDR5 are associated with transcribed promoters. Thus, our findings suggest that MYC and ASH2L–KMT2 complexes cooperate in gene transcription by controlling H3K27 modifications and thereby regulate bivalent chromatin. PMID:24782528

  14. Jasmonic acid promotes degreening via MYC2/3/4- and ANAC019/055/072-mediated regulation of major chlorophyll catabolic genes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Junyi; Xie, Zuokun; Gao, Jiong; Ren, Guodong; Gao, Shan; Zhou, Xin; Kuai, Benke

    2015-11-01

    Degreening caused by rapid chlorophyll (Chl) degradation is a characteristic event during green organ senescence or maturation. Pheophorbide a oxygenase gene (PAO) encodes a key enzyme of Chl degradation, yet its transcriptional regulation remains largely unknown. Using yeast one-hybrid screening, coupled with in vitro and in vivo assays, we revealed that Arabidopsis MYC2/3/4 basic helix-loop-helix proteins directly bind to PAO promoter. Overexpression of the MYCs significantly enhanced the transcriptional activity of PAO promoter in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatment greatly induced PAO expression in wild-type Arabidopsis plants, but the induction was abolished in mycmycmyc4. In addition, MYC2/3/4 proteins could promote the expression of another Chl catabolic enzyme gene, NYC1, as well as a key regulatory gene of Chl degradation, NYE1/SGR1, by directly binding to their promoters. More importantly, the mycmycmyc4 triple mutant showed a severe stay-green phenotype, whereas the lines overexpressing the MYCs showed accelerated leaf yellowing upon MeJA treatment. These results suggest that MYC2/3/4 proteins may mediate jasmonic acid (JA)-induced Chl degradation by directly activating these Chl catabolic genes (CCGs). Three NAC family proteins, ANAC019/055/072, downstream from MYC2/3/4 proteins, could also directly promote the expression of a similar set of CCGs (NYE1/SGR1, NYE2/SGR2 and NYC1) during Chl degradation. In particular, anac019 anac055 anac072 triple mutant displayed a severe stay-green phenotype after MeJA treatment. Finally, we revealed that MYC2 and ANAC019 may interact with each other and synergistically enhance NYE1 expression. Together, our study reveals a hierarchical and coordinated regulatory network of JA-induced Chl degradation.

  15. MYC-repressed long noncoding RNAs antagonize MYC-induced cell proliferation and cell cycle progression

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young-Jun; Fadda, Paolo; Alder, Hansjuerg; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC is a proto-oncogene regulating cell proliferation, cell cycle, apoptosis and metabolism. The recent identification of MYC-regulated long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) expands our knowledge of the role of lncRNAs in MYC functions. Here, we identify MYC-repressed lncRNAs named MYCLo-4, -5 and -6 by comparing 3 categories of lncRNAs (downregulated in highly MYC-expressing colorectal cancer, up-regulated by MYC knockdown in HCT116, upregulated by MYC knockdown in RKO). The MYC-repressed MYCLos are implicated in MYC-modulated cell proliferation through cell cycle regulation. By screening cell cycle-related genes regulated by MYC and the MYC-repressed MYCLos, we identified the MYC-repressed gene GADD45A as a target gene of the MYC-repressed MYCLos such as MYCLo-4 and MYCLo-6. PMID:26003165

  16. A Core MYC Gene Expression Signature Is Prominent in Basal-Like Breast Cancer but Only Partially Overlaps the Core Serum Response

    PubMed Central

    Chandriani, Sanjay; Frengen, Eirik; Cowling, Victoria H.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Perou, Charles M.; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    Background The MYC oncogene contributes to induction and growth of many cancers but the full spectrum of the MYC transcriptional response remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using microarrays, we conducted a detailed kinetic study of genes that respond to MYCN or MYCNΔMBII induction in primary human fibroblasts. In parallel, we determined the response to steady state overexpression of MYCN and MYCNΔMBII in the same cell type. An overlapping set of 398 genes from the two protocols was designated a ‘Core MYC Signature’ and used for further analysis. Comparison of the Core MYC Signature to a published study of the genes induced by serum stimulation revealed that only 7.4% of the Core MYC Signature genes are in the Core Serum Response and display similar expression changes to both MYC and serum. Furthermore, more than 50% of the Core MYC Signature genes were not influenced by serum stimulation. In contrast, comparison to a panel of breast cancers revealed a strong concordance in gene expression between the Core MYC Signature and the basal-like breast tumor subtype, which is a subtype with poor prognosis. This concordance was supported by the higher average level of MYC expression in the same tumor samples. Conclusions/Significance The Core MYC Signature has clinical relevance as this profile can be used to deduce an underlying genetic program that is likely to contribute to a clinical phenotype. Therefore, the presence of the Core MYC Signature may predict clinical responsiveness to therapeutics that are designed to disrupt MYC-mediated phenotypes. PMID:19690609

  17. c-Myc/Max heterodimers bind cooperatively to the E-box sequences located in the first intron of the rat ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene.

    PubMed

    Walhout, A J; Gubbels, J M; Bernards, R; van der Vliet, P C; Timmers, H T

    1997-04-15

    The oncoprotein c-Myc plays an important role in cell proliferation, transformation, inhibition of differentiation and apoptosis. These functions most likely result from the transcription factor activity of c-Myc. As a heterodimer with Max, the c-Myc protein binds to the E-box sequence (CACGTG), which is also recognized by USF dimers. In order to test differences in target gene recognition of c-Myc/Max, Max and USF dimers, we compared the DNA binding characteristics of these proteins in vitro using vaccinia viruses expressing full-length c-Myc and Max proteins. As expected, purified c-Myc/max binds specifically to a consensus E-box. The optimal conditions for DNA binding by either c-Myc/Max, Max or USF dimers differ with respect to ionic strength and Mg2+ ion concentration. Most interestingly, the c-Myc/Max complex binds with a high affinity to its natural target, the rat ODC gene, which contains two adjacent, consensus E-boxes. High affinity binding results from teh ability of c-Myc/Max dimers to bind cooperatively to these E-boxes. We propose that differential cooperative binding by E-box binding transcription factors could contribute to target gene specificity.

  18. Myc Inhibits p27-Induced Erythroid Differentiation of Leukemia Cells by Repressing Erythroid Master Genes without Reversing p27-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Juan C.; Ferrándiz, Nuria; Bretones, Gabriel; Torrano, Verónica; Blanco, Rosa; Richard, Carlos; O'Connell, Brenda; Sedivy, John; Delgado, M. Dolores; León, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Inhibition of differentiation has been proposed as an important mechanism for Myc-induced tumorigenesis, but the mechanisms involved are unclear. We have established a genetically defined differentiation model in human leukemia K562 cells by conditional expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p27 (inducible by Zn2+) and Myc (activatable by 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen). Induction of p27 resulted in erythroid differentiation, accompanied by Cdk inhibition and G1 arrest. Interestingly, activation of Myc inhibited p27-mediated erythroid differentiation without affecting p27-mediated proliferation arrest. Microarray-based gene expression indicated that, in the presence of p27, Myc blocked the upregulation of several erythroid-cell-specific genes, including NFE2, JUNB, and GATA1 (transcription factors with a pivotal role in erythropoiesis). Moreover, Myc also blocked the upregulation of Mad1, a transcriptional antagonist of Myc that is able to induce erythroid differentiation. Cotransfection experiments demonstrated that Myc-mediated inhibition of differentiation is partly dependent on the repression of Mad1 and GATA1. In conclusion, this model demonstrates that Myc-mediated inhibition of differentiation depends on the regulation of a specific gene program, whereas it is independent of p27-mediated cell cycle arrest. Our results support the hypothesis that differentiation inhibition is an important Myc tumorigenic mechanism that is independent of cell proliferation. PMID:18838534

  19. The Action Mechanism of the Myc Inhibitor Termed Omomyc May Give Clues on How to Target Myc for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Savino, Mauro; Annibali, Daniela; Carucci, Nicoletta; Favuzzi, Emilia; Cole, Michael D.; Evan, Gerard I.; Soucek, Laura; Nasi, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence points to Myc – a multifaceted bHLHZip transcription factor deregulated in the majority of human cancers – as a priority target for therapy. How to target Myc is less clear, given its involvement in a variety of key functions in healthy cells. Here we report on the action mechanism of the Myc interfering molecule termed Omomyc, which demonstrated astounding therapeutic efficacy in transgenic mouse cancer models in vivo. Omomyc action is different from the one that can be obtained by gene knockout or RNA interference, approaches designed to block all functions of a gene product. This molecule – instead – appears to cause an edge-specific perturbation that destroys some protein interactions of the Myc node and keeps others intact, with the result of reshaping the Myc transcriptome. Omomyc selectively targets Myc protein interactions: it binds c- and N-Myc, Max and Miz-1, but does not bind Mad or select HLH proteins. Specifically, it prevents Myc binding to promoter E-boxes and transactivation of target genes while retaining Miz-1 dependent binding to promoters and transrepression. This is accompanied by broad epigenetic changes such as decreased acetylation and increased methylation at H3 lysine 9. In the presence of Omomyc, the Myc interactome is channeled to repression and its activity appears to switch from a pro-oncogenic to a tumor suppressive one. Given the extraordinary therapeutic impact of Omomyc in animal models, these data suggest that successfully targeting Myc for cancer therapy might require a similar twofold action, in order to prevent Myc/Max binding to E-boxes and, at the same time, keep repressing genes that would be repressed by Myc. PMID:21811581

  20. MYC is a critical target of FBXW7.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mai; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Yu, Jiyang; Do, Catherine; Silva, Jose M; Gautier, Jean

    2015-02-20

    MYC deregulation is a driver of many human cancers. Altering the balance of MYC protein levels at the level of transcription, protein stability, or turnover is sufficient to transform cells to a tumorigenic phenotype. While direct targeting of MYC is difficult, specific genetic vulnerabilities of MYC-deregulated cells could be exploited to selectively inhibit their growth. Using a genome-wide shRNA screen, we identified 78 candidate genes, which are required for survival of human mammary epithelial cells with elevated MYC levels. Among the candidates, we validated and characterized FBXW7, a component of the SCF-like ubiquitin ligase complex that targets MYC for proteasomal degradation. Down-regulation of FBXW7 leads to synergistic accumulation of cellular and active chromatin-bound MYC, while protein levels of other FBXW7 targets appear unaffected. Over a four-week time course, continuous FBXW7 down-regulation and MYC activation together cause an accumulation of cells in S-phase and G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Under these conditions, we also observe elevated chromatin-bound levels of CDC45, suggesting increased DNA replication stress. Consistent with these results, FBXW7 down-regulation alone decreases the survival of T47D breast cancer cells. These results establish that FBXW7 down-regulation is synthetic lethal with MYC, and that MYC is a critical target of FBXW7 in breast epithelial cells. PMID:25669969

  1. MYC is a critical target of FBXW7

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Mai; Rodriguez-Barrueco, Ruth; Yu, Jiyang; Do, Catherine; Silva, Jose M.; Gautier, Jean

    2015-01-01

    MYC deregulation is a driver of many human cancers. Altering the balance of MYC protein levels at the level of transcription, protein stability, or turnover is sufficient to transform cells to a tumorigenic phenotype. While direct targeting of MYC is difficult, specific genetic vulnerabilities of MYC-deregulated cells could be exploited to selectively inhibit their growth. Using a genome-wide shRNA screen, we identified 78 candidate genes, which are required for survival of human mammary epithelial cells with elevated MYC levels. Among the candidates, we validated and characterized FBXW7, a component of the SCF-like ubiquitin ligase complex that targets MYC for proteasomal degradation. Down-regulation of FBXW7 leads to synergistic accumulation of cellular and active chromatin-bound MYC, while protein levels of other FBXW7 targets appear unaffected. Over a four-week time course, continuous FBXW7 down-regulation and MYC activation together cause an accumulation of cells in S-phase and G2/M-phase of the cell cycle. Under these conditions, we also observe elevated chromatin-bound levels of CDC45, suggesting increased DNA replication stress. Consistent with these results, FBXW7 down-regulation alone decreases the survival of T47D breast cancer cells. These results establish that FBXW7 down-regulation is synthetic lethal with MYC, and that MYC is a critical target of FBXW7 in breast epithelial cells. PMID:25669969

  2. Deregulation of c-myc gene expression in human colon carcinoma is not accompanied by amplification or rearrangement of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Erisman, M D; Rothberg, P G; Diehl, R E; Morse, C C; Spandorfer, J M; Astrin, S M

    1985-01-01

    The structure and expression of the c-myc oncogene were examined in 29 primary human colon adenocarcinomas. Dot blot hybridization of total RNA showed that 21 tumors (72%) had considerably elevated expression of c-myc (5- to 40-fold) relative to normal colonic mucosa. These data were corroborated by Northern blots of polyadenylated RNA, which showed a 2.3-kilobase transcript. Southern analysis of the c-myc locus in these tumors indicated the absence of amplification or DNA rearrangement in a 35-kilobase region encompassing the gene. In a parallel study, elevated expression of c-myc without amplification or DNA rearrangement was also observed in three of six colon carcinoma cell lines examined; in addition, unlike a normal colon cell line control, these three cell lines exhibited constitutive, high-level expression of the gene during their growth in cultures. These results indicate that elevated expression of the c-myc oncogene occurs frequently in primary human colon carcinomas and that the mechanism involved in the regulation of c-myc expression is altered in tumor-derived cell lines. Images PMID:3837853

  3. BET and HDAC inhibitors induce similar genes and biological effects and synergize to kill in Myc-induced murine lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhadury, Joydeep; Nilsson, Lisa M.; Veppil Muralidharan, Somsundar; Green, Lydia C.; Li, Zhoulei; Gesner, Emily M.; Hansen, Henrik C.; Keller, Ulrich B.; McLure, Kevin G.; Nilsson, Jonas A.

    2014-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) domain family of proteins binds to acetylated lysines on histones and regulates gene transcription. Recently, BET inhibitors (BETi) have been developed that show promise as potent anticancer drugs against various solid and hematological malignancies. Here we show that the structurally novel and orally bioavailable BET inhibitor RVX2135 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis of lymphoma cells arising in Myc-transgenic mice in vitro and in vivo. We find that BET inhibition exhibits broad transcriptional effects in Myc-transgenic lymphoma cells affecting many transcription factor networks. By examining the genes induced by BETi, which have largely been ignored to date, we discovered that these were similar to those induced by histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi). HDACi also induced cell-cycle arrest and cell death of Myc-induced murine lymphoma cells and synergized with BETi. Our data suggest that BETi sensitize Myc-overexpressing lymphoma cells partly by inducing HDAC-silenced genes, and suggest synergistic and therapeutic combinations by targeting the genetic link between BETi and HDACi. PMID:24979794

  4. Multiple single-stranded cis elements are associated with activated chromatin of the human c-myc gene in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Michelotti, G A; Michelotti, E F; Pullner, A; Duncan, R C; Eick, D; Levens, D

    1996-01-01

    Transcription activation and repression of eukaryotic genes are associated with conformational and topological changes of the DNA and chromatin, altering the spectrum of proteins associated with an active gene. Segments of the human c-myc gene possessing non-B structure in vivo located with enzymatic and chemical probes. Sites hypertensive to cleavage with single-strand-specific S1 nuclease or the single-strand-selective agent potassium permanganate included the major promoters P1 and P2 as well as the far upstream sequence element (FUSE) and CT elements, which bind, respectively, the single-strand-specific factors FUSE-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in vitro. Active and inactive c-myc genes yielded different patterns of S1 nuclease and permanganate sensitivity, indicating alternative chromatin configurations of active and silent genes. The melting of specific cis elements of active c-myc genes in vivo suggested that transcriptionally associated torsional strain might assist strand separation and facilitate factor binding. Therefore, the interaction of FUSE-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K with supercoiled DNA was studied. Remarkably, both proteins recognize their respective elements torsionally strained but not as liner duplexes. Single-strand- or supercoil-dependent gene regulatory proteins may directly link alterations in DNA conformation and topology with changes in gene expression. PMID:8649373

  5. Association Between Amplification and Expression of C-MYC Gene and Clinicopathological Characteristics of Stomach Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Khaleghian, Malihea; Jahanzad, Issa; Shakoori, Abbas; Emami Razavi, Amirnader; Azimi, Cyrus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The incidence rate of gastric cancer in western countries has shown a remarkable decline in the recent years while it is still the most common cancer among males in Iran. The proto-oncogene MYC, located at 8q24.1, regulates almost 15% of human genes and is activated in 20% of all tumors. The amplification of MYC and overexpression of its protein product are observed in 15 - 30% of gastric neoplasias. Objectives: The objective of this study was to find the preferences of Chromogenic In Situ Hybridization (CISH) and Immunohistochemistry (IHC) in diagnosis and prognosis of gastric cancer. Patients and Methods: We studied 102 samples of gastric cancer in Iran and all the patients had undergone primary surgical resection at the Cancer Institute Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences. The CISH and IHC techniques were applied for all our samples. All of the samples had adenocarcinoma gastric cancer and were selected randomly. Also, the type of study was cross sectional. The sample size was 100 patients. Results: Our data revealed that both diffuse and intestinal types of gastric cancer occurred significantly more in males than females. Our results showed that there was an indication of some correlation between grades and CISH, although the difference was not significant. Our data also showed that CISH positive patients (43%) were more frequent compared to IHC positive patients (14.7%). There was a correlation between CISH and IHC. These results revealed that there was a significant difference between grades and IHC. There was also no statistical difference between CISH amplification in diffuse and intestinal types. Conclusions: From the results, it could be concluded that for administration of the treatment of stomach cancer, and progress and prognosis of tumor, which is important for patients and clinicians, the CISH is a better and more feasible test than IHC, in regards to sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27175302

  6. c-MYC targets the central oscillator gene Per1 and is regulated by the circadian clock at the post-transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Repouskou, Anastasia; Prombona, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    Cell proliferation in mammals follows a circadian rhythm while disruption of clock gene expression has been linked to tumorigenesis. Expression of the c-Myc oncogene is frequently deregulated in tumors, facilitating aberrant cell proliferation. c-MYC protein levels display circadian rhythmicity, which is compatible with an in vitro repressive role of the clock-activating complex BMAL1/CLOCK on its promoter. In this report, we provide evidence for the in vivo binding of the core circadian factor BMAL1 on the human c-Myc promoter. In addition, analysis of protein synthesis and degradation rates, as well as post-translational acetylation, demonstrate that the clock tightly controls cellular MYC levels. The oncoprotein itself is a transcription factor that by responding to mitogenic signals regulates the expression of several hundred genes. c-MYC-driven transcription is generally exerted upon dimerization with MAX and binding to E-box elements, a sequence that is also recognized by the circadian heterodimer. Our reporter assays reveal that the MYC/MAX dimer cannot affect transcription of the circadian gene Per1. However, when overexpressed, c-MYC is able to repress Per1 transactivation by BMAL1/CLOCK via targeting selective E-box sequences. Importantly, upon serum stimulation, MYC was detected in BMAL1 protein complexes. Together, these data demonstrate a novel interaction between MYC and circadian transactivators resulting in reduced clock-driven transcription. Perturbation of Per1 expression by MYC constitutes a plausible alternative explanation for the deregulated expression of clock genes observed in many types of cancer.

  7. Survivin enhances telomerase activity via up-regulation of specificity protein 1- and c-Myc-mediated human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Endoh, Teruo; Tsuji, Naoki; Asanuma, Koichi; Yagihashi, Atsuhito; Watanabe, Naoki . E-mail: watanabn@sapmed.ac.jp

    2005-05-01

    Suppression of apoptosis is thought to contribute to carcinogenesis. Survivin, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis family, blocks apoptotic signaling activated by various cellular stresses. Since elevated expression of survivin observed in human cancers of varied origin was associated with poor patient survival, survivin has attracted growing attention as a potential target for cancer treatment. Immortalization of cells also is required for carcinogenesis; telomere length maintenance by telomerase is required for cancer cells to proliferate indefinitely. Yet how cancer cells activate telomerase remains unclear. We therefore examined possible interrelationships between survivin expression and telomerase activity. Correlation between survivin and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression was observed in colon cancer tissues, and overexpression of survivin enhanced telomerase activity by up-regulation of hTERT expression in LS180 human colon cancer cells. DNA-binding activities of specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and c-Myc to the hTERT core promoter were increased in survivin gene transfectant cells. Phosphorylation of Sp1 and c-Myc at serine and threonine residues was enhanced by survivin, while total amounts of these proteins were unchanged. Further, 'knockdown' of survivin by a small inhibitory RNA decreased Sp1 and c-Myc phosphorylation. Thus survivin participates not only in inhibition of apoptosis, but also in prolonging cellular lifespan.

  8. Ras enhances Myc protein stability.

    PubMed

    Sears, R; Leone, G; DeGregori, J; Nevins, J R

    1999-02-01

    Various experiments have demonstrated a collaborative action of Myc and Ras, both in normal cell growth control as well as during oncogenesis. We now show that Ras enhances the accumulation of Myc activity by stabilizing the Myc protein. Whereas Myc has a very short half-life when produced in the absence of mitogenic signals, due to degradation by the 26S proteasome, the half-life of Myc increases markedly in growth-stimulated cells. This stabilization is dependent on the Ras/Raf/MAPK pathway and is not augmented by proteasome inhibition, suggesting that Ras inhibits the proteasome-dependent degradation of Myc. We propose that one aspect of Myc-Ras collaboration is an ability of Ras to enhance the accumulation of transcriptionally active Myc protein.

  9. The transcriptional program of a human B cell line in response to Myc

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmacher, Marino; Kohlhuber, Franz; Hölzel, Michael; Kaiser, Carmen; Burtscher, Helmut; Jarsch, Michael; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Laux, Gerhard; Polack, Axel; Weidle, Ulrich H.; Eick, Dirk

    2001-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc (myc) encodes a transcription factor (Myc) that promotes growth, proliferation and apoptosis. Myc has been suggested to induce these effects by induction/repression of downstream genes. Here we report the identification of potential Myc target genes in a human B cell line that grows and proliferates depending on conditional myc expression. Oligonucleotide microarrays were applied to identify downstream genes of Myc at the level of cytoplasmic mRNA. In addition, we identified potential Myc target genes in nuclear run-on experiments by changes in their transcription rate. The identified genes belong to gene classes whose products are involved in amino acid/protein synthesis, lipid metabolism, protein turnover/folding, nucleotide/DNA synthesis, transport, nucleolus function/RNA binding, transcription and splicing, oxidative stress and signal transduction. The identified targets support our current view that myc acts as a master gene for growth control and increases transcription of a large variety of genes. PMID:11139609

  10. Direct interaction of Gas41 and Myc encoded by amplified genes in nervous system tumours.

    PubMed

    Piccinni, Eugenia; Chelstowska, Anna; Hanus, Jakub; Widlak, Piotr; Loreti, Simona; Tata, Ada Maria; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Bianchi, Michele Maria; Negri, Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    In order to understand better the role of the human Tip60 complex component Gas41, we analysed its expression levels in brain tumours and searched for possible interactors. Two-hybrid screening of a human foetal brain library allowed identification of some molecular interactors of Gas41. Among them we found n-Myc transcription factor. The interaction between Gas41 and n-Myc was validated by pull-down experiments. We showed that Gas41 is able to bind both n-Myc and c-Myc proteins, and that the levels of expression of Gas41 and Myc proteins were similar to each other in such brain tumors as neuroblastomas and glioblastomas. Finally, in order to identify which region of Gas41 is involved in the interaction with Myc proteins, we analysed the ability of Gas41 to substitute for its orthologue Yaf9 in yeast; we showed that the N-terminal portions of the two proteins, containing the YEATS domains, are interchangeable, while the C-terminal portions are species-specific. In fact we found that Gas41 C-terminal portion is required for Myc protein interaction in human.

  11. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays. Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies. PMID:26427040

  12. Decoding c-Myc networks of cell cycle and apoptosis regulated genes in a transgenic mouse model of papillary lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ciribilli, Yari; Singh, Prashant; Spanel, Reinhard; Inga, Alberto; Borlak, Jürgen

    2015-10-13

    The c-Myc gene codes for a basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper transcription factor protein and is reported to be frequently over-expressed in human cancers. Given that c-Myc plays an essential role in neoplastic transformation we wished to define its activity in lung cancer and therefore studied its targeted expression to respiratory epithelium in a transgenic mouse disease model. Using histological well-defined tumors, transcriptome analysis identified novel c-Myc responsive cell cycle and apoptosis genes that were validated as direct c-Myc targets using EMSA, Western blotting, gene reporter and ChIP assays.Through computational analyses c-Myc cooperating transcription factors emerged for repressed and up-regulated genes in cancer samples, namely Klf7, Gata3, Sox18, p53 and Elf5 and Cebpα, respectively. Conversely, at promoters of genes regulated in transgenic but non-carcinomatous lung tissue enriched binding sites for c-Myc, Hbp1, Hif1 were observed. Bioinformatic analysis of tumor transcriptomic data revealed regulatory gene networks and highlighted mortalin and moesin as master regulators while gene reporter and ChIP assays in the H1299 lung cancer cell line as well as cross-examination of published ChIP-sequence data of 7 human and 2 mouse cell lines provided strong evidence for the identified genes to be c-Myc targets. The clinical significance of findings was established by evaluating expression of orthologous proteins in human lung cancer. Taken collectively, a molecular circuit for c-Myc-dependent cellular transformation was identified and the network analysis broadened the perspective for molecularly targeted therapies.

  13. Continued withdrawal from the cell cycle and regulation of cellular genes in mouse erythroleukemia cells blocked in differentiation by the c-myc oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Coppola, J A; Parker, J M; Schuler, G D; Cole, M D

    1989-01-01

    Constitutive expression of the c-myc oncogene blocks dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)-induced differentiation of mouse erythroleukemia (MEL) cells. During the first 12 h of treatment with DMSO, MEL cells undergo a temporary decrease in the level of c-myc mRNA, followed by a temporary withdrawal from the cell cycle. We found the same shutoff of DNA synthesis during the first 12 to 30 h after DMSO induction in normal MEL cells (which differentiate) and in c-myc-transfected MEL cells (which do not differentiate). We also examined whether deregulated c-myc expression grossly interfered with the regulation of gene expression during MEL cell differentiation. We used run-on transcription assays to monitor the rate of transcription of four oncogenes (c-myc, c-myb, c-fos, and c-K-ras); all except c-K-ras showed a rapid but temporary decrease in transcription after induction in both c-myc-transfected and control cells. Finally, we found the same regulation of cytoplasmic mRNA expression in both types of cells for four oncogenes and three housekeeping genes associated with growth. We conclude that in the MEL cell system, the effects of deregulated c-myc expression do not occur through a disruption of cell cycle control early in induction, nor do they occur through gross deregulation of gene expression. Images PMID:2657403

  14. MYC oncogene in myeloid neoplasias.

    PubMed

    Delgado, M Dolores; Albajar, Marta; Gomez-Casares, M Teresa; Batlle, Ana; León, Javier

    2013-02-01

    MYC is a transcription factor that regulates many critical genes for cell proliferation, differentiation, and biomass accumulation. MYC is one of the most prevalent oncogenes found to be altered in human cancer, being deregulated in about 50 % of tumors. Although MYC deregulation has been more frequently associated to lymphoma and lymphoblastic leukemia than to myeloid malignancies, a body of evidence has been gathered showing that MYC plays a relevant role in malignancies derived from the myeloid compartment. The myeloid leukemogenic activity of MYC has been demonstrated in different murine models. Not surprisingly, MYC has been found to be amplified or/and deregulated in the three major types of myeloid neoplasms: acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and myeloproliferative neoplasms, including chronic myeloid leukemia. Here, we review the recent literature describing the involvement of MYC in myeloid tumors.

  15. N-myc is frequently activated by proviral insertion in MuLV-induced T cell lymphomas.

    PubMed Central

    van Lohuizen, M; Breuer, M; Berns, A

    1989-01-01

    We report a new common proviral insertion site in murine leukemia virus-induced T cell lymphomas to be N-myc. Proviral activation of N-myc was found in 35% of independently induced primary tumors. The vast majority of the proviral insertions occur within a small segment of the 3'-untranslated region of the N-myc gene, directly downstream of the protein-encoding domain. This results in an increased level of expression of a truncated N-myc mRNA. Together with the previously shown c-myc activation we now find involvement of myc genes in greater than 75% of the primary T cell lymphomas induced by Moloney murine leukemia virus in C57BL10 and BALB/c mice, and show for the first time that N-myc can be over-expressed by a mechanism other than gene amplification. Images PMID:2653809

  16. Role of DLC1 tumor suppressor gene and MYC oncogene in pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma: potential prospects for combined targeted therapeutics (review).

    PubMed

    Zimonjic, Drazen B; Popescu, Nicholas C

    2012-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death, and its incidence is increasing worldwide in an alarming manner. The development of curative therapy for advanced and metastatic HCC is a high clinical priority. The HCC genome is complex and heterogeneous; therefore, the identification of recurrent genomic and related gene alterations is critical for developing clinical applications for diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy of the disease. This article focuses on recent research progress and our contribution in identifying and deciphering the role of defined genetic alterations in the pathogenesis of HCC. A significant number of genes that promote or suppress HCC cell growth have been identified at the sites of genomic reorganization. Notwithstanding the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations, highly recurrent changes on a single chromosome can alter the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) whose deregulation may be sufficient to drive the progression of normal hepatocytes to malignancy. A distinct and highly recurrent pattern of genomic imbalances in HCC includes the loss of DNA copy number (associated with loss of heterozygosity) of TSG-containing chromosome 8p and gain of DNA copy number or regional amplification of protooncogenes on chromosome 8q. Even though 8p is relatively small, it carries an unusually large number of TSGs, while, on the other side, several oncogenes are dispersed along 8q. Compelling evidence demonstrates that DLC1, a potent TSG on 8p, and MYC oncogene on 8q play a critical role in the pathogenesis of human HCC. Direct evidence for their role in the genesis of HCC has been obtained in a mosaic mouse model. Knockdown of DLC1 helps MYC in the induction of hepatoblast transformation in vitro, and in the development of HCC in vivo. Therapeutic interventions, which would simultaneously target signaling pathways governing both DLC1 and MYC functions in hepatocarcinogenesis, could

  17. The c-Myc Transactivation Domain Is a Direct Modulator of Apoptotic versus Proliferative Signals

    PubMed Central

    Chang, David W.; Claassen, Gisela F.; Hann, Stephen R.; Cole, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    We have assayed the oncogenic, proliferative, and apoptotic activities of the frequent mutations that occur in the c-myc gene in Burkitt's lymphomas. Some alleles have a modest (50 to 60%) increase in transforming activity; however, the most frequent Burkitt's lymphoma allele (T58I) had an unexpected substantial decrease in transforming activity (85%). All alleles restored the proliferation function of c-Myc in cells that grow slowly due to a c-myc knockout. There was discordance for some alleles between apoptotic and oncogenic activities, but only the T58A allele had elevated transforming activity with a concomitant reduced apoptotic potential. We discovered a novel missense mutation, MycS71F, that had a very low apoptotic activity compared to wild-type Myc, yet this mutation has never been found in lymphomas, suggesting that there is no strong selection for antiapoptotic c-Myc alleles. MycS71F also induced very low levels of cytochrome c release from mitochondria, suggesting a mechanism of action for this mutation. Phosphopeptide mapping provided a biochemical basis for the dramatically different biological activities of the transformation-defective T58I and transformation-enhanced T58A c-Myc alleles. Furthermore, the antiapoptotic survival factor insulin-like growth factor 1 was found to suppress phosphorylation of T58, suggesting that the c-Myc transactivation domain is a direct target of survival signals. PMID:10825194

  18. c-Myc Transforms Human Mammary Epithelial Cells through Repression of the Wnt Inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; D'Cruz, Celina M.; Chodosh, Lewis A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    c-myc is frequently amplified in breast cancer; however, the mechanism of myc-induced mammary epithelial cell transformation has not been defined. We show that c-Myc induces a profound morphological transformation in human mammary epithelial cells and anchorage-independent growth. c-Myc suppresses the Wnt inhibitors DKK1 and SFRP1, and derepression of DKK1 or SFRP1 reduces Myc-dependent transforming activity. Myc-dependent repression of DKK1 and SFRP1 is accompanied by Wnt target gene activation and endogenous T-cell factor activity. Myc-induced mouse mammary tumors have repressed SFRP1 and increased expression of Wnt target genes. DKK1 and SFRP1 inhibit the transformed phenotype of breast cancer cell lines, and DKK1 inhibits tumor formation. We propose a positive feedback loop for activation of the c-myc and Wnt pathways in breast cancer. PMID:17485441

  19. Self-assembly of c-myc DNA promoted by a single enantiomer ruthenium complex as a potential nuclear targeting gene carrier

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiong; Mei, Wenjie; Zheng, Kangdi; Ding, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has long been limited in the clinic, due in part to the lack of safety and efficacy of the gene carrier. Herein, a single enantiomer ruthenium(II) complex, Λ-[Ru(bpy)2(p-BEPIP)](ClO4)2 (Λ-RM0627, bpy = 4,4′-bipyridine, p-BEPIP = 2-(4-phenylacetylenephenyl)imidazole [4,5f][1, 10] phenanthroline), has been synthesized and investigated as a potential gene carrier that targets the nucleus. In this report, it is shown that Λ-RM0627 promotes self-assembly of c-myc DNA to form a nanowire structure. Further studies showed that the nano-assembly of c-myc DNA that induced Λ-RM0627 could be efficiently taken up and enriched in the nuclei of HepG2 cells. After treatment of the nano-assembly of c-myc DNA with Λ-RM0627, over-expression of c-myc in HepG2 cells was observed. In summary, Λ-RM0627 played a key role in the transfer and release of c-myc into cells, which strongly indicates Λ-RM0627 as a potent carrier of c-myc DNA that targets the nucleus of tumor cells. PMID:27381008

  20. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Juan C; Redding, Nicole; Bloté, Karen; Robbins, Stephen M; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John C; Beaudry, Paul

    2016-01-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N) increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVΔM51) and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVΔM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses. PMID:27626059

  1. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, Juan C; Redding, Nicole; Bloté, Karen; Robbins, Stephen M; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John C; Beaudry, Paul

    2016-01-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N) increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVΔM51) and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVΔM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses. PMID:27626059

  2. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Corredor, Juan C; Redding, Nicole; Bloté, Karen; Robbins, Stephen M; Senger, Donna L; Bell, John C; Beaudry, Paul

    2016-01-01

    N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB). Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N) increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVΔM51) and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVΔM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses.

  3. Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4 regulate glucosinolate biosynthesis, insect performance, and feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Fabian; Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Zander, Mark; Diez-Diaz, Monica; Fonseca, Sandra; Glauser, Gaétan; Lewsey, Mathew G; Ecker, Joseph R; Solano, Roberto; Reymond, Philippe

    2013-08-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana plants fend off insect attack by constitutive and inducible production of toxic metabolites, such as glucosinolates (GSs). A triple mutant lacking MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4, three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors that are known to additively control jasmonate-related defense responses, was shown to have a highly reduced expression of GS biosynthesis genes. The myc2 myc3 myc4 (myc234) triple mutant was almost completely devoid of GS and was extremely susceptible to the generalist herbivore Spodoptera littoralis. On the contrary, the specialist Pieris brassicae was unaffected by the presence of GS and preferred to feed on wild-type plants. In addition, lack of GS in myc234 drastically modified S. littoralis feeding behavior. Surprisingly, the expression of MYB factors known to regulate GS biosynthesis genes was not altered in myc234, suggesting that MYC2/MYC3/MYC4 are necessary for direct transcriptional activation of GS biosynthesis genes. To support this, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that MYC2 binds directly to the promoter of several GS biosynthesis genes in vivo. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and pull-down experiments indicated that MYC2/MYC3/MYC4 interact directly with GS-related MYBs. This specific MYC-MYB interaction plays a crucial role in the regulation of defense secondary metabolite production and underlines the importance of GS in shaping plant interactions with adapted and nonadapted herbivores. PMID:23943862

  4. Perturbation of 14q32 miRNAs-cMYC gene network in osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Sarver, Aaron L; Kartha, Reena V; Li, Lihua; Angstadt, Andrea Y; Breen, Matthew; Steer, Clifford J; Modiano, Jaime F; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2012-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the common histological form of primary bone cancer and one of the leading aggressive cancers in children under age fifteen. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with OS the understanding of its molecular etiology is limited. Here, we show that microRNAs (miRNAs) at the chr.14q32 locus are significantly downregulated in osteosarcoma compared to normal bone tissues. Bioinformatic predictions identified that a subset of 14q32 miRNAs (miR-382, miR-369-3p, miR-544 and miR-134) could potentially target cMYC transcript. The physical interaction between these 14q32 miRNAs and cMYC was validated using reporter assays. Further, restoring expression of these four 14q32 miRNAs decreased cMYC levels and induced apoptosis in Saos2 cells. We also show that exogenous expression of 14q32 miRNAs in Saos2 cells significantly downregulated miR-17-92, a transcriptional target of cMYC. The pro-apoptotic effect of 14q32 miRNAs in Saos2 cells was rescued either by overexpression of cMYC cDNA without the 3'UTR or with miR-17-92 cluster. Further, array comparative genomic hybridization studies showed no DNA copy number changes at 14q32 locus in OS patient samples suggesting that downregulation of 14q32 miRNAs are not due to deletion at this locus. Together, our data support a model where the deregulation of a network involving 14q32 miRNAs, cMYC and miR-17-92 miRNAs could contribute to osteosarcoma pathogenesis.

  5. Perturbation of 14q32 miRNAs-cMYC gene network in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Sarver, Aaron L.; Kartha, Reena V.; Lihua, Li; Angstadt, Andrea Y.; Breen, Matthew; Steer, Clifford J.; Modiano, Jaime F.; Subramanian, Subbaya

    2013-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the common histological form of primary bone cancer and one of the leading aggressive cancers in children under age fifteen. Although several genetic predisposing conditions have been associated with OS the understanding of its molecular etiology is limited. Here, we show that microRNAs (miRNAs) at the chr.14q32 locus are significantly downregulated in osteosarcoma compared to normal bone tissues. Bioinformatic predictions identified that a subset of 14q32 miRNAs (miR-382, miR-369-3p, miR-544 and miR-134) could potentially target cMYC transcript. The physical interaction between these 14q32 miRNAs and cMYC was validated using reporter assays. Further, restoring expression of these four 14q32 miRNAs decreased cMYC levels and induced apoptosis in Saos2 cells. We also show that exogenous expression of 14q32 miRNAs in Saos2 cells significantly downregulated miR-17∼92, a transcriptional target of cMYC. The pro-apoptotic effect of 14q32 miRNAs in Saos2 cells was rescued either by overexpression of cMYC cDNA without the 3′UTR or with miR-17∼92 cluster. Further, array comparative genomic hybridization studies showed no DNA copy number changes at 14q32 locus in OS patient samples suggesting that downregulation of 14q32 miRNAs are not due to deletion at this locus. Together, our data support a model where the deregulation of a network involving 14q32 miRNAs, cMYC and miR-17∼92 miRNAs could contribute to osteosarcoma pathogenesis. PMID:22037351

  6. Induction of c-myc and c-jun proto-oncogene expression in rat L6 myoblasts by cadmium is inhibited by zinc preinduction of the metallothionein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Abshire, M.K.; Buzard, G.S.; Shiraishi, Noriyuki; Waalkers, M.P.

    1996-07-01

    Certain proto-oncogenes transfer growth regulatory signals from the cell surface to the nucleus. These genes often show activation soon after cells are exposed to mitogenic stimulation but can also be activated as a nonmitogenic stress response. Cadmium (Cd) is a carcinogenic metal in humans and rodents and, though its mechanism of action is unknown, it could involve activation of such proto-oncogenes. Metallothionein (MT), a metal-inducible protein that binds Cd, can protect against many aspects of Cd toxicity, including genotoxicity and possibly carcinogenesis. Thus, the effects of Cd on expression of c-myc and c-jun in rat L6 myoblasts, and the effect of preactivation of the MT gene by Zn treatment on such oncogene expression, were studied. MT protein levels were measured using oligonucleotide hybridization and standardized to {beta}-actin levels. Cd (5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}, 0-30 h) stimulated both c-myc and c-jun mRNA expression. An initial peak of activation of c-myc expression occurred 2 h after initiation of Cd exposure, and levels remained elevated throughout the assessment period. Zn pretreatment markedly reduced the activation of c-myc expression by Cd compared to cells not receiving Zn pretreatment. Cd treatment increased c-jun mRNA levels by up to 3.5-fold. Again, Zn pretreatment markedly reduced. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  7. The Drosophila Myc gene, diminutive, is a positive regulator of the Sex-lethal establishment promoter, Sxl-Pe

    PubMed Central

    Kappes, Gretchen; Deshpande, Girish; Mulvey, Brett B.; Horabin, Jamila I.; Schedl, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The binary switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) controls sexual identity in Drosophila. When activated, Sxl imposes female identity, whereas male identity ensues by default when the gene is off. The decision to activate Sxl is controlled by an X chromosome counting system that regulates the Sxl establishment promoter, Sxl-Pe. The counting system depends upon the twofold difference in the gene dose of a series of X-linked transcription factors or numerators. Because of this difference in dose, early female embryos express twice the amount of these transcription factors, and the cumulative action of these transcription factors turns on Sxl-Pe. Here we show that the Drosophila Myc gene diminutive is an X-linked numerator. PMID:21220321

  8. Coexistent rearrangements of c-MYC, BCL2, and BCL6 genes in a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Chiyoko; Nishikori, Momoko; Kitawaki, Toshio; Uchiyama, Takashi; Ohno, Hitoshi

    2004-01-01

    We present a patient with stage III de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The lymphoma cells showed mature B-cell immunophenotype but lacked surface immunoglobulin (Ig) expression. Long-distance and long-distance inverse polymerase chain reaction assays to detect the oncogene/Ig gene rearrangement revealed that the cells carried 3 independent fusion genes, namely, c-MYC/Ig heavy chain gene (IgH), BCL2/IgH, and Ig lambda light chain gene/BCL6. Thus, the lymphoma cells concurrently carried t(8;14)(q24;q32), t(14;18)(q32;q21), and t(3;22)(q27;q11), which developed in association with class switching, V/D/J recombination, and somatic hypermutation, respectively. The lymphoma responded to chemoradiotherapy, and the patient has been well for 2 years, suggesting that multiple oncogene rearrangements may not necessarily be associated with poor clinical outcome.

  9. Stabilization of Myc through Heterotypic Poly-Ubiquitination by mLANA Is Critical for γ-Herpesvirus Lymphoproliferation

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Lénia; Popov, Nikita; Kaye, Kenneth M.; Simas, J. Pedro

    2013-01-01

    Host colonization by lymphotropic γ-herpesviruses depends critically on expansion of viral genomes in germinal center (GC) B-cells. Myc is essential for the formation and maintenance of GCs. Yet, the role of Myc in the pathogenesis of γ-herpesviruses is still largely unknown. In this study, Myc was shown to be essential for the lymphotropic γ-herpesvirus MuHV-4 biology as infected cells exhibited increased expression of Myc signature genes and the virus was unable to expand in Myc defficient GC B-cells. We describe a novel strategy of a viral protein activating Myc through increased protein stability resulting in increased progression through the cell cycle. This is acomplished by modulating a physiological post-translational regulatory pathway of Myc. The molecular mechanism involves Myc heterotypic poly-ubiquitination mediated via the viral E3 ubiquitin-ligase mLANA protein. EC5SmLANA modulates cellular control of Myc turnover by antagonizing SCFFbw7 mediated proteasomal degradation of Myc, mimicking SCFβ-TrCP. The findings here reported reveal that modulation of Myc is essential for γ-herpesvirus persistent infection, establishing a link between virus induced lymphoproliferation and disease. PMID:23950719

  10. Suppression of Myc oncogenic activity by ribosomal protein haploinsufficiency.

    PubMed

    Barna, Maria; Pusic, Aya; Zollo, Ornella; Costa, Maria; Kondrashov, Nadya; Rego, Eduardo; Rao, Pulivarthi H; Ruggero, Davide

    2008-12-18

    The Myc oncogene regulates the expression of several components of the protein synthetic machinery, including ribosomal proteins, initiation factors of translation, RNA polymerase III and ribosomal DNA. Whether and how increasing the cellular protein synthesis capacity affects the multistep process leading to cancer remains to be addressed. Here we use ribosomal protein heterozygote mice as a genetic tool to restore increased protein synthesis in Emu-Myc/+ transgenic mice to normal levels, and show that the oncogenic potential of Myc in this context is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate that the ability of Myc to increase protein synthesis directly augments cell size and is sufficient to accelerate cell cycle progression independently of known cell cycle targets transcriptionally regulated by Myc. In addition, when protein synthesis is restored to normal levels, Myc-overexpressing precancerous cells are more efficiently eliminated by programmed cell death. Our findings reveal a new mechanism that links increases in general protein synthesis rates downstream of an oncogenic signal to a specific molecular impairment in the modality of translation initiation used to regulate the expression of selective messenger RNAs. We show that an aberrant increase in cap-dependent translation downstream of Myc hyperactivation specifically impairs the translational switch to internal ribosomal entry site (IRES)-dependent translation that is required for accurate mitotic progression. Failure of this translational switch results in reduced mitotic-specific expression of the endogenous IRES-dependent form of Cdk11 (also known as Cdc2l and PITSLRE), which leads to cytokinesis defects and is associated with increased centrosome numbers and genome instability in Emu-Myc/+ mice. When accurate translational control is re-established in Emu-Myc/+ mice, genome instability is suppressed. Our findings demonstrate how perturbations in translational control provide a highly specific outcome

  11. TATA-binding protein and the retinoblastoma gene product bind to overlapping epitopes on c-Myc and adenovirus E1A protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hateboer, G; Timmers, H T; Rustgi, A K; Billaud, M; van 't Veer, L J; Bernards, R

    1993-01-01

    Using a protein binding assay, we show that the amino-terminal 204 amino acids of the c-Myc protein interact directly with a key component of the basal transcription factor TFIID, the TATA box-binding protein (TBP). Essentially the same region of the c-Myc protein also binds the product of the retinoblastoma gene, the RB protein. c-Myc protein coimmunoprecipitates with TBP in lysates of mammalian cells, demonstrating that the proteins are also complexed in vivo. A short peptide that spans the RB binding site of the E7 protein of human papilloma virus type 16 interferes with the binding of c-Myc to TBP. The same peptide also blocks binding of adenovirus E1A protein to TBP, suggesting that c-Myc and E1A bind to RB and TBP through overlapping epitopes. Furthermore, we show that binding of RB to E1A prevents association of E1A with TBP. Our data suggest that one of the functions of RB and RB-like proteins is to prevent interaction of viral and cellular oncoproteins, such as c-Myc and E1A, with TBP. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7690963

  12. TRRAP and GCN5 are used by c-Myc to activate RNA polymerase III transcription.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; Ramsbottom, Ben A; Gomez-Roman, Natividad; Marshall, Lynne; Cole, Philip A; White, Robert J

    2007-09-18

    Activation of RNA polymerase (pol) II transcription by c-Myc generally involves recruitment of histone acetyltransferases and acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Here, we describe the mechanism used by c-Myc to activate pol III transcription of tRNA and 5S rRNA genes. Within 2 h of its induction, c-Myc appears at these genes along with the histone acetyltransferase GCN5 and the cofactor TRRAP. At the same time, occupancy of the pol III-specific factor TFIIIB increases and histone H3 becomes hyperacetylated, but increased histone H4 acetylation is not detected at these genes. The rapid acetylation of histone H3 and promoter assembly of TFIIIB, c-Myc, GCN5, and TRRAP are followed by recruitment of pol III and transcriptional induction. The selective acetylation of histone H3 distinguishes pol III activation by c-Myc from mechanisms observed in other systems.

  13. PIAS1 Promotes Lymphomagenesis Through MYC Upregulation

    PubMed Central

    Rabellino, Andrea; Melegari, Margherita; Tompkins, Van S.; Chen, Weina; Van Ness, Brian G.; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Janz, Siegfried; Scaglioni, Pier Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Summary The MYC proto-oncogene is a transcription factor implicated in a broad range of cancers. MYC is regulated by several post-translational modifications including SUMOylation, but the functional impact of this post-translational modification is still unclear. Here we report that the SUMO E3 ligase PIAS1 SUMOylates MYC. We demonstrate that PIAS1 promotes, in a SUMOylation-dependent manner, MYC phosphorylation at serine 62 and dephosphorylation at threonine 58. These events reduce the MYC turnover leading to increased transcriptional activity. Furthermore, we find that MYC is SUMOylated in primary B-cell lymphomas and that PIAS1 is required for the viability of MYC-dependent B-cell lymphoma cells as well as several cancer cell lines of epithelial origin. Finally, Pias1 null mice display endothelial defects reminiscent of Myc null mice. Taken together these results indicate that PIAS1 is a positive regulator of MYC. PMID:27239040

  14. Enigmatic MYC Conducts an Unfolding Systems Biology Symphony.

    PubMed

    Dang, Chi V

    2010-06-01

    The enigmatic MYC oncogene, which participates broadly in cancers, revealed itself recently as the maestro of an unfolding symphony of cell growth, proliferation, death, and metabolism. The study of MYC is arguably most challenging to its students but at the same time exhilarating when MYC reveals its deeply held secrets. It is the excitement of our richer understanding of MYC that is captured in each review of this special issue of Genes & Cancer. Collectively, our deeper understanding of MYC reveals that it is a symphony conductor, controlling a large orchestra of target genes. Although MYC controls many orchestra sections, which are necessary but not sufficient for Myc function, ribosome biogenesis stands out to reveal Myc's primordial function particularly in fruit flies. Because ribosome biogenesis and the associated translational machinery are bioenergetically demanding, Myc's other target genes involved in energy metabolism must be coupled with energy demand to ensure that cells can replicate their genome and produce daughter cells. Normal cells have feedback loops that diminish MYC expression when nutrients are scarce. On the other hand, when deregulated Myc transforms cells, their constitutive bioenergetic demand can trigger cell death when energy is unavailable. This special issue captures the unfolding symphony of MYC-mediated tumorigenesis through reviews that span from a timeline of MYC research, fundamental understanding of how the MYC gene itself is regulated, the study of Myc in model organisms, Myc function, and target genes to translational research in search of new therapeutic modalities for the treatment of cancer.

  15. ECA39, a conserved gene regulated by c-Myc in mice, is involved in G1/S cell cycle regulation in yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Schuldiner, O; Eden, A; Ben-Yosef, T; Yanuka, O; Simchen, G; Benvenisty, N

    1996-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been shown to play a role in cell proliferation and apoptosis. The realization that myc oncogenes may control the level of expression of other genes has opened the field to search for genetic targets for Myc regulation. Recently, using a subtraction/coexpression strategy, a murine genetic target for Myc regulation, called EC439, was isolated. To further characterize the ECA39 gene, we set out to determine the evolutionary conservation of its regulatory and coding sequences. We describe the human, nematode, and budding yeast homologs of the mouse ECA39 gene. Identities between the mouse ECA39 protein and the human, nematode, or yeast proteins are 79%, 52%, and 49%, respectively. Interestingly, the recognition site for Myc binding, located 3' to the start site of transcription in the mouse gene, is also conserved in the human homolog. This regulatory element is missing in the ECA39 homologs from nematode or yeast, which also lack the regulator c-myc. To understand the function of ECA39, we deleted the gene from the yeast genome. Disruption of ECA39 which is a recessive mutation that leads to a marked alteration in the cell cycle. Mutant haploids and homozygous diploids have a faster growth rate than isogenic wild-type strains. Fluorescence-activated cell sorter analyses indicate that the mutation shortens the G1 stage in the cell cycle. Moreover, mutant strains show higher rates of UV-induced mutations. The results suggest that the product of ECA39 is involved in the regulation of G1 to S transition. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:8692959

  16. c-Myc activates multiple metabolic networks to generate substrates for cell-cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Morrish, F; Isern, N; Sadilek, M; Jeffrey, M; Hockenbery, D M

    2009-07-01

    Cell proliferation requires the coordinated activity of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways to provide ATP and building blocks for DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Many metabolic pathway genes are targets of the c-myc oncogene and cell-cycle regulator. However, the contribution of c-Myc to the activation of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic networks during cell-cycle entry is unknown. Here, we report the metabolic fates of [U-(13)C] glucose in serum-stimulated myc(-/-) and myc(+/+) fibroblasts by (13)C isotopomer NMR analysis. We demonstrate that endogenous c-myc increased (13)C labeling of ribose sugars, purines and amino acids, indicating partitioning of glucose carbons into C1/folate and pentose phosphate pathways, and increased tricarboxylic acid cycle turnover at the expense of anaplerotic flux. Myc expression also increased global O-linked N-acetylglucosamine protein modification, and inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis selectively reduced growth of Myc-expressing cells, suggesting its importance in Myc-induced proliferation. These data reveal a central organizing function for the Myc oncogene in the metabolism of cycling cells. The pervasive deregulation of this oncogene in human cancers may be explained by its function in directing metabolic networks required for cell proliferation.

  17. c-Myc activates multiple metabolic networks to generate substrates for cell-cycle entry.

    SciTech Connect

    Morrish, Fionnuala M.; Isern, Nancy; Sadilek, Martin; Jeffrey, Mark; Hockenbery, David M.

    2009-05-18

    Cell proliferation requires the coordinated activity of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic pathways to provide ATP and building blocks for DNA, RNA, and protein synthesis. Many metabolic pathway genes are targets of the c-myc oncogene and cell cycle regulator. However, the contribution of c-Myc to the activation of cytosolic and mitochondrial metabolic networks during cell cycle entry is unknown. Here, we report the metabolic fates of [U-13C] glucose in serum-stimulated myc-/- and myc+/+ fibroblasts by 13C isotopomer NMR analysis. We demonstrate that endogenous c-myc increased 13C-labeling of ribose sugars, purines, and amino acids, indicating partitioning of glucose carbons into C1/folate and pentose phosphate pathways, and increased tricarboxylic acid cycle turnover at the expense of anaplerotic flux. Myc expression also increased global O-linked GlcNAc protein modification, and inhibition of hexosamine biosynthesis selectively reduced growth of Myc-expressing cells, suggesting its importance in Myc-induced proliferation. These data reveal a central organizing role for the Myc oncogene in the metabolism of cycling cells. The pervasive deregulation of this oncogene in human cancers may be explained by its role in directing metabolic networks required for cell proliferation.

  18. A MYC-Driven Change in Mitochondrial Dynamics Limits YAP/TAZ Function in Mammary Epithelial Cells and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    von Eyss, Björn; Jaenicke, Laura A; Kortlever, Roderik M; Royla, Nadine; Wiese, Katrin E; Letschert, Sebastian; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Sauer, Markus; Rosenwald, Andreas; Evan, Gerard I; Kempa, Stefan; Eilers, Martin

    2015-12-14

    In several developmental lineages, an increase in MYC expression drives the transition from quiescent stem cells to transit-amplifying cells. We show that MYC activates a stereotypic transcriptional program of genes involved in cell growth in mammary epithelial cells. This change in gene expression indirectly inhibits the YAP/TAZ co-activators, which maintain the clonogenic potential of these cells. We identify a phospholipase of the mitochondrial outer membrane, PLD6, as the mediator of MYC activity. MYC-dependent growth strains cellular energy resources and stimulates AMP-activated kinase (AMPK). PLD6 alters mitochondrial fusion and fission dynamics downstream of MYC. This change activates AMPK, which in turn inhibits YAP/TAZ. Mouse models and human pathological data show that MYC enhances AMPK and suppresses YAP/TAZ activity in mammary tumors. PMID:26678338

  19. Participation of cyclin A in Myc-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, A T; Cohen, K J; Barrett, J F; Bergstrom, D A; Dang, C V

    1994-01-01

    The involvement of c-Myc in cellular proliferation or apoptosis has been linked to differential cyclin gene expression. We observed that in both proliferating cells and cells undergoing apoptosis, cyclin A (but not B, C, D1, and E) mRNA level was elevated in unsynchronized Myc-overexpressing cells when compared with parental Rat1a fibroblasts. We further demonstrated that Zn(2+)-inducible cyclin A expression was sufficient to cause apoptosis. When Myc-induced apoptosis was blocked by coexpression of Bcl-2, the levels of cyclin C, D1, and E mRNAs were also elevated. Thus, while apoptosis induced by c-Myc is associated with an elevated cyclin A mRNA level, protection from apoptosis by coexpressed Bcl-2 is associated with a complementary increase in cyclin C, D1, and E mRNAs. Images PMID:8041712

  20. An ABA-increased interaction of the PYL6 ABA receptor with MYC2 Transcription Factor: A putative link of ABA and JA signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Fernando; Yazaki, Junshi; Lee, Melissa; Takahashi, Yohei; Kim, Alice Y.; Li, Zixing; Kinoshita, Toshinori; Ecker, Joseph R.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a plant hormone that mediates abiotic stress tolerance and regulates growth and development. ABA binds to members of the PYL/RCAR ABA receptor family that initiate signal transduction inhibiting type 2C protein phosphatases. Although crosstalk between ABA and the hormone Jasmonic Acid (JA) has been shown, the molecular entities that mediate this interaction have yet to be fully elucidated. We report a link between ABA and JA signaling through a direct interaction of the ABA receptor PYL6 (RCAR9) with the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor MYC2. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in yeast two hybrid assays and the interaction is enhanced in the presence of ABA. PYL6 and MYC2 interact in planta based on bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation of the proteins. Furthermore, PYL6 was able to modify transcription driven by MYC2 using JAZ6 and JAZ8 DNA promoter elements in yeast one hybrid assays. Finally, pyl6 T-DNA mutant plants show an increased sensitivity to the addition of JA along with ABA in cotyledon expansion experiments. Overall, the present study identifies a direct mechanism for transcriptional modulation mediated by an ABA receptor different from the core ABA signaling pathway, and a putative mechanistic link connecting ABA and JA signaling pathways. PMID:27357749

  1. Inverse Relationship between Progesterone Receptor and Myc in Endometrial Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Donghai; Meng, Xiangbing; Thiel, Kristina W.; Leslie, Kimberly K.; Yang, Shujie

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer, the most common gynecologic malignancy, is a hormonally-regulated disease. Response to progestin therapy positively correlates with hormone receptor expression, in particular progesterone receptor (PR). However, many advanced tumors lose PR expression. We recently reported that the efficacy of progestin therapy can be significantly enhanced by combining progestin with epigenetic modulators, which we term “molecularly enhanced progestin therapy.” What remained unclear was the mechanism of action and if estrogen receptor α (ERα), the principle inducer of PR, is necessary to restore functional expression of PR via molecularly enhanced progestin therapy. Therefore, we modeled advanced endometrial tumors that have lost both ERα and PR expression by generating ERα-null endometrial cancer cell lines. CRISPR-Cas9 technology was used to delete ERα at the genomic level. Our data demonstrate that treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) was sufficient to restore functional PR expression, even in cells devoid of ERα. Our studies also revealed that HDACi treatment results in marked downregulation of the oncogene Myc. We established that PR is a negative transcriptional regulator of Myc in endometrial cancer in the presence or absence of ERα, which is in contrast to studies in breast cancer cells. First, estrogen stimulation augmented PR expression and decreased Myc in endometrial cancer cell lines. Second, progesterone increased PR activity yet blunted Myc mRNA and protein expression. Finally, overexpression of PR by adenoviral transduction in ERα-null endometrial cancer cells significantly decreased expression of Myc and Myc-regulated genes. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database of endometrial tumors identified an inverse correlation between PR and Myc mRNA levels, with a corresponding inverse correlation between PR and Myc downstream transcriptional targets SRD5A1, CDK2 and CCNB1. Together, these data reveal a

  2. Mutations in NEK8 link multiple organ dysplasia with altered Hippo signalling and increased c-MYC expression.

    PubMed

    Frank, Valeska; Habbig, Sandra; Bartram, Malte P; Eisenberger, Tobias; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; Decker, Christian; Boorsma, Reinder A C; Göbel, Heike; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Griessmann, Anabel; Franke, Mareike; Borgal, Lori; Kohli, Priyanka; Völker, Linus A; Dötsch, Jörg; Nürnberg, Peter; Benzing, Thomas; Bolz, Hanno J; Johnson, Colin; Gerkes, Erica H; Schermer, Bernhard; Bergmann, Carsten

    2013-06-01

    Mutations affecting the integrity and function of cilia have been identified in various genes over the last decade accounting for a group of diseases called ciliopathies. Ciliopathies display a broad spectrum of phenotypes ranging from mild manifestations to lethal combinations of multiple severe symptoms and most of them share cystic kidneys as a common feature. Our starting point was a consanguineous pedigree with three affected fetuses showing an early embryonic phenotype with enlarged cystic kidneys, liver and pancreas and developmental heart disease. By genome-wide linkage analysis, we mapped the disease locus to chromosome 17q11 and identified a homozygous nonsense mutation in NEK8/NPHP9 that encodes a kinase involved in ciliary dynamics and cell cycle progression. Missense mutations in NEK8/NPHP9 have been identified in juvenile cystic kidney jck mice and in patients suffering from nephronophthisis (NPH), an autosomal-recessive cystic kidney disease. This work confirmed a complete loss of NEK8 expression in the affected fetuses due to nonsense-mediated decay. In cultured fibroblasts derived from these fetuses, the expression of prominent polycystic kidney disease genes (PKD1 and PKD2) was decreased, whereas the oncogene c-MYC was upregulated, providing potential explanations for the observed renal phenotype. We furthermore linked NEK8 with NPHP3, another NPH protein known to cause a very similar phenotype in case of null mutations. Both proteins interact and activate the Hippo effector TAZ. Taken together, our study demonstrates that NEK8 is essential for organ development and that the complete loss of NEK8 perturbs multiple signalling pathways resulting in a severe early embryonic phenotype.

  3. C-Myc regulates substrate oxidation patterns during early pressure-overload hypertrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena R.; Smith, Lincoln; Kajimoto, Masaki; Bruce, Margaret; Isern, Nancy G.; Xu, Chun; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron

    2013-11-26

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of glycolytic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected FVB mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketones and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Western blots were used to evaluate metabolic enzymes. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (presumably glucose) contribution. Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) inhibited these metabolic changes. Hypertrophy in general increased protein levels of PKM2; however this change was not linked to Myc status. Protein post-translation modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc regulates substrate utilization during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Our results show that the metabolic switch during hypertrophy is not necessary to maintain cardiac function, but it may be important mechanism to promote cardiomyocyte growth. Myc also regulates protein O-GlcNAcylation during hypertrophy.

  4. Drosophila Growth and Development in the Absence of dMyc and dMnt

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Sarah B.; Yost, Cynthia; Anderson, Sarah A. R.; Flynn, Erin M.; Delrow, Jeffrey; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2008-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins are essential regulators of the growth and proliferation of mammalian cells. In Drosophila the single ortholog of Myc (dMyc), encoded by the dm gene, influences organismal size and the growth of both mitotic and endoreplicating cells. A null mutation in dm results in attenuated endoreplication and growth arrest early in larval development. Drosophila also contains a single ortholog of the mammalian Mad/Mnt transcriptional repressor proteins (dMnt), which is thought to antagonize dMyc function. Here we show that animals lacking both dMyc and dMnt display increased viability and grow significantly larger and develop further than dMyc single mutants. We observe increased endoreplication and growth of larval tissues in these double mutants and disproportionate growth of the imaginal discs. Gene expression analysis indicates that loss of dMyc leads to decreased expression of genes required for ribosome biogenesis and protein synthesis. The additional loss of dMnt partially rescues expression of a small number of dMyc and dMnt genes that are primarily involved in rRNA synthesis and processing. Our results indicate that dMnt repression is normally overridden by dMyc activation during larval development. Therefore the severity of the dm null phenotype is likely due to unopposed repression by dMnt on a subset of genes critical for cell and organismal growth. Surprisingly, considerable growth and development can occur in the absence of both dMyc and dMnt. PMID:18241851

  5. c-Myc Alters Substrate Utilization and O-GlcNAc Protein Posttranslational Modifications without Altering Cardiac Function during Early Aortic Constriction

    PubMed Central

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic stimuli cause transcription of the proto-oncogene c-Myc (Myc). Prior work showed that myocardial knockout of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we assessed the interplay between Myc, substrate oxidation and cardiac function during early pressure overload hypertrophy. Mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc knockout (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) were subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n = 7/group). Additional groups underwent sham surgery (Cont-Sham and MycKO-Sham, n = 5 per group). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. In sham hearts, Myc knockout did not affect cardiac function or substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle. However, Myc knockout altered fractional contributions during TAC. The unlabeled fractional contribution increased in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC, whereas ketone and free fatty acid fractional contributions decreased. Additionally, protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc were significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Cont-Sham and MycKO-TAC. In conclusion, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy, which may regulate Myc-induced metabolic changes. PMID:26266538

  6. MYC — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    The oncogenic protein MYC, previously known as c-MYC, is a multifunctional, nuclear phosphoprotein that plays a role in cell cycle progression, apoptosis and cellular transformation. It participates in the regulation of gene transcription of specific target genes. MYC binds DNA in a non-specific manner, yet also specifically recognizes the core sequence 5'-CAC[GA]TG-3'. Mutations, overexpression, rearrangement and translocation of the MYC gene have been associated with a variety of hematopoietic tumors, leukemias and lymphomas, including Burkitt lymphoma. Evidence shows that alternative translation initiations from an upstream, in-frame non-AUG (CUG) and a downstream AUG start site result in the production of two isoforms with distinct N-termini.

  7. Taking on challenging targets: making MYC druggable.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Dai; Anderton, Brittany; Goga, Andrei

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor proto-oncogene c-MYC (hereafter MYC) was first identified more than 3 decades ago and has since been found deregulated in a wide variety of the most aggressive human malignancies. As a pleiotropic transcription factor, MYC directly or indirectly controls expression of hundreds of coding and noncoding genes, which affect cell cycle entry, proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, and death/survival decisions of normal and cancer cells. Tumors with elevated MYC expression often exhibit highly proliferative, aggressive phenotypes, and elevated MYC expression has been correlated with diminished disease-free survival for a variety of human cancers. The use of MYC overexpression or MYC-dependent transcriptional gene signatures as clinical biomarkers is currently being investigated. Furthermore, preclinical animal and cell-based model systems have been extensively utilized in an effort to uncover the mechanisms of MYC-dependent tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance. Despite our ever-growing understanding of MYC biology, currently no targeted therapeutic strategy is clinically available to treat tumors that have acquired elevated MYC expression. This article summarizes the progresses being made to discover and implement new therapies to kill MYC over-expressing tumors-a target that was once deemed undruggable.

  8. The MYC 3' Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Rennoll, Sherri A; Eshelman, Melanie A; Raup-Konsavage, Wesley M; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Yochum, Gregory S

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC) by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF) and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3' Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3' WRE) with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE) within the MYC 3' WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3' WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3' WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27223305

  9. Myc Regulation of mRNA Cap Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Cole, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    The c-myc proto-oncogene regulates the expression of 15% to 20% of all genes, depending on the cell type, and the regulation is usually modest (1.5- to 2.0-fold). The authors discovered that in addition to regulating mRNA abundance, c-Myc regulates the formation of the 7-methylguanosine cap on many mRNAs, including transcriptional target genes and others not transcriptionally activated. Because the 7-methylguanosine cap is required for effective translation, enhanced methyl cap formation leads to increased protein production from Myc-responsive genes that exceeds the transcriptional induction. Increased cap methylation is linked to Myc-dependent enhanced activity of 2 critical kinases, TFIIH and p-TEFb, which phosphorylate the RNA polymerase II carboxy-terminal domain (CTD). Phosphorylation of the CTD recruits RNGTT and RNMT, the enzymes involved in mRNA capping, to the nascent transcript. Evidence is accumulating that enhanced cap methylation makes a significant contribution to Myc-dependent gene regulation and protein production. PMID:21170289

  10. Nickel compounds induce apoptosis in human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells by activation of c-Myc through ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li Qin; Suen, T.-C.; Sun Hong; Arita, Adriana; Costa, Max

    2009-03-01

    Nickel compounds are carcinogenic to humans and have been shown to alter epigenetic homeostasis. The c-Myc protein controls 15% of human genes and it has been shown that fluctuations of c-Myc protein alter global epigenetic marks. Therefore, the regulation of c-Myc by nickel ions in immortalized but not tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells was examined in this study. It was found that c-Myc protein expression was increased by nickel ions in non-tumorigenic Beas-2B and human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The results also indicated that nickel ions induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells. Knockout of c-Myc and its restoration in a rat cell system confirmed the essential role of c-Myc in nickel ion-induced apoptosis. Further studies in Beas-2B cells showed that nickel ion increased the c-Myc mRNA level and c-Myc promoter activity, but did not increase c-Myc mRNA and protein stability. Moreover, nickel ion upregulated c-Myc in Beas-2B cells through the MEK/ERK pathway. Collectively, the results demonstrate that c-Myc induction by nickel ions occurs via an ERK-dependent pathway and plays a crucial role in nickel-induced apoptosis in Beas-2B cells.

  11. Gene therapy of c-myc suppressor FUSE-binding protein-interacting repressor by Sendai virus delivery prevents tracheal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Mizokami, Daisuke; Araki, Koji; Tanaka, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Tomifuji, Masayuki; Yamashita, Taku; Ueda, Yasuji; Shimada, Hideaki; Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2015-01-01

    Acquired tracheal stenosis remains a challenging problem for otolaryngologists. The objective of this study was to determine whether the Sendai virus (SeV)-mediated c-myc suppressor, a far upstream element (FUSE)-binding protein (FBP)-interacting repressor (FIR), modulates wound healing of the airway mucosa, and whether it prevents tracheal stenosis in an animal model of induced mucosal injury. A fusion gene-deleted, non-transmissible SeV vector encoding FIR (FIR-SeV/ΔF) was prepared. Rats with scraped airway mucosae were administered FIR-SeV/ΔF through the tracheostoma. The pathological changes in the airway mucosa and in the tracheal lumen were assessed five days after scraping. Untreated animals showed hyperplasia of the airway epithelium and a thickened submucosal layer with extensive fibrosis, angiogenesis, and collagen deposition causing lumen stenosis. By contrast, the administration of FIR-SeV/ΔF decreased the degree of tracheal stenosis (P < 0.05) and improved the survival rate (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical staining showed that c-Myc expression was downregulated in the tracheal basal cells of the FIR-SeV/ΔF-treated animals, suggesting that c-myc was suppressed by FIR-SeV/ΔF in the regenerating airway epithelium of the injured tracheal mucosa. The airway-targeted gene therapy of the c-myc suppressor FIR, using a recombinant SeV vector, prevented tracheal stenosis in a rat model of airway mucosal injury.

  12. TIP30 interacts with an estrogen receptor alpha-interacting coactivator CIA and regulates c-myc transcription.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chao; Ito, Mitsuhiro; Piening, Valerie; Bruck, Kristy; Roeder, Robert G; Xiao, Hua

    2004-06-25

    Deregulation of c-myc expression is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neoplasias. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) can increase the rate of c-myc transcription through the recruitment of a variety of cofactors to the promoter, yet the precise roles of these cofactors in transcription and tumorigenesis are largely unknown. We show here that a putative tumor suppressor TIP30, also called CC3 or Htatip2, interacts with an ERalpha-interacting coactivator CIA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate that TIP30 and CIA are distinct cofactors that are dynamically associated with the promoter and downstream regions of the c-myc gene in response to estrogen. Both TIP30 and CIA are recruited to the c-myc gene promoter by liganded ERalpha in the second transcription cycle. TIP30 overexpression represses ERalpha-mediated c-myc transcription, whereas TIP30 deficiency enhances c-myc transcription in both the absence and presence of estrogen. Ectopic CIA cooperates with TIP30 to repress ERalpha-mediated c-myc transcription. Moreover, virgin TIP30 knockout mice exhibit increased c-myc expression in mammary glands. Together, these results reveal an important role for TIP30 in the regulation of ERalpha-mediated c-myc transcription and suggest a mechanism for tumorigenesis promoted by TIP30 deficiency.

  13. Blocking Lactate Export by Inhibiting the Myc Target MCT1 Disables Glycolysis and Glutathione Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Joanne R.; Yang, Chunying; Scott, Kristen E. N.; Cameron, Michael D.; Fallahi, Mohammad; Li, Weimin; Hall, Mark A.; Amelio, Antonio L.; Mishra, Jitendra K.; Li, Fangzheng; Tortosa, Mariola; Genau, Heide Marika; Rounbehler, Robert J.; Lu, Yunqi; Dang, Chi. V.; Kumar, K. Ganesh; Butler, Andrew A.; Bannister, Thomas D.; Hooper, Andrea T.; Unsal-Kacmaz, Keziban; Roush, William R.; Cleveland, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Myc oncoproteins induce genes driving aerobic glycolysis, including lactate dehydrogenase-A that generates lactate. Here we report that Myc controls transcription of the lactate transporter SLC16A1/MCT1, and that elevated MCT1 levels are manifest in premalignant and neoplastic Eμ-Myc transgenic B cells and in human malignancies with MYC or MYCN involvement. Notably, disrupting MCT1 function leads to an accumulation of intracellular lactate that rapidly disables tumor cell growth and glycolysis, provoking marked alterations in glycolytic intermediates, and reductions in glucose transport, and in levels of ATP, NADPH and glutathione. Reductions in glutathione then lead to increases in hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial damage and, ultimately, cell death. Finally, forcing glycolysis by metformin treatment augments this response and the efficacy of MCT1 inhibitors, suggesting an attractive combination therapy for MYC/MCT1-expressing malignancies. PMID:24285728

  14. MYC Association with Cancer Risk and a New Model of MYC-Mediated Repression

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    MYC is one of the most frequently mutated and overexpressed genes in human cancer but the regulation of MYC expression and the ability of MYC protein to repress cellular genes (including itself) have remained mysterious. Recent genome-wide association studies show that many genetic polymorphisms associated with disease risk map to distal regulatory elements that regulate the MYC promoter through large chromatin loops. Cancer risk-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) contain more potent enhancer activity, promoting higher MYC levels and a greater risk of disease. The MYC promoter is also subject to complex regulatory circuits and limits its own expression by a feedback loop. A model for MYC autoregulation is discussed which involves a signaling pathway between the PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog) tumor suppressor and repressive histone modifications laid down by the EZH2 methyltransferase. PMID:24985129

  15. Nuclear colocalization of cellular and viral myc proteins with HSP70 in myc-overexpressing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koskinen, P J; Sistonen, L; Evan, G; Morimoto, R; Alitalo, K

    1991-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene and its viral counterpart v-myc encode phosphoproteins which have been located within cell nuclei, excluding nucleoli. We have expressed the c-myc gene under the simian virus 40 early promoter and studied the distribution of its protein product in transient expression assays in COS, HeLa, and 293 cells. We found three distinct patterns of c-myc immunofluorescence in the transfected cells: one-third of the c-myc-positive cells displayed a diffuse nuclear distribution, and in two-thirds of the cells the c-myc fluorescence was accumulated either in small amorphous or in large multilobed phase-dense nuclear structures. Unexpectedly, these structures also stained for the HSP70 heat shock protein in both heat-shocked and untreated cells. Our results indicate that both transient and stable overexpression of either the c-myc or v-myc protein induces translocation of the endogenous HSP70 protein from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it becomes sequestered in structures containing the myc protein. Interestingly, the closely related N-myc protein does not stimulate substantial nuclear expression of the HSP70 protein. Studies with chimeric myc proteins revealed that polypeptide sequences encoded by the second exon of c-myc are involved in colocalization with HSP70. Images PMID:1846202

  16. Investigating actinomycin D binding to G-quadruplex, i-motif and double-stranded DNA in 27-nt segment of c-MYC gene promoter.

    PubMed

    Niknezhad, Zhila; Hassani, Leila; Norouzi, Davood

    2016-01-01

    c-MYC DNA is an attractive target for drug design, especially for cancer chemotherapy. Around 90% of c-MYC transcription is controlled by NHE III1, whose 27-nt purine-rich strand has the ability to form G-quadruplex structure. In this investigation, interaction of ActD with 27-nt G-rich strand (G/c-MYC) and its equimolar mixture with the complementary sequence, (GC/c-MYC) as well as related C-rich oligonucleotide (C/c-MYC) was evaluated. Molecular dynamic simulations showed that phenoxazine and lactone rings of ActD come close to the outer G-tetrad nucleotides indicating that ActD binds through end-stacking to the quadruplex DNA. RMSD and RMSF revealed that fluctuation of the quadruplex DNA increases upon interaction with the drug. The results of spectrophotometry and spectrofluorometry indicated that ActD most probably binds to the c-MYC quadruplex and duplex DNA via end-stacking and intercalation, respectively and polarity of ActD environment decreases due to the interaction. It was also found that binding of ActD to the GC-rich DNA is stronger than the two other forms of DNA. Circular dichroism results showed that the type of the three forms of DNA structures doesn't change, but their compactness alters due to their interaction with ActD. Finally, it can be concluded that ActD binds differently to double stranded DNA, quadruplex DNA and i-motif.

  17. NCYM promotes calpain-mediated Myc-nick production in human MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, Wataru; Suenaga, Yusuke; Kaneko, Yoshiki; Islam, S.M. Rafiqul; Alagu, Jennifer; Yokoi, Sana; Nio, Masaki; Nakagawara, Akira

    2015-06-05

    NCYM is a cis-antisense gene of MYCN and is amplified in human neuroblastomas. High NCYM expression is associated with poor prognoses, and the NCYM protein stabilizes MYCN to promote proliferation of neuroblastoma cells. However, the molecular mechanisms of NCYM in the regulation of cell survival have remained poorly characterized. Here we show that NCYM promotes cleavage of MYCN to produce the anti-apoptotic protein, Myc-nick, both in vitro and in vivo. NCYM and Myc-nick were induced at G2/M phase, and NCYM knockdown induced apoptotic cell death accompanied by Myc-nick downregulation. These results reveal a novel function of NCYM as a regulator of Myc-nick production in human neuroblastomas. - Highlights: • NCYM promotes cleavages of MYC and MYCN to produce Myc-nick in vitro. • NCYM increases Myc-nick production in MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cells. • NCYM knockdown decreases Myc-nick production and induces apoptosis at G2/M phase.

  18. Coordinated regulation of Myc trans-activation targets by Polycomb and the Trithorax group protein Ash1

    PubMed Central

    Goodliffe, Julie M; Cole, Michael D; Wieschaus, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background The Myc oncoprotein is a transcriptional regulator whose function is essential for normal development. Myc is capable of binding to 10% of the mammalian genome, and it is unclear how a developing embryo controls the DNA binding of its abundant Myc proteins in order to avoid Myc's potential for inducing tumorigenesis. Results To identify chromatin binding proteins with a potential role in controlling Myc activity, we established a genetic assay for dMyc activity in Drosophila. We conducted a genome-wide screen using this assay, and identified the Trithorax Group protein Ash1 as a modifier of dMyc activity. Ash1 is a histone methyltransferase known for its role in opposing repression by Polycomb. Using RNAi in the embryo and Affymetrix microarrays, we show that ash1 RNAi causes the increased expression of many genes, suggesting that it is directly or indirectly required for repression in the embryo, in contrast to its known role in maintenance of activation. Many of these genes also respond similarly upon depletion of Pc and pho transcripts, as determined by concurrent microarray analysis of Pc and pho RNAi embryos, suggesting that the three are required for low levels of expression of a common set of targets. Further, many of these overlapping targets are also activated by Myc overexpression. We identify a second group of genes whose expression in the embryo requires Ash1, consistent with its previously established role in maintenance of activation. We find that this second group of Ash1 targets overlaps those activated by Myc and that ectopic Myc overcomes their requirement for Ash1. Conclusion Genetic, genomic and chromatin immunoprecipitation data suggest a model in which Pc, Ash1 and Pho are required to maintain a low level of expression of embryonic targets of activation by Myc, and that this occurs, directly or indirectly, by a combination of disparate chromatin modifications. PMID:17519021

  19. LeMYC2 acts as a negative regulator of blue light mediated photomorphogenic growth, and promotes the growth of adult tomato plants

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Arabidopsis ZBF1/MYC2bHLH transcription factor is a repressor of photomorphogenesis, and acts as a point of cross talk in light, abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways. MYC2 also functions as a positive regulator of lateral root development and flowering time under long day conditions. However, the function of MYC2 in growth and development remains unknown in crop plants. Results Here, we report the functional analyses of LeMYC2 in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). The amino acid sequence of LeMYC2 showed extensive homology with Arabidopsis MYC2, containing the conserved bHLH domain. To study the function of LeMYC2 in tomato, overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) LeMYC2 tomato transgenic plants were generated. Examination of seedling morphology, physiological responses and light regulated gene expression has revealed that LeMYC2 works as a negative regulator of blue light mediated photomorphogenesis. Furthermore, LeMYC2 specifically binds to the G-box of LeRBCS-3A promoter. Overexpression of LeMYC2 has led to increased root length with more number of lateral roots. The tomato plants overexpressing LeMYC2 have reduced internode distance with more branches, and display the opposite morphology to RNAi transgenic lines. Furthermore, this study shows that LeMYC2 promotes ABA and JA responsiveness. Conclusions Collectively, this study highlights that working in light, ABA and JA signaling pathways LeMYC2 works as an important regulator for growth and development in tomato plants. PMID:24483714

  20. The Myc Transactivation Domain Promotes Global Phosphorylation of the RNA Polymerase II Carboxy-Terminal Domain Independently of Direct DNA Binding▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Cole, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    Myc is a transcription factor which is dependent on its DNA binding domain for transcriptional regulation of target genes. Here, we report the surprising finding that Myc mutants devoid of direct DNA binding activity and Myc target gene regulation can rescue a substantial fraction of the growth defect in myc−/− fibroblasts. Expression of the Myc transactivation domain alone induces a transcription-independent elevation of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) C-terminal domain (CTD) kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) and CDK9 and a global increase in CTD phosphorylation. The Myc transactivation domain binds to the transcription initiation sites of these promoters and stimulates TFIIH binding in an MBII-dependent manner. Expression of the Myc transactivation domain increases CDK mRNA cap methylation, polysome loading, and the rate of translation. We find that some traditional Myc transcriptional target genes are also regulated by this Myc-driven translation mechanism. We propose that Myc transactivation domain-driven RNA Pol II CTD phosphorylation has broad effects on both transcription and mRNA metabolism. PMID:17242204

  1. Contrasting roles for Myc and Mad proteins in cellular growth and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, L; Schreiber-Agus, N; Pellicer, I; Chen, K; Lee, H W; Dudast, M; Cordon-Cardo, C; DePinho, R A

    1995-01-01

    The positive effects of Myc on cellular growth and gene expression are antagonized by activities of another member of the Myc superfamily, Mad. Characterization of the mouse homolog of human mad on the structural level revealed that domains shown previously to be required in the human protein for anti-Myc repression, sequence-specific DNA-binding activity, and dimerization with its partner Max are highly conserved. Conservation is also evident on the biological level in that both human and mouse mad can antagonize the ability of c-myc to cooperate with ras in the malignant transformation of cultured cells. An analysis of c-myc and mad gene expression in the developing mouse showed contrasting patterns with respect to tissue distribution and developmental stage. Regional differences in expression were more striking on the cellular level, particularly in the mouse and human gastrointestinal system, wherein c-Myc protein was readily detected in immature proliferating cells at the base of the colonic crypts, while Mad protein distribution was restricted to the postmitotic differentiated cells in the apex of the crypts. An increasing gradient of Mad was also evident in the more differentiated subcorneal layers of the stratified squamous epithelium of the skin. Together, these observations support the view that both downregulation of Myc and accumulation of Mad may be necessary for progression of precursor cells to a growth-arrested, terminally differentiated state. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7667316

  2. Nitric oxide suppresses tumor cell migration through N-Myc downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) expression: role of chelatable iron.

    PubMed

    Hickok, Jason R; Sahni, Sumit; Mikhed, Yuliya; Bonini, Marcelo G; Thomas, Douglas D

    2011-12-01

    N-Myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a ubiquitous cellular protein that is up-regulated under a multitude of stress and growth-regulatory conditions. Although the exact cellular functions of this protein have not been elucidated, mutations in this gene or aberrant expression of this protein have been linked to both tumor suppressive and oncogenic phenotypes. Previous reports have demonstrated that NDRG1 is strongly up-regulated by chemical iron chelators and hypoxia, yet its regulation by the free radical nitric oxide ((•)NO) has never been demonstrated. Herein, we examine the chemical biology that confers NDRG1 responsiveness at the mRNA and protein levels to (•)NO. We demonstrate that the interaction of (•)NO with the chelatable iron pool (CIP) and the appearance of dinitrosyliron complexes (DNIC) are key determinants. Using HCC 1806 triple negative breast cancer cells, we find that NDRG1 is up-regulated by physiological (•)NO concentrations in a dose- and time-dependant manner. Tumor cell migration was suppressed by NDRG1 expression and we excluded the involvement of HIF-1α, sGC, N-Myc, and c-Myc as upstream regulatory targets of (•)NO. Augmenting the chelatable iron pool abolished (•)NO-mediated NDRG1 expression and the associated phenotypic effects. These data, in summary, reveal a link between (•)NO, chelatable iron, and regulation of NDRG1 expression and signaling in tumor cells.

  3. Coexpression of MMTV/v-Ha-ras and MMTV/c-myc genes in transgenic mice: synergistic action of oncogenes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sinn, E; Muller, W; Pattengale, P; Tepler, I; Wallace, R; Leder, P

    1987-05-22

    We have derived and mated separate strains of transgenic mice that carry either the v-Ha-ras or the c-myc gene driven by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) promoter/enhancer. Mice carrying the MMTV/v-Ha-ras transgene manifest two distinct disturbances of cell growth. The first, a benign hyperplasia of the Harderian lacrimal gland, is diffuse, involves the entire gland, and likely requires only the abnormal action of the v-Ha-ras gene. The second involves the focal development of malignancies of mammary, salivary, and lymphoid tissue and likely requires additional somatic events. When the MMTV/v-Ha-ras and MMTV/c-myc strains are crossed to yield hybrid mice, their joint action results in a dramatic and synergistic acceleration of tumor formation. Since these tumors arise stochastically and are apparently monoclonal in origin, additional somatic events appear necessary for their full malignant progression, even in the presence of activated v-Ha-ras and c-myc transgenes.

  4. Changes in the phenotype of human small cell lung cancer cell lines after transfection and expression of the c-myc proto-oncogene.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, B E; Battey, J; Linnoila, I; Becker, K L; Makuch, R W; Snider, R H; Carney, D N; Minna, J D

    1986-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer growing in cell culture possesses biologic properties that allow classification into two categories: classic and variant. Compared with classic small cell lung cancer cell lines, variant lines have altered large cell morphology, shorter doubling times, higher cloning efficiencies in soft agarose, and very low levels of L dopa decarboxylase production and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. C-myc is amplified and expressed in some small cell lung cancer cell lines and all c-myc amplified lines studied to date display the variant phenotype. To investigate if c-myc amplification and expression is responsible for the variant phenotype, a normal human c-myc gene was transfected into a cloned classic small cell lung cancer cell line not amplified for or expressing detectable c-myc messenger RNA (mRNA). Clones were isolated with one to six copies of c-myc stably integrated into DNA that expressed c-myc mRNA. In addition, one clone with an integrated neo gene but a deleted c-myc gene was isolated and in this case c-myc was not expressed. C-myc expression in transfected clones was associated with altered large cell morphology, a shorter doubling time, and increased cloning efficiency, but no difference in L dopa decarboxylase levels and bombesin-like immunoreactivity. We conclude increased c-myc expression observed here in transfected clones correlates with some of the phenotypic properties distinguishing c-myc amplified variants from unamplified classic small cell lung cancer lines. Images PMID:3016030

  5. Cooperation between the polyomavirus middle-T-antigen gene and the human c-myc oncogene in a rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell line: model of in vitro progression.

    PubMed Central

    Berlingieri, M T; Portella, G; Grieco, M; Santoro, M; Fusco, A

    1988-01-01

    Two rat thyroid epithelial differentiated cell lines, PC Cl 3 and PC myc, were infected with the polyoma murine leukemia virus (PyMLV) carrying the Middle-T-antigen gene of polyomavirus. After infection, both cell lines acquired the typical markers of neoplastic transformation; however, the PC myc cells showed a greater malignant phenotype. Furthermore, the thyroid differentiated functions were completely suppressed in PC myc cells transformed by PyMLV, whereas they were, at least partially, retained in PC Cl 3 cells transformed by PyMLV, and in particular, thyroglobulin synthesis and secretion were not affected at all. Since no differences in the expression of the middle-T-antigen gene were observed in the two PyMLV-transformed cell lines, the different properties shown by these two infected cell lines must be ascribed to the expression of the c-myc oncogene. Images PMID:2838744

  6. 8q24 (C-MYC) — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Chromosome region 8q24 contains the gene for MYC, also known as C-MYC. MYC is a multifunctional, nuclear phosphoprotein that plays a role in cell cycle progression, apoptosis and cellular transformation. The 8q24 region may contain a locus that influences general cancer susceptibility.

  7. Therapeutic aspects of c-MYC signaling in inflammatory and cancerous colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Ferenc; Firneisz, Gábor; Műzes, Györgyi

    2016-01-01

    Colonic inflammation is required to heal infections, wounds, and maintain tissue homeostasis. As the seventh hallmark of cancer, however, it may affect all phases of tumor development, including tumor initiation, promotion, invasion and metastatic dissemination, and also evasion immune surveillance. Inflammation acts as a cellular stressor and may trigger DNA damage or genetic instability, and, further, chronic inflammation can provoke genetic mutations and epigenetic mechanisms that promote malignant cell transformation. Both sporadical and colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis are multi-step, complex processes arising from the uncontrolled proliferation and spreading of malignantly transformed cell clones with the obvious ability to evade the host’s protective immunity. In cells upon DNA damage several proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC are activated in parelell with the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. The target genes of the c-MYC protein participate in different cellular functions, including cell cycle, survival, protein synthesis, cell adhesion, and micro-RNA expression. The transcriptional program regulated by c-MYC is context dependent, therefore the final cellular response to elevated c-MYC levels may range from increased proliferation to augmented apoptosis. Considering physiological intestinal homeostasis, c-MYC displays a fundamental role in the regulation of cell proliferation and crypt cell number. However, c-MYC gene is frequently deregulated in inflammation, and overexpressed in both sporadic and colitis-associated colon adenocarcinomas. Recent results demonstrated that endogenous c-MYC is essential for efficient induction of p53-dependent apoptosis following DNA damage, but c-MYC function is also involved in and regulated by autophagy-related mechanisms, while its expression is affected by DNA-methylation, or histone acetylation. Molecules directly targeting c-MYC, or agents acting on other genes involved in the c-MYC pathway could be

  8. Therapeutic aspects of c-MYC signaling in inflammatory and cancerous colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Ferenc; Firneisz, Gábor; Műzes, Györgyi

    2016-09-21

    Colonic inflammation is required to heal infections, wounds, and maintain tissue homeostasis. As the seventh hallmark of cancer, however, it may affect all phases of tumor development, including tumor initiation, promotion, invasion and metastatic dissemination, and also evasion immune surveillance. Inflammation acts as a cellular stressor and may trigger DNA damage or genetic instability, and, further, chronic inflammation can provoke genetic mutations and epigenetic mechanisms that promote malignant cell transformation. Both sporadical and colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis are multi-step, complex processes arising from the uncontrolled proliferation and spreading of malignantly transformed cell clones with the obvious ability to evade the host's protective immunity. In cells upon DNA damage several proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC are activated in parelell with the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. The target genes of the c-MYC protein participate in different cellular functions, including cell cycle, survival, protein synthesis, cell adhesion, and micro-RNA expression. The transcriptional program regulated by c-MYC is context dependent, therefore the final cellular response to elevated c-MYC levels may range from increased proliferation to augmented apoptosis. Considering physiological intestinal homeostasis, c-MYC displays a fundamental role in the regulation of cell proliferation and crypt cell number. However, c-MYC gene is frequently deregulated in inflammation, and overexpressed in both sporadic and colitis-associated colon adenocarcinomas. Recent results demonstrated that endogenous c-MYC is essential for efficient induction of p53-dependent apoptosis following DNA damage, but c-MYC function is also involved in and regulated by autophagy-related mechanisms, while its expression is affected by DNA-methylation, or histone acetylation. Molecules directly targeting c-MYC, or agents acting on other genes involved in the c-MYC pathway could be

  9. Therapeutic aspects of c-MYC signaling in inflammatory and cancerous colonic diseases.

    PubMed

    Sipos, Ferenc; Firneisz, Gábor; Műzes, Györgyi

    2016-09-21

    Colonic inflammation is required to heal infections, wounds, and maintain tissue homeostasis. As the seventh hallmark of cancer, however, it may affect all phases of tumor development, including tumor initiation, promotion, invasion and metastatic dissemination, and also evasion immune surveillance. Inflammation acts as a cellular stressor and may trigger DNA damage or genetic instability, and, further, chronic inflammation can provoke genetic mutations and epigenetic mechanisms that promote malignant cell transformation. Both sporadical and colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis are multi-step, complex processes arising from the uncontrolled proliferation and spreading of malignantly transformed cell clones with the obvious ability to evade the host's protective immunity. In cells upon DNA damage several proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC are activated in parelell with the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. The target genes of the c-MYC protein participate in different cellular functions, including cell cycle, survival, protein synthesis, cell adhesion, and micro-RNA expression. The transcriptional program regulated by c-MYC is context dependent, therefore the final cellular response to elevated c-MYC levels may range from increased proliferation to augmented apoptosis. Considering physiological intestinal homeostasis, c-MYC displays a fundamental role in the regulation of cell proliferation and crypt cell number. However, c-MYC gene is frequently deregulated in inflammation, and overexpressed in both sporadic and colitis-associated colon adenocarcinomas. Recent results demonstrated that endogenous c-MYC is essential for efficient induction of p53-dependent apoptosis following DNA damage, but c-MYC function is also involved in and regulated by autophagy-related mechanisms, while its expression is affected by DNA-methylation, or histone acetylation. Molecules directly targeting c-MYC, or agents acting on other genes involved in the c-MYC pathway could be

  10. Therapeutic aspects of c-MYC signaling in inflammatory and cancerous colonic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sipos, Ferenc; Firneisz, Gábor; Műzes, Györgyi

    2016-01-01

    Colonic inflammation is required to heal infections, wounds, and maintain tissue homeostasis. As the seventh hallmark of cancer, however, it may affect all phases of tumor development, including tumor initiation, promotion, invasion and metastatic dissemination, and also evasion immune surveillance. Inflammation acts as a cellular stressor and may trigger DNA damage or genetic instability, and, further, chronic inflammation can provoke genetic mutations and epigenetic mechanisms that promote malignant cell transformation. Both sporadical and colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis are multi-step, complex processes arising from the uncontrolled proliferation and spreading of malignantly transformed cell clones with the obvious ability to evade the host’s protective immunity. In cells upon DNA damage several proto-oncogenes, including c-MYC are activated in parelell with the inactivation of tumor suppressor genes. The target genes of the c-MYC protein participate in different cellular functions, including cell cycle, survival, protein synthesis, cell adhesion, and micro-RNA expression. The transcriptional program regulated by c-MYC is context dependent, therefore the final cellular response to elevated c-MYC levels may range from increased proliferation to augmented apoptosis. Considering physiological intestinal homeostasis, c-MYC displays a fundamental role in the regulation of cell proliferation and crypt cell number. However, c-MYC gene is frequently deregulated in inflammation, and overexpressed in both sporadic and colitis-associated colon adenocarcinomas. Recent results demonstrated that endogenous c-MYC is essential for efficient induction of p53-dependent apoptosis following DNA damage, but c-MYC function is also involved in and regulated by autophagy-related mechanisms, while its expression is affected by DNA-methylation, or histone acetylation. Molecules directly targeting c-MYC, or agents acting on other genes involved in the c-MYC pathway could be

  11. Sequential and Coordinated Actions of c-Myc and N-Myc Control Appendicular Skeletal Development

    PubMed Central

    Ota, Sara; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Keene, Douglas R.; Hurlin, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Background During limb development, chondrocytes and osteoblasts emerge from condensations of limb bud mesenchyme. These cells then proliferate and differentiate in separate but adjacent compartments and function cooperatively to promote bone growth through the process of endochondral ossification. While many aspects of limb skeletal formation are understood, little is known about the mechanisms that link the development of undifferentiated limb bud mesenchyme with formation of the precartilaginous condensation and subsequent proliferative expansion of chondrocyte and osteoblast lineages. The aim of this study was to gain insight into these processes by examining the roles of c-Myc and N-Myc in morphogenesis of the limb skeleton. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate c-Myc function in skeletal development, we characterized mice in which floxed c-Myc alleles were deleted in undifferentiated limb bud mesenchyme with Prx1-Cre, in chondro-osteoprogenitors with Sox9-Cre and in osteoblasts with Osx1-Cre. We show that c-Myc promotes the proliferative expansion of both chondrocytes and osteoblasts and as a consequence controls the process of endochondral growth and ossification and determines bone size. The control of proliferation by c-Myc was related to its effects on global gene transcription, as phosphorylation of the C-Terminal Domain (pCTD) of RNA Polymerase II, a marker of general transcription initiation, was tightly coupled to cell proliferation of growth plate chondrocytes where c-Myc is expressed and severely downregulated in the absence of c-Myc. Finally, we show that combined deletion of N-Myc and c-Myc in early limb bud mesenchyme gives rise to a severely hypoplastic limb skeleton that exhibits features characteristic of individual c-Myc and N-Myc mutants. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that N-Myc and c-Myc act sequentially during limb development to coordinate the expansion of key progenitor populations responsible for forming the limb

  12. Change in lactate production in Myc-transformed cells precedes apoptosis and can be inhibited by Bcl-2 overexpression.

    PubMed

    Papas, K K; Sun, L; Roos, E S; Gounarides, J S; Shapiro, M; Nalin, C M

    1999-03-12

    As a result of Myc-dependent transcription of the LDH-A gene, Myc-transformed cells (Rat1-Myc) exhibit increased lactate production rates (LPR) even under aerobic conditions (the Warburg effect). Recently, the increased susceptibility to stress-induced apoptosis associated with Myc transfection has been linked to the overexpression of the LDH-A gene. In this report we demonstrate that the overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in Rat1-Myc cells (Rat1-Myc-Bcl-2) reduces the molar ratio of lactate production to glucose consumption (Y(L/G)). The Bcl-2 induced reduction in Y(L/G) may be associated with reduced expression of the LDH-A gene, or a decrease in LDH-A activity. Stimulation of apoptosis by staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, reduces the LPR in Rat1-Myc cells in a dose-dependent manner. The staurosporine effect on the LPR is rapid and precedes the execution phase of apoptosis as defined by caspase activation and PARP cleavage. This effect on LPR is completely blocked by Bcl-2 overexpression. Serum starvation alone does not affect the LPR of Rat1-Myc or Rat1-Myc-Bcl-2 cells; however, the effect of staurosporine on the LPR of Rat1-Myc cells is potentiated by serum starvation. These data demonstrate that Bcl-2 overexpression reduces the Y(L/G) in Rat1-Myc cells, perhaps via a reduction in the activity or expression of the LDH-A gene, and this reduction may desensitize cells to some pro-apoptotic stimuli. The reduction in LPR in response to staurosporine may be an early step in the induction of apoptosis in Rat1-Myc cells. By abolishing the reduction in LPR, Bcl-2 may protect Rat1-Myc cells from staurosporine-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the lack of effect by serum starvation on the LPR supports a model in which serum starvation induces apoptosis through a pathway distinct from that of the staurosporine and glucose-dependent apoptotic pathway(s) in Myc-transformed cells.

  13. The Interaction of Myc with Miz1 Defines Medulloblastoma Subgroup Identity.

    PubMed

    Vo, BaoHan T; Wolf, Elmar; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Gebhardt, Anneli; Rehg, Jerold E; Finkelstein, David; Walz, Susanne; Murphy, Brian L; Youn, Yong Ha; Han, Young-Goo; Eilers, Martin; Roussel, Martine F

    2016-01-11

    Four distinct subgroups of cerebellar medulloblastomas (MBs) differ in their histopathology, molecular profiles, and prognosis. c-Myc (Myc) or MycN overexpression in granule neuron progenitors (GNPs) induces Group 3 (G3) or Sonic Hedgehog (SHH) MBs, respectively. Differences in Myc and MycN transcriptional profiles depend, in part, on their interaction with Miz1, which binds strongly to Myc but not MycN, to target sites on chromatin. Myc suppresses ciliogenesis and reprograms the transcriptome of SHH-dependent GNPs through Miz1-dependent gene repression to maintain stemness. Genetic disruption of the Myc/Miz1 interaction inhibited G3 MB development. Target genes of Myc/Miz1 are repressed in human G3 MBs but not in other subgroups. Therefore, the Myc/Miz1 interaction is a defining hallmark of G3 MB development. PMID:26766587

  14. The Interplay between Myc and CTP Synthase in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Grice, Stuart J.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    CTP synthase (CTPsyn) is essential for the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. It has been shown that CTPsyn is incorporated into a novel cytoplasmic structure which has been termed the cytoophidium. Here, we report that Myc regulates cytoophidium formation during Drosophila oogenesis. We have found that Myc protein levels correlate with cytoophidium abundance in follicle epithelia. Reducing Myc levels results in cytoophidium loss and small nuclear size in follicle cells, while overexpression of Myc increases the length of cytoophidia and the nuclear size of follicle cells. Ectopic expression of Myc induces cytoophidium formation in late stage follicle cells. Furthermore, knock-down of CTPsyn is sufficient to suppress the overgrowth phenotype induced by Myc overexpression, suggesting CTPsyn acts downstream of Myc and is required for Myc-mediated cell size control. Taken together, our data suggest a functional link between Myc, a renowned oncogene, and the essential nucleotide biosynthetic enzyme CTPsyn. PMID:26889675

  15. The Interplay between Myc and CTP Synthase in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Aughey, Gabriel N; Grice, Stuart J; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-02-01

    CTP synthase (CTPsyn) is essential for the biosynthesis of pyrimidine nucleotides. It has been shown that CTPsyn is incorporated into a novel cytoplasmic structure which has been termed the cytoophidium. Here, we report that Myc regulates cytoophidium formation during Drosophila oogenesis. We have found that Myc protein levels correlate with cytoophidium abundance in follicle epithelia. Reducing Myc levels results in cytoophidium loss and small nuclear size in follicle cells, while overexpression of Myc increases the length of cytoophidia and the nuclear size of follicle cells. Ectopic expression of Myc induces cytoophidium formation in late stage follicle cells. Furthermore, knock-down of CTPsyn is sufficient to suppress the overgrowth phenotype induced by Myc overexpression, suggesting CTPsyn acts downstream of Myc and is required for Myc-mediated cell size control. Taken together, our data suggest a functional link between Myc, a renowned oncogene, and the essential nucleotide biosynthetic enzyme CTPsyn. PMID:26889675

  16. Factor-binding element in the human c-myc promoter involved in transcriptional regulation by transforming growth factor. beta. 1 and by the retinoblastoma gene product

    SciTech Connect

    Pietenpol, J.A.; Stein, R.W.; Moses, H.L. ); Muenger, K.; Howley, P.M. )

    1991-11-15

    Previous studies have shown that transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) inhibition of keratinocyte proliferation involves suppression of c-myc transcription, and indirect evidence has suggested that the retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) may be involved in this process. In this study, transient expression of pRB in skin keratinocytes was shown to repress transcription of the human c-myc promoter region was required for regulation by both TGF-{beta}1 and pRB. These sequences, termed the TGF-{beta} control element (TCE), lie between positions {minus}86 and {minus}63 relative to the P1 transcription start site. Oligonucleotides containing the TCE bound to several nuclear factors in mobility-shift assays using extracts from cells with or without normal pRB. Binding of some factors was inhibited by TGF-{beta}1 treatment of TGF-{beta}-sensitive but not TGF-{beta}-insensitive cells. These data indicate that pRB can suppress c-myc transcription and growth inhibition.

  17. c-myc null cells misregulate cad and gadd45 but not other proposed c-Myc targets

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Andrew; Mateyak, Maria; Dugan, Kerri; Obaya, Alvaro; Adachi, Susumu; Sedivy, John; Cole, Michael

    1998-01-01

    We report here that the expression of virtually all proposed c-Myc target genes is unchanged in cells containing a homozygous null deletion of c-myc. Two noteworthy exceptions are the gene cad, which has reduced log phase expression and serum induction in c-myc null cells, and the growth arrest gene gadd45, which is derepressed by c-myc knockout. Thus, cad and gadd45 are the only proposed targets of c-Myc that may contribute to the dramatic slow growth phenotype of c-myc null cells. Our results demonstrate that a loss-of-function approach is critical for the evaluation of potential c-Myc target genes. PMID:9869632

  18. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yan; Lv, Liyang; Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao; Cao, Lili

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  19. The MYC 3′ Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Eshelman, Melanie A.; Raup-Konsavage, Wesley M.; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Yochum, Gregory S.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC) by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC). The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF) and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3′ Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3′ WRE) with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE) within the MYC 3′ WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3′ WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3′ WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC. PMID:27223305

  20. Sirt1 deacetylates c-Myc and promotes c-Myc/Max association.

    PubMed

    Mao, Beibei; Zhao, Guowei; Lv, Xiang; Chen, Hou-Zao; Xue, Zheng; Yang, Ben; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chih-Chuan

    2011-11-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein plays critical roles in multiple biological processes by controlling cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and metabolism. Especially, c-Myc is frequently overexpressed in many human cancers and widely involved in tumorigenesis. However, how the post-translational modifications, especially acetylation of c-Myc, contribute to its activity in the leukemia cells remains largely unknown. Sirt1, a NAD-dependent class III histone deacetylase, has a paradoxical role in tumorigenesis by deacetylating several transcription factors, including p53, E2F1 and forkhead proteins. In this study, we show that Sirt1 interacts physically with the C-terminus of c-Myc and deacetylates c-Myc both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, the deacetylation of c-Myc by Sirt1 promotes its association with Max, a partner essential for its activation, thereby facilitating c-Myc transactivation activity on hTERT promoter. Finally, inhibition of endogenous Sirt1 in K562 cells by either RNAi or its inhibitor NAM causes the overall decrease of c-Myc target genes expression, including hTERT, cyclinD2 and LDHA, which further suppress cell proliferation and arrest cell cycle at G1/S phase. Thus, our results demonstrate the positive effect of Sirt1 on c-Myc activity by efficiently enhancing c-Myc/Max association in human leukemia cell line K562, suggesting a potential role of Sirt1 in tumorigenesis.

  1. A Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Enhancer of Myc Transforming Potential Stabilizes Myc-TIP60 Transcriptional Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Soumya; Sharma, Anima; Wong, Kasuen; Zhang, Junyu; Matlock, Elizabeth F.; Rogers, Lowery; Motloch, Pamela; Takemoto, Shigeki; Taguchi, Hirokuni; Cole, Michael D.; Lüscher, Bernhard; Dittrich, Oliver; Tagami, Hideaki; Nakatani, Yoshihiro; McGee, Monnie; Girard, Anne-Marie; Gaughan, Luke; Robson, Craig N.; Monnat, Raymond J.; Harrod, Robert

    2005-01-01

    The human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infects and transforms CD4+ lymphocytes and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), an aggressive lymphoproliferative disease that is often fatal. Here, we demonstrate that the HTLV-1 pX splice-variant p30II markedly enhances the transforming potential of Myc and transcriptionally activates the human cyclin D2 promoter, dependent upon its conserved Myc-responsive E-box enhancer elements, which are associated with increased S-phase entry and multinucleation. Enhancement of c-Myc transforming activity by HTLV-1 p30II is dependent upon the transcriptional coactivators, transforming transcriptional activator protein/p434 and TIP60, and it requires TIP60 histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity and correlates with the stabilization of HTLV-1 p30II/Myc-TIP60 chromatin-remodeling complexes. The p30II oncoprotein colocalizes and coimmunoprecipitates with Myc-TIP60 complexes in cultured HTLV-1-infected ATLL patient lymphocytes. Amino acid residues 99 to 154 within HTLV-1 p30II interact with the TIP60 HAT, and p30II transcriptionally activates numerous cellular genes in a TIP60-dependent or TIP60-independent manner, as determined by microarray gene expression analyses. Importantly, these results suggest that p30II functions as a novel retroviral modulator of Myc-TIP60-transforming interactions that may contribute to adult T-cell leukemogenesis. PMID:15988028

  2. Identification of VEGF-regulated genes associated with increased lung metastatic potential: functional involvement of tenascin-C in tumor growth and lung metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, A; Catena, R; Noble, MS; Carbott, D; Gil-Bazo, I; Gonzalez-Moreno, O; Huh, J-I; Sharp, R; Qiu, T-H; Anver, MR; Merlino, G; Dickson, RB; Johnson, MD; Green, JE

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis is the primary cause of death in patients with breast cancer. Overexpression of c-myc in humans correlates with metastases, but transgenic mice only show low rates of micrometastases. We have generated transgenic mice that overexpress both c-myc and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (Myc/VEGF) in the mammary gland, which develop high rates of pulmonary macrometastases. Gene expression profiling revealed a set of deregulated genes in Myc/VEGF tumors compared to Myc tumors associated with the increased metastatic phenotype. Cross-comparisons between this set of genes with a human breast cancer lung metastasis gene signature identified five common targets: tenascin-C (TNC), matrix metalloprotease-2, collagen-6-A1, mannosidase-α-1A and HLA-DPA1. Signaling blockade or knockdown of TNC in MDA-MB-435 cells resulted in a significant impairment of cell migration and anchorage-independent cell proliferation. Mice injected with clonal MDA-MB-435 cells with reduced expression of TNC demonstrated a significant decrease (P < 0.05) in (1) primary tumor growth; (2) tumor relapse after surgical removal of the primary tumor and (3) incidence of lung metastasis. Our results demonstrate that VEGF induces complex alterations in tissue architecture and gene expression. The TNC signaling pathway plays an important role in mammary tumor growth and metastases, suggesting that TNC may be a relevant target for therapy against metastatic breast cancer. PMID:18504437

  3. The human zinc-finger protein-7 gene is located 90 kb 3' of MYC and is not expressed in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Feduchi, E; Gallego, M I; Lazo, P A

    1994-09-15

    The zinc-finger gene-7 (ZNF7) was located 90 kb 3' of MYC on human chromosome 8 band q24 by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). This position lies between the MLV14 and BVR1 loci, 2 variant translocation breakpoints in Burkitt lymphomas. The structure of the ZNF7 gene was not altered by translocations in Burkitt-lymphoma cell lines as shown by its germline-restriction map configuration. The chromosomal region surrounding the ZNF7 gene was extensively methylated. The ZNF7 gene was not expressed in 19 BL cell lines. Expression was detected only in the BL41 and BL47 cell lines and in the SW756 cervical-carcinoma cell line. The RNA in each was of a different size. We postulate that the lack of ZNF7 expression in Burkitt lymphomas might contribute to the tumor phenotype.

  4. Neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis by the human protooncogene MYC

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, G.M.; Bishop, J.M. ); Moscovici, G.; Moscovici, C. )

    1990-03-01

    Damage to the protooncogene MYC has been implicated in the genesis of diverse human tumors, but the tumorigenic potential of the isolated gene has been disputed. Here the authors report the use of a retroviral vector to test the potency of human MYC for neoplastic transformation in avian cells. They found that sustained and abundant expression of MYC can transform both embryonic fibroblasts and hematopoietic cells and elicit granulocytic leukemias in chickens. Transformation by MYC is accompanied by changes in diverse aspects of cellular phenotype, including morphology, ability to grow in suspension, rate of proliferation, the structure of the cytoskeleton, and the composition of the extracellular matrix. Nevertheless, the biological potency of MYC is inherently constrained when compared to that of the retroviral oncogene v-myc. The findings enlarge on previous descriptions of neoplastic transformation by MYC and sustain the view that ungoverned expression of the gene can contribute to the genesis of human tumors.

  5. Overexpression of c-myc induces epithelial mesenchymal transition in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung Bin; Cho, Min Kyong; Lee, Won Young; Kang, Keon Wook

    2010-07-28

    The c-myc gene is frequently overexpressed in human breast cancer and its target genes are involved in tumorigenesis. Epithelial mesenchymal transitions (EMT), where cells undergo a developmental switch from a polarized epithelial phenotype to a highly motile mesenchymal phenotype, are associated with invasion and motility of cancer cells. Basal E-cadherin expression was down-regulated in c-myc overexpressing MCF10A (c-myc-MCF10A) cells compared to GFP-overexpressing MCF10A (GFP-MCF10A) cells, while N-cadherin was distinctly increased in c-myc-MCF10A cells. Given that glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) and the snail axis have key roles in E-cadherin deregulation during EMT, we investigated the role of GSK-3beta/snail signaling pathways in the induction of EMT by c-myc overexpression. In contrast to GFP-MCF10A cells, both the transcriptional activity and the ubiquitination-dependent protein stability of snail were enhanced in c-myc-MCF10A cells, and this was reversed by GSK-3beta overexpression. We also found that c-myc overexpression inhibits GSK-3beta activity through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of ERK by dominant negative mutant transfection or chemical inhibitor significantly suppressed snail gene transcription. These results suggest that c-myc overexpression during transformation of mammary epithelial cells (MEC) is involved in EMTs via ERK-dependent GSK-3beta inactivation and subsequent snail activation.

  6. Deuterium depleted water effects on survival of lung cancer patients and expression of Kras, Bcl2, and Myc genes in mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyi, Zoltán; Budán, Ferenc; Szabó, István; Ember, István; Kiss, István; Krempels, Krisztina; Somlyai, Ildikó; Somlyai, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    Although advances in cancer therapies continue to develop, the shortness of the survival of lung cancer patients is still disappointing. Therefore, finding new adjuvant strategies is within the focus of cancer cure. Based on observations that deuterium depletion inhibits the growth of cancer cell lines and suppresses certain proto-oncogenes, we have conducted a clinical study in 129 patients with small cell and nonsmall cell lung cancers who consumed deuterium-depleted drinking water (DDW) as a nontoxic agent in addition to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Median survival time (MST) was 25.9 mo in males and 74.1 mo in female patients; the difference between genders was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Median survival of subjects with brain metastasis was 27.1 mo. Cumulative 5-yr survival probabilities were 19%, 52%, and 33% in males, females, and all patients with brain metastasis, respectively. Gene expression analysis in mouse lung indicated that DDW attenuates 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced expression of Bcl2, Kras, and Myc in females. In conclusion, DDW counteracts the DMBA-induced overexpression of Bcl2, Kras and Myc genes in mouse lung, and it may extend survival of lung cancer patients as a nontoxic anticancer dietary supplement, especially for women with tumors overexpressing cancer-related genes, because MST of DDW-consuming group was 2-4 times longer than it is generally observed in lung cancer patients.

  7. c-Myc over-expression in Ramos Burkitt's lymphoma cell line predisposes to iron homeostasis disruption in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Habel, Marie-Eve; Jung, Daniel . E-mail: djung@hema-quebec.qc.ca

    2006-03-24

    Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell neoplasm resulting from deregulated c-myc expression. We have previously shown that proliferation of Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines such as Ramos is markedly reduced by iron treatment. It has been shown that iron induces expression of c-myc which, owing to its transcriptional regulatory functions, regulates genes involved in iron metabolism. Transient enhancement of c-myc expression by iron could increase the expression of genes involved in iron incorporation, which could lead to an accumulation of intracellular free iron. Here, we have investigated whether cells with a high basal level of c-Myc were more likely to accumulate free iron. Our results suggest that the basal level of c-Myc in Ramos cells is twofold higher than what is seen in HL-60 cells. Moreover, in Ramos cells, where c-Myc is expressed at a high level, H-ferritin expression is down-regulated, transferrin receptor (CD71) expression is increased, and ferritin translation is inhibited. These modifications in iron metabolism, resulting from the strong basal expression of c-Myc, and amplified by iron addition, could lead to a disruption in homeostasis and consequently to growth arrest.

  8. N-Myc knockdown and apigenin treatment controlled growth of malignant neuroblastoma cells having N-Myc amplification.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Motarab; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2013-10-15

    Malignant neuroblastomas mostly occur in children and are frequently associated with N-Myc amplification. Oncogene amplification, which is selective increase in copy number of the oncogene, provides survival advantages in solid tumors including malignant neuroblastoma. We have decreased expression of N-Myc oncogene using short hairpin RNA (shRNA) plasmid to increase anti-tumor efficacy of the isoflavonoid apigenin (APG) in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-DZ and SK-N-BE2 cell lines that harbor N-Myc amplification. N-Myc knockdown induced morphological and biochemical features of neuronal differentiation. Combination of N-Myc knockdown and APG most effectively induced morphological and biochemical features of apoptotic death. This combination therapy also prevented cell migration and decreased N-Myc driven survival, angiogenic, and invasive factors. Collectively, N-Myc knockdown and APG treatment is a promising strategy for controlling the growth of human malignant neuroblastoma cell lines that harbor N-Myc amplification.

  9. Continuous Hypoxic Culturing of Human Embryonic Stem Cells Enhances SSEA-3 and MYC Levels

    PubMed Central

    Laiho, Asta; Rahkonen, Nelly; Emani, Maheswara Reddy; Viitala, Miro; Laurila, Kirsti; Sahla, Roosa; Lund, Riikka; Lähdesmäki, Harri; Jaakkola, Panu; Lahesmaa, Riitta

    2013-01-01

    Low oxygen tension (hypoxia) contributes critically to pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) by preventing spontaneous differentiation and supporting self-renewal. However, it is not well understood how hESCs respond to reduced oxygen availability and what are the molecular mechanisms maintaining pluripotency in these conditions. In this study we characterized the transcriptional and molecular responses of three hESC lines (H9, HS401 and HS360) on short (2 hours), intermediate (24 hours) and prolonged (7 days) exposure to low oxygen conditions (4% O2). In response to prolonged hypoxia the expression of pluripotency surface marker SSEA-3 was increased. Furthermore, the genome wide gene-expression analysis revealed that a substantial proportion (12%) of all hypoxia-regulated genes in hESCs, were directly linked to the mechanisms controlling pluripotency or differentiation. Moreover, transcription of MYC oncogene was induced in response to continuous hypoxia. At the protein level MYC was stabilized through phosphorylation already in response to a short hypoxic exposure. Total MYC protein levels remained elevated throughout all the time points studied. Further, MYC protein expression in hypoxia was affected by silencing HIF2α, but not HIF1α. Since MYC has a crucial role in regulating pluripotency we propose that induction of sustained MYC expression in hypoxia contributes to activation of transcriptional programs critical for hESC self-renewal and maintenance of enhanced pluripotent state. PMID:24236059

  10. c-MYC inhibition impairs hypoxia response in glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Mongiardi, Maria Patrizia; Savino, Mauro; Falchetti, Maria Laura; Illi, Barbara; Bozzo, Francesca; Valle, Cristiana; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Nasi, Sergio; Levi, Andrea

    2016-05-31

    The c-MYC oncoprotein is a DNA binding transcription factor that enhances the expression of many active genes. c-MYC transcriptional signatures vary according to the transcriptional program defined in each cell type during differentiation. Little is known on the involvement of c-MYC in regulation of gene expression programs that are induced by extracellular cues such as a changing microenvironment. Here we demonstrate that inhibition of c-MYC in glioblastoma multiforme cells blunts hypoxia-dependent glycolytic reprogramming and mitochondria fragmentation in hypoxia. This happens because c-MYC inhibition alters the cell transcriptional response to hypoxia and finely tunes the expression of a subset of Hypoxia Inducible Factor 1-regulated genes. We also show that genes whose expression in hypoxia is affected by c-MYC inhibition are able to distinguish the Proneural subtype of glioblastoma multiforme, thus potentially providing a molecular signature for this class of tumors that are the least tractable among glioblastomas. PMID:27119353

  11. Contrasting roles for c-Myc and L-Myc in the regulation of cellular growth and differentiation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Morgenbesser, S D; Schreiber-Agus, N; Bidder, M; Mahon, K A; Overbeek, P A; Horner, J; DePinho, R A

    1995-01-01

    Although myc family genes are differentially expressed during development, their expression frequently overlaps, suggesting that they may serve both distinct and common biological functions. In addition, alterations in their expression occur at major developmental transitions in many cell lineages. For example, during mouse lens maturation, the growth arrest and differentiation of epithelial cells into lens fiber cells is associated with a decrease in L- and c-myc expression and a reciprocal rise in N-myc levels. To determine whether the down-regulation of L- and c-myc are required for mitotic arrest and/or completion of differentiation and whether these genes have distinct or similar activities in the same cell type, we have studied the consequences of forced L- and c-myc expression in the lens fiber cell compartment using the alpha A-crystallin promoter in transgenic mice (alpha A/L-myc and alpha A/c-myc mice). With respect to morphological and molecular differentiation, alpha A/L-myc lenses were characterized by a severely disorganized lens fiber cell compartment and a significant decrease in the expression of a late-stage differentiation marker (MIP26); in contrast, differentiation appeared to be unaffected in alpha A/c-myc mice. Furthermore, an analysis of proliferation indicated that while alpha A/L-myc fiber cells withdrew properly from the cell cycle, inappropriate cell cycle progression occurred in the lens fiber cell compartment of alpha A/c-myc mice. These observations indicate that continued late-stage expression of L-myc affected differentiation processes directly, rather than indirectly through deregulated growth control, whereas constitutive c-myc expression inhibited proliferative arrest, but did not appear to disturb differentiation. As a direct corollary, our data indicate that L-Myc and c-Myc are involved in distinct physiological processes in the same cell type. Images PMID:7882978

  12. Enhanced angiogenesis, hypoxia and neutrophil recruitment during Myc-induced liver tumorigenesis in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ye; Huang, Xiaoqian; Ding, Tony Weixi; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis, hypoxia and immune cells are important components in tumor microenvironment affecting tumor growth. Here we employed a zebrafish liver tumor model to investigate the effect of Myc expression on angiogenesis, hypoxia and tumor-infiltrated neutrophils during the tumor initiation stage. We found that induced Myc expression in the liver caused a dramatic increase of liver size with neoplastic features. The tumorigenic liver was accompanied by enhanced angiogenesis and inhibition of angiogenesis by an inhibitor (SU5416 or sunitinib) hindered the tumorigenic growth, suggesting an essential role of angiogenesis in tumorigenic growth of liver tumor in this zebrafish model. Myc induction also caused hypoxia, which could be further enhanced by hypoxia activator, ML228, to lead to a further enlargement of tumorigenic liver. Furthermore, Myc overexpression incurred an increase of liver-infiltrated neutrophils and the increase could be suppressed by angiogenesis inhibitors or by morpholino knockdown inhibition of neutrophil differentiation, leading to a suppression of growth of tumorigenic livers. Finally, the enhanced angiogenesis, hypoxia and tumor-infiltrated neutrophils by Myc overexpression were validated by RT-qPCR examination of expression of relevant biomarker genes. In sum, the current study demonstrated that the Myc-induced liver tumor model in zebrafish provides an excellent platform for study of tumor microenvironment. PMID:27549025

  13. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC's transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-09-22

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes.

  14. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours.

  15. S6 Kinase is essential for MYC-dependent rDNA transcription in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Naomi C; Tchoubrieva, Elissaveta B; Chahal, Arjun; Woods, Simone; Lee, Amanda; Lin, Jane I; Parsons, Linda; Jastrzebski, Katarzyna; Poortinga, Gretchen; Hannan, Katherine M; Pearson, Richard B; Hannan, Ross D; Quinn, Leonie M

    2015-10-01

    Increased rates of ribosome biogenesis and biomass accumulation are fundamental properties of rapidly growing and dividing malignant cells. The MYC oncoprotein drives growth predominantly via its ability to upregulate the ribosome biogenesis program, in particular stimulating the activity of the RNA Polymerase I (Pol I) machinery to increase ribosomal RNA (rRNA) transcription. Although MYC function is known to be highly dependent on the cellular signalling context, the pathways interacting with MYC to regulate transcription of ribosomal genes (rDNA) in vivo in response to growth factor status, nutrient availability and cellular stress are only beginning to be understood. To determine factors critical to MYC-dependent stimulation of rDNA transcription in vivo, we performed a transient expression screen for known oncogenic signalling pathways in Drosophila. Strikingly, from the broad range of pathways tested, we found that ribosomal protein S6 Kinase (S6K) activity, downstream of the TOR pathway, was the only factor rate-limiting for the rapid induction of rDNA transcription due to transiently increased MYC. Further, we demonstrated that one of the mechanism(s) by which MYC and S6K cooperate is through coordinate activation of the essential Pol I transcription initiation factor TIF-1A (RRN 3). As Pol I targeted therapy is now in phase 1 clinical trials in patients with haematological malignancies, including those driven by MYC, these data suggest that therapies dually targeting Pol I transcription and S6K activity may be effective in treating MYC-driven tumours. PMID:26215099

  16. NM23-H2 may play an indirect role in transcriptional activation of c-myc gene expression but does not cleave the nuclease hypersensitive element III[subscript 1

    SciTech Connect

    Dexheimer, Thomas S.; Carey, Steven S.; Zuohe, Song; Gokhale, Vijay M.; Hu, Xiaohui; Murata, Lauren B.; Maes, Estelle M.; Weichsel, Andrzej; Sun, Daekyu; Meuillet, Emmanuelle J.; Montfort, William R.; Hurley, Laurence H.

    2009-05-13

    The formation of G-quadruplex structures within the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III{sub 1} region of the c-myc promoter and the ability of these structures to repress c-myc transcription have been well established. However, just how these extremely stable DNA secondary structures are transformed to activate c-myc transcription is still unknown. NM23-H2/nucleoside diphosphate kinase B has been recognized as an activator of c-myc transcription via interactions with the NHE III{sub 1} region of the c-myc gene promoter. Through the use of RNA interference, we confirmed the transcriptional regulatory role of NM23-H2. In addition, we find that further purification of NM23-H2 results in loss of the previously identified DNA strand cleavage activity, but retention of its DNA binding activity. NM23-H2 binds to both single-stranded guanine- and cytosine-rich strands of the c-myc NHE III{sub 1} and, to a lesser extent, to a random single-stranded DNA template. However, it does not bind to or cleave the NHE III{sub 1} in duplex form. Significantly, potassium ions and compounds that stabilize the G-quadruplex and i-motif structures have an inhibitory effect on NM23-H2 DNA-binding activity. Mutation of Arg{sup 88} to Ala{sup 88} (R88A) reduced both DNA and nucleotide binding but had minimal effect on the NM23-H2 crystal structure. On the basis of these data and molecular modeling studies, we have proposed a stepwise trapping-out of the NHE III{sub 1} region in a single-stranded form, thus allowing single-stranded transcription factors to bind and activate c-myc transcription. Furthermore, this model provides a rationale for how the stabilization of the G-quadruplex or i-motif structures formed within the c-myc gene promoter region can inhibit NM23-H2 from activating c-myc gene expression.

  17. Interaction of MYC with Host Cell Factor-1 is meditated by the evolutionarily-conserved Myc box IV motif

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Lance R.; Foshage, Audra M.; Weissmiller, April M.; Popay, Tessa M.; Grieb, Brian C.; Qualls, Susan J.; Ng, Victoria; Carboneau, Bethany; Lorey, Shelly; Eischen, Christine M.; Tansey, William P.

    2015-01-01

    The MYC family of oncogenes encodes a set of three related transcription factors that are overexpressed in many human tumors and contribute to the cancer-related deaths of more than 70,000 Americans every year. MYC proteins drive tumorigenesis by interacting with co-factors that enable them to regulate the expression of thousands of genes linked to cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and genome stability. One effective way to identify critical cofactors required for MYC function has been to focus on sequence motifs within MYC that are conserved throughout evolution, on the assumption that their conservation is driven by protein-protein interactions that are vital for MYC activity. In addition to their DNA-binding domains, MYC proteins carry five regions of high sequence conservation known as Myc boxes (Mb). To date, four of the Myc box motifs (MbI, MbII, MbIIIa, and MbIIIb) have had a molecular function assigned to them, but the precise role of the remaining Myc box, MbIV, and the reason for its preservation in vertebrate Myc proteins, is unknown. Here, we show that MbIV is required for the association of MYC with the abundant transcriptional coregulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1). We show that the invariant core of MbIV resembles the tetrapeptide HCF-binding motif (HBM) found in many HCF-interaction partners, and demonstrate that MYC interacts with HCF in a manner indistinguishable from the prototypical HBM-containing protein VP16. Finally, we show that rationalized point mutations in MYC that disrupt interaction with HCF-1 attenuate the ability of MYC to drive tumorigenesis in mice. Together, these data expose a molecular function for MbIV and indicate that HCF-1 is an important co-factor for MYC. PMID:26522729

  18. Expression and activity of L-Myc in normal mouse development.

    PubMed Central

    Hatton, K S; Mahon, K; Chin, L; Chiu, F C; Lee, H W; Peng, D; Morgenbesser, S D; Horner, J; DePinho, R A

    1996-01-01

    To determine the role of L-Myc in normal mammalian development and its functional relationship to other members of the Myc family, we determined the normal patterns of L-myc gene expression in the developing mouse by RNA in situ hybridization and assessed the phenotypic impact of L-Myc deficiency produced through standard gene targeting methodology. L-myc transcripts were detected in the developing kidney and lung as well as in both the proliferative and the differentiative zones of the brain and neural tube. Despite significant expression of L-myc in developing mouse tissue, homozygous null L-myc mice were found to be viable, reproductively competent, and represented in expected frequencies from heterozygous matings. A detailed histological survey of embryonic and adult tissues, characterization of an embryonic neuronal marker, and measurement of cellular proliferation in situ did not reveal any congenital abnormalities. The lack of an apparent phenotype associated with L-Myc deficiency indicates that L-Myc is dispensable for gross morphological development and argues against a unique role for L-Myc in early central nervous system development as had been previously suggested. Although overlapping expression patterns among myc family members raise the possibility of complementation of L-Myc deficiency by other Myc oncoproteins, compensatory changes in the levels of c- and/or N-myc transcripts were not detected in homozygous null L-myc mice. PMID:8657155

  19. Frequent co-amplification and co-operation between C-MYC and PVT1 oncogenes promote malignant pleural mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Erick; Suraokar, Milind B.; Rodriguez, Jaime; Mino, Barbara; Lin, Heather Y.; Rice, David C.; Tsao, Anne; Wistuba, Ignacio I.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a deadly disease with poor prognosis and few treatment options. We characterized and elucidate the roles of C-MYC and PVT1 involved in the pathogenesis of MPM. Methods We used siRNA-mediated knockdown in MPM cell lines to determine the effect of C-MYC and PVT1 abrogation on MPM cells undergoing apoptosis, proliferation, and cisplatin sensitivity. We also characterized the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) spanning the PVT1 region in MPM cell lines. Copy number analysis was measured by quantitative PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Results Copy number analysis revealed copy number gains (CNGs) in chromosomal region 8q24 in six of twelve MPM cell lines. MicroRNA analysis showed high miR-1204 expression in MSTO-211H cell lines with ≥4 copies of PVT1. Knockdown by siRNA showed increased PARP-C levels in MSTO-211H transfected with siPVT1 but not in cells transfected with siC-MYC. C-MYC and PVT1 knockdown reduced cell proliferation and increased sensitivity to cisplatin. Analysis of the expression of apoptosis-related genes in the MSTO-211H cell line suggested that C-MYC maintains a balance between pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic gene expression, whereas PVT1 and to a lesser extent miR-1204, upregulate pro-apoptotic genes and downregulate anti-apoptotic genes. FISH analysis of MPM tumor specimens showed a high frequency of both CNGs (11/75) and trisomy (three copies; 11/75) for the C-MYC locus. Conclusion Our results suggest that C-MYC and PVT1 copy number gain promotes a malignant phenotype of MPM, with C-MYC CNG stimulating cell proliferation and PVT1 both stimulating proliferation and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:24926545

  20. MYC, Metabolic Synthetic Lethality, and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Annie L; Dang, Chi V

    2016-01-01

    The MYC oncogene plays a pivotal role in the development and progression of human cancers. It encodes a transcription factor that has broad reaching effects on many cellular functions, most importantly in driving cell growth through regulation of genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, metabolism, and cell cycle. Upon binding DNA with its partner MAX, MYC recruits factors that release paused RNA polymerases to drive transcription and amplify gene expression. At physiologic levels of MYC, occupancy of high-affinity DNA-binding sites drives 'house-keeping' metabolic genes and those involved in ribosome and mitochondrial biogenesis for biomass accumulation. At high oncogenic levels of MYC, invasion of low-affinity sites and enhancer sequences alter the transcriptome and cause metabolic imbalances, which activates stress response and checkpoints such as p53. Loss of checkpoints unleashes MYC's full oncogenic potential to couple metabolism with neoplastic cell growth and division. Cells that overexpress MYC, however, are vulnerable to metabolic perturbations that provide potential new avenues for cancer therapy. PMID:27557535

  1. Regulation of human ornithine decarboxylase expression by the c-Myc.Max protein complex.

    PubMed

    Peña, A; Reddy, C D; Wu, S; Hickok, N J; Reddy, E P; Yumet, G; Soprano, D R; Soprano, K J

    1993-12-25

    The presence of a CACGTG element within a region of the human ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) promoter located at -491 to -474 base pairs 5' to the start site of transcription suggested that the c-Myc.Max protein complex may play a role in the regulation of ODC expression during growth. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and methylation interference analysis showed that the nuclei of WI-38 cells expressing ODC contained proteins that bound to this region of the ODC gene in a manner that correlated with growth-associated ODC expression. Also, use of antibodies against c-Myc and Max and purified recombinant c-Myc and Max protein in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed that these proteins can specifically bind this portion of the human ODC promoter. Transient transfection studies showed that increase in the level of c-Myc and/or Max led to a significant enhancement of expression of a human ODC promoter-CAT reporter construct. Moreover, treatment of actively growing WI-38 cells with an antisense oligomer to c-Myc reduced the amount of endogenous protein complex formed and the amount of endogenous ODC mRNA expressed. These studies show that the c-Myc.Max protein complex plays a role in the transcriptional regulation of human ODC in vivo.

  2. SMARCAL1 Negatively Regulates C-Myc Transcription By Altering The Conformation Of The Promoter Region

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Tapan; Bansal, Ritu; Haokip, Dominic Thangminlen; Goel, Isha; Muthuswami, Rohini

    2015-01-01

    SMARCAL1, a member of the SWI2/SNF2 protein family, stabilizes replication forks during DNA damage. In this manuscript, we provide the first evidence that SMARCAL1 is also a transcriptional co-regulator modulating the expression of c-Myc, a transcription factor that regulates 10–15% genes in the human genome. BRG1, SMARCAL1 and RNAPII were found localized onto the c-myc promoter. When HeLa cells were serum starved, the occupancy of SMARCAL1 on the c-myc promoter increased while that of BRG1 and RNAPII decreased correlating with repression of c-myc transcription. Using Active DNA-dependent ATPase A Domain (ADAAD), the bovine homolog of SMARCAL1, we show that the protein can hydrolyze ATP using a specific region upstream of the CT element of the c-myc promoter as a DNA effector. The energy, thereby, released is harnessed to alter the conformation of the promoter DNA. We propose that SMARCAL1 negatively regulates c-myc transcription by altering the conformation of its promoter region during differentiation. PMID:26648259

  3. SMARCAL1 Negatively Regulates C-Myc Transcription By Altering The Conformation Of The Promoter Region.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Tapan; Bansal, Ritu; Haokip, Dominic Thangminlen; Goel, Isha; Muthuswami, Rohini

    2015-12-09

    SMARCAL1, a member of the SWI2/SNF2 protein family, stabilizes replication forks during DNA damage. In this manuscript, we provide the first evidence that SMARCAL1 is also a transcriptional co-regulator modulating the expression of c-Myc, a transcription factor that regulates 10-15% genes in the human genome. BRG1, SMARCAL1 and RNAPII were found localized onto the c-myc promoter. When HeLa cells were serum starved, the occupancy of SMARCAL1 on the c-myc promoter increased while that of BRG1 and RNAPII decreased correlating with repression of c-myc transcription. Using Active DNA-dependent ATPase A Domain (ADAAD), the bovine homolog of SMARCAL1, we show that the protein can hydrolyze ATP using a specific region upstream of the CT element of the c-myc promoter as a DNA effector. The energy, thereby, released is harnessed to alter the conformation of the promoter DNA. We propose that SMARCAL1 negatively regulates c-myc transcription by altering the conformation of its promoter region during differentiation.

  4. An essential E box in the promoter of the gene encoding the mRNA cap-binding protein (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E) is a target for activation by c-myc.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R M; Branda, J; Johnston, K A; Polymenis, M; Gadd, M; Rustgi, A; Callanan, L; Schmidt, E V

    1996-01-01

    The mRNA cap-binding protein (eukaryotic initiation factor 4E [eIF4E]) binds the m7 GpppN cap on mRNA, thereby initiating translation. eIF4E is essential and rate limiting for protein synthesis. Overexpression of eIF4E transforms cells, and mutations in eIF4E arrest cells in G, in cdc33 mutants. In this work, we identified the promoter region of the gene encoding eIF4E, because we previously identified eIF4E as a potential myc-regulated gene. In support of our previous data, a minimal, functional, 403-nucleotide promoter region of eIF4E was found to contain CACGTG E box repeats, and this core eIF4E promoter was myc responsive in cotransfections with c-myc. A direct role for myc in activating the eIF4E promoter was demonstrated by cotransfections with two dominant negative mutants of c-myc (MycdeltaTAD and MycdeltaBR) which equally suppressed promoter function. Furthermore, electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated quantitative binding to the E box motifs that correlated with myc levels in the electrophoretic mobility shift assay extracts; supershift assays demonstrated max and USF binding to the same motif. cis mutations in the core or flank of the eIF4E E box simultaneously altered myc-max and USF binding and inactivated the promoter. Indeed, mutations of this E box inactivated the promoter in all cells tested, suggesting it is essential for expression of eIF4E. Furthermore, the GGCCACGTG(A/T)C(C/G) sequence is shared with other in vivo targets for c-myc, but unlike other targets, it is located in the immediate promoter region. Its critical function in the eIF4E promoter coupled with the known functional significance of eIF4E in growth regulation makes it a particularly interesting target for c-myc regulation. PMID:8756633

  5. Linc-RoR promotes c-Myc expression through hnRNP I and AUF1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianguo; Zhang, Ali; Ho, Tsui-Ting; Zhang, Ziqiang; Zhou, Nanjiang; Ding, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Min; Mo, Yin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Linc-RoR was originally identified to be a regulator for induced pluripotent stem cells in humans and it has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanism of Linc-RoR-mediated gene expression in cancer is poorly understood. The present study demonstrates that Linc-RoR plays an oncogenic role in part through regulation of c-Myc expression. Linc-RoR knockout (KO) suppresses cell proliferation and tumor growth. In particular, Linc-RoR KO causes a significant decrease in c-Myc whereas re-expression of Linc-RoR in the KO cells restores the level of c-Myc. Mechanistically, Linc-RoR interacts with heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) I and AU-rich element RNA-binding protein 1 (AUF1), respectively, with an opposite consequence to their interaction with c-Myc mRNA. While Linc-RoR is required for hnRNP I to bind to c-Myc mRNA, interaction of Linc-RoR with AUF1 inhibits AUF1 to bind to c-Myc mRNA. As a result, Linc-RoR may contribute to the increased stability of c-Myc mRNA. Although hnRNP I and AUF1 can interact with many RNA species and regulate their functions, with involvement of Linc-RoR they would be able to selectively regulate mRNA stability of specific genes such as c-Myc. Together, these results support a role for Linc-RoR in c-Myc expression in part by specifically enhancing its mRNA stability, leading to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. PMID:26656491

  6. Apoptosis is induced by N-myc expression in hepatocytes, a frequent event in hepadnavirus oncogenesis, and is blocked by insulin-like growth factor II.

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, K; Ganem, D

    1996-01-01

    Induction of hepatocellular carcinoma in woodchucks by woodchuck hepatitis virus is associated with the activation of N-myc gene expression, usually by viral DNA integration in cis to the N-myc locus. We have examined the consequences of N-myc up-regulation in rodent hepatic cells in culture. Mouse alpha ML hepatocytes infected with a retroviral vector overexpressing the woodchuck N-myc2 gene display a higher proliferation rate than parental alpha ML cells but are morphologically unchanged and do not form colonies in soft agar. However, they display an increased propensity to undergo apoptosis, an effect that is markedly augmented by serum deprivation. Expression of the woodchuck hepatitis virus X gene in alpha ML cells does not alter the growth phenotype of the cells and has no effect upon N-myc-dependent apoptosis. However, apoptosis in N-myc2-expressing alpha ML cells is strongly inhibited by insulin-like growth factor II (IGF II). IGF II gene expression is also strongly up-regulated during hepatic carcinogenesis in vivo in virally infected animals and has been speculated to be part of an autocrine growth-stimulatory pathway. Our results suggest that IGF II may play another role in the development of virus-induced hepatoma: the prevention of programmed cell death triggered by deregulated N-myc expression. PMID:8627653

  7. MYC, FBXW7 and TP53 copy number variation and expression in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MYC deregulation is a common event in gastric carcinogenesis, usually as a consequence of gene amplification, chromosomal translocations, or posttranslational mechanisms. FBXW7 is a p53-controlled tumor-suppressor that plays a role in the regulation of cell cycle exit and reentry via MYC degradation. Methods We evaluated MYC, FBXW7, and TP53 copy number, mRNA levels, and protein expression in gastric cancer and paired non-neoplastic specimens from 33 patients and also in gastric adenocarcinoma cell lines. We also determined the invasion potential of the gastric cancer cell lines. Results MYC amplification was observed in 51.5% of gastric tumor samples. Deletion of one copy of FBXW7 and TP53 was observed in 45.5% and 21.2% of gastric tumors, respectively. MYC mRNA expression was significantly higher in tumors than in non-neoplastic samples. FBXW7 and TP53 mRNA expression was markedly lower in tumors than in paired non-neoplastic specimens. Moreover, deregulated MYC and FBXW7 mRNA expression was associated with the presence of lymph node metastasis and tumor stage III-IV. Additionally, MYC immunostaining was more frequently observed in intestinal-type than diffuse-type gastric cancers and was associated with MYC mRNA expression. In vitro studies showed that increased MYC and reduced FBXW7 expression is associated with a more invasive phenotype in gastric cancer cell lines. This result encouraged us to investigate the activity of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 in both cell lines. Both gelatinases are synthesized predominantly by stromal cells rather than cancer cells, and it has been proposed that both contribute to cancer progression. We observed a significant increase in MMP-9 activity in ACP02 compared with ACP03 cells. These results confirmed that ACP02 cells have greater invasion capability than ACP03 cells. Conclusion In conclusion, FBXW7 and MYC mRNA may play a role in aggressive biologic behavior of gastric cancer cells and may be a useful

  8. Cloning and characterization of rabbit POU5F1, SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC and NANOG pluripotency-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Táncos, Zsuzsanna; Bock, István; Nemes, Csilla; Kobolák, Julianna; Dinnyés, András

    2015-07-25

    While the rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) is an important research model for aspects of human development and disease that cannot be studied in rodents, the lack of data on the genetic regulation of rabbit preimplantation development is a limitation. To assist in the understanding of this process, our aim was to isolate and characterize genes necessary for the induction and maintenance of cellular pluripotency. We are the first to report the isolation of complete coding regions of rabbit SOX2, KLF4, C-MYC and NANOG, which encode transcription factors that play crucial regulatory roles during early mammalian embryonic development. We determined the exon-intron boundaries and chromosomal localization of these genes using computational analysis. The sequences of mRNA and translated protein of the newly identified genes and those of POU5F1 were aligned to their mammalian orthologs to determine the degree of evolutionary conservation. Furthermore, the expression of these genes in embryonic and adult cells was studied at the mRNA and protein levels. We found the sequences and the expression pattern of these pluripotency-associated genes to be highly conserved between human and rabbit, indicating that the rabbit would be a valuable model for human preimplantation development. Implementing the newly identified genes either as biomarkers or as reprogramming factors might also pave the way towards the creation of stable pluripotent rabbit cell lines. PMID:25895477

  9. CCND2, CTNNB1, DDX3X, GLI2, SMARCA4, MYC, MYCN, PTCH1, TP53, and MLL2 gene variants and risk of childhood medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Dahlin, Anna M; Hollegaard, Mads V; Wibom, Carl; Andersson, Ulrika; Hougaard, David M; Deltour, Isabelle; Hjalmars, Ulf; Melin, Beatrice

    2015-10-01

    Recent studies have described a number of genes that are frequently altered in medulloblastoma tumors and that have putative key roles in the development of the disease. We hypothesized that common germline genetic variations in these genes may be associated with medulloblastoma development. Based on recent publications, we selected 10 genes that were frequently altered in medulloblastoma: CCND2, CTNNB1, DDX3X, GLI2, SMARCA4, MYC, MYCN, PTCH1, TP53, and MLL2 (now renamed as KMT2D). Common genetic variants (single nucleotide polymorphisms) annotating these genes (n = 221) were genotyped in germline DNA (neonatal dried blood spot samples) from 243 childhood medulloblastoma cases and 247 control subjects from Sweden and Denmark. Eight genetic variants annotating three genes in the sonic hedgehog signaling pathway; CCND2, PTCH1, and GLI2, were found to be associated with the risk of medulloblastoma (P(combined) < 0.05). The findings were however not statistically significant following correction for multiple testing by the very stringent Bonferroni method. The results do not support our hypothesis that common germline genetic variants in the ten studied genes are associated with the risk of developing medulloblastoma. PMID:26290144

  10. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    SciTech Connect

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated working hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.

  11. c-Myc alters substrate utilization and O-GlcNAc protein posttranslational modifications without altering cardiac function during early aortic constriction

    DOE PAGES

    Ledee, Dolena; Smith, Lincoln; Bruce, Margaret; Kajimoto, Masaki; Isern, Nancy; Portman, Michael A.; Olson, Aaron K.; Bertrand, Luc

    2015-08-12

    Pressure overload cardiac hypertrophy alters substrate metabolism. Prior work showed that myocardial inactivation of c-Myc (Myc) attenuated hypertrophy and decreased expression of metabolic genes after aortic constriction. Accordingly, we hypothesize that Myc regulates substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during pressure overload hypertrophy from transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and that these metabolic changes impact cardiac function and growth. To test this hypothesis, we subjected mice with cardiac specific, inducible Myc inactivation (MycKO-TAC) and non-transgenic littermates (Cont-TAC) to transverse aortic constriction (TAC; n=7/group). A separate group underwent sham surgery (Sham, n=5). After two weeks, function was measured in isolated workingmore » hearts along with substrate fractional contributions to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate with 13C labeled mixed fatty acids, lactate, ketone bodies and unlabeled glucose and insulin. Cardiac function was similar between groups after TAC although +dP/dT and -dP/dT trended towards improvement in MycKO-TAC versus Cont-TAC. Compared to Sham, Cont-TAC had increased free fatty acid fractional contribution with a concurrent decrease in unlabeled (predominately glucose) contribution. The changes in free fatty acid and unlabeled fractional contributions were abrogated by Myc inactivation during TAC (MycKO-TAC). Additionally, protein posttranslational modification by O-GlcNAc was significantly greater in Cont-TAC versus both Sham and MycKO-TAC. Lastly, Myc alters substrate preferences for the citric acid cycle during early pressure overload hypertrophy without negatively affecting cardiac function. Myc also affects protein posttranslational modifications by O-GlcNAc during hypertrophy.« less

  12. Duplicate genes increase gene expression diversity within and between species.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhenglong; Rifkin, Scott A; White, Kevin P; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2004-06-01

    Using microarray gene expression data from several Drosophila species and strains, we show that duplicated genes, compared with single-copy genes, significantly increase gene expression diversity during development. We show further that duplicate genes tend to cause expression divergences between Drosophila species (or strains) to evolve faster than do single-copy genes. This conclusion is also supported by data from different yeast strains.

  13. Recombinant interleukin 2 regulates levels of c-myc mRNA in a cloned murine T lymphocyte.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, J C; Sabath, D E; Hoover, R G; Prystowsky, M B

    1985-01-01

    The cellular oncogene c-myc has been implicated in the regulation of growth of normal and neoplastic cells. Recently, it was suggested that c-myc gene expression may control the G0----G1-phase transition in normal lymphocytes that were stimulated to enter the cell cycle by the lectin concanavalin A (ConA). Here we describe the effects of purified recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL2) and of ConA on levels of c-myc mRNA in the noncytolytic murine T-cell clone L2. In contrast to resting (G0) primary cultures of lymphocytes, quiescent L2 cells have a higher RNA content than resting splenocytes and express receptors for interleukin 2 (IL2). Resting L2 cells are therefore best regarded as early G1-phase cells. Purified rIL2 was found to stimulate the rapid accumulation of c-myc mRNA in L2 cells. Levels of c-myc mRNA became maximal within 1 h and declined gradually thereafter. In contrast, ConA induced slower accumulation of c-myc mRNA in L2 cells, with increased levels of c-myc mRNA becoming detectable 4 to 8 h after stimulation. Experiments with the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide demonstrated that the increase in levels of c-myc mRNA that were induced by ConA was a direct effect of this lectin and not secondary to IL2 production. Cyclosporin A, an immunosuppressive agent, markedly reduced the accumulation of c-myc mRNA that was induced by ConA but only slightly diminished the accumulation of c-myc mRNA that was induced by rIL2. Taken together, these data provide evidence that (i) c-myc gene expression can be regulated by at least two distinct pathways in T lymphocytes, only one of which is sensitive to cyclosporine A, and (ii) the accumulation of c-myc mRNA can be induced in T cells by IL2 during the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Images PMID:3879814

  14. Skp2 Is Necessary for Myc-Induced Keratinocyte Proliferation but Dispensable for Myc Oncogenic Activity in the Oral Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Sistrunk, Christopher; Macias, Everardo; Nakayama, Keiichi; Kim, Yongbaek; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2011-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-Myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Myc accelerates the rate of cell proliferation, at least in part, through its ability to down-regulate the expression of the cell cycle inhibitor p27Kip1. Moreover, p27Kip1 protein levels are regulated by ubiquitin-mediated turnover, leading to destruction by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFSkp2. Therefore, we hypothesize that a lack of Skp2 expression should lead to increased p27Kip1 levels and further inhibition of Myc-mediated proliferation and tumorigenesis. Myc expression in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) led to increased keratinocyte proliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors within the oral cavity. We generated K5-Myc–transgenic mice in an Skp2-null background. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that Myc-mediated keratinocyte hyperproliferation was abolished by the loss of Skp2. However, Skp2 ablation did not affect Myc-driven tumorigenesis because the incidence, latency, and degree of differentiation of oral tumors were identical between K5-Myc/Skp2+/+ and K5-Myc/Skp2−/− mice. Altogether, these findings suggest that Skp2 and p27Kip1 are critical for Myc-driven keratinocyte proliferation; however, Myc-mediated tumorigenesis in the oral epithelium is independent of the Skp2-p27Kip1 axis. PMID:21641375

  15. MYC activation and BCL2L11 silencing by a tumour virus through the large-scale reconfiguration of enhancer-promoter hubs.

    PubMed

    Wood, C David; Veenstra, Hildegonda; Khasnis, Sarika; Gunnell, Andrea; Webb, Helen M; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Andrews, Simon; Osborne, Cameron S; West, Michelle J

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomagenesis in the presence of deregulated MYC requires suppression of MYC-driven apoptosis, often through downregulation of the pro-apoptotic BCL2L11 gene (Bim). Transcription factors (EBNAs) encoded by the lymphoma-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activate MYC and silence BCL2L11. We show that the EBNA2 transactivator activates multiple MYC enhancers and reconfigures the MYC locus to increase upstream and decrease downstream enhancer-promoter interactions. EBNA2 recruits the BRG1 ATPase of the SWI/SNF remodeller to MYC enhancers and BRG1 is required for enhancer-promoter interactions in EBV-infected cells. At BCL2L11, we identify a haematopoietic enhancer hub that is inactivated by the EBV repressors EBNA3A and EBNA3C through recruitment of the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2. Reversal of enhancer inactivation using an EZH2 inhibitor upregulates BCL2L11 and induces apoptosis. EBV therefore drives lymphomagenesis by hijacking long-range enhancer hubs and specific cellular co-factors. EBV-driven MYC enhancer activation may contribute to the genesis and localisation of MYC-Immunoglobulin translocation breakpoints in Burkitt's lymphoma. PMID:27490482

  16. MYC activation and BCL2L11 silencing by a tumour virus through the large-scale reconfiguration of enhancer-promoter hubs

    PubMed Central

    Wood, C David; Veenstra, Hildegonda; Khasnis, Sarika; Gunnell, Andrea; Webb, Helen M; Shannon-Lowe, Claire; Andrews, Simon; Osborne, Cameron S; West, Michelle J

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomagenesis in the presence of deregulated MYC requires suppression of MYC-driven apoptosis, often through downregulation of the pro-apoptotic BCL2L11 gene (Bim). Transcription factors (EBNAs) encoded by the lymphoma-associated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activate MYC and silence BCL2L11. We show that the EBNA2 transactivator activates multiple MYC enhancers and reconfigures the MYC locus to increase upstream and decrease downstream enhancer-promoter interactions. EBNA2 recruits the BRG1 ATPase of the SWI/SNF remodeller to MYC enhancers and BRG1 is required for enhancer-promoter interactions in EBV-infected cells. At BCL2L11, we identify a haematopoietic enhancer hub that is inactivated by the EBV repressors EBNA3A and EBNA3C through recruitment of the H3K27 methyltransferase EZH2. Reversal of enhancer inactivation using an EZH2 inhibitor upregulates BCL2L11 and induces apoptosis. EBV therefore drives lymphomagenesis by hijacking long-range enhancer hubs and specific cellular co-factors. EBV-driven MYC enhancer activation may contribute to the genesis and localisation of MYC-Immunoglobulin translocation breakpoints in Burkitt's lymphoma. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18270.001 PMID:27490482

  17. The c-MYC Protooncogene Expression in Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Palkó, Enikő; Póliska, Szilárd; Csákányi, Zsuzsanna; Katona, Gábor; Karosi, Tamás; Penyige, András; Sziklai, István

    2014-01-01

    Cholesteatoma is an epidermoid cyst, which is most frequently found in the middle ear. The matrix of cholesteatoma is histologically similar to the matrix of the epidermoid cyst of the skin (atheroma); their epithelium is characterized by hyperproliferation. The c-MYC protooncogene located on chromosome 8q24 encodes a transcription factor involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation. Previous studies have found aneuploidy of chromosome 8, copy number variation of c-MYC gene, and the presence of elevated level c-MYC protein in cholesteatoma. In this study we have compared the expression of c-MYC gene in samples taken from the matrix of 26 acquired cholesteatomas (15 children and 11 adults), 15 epidermoid cysts of the skin (atheromas; head and neck region) and 5 normal skin samples (retroauricular region) using RT-qPCR, providing the first precise measurement of the expression of c-MYC gene in cholesteatoma. We have found significantly elevated c-MYC gene expression in cholesteatoma compared to atheroma and to normal skin samples. There was no significant difference, however, in c-MYC gene expression between cholesteatoma samples of children and adults. The significant difference in c-MYC gene expression level in cholesteatoma compared to that of atheroma implies a more prominent hyperproliferative phenotype which may explain the clinical behavior typical of cholesteatoma. PMID:24683550

  18. MYC cofactors: molecular switches controlling diverse biological outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hann, Stephen R

    2014-06-17

    The transcription factor MYC has fundamental roles in proliferation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and stem cell pluripotency. Over the last 30 years extensive information has been gathered on the numerous cofactors that interact with MYC and the target genes that are regulated by MYC as a means of understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling its diverse roles. Despite significant advances and perhaps because the amount of information learned about MYC is overwhelming, there has been little consensus on the molecular functions of MYC that mediate its critical biological roles. In this perspective, the major MYC cofactors that regulate the various transcriptional activities of MYC, including canonical and noncanonical transactivation and transcriptional repression, will be reviewed and a model of how these transcriptional mechanisms control MYC-mediated proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis will be presented. The basis of the model is that a variety of cofactors form dynamic MYC transcriptional complexes that can switch the molecular and biological functions of MYC to yield a diverse range of outcomes in a cell-type- and context-dependent fashion.

  19. The Quest for Targets Executing MYC-Dependent Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Hartl, Markus

    2016-01-01

    MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than 40 upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, further systematic and selective approaches are required for determination of the known or yet unidentified targets responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process, thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression, and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets. Knowledge about essential MYC-regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated. Approaches based on the principle of

  20. The Quest for Targets Executing MYC-Dependent Cell Transformation.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Markus

    2016-01-01

    MYC represents a transcription factor with oncogenic potential converting multiple cellular signals into a broad transcriptional response, thereby controlling the expression of numerous protein-coding and non-coding RNAs important for cell proliferation, metabolism, differentiation, and apoptosis. Constitutive activation of MYC leads to neoplastic cell transformation, and deregulated MYC alleles are frequently observed in many human cancer cell types. Multiple approaches have been performed to isolate genes differentially expressed in cells containing aberrantly activated MYC proteins leading to the identification of thousands of putative targets. Functional analyses of genes differentially expressed in MYC-transformed cells had revealed that so far more than 40 upregulated or downregulated MYC targets are actively involved in cell transformation or tumorigenesis. However, further systematic and selective approaches are required for determination of the known or yet unidentified targets responsible for processing the oncogenic MYC program. The search for critical targets in MYC-dependent tumor cells is exacerbated by the fact that during tumor development, cancer cells progressively evolve in a multistep process, thereby acquiring their characteristic features in an additive manner. Functional expression cloning, combinatorial gene expression, and appropriate in vivo tests could represent adequate tools for dissecting the complex scenario of MYC-specified cell transformation. In this context, the central goal is to identify a minimal set of targets that suffices to phenocopy oncogenic MYC. Recently developed genomic editing tools could be employed to confirm the requirement of crucial transformation-associated targets. Knowledge about essential MYC-regulated genes is beneficial to expedite the development of specific inhibitors to interfere with growth and viability of human tumor cells in which MYC is aberrantly activated. Approaches based on the principle of

  1. Both coding exons of the c-myc gene contribute to its posttranscriptional regulation in the quiescent liver and regenerating liver and after protein synthesis inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Lavenu, A; Pistoi, S; Pournin, S; Babinet, C; Morello, D

    1995-01-01

    In vivo, the steady-state level of c-myc mRNA is mainly controlled by posttranscriptional mechanisms. Using a panel of transgenic mice in which various versions of the human c-myc proto-oncogene were under the control of major histocompatibility complex H-2Kb class I regulatory sequences, we have shown that the 5' and the 3' noncoding sequences are dispensable for obtaining a regulated expression of the transgene in adult quiescent tissues, at the start of liver regeneration, and after inhibition of protein synthesis. These results indicated that the coding sequences were sufficient to ensure a regulated c-myc expression. In the present study, we have pursued this analysis with transgenes containing one or the other of the two c-myc coding exons either alone or in association with the c-myc 3' untranslated region. We demonstrate that each of the exons contains determinants which control c-myc mRNA expression. Moreover, we show that in the liver, c-myc exon 2 sequences are able to down-regulate an otherwise stable H-2K mRNA when embedded within it and to induce its transient accumulation after cycloheximide treatment and soon after liver ablation. Finally, the use of transgenes with different coding capacities has allowed us to postulate that the primary mRNA sequence itself and not c-Myc peptides is an important component of c-myc posttranscriptional regulation. PMID:7623834

  2. CSIG promotes hepatocellular carcinoma proliferation by activating c-MYC expression

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Yuan, Fuwen; Lu, Fengmin; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Tianda; Chen, Xiangmei; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Na; Ma, Liwei; Tong, Tanjun

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence-inhibited gene (CSIG) protein significantly prolongs the progression of replicative senescence, but its role in tumorigenesis is unclear. To reveal the role of CSIG in HCC, we determined its expression in HCC tissues and surrounding tissues and its functions in tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. CSIG protein was overexpressed in 86.4% of the human HCC cancerous tissues as compared with matched surrounding tissues, and its protein expression was greater in HCC cells than the non-transformed hepatic cell line L02. Furthermore, upregulation of CSIG significantly increased the colony formation of SMMC7721 and HepG2 cells, and silencing CSIG could induce cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. The tumorigenic ability of CSIG was confirmed in vivo in a mouse xenograft model. Our results showed that CSIG promoted the proliferation of HepG2 and SMMC7721 cells in vivo. Finally, CSIG protein directly interacted with c-MYC protein and increased c-MYC protein levels; the ubiquitination and degradation of c-MYC protein was increased with knockdown of CSIG. CSIG could also increase the expression of c-MYC protein in SMMC7721 cells in vivo, and it was noted that the level of c-MYC protein was also elevated in most human cancerous tissues with high level of CSIG. PMID:25749381

  3. Transcription-independent functions of MYC: regulation of translation and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael D.; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2013-01-01

    MYC is a potent oncogene that drives unrestrained cell growth and proliferation. Shortly after its discovery as an oncogene, the MYC protein was recognized as a sequence-specific transcription factor. Since that time, MYC oncogene research has focused on the mechanism of MYC-induced transcription and on the identification of MYC transcriptional target genes. Recently, MYC was shown to control protein expression through mRNA translation and to directly regulate DNA replication, thus initiating exciting new areas of oncogene research. PMID:18698328

  4. Normal Expression of a Rearranged and Mutated c-myc Oncogene after Transfection into Fibroblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Adam; Hayday, Adrian

    1989-10-01

    Expression of the c-myc oncogene is deregulated in a variety of malignancies. Rearrangement and mutation of the c-myc locus is a characteristic feature of human Burkitt's lymphoma. Whether deregulation is solely a result of mutation of c-myc or whether it is influenced by the transformed B cell context has not been determined. A translocated and mutated allele of c-myc was stably transfected into fibroblasts. The rearranged allele was expressed indistinguishably from a normal c-myc gene: it had serum-regulated expression, was transcribed with normal promoter preference, and was strongly attenuated. Thus mutations by themselves are insufficient to deregulate c-myc transcription.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor II blocks apoptosis of N-myc2-expressing woodchuck liver epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, D; Faris, R; Hixson, D; Affigne, S; Rogler, C E

    1996-01-01

    N-myc2 and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) are coordinately overexpressed in the great majority of altered hepatic foci, which are the earliest precancerous lesions observed in the liver of woodchuck hepatitis virus carrier woodchucks, and these genes continue to be overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs). We have investigated the function of these genes in woodchuck hepatocarcinogenesis by using a woodchuck liver epithelial cell line (WC-3). WC-3 cells react positively with a monoclonal antibody (12.8.5) against woodchuck oval cells, suggesting a lineage relationship with oval cells. Overexpression of N-myc2 in three WC-3 cell lines caused their morphological transformation and increased their growth rate and saturation density in medium containing 10% serum. Removal of serum from the medium increased cell death of the N-myc2-expressing lines, whereas cell death in control lines was minimal. The death of N-myc2-expressing WC-3 cells was accompanied by nucleosomal fragmentation of cellular DNA, and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) staining revealed condensation and fragmentation of the nuclei, suggesting that N-myc2-expressing WC-3 cells undergo apoptosis in the absence of serum. In colony regression assays, conducted in the absence of serum, control colonies were stable, while N-myc2-expressing colonies regressed to various degrees. Addition of recombinant human IGF-II to the serum-free medium blocked both cell death and colony regression in all the N-myc2-expressing lines. Therefore, coordinate overexpression of N-myc2 and IGF-II in woodchuck altered hepatic foci may allow cells which otherwise might die to survive and progress to hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:8709253

  6. Myc-induced liver tumors in transgenic zebrafish can regress in tp53 null mutation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lili; Nguyen, Anh Tuan; Spitsbergen, Jan M; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is currently one of the top lethal cancers with an increasing trend. Deregulation of MYC in HCC is frequently detected and always correlated with poor prognosis. As the zebrafish genome contains two differentially expressed zebrafish myc orthologs, myca and mycb, it remains unclear about the oncogenicity of the two zebrafish myc genes. In the present study, we developed two transgenic zebrafish lines to over-express myca and mycb respectively in the liver using a mifepristone-inducible system and found that both myc genes were oncogenic. Moreover, the transgenic expression of myca in hepatocytes caused robust liver tumors with several distinct phenotypes of variable severity. ~5% of myca transgenic fish developing multinodular HCC with cirrhosis after 8 months of induced myca expression. Apoptosis was also observed with myca expression; introduction of homozygous tp53(-/-) mutation into the myca transgenic fish reduced apoptosis and accelerated tumor progression. The malignant status of hepatocytes was dependent on continued expression of myca; withdrawal of the mifepristone inducer resulted in a rapid regression of liver tumors, and the tumor regression occurred even in the tp53(-/-) mutation background. Thus, our data demonstrated the robust oncogenicity of zebrafish myca and the requirement of sustained Myc overexpression for maintenance of the liver tumor phenotype in this transgenic model. Furthermore, tumor regression is independent of the function of Tp53.

  7. Synergistic efficacy of sorafenib and genistein in growth inhibition by down regulating angiogenic and survival factors and increasing apoptosis through upregulation of p53 and p21 in malignant neuroblastoma cells having N-Myc amplification or non-amplification.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Subhasree; Karmakar, Surajit; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2010-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is an extracranial, solid, and heterogeneous malignancy in children. The conventional therapeutic modalities are mostly ineffective and thus new therapeutic strategies for malignant neuroblastoma are urgently warranted. We examined the synergistic efficacy of combination of sorafenib (SF) and genistein (GST) in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-DZ (N-Myc amplified) and SH-SY5Y (N-Myc non-amplified) cell lines. MTT assay showed dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and the combination therapy more prominently inhibited the cell proliferation in both cell lines than either treatment alone. Apoptosis was confirmed morphologically by Wright staining. Flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle phase distribution and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining showed increase in subG1 DNA content and early apoptosis, respectively, after treatment with the combination of drugs. Apoptosis was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Combination therapy showed activation of caspase-8, cleavage of Bid to tBid, increase in p53 and p21 expression, down regulation of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1, and increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio to trigger apoptosis. Down regulation of MDR, hTERT, N-Myc, VEGF, FGF-2, NF-κB, p-Akt, and c-IAP2 indicated suppression of angiogenic and survival pathways. Mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and Smac into cytosol indicated involvement of mitochondia in apoptosis. Increases in proteolytic activities of calpain and caspase-3 were also confirmed. Our results suggested that combination of SF and GST inhibited angiogenic and survival factors and increased apoptosis via receptor and mitochondria mediated pathways in both neuroblastoma SK-N-DZ and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Thus, this combination of drugs could be a potential therapeutic strategy against human malignant neuroblastoma cells having N-Myc amplification or non-amplification. PMID:19777160

  8. Synergistic efficacy of sorafenib and genistein in growth inhibition by down regulating angiogenic and survival factors and increasing apoptosis through upregulation of p53 and p21 in malignant neuroblastoma cells having N-Myc amplification or non-amplification.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Subhasree; Karmakar, Surajit; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2010-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is an extracranial, solid, and heterogeneous malignancy in children. The conventional therapeutic modalities are mostly ineffective and thus new therapeutic strategies for malignant neuroblastoma are urgently warranted. We examined the synergistic efficacy of combination of sorafenib (SF) and genistein (GST) in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-DZ (N-Myc amplified) and SH-SY5Y (N-Myc non-amplified) cell lines. MTT assay showed dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and the combination therapy more prominently inhibited the cell proliferation in both cell lines than either treatment alone. Apoptosis was confirmed morphologically by Wright staining. Flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle phase distribution and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining showed increase in subG1 DNA content and early apoptosis, respectively, after treatment with the combination of drugs. Apoptosis was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Combination therapy showed activation of caspase-8, cleavage of Bid to tBid, increase in p53 and p21 expression, down regulation of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1, and increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio to trigger apoptosis. Down regulation of MDR, hTERT, N-Myc, VEGF, FGF-2, NF-κB, p-Akt, and c-IAP2 indicated suppression of angiogenic and survival pathways. Mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and Smac into cytosol indicated involvement of mitochondia in apoptosis. Increases in proteolytic activities of calpain and caspase-3 were also confirmed. Our results suggested that combination of SF and GST inhibited angiogenic and survival factors and increased apoptosis via receptor and mitochondria mediated pathways in both neuroblastoma SK-N-DZ and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Thus, this combination of drugs could be a potential therapeutic strategy against human malignant neuroblastoma cells having N-Myc amplification or non-amplification.

  9. MYC and Mitochondrial Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morrish, Fionnuala; Hockenbery, David

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, face two imperatives concerning biogenesis. The first is the requirement for dividing cells to replicate their mitochondrial content by growth of existing mitochondria. The second is the dynamic regulation of mitochondrial content in response to organismal and cellular cues (e.g., exercise, caloric restriction, energy status, temperature). MYC provides the clearest example of a programmed expansion of mitochondrial content linked to the cell cycle. As an oncogene, MYC also presents intriguing questions about the role of its mitochondrial targets in cancer-related phenotypes, such as the Warburg effect and MYC-dependent apoptosis. PMID:24789872

  10. Burkitt lymphoma and MYC: what else is new?

    PubMed

    Said, Jonathan; Lones, Mark; Yea, Steven

    2014-05-01

    Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents, but at least 30% of cases occur in patients older than 60 years, and the absolute number of BL cases in adults exceeds those in childhood. BL is described as a monomorphic proliferation of medium-sized transformed B cells with round nuclei, clumped chromatin, basophilic cytoplasm, and squared-off cell borders, cytoplasmic vacuoles, medium-sized paracentral nucleoli, and a starry sky pattern. Translocation involving MYC is characteristic but not specific for BL. No single parameter is the gold standard for diagnosis; morphology, cytogenetics, immunophenotype, and gene expression profiles all may contribute to the diagnosis. Although neither EBV nor MYC are sufficient to cause BL there is increasing information from techniques such as complete RNA sequencing that identify essential pathways that are activated in the pathogenesis of BL. These findings suggest novel opportunities for improved therapeutic intervention. PMID:24713985

  11. Otx2 is a target of N-myc and acts as a suppressor of sensory development in the mammalian cochlea.

    PubMed

    Vendrell, Victor; López-Hernández, Iris; Durán Alonso, María Beatriz; Feijoo-Redondo, Ana; Abello, Gina; Gálvez, Héctor; Giráldez, Fernando; Lamonerie, Thomas; Schimmang, Thomas

    2015-08-15

    Transcriptional regulatory networks are essential during the formation and differentiation of organs. The transcription factor N-myc is required for proper morphogenesis of the cochlea and to control correct patterning of the organ of Corti. We show here that the Otx2 gene, a mammalian ortholog of the Drosophila orthodenticle homeobox gene, is a crucial target of N-myc during inner ear development. Otx2 expression is lost in N-myc mouse mutants, and N-myc misexpression in the chick inner ear leads to ectopic expression of Otx2. Furthermore, Otx2 enhancer activity is increased by N-myc misexpression, indicating that N-myc may directly regulate Otx2. Inactivation of Otx2 in the mouse inner ear leads to ectopic expression of prosensory markers in non-sensory regions of the cochlear duct. Upon further differentiation, these domains give rise to an ectopic organ of Corti, together with the re-specification of non-sensory areas into sensory epithelia, and the loss of Reissner's membrane. Therefore, the Otx2-positive domain of the cochlear duct shows a striking competence to develop into a mirror-image copy of the organ of Corti. Taken together, these data show that Otx2 acts downstream of N-myc and is essential for patterning and spatial restriction of the sensory domain of the mammalian cochlea. PMID:26160903

  12. Prognostic and Predictive Significance of MYC and KRAS Alterations in Breast Cancer from Women Treated with Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carolina Rosal Teixeira; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; Rey, Juan Antonio; Carvalho, Antônio Alberto; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Khayat, André Salim; Pinto, Giovanny Rebouças; Demachki, Sâmia; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease, with heterogeneous clinical evolution. Several analyses have been performed to identify the risk factors for breast cancer progression and the patients who respond best to a specific treatment. We aimed to evaluate whether the hormone receptor expression, HER2 and MYC genes and their protein status, and KRAS codon 12 mutations may be prognostic or predictive biomarkers of breast cancer. Protein, gene and mutation status were concomitantly evaluated in 116 breast tumors from women who underwent neoadjuvant chemotherapy with doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide. We observed that MYC expression was associated with luminal B and HER2 overexpression phenotypes compared to luminal A (p<0.05). The presence of MYC duplication or polysomy 8, as well as KRAS mutation, were also associated with the HER2 overexpression subtype (p<0.05). MYC expression and MYC gain were more frequently observed in early-onset compared to late-onset tumors (p<0.05). KRAS mutation was a risk factor of grade 3 tumors (p<0.05). A multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that MYC amplification defined as MYC/nucleus ratio of ≥2.5 was a protective factor for chemotherapy resistance. On the other hand, age and grade 2 tumors were a risk factor. Additionally, luminal B, HER2 overexpression, and triple-negative tumors presented increased odds of being resistant to chemotherapy relative to luminal A tumors. Thus, breast tumors with KRAS codon 12 mutations seem to present a worse prognosis. Additionally, MYC amplification may help in the identification of tumors that are sensitive to doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide treatment. If confirmed in a large set of samples, these markers may be useful for clinical stratification and prognosis. PMID:23555992

  13. L1-CAM knock-down radiosensitizes neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells by simultaneously decreasing MycN, but increasing PTEN protein expression.

    PubMed

    Rached, Johnny; Nasr, Zeina; Abdallah, Jad; Abou-Antoun, Tamara

    2016-10-01

    Childhood neuroblastoma is one of the most malignant types of cancers leading to a high mortality rate. These cancerous cells can be highly metastatic and malignant giving rise to disease recurrence and poor prognosis. The proto-oncogene myelocytomatosis neuroblastoma (MycN) is known to be amplified in this type of cancer, thus, promoting high malignancy and resistance. The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) cleavage has been found upregulated in many types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we explored the interplay between L1-CAM, MycN and PTEN as well as the role played by PDGFR and VEGFR on tumorigenicity in neuroblastoma cells. We investigated the effect of L1-CAM knock-down (KD) and PDGFR/VEGFR inhibition with sunitinib malate (Sutent®) treatment on subsequent tumorsphere formation and cellular proliferation and migration in the MycN-amplified IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. We further examined the effect of combined L1-CAM KD with Sutent treatment or radiotherapy on these cellular functions in our cells. Tumorsphere formation is one of the indicators of aggressiveness in malignant cancers, which was significantly inhibited in IMR-32 cells after L1-CAM KD or Sutent treatment, however, no synergistic effect was observed with dual treatments, rather L1-CAM KD alone showed a greater inhibition on tumorsphere formation compared to Sutent treatment alone. In addition, cellular proliferation and migration were significantly inhibited after L1-CAM KD in the IMR-32 cells with no synergistic effect observed on the rate of cell proliferation when combined with Sutent treatment. Again, L1-CAM KD alone exhibited greater inhibitory effect than Sutent treatment on cell proliferation. L1-CAM KD led to the simultaneous downregulation of MycN, but the upregulation of PTEN protein expression. Notably, radiotherapy (2 Gy) of the IMR-32 cells led to significant upregulation of both L1-CAM and MycN, which was abrogated with L1-CAM KD in our cells. In addition, L1-CAM KD

  14. L1-CAM knock-down radiosensitizes neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells by simultaneously decreasing MycN, but increasing PTEN protein expression.

    PubMed

    Rached, Johnny; Nasr, Zeina; Abdallah, Jad; Abou-Antoun, Tamara

    2016-10-01

    Childhood neuroblastoma is one of the most malignant types of cancers leading to a high mortality rate. These cancerous cells can be highly metastatic and malignant giving rise to disease recurrence and poor prognosis. The proto-oncogene myelocytomatosis neuroblastoma (MycN) is known to be amplified in this type of cancer, thus, promoting high malignancy and resistance. The L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1-CAM) cleavage has been found upregulated in many types of malignant cancers. In the present study, we explored the interplay between L1-CAM, MycN and PTEN as well as the role played by PDGFR and VEGFR on tumorigenicity in neuroblastoma cells. We investigated the effect of L1-CAM knock-down (KD) and PDGFR/VEGFR inhibition with sunitinib malate (Sutent®) treatment on subsequent tumorsphere formation and cellular proliferation and migration in the MycN-amplified IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells. We further examined the effect of combined L1-CAM KD with Sutent treatment or radiotherapy on these cellular functions in our cells. Tumorsphere formation is one of the indicators of aggressiveness in malignant cancers, which was significantly inhibited in IMR-32 cells after L1-CAM KD or Sutent treatment, however, no synergistic effect was observed with dual treatments, rather L1-CAM KD alone showed a greater inhibition on tumorsphere formation compared to Sutent treatment alone. In addition, cellular proliferation and migration were significantly inhibited after L1-CAM KD in the IMR-32 cells with no synergistic effect observed on the rate of cell proliferation when combined with Sutent treatment. Again, L1-CAM KD alone exhibited greater inhibitory effect than Sutent treatment on cell proliferation. L1-CAM KD led to the simultaneous downregulation of MycN, but the upregulation of PTEN protein expression. Notably, radiotherapy (2 Gy) of the IMR-32 cells led to significant upregulation of both L1-CAM and MycN, which was abrogated with L1-CAM KD in our cells. In addition, L1-CAM KD

  15. A Conserved Myc Protein Domain, MBIV, Regulates DNA Binding, Apoptosis, Transformation, and G2 Arrest†

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Victoria H.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Whitfield, Michael L.; Cole, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    The myc family of oncogenes is well conserved throughout evolution. Here we present the characterization of a domain conserved in c-, N-, and L-Myc from fish to humans, N-Myc317-337, designated Myc box IV (MBIV). A deletion of this domain leads to a defect in Myc-induced apoptosis and in some transformation assays but not in cell proliferation. Unlike other Myc mutants, MycΔMBIV is not a simple loss-of-function mutant because it is hyperactive for G2 arrest in primary cells. Microarray analysis of genes regulated by N-MycΔMBIV reveals that it is weakened for transactivation and repression but not nearly as defective as N-MycΔMBII. Although the mutated region is not part of the previously defined DNA binding domain, we find that N-MycΔMBIV has a significantly lower affinity for DNA than the wild-type protein in vitro. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation shows reduced binding of N-MycΔMBIV to some target genes in vivo, which correlates with the defect in transactivation. Thus, this conserved domain has an unexpected role in Myc DNA binding activity. These data also provide a novel separation of Myc functions linked to the modulation of DNA binding activity. PMID:16705173

  16. Transcriptional activation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2.

    PubMed Central

    Gaubatz, S; Imhof, A; Dosch, R; Werner, O; Mitchell, P; Buettner, R; Eilers, M

    1995-01-01

    The Myc protein binds to and transactivates the expression of genes via E-box elements containing a central CAC(G/A)TG sequence. The transcriptional activation function of Myc is required for its ability to induce cell cycle progression, cellular transformation and apoptosis. Here we show that transactivation by Myc is under negative control by the transcription factor AP-2. AP-2 inhibits transactivation by Myc via two distinct mechanisms. First, high affinity binding sites for AP-2 overlap Myc-response elements in two bona fide target genes of Myc, prothymosin-alpha and ornithine decarboxylase. On these sites, AP-2 competes for binding of either Myc/Max heterodimers or Max/Max homodimers. The second mechanism involves a specific interaction between C-terminal domains of AP-2 and the BR/HLH/LZ domain of Myc, but not Max or Mad. Binding of AP-2 to Myc does not preclude association of Myc with Max, but impairs DNA binding of the Myc/Max complex and inhibits transactivation by Myc even in the absence of an overlapping AP-2 binding site. Taken together, our data suggest that AP-2 acts as a negative regulator of transactivation by Myc. Images PMID:7729426

  17. MicroRNA-561 inhibits gastric cancercell proliferation and invasion by downregulating c-Myc expression

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Kun; Mao, Binglang; Zhang, Wei; Chen, Huanwen

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) causes nearly one million deaths worldwide each year. However, the molecular pathway of GC development remains unclear. Increasing evidences have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) are highly associated with tumor development. However, relative little is known about the potential role of miRNAs in gastric cancer development. In the present study, we showed that miR-561 was down-regulated frequently in human GCs cell lines and tissues, and its expression was associated with tumor-node-metastasis (pTNM) stage. Enforced expression of miR-561 in GC cells inhibited cell proliferation and invasion in vitro. In contrast, knockdown of miR-561 had the opposite effect on cell proliferation and invasion. Moreover, c-Myc was identified as a potential miR-561 target. Further studies confirmed that miR-561 suppressed the expression of c-Myc by directly binding to its 3’-untranslated region. Restoration of c-Myc in miR-561-overexpressed GC cells reversed the suppressive effects of miR-561 and c-Myc was inversely correlated with miR-561 expression in GC tissues. These results demonstrate that miR-561 acts as a novel tumor suppressor in GC by targeting c-Myc gene and inhibiting GC cells proliferation and invasion. These findings contribute to current understanding of the functions of miR-561 in GC. PMID:27725860

  18. The jasmonate-responsive AaMYC2 transcription factor positively regulates artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Lu, Xu; Yan, Tingxiang; Fu, Xueqing; Lv, Zongyou; Zhang, Fangyuan; Pan, Qifang; Wang, Guofeng; Sun, Xiaofen; Tang, Kexuan

    2016-06-01

    The plant Artemisia annua is well known due to the production of artemisinin, a sesquiterpene lactone that is widely used in malaria treatment. Phytohormones play important roles in plant secondary metabolism, such as jasmonic acid (JA), which can induce artemisinin biosynthesis in A. annua. Nevertheless, the JA-inducing mechanism remains poorly understood. The expression of gene AaMYC2 was rapidly induced by JA and AaMYC2 binds the G-box-like motifs within the promoters of gene CYP71AV1 and DBR2, which are key structural genes in the artemisinin biosynthetic pathway. Overexpression of AaMYC2 in A. annua significantly activated the transcript levels of CYP71AV1 and DBR2, which resulted in an increased artemisinin content. By contrast, artemisinin content was reduced in the RNAi transgenic A. annua plants in which the expression of AaMYC2 was suppressed. Meanwhile, the RNAi transgenic A. annua plants showed lower sensitivity to methyl jasmonate treatment than the wild-type plants. These results demonstrate that AaMYC2 is a positive regulator of artemisinin biosynthesis and is of great value in genetic engineering of A. annua for increased artemisinin production. PMID:26864531

  19. TRRAP-Dependent and TRRAP-Independent Transcriptional Activation by Myc Family Oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Mikhail A.; Chandriani, Sanjay; Park, Jeonghyeon; Kotenko, Iulia; Matheos, Dina; Johnsson, Anna; McMahon, Steven B.; Cole, Michael D.

    2002-01-01

    We demonstrate that transformation-transactivation domain-associated protein (TRRAP) binding and the recruitment of histone H3 and H4 acetyltransferase activities are required for the transactivation of a silent telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene in exponentially growing human fibroblasts by c-Myc or N-Myc protein. However, recruitment of TRRAP by c- or N-Myc is dispensable for the partial induction of several basally expressed genes in exponentially growing primary and immortalized fibroblasts. Furthermore, recruitment of TRRAP is required for c-Myc- or N-Myc-mediated oncogenic transformation but not for the partial restoration of the growth defect in myc-null fibroblasts. A segment of the adenovirus E1A protein fused to a transformation-defective N-Myc protein carrying a small deletion in the transactivation domain specifically restores interaction with TRRAP, activates the silent TERT gene, induces acetylation of histones H3 and H4 at the TERT promoter, and transforms primary cells. Accordingly, wild-type L-Myc is much less efficient in TRRAP binding, activation of the silent TERT gene, and transformation of primary fibroblasts. Nevertheless, L-Myc is a potent activator of several basally expressed genes and can fully restore the growth defect of myc-null cells. These results suggest a differential requirement for TRRAP for several Myc-mediated activities. PMID:12077335

  20. Polycomb mediates Myc autorepression and its transcriptional control of many loci in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Goodliffe, Julie M.; Wieschaus, Eric; Cole, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant accumulation of the Myc oncoprotein propels proliferation and induces carcinogenesis. In normal cells, however, an abundance of Myc protein represses transcription at the c-myc locus. Cancer cells often lose this autorepression. We examined the control of myc in Drosophila and show here that the Drosophila ortholog, dmyc, also undergoes autorepression. We find that the developmental repressor Polycomb (Pc) is required for dmyc autorepression, and that this Pc-dMyc-mediated repression spreads across an 875-kb region encompassing the dmyc gene. To further investigate the relationship between Myc and Polycomb, we used microarrays to identify genes regulated by each, and identify a striking relationship between the two: A large set of dMyc activation targets is normally repressed by Pc, and 73% of dMyc repression targets require Pc for this repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that many dMyc-Pc-repressed loci have an epigenetic mark recognized by Pc. Our results suggest a novel relationship between Myc and Polycomb, wherein Myc enhances Polycomb repression in order to repress targets, and Myc suppresses Polycomb repression in order to activate targets. PMID:16357214

  1. Addiction to Runx1 is partially attenuated by loss of p53 in the Eμ-Myc lymphoma model

    PubMed Central

    Borland, Gillian; Kilbey, Anna; Hay, Jodie; Gilroy, Kathryn; Terry, Anne; Mackay, Nancy; Bell, Margaret; McDonald, Alma; Mills, Ken; Cameron, Ewan; Neil, James C.

    2016-01-01

    The Runx genes function as dominant oncogenes that collaborate potently with Myc or loss of p53 to induce lymphoma when over-expressed. Here we examined the requirement for basal Runx1 activity for tumor maintenance in the Eμ-Myc model of Burkitt's lymphoma. While normal Runx1fl/fl lymphoid cells permit mono-allelic deletion, primary Eμ-Myc lymphomas showed selection for retention of both alleles and attempts to enforce deletion in vivo led to compensatory expansion of p53null blasts retaining Runx1. Surprisingly, Runx1 could be excised completely from established Eμ-Myc lymphoma cell lines in vitro without obvious effects on cell phenotype. Established lines lacked functional p53, and were sensitive to death induced by introduction of a temperature-sensitive p53 (Val135) allele. Transcriptome analysis of Runx1-deleted cells revealed a gene signature associated with lymphoid proliferation, survival and differentiation, and included strong de-repression of recombination-activating (Rag) genes, an observation that was mirrored in a panel of human acute leukemias where RUNX1 and RAG1,2 mRNA expression were negatively correlated. Notably, despite their continued growth and tumorigenic potential, Runx1null lymphoma cells displayed impaired proliferation and markedly increased sensitivity to DNA damage and dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, validating Runx1 function as a potential therapeutic target in Myc-driven lymphomas regardless of their p53 status. PMID:27056890

  2. p19ARF is a critical mediator of both cellular senescence and an innate immune response associated with MYC inactivation in mouse model of acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yetil, Alper; Anchang, Benedict; Gouw, Arvin M.; Adam, Stacey J.; Zabuawala, Tahera; Parameswaran, Ramya; van Riggelen, Jan; Plevritis, Sylvia; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    MYC-induced T-ALL exhibit oncogene addiction. Addiction to MYC is a consequence of both cell-autonomous mechanisms, such as proliferative arrest, cellular senescence, and apoptosis, as well as non-cell autonomous mechanisms, such as shutdown of angiogenesis, and recruitment of immune effectors. Here, we show, using transgenic mouse models of MYC-induced T-ALL, that the loss of either p19ARF or p53 abrogates the ability of MYC inactivation to induce sustained tumor regression. Loss of p53 or p19ARF, influenced the ability of MYC inactivation to elicit the shutdown of angiogenesis; however the loss of p19ARF, but not p53, impeded cellular senescence, as measured by SA-beta-galactosidase staining, increased expression of p16INK4A, and specific histone modifications. Moreover, comparative gene expression analysis suggested that a multitude of genes involved in the innate immune response were expressed in p19ARF wild-type, but not null, tumors upon MYC inactivation. Indeed, the loss of p19ARF, but not p53, impeded the in situ recruitment of macrophages to the tumor microenvironment. Finally, p19ARF null-associated gene signature prognosticated relapse-free survival in human patients with ALL. Therefore, p19ARF appears to be important to regulating cellular senescence and innate immune response that may contribute to the therapeutic response of ALL. PMID:25784651

  3. Biological characterization of adult MYC-translocation-positive mature B-cell lymphomas other than molecular Burkitt lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aukema, Sietse M; Kreuz, Markus; Kohler, Christian W; Rosolowski, Maciej; Hasenclever, Dirk; Hummel, Michael; Küppers, Ralf; Lenze, Dido; Ott, German; Pott, Christiane; Richter, Julia; Rosenwald, Andreas; Szczepanowski, Monika; Schwaenen, Carsten; Stein, Harald; Trautmann, Heiko; Wessendorf, Swen; Trümper, Lorenz; Loeffler, Markus; Spang, Rainer; Kluin, Philip M; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2014-04-01

    Chromosomal translocations affecting the MYC oncogene are the biological hallmark of Burkitt lymphomas but also occur in a subset of other mature B-cell lymphomas. If accompanied by a chromosomal break targeting the BCL2 and/or BCL6 oncogene these MYC translocation-positive (MYC(+)) lymphomas are called double-hit lymphomas, otherwise the term single-hit lymphomas is applied. In order to characterize the biological features of these MYC(+) lymphomas other than Burkitt lymphoma we explored, after exclusion of molecular Burkitt lymphoma as defined by gene expression profiling, the molecular, pathological and clinical aspects of 80 MYC-translocation-positive lymphomas (31 single-hit, 46 double-hit and 3 MYC(+)-lymphomas with unknown BCL6 status). Comparison of single-hit and double-hit lymphomas revealed no difference in MYC partner (IG/non-IG), genomic complexity, MYC expression or gene expression profile. Double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-cell-like gene expression profile and had higher IGH and MYC mutation frequencies. Gene expression profiling revealed 130 differentially expressed genes between BCL6(+)/MYC(+) and BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas. BCL2(+)/MYC(+) double-hit lymphomas more frequently showed a germinal center B-like gene expression profile. Analysis of all lymphomas according to MYC partner (IG/non-IG) revealed no substantial differences. In this series of lymphomas, in which immunochemotherapy was administered in only a minority of cases, single-hit and double-hit lymphomas had a similar poor outcome in contrast to the outcome of molecular Burkitt lymphoma and lymphomas without the MYC break. Our data suggest that, after excluding molecular Burkitt lymphoma and pediatric cases, MYC(+) lymphomas are biologically quite homogeneous with single-hit and double-hit lymphomas as well as IG-MYC and non-IG-MYC(+) lymphomas sharing various molecular characteristics.

  4. Strategically targeting MYC in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Posternak, Valeriya; Cole, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    MYC is a major driver of cancer cell growth and mediates a transcriptional program spanning cell growth, the cell cycle, metabolism, and cell survival. Many efforts have been made to deliberately target MYC for cancer therapy. A variety of compounds have been generated to inhibit MYC function or stability, either directly or indirectly. The most direct inhibitors target the interaction between MYC and MAX, which is required for DNA binding. Unfortunately, these compounds do not have the desired pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for in vivo application. Recent studies report the indirect inhibition of MYC through the development of two compounds, JQ1 and THZ1, which target factors involved in unique stages of transcription. These compounds appear to have significant therapeutic value for cancers with high levels of MYC, although some effects are MYC-independent. These approaches serve as a foundation for developing novel compounds to pharmacologically target MYC-driven cancers. PMID:27081479

  5. Strategically targeting MYC in cancer.

    PubMed

    Posternak, Valeriya; Cole, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    MYC is a major driver of cancer cell growth and mediates a transcriptional program spanning cell growth, the cell cycle, metabolism, and cell survival. Many efforts have been made to deliberately target MYC for cancer therapy. A variety of compounds have been generated to inhibit MYC function or stability, either directly or indirectly. The most direct inhibitors target the interaction between MYC and MAX, which is required for DNA binding. Unfortunately, these compounds do not have the desired pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics for in vivo application. Recent studies report the indirect inhibition of MYC through the development of two compounds, JQ1 and THZ1, which target factors involved in unique stages of transcription. These compounds appear to have significant therapeutic value for cancers with high levels of MYC, although some effects are MYC-independent. These approaches serve as a foundation for developing novel compounds to pharmacologically target MYC-driven cancers. PMID:27081479

  6. Regulation by c-Myc of ncRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Kenneth, Niall S; White, Robert J

    2009-02-01

    Deregulated activity of the proto-oncogene product c-Myc is instrumental in promoting many human cancers. As it is a transcription factor, priority has been given to identifying the genes that it regulates. Until recently, all the attention was focused on protein-encoding genes. It is now clear, however, that c-Myc also controls the production of many non-coding (nc) RNAs, including tRNA, rRNA and miRNAs. This involves it regulating the transcriptional activity of three different RNA polymerases. These ncRNAs are likely to contribute substantially to the complex biology and pathology that is associated with c-Myc.

  7. SAP155-mediated splicing of FUSE-binding protein-interacting repressor serves as a molecular switch for c-myc gene expression.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Kazuyuki; Kajiwara, Toshiko; Tamura, Mai; Satoh, Mamoru; Tanaka, Nobuko; Tomonaga, Takeshi; Matsubara, Hisahiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Rei; Ito, Akihiro; Kubo, Shuji; Natsume, Tohru; Levens, David; Yoshida, Minoru; Nomura, Fumio

    2012-06-01

    The Far UpStream Element (FUSE)-binding protein-interacting repressor (FIR), a c-myc transcriptional suppressor, is alternatively spliced removing the transcriptional repression domain within exon 2 (FIRΔexon2) in colorectal cancers. SAP155 is a subunit of the essential splicing factor 3b (SF3b) subcomplex in the spliceosome. This study aims to study the significance of the FIR-SAP155 interaction for the coordination of c-myc transcription, pre-mRNA splicing, and c-Myc protein modification, as well as to interrogate FIRΔexon2 for other functions relating to altered FIR pre-mRNA splicing. Knockdown of SAP155 or FIR was used to investigate their reciprocal influence on each other and on c-myc transcription, pre-mRNA splicing, and protein expression. Pull down from HeLa cell nuclear extracts revealed the association of FIR, FIRΔexon2, and SF3b subunits. FIR and FIRΔexon2 were coimmunoprecipitated with SAP155. FIR and FIRΔexon2 adenovirus vector (Ad-FIR and Ad-FIRΔexon2, respectively) were prepared to test for their influence on c-myc expression. FIR, SAP155, SAP130, and c-myc were coordinately upregulated in human colorectal cancer. These results reveal that SAP155 and FIR/FIRΔexon2 form a complex and are mutually upregulating. Ad-FIRΔexon2 antagonized Ad-FIR transcriptional repression of c-myc in HeLa cells. Because FIRΔexon2 still carries RRM1 and RRM2 and binding activity to FUSE, it is able to displace repression competent FIR from FUSE in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, thus thwarting FIR-mediated transcriptional repression by FUSE. Thus aberrant FIRΔexon2 production in turn sustained c-Myc expression. In conclusion, altered FIR and c-myc pre-mRNA splicing, in addition to c-Myc expression by augmented FIR/FIRΔexon2-SAP155 complex, potentially contribute to colorectal cancer development.

  8. The adenoviral E1A N-terminal domain represses MYC transcription in human cancer cells by targeting both p300 and TRRAP and inhibiting MYC promoter acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M.; Green, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers frequently arise from increased expression of proto-oncogenes, such as MYC and HER2. Understanding the cellular pathways regulating the transcription and expression of proto-oncogenes is important for targeted therapies for cancer treatment. Adenoviral (Ad) E1A 243R (243 aa residues) is a viral oncoprotein that interacts with key regulators of gene transcription and cell proliferation. We have shown previously that the 80 amino acid N-terminal transcriptional repression domain of E1A 243R (E1A 1-80) can target the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) p300 and repress HER2 in the HER2-overexpressing human breast cancer cell line SKBR3. Expression of E1A 1-80 induces death of SKBR3 and other cancer cell lines. In this study, we performed total cell RNA sequence analysis and identified MYC as the regulatory gene for cellular proliferation most strongly repressed by E1A 1-80. By RT-quantitative PCR analysis we show that repression of MYC in SKBR3 cells occurs early after expression of E1A 1-80, suggesting that MYC may be an early responder of E1A 1-80-mediated transcriptional repression. Of interest, while E1A 1-80 repression of MYC occurs in all eight human cancer cell lines examined, repression of HER2 is cell-type dependent. We demonstrate by ChIP analysis that MYC transcriptional repression by E1A 1-80 is associated with inhibition of acetylation of H3K18 and H4K16 on the MYC promoter, as well as inhibition of RNA Pol II binding to the MYC promoter. Deletion mutant analysis of E1A 1-80 suggests that both p300/CBP and TRRAP are involved in E1A 1-80 repression of MYC transcription. Further, E1A 1-80 interaction with p300/CBP and TRRAP is correlated with inhibition of H3K18 and H4K16 acetylation on the MYC promoter, respectively. Our results indicate that E1A 1-80 may target two important pathways for histone modification to repress transcription in human cancer cells. PMID:27382434

  9. Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Steven; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2014-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein is among the most attractive of cancer targets given that is deregulated in the majority of tumors and that its inhibition profoundly affects their growth and/or survival. However, its role as a seldom-mutated transcription factor, its lack of enzymatic activity for which suitable pharmaceutical inhibitors could be crafted and its expression by normal cells have largely been responsible for its being viewed as “undruggable”. Work over the past several years, however, has begun to reverse this idea by allowing us to view Myc within the larger context of global gene regulatory control. Thus, Myc and its obligate heterodimeric partner, Max, are integral to the coordinated recruitment and post-translational modification of components of the core transcriptional machinery. Moreover, Myc over-expression re-programs numerous critical cellular functions and alters the cell’s susceptibility to their inhibition. This new knowledge has therefore served as a framework upon which to develop new pharmaceutical approaches. These include the continuing development of small molecules which act directly to inhibit the critical Myc-Max interaction, those which act indirectly to prevent Myc-directed post-translational modifications necessary to initiate productive transcription and those which inhibit vital pathways upon which the Myc-transformed cell is particularly reliant. PMID:24657798

  10. Bin1 mediates apoptosis by c-Myc in transformed primary cells.

    PubMed

    DuHadaway, J B; Sakamuro, D; Ewert, D L; Prendergast, G C

    2001-04-01

    The Bin1 gene encodes a c-Myc-interacting adapter protein with tumor suppressor and cell death properties. In this study, we offer evidence that Bin1 participates in a mechanism through which c-Myc activates programmed cell death in transformed primary chick or rat cells. Antisense or dominant inhibitory Bin1 genes did not affect the ability of c-Myc to drive proliferation or transformation, but they did reduce the susceptibility of cells to c-Myc-induced apoptosis. Protein-protein interaction was implicated, suggesting that Bin1 mediates a death or death sensitization signal from c-Myc. Our findings offer direct support for the "dual signal" model of Myc apoptotic function, based on interactions with a binding protein. Loss of Bin1 in human tumors may promote malignant progression in part by helping to stanch the death penalty associated with c-Myc activation.

  11. Cadmium Activates Multiple Signaling Pathways That Coordinately Stimulate Akt Activity to Enhance c-Myc mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jia-Shiuan; Chao, Cheng-Han; Lin, Lih-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium is a known environmental carcinogen. Exposure of Cd leads to the activation of several proto-oncogenes in cells. We investigated here the mechanism of c-Myc expression in hepatic cells under Cd treatment. The c-Myc protein and mRNA levels increased in dose- and time-dependent manners in HepG2 cells with Cd treatment. This increase was due to an increase in c-Myc mRNA stability. To explore the mechanism involved in enhancing the mRNA stability, several cellular signaling factors that evoked by Cd treatment were analyzed. PI3K, p38, ERK and JNK were activated by Cd. However, ERK did not participate in the Cd-induced c-Myc expression. Further analysis revealed that mTORC2 was a downstream factor of p38. PI3K, JNK and mTORC2 coordinately activated Akt. Akt was phosphorylated at Thr450 in the untreated cells. Cd treatment led to additional phosphorylation at Thr308 and Ser473. Blocking any of the three signaling factors resulted in the reduction of phosphorylation level at all three Akt sites. The activated Akt phosphorylated Foxo1 and allowed the modified protein to translocate into the cytoplasm. We conclude that Cd-induced accumulation of c-Myc requires the activation of several signaling pathways. The signals act coordinately for Akt activation and drive the Foxo1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Reduction of Foxo1 in the nucleus reduces the transcription of its target genes that may affect c-Myc mRNA stability, resulting in a higher accumulation of the c-Myc proteins. PMID:26751215

  12. Overexpression of c-Myc alters G(1)/S arrest following ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Joon-Ho; Dickson, Robert B

    2002-03-01

    Study of the mechanism(s) of genomic instability induced by the c-myc proto-oncogene has the potential to shed new light on its well-known oncogenic activity. However, an underlying mechanism(s) for this phenotype is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the effects of c-Myc overexpression on the DNA damage-induced G(1)/S checkpoint, in order to obtain mechanistic insights into how deregulated c-Myc destabilizes the cellular genome. The DNA damage-induced checkpoints are among the primary safeguard mechanisms for genomic stability, and alterations of cell cycle checkpoints are known to be crucial for certain types of genomic instability, such as gene amplification. The effects of c-Myc overexpression were studied in human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) as one approach to understanding the c-Myc-induced genomic instability in the context of mammary tumorigenesis. Initially, flow-cytometric analyses were used with two c-Myc-overexpressing, nontransformed immortal lines (184A1N4 and MCF10A) to determine whether c-Myc overexpression leads to alteration of cell cycle arrest following ionizing radiation (IR). Inappropriate entry into S phase was then confirmed with a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation assay measuring de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Direct involvement of c-Myc overexpression in alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was then confirmed by utilizing the MycER construct, a regulatable c-Myc. A transient excess of c-Myc activity, provided by the activated MycER, was similarly able to induce the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Significantly, the transient expression of full-length c-Myc in normal mortal HMECs also facilitated entry into S phase and the inappropriate de novo DNA synthesis following IR. Furthermore, irradiated, c-Myc-infected, normal HMECs developed a sub-G(1) population and a >4N population of cells. The c-Myc-induced alteration of the G(1)/S checkpoint was also compared to the effects of expression of MycS (N

  13. MIF loss impairs Myc-induced lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Talos, F; Mena, P; Fingerle-Rowson, G; Moll, U; Petrenko, O

    2005-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a potent regulator of inflammation and cell growth. Using the Emu-Myc lymphoma mouse model, we demonstrate that loss of MIF markedly delays the onset of B-cell lymphoma development in vivo. The molecular basis for this MIF-loss-induced phenotype is the perturbed DNA-binding activity of E2F factors and the concomitantly enhanced tumor suppressor activity of the p53 pathway. Accordingly, premalignant MIF-null Emu-Myc B-cells are predisposed to delayed S-phase progression and increased apoptosis. MIF-deficient lymphomas that do arise under these conditions contain frequent ARF deletions and p53 inactivating mutations. Conversely, MIF expression is retained in tumors developed by wild-type Emu-Myc animals, and the presence of one or both MIF alleles is sufficient to accelerate the development of Myc-induced lymphomas. Collectively, these results indicate that MIF promotes Myc-mediated tumorigenesis, at least in the B-lymphoid compartment, and implicate MIF as a mediator of malignant cell growth in vivo.

  14. Perfusion of veins at arterial pressure increases the expression of KLF5 and cell cycle genes in smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Amirak, Emre; Zakkar, Mustafa; Evans, Paul C.; Kemp, Paul R.

    2010-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation remains a major cause of veno-arterial graft failure. We hypothesised that exposure of venous SMCs to arterial pressure would increase KLF5 expression and that of cell cycle genes. Porcine jugular veins were perfused at arterial or venous pressure in the absence of growth factors. The KLF5, c-myc, cyclin-D and cyclin-E expression were elevated within 24 h of perfusion at arterial pressure but not at venous pressure. Arterial pressure also reduced the decline in SM-myosin heavy chain expression. These data suggest a role for KLF5 in initiating venous SMCs proliferation in response to arterial pressure.

  15. MYC Deregulation in Gastric Cancer and Its Clinicopathological Implications

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Carolina Rosal Teixeira; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Costa Sozinho, Eliana Kelly; Borges, Bárbara do Nascimento; Montenegro, Raquel Carvalho; dos Santos, Ândrea Kely Campos Ribeiro; dos Santos, Sidney Emanuel Batista; Ribeiro, Helem Ferreira; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; de Arruda Cardoso Smith, Marília; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2013-01-01

    Our study investigated the relationship between MYC alterations and clinicopathological features in gastric cancers. We evaluated the effect of MYC mRNA expression and its protein immunoreactivity, as well as copy number variation, promoter DNA methylation, and point mutations, in 125 gastric adenocarcinoma and 67 paried non-neoplastic tissues. We observed that 77% of the tumors presented MYC immunoreactivity which was significantly associated with increased mRNA expression (p<0.05). These observations were associated with deeper tumor extension and the presence of metastasis (p<0.05). MYC protein expression was also more frequently observed in intestinal-type than in diffuse-type tumors (p<0.001). Additionally, MYC mRNA and protein expression were significantly associated with its copy number (p<0.05). The gain of MYC copies was associated with late-onset, intestinal-type, advanced tumor stage, and the presence of distant metastasis (p<0.05). A hypomethylated MYC promoter was detected in 86.4% of tumor samples. MYC hypomethylation was associated with diffuse-type, advanced tumor stage, deeper tumor extension, and the presence of lymph node metastasis (p<0.05). Moreover, eighteen tumor samples presented at least one known mutation. The presence of MYC mutations was associated with diffuse-type tumor (p<0.001). Our results showed that MYC deregulation was mainly associated with poor prognostic features and also reinforced the presence of different pathways involved in intestinal-type and diffuse-type gastric carcinogenesis. Thus, our findings suggest that MYC may be a useful marker for clinical stratification and prognosis. PMID:23717612

  16. Extra c-myc oncogene copies in high risk cutaneous malignant melanoma and melanoma metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kraehn, G M; Utikal, J; Udart, M; Greulich, K M; Bezold, G; Kaskel, P; Leiter, U; Peter, R U

    2001-01-01

    Amplification and overexpression of the c-myc gene have been associated with neoplastic transformation in a plethora of malignant tumours. We applied interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a locus-specific probe for the c-myc gene (8q24) in combination with a corresponding chromosome 8 α-satellite probe to evaluate genetic alterations in 8 primary melanomas and 33 advanced melanomas and compared it to 12 melanocytic nevi, 7 safety margins and 2 cases of normal skin. Additionally, in metaphase spreads of 7 melanoma cell lines a whole chromosome 8 paint probe was used. We investigated the functionality of the c-myc gene by detecting c-myc RNA expression with RT-PCR and c-myc protein by immunohistochemistry. 4/8 primary melanomas and 11/33 melanoma metastases showed additional c-myc signals relative to the centromere of chromosome 8 copy number. None of the nevi, safety margins or normal skin samples demonstrated this gain. In 2/7 melanoma cell lines (C32 and WM 266–4) isochromosome 8q formation with a relative gain of c-myc copies and a loss of 8p was observed. The highest c-myc gene expression compared to GAPDH was found in melanoma metastases (17.5%). Nevi (6.6%) and primary melanomas (5.0%) expressed the c-myc gene on a lower level. 72.7% of the patients with c-myc extra copies had visceral melanoma metastases (UICC IV), patients without c-myc gain in 35.0% only. The collective with additional c-myc copies also expressed the gene on a significantly higher level. These results indicate that a c-myc gain in relation to the centromere 8 copy number might be associated with advanced cutaneous melanoma. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11139316

  17. Oncogenic Myc Induces Expression of Glutamine Synthetase through Promoter Demethylation.

    PubMed

    Bott, Alex J; Peng, I-Chen; Fan, Yongjun; Faubert, Brandon; Zhao, Lu; Li, Jinyu; Neidler, Sarah; Sun, Yu; Jaber, Nadia; Krokowski, Dawid; Lu, Wenyun; Pan, Ji-An; Powers, Scott; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Hatzoglou, Maria; Murphy, Daniel J; Jones, Russell; Wu, Song; Girnun, Geoffrey; Zong, Wei-Xing

    2015-12-01

    c-Myc is known to promote glutamine usage by upregulating glutaminase (GLS), which converts glutamine to glutamate that is catabolized in the TCA cycle. Here we report that in a number of human and murine cells and cancers, Myc induces elevated expression of glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL), also termed glutamine synthetase (GS), which catalyzes the de novo synthesis of glutamine from glutamate and ammonia. This is through upregulation of a Myc transcriptional target thymine DNA glycosylase (TDG), which promotes active demethylation of the GS promoter and its increased expression. Elevated expression of GS promotes cell survival under glutamine limitation, while silencing of GS decreases cell proliferation and xenograft tumor growth. Upon GS overexpression, increased glutamine enhances nucleotide synthesis and amino acid transport. These results demonstrate an unexpected role of Myc in inducing glutamine synthesis and suggest a molecular connection between DNA demethylation and glutamine metabolism in Myc-driven cancers.

  18. Cyclin D1 inhibits whereas c-Myc enhances the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in mouse pancreatic cancer cells via regulation of several members of the NF-κB and Bcl-2 families

    PubMed Central

    El-Kady, Ayman; Sun, Yuan; Li, Ying-xia; Liao, D Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Background: Cisplatin (CDDP) is a drug used for treatment of many types of malignancy but pancreatic cancer is relatively resistant to it. This study aims to determine whether and how cyclin D1 (D1) and c-Myc influence the response of pancreatic cancer cells to CDDP. Materials and Methods: Ela-mycPT mouse pancreatic cancer cells were transfected with D1 or c-myc cDNA and treated with CDDP alone or together with NPCD, an inhibitor of cyclin dependent ckinase (CDK) 4 and 6. Reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot assays were used to determine the mRNA and protein levels of interested genes. Cell viability was determined using 3-(4, 5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results: Treatment of Ela-mycPT1 cells with CDDP caused an increase in c-myc expression but a slightly latent decrease in D1 expression, whereas D1 and c-Myc proteins repressed each other. D1 or c-Myc rendered Ela-mycPT1 cells resistant or sensitive, respectively, to CDDP. D1 induced the expression of several members of the NF-κB family, including RelA, RelB, Nfκb1 and Nfκb2. D1 also induced BIRC5 and several pro-survival members of the Bcl-2 gene family, including Bcl-2 , Mcl-1 and Bad while it decreased the level of the pro-apoptotic Noxa. Inhibition of CDK4 or CDK6 kinase activity by NPCD did not affect these effects of D1. In contrast, c-Myc in Ela-mycPT1 and Ela-mycPT4 cells has the opposite effects to D1 on the expression of most of these apoptosis regulating genes. Conclusion: Our results suggest that induction of c-Myc and inhibition of D1 may be mechanisms for CDDP to elicit cytotoxicity. On the other hand, D1 induces whereas c-Myc represses the expression of key NF-κB family members to induce and repress, respectively, the expression of BIRC5 and several Bcl-2 family members, in turn inhibiting or enhancing the response to CDDP. PMID:22190866

  19. Identification of N-myc regulatory regions involved in embryonic expression.

    PubMed

    Charron, Jean; Gagnon, Jean-François; Cadrin-Girard, Jean François

    2002-01-01

    Our knowledge on the regulation of the N-myc proto-oncogene expression comes mostly from in vitro studies. Very few in vivo analyses have been performed to identify the regulatory elements involved in N-myc developmental expression. In the present study, we defined DNA regions required for the regulated expression of N-myc during early embryogenesis. We showed that the expression of N-myc driven by the human N-myc sequences previously described to control N-myc expression in appropriate cell types in vitro cannot rescue the mouse N-myc mutant phenotype, suggesting that regulatory elements necessary for N-myc embryonic expression were missing. To identify the regulatory DNA regions involved in N-myc expression, transgenic mouse lines carrying N-myc/lacZ reporter constructs were generated. Beta-galactosidase staining analysis at different stages of gestation revealed that >16 kb of mouse N-myc genomic sequences are required to recapitulate the entire spatiotemporal expression pattern of the endogenous N-myc gene between embryonic d 8.5 and 11.5. This observation supported the notion that the sequences previously identified by in vitro assays were not sufficient to reproduce the N-myc embryonic expression pattern. However, regulatory elements that can direct specific expression in the visceral arches, the limb buds, the CNS, and the dorsal root ganglia are included into the mouse N-myc genomic sequences tested. Altogether, these findings indicated that the regulation of the spatiotemporal expression pattern of N-myc during development necessitates multiple regulatory DNA elements. PMID:11756639

  20. Lack of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4 Inhibits c-myc Tumorigenic Activities in Epithelial Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Macias, Everardo; Rounbehler, Robert; Sicinski, Piotr; Kiyokawa, Hiroaki; Johnson, David G.; Conti, Claudio J.; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2004-01-01

    The proto-oncogene c-myc encodes a transcription factor that is implicated in the regulation of cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and that has also been found to be deregulated in several forms of human and experimental tumors. We have shown that forced expression of c-myc in epithelial tissues of transgenic mice (K5-Myc) resulted in keratinocyte hyperproliferation and the development of spontaneous tumors in the skin and oral cavity. Although a number of genes involved in cancer development are regulated by c-myc, the actual mechanisms leading to Myc-induced neoplasia are not known. Among the genes regulated by Myc is the cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) gene. Interestingly, previous studies from our laboratory showed that the overexpression of CDK4 led to keratinocyte hyperproliferation, although no spontaneous tumor development was observed. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that CDK4 may be one of the critical downstream genes involved in Myc carcinogenesis. Our results showed that CDK4 inhibition in K5-Myc transgenic mice resulted in the complete inhibition of tumor development, suggesting that CDK4 is a critical mediator of tumor formation induced by deregulated Myc. Furthermore, a lack of CDK4 expression resulted in marked decreases in epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation compared to the results obtained for K5-Myc littermates. Biochemical analysis of the K5-Myc epidermis showed that CDK4 mediates the proliferative activities of Myc by sequestering p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 and thereby indirectly activating CDK2 kinase activity. These results show that CDK4 mediates the proliferative and oncogenic activities of Myc in vivo through a mechanism that involves the sequestration of specific CDK inhibitors. PMID:15314163

  1. High level amplification of N-MYC is not associated with adverse histology or outcome in primary retinoblastoma tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lillington, D M; Goff, L K; Kingston, J E; Onadim, Z; Price, E; Domizio, P; Young, B D

    2002-01-01

    Twenty-five primary retinoblastoma tumours were analysed by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine the genomic copy number of the N-MYC gene (2p24) relative to the copy number for REL, B2M, ALB, AF10 and MLL. Twenty-one of these tumours were shown by Comparative Genomic Hybridization to contain variable copy number increases of chromosomal material mapping to 2p. High level amplification (>30-fold) of N-MYC was found in three tumours, none of which showed adverse histological features and all patients are surviving at between 54 and 108 months post enucleation. Furthermore, the three tumours associated with metastasis and adverse patient outcome showed normal N-MYC copy number. Although high level amplification of N-MYC is an unfavourable prognostic indicator in neuroblastoma, these data show no evidence of a correlation between amplification of N-MYC and adverse outcome in retinoblastoma. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 87, 779–782. doi:10.1038/sj.bjc.6600532 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:12232763

  2. Myeloblastic leukemia cells conditionally blocked by myc-estrogen receptor chimeric transgenes for terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Selvakumaran, M; Liebermann, D; Hoffman-Liebermann, B

    1993-05-01

    Conditional mutants of the myeloblastic leukemic M1 cell line, expressing the chimeric mycer transgene, have been established. It is shown that M1 mycer cells, like M1, undergo terminal differentiation coupled to growth arrest and programmed cell death (apoptosis) after treatment with the physiologic differentiation inducer interleukin-6. However, when beta-estradiol is included in the culture medium, M1 mycer cells respond to differentiation inducers like M1 myc cell lines, where the differentiation program is blocked at an intermediate stage. By manipulating the function of the mycer transgene product, it is shown that there is a 10-hour window during myeloid differentiation, from 30 to 40 hours after the addition of the differentiation inducer, when the terminal differentiation program switches from being dependent on c-myc suppression to becoming c-myc suppression independent, where activation of c-myc has no apparent effect on mature macrophages. M1 mycer cell lines provide a powerful tool to increase our understanding of the role of c-myc in normal myelopoiesis and in leukemogenesis, also providing a strategy to clone c-myc target genes.

  3. Acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein is required for cooperation with the HTLV-1 p30{sup II} accessory protein and the induction of oncogenic cellular transformation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC

    SciTech Connect

    Romeo, Megan M.; Ko, Bookyung; Kim, Janice; Brady, Rebecca; Heatley, Hayley C.; He, Jeffrey; Harrod, Carolyn K.; Barnett, Braden; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.; Martinez, Ernest; Lüscher, Bernhard; Robson, Craig N.; Henriksson, Marie; Harrod, Robert

    2015-02-15

    The human T-cell leukemia retrovirus type-1 (HTLV-1) p30{sup II} protein is a multifunctional latency-maintenance factor that negatively regulates viral gene expression and deregulates host signaling pathways involved in aberrant T-cell growth and proliferation. We have previously demonstrated that p30{sup II} interacts with the c-MYC oncoprotein and enhances c-MYC-dependent transcriptional and oncogenic functions. However, the molecular and biochemical events that mediate the cooperation between p30{sup II} and c-MYC remain to be completely understood. Herein we demonstrate that p30{sup II} induces lysine-acetylation of the c-MYC oncoprotein. Acetylation-defective c-MYC Lys→Arg substitution mutants are impaired for oncogenic transformation with p30{sup II} in c-myc{sup −/−} HO15.19 fibroblasts. Using dual-chromatin-immunoprecipitations (dual-ChIPs), we further demonstrate that p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC-containing nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed HuT-102 T-lymphocytes. Moreover, p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in proliferating cells expressing c-MYC under conditions of genotoxic stress. These findings suggest that c-MYC-acetylation is required for the cooperation between p30{sup II}/c-MYC which could promote proviral replication and contribute to HTLV-1-induced carcinogenesis. - Highlights: • Acetylation of c-MYC is required for oncogenic transformation by HTLV-1 p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • Acetylation-defective c-MYC mutants are impaired for foci-formation by p30{sup II}/c-MYC. • The HTLV-1 p30{sup II} protein induces lysine-acetylation of c-MYC. • p30{sup II} is present in c-MYC nucleoprotein complexes in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. • HTLV-1 p30{sup II} inhibits apoptosis in c-MYC-expressing proliferating cells.

  4. Down-regulation of Myc is essential for terminal erythroid maturation.

    PubMed

    Jayapal, Senthil Raja; Lee, Kian Leong; Ji, Peng; Kaldis, Philipp; Lim, Bing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2010-12-17

    Terminal differentiation of mammalian erythroid progenitors involves 4-5 cell divisions and induction of many erythroid important genes followed by chromatin and nuclear condensation and enucleation. The protein levels of c-Myc (Myc) are reduced dramatically during late stage erythroid maturation, coinciding with cell cycle arrest in G(1) phase and enucleation, suggesting possible roles for c-Myc in either or both of these processes. Here we demonstrate that ectopic Myc expression affects terminal erythroid maturation in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of Myc at physiological levels did not affect erythroid differentiation or cell cycle shutdown but specifically blocked erythroid nuclear condensation and enucleation. Continued Myc expression prevented deacetylation of several lysine residues in histones H3 and H4 that are normally deacetylated during erythroid maturation. The histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 was up-regulated by Myc, and ectopic Gcn5 expression partially blocked enucleation and inhibited the late stage erythroid nuclear condensation and histone deacetylation. When overexpressed at levels higher than the physiological range, Myc blocked erythroid differentiation, and the cells continued to proliferate in cytokine-free, serum-containing culture medium with an early erythroblast morphology. Gene expression analysis demonstrated the dysregulation of erythropoietin signaling pathway and the up-regulation of several positive regulators of G(1)-S cell cycle checkpoint by supraphysiological levels of Myc. These results reveal an important dose-dependent function of Myc in regulating terminal maturation in mammalian erythroid cells.

  5. SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b played similar but irreplaceable roles in regulating the biosynthesis of tanshinones and phenolic acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yangyun; Sun, Wei; Chen, Junfeng; Tan, Hexin; Xiao, Ying; Li, Qing; Ji, Qian; Gao, Shouhong; Chen, Li; Chen, Shilin; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Wansheng

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, which contains tanshinones and phenolic acids as major classes of bioactive components, is one of the most widely used herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. Production of tanshinones and phenolic acids is enhanced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Transcription factor MYC2 is the switch of jasmontes signaling in plants. Here, we focused on two novel JA-inducible genes in S. miltiorrhiza, designated as SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b, which were localized in the nucleus. SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b were also discovered to interact with SmJAZ1 and SmJAZ2, implying that the two MYC2s might function as direct targets of JAZ proteins. Ectopic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown experiments suggested that SmMYC2a/b affected multiple genes in tanshinone and phenolic acid biosynthetic pathway. Besides, the accumulation of tanshinones and phenolic acids was impaired by the loss of function in SmMYC2a/b. Meanwhile, SmMYC2a could bind with an E-box motif within SmHCT6 and SmCYP98A14 promoters, while SmMYC2b bound with an E-box motif within SmCYP98A14 promoter, through which the regulation of phenolic acid biosynthetic pathway might achieve. Together, these results suggest that SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b are JAZ-interacting transcription factors that positively regulate the biosynthesis of tanshinones and Sal B with similar but irreplaceable effects. PMID:26947390

  6. SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b played similar but irreplaceable roles in regulating the biosynthesis of tanshinones and phenolic acids in Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yangyun; Sun, Wei; Chen, Junfeng; Tan, Hexin; Xiao, Ying; Li, Qing; Ji, Qian; Gao, Shouhong; Chen, Li; Chen, Shilin; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Wansheng

    2016-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, which contains tanshinones and phenolic acids as major classes of bioactive components, is one of the most widely used herbs in traditional Chinese medicine. Production of tanshinones and phenolic acids is enhanced by methyl jasmonate (MeJA). Transcription factor MYC2 is the switch of jasmontes signaling in plants. Here, we focused on two novel JA-inducible genes in S. miltiorrhiza, designated as SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b, which were localized in the nucleus. SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b were also discovered to interact with SmJAZ1 and SmJAZ2, implying that the two MYC2s might function as direct targets of JAZ proteins. Ectopic RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown experiments suggested that SmMYC2a/b affected multiple genes in tanshinone and phenolic acid biosynthetic pathway. Besides, the accumulation of tanshinones and phenolic acids was impaired by the loss of function in SmMYC2a/b. Meanwhile, SmMYC2a could bind with an E-box motif within SmHCT6 and SmCYP98A14 promoters, while SmMYC2b bound with an E-box motif within SmCYP98A14 promoter, through which the regulation of phenolic acid biosynthetic pathway might achieve. Together, these results suggest that SmMYC2a and SmMYC2b are JAZ-interacting transcription factors that positively regulate the biosynthesis of tanshinones and Sal B with similar but irreplaceable effects. PMID:26947390

  7. c-myc RNA degradation in growing and differentiating cells: Possible alternate pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Swartwout, S.G. ); Kinniburgh, A.J. . Dept. of Hematology Research)

    1989-01-01

    Transcripts of the proto-oncogene c-myc are composed of a rapidly degraded polyadenylated RNA species and an apparently much more stable, nonadenylated RNA species. In this report, the extended kinetics of c-myc RNA turnover have been examined in rapidly growing cells and in cells induced to differentiate. When transcription was blocked with actinomycin D in rapidly growing cells, poly(A)/sup +/ c-myc was rapidly degraded (t/sub 1/2/ = 12 min). c-myc RNA lacking poly (A) initially remained at or near control levels; however, after 80 to 90 min it was degraded with kinetics similar to those of poly (A)/sup +/ c-myc RNA. These bizarre kinetics are due to the deadenylation of poly (A)/sup +/ c-myc RNA to form poly (A)/sup -/ c-myc, thereby initially maintaining the poly (A)/sup -/ c-myc RNA pool when transcription is blocked. In contrast to growing cells, cells induced to differentiate degraded both poly (A)/sup +/ and poly (A)/sup -/ c-myc RNA rapidly. The rapid disappearance of both RNA species in differentiating cells suggests that a large proportion of the poly (A)/sup +/ c-myc RNA was directly degraded without first being converted to poly (A)/sup -/ c-myc RNA. Others have shown that transcriptional elongation of the c-myc gene is rapidly blocked in differentiating cells. The authors therefore hypothesize that in differentiating cells a direct, rapid degradation of poly (A)/sup +/ c-myc RNA may act as a backup or fail-safe system to ensure that c-myc protein is not synthesized.

  8. B Lymphocyte commitment program is driven by the proto-oncogene c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Vallespinós, Mireia; Fernández, David; Rodríguez, Lorena; Alvaro-Blanco, Josué; Baena, Esther; Ortiz, Maitane; Dukovska, Daniela; Martínez, Dolores; Rojas, Ana; Campanero, Miguel R; Moreno de Alborán, Ignacio

    2011-06-15

    c-Myc, a member of the Myc family of transcription factors, is involved in numerous biological functions including the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis in various cell types. Of all of its functions, the role of c-Myc in cell differentiation is one of the least understood. We addressed the role of c-Myc in B lymphocyte differentiation. We found that c-Myc is essential from early stages of B lymphocyte differentiation in vivo and regulates this process by providing B cell identity via direct transcriptional regulation of the ebf-1 gene. Our data show that c-Myc influences early B lymphocyte differentiation by promoting activation of B cell identity genes, thus linking this transcription factor to the EBF-1/Pax-5 pathway.

  9. IS THE AMPLIFICATION OF c-MYC, MLL AND RUNX1 GENES IN AML AND MDS PATIENTS WITH TRISOMY 8, 11 AND 21 A FACTOR FOR A CLONAL EVOLUTION IN THEIR KARYOTYPE?

    PubMed

    Angelova, S; Spassov, B; Nikolova, V; Christov, I; Tzvetkov, N; Simeonova, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was 1) to define if the amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes is related to the progressive changes of the karyotype in patients with AML and MDS with trisomy 8, 11 and 21 (+8, +11 and +21) in bone marrow and 2) can that amplification be accepted as part of the clonal evolution (CE). Karyotype analysis was performed in 179 patients with AML or MDS with the different chromosomal aberrations (CA) aged 16-81. The findings were distributed as follow: initiating balanced CA (n = 60), aneuploidia (n = 55), unbalanced CA (n = 64). Amplification of c-MYC, MLL and RUNX1 genes by means of fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was found in 35% (7 out of 20) of AML and MDS patients with +8, +11 u +21 as single CA in their karyotype; in 63.6% of pts (7 out of 11)--with additional numerical or structural CA and in 75% (9 out of 12)--with complex karyotype. We assume that the amplification of the respective chromosomal regions in patients with +8, +11 and +21 is related to CE. Considering the amplification as a factor of CE, we established 3 patterns of karyotype development depending on the type of the initiating CA in it. Significant statistical differences were found between the three patterns regarding the karyotype distribution in the different stages of progression (p < 0.001). PMID:26214902

  10. Premetazoan ancestry of the Myc-Max network.

    PubMed

    Young, Susan L; Diolaiti, Daniel; Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki; Eisenman, Robert N; King, Nicole

    2011-10-01

    The origin of metazoans required the evolution of mechanisms for maintaining differentiated cell types within a multicellular individual, in part through spatially differentiated patterns of gene transcription. The unicellular ancestor of metazoans was presumably capable of regulating gene expression temporally in response to changing environmental conditions, and spatial cell differentiation in metazoans may represent a co-option of preexisting regulatory mechanisms. Myc is a critical regulator of cell growth, proliferation, and death that is found in all metazoans but absent in other multicellular lineages, including fungi and plants. Homologs of Myc and its binding partner, Max, exist in two of the closest living relatives of animals, the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis (Mb) and Capsaspora owczarzaki, a unicellular opisthokont that is closely related to metazoans and choanoflagellates. We find that Myc and Max from M. brevicollis heterodimerize and bind to both canonical and noncanonical E-boxes, the DNA-binding sites through which metazoan Myc proteins act. Moreover, in M. brevicollis, MbMyc protein can be detected in nuclear and flagellar regions. Like metazoan Max proteins, MbMax can form homodimers that bind to E-boxes. However, cross-species dimerization between Mb and human Myc and Max proteins was not observed, suggesting that the binding interface has diverged. Our results reveal that the Myc/Max network arose before the divergence of the choanoflagellate and metazoan lineages. Furthermore, core features of metazoan Myc function, including heterodimerization with Max, binding to E-box sequences in DNA, and localization to the nucleus, predate the origin of metazoans.

  11. Effects of c-myc expression on cell cycle progression.

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, K D; Shichiri, M; Follansbee, M R; Sedivy, J M

    1994-01-01

    We used targeted homologous recombination to disrupt one c-myc gene copy in a diploid fibroblast cell line and found that a twofold reduction in Myc expression resulted in lower exponential growth rates and a lengthening of the G0-to-S-phase transition (M. Shichiri, K. D. Hanson and J. M. Sedivy, Cell Growth Differ. 4:93-104, 1993). Myc is a transcription factor, and the number of target genes whose regulation could result in differential growth rates may be very large. We have approached this problem by examining effects of reduced c-myc expression in three broad areas: (i) secretion of growth factors, (ii) expression of growth factor receptors, and (iii) intracellular signal transduction between Myc and components of the intrinsic cell cycle clock. We have found no evidence that differential medium conditioning can account for the growth phenotypes. Likewise, the expression of receptors for platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor I was the same in diploid and heterozygous cells (platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, and insulin-like growth factor are the sole growth factors required by these cells for growth in serum-free medium). In contrast, expression of cyclin E, cyclin A, and Rb phosphorylation were delayed when quiescent c-myc heterozygous cells were stimulated to enter the cell cycle. Expression of cyclin D1, cyclin D3, and Cdk2 was not affected. The timing of cyclin E induction was the earliest observable effect of reduced Myc expression. Our data indicate that Myc contributes to regulation of proliferation by a cell-autonomous mechanism that involves the modulation of cyclin E expression and, consequently, progression through the restriction point of the cell cycle. Images PMID:8065309

  12. Unsaturated fatty acids bind Myc-Max transcription factor and inhibit Myc-Max-DNA complex formation.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sunah; Park, Seyeon; Yang, Chul Hak

    2002-12-15

    Oncoprotein Myc, hetero-dimerized with Max through a b/HLH/Zip region, is a transcription factor that governs important cellular processes such as cell cycle entry, proliferation and differentiation. We found that linoleic acid, isolated from Pollen Typhae, and other unsaturated fatty acids have strong inhibitory effects on the binding of Myc-Max heterodimer to an E-box DNA site (CA(C/T)GTG). The interaction of a fatty acid with a protein dimer, not with DNA, is assumed to block the entire Myc-Max-DNA complex formation. Unsaturated fatty acids also showed cytotoxicity against a SNU16 human stomach cancer cell line and conjugated linoleic acid suppressed mRNA expression of several myc-target genes; ornithine decarboxylase, p53, cdc25a in the SNU16 cells.

  13. Deregulated c-myc expression overrides IFN gamma-induced macrophage growth arrest.

    PubMed

    Vairo, G; Vadiveloo, P K; Royston, A K; Rockman, S P; Rock, C O; Jackowski, S; Hamilton, J A

    1995-05-18

    Induction of c-myc gene expression is an essential response to growth promoting agents, including colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF-1). Down regulation of c-myc expression occurs in response to a variety of negative growth regulators in many cell types. However, for many of these systems the causal link between c-myc down regulation and growth arrest remains to be established. Here we show for CSF-1-dependent BAC1.2F5 mouse macrophages that interferon-gamma (IFN gamma) results in a midlate G1 phase decrease of CSF-1-dependent c-myc mRNA and subsequent cell cycle arrest. Introduction of a deregulated c-myc gene into these cells, which prevents the IFN gamma-mediated decrease in c-myc expression, overrides the cell cycle arrest and restores CSF-1-dependent growth in the presence of the cytokine. This result contrasts with the macrophage growth arrest induced by cAMP elevation, which also suppresses c-myc expression, but is not overcome by a deregulated c-myc gene. These results show that inhibition of c-myc expression is an essential component in IFN gamma-mediated cell cycle arrest and demonstrates that distinct mechanisms contribute to IFN gamma- and cAMP-mediated growth arrest in macrophages.

  14. Small Molecule Microarrays Enable the Identification of a Selective, Quadruplex-Binding Inhibitor of MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC plays a pivotal role in cancer initiation, progression, and maintenance. However, it has proven difficult to develop small molecule inhibitors of MYC. One attractive route to pharmacological inhibition of MYC has been the prevention of its expression through small molecule-mediated stabilization of the G-quadruplex (G4) present in its promoter. Although molecules that bind globally to quadruplex DNA and influence gene expression are well-known, the identification of new chemical scaffolds that selectively modulate G4-driven genes remains a challenge. Here, we report an approach for the identification of G4-binding small molecules using small molecule microarrays (SMMs). We use the SMM screening platform to identify a novel G4-binding small molecule that inhibits MYC expression in cell models, with minimal impact on the expression of other G4-associated genes. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and thermal melt assays demonstrated that this molecule binds reversibly to the MYC G4 with single digit micromolar affinity, and with weaker or no measurable binding to other G4s. Biochemical and cell-based assays demonstrated that the compound effectively silenced MYC transcription and translation via a G4-dependent mechanism of action. The compound induced G1 arrest and was selectively toxic to MYC-driven cancer cell lines containing the G4 in the promoter but had minimal effects in peripheral blood mononucleocytes or a cell line lacking the G4 in its MYC promoter. As a measure of selectivity, gene expression analysis and qPCR experiments demonstrated that MYC and several MYC target genes were downregulated upon treatment with this compound, while the expression of several other G4-driven genes was not affected. In addition to providing a novel chemical scaffold that modulates MYC expression through G4 binding, this work suggests that the SMM screening approach may be broadly useful as an approach for the identification of new G4-binding small

  15. Mnt-Max to Myc-Max complex switching regulates cell cycle entry.

    PubMed

    Walker, William; Zhou, Zi-Qiang; Ota, Sara; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Hurlin, Peter J

    2005-05-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein is strongly induced during the G0 to S-phase transition and is an important regulator of cell cycle entry. In contrast to c-Myc, the putative Myc antagonist Mnt is maintained at a constant level during cell cycle entry. Mnt and Myc require interaction with Max for specific DNA binding at E-box sites, but have opposing transcriptional activities. Here, we show that c-Myc induction during cell cycle entry leads to a transient decrease in Mnt-Max complexes and a transient switch in the ratio of Mnt-Max to c-Myc-Max on shared target genes. Mnt overexpression suppressed cell cycle entry and cell proliferation, suggesting that the ratio of Mnt-Max to c-Myc-Max is critical for cell cycle entry. Furthermore, simultaneous Cre-Lox mediated deletion of Mnt and c-Myc in mouse embryo fibroblasts rescued the cell cycle entry and proliferative block caused by c-Myc ablation alone. These results demonstrate that Mnt-Myc antagonism plays a fundamental role in regulating cell cycle entry and proliferation.

  16. Hepadnavirus integration: mechanisms of activation of the N-myc2 retrotransposon in woodchuck liver tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Y; Fourel, G; Ponzetto, A; Silvestro, M; Tiollais, P; Buendia, M A

    1992-01-01

    In persistent hepadnavirus infections, a distinctive feature of woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is the coupling of frequent viral integrations into myc family genes with the rapid onset of primary liver tumors. We have investigated the patterns of WHV DNA insertion into N-myc2, a newly identified retroposed oncogene, in woodchuck hepatomas resulting from either natural or experimental infections. In both cases, integrated viral sequences were preferentially associated with the N-myc2 locus. In more than 40% of the woodchuck tumors analyzed, viral insertion sites were clustered in a 3-kb region upstream of N-myc2 or in the 3' noncoding region. Insertion of WHV sequences homologous to the human hepatitis B virus enhancers, either upstream or downstream of the N-myc2 coding domain, was associated with the production of normal N-myc2 mRNA or hybrid N-myc2-WHV transcripts, initiated at the normal N-myc2 transcriptional start site. Transient-transfection assays with different N-myc2-WHV constructs in HepG2 cells demonstrated that the viral enhancers could efficiently activate the N-myc2 promoter. These results, showing that cis activation of preferred cellular targets through enhancer insertion is a common strategy for tumor induction by WHV, emphasize the previously noted similarities between hepadnaviruses and nonacute oncogenic retroviruses. Images PMID:1323693

  17. An improved method for the derivation of high quality iPSCs in the absence of c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Habib, Omer; Habib, Gizem; Choi, Hyun Woo; Hong, Ki-Sung; Do, Jeong Tae; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Chung, Hyung-Min

    2013-12-10

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold tremendous potential for the development of new regenerative medicine therapies and the study of molecular mechanisms of pluripotency and development. However, reactivation of c-Myc, which results in tumor formation in chimeric mice, is a major roadblock in the translation of iPSCs into therapies. Although ectopic expression of c-Myc is not absolutely required for somatic reprogramming, in the absence of c-Myc, the overall efficiency of reprogramming is drastically reduced and the reprogramming time is increased. Subtle, abnormal epigenetic modifications in iPSCs derived in the absence of c-Myc have also been documented. Therefore, we developed a reprogramming method without c-Myc to generate high-quality iPSCs, a prerequisite to harnessing the full potential of iPSCs. In this study, we determined that serum replacement (SR)-based culture conditions dramatically increased the transcription factor-mediated reprogramming of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs). The process was shortened to approximately 8 days when Oct4/Sox2/Klf4 (3F)-transduced MEFs were first cultured for 3 days under low serum conditions (LS protocol). The 3F-derived iPSCs that were generated by this method resembled mouse ES cells (mESCs) in morphology, gene expression, and in vitro differentiation. Finally, we observed that 3F-derived iPSC colonies were able to reach definite pluripotency in terms of molecular signatures when the catalytic function of c-Myc was tolerated. The 3F induction of pluripotency described here should facilitate the use of iPSCs and may also facilitate the mechanistic dissection of somatic reprogramming. PMID:24095950

  18. CUDR promotes liver cancer stem cell growth through upregulating TERT and C-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Pu, Hu; Zheng, Qidi; Li, Haiyan; Wu, Mengying; An, Jiahui; Gui, Xin; Li, Tianming; Lu, Dongdong

    2015-01-01

    Cancer up-regulated drug resistant (CUDR) is a novel non-coding RNA gene. Herein, we demonstrate excessive CUDR cooperates with excessive CyclinD1 or PTEN depletion to accelerate liver cancer stem cells growth and liver stem cell malignant transformation in vitro and in vivo. Mechanistically, we reveal the decrease of PTEN in cells may lead to increase binding capacity of CUDR to CyclinD1. Therefore, CUDR-CyclinD1 complex loads onto the long noncoding RNA H19 promoter region that may lead to reduce the DNA methylation on H19 promoter region and then to enhance the H19 expression. Strikingly, the overexpression of H19 increases the binding of TERT to TERC and reduces the interplay between TERT with TERRA, thus enhancing the cell telomerase activity and extending the telomere length. On the other hand, insulator CTCF recruits the CUDR-CyclinD1 complx to form the composite CUDR-CyclinD1-insulator CTCF complex which occupancied on the C-myc gene promoter region, increasing the outcome of oncogene C-myc. Ultimately, excessive TERT and C-myc lead to liver cancer stem cell and hepatocyte-like stem cell malignant proliferation. To understand the novel functions of long noncoding RNA CUDR will help in the development of new liver cancer therapeutic and diagnostic approaches. PMID:26513297

  19. Comparative analysis of the expression and oncogenic activities of Xenopus c-, N-, and L-myc homologs.

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber-Agus, N; Torres, R; Horner, J; Lau, A; Jamrich, M; DePinho, R A

    1993-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-based cloning strategy allowed for the isolation of two distinct Xenopus L-myc genes, as well as previously isolated xc- and xN-myc genes, thus demonstrating that these three well-defined members of the mammalian myc gene family are present in lower vertebrates as well. Comparison of the Xenopus and mammalian Myc families revealed a high degree of structural relatedness at the gene and protein levels; this homology was consistent with the ability of the xc-myc1 and xN-myc1 genes to function as oncogenes in primary mammalian cells. In contrast, the xL-myc1 gene was found to be incapable of transforming rat embryo fibroblast cells, and this inactivity may relate to localized but significant differences in its putative transactivation domain. Analysis of xc-, xN-, and xL-myc gene expression demonstrated that (i) all three genes were highly expressed during oogenesis and their transcripts accumulated as abundant maternal mRNAs, (ii) each gene exhibited a distinctive pattern of expression during embryogenesis and in adult tissues, and (iii) the xL-myc1 and xL-myc2 genes were coordinately expressed in the maternal and zygotic genomes. The markedly high expression of the Xenopus myc gene family in differentiated tissues, such as the central nervous system and kidney, contrasts sharply with the low levels observed in mammalian adult tissues. These differences may reflect unique functions of the Myc family proteins in processes specific to amphibians, such as tissue regeneration. Images PMID:8455622

  20. EGFR gene copy number increase in vulvar carcinomas is linked with poor clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Woelber, L; Hess, S; Bohlken, H; Tennstedt, P; Eulenburg, C; Simon, R; Gieseking, F; Jaenicke, F; Mahner, S; Choschzick, M

    2012-02-01

    EGFR copy number increases have been frequently reported in cancer including vulvar carcinomas. Co-amplification of cancer genes plays an important role in the development of many tumour types. To better understand the effect of EGFR aberrations on vulvar cancer phenotype and patient prognosis, the authors analysed EGFR copy number changes using fluorescence in situ hybridisation and EGFR expression by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray containing 183 squamous cell carcinomas of vulva. Furthermore, the authors analysed the co-amplification frequency of EGFR with HER2, CCND1, MYC and PIK3CA, respectively. EGFR copy number increase was found in 39.3% of the tumours. Seventeen per cent of vulvar carcinomas showed EGFR high polysomy including 9% with amplification of the EGFR gene. Copy number gain of the EGFR locus was associated with non-basaloid phenotype (p=0.03), high-tumour stage (p<0.001), human papillomaviruse negativity of tumours (p=0.04) and the number of lymph node metastases (p=0.02). EGFR protein expression was statistically correlated to EGFR copy number increase (p<0.05). The observed co-amplification rate of EGFR with all four additionally examined oncogenes was much higher than statistically expected. There was a highly significant association between EGFR copy number increase and CCND1 amplifications (p<0.001) as well as the total number of gene amplifications (p=0.04). EGFR copy number gains were significantly related to unfavourable patient outcome in univariate analysis and multivariate Cox regression analysis. In conclusion, EGFR copy number increases are detectable in a substantial proportion of vulvar carcinomas with relationships to advanced tumour stages and the development of lymph node metastases. EGFR copy number aberrations are connected to other gene amplifications and probably define an human papillomaviruses-independent pathway in the development of vulvar carcinomas. These data support the potential utility of EGFR inhibitors

  1. The Essential Cofactor TRRAP Recruits the Histone Acetyltransferase hGCN5 to c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Steven B.; Wood, Marcelo A.; Cole, Michael D.

    2000-01-01

    The c-Myc protein functions as a transcription factor to facilitate oncogenic transformation; however, the biochemical and genetic pathways leading to transformation remain undefined. We demonstrate here that the recently described c-Myc cofactor TRRAP recruits histone acetylase activity, which is catalyzed by the human GCN5 protein. Since c-Myc function is inhibited by recruitment of histone deacetylase activity through Mad family proteins, these opposing biochemical activities are likely to be responsible for the antagonistic biological effects of c-Myc and Mad on target genes and ultimately on cellular transformation. PMID:10611234

  2. Upregulation of c-MYC in cis through a Large Chromatin Loop Linked to a Cancer Risk-Associated Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism in Colorectal Cancer Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jason B.; Brown, Seth J.; Cole, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have mapped many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are linked to cancer risk, but the mechanism by which most SNPs promote cancer remains undefined. The rs6983267 SNP at 8q24 has been associated with many cancers, yet the SNP falls 335 kb from the nearest gene, c-MYC. We show that the beta-catenin-TCF4 transcription factor complex binds preferentially to the cancer risk-associated rs6983267(G) allele in colon cancer cells. We also show that the rs6983267 SNP has enhancer-related histone marks and can form a 335-kb chromatin loop to interact with the c-MYC promoter. Finally, we show that the SNP has no effect on the efficiency of chromatin looping to the c-MYC promoter but that the cancer risk-associated SNP enhances the expression of the linked c-MYC allele. Thus, cancer risk is a direct consequence of elevated c-MYC expression from increased distal enhancer activity and not from reorganization/creation of the large chromatin loop. The findings of these studies support a mechanism for intergenic SNPs that can promote cancer through the regulation of distal genes by utilizing preexisting large chromatin loops. PMID:20065031

  3. Elevated levels of a specific class of nuclear phosphoproteins in cells transformed with v-ras and v-mos oncogenes and by cotransfection with c-myc and polyoma middle T genes.

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, V; Pani, B; D'Andrea, P; Berlingieri, M T; Di Fiore, P P; Fusco, A; Vecchio, G; Philp, R; Crane-Robinson, C; Nicolas, R H

    1987-01-01

    Transformation of a rat thyroid epithelial cell line (FRTL5-C12) with Kirsten and Harvey murine sarcoma viruses (carrying the ras oncogenes) results in elevated levels of three perchloric acid-soluble nuclear phosphoproteins. These three proteins are also induced to high levels in the PC-C13 thyroid epithelial cell line when transformed by the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus (carrying the v-mos oncogene) and when transformed by transfection with the c-myc proto-oncogene followed by infection with the polyoma leukaemia virus (PyMuLV) carry the polyoma middle T antigen gene. Neither c-myc or PyMuLV alone induced high levels of the three nuclear proteins. Untransformed thyroid fibroblasts have high levels of two of the three proteins and can be transformed by PyMuLV alone resulting in the appearance of the third protein. Transformation with Harvey sarcoma virus also results in the induction of the third protein. The three phosphoproteins have been purified by h.p.l.c. and shown to be related to the HeLa protein HMGI already described. The results of these studies indicate that elevated levels of these HMGI-like proteins are associated with neoplastic transformation and/or with an undifferentiated phenotype. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2820715

  4. miR-451 suppresses bladder cancer cell migration and invasion via directly targeting c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Zhao, Xiaomei; Shi, Jianhua; Pan, Yiwei; Chen, Qinghai; Leng, Pengfei; Wang, Yan

    2016-10-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) expression is shown dysregulated in tumors. It has been reported that miR-451 alters gene expression and regulates tumorigenesis in various cancer tissues. However, its underlying biological significance in bladder cancer remains to be clarified. In the present study, we investigated the function and molecular mechanism of miR-451 involved in bladder cancer cell migration and invasion. Our results showed that miR-451 was downregulated in clinical bladder carcinoma tissues compared with adjacent bladder tissues. Overexpression of miR-451 significantly retarded the proliferation, migration and invasion of bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells in vitro. Moreover, the attenuated cell migration and invasion by miR-451 was correlated with increased apoptosis. However, our dual-luciferase reporter assay validated that c-Myc, an oncogene in many tumors, was a direct target gene of miR-451 in bladder cancer. The expression of c-Myc was repressed by miR-451 in bladder cancer cells, and knockdown of c-Myc mimicked the effects of miR-451 overexpression. This discovery suggested that miR-451 is a tumor suppressor modulating bladder cancer cell migration and invasion by directly targeting c-Myc. In addition, apoptosis promoted by miR-451 may participates in this biological behavior. Therefore, target miR-451 may be a novel therapeutic intervention for bladder cancer. PMID:27571748

  5. Diagnostic utility of MYC amplification and anti-MYC immunohistochemistry in atypical vascular lesions, primary or radiation-induced mammary angiosarcomas, and primary angiosarcomas of other sites.

    PubMed

    Ginter, Paula S; Mosquera, Juan Miguel; MacDonald, Theresa Y; D'Alfonso, Timothy M; Rubin, Mark A; Shin, Sandra J

    2014-04-01

    Breast cancer patients who receive radiation therapy or develop chronic lymphedema following axillary dissection can develop secondary mammary angiosarcomas (ASs) and, additionally, atypical vascular lesions (AVLs) in the former group. Recently, MYC amplification by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has been identified in secondary mammary AS but not in AVL and most primary mammary AS as well as AS of other sites. We studied MYC amplification and MYC protein expression in 7 radiation-induced AVLs, 9 secondary mammary ASs, 17 primary mammary ASs, and 20 primary ASs of other sites by FISH analysis and immunohistochemistry. All 9 secondary mammary ASs showed gene amplification and protein expression, whereas neither was found in any of 7 AVLs. No MYC amplification or protein expression was identified in any of the 17 primary mammary ASs. Among primary ASs of other sites, 1 cardiac AS and 1 skin AS showed gene amplification and protein expression. The remaining 18 did not show amplification (90%), but some demonstrated protein expression (39%). We conclude that MYC amplification by FISH is present in secondary mammary AS but not in AVL. We also found MYC amplification in 1 primary skin AS and 1 primary cardiac AS. There was 100% concordance between MYC amplification and protein expression in all AVL, primary mammary AS, and secondary mammary AS, whereas only 65% concordance was found in AS of other sites. MYC protein expression in AS can be helpful in certain diagnostic scenarios in the breast but not in other sites.

  6. Preventive and protective effects of silymarin on doxorubicin-induced testicular damages correlate with changes in c-myc gene expression.

    PubMed

    Malekinejad, H; Janbaz-Acyabar, H; Razi, M; Varasteh, S

    2012-09-15

    This study aimed to investigate the preventive and protective effects of silymarin (SMN) on doxorubicin (DOX)-induced damages in the testis. Wistar rats were divided into six groups (n=8), including: control (C), DOX-treated (DOX, 15 mg/kg, i.p.), DOX- and SMN-treated and SMN-treated animals (SMN, 50 mg/kg, orally). Those groups, which received either compounds, were sub-grouped based on the preventive (PVT), protective (PTT) and/or therapeutic regimens (TPT) of SMN administration. The antioxidant status analyses, hormonal assay, and histopathological examinations in the testis were conducted. The expression of c-myc at mRNA level also was analyzed. SMN in preventive and protective forms significantly (p<0.05) improved the DOX-induced weight loss and lowered the alkaline phosphatase level. Pretreatment and co-treatment with SMN attenuated the DOX-induced carbonyl stress. The DOX-induced histopathological damages including negative TDI and IR were significantly (p<0.05) improved with SMN pretreatment and co-administration. SMN in preventive and protective forms prevented from DOX-induced DNA fragmentation in the testis. SMN ameliorated the DOX-reduced serum level of sexual hormones including testosterone, inhibin B, LH and FSH in PVT and PTT groups. The c-myc expression at mRNA level was completely and relatively down regulated in the testis of animals that received SMN as pretreatment and concurrent administration, respectively. Our data suggests that the DOX-induced biochemical and histopathological alterations could be prevented and/or protected by SMN. Moreover, the SMN protective and preventive effects attribute to its capacity in the reduction of DOX-induced carbonyl stress and DNA damage, which may be mediated by c-myc expression.

  7. A common proviral integration region, fit-1, in T-cell tumors induced by myc-containing feline leukemia viruses.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, H; Fulton, R; Nishigaki, K; Matsumoto, Y; Hasegawa, A; Tsujimoto, A; Cevario, S; O'Brien, S J; Terry, A; Onions, D

    1993-10-01

    Feline leukemia viruses carrying transduced v-myc genes (myc-FeLV) induce tumors of clonal origin, suggesting that activated myc alone is not sufficient for tumorigenesis. To investigate the hypothesis that insertional mutagenesis plays a role by activating genes which collaborate with v-myc, we looked for evidence of common proviral integration sites in these tumors. By inverse polymerase chain reaction we identified a 6-kb domain, designated fit-1, in which FeLV proviruses were inserted in four of nine (44%) T-cell tumors induced by myc-FeLV. The fit-1 locus was mapped to feline chromosome B2 and appears to be distinct from known oncogenes located on this chromosome. Fit-1 represents a novel common proviral integration region which may harbor a cellular gene which acts in concert with the myc gene in T-cell tumorigenesis. PMID:8396812

  8. The enforced expression of c-Myc in pig fibroblasts triggers mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) via F-actin reorganization and RhoA/Rock pathway inactivation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jun-Wen; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Wang, Sheng-Chun; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Li, Jing; Jia, Jun-Shuang; Sheng, Hong-Fen; Yao, Zhi-Fang; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Zhao, Zun-Lan; Xie, Rao-Ying; Yang, Sheng; Gao, Fei; Fan, Quan-Rong; Zhang, Meng-Ya; Yue, Min; Yuan, Jin; Gu, Wei-Wang; Yao, Kai-Tai; Xiao, Dong

    2013-04-01

    In previous studies from other labs it has been well demonstrated that the ectopic expression of c-Myc in mammary epithelial cells can induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), whereas in our pilot experiment, epithelial-like morphological changes were unexpectedly observed in c-Myc-expressing pig fibroblasts [i.e., porcine embryonic fibroblasts (PEFs) and porcine dermal fibroblasts (PDFs)] and pig mesenchymal stem cells, suggesting that the same c-Myc gene is entitled to trigger EMT in epithelial cells and mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET) in fibroblasts. This prompted us to characterize the existence of a MET in c-Myc-expressing PEFs and PDFs at the molecular level. qRT-PCR, immunofluorescence and western blot analysis illustrated that epithelial-like morphological changes were accompanied by the increased expression of epithelial markers [such as cell adhesion proteins (E-cadherin, α-catenin and Bves), tight junction protein occludin and cytokeratins (Krt8 and Krt18)], the reduced expression of mesenchymal markers [vimentin, fibronectin 1 (FN1), snail1, collagen family of proteins (COL1A1, COL5A2) and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family (MMP12 and MMP14)] and the decreased cell motility and increased cell adhesion in c-Myc-expressing PEFs and PDFs. Furthermore, the ectopic expression of c-Myc in pig fibroblasts disrupted the stress fiber network, suppressed the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia, and resulted in RhoA/Rock pathway inactivation, which finally participates in epithelial-like morphological conversion. Taken together, these findings demonstrate, for the first time, that the enforced expression of c-Myc in fibroblasts can trigger MET, to which cytoskeleton depolymerization and RhoA/Rock pathway inactivation contribute.

  9. Post-transcriptional control of c-myc RNA during early development analyzed in vivo with a Xenopus-axolotl heterologous system.

    PubMed

    Andéol, Y; Lefresne, J; Simard, C; Séguin, C; Mouton, C; Signoret, J

    1998-06-01

    We have set up a heterologous in vivo system to study gene regulation at the post-transcriptional level during early development. This system uses two amphibian species, Xenopus laevis and Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotl), the development of which is three to four times slower than that of X. laevis. The stability of three different synthetic X. laevis c-myc transcripts was followed after injection into fertilized axolotl eggs. One transcript is 2.2 kilobases (kb) long (full-length). The second is 1.5-kb long with most of the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) removed, and the third corresponds to the 3'UTR (0.7-kb). The behavior of the endogenous axolotl c-myc RNA was compared with the exogenous injected c-myc transcripts. Our results show the existence of several developmental timers controlling degradation of the c-myc molecules. The first is activated at oocyte maturation and affects both the endogenous and exogenous (2.2- and 1.5-kb) transcripts containing the coding regions. A second timer could be linked to the number of cell divisions since fertilization (6th-7th cleavages) and involves the endogenous c-myc RNAs. Another timer could involve the c-myc mRNA molecule itself, because when injected into axolotl eggs, the half-life of the 2.2-kb X. laevis transcript appears to be independent of the axolotl context. After injection into axolotl fertilized eggs, the behavior of this X. laevis full-length c-myc molecule reveals an unexpected increase in the intensity of its autoradiographic signals. This increase occurs independently of events linked to mid-blastula transition and preliminary investigations are discussed. PMID:9674116

  10. Antisense-mediated depletion of p300 in human cells leads to premature G1 exit and up-regulation of c-MYC.

    PubMed

    Kolli, S; Buchmann, A M; Williams, J; Weitzman, S; Thimmapaya, B

    2001-04-10

    The cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein and p300 are two highly conserved transcriptional coactivators and histone acetyltransferases that integrate signals from diverse signal transduction pathways in the nucleus and also link chromatin remodeling with transcription. In this report, we have examined the role of p300 in the control of the G(1) phase of the cell cycle in nontransformed immortalized human breast epithelial cells (MCF10A) and fibroblasts (MSU) by using adenovirus vectors expressing p300-specific antisense sequences. Quiescent MCF10A and MSU cells expressing p300-specific antisense sequences synthesized p300 at much reduced levels and exited G(1) phase without serum stimulation. These cells also showed an increase in cyclin A and cyclin A- and E-associated kinase activities characteristic of S phase induction. Further analysis of the p300-depleted quiescent MCF10A cells revealed a 5-fold induction of c-MYC and a 2-fold induction of c-JUN. A direct target of c-MYC, CAD, which is required for DNA synthesis, was also found to be up-regulated, indicating that up-regulation of c-MYC functionally contributed to DNA synthesis. Furthermore, S phase induction in p300-depleted cells was reversed when antisense c-MYC was expressed in these cells, indicating that up-regulation of c-MYC may directly contribute to S phase induction. Adenovirus E1A also induced DNA synthesis and increased the levels of c-MYC and c-JUN in serum-starved MCF10A cells in a p300-dependent manner. Our results suggest an important role of p300 in cell cycle regulation at G(1) and raise the possibility that p300 may negatively regulate early response genes, including c-MYC and c-JUN, thereby preventing DNA synthesis in quiescent cells.

  11. MYC Regulation of Cell Growth through Control of Transcription by RNA Polymerases I and III

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kirsteen J.; White, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    MYC’s tumorigenic potential involves increased ribosome biogenesis and translational capacity, which supply the cell with protein required for enhanced cell growth and subsequent cell division. In addition to activation of protein-encoding genes transcribed by RNA polymerase II, MYC must stimulate transcription by RNA polymerase I and RNA polymerase III to meet this synthetic demand. In the past decade our knowledge of the mechanisms and importance of MYC regulation of RNA polymerases I and III has flourished. Here we discuss MYC’s influence on transcription by these “odd” RNA polymerases and the physiological impact of this regulation is evaluated with relevance to cancer development and treatment. PMID:24789877

  12. Increasing feasibility of optimal gene network estimation.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Annika; Ott, Sascha; Koentges, Georgy

    2004-01-01

    Disentangling networks of regulation of gene expression is a major challenge in the field of computational biology. Harvesting the information contained in microarray data sets is a promising approach towards this challenge. We propose an algorithm for the optimal estimation of Bayesian networks from microarray data, which reduces the CPU time and memory consumption of previous algorithms. We prove that the space complexity can be reduced from O(n(2) x 2(n)) to O(2(n)), and that the expected calculation time can be reduced from O(n(2) x 2(n)) to O(n x 2(n)), where n is the number of genes. We make intrinsic use of a limitation of the maximal number of regulators of each gene, which has biological as well as statistical justifications. The improvements are significant for some applications in research.

  13. A role for c-myc in chemically induced renal-cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Y; Cleveland, J L; Stevens, J L

    1997-01-01

    A variety of genes, including c-myc, are activated by chemical toxicants in vivo and in vitro. Although enforced c-myc expression induces apoptosis after withdrawing survival factors, it is not clear if activation of the endogenous c-myc gene is an apoptotic signal after toxicant exposure. The renal tubular epithelium is a target for many toxicants. c-myc expression is activated by tubular damage. In quiescent LLC-PK1 renal epithelial cells, c-myc but not max or mad mRNA is induced by the nephrotoxicant S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC). The kinetics of DCVC-induced c-myc expression and apoptosis suggested an association between cell death and prolonged activation of c-myc expression after toxicant exposure. Accordingly, prolonged activation of an estrogen receptor-Myc fusion construct, but not a construct in which a c-Myc transactivation domain had been deleted, was sufficient to induce apoptosis in LLC-PK1 cells. Moreover, under conditions in which necrosis was the predominant cell death pathway caused by DCVC in parental cells, overexpressing c-myc biased the cell death pathway toward apoptosis. DCVC also induced ornithine decarboxylase (odc) mRNA and activated the odc promoter. Activation of the odc promoter by DCVC required consensus c-Myc-Max binding sites in odc intron 1. Inhibiting ODC activity with alpha-difluoromethylornithine delayed DCVC-induced cell death. Therefore, odc is a target gene in the DCVC apoptotic pathway involving c-myc activation and contributes to apoptosis. Finally, a structurally related cytotoxic but nongenotoxic analog of DCVC did not induce c-myc and did not activate the odc promoter or induce apoptosis. The data support the hypothesis that activation of apoptotic cell death in quiescent renal epithelial cells involves induction of c-myc. This is the first study to demonstrate that c-myc induction by a specific nephrotoxicant leads to gene activation and cell death. PMID:9343440

  14. c-myc as a mediator of accelerated apoptosis and involution in mammary glands lacking Socs3

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Kate D; Vaillant, François; Alexander, Warren S; Wintermantel, Tim M; Forrest, Natasha C; Holroyd, Sheridan L; McManus, Edward J; Schutz, Gunther; Watson, Christine J; Chodosh, Lewis A; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Visvader, Jane E

    2006-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins are critical attenuators of cytokine-mediated signalling in diverse tissues. To determine the importance of Socs3 in mammary development, we generated mice in which Socs3 was deleted in mammary epithelial cells. No overt phenotype was evident during pregnancy and lactation, indicating that Socs3 is not a key physiological regulator of prolactin signalling. However, Socs3-deficient mammary glands exhibited a profound increase in epithelial apoptosis and tissue remodelling, resulting in precocious involution. This phenotype was accompanied by augmented Stat3 activation and a marked increase in the level of c-myc. Moreover, induction of c-myc before weaning using an inducible transgenic model recapitulated the Socs3 phenotype, and elevated expression of likely c-myc target genes, E2F-1, Bax and p53, was observed. Our data establish Socs3 as a critical attenuator of pro-apoptotic pathways that act in the developing mammary gland and provide evidence that c-myc regulates apoptosis during involution. PMID:17139252

  15. Deregulation of MYC and TP53 through genetic and epigenetic alterations in gallbladder carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Ishak, Geraldo; Leal, Mariana Ferreira; Dos Santos, Ney Pereira Carneiro; Demachki, Samia; Nunes, Caroline Aquino Moreira; do Nascimento Borges, Barbara; Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Smith, Marília Cardoso; Assumpção, Paulo Pimentel; Burbano, Rommel Rodríguez

    2015-08-01

    Gallbladder cancer is a rare malignancy and presents a poor prognosis. MYC and p53 have been implicated in gallbladder carcinogenesis. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their regulation in this neoplasia. Here, we evaluated the MYC and TP53 copy numbers in gallbladder tumors and their possible association with protein expression. We also investigated whether MYC may be controlled by mutations and DNA promoter methylation. In the present study, 15 samples of invasive gallbladder carcinomas and six control samples were analyzed. On the other hand, the expression of MYC and p53 was more frequent in gallbladder carcinomas than in control samples (p = 0.002, p = 0.046, respectively). Gain of copies of the MYC and TP53 genes was detected in 86.7 and 50 % of gallbladder carcinomas, respectively. MYC and TP53 amplifications were associated with immunoreactivity of their protein (p = 0.029, p = 0.001, respectively). MYC hypomethylation was only detected in tumoral samples and was associated with its protein expression (p = 0.029). MYC mutations were detected in 80 % of tumor samples. The G allele at rs117856857 was associated with the presence of gallbladder tumors (p = 0.019) and with MYC expression (p = 0.044). Moreover, two tumors presented a pathogenic mutation in MYC exon 2 (rs28933407). Our study highlights that the gain of MYC and TP53 copies seems to be a frequent finding in gallbladder cancer. In addition, gain of copies, hypomethylation and point mutations at MYC may contribute to overexpression of its protein in this type of cancer. PMID:25200035

  16. Low molecular weight inhibitors of Myc-Max interaction and function.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaoying; Giap, Christine; Lazo, John S; Prochownik, Edward V

    2003-09-18

    c-Myc is helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (HLH-ZIP) oncoprotein that is frequently deregulated in human cancers. In order to bind DNA, regulate target gene expression, and function in a biological context, c-Myc must dimerize with another HLH-ZIP protein, Max. A large number of c-Myc target genes have been identified, and many of the encoded proteins are transforming. Such functional redundancy, however, complicates therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting any single target gene product. Given this consideration, we have instead attempted to identify ways by which c-Myc itself could be effectively disabled. We have used a yeast two-hybrid approach to identify low-molecular-weight compounds that inhibit c-Myc-Max association. All of the compounds prevented transactivation by c-Myc-Max heterodimers, inhibited cell cycle progression, and prevented the in vitro growth of fibroblasts in a c-Myc-dependent manner. Several of the compounds also inhibited tumor growth in vivo. These results show that the yeast two-hybrid screen is useful for identifying compounds that can be exploited in mammalian cells. More specifically, they provide a means by which structural analogs, based upon these first-generation Myc-Max inhibitors, can be developed to enhance antitumor efficacy.

  17. Structure, origin, and transforming activity of feline leukemia virus-myc recombinant provirus FTT.

    PubMed Central

    Doggett, D L; Drake, A L; Hirsch, V; Rowe, M E; Stallard, V; Mullins, J I

    1989-01-01

    A myc-containing recombinant feline leukemia provirus, designated FTT, was molecularly cloned from the cat T-cell lymphoma line F422. Its transforming activity, as well as the nucleotide sequence of the 3' 2.7 kilobases of FTT, including v-myc, was determined. The predicted v-myc protein differs from feline c-myc by three amino acid changes and is truncated by two amino acids at the carboxyl terminus. Comparison with feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline c-myc, and other FeLV proviruses indicates that recombination junctions involved in the generation of FeLV-onc viruses occur at preferred locations within the virus. They usually follow or occur within the sequence ACCCC at 5' junctions and may result from homologous recombination between sequences of marked purine-pyrimidine strand bias, especially at 3' junctions. Some recombination sites also resemble recombinase recognition sequences utilized in immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor variable-region joining. Transfection of primary rat embryo fibroblasts and subsequent in vivo analysis revealed that morphologic and tumorigenic transformation require cotransfection of FTT with human EJ-ras DNA; neither gene alone is sufficient. FTT v-myc is expressed in these transformed rat cells as a 3.0-kilobase subgenomic RNA; however, in contrast to the depressed level of c-myc expression in v-myc-involved feline tumors, steady-state levels of rat c-myc RNA and protein are apparently unaltered. Images PMID:2539507

  18. Lack of correlation between N-myc and MAX expression in neuroblastoma tumors and in cell lines: implication for N-myc-MAX complex formation.

    PubMed

    Raschella, G; Romeo, A; Negroni, A; Pucci, S; Dominici, C; Castello, M A; Bevilacqua, P; Felsani, A; Calabretta, B

    1994-04-15

    Detectable levels of MAX messenger RNA were found in a set of human neuroblastoma tumors and established cell lines. MAX mRNA levels were independent of tumor stage and N-myc genomic amplification. By contrast, N-myc mRNA transcripts were detectable only in tumors with amplification of N-myc gene and in cell lines. Analysis by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and hybridization to specific oligodeoxynucleotide probes revealed approximately equal amounts of two MAX transcripts in all cases analyzed. Immunoprecipitations with a specific antibody to MAX detected two proteins of M(r) 21,000 and 22,000 in approximately equal amounts in all neuroblastoma lines regardless of N-myc amplification and/or expression. On the other hand, protein binding to the myc DNA consensus sequence correlated with N-myc expression in neuroblastoma cells. Thus, N-myc expression might be a limiting factor in the formation of the N-myc-MAX heterodimer in neuroblastomas.

  19. Detection of HER-2/neu, c-myc amplification and p53 inactivation by FISH in Egyptian patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Manal F; Aly, Magdy Sayed; Khaled, Hussein M; Mohamed, Hanaa M

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The clinical course of this disease is highly variable and clinicians continuously search for prognostic parameters that can accurately predict prognosis, and indicate a suitable adjuvant therapy for each patient. Amplification of the two oncogenes HER-2/neu and c-myc and inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 are frequently encountered in breast carcinomas. The purpose of this study was to use the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the assessment of HER-2/neu and c-myc amplification and p53 inactivation and to relate these molecular markers with the commonly used clinical and pathological factors. The study was conducted on 34 tissue samples obtained from 33 females and 1 male with breast carcinomas and 17 samples obtained from 16 females and 1 male with benign breast lesions. Results revealed that the level of HER-2/neu, c-myc and p53 in the malignant group was significantly increased as compared to the benign group. On relating the level of the molecular markers to clinicopathological factors, p53 was significantly associated with increased patient's age. The sensitivity of the investigated markers significantly increased with larger tumor size. Concerning tumor grade, HER-2/neu and p53 showed a significant increase in low-grade tumors whereas c-myc showed a highly significant increase in high-grade tumors. With regard to disease staging, HER-2/neu and c-myc were the only markers that showed significant increase at late stages of disease. p53 and HER-2/neu were significantly associated with positive lymph nodal status. A significant correlation was obtained between the levels of the three biomarkers to each other. Conclusively, the combination of HER-2/neu, c-myc and p53 can stratify patients into different risk groups. PMID:19675743

  20. Predictive Value of BRCA1, ERCC1, ATP7B, PKM2, TOPOI, TOPΟ-IIA, TOPOIIB and C-MYC Genes in Patients with Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Who Received First Line Therapy with Cisplatin and Etoposide

    PubMed Central

    Karachaliou, Niki; Papadaki, Chara; Lagoudaki, Eleni; Trypaki, Maria; Sfakianaki, Maria; Koutsopoulos, Anastasios; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, Efstathios; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Souglakos, John

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to evaluate the predictive value of genes involved in the action of cisplatin-etoposide in Small Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC). Methods 184 SCLC patients’ primary tumour samples were analyzed for ERCCI, BRCA1, ATP7B, PKM2 TOPOI, TOPOIIA, TOPOIIB and C-MYC mRNA expression. All patients were treated with cisplatin-etoposide. Results The patients’ median age was 63 years and 120 (65%) had extended stage, 75 (41%) had increased LDH serum levels and 131 (71%) an ECOG performance status was 0-1. Patients with limited stage, whose tumours expressed high ERCC1 (p=0.028), PKM2 (p=0.046), TOPOI (p=0.008), TOPOIIA (p=0.002) and TOPOIIB (p<0.001) mRNA had a shorter Progression Free Survival (PFS). In limited stage patients, high expression of ERCC1 (p=0.014), PKM2 (p=0.026), TOPOIIA (p=0.021) and TOPOIIB (p=0.019) was correlated with decreased median overall survival (mOS) while in patients with extended stage, only high TOPOIIB expression had a negative impact on Os (p=0.035). The favorable expression signature expression signature (low expression of ERCC1, PKM2, TOPOIIA and TOPOIIB) was correlated with significantly better PFS and Os in both LS-SCLC (p<0.001 and p=0.007, respectively) and ES-SCLC (p=0.007 and (p=0.011, respectively) group. The unfavorable expression signature was an independent predictor for poor PFS (HR: 3.18; p=0.002 and HR: 3.14; p=0.021) and Os (HR: 4.35; p=0.001and HR: 3.32; p=0.019) in both limited and extended stage, respectively. Conclusions Single gene’s expression analysis as well as the integrated analysis of ERCC1, PKM2, TOPOIIA and TOPOIIB may predict treatment outcome in patients with SCLC. These findings should be further validated in a prospective study. PMID:24058603

  1. Farnesiferol c induces apoptosis via regulation of L11 and c-Myc with combinational potential with anticancer drugs in non-small-cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Ji Hoon; Kim, Moon Joon; Lee, Hyemin; Lee, Jihyun; Kim, Jaekwang; Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Eun Ah; Kim, Yoon Hyeon; Kim, Bonglee; Shim, Bum Sang; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Though Farnesiferol c (FC) has been reported to have anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity, the underlying antitumor mechanism of FC still remains unclear. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the apoptotic mechanism of FC in human H1299 and H596 non-small lung cancer cells (NSCLCs). FC significantly showed cytotoxicity, increased sub-G1 accumulation, and attenuated the expression of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Survivin and procaspase 3 in H1299 and H596 cells. Furthermore, FC effectively suppressed the mRNA expression of G1 arrest related genes such as Cyclin D1, E2F1 transcription factor and CDC25A by RT-PCR. Interestingly, FC inhibited the expression of c-Myc, ribosomal protein L11 (L11) and nucleolin (NCL) in H1299 and H596 cells. Of note, silencing of L11 by siRNA transfection enhanced the expression of c-Myc through a negative feedback mechanism, while c-Myc knockdown downregulated L11 in H1299 cells. Additionally, combined treatment of FC and puromycin/doxorubicin promoted the activation of caspase 9/3, and attenuated the expression of c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CDK4 in H1299 cells compared to single treatment. Taken together, our findings suggest that FC induces apoptosis and G1 arrest via regulation of ribosomal protein L11 and c-Myc and also enhances antitumor effect of puromycin or doxorubicin in NSCLCs. PMID:27231235

  2. Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes.

    PubMed

    Smetanina, Mariya A; Pakharukova, Mariya Y; Kurinna, Svitlana M; Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P; Moore, David D; Merkulova, Tatyana I

    2011-08-15

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car(-/-)) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car(-/-) livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. PMID:21672546

  3. Ortho-Aminoazotoluene activates mouse Constitutive Androstane Receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes

    PubMed Central

    Smetanina, Mariya A.; Pakharukova, Mariya Y.; Kurinna, Svitlana M.; Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2011-01-01

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car−/−) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car−/− livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. PMID:21672546

  4. Definition of the human N-myc promoter region during development in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Tai, K F; Rogers, S W; Pont-Kingdon, G; Carroll, W L

    1999-09-01

    The N-myc oncogene directs organogenesis, and gene amplification is associated with aggressive forms of neuroblastoma, a common malignant tumor in children. N-myc is expressed in fetal epithelium, and expression decreases markedly postnatally. To localize sequences responsible for directing expression, we have analyzed the human N-myc promoter. We noted previously that N-myc promoter regions 5' to exon 1 directed reporter gene expression in all cell lines, including those without detectable N-myc transcripts. However, when promoter constructs included 3' exon 1 and the 5' portion of intron 1, reporter activity was detected only when there was expression of the endogenous gene. To determine the role of this "tissue-specific region" in directing expression during development, we generated transgenic mice carrying N-myc promoter lacZ minigenes that contained 5' N-myc promoter elements alone or the promoter linked to the 3' exon 1/5' intron 1 tissue-specific region. Animals lacking the tissue-specific exon 1/intron 1 region showed beta-galactosidase expression in the CNS, but expression was not observed in other organs in which endogenously derived N-myc transcripts were seen. Within the CNS, transgene expression was seen mainly in the olfactory system and was not observed in other areas in which expression of the murine gene has been noted. In contrast, no transgene expression was observed in any of the animals carrying the tissue-specific exon 1/intron 1 region. Thus, sequences that direct expression within the olfactory system were contained within our 5' promoter transgene, whereas sequences that guide the ubiquitous expression of N-myc during organogenesis lie outside the regions studied here. Finally, the exon 1/intron 1 region seems to act in a dominant fashion to repress expression in the CNS from the immediate 5' N-myc promoter. PMID:10473038

  5. Rictor regulates FBXW7-dependent c-Myc and cyclin E degradation in colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Zheng; Zhou, Yuning; Evers, B. Mark; Wang, Qingding

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor decreases ubiquitination of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor increases protein levels of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. -- Abstract: Rictor (Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR) forms a complex with mTOR and phosphorylates and activates Akt. Activation of Akt induces expression of c-Myc and cyclin E, which are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and play an important role in colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Here, we show that rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E degradation. The Rictor-FBXW7 complex is biochemically distinct from the previously reported mTORC2 and can be immunoprecipitated independently of mTORC2. Moreover, knocking down of rictor in serum-deprived colorectal cancer cells results in the decreased ubiquitination and increased protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin E while overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Genetic knockout of FBXW7 blunts the effects of rictor, suggesting that rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. Our findings identify rictor as an important component of FBXW7 E3 ligase complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E protein ubiquitination and degradation. Importantly, our results suggest that elevated growth factor signaling may contribute to decrease rictor/FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination of c-Myc and cyclin E, thus leading to accumulation of cyclin E and c-Myc in colorectal cancer cells.

  6. c-Myc and AMPK Control Cellular Energy Levels by Cooperatively Regulating Mitochondrial Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Lia R.; Sharma, Lokendra; Wang, Huabo; Kang, Audry; d’Souza, Sonia; Lu, Jie; McLaughlin, Michael; Dolezal, James M.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan T.; Ding, Ying; Zeng, Xuemei; Yates, Nathan; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    The c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulate glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation (Oxphos) although often for different purposes. Because Myc over-expression depletes ATP with the resultant activation of AMPK, we explored the potential co-dependency of and cross-talk between these proteins by comparing the consequences of acute Myc induction in ampk+/+ (WT) and ampk-/- (KO) murine embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). KO MEFs showed a higher basal rate of glycolysis than WT MEFs and an appropriate increase in response to activation of a Myc-estrogen receptor (MycER) fusion protein. However, KO MEFs had a diminished ability to increase Oxphos, mitochondrial mass and reactive oxygen species in response to MycER activation. Other differences between WT and KO MEFs, either in the basal state or following MycER induction, included abnormalities in electron transport chain function, levels of TCA cycle-related oxidoreductases and cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox states. Transcriptional profiling of pathways pertinent to glycolysis, Oxphos and mitochondrial structure and function also uncovered significant differences between WT and KO MEFs and their response to MycER activation. Finally, an unbiased mass-spectrometry (MS)-based survey capable of quantifying ~40% of all mitochondrial proteins, showed about 15% of them to be AMPK- and/or Myc-dependent in their steady state. Significant differences in the activities of the rate-limiting enzymes pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase, which dictate pyruvate and acetyl coenzyme A abundance, were also differentially responsive to Myc and AMPK and could account for some of the differences in basal metabolite levels that were also detected by MS. Thus, Myc and AMPK are highly co-dependent and appear to engage in significant cross-talk across numerous pathways which support metabolic and ATP-generating functions. PMID:26230505

  7. Identification of soybean MYC2-like transcription factors and overexpression of GmMYC1 could stimulate defense mechanism against common cutworm in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Ding, Changwen; Du, Haiping; Liu, Hailun; Wang, Yongli; Yu, Deyue

    2014-09-01

    MYC2 is a basic helix-loop-helix Leu zipper transcription factor (TF). Here, 22 putative soybean MYC-like TFs were identified bioinformatically. Of these TFs, seven MYC2-like genes without introns were isolated and characterized. All seven GmMYCs displayed transactivation activity in yeast cells. Six genes (excepting GmMYC3) were expressed in the roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seed wall but not in the developing seeds and up-regulated after insect feeding. The GmMYC1 transgenic tobacco rejected common cutworm (CCW, Spodoptera litura Fabricius) more strongly and lost less leaf area than the control (2.94 ± 2.36 vs 7.84 ± 4.63 cm(2)). The average relative growth rate of CCW feeding on transgenic tobacco leaves was lower than on control tobacco leaves (136 ± 60 vs 271 ± 76 %). These results indicated that GmMYC could stimulate the defense mechanism against insects in plants.

  8. HBXIP and LSD1 Scaffolded by lncRNA Hotair Mediate Transcriptional Activation by c-Myc.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghui; Wang, Zhen; Shi, Hui; Li, Hang; Li, Leilei; Fang, Runping; Cai, Xiaoli; Liu, Bowen; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2016-01-15

    c-Myc is regarded as a transcription factor, but the basis for its function remains unclear. Here, we define a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA)/protein complex that mediates the transcriptional activation by c-Myc in breast cancer cells. Among 388 c-Myc target genes in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells, we found that their promoters could be occupied by the oncoprotein HBXIP. We confirmed that the HBXIP expression correlated with expression of the c-Myc target genes cyclin A, eIF4E, and LDHA. RNAi-mediated silencing of HBXIP abolished c-Myc-mediated upregulation of these target genes. Mechanistically, HBXIP interacted directly with c-Myc through the leucine zippers and recruited the lncRNA Hotair along with the histone demethylase LSD1, for which Hotair serves as a scaffold. Silencing of HBXIP, Hotair, or LSD1 was sufficient to block c-Myc-enhanced cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our results support a model in which the HBXIP/Hotair/LSD1 complex serves as a critical effector of c-Myc in activating transcription of its target genes, illuminating long-standing questions on how c-Myc drives carcinogenesis.

  9. Elevated c-myc protooncogene expression in autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, B.D. Jr.; Smardo, F.L. Jr.; Grantham, J.J.; Calvet, J.P.

    1987-12-01

    The polycystic kidney diseases (PKDs) are a group of disorders characterized by the growth of epithelial cysts from the nephrons and collecting ducts of kidney tubules. The diseases can be inherited or can be provoked by environmental factors. To investigate the molecular basis of the abnormal cell growth associated with PKD, c-myc protooncogene expression was studied in a mouse model for autosomal recessive PKD. Homozygous recessive C57BL/6J (cpk/cpk) mice develop massively enlarged cystic kidneys and die from renal failure shortly after 3 weeks of age. Quantitative dot blot and RNA blot hybridization experiments in which whole kidney poly(A)/sup +/ RNA was hybridized with a c-myc RNA probe showed a 2- to 6-fold increase in c-myc mRNA at 2 weeks, and a 25- to 30-fold increase in c-myc mRNA at 3 weeks of age in polycystic mice, as compared to normal littermates. c-myc expression was also examined under two conditions in which kidney cell growth was experimentally induced in normal adult mice: compensatory renal hypertrophy and tubule regeneration following folic acid-induced renal cell injury. While compensatory hypertrophy resulted in only a small increase in c-myc, folic acid treatment gave rise after 24 hr to a 12-fold increase in c-myc RNA. The induction of c-myc by folic acid is consistent with increased cellular proliferation regenerating tubules. In contrast, polycystic kidneys show only a minimal increase in cellular proliferation over that seen in normal kidneys, while c-myc levels were found to be markedly elevated. Thus, the level of c-myc expression in cystic kidneys appears to be out of proportion to the rate of cell division, suggesting that elevated and potentially abnormal c-myc expression may be involved in the pathogenesis of PKD.

  10. Allantoin, a stress-related purine metabolite, can activate jasmonate signaling in a MYC2-regulated and abscisic acid-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Shunsuke; Konishi, Tomokazu; Egusa, Mayumi; Akiyoshi, Nobuhiro; Matsuura, Takakazu; Mori, Izumi C.; Hirayama, Takashi; Kaminaka, Hironori; Shimada, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Allantoin is a metabolic intermediate of purine catabolism that often accumulates in stressed plants. Recently, we used Arabidopsis knockout mutants (aln) of ALLANTOINASE to show that this purine metabolite activates abscisic acid (ABA) production, thereby stimulating stress-related gene expression and enhancing seedling tolerance to abiotic stress. A detailed re-examination of the microarray data of an aln mutant (aln-1) confirmed the increased expression of ABA-related genes and also revealed altered expression of genes involved in jasmonic acid (JA) responses, probably under the control of MYC2, a master switch in the JA signaling pathway. Consistent with the transcriptome profiles, the aln-1 mutant displayed increased JA levels and enhanced responses to mechanical wounding and exogenous JA. Moreover, aln mutants demonstrated modestly increased susceptibility to Pseudomonas syringae and Pectobacterium carotovorum, probably reflecting the antagonistic action of MYC2 on the defense against these bacterial phytopathogens. Exogenously administered allantoin elicited the expression of JA-responsive genes, including MYC2, in wild-type plants, supporting the idea that allantoin might be responsible for the observed JA-related phenotypes of aln mutants. However, mutants deficient in bioactive JA (jar1-1), insensitive to JA (myc2-3), or deficient in ABA (aba2-1 and bglu18) suppressed the effect of exogenous allantoin. The suppression was further confirmed in aln-1 jar1-1 and aln-1 bglu18 double mutants. These results indicate that allantoin can activate the MYC2-regulated JA signaling pathway through ABA production. Overall, this study suggests a possible connection of purine catabolism with stress hormone homeostasis and signaling, and highlights the potential importance of allantoin in these interactions. PMID:26931169

  11. Direct inhibition of c-Myc-Max heterodimers by celastrol and celastrol-inspired triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabo; Teriete, Peter; Hu, Angela; Raveendra-Panickar, Dhanya; Pendelton, Kelsey; Lazo, John S; Eiseman, Julie; Holien, Toril; Misund, Kristine; Oliynyk, Ganna; Arsenian-Henriksson, Marie; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Sundan, Anders; Prochownik, Edward V

    2015-10-20

    Many oncogenic signals originate from abnormal protein-protein interactions that are potential targets for small molecule inhibitors. However, the therapeutic disruption of these interactions has proved elusive. We report here that the naturally-occurring triterpenoid celastrol is an inhibitor of the c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein, which is over-expressed in many human cancers. Most Myc inhibitors prevent the association between Myc and its obligate heterodimerization partner Max via their respective bHLH-ZIP domains. In contrast, we show that celastrol binds to and alters the quaternary structure of the pre-formed dimer and abrogates its DNA binding. Celastrol contains a reactive quinone methide group that promiscuously forms Michael adducts with numerous target proteins and other free sulfhydryl-containing molecules. Interestingly, triterpenoid derivatives lacking the quinone methide showed enhanced specificity and potency against Myc. As with other Myc inhibitors, these analogs rapidly reduced the abundance of Myc protein and provoked a global energy crisis marked by ATP depletion, neutral lipid accumulation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also inhibited the proliferation of numerous established human cancer cell lines as well as primary myeloma explants that were otherwise resistant to JQ1, a potent indirect Myc inhibitor. N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma cells showed similar responses and, in additional, underwent neuronal differentiation. These studies indicate that certain pharmacologically undesirable properties of celastrol such as Michael adduct formation can be eliminated while increasing selectivity and potency toward Myc and N-Myc. This, together with their low in vivo toxicity, provides a strong rationale for pursuing the development of additional Myc-specific triterpenoid derivatives.

  12. Direct inhibition of c-Myc-Max heterodimers by celastrol and celastrol-inspired triterpenoids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huabo; Teriete, Peter; Hu, Angela; Raveendra-Panickar, Dhanya; Pendelton, Kelsey; Lazo, John S; Eiseman, Julie; Holien, Toril; Misund, Kristine; Oliynyk, Ganna; Arsenian-Henriksson, Marie; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Sundan, Anders; Prochownik, Edward V

    2015-10-20

    Many oncogenic signals originate from abnormal protein-protein interactions that are potential targets for small molecule inhibitors. However, the therapeutic disruption of these interactions has proved elusive. We report here that the naturally-occurring triterpenoid celastrol is an inhibitor of the c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein, which is over-expressed in many human cancers. Most Myc inhibitors prevent the association between Myc and its obligate heterodimerization partner Max via their respective bHLH-ZIP domains. In contrast, we show that celastrol binds to and alters the quaternary structure of the pre-formed dimer and abrogates its DNA binding. Celastrol contains a reactive quinone methide group that promiscuously forms Michael adducts with numerous target proteins and other free sulfhydryl-containing molecules. Interestingly, triterpenoid derivatives lacking the quinone methide showed enhanced specificity and potency against Myc. As with other Myc inhibitors, these analogs rapidly reduced the abundance of Myc protein and provoked a global energy crisis marked by ATP depletion, neutral lipid accumulation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also inhibited the proliferation of numerous established human cancer cell lines as well as primary myeloma explants that were otherwise resistant to JQ1, a potent indirect Myc inhibitor. N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma cells showed similar responses and, in additional, underwent neuronal differentiation. These studies indicate that certain pharmacologically undesirable properties of celastrol such as Michael adduct formation can be eliminated while increasing selectivity and potency toward Myc and N-Myc. This, together with their low in vivo toxicity, provides a strong rationale for pursuing the development of additional Myc-specific triterpenoid derivatives. PMID:26474287

  13. Direct inhibition of c-Myc-Max heterodimers by celastrol and celastrol-inspired triterpenoids

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huabo; Teriete, Peter; Hu, Angela; Raveendra-Panickar, Dhanya; Pendelton, Kelsey; Lazo, John S.; Eiseman, Julie; Holien, Toril; Misund, Kristine; Oliynyk, Ganna; Arsenian-Henriksson, Marie; Cosford, Nicholas D. P; Sundan, Anders; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2015-01-01

    Many oncogenic signals originate from abnormal protein-protein interactions that are potential targets for small molecule inhibitors. However, the therapeutic disruption of these interactions has proved elusive. We report here that the naturally-occurring triterpenoid celastrol is an inhibitor of the c-Myc (Myc) oncoprotein, which is over-expressed in many human cancers. Most Myc inhibitors prevent the association between Myc and its obligate heterodimerization partner Max via their respective bHLH-ZIP domains. In contrast, we show that celastrol binds to and alters the quaternary structure of the pre-formed dimer and abrogates its DNA binding. Celastrol contains a reactive quinone methide group that promiscuously forms Michael adducts with numerous target proteins and other free sulfhydryl-containing molecules. Interestingly, triterpenoid derivatives lacking the quinone methide showed enhanced specificity and potency against Myc. As with other Myc inhibitors, these analogs rapidly reduced the abundance of Myc protein and provoked a global energy crisis marked by ATP depletion, neutral lipid accumulation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. They also inhibited the proliferation of numerous established human cancer cell lines as well as primary myeloma explants that were otherwise resistant to JQ1, a potent indirect Myc inhibitor. N-Myc amplified neuroblastoma cells showed similar responses and, in additional, underwent neuronal differentiation. These studies indicate that certain pharmacologically undesirable properties of celastrol such as Michael adduct formation can be eliminated while increasing selectivity and potency toward Myc and N-Myc. This, together with their low in vivo toxicity, provides a strong rationale for pursuing the development of additional Myc-specific triterpenoid derivatives. PMID:26474287

  14. MYC interaction with the tumor suppressive SWI/SNF complex member INI1 regulates transcription and cellular transformation

    PubMed Central

    Stojanova, Angelina; Tu, William B.; Ponzielli, Romina; Kotlyar, Max; Chan, Pak-Kei; Boutros, Paul C.; Khosravi, Fereshteh; Jurisica, Igor; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT MYC is a key driver of cellular transformation and is deregulated in most human cancers. Studies of MYC and its interactors have provided mechanistic insight into its role as a regulator of gene transcription. MYC has been previously linked to chromatin regulation through its interaction with INI1 (SMARCB1/hSNF5/BAF47), a core member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. INI1 is a potent tumor suppressor that is inactivated in several types of cancers, most prominently as the hallmark alteration in pediatric malignant rhabdoid tumors. However, the molecular and functional interaction of MYC and INI1 remains unclear. Here, we characterize the MYC-INI1 interaction in mammalian cells, mapping their minimal binding domains to functionally significant regions of MYC (leucine zipper) and INI1 (repeat motifs), and demonstrating that the interaction does not interfere with MYC-MAX interaction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis expands the MYC-INI1 interaction to the SWI/SNF complex and a larger network of chromatin regulatory complexes. Genome-wide analysis reveals that the DNA-binding regions and target genes of INI1 significantly overlap with those of MYC. In an INI1-deficient rhabdoid tumor system, we observe that with re-expression of INI1, MYC and INI1 bind to common target genes and have opposing effects on gene expression. Functionally, INI1 re-expression suppresses cell proliferation and MYC-potentiated transformation. Our findings thus establish the antagonistic roles of the INI1 and MYC transcriptional regulators in mediating cellular and oncogenic functions. PMID:27267444

  15. MYC interaction with the tumor suppressive SWI/SNF complex member INI1 regulates transcription and cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Angelina; Tu, William B; Ponzielli, Romina; Kotlyar, Max; Chan, Pak-Kei; Boutros, Paul C; Khosravi, Fereshteh; Jurisica, Igor; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z

    2016-07-01

    MYC is a key driver of cellular transformation and is deregulated in most human cancers. Studies of MYC and its interactors have provided mechanistic insight into its role as a regulator of gene transcription. MYC has been previously linked to chromatin regulation through its interaction with INI1 (SMARCB1/hSNF5/BAF47), a core member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. INI1 is a potent tumor suppressor that is inactivated in several types of cancers, most prominently as the hallmark alteration in pediatric malignant rhabdoid tumors. However, the molecular and functional interaction of MYC and INI1 remains unclear. Here, we characterize the MYC-INI1 interaction in mammalian cells, mapping their minimal binding domains to functionally significant regions of MYC (leucine zipper) and INI1 (repeat motifs), and demonstrating that the interaction does not interfere with MYC-MAX interaction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis expands the MYC-INI1 interaction to the SWI/SNF complex and a larger network of chromatin regulatory complexes. Genome-wide analysis reveals that the DNA-binding regions and target genes of INI1 significantly overlap with those of MYC. In an INI1-deficient rhabdoid tumor system, we observe that with re-expression of INI1, MYC and INI1 bind to common target genes and have opposing effects on gene expression. Functionally, INI1 re-expression suppresses cell proliferation and MYC-potentiated transformation. Our findings thus establish the antagonistic roles of the INI1 and MYC transcriptional regulators in mediating cellular and oncogenic functions. PMID:27267444

  16. MYC interaction with the tumor suppressive SWI/SNF complex member INI1 regulates transcription and cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Stojanova, Angelina; Tu, William B; Ponzielli, Romina; Kotlyar, Max; Chan, Pak-Kei; Boutros, Paul C; Khosravi, Fereshteh; Jurisica, Igor; Raught, Brian; Penn, Linda Z

    2016-07-01

    MYC is a key driver of cellular transformation and is deregulated in most human cancers. Studies of MYC and its interactors have provided mechanistic insight into its role as a regulator of gene transcription. MYC has been previously linked to chromatin regulation through its interaction with INI1 (SMARCB1/hSNF5/BAF47), a core member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex. INI1 is a potent tumor suppressor that is inactivated in several types of cancers, most prominently as the hallmark alteration in pediatric malignant rhabdoid tumors. However, the molecular and functional interaction of MYC and INI1 remains unclear. Here, we characterize the MYC-INI1 interaction in mammalian cells, mapping their minimal binding domains to functionally significant regions of MYC (leucine zipper) and INI1 (repeat motifs), and demonstrating that the interaction does not interfere with MYC-MAX interaction. Protein-protein interaction network analysis expands the MYC-INI1 interaction to the SWI/SNF complex and a larger network of chromatin regulatory complexes. Genome-wide analysis reveals that the DNA-binding regions and target genes of INI1 significantly overlap with those of MYC. In an INI1-deficient rhabdoid tumor system, we observe that with re-expression of INI1, MYC and INI1 bind to common target genes and have opposing effects on gene expression. Functionally, INI1 re-expression suppresses cell proliferation and MYC-potentiated transformation. Our findings thus establish the antagonistic roles of the INI1 and MYC transcriptional regulators in mediating cellular and oncogenic functions.

  17. The MYC oncogene in breast cancer progression: from benign epithelium to invasive carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Cristina; Corominas, Josep M; Tusquets, Ignacio; Salido, Marta; Bellet, Meritxell; Fabregat, Xavier; Serrano, Sergio; Solé, Francesc

    2006-03-01

    One hypothesis for breast cancer development suggests that breast carcinogenesis involves a progression of events leading from benign epithelium to hyperplasia (with or without atypia) to carcinoma in situ and then invasive carcinoma. The MYC gene (alias c-Myc) is a transcriptional regulator whose expression is strongly associated with cell proliferation and cell differentiation. The present study is a descriptive analysis of MYC status throughout the hypothesized stages of invasive ductal carcinoma progression. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed including representative selected areas (normal cells, hyperplasia, in situ carcinoma, and invasive carcinoma) from each of 15 patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with the LSI c-MYC/CEN8/IgH probe was performed. Two cases displayed MYC amplification (13%), showing this amplification only in the invasive carcinoma zones selected. Five cases displayed polysomy of chromosome 8 (33%), detected only in ductal in situ and invasive zones selected. Benign lesions and normal adjacent cells were classified as normal. None of the hyperplasia specimens and normal specimens analyzed showed any alterations in MYC status or any aneusomies of chromosome 8. The presence of MYC amplification only in invasive cells suggests that the finding of MYC amplification could reflect an advanced tumor progression.

  18. Stat3 and c-Myc Genome-Wide Promoter Occupancy in Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kidder, Benjamin L.; Yang, Jim; Palmer, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cell pluripotency is regulated in part by transcription factor (TF) pathways that maintain self-renewal and inhibit differentiation. Stat3 and c-Myc TFs are essential for maintaining mouse ES cell self-renewal. c-Myc, together with Oct4, Sox2, and Klf4, is a reprogramming factor. While previous studies have investigated core transcriptional circuitry in ES cells, other TF pathways that promote ES cell pluripotency have yet to be investigated. Therefore, to further understand ES cell transcriptional networks, we used genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and microarray analysis (ChIP-chip) to map Stat3 and c-Myc binding targets in ES cells. Our results show that Stat3 and c-Myc occupy a significant number of genes whose expression is highly enriched in ES cells. By comparing Stat3 and c-Myc target genes with gene expression data from undifferentiated ES cells and embryoid bodies (EBs), we found that Stat3 binds active and inactive genes in ES cells, while c-Myc binds predominantly active genes. Moreover, the transcriptional states of Stat3 and c-Myc targets are correlated with co-occupancy of pluripotency-related TFs, polycomb group proteins, and active and repressive histone modifications. We also provide evidence that Stat3 targets are differentially expressed in ES cells following removal of LIF, where culture of ES cells in the absence of LIF resulted in downregulation of Stat3 target genes enriched in ES cells, and upregulation of lineage specific Stat3 target genes. Altogether, we reveal transcriptional targets of two key pluripotency-related genes in ES cells – Stat3 and c-Myc, thus providing further insight into the ES cell transcriptional network. PMID:19079543

  19. Impact of dual expression of MYC and BCL2 by immunohistochemistry on the risk of CNS relapse in DLBCL.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Slack, Graham W; Mottok, Anja; Sehn, Laurie H; Villa, Diego; Kansara, Roopesh; Kridel, Robert; Steidl, Christian; Ennishi, Daisuke; Tan, King L; Ben-Neriah, Susana; Johnson, Nathalie A; Connors, Joseph M; Farinha, Pedro; Scott, David W; Gascoyne, Randy D

    2016-05-01

    Dual expression of MYC and BCL2 by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is associated with poor outcome in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). Dual translocation of MYC and BCL2, so-called "double-hit lymphoma," has been associated with a high risk of central nervous system (CNS) relapse; however, the impact of dual expression of MYC and BCL2 (dual expressers) on the risk of CNS relapse remains unknown. Pretreatment formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded DLBCL biopsies derived from patients subsequently treated with rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) were assembled on tissue microarrays from 2 studies and were evaluated for expression of MYC and BCL2 by IHC. In addition, cell of origin was determined by IHC and the Lymph2Cx gene expression assay in a subset of patients. We identified 428 patients who met the inclusion criteria. By the recently described CNS risk score (CNS-International Prognostic Index [CNS-IPI]), 34% were low risk (0 to 1), 45% were intermediate risk (2 to 3), and 21% were high risk (4 or greater). With a median follow-up of 6.8 years, the risk of CNS relapse was higher in dual expressers compared with non-dual expressers (2-year risk, 9.7% vs 2.2%; P = .001). Patients with activated B-cell or non-germinal center B-cell type DLBCL also had an increased risk of CNS relapse. However, in multivariate analysis, only dual expresser status and CNS-IPI were associated with CNS relapse. Dual expresser MYC(+) BCL2(+) DLBCL defines a group at high risk of CNS relapse, independent of CNS-IPI score and cell of origin. Dual expresser status may help to identify a high-risk group who should undergo CNS-directed evaluation and consideration of prophylactic strategies.

  20. c-Myc oncoprotein: cell cycle-related events and new therapeutic challenges in cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    de Nigris, Filomena; Sica, Vincenzo; Herrmann, Joerg; Condorelli, Gianluigi; Chade, Alejandro R; Tajana, Gianfranco; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O; Napoli, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Advanced stages of both cancer and atherosclerosis are characterized by a local increase in tissue mass that may be hard to control. This increase in tissue mass can be attributed to oxidation-sensitive modification of cell cycle-related events, including cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, which could be secondary to alteration in the activity of tumor suppressor gene and oncogene products. The oncogene c-Myc has classically been considered to be involved in carcinogenesis and has more recently been implicated in both endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis as well. Consequently, inhibition of c-Myc-dependent signaling has become a novel therapeutic opportunity and challenge in atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular diseases. Antioxidant strategies, RNA synthesis inhibitors such as mithramycin, and gene therapeutic approaches with antisense oligonucleotides against c-Myc are some of the promising strategies. In general, the increased biologic understanding of the participation of cell cycle events and targeting these events may enable to attenuate or prevent some of the complications of vascular and neoplastic diseases. PMID:12851483

  1. Endogenous c-Myc is essential for p53-induced apoptosis in response to DNA damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phesse, T J; Myant, K B; Cole, A M; Ridgway, R A; Pearson, H; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Vousden, K H; Sears, R; Vassilev, L T; Clarke, A R; Sansom, O J

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that C-MYC may be an excellent therapeutic cancer target and a number of new agents targeting C-MYC are in preclinical development. Given most therapeutic regimes would combine C-MYC inhibition with genotoxic damage, it is important to assess the importance of C-MYC function for DNA damage signalling in vivo. In this study, we have conditionally deleted the c-Myc gene in the adult murine intestine and investigated the apoptotic response of intestinal enterocytes to DNA damage. Remarkably, c-Myc deletion completely abrogated the immediate wave of apoptosis following both ionizing irradiation and cisplatin treatment, recapitulating the phenotype of p53 deficiency in the intestine. Consistent with this, c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes did not upregulate p53. Mechanistically, this was linked to an upregulation of the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which targets p53 for degradation in c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes. Further, low level overexpression of c-Myc, which does not impact on basal levels of apoptosis, elicited sustained apoptosis in response to DNA damage, suggesting c-Myc activity acts as a crucial cell survival rheostat following DNA damage. We also identify the importance of MYC during DNA damage-induced apoptosis in several other tissues, including the thymus and spleen, using systemic deletion of c-Myc throughout the adult mouse. Together, we have elucidated for the first time in vivo an essential role for endogenous c-Myc in signalling DNA damage-induced apoptosis through the control of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.

  2. Prognostic impact of concurrent MYC and BCL6 rearrangements and expression in de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Lijuan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Manyam, Ganiraju C.; Visco, Carlo; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; Zhang, Li; Dybkær, Karen; Chiu, April; Orazi, Attilio; Zu, Youli; Bhagat, Govind; Richards, Kristy L.; Hsi, Eric D.; Choi, William W.L.; van Krieken, J. Han; Huh, Jooryung; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ferreri, Andrés J.M.; Parsons, Ben M.; Møller, Michael B.; Piris, Miguel A.; Winter, Jane N.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Hu, Shimin; Young, Ken H.

    2016-01-01

    Double-hit B-cell lymphoma is a common designation for a group of tumors characterized by concurrent translocations of MYC and BCL2, BCL6, or other genes. The prognosis of concurrent MYC and BCL6 translocations is not well known. In this study, we assessed rearrangements and expression of MYC, BCL2 and BCL6 in 898 patients with de novo diffuse large B-cell lymphoma treated with standard chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone plus rituximab). Neither BCL6 translocation alone (more frequent in activated B-cell like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) nor in combination with MYC translocation (observed in 2.0% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) predicted poorer survival in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with MYC/BCL6 co-expression did have significantly poorer survival, however, MYC/BCL6 co-expression had no effect on prognosis in the absence of MYC/BCL2 co-expression, and had no additive impact in MYC+/BCL2+ cases. The isolated MYC+/BCL6+/BCL2− subset, more frequent in germinal center B-cell like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, had significantly better survival compared with the isolated MYC+/BCL2+/BCL6− subset (more frequent in activated B-cell like diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). In summary, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patients with either MYC/BCL6 rearrangements or MYC/BCL6 co-expression did not always have poorer prognosis; MYC expression levels should be evaluated simultaneously; and double-hit B-cell lymphoma needs to be refined based on the specific genetic abnormalities present in these tumors. PMID:26573234

  3. An Overview of MYC and Its Interactome

    PubMed Central

    Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice; McFerrin, Lisa; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2014-01-01

    This review is intended to provide a broad outline of the biological and molecular functions of MYC as well as of the larger protein network within which MYC operates. We present a view of MYC as a sensor that integrates multiple cellular signals to mediate a broad transcriptional response controlling many aspects of cell behavior. We also describe the larger transcriptional network linked to MYC with emphasis on the MXD family of MYC antagonists. Last, we discuss evidence that the network has evolved for millions of years, dating back to the emergence of animals. PMID:24384812

  4. The Increasing Importance of Gene-Based Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, genome and exome sequencing studies have implicated a plethora of new disease genes with rare causal variants. Here, I review 150 exome sequencing studies that claim to have discovered that a disease can be caused by different rare variants in the same gene, and I determine whether their methods followed the current best-practice guidelines in the interpretation of their data. Specifically, I assess whether studies appropriately assess controls for rare variants throughout the entire gene or implicated region as opposed to only investigating the specific rare variants identified in the cases, and I assess whether studies present sufficient co-segregation data for statistically significant linkage. I find that the proportion of studies performing gene-based analyses has increased with time, but that even in 2015 fewer than 40% of the reviewed studies used this method, and only 10% presented statistically significant co-segregation data. Furthermore, I find that the genes reported in these papers are explaining a decreasing proportion of cases as the field moves past most of the low-hanging fruit, with 50% of the genes from studies in 2014 and 2015 having variants in fewer than 5% of cases. As more studies focus on genes explaining relatively few cases, the importance of performing appropriate gene-based analyses is increasing. It is becoming increasingly important for journal editors and reviewers to require stringent gene-based evidence to avoid an avalanche of misleading disease gene discovery papers. PMID:27055023

  5. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC’s transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H.; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K.; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I.; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A.; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-01-01

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes. PMID:26351698

  6. The Trithorax group protein Lid is a trimethyl histone H3K4 demethylase required for dMyc-induced cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Secombe, Julie; Li, Ling; Carlos, Leni; Eisenman, Robert N.

    2007-01-01

    The Myc oncoprotein is a potent inducer of cell growth, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. While many direct Myc target genes have been identified, the molecular determinants of Myc’s transcriptional specificity remain elusive. We have carried out a genetic screen in Drosophila and identified the Trithorax group protein Little imaginal discs (Lid) as a regulator of dMyc-induced cell growth. Lid binds to dMyc and is required for dMyc-induced expression of the growth regulatory gene Nop60B. The mammalian Lid orthologs, Rbp-2 (JARID1A) and Plu-1 (JARID1B), also bind to c-Myc, indicating that Lid–Myc function is conserved. We demonstrate that Lid is a JmjC-dependent trimethyl H3K4 demethylase in vivo and that this enzymatic activity is negatively regulated by dMyc, which binds to Lid’s JmjC domain. Because Myc binding is associated with high levels of trimethylated H3K4, we propose that the Lid–dMyc complex facilitates Myc binding to, or maintenance of, this chromatin context. PMID:17311883

  7. V-Myc Immortalizes Human Neural Stem Cells in the Absence of Pluripotency-Associated Traits

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Barrio, María José; García-García, Elisa; Menéndez, Pablo; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms governing stem cell self-renewal will foster the use of different types of stem cells in disease modeling and cell therapy strategies. Immortalization, understood as the capacity for indefinite expansion, is needed for the generation of any cell line. In the case of v-myc immortalized multipotent human Neural Stem Cells (hNSCs), we hypothesized that v-myc immortalization could induce a more de-differentiated state in v-myc hNSC lines. To test this, we investigated the expression of surface, biochemical and genetic markers of stemness and pluripotency in v-myc immortalized and control hNSCs (primary precursors, that is, neurospheres) and compared these two cell types to human Embryonic Stem Cells (hESCs) and fibroblasts. Using a Hierarchical Clustering method and a Principal Component Analysis (PCA), the v-myc hNSCs associated with their counterparts hNSCs (in the absence of v-myc) and displayed a differential expression pattern when compared to hESCs. Moreover, the expression analysis of pluripotency markers suggested no evidence supporting a reprogramming-like process despite the increment in telomerase expression. In conclusion, v-myc expression in hNSC lines ensures self-renewal through the activation of some genes involved in the maintenance of stem cell properties in multipotent cells but does not alter the expression of key pluripotency-associated genes. PMID:25764185

  8. Acute and chronic effects of alcohol exposure on skeletal muscle c-myc, p53, and Bcl-2 mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tatsuo; Hashimoto, Kijiro; Hirano, Makoto; Koll, Michael; Martin, Colin R; Preedy, Victor R

    2003-12-01

    Skeletal muscle atrophy is a common feature in alcoholism that affects up to two-thirds of alcohol misusers, and women appear to be particularly susceptible. There is also some evidence to suggest that malnutrition exacerbates the effects of alcohol on muscle. However, the mechanisms responsible for the myopathy remain elusive, and some studies suggest that acetaldehyde, rather than alcohol, is the principal pathogenic perturbant. Previous reports on rats dosed acutely with ethanol (<24 h) have suggested that increased proto-oncogene expression (i.e., c-myc) may be a causative process, possibly via activating preapoptotic or transcriptional pathways. We hypothesized that 1) increases in c-myc mRNA levels also occur in muscle exposed chronically to alcohol, 2) muscle of female rats is more sensitive than that from male rats, 3) raising acetaldehyde will also increase c-myc, 4) prior starvation will cause further increases in c-myc mRNA expression in response to ethanol, and 5) other genes involved in apoptosis (i.e., p53 and Bcl-2) would also be affected by alcohol. To test this, we measured c-myc mRNA levels in skeletal muscle of rats dosed either chronically (6-7 wk; ethanol as 35% of total dietary energy) or acutely (2.5 h; ethanol as 75 mmol/kg body wt ip) with ethanol. All experiments were carried out in male Wistar rats (approximately 0.1-0.15 kg body wt) except the study that examined gender susceptibility in male and female rats. At the end of the studies, rats were killed, and c-myc, p53, and Bcl-2 mRNA was analyzed in skeletal muscle by RT-PCR with an endogenous internal standard, GAPDH. The results showed that 1) in male rats fed ethanol chronically, there were no increases in c-myc mRNA; 2) increases, however, occurred in c-myc mRNA in muscle from female rats fed ethanol chronically; 3) raising endogenous acetaldehyde with cyanamide increased c-myc mRNA in acute studies; 4) starvation per se increased c-myc mRNA levels and at 1 day potentiated the acute

  9. Ortho-aminoazotoluene activates mouse constitutive androstane receptor (mCAR) and increases expression of mCAR target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Smetanina, Mariya A.; Pakharukova, Mariya Y.; Kurinna, Svitlana M.; Dong, Bingning; Hernandez, Juan P.; Moore, David D.; Merkulova, Tatyana I.

    2011-08-15

    2'-3-dimethyl-4-aminoazobenzene (ortho-aminoazotoluene, OAT) is an azo dye and a rodent carcinogen that has been evaluated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) as a possible (class 2B) human carcinogen. Its mechanism of action remains unclear. We examined the role of the xenobiotic receptor Constitutive Androstane Receptor (CAR, NR1I3) as a mediator of the effects of OAT. We found that OAT increases mouse CAR (mCAR) transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. This effect is specific because another closely related azo dye, 3'-methyl-4-dimethyl-aminoazobenzene (3'MeDAB), did not activate mCAR. Real-time Q-PCR analysis in wild-type C57BL/6 mice revealed that OAT induces the hepatic mRNA expression of the following CAR target genes: Cyp2b10, Cyp2c29, Cyp3a11, Ugt1a1, Mrp4, Mrp2 and c-Myc. CAR-null (Car{sup -/-}) mice showed no increased expression of these genes following OAT treatment, demonstrating that CAR is required for their OAT dependent induction. The OAT-induced CAR-dependent increase of Cyp2b10 and c-Myc expression was confirmed by Western blotting. Immunohistochemistry analysis of wild-type and Car{sup -/-} livers showed that OAT did not acutely induce hepatocyte proliferation, but at much later time points showed an unexpected CAR-dependent proliferative response. These studies demonstrate that mCAR is an OAT xenosensor, and indicate that at least some of the biological effects of this compound are mediated by this nuclear receptor. - Highlights: > The azo dye and mouse carcinogen OAT is a very effective mCAR activator. > OAT increases mCAR transactivation in a dose-dependent manner. > OAT CAR-dependently increases the expression of a specific subset of CAR target genes. > OAT induces an unexpectedly deferred, but CAR-dependent hepatocyte proliferation.

  10. Regulation of OGT by URI in Response to Glucose Confers c-MYC-Dependent Survival Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Burén, Stefan; Gomes, Ana L; Teijeiro, Ana; Fawal, Mohamad-Ali; Yilmaz, Mahmut; Tummala, Krishna S; Perez, Manuel; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Campos-Olivas, Ramón; Megías, Diego; Djouder, Nabil

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells can adapt and survive under low nutrient conditions, but underlying mechanisms remain poorly explored. We demonstrate here that glucose maintains a functional complex between the co-chaperone URI, PP1γ, and OGT, the enzyme catalyzing O-GlcNAcylation. Glucose deprivation induces the activation of PKA, which phosphorylates URI at Ser-371, resulting in PP1γ release and URI-mediated OGT inhibition. Low OGT activity reduces O-GlcNAcylation and promotes c-MYC degradation to maintain cell survival. In the presence of glucose, PP1γ-bound URI increases OGT and c-MYC levels. Accordingly, mice expressing non-phosphorylatable URI (S371A) in hepatocytes exhibit high OGT activity and c-MYC stabilization, accelerating liver tumorigenesis in agreement with c-MYC oncogenic functions. Our work uncovers that URI-regulated OGT confers c-MYC-dependent survival functions in response to glucose fluctuations. PMID:27505673

  11. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  12. Inhibition of MUC1-C Suppresses MYC Expression and Attenuates Malignant Growth in KRAS Mutant Lung Adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bouillez, Audrey; Rajabi, Hasan; Pitroda, Sean; Jin, Caining; Alam, Maroof; Kharbanda, Akriti; Tagde, Ashujit; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Kufe, Donald

    2016-03-15

    Dysregulation of MYC expression is a hallmark of cancer, but the development of agents that target MYC has remained challenging. The oncogenic MUC1-C transmembrane protein is, like MYC, aberrantly expressed in diverse human cancers. The present studies demonstrate that MUC1-C induces MYC expression in KRAS mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells, an effect that can be suppressed by targeting MUC1-C via shRNA silencing, CRISPR editing, or pharmacologic inhibition with GO-203. MUC1-C activated the WNT/β-catenin (CTNNB1) pathway and promoted occupancy of MUC1-C/β-catenin/TCF4 complexes on the MYC promoter. MUC1-C also promoted the recruitment of the p300 histone acetylase (EP300) and, in turn, induced histone H3 acetylation and activation of MYC gene transcription. We also show that targeting MUC1-C decreased the expression of key MYC target genes essential for the growth and survival of NSCLC cells, such as TERT and CDK4. Based on these results, we found that the combination of GO-203 and the BET bromodomain inhibitor JQ1, which targets MYC transcription, synergistically suppressed MYC expression and cell survival in vitro as well as tumor xenograft growth. Furthermore, MUC1 expression significantly correlated with that of MYC and its target genes in human KRAS mutant NSCLC tumors. Taken together, these findings suggest a therapeutic approach for targeting MYC-dependent cancers and provide the framework for the ongoing clinical studies addressing the efficacy of MUC1-C inhibition in solid tumors. PMID:26833129

  13. Carrot and stick: HIF-alpha engages c-Myc in hypoxic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Huang, L E

    2008-04-01

    The past decade of research on hypoxic responses has provided a considerable understanding of how cells respond to hypoxic stress at the molecular level, thanks to the identification and molecular cloning of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF-1alpha. Numerous target genes have since been identified to account for various aspects of the hypoxic response, including angiogenesis and glycolysis. Yet, fundamental questions remain regarding the mechanisms by which hypoxia controls cell proliferation, genetic instability, mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative respiration in cancer cells. Although the proto-oncoprotein c-Myc appears to be the diametrical opposite of HIF-1alpha in most of these processes, recent studies indicate that c-Myc is an integral part of the HIF-alpha-c-Myc molecular pathway in the hypoxic response. It has been shown that HIF-alpha engages with Myc by various mechanisms to achieve oxygen homeostasis for cell survival. This article focuses on the intricate roles of c-Myc in the hypoxic response, discusses various mechanisms controlling c-Myc activity by HIF-alpha for the regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes, and emphasizing the outcome of gene expression apparently dependent upon hypoxic conditions, cellular context, and gene promoter.

  14. Indefinite self-renewal of ESCs through Myc/Max transcriptional complex-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hishida, Tomoaki; Nozaki, Yuriko; Nakachi, Yutaka; Mizuno, Yosuke; Okazaki, Yasushi; Ema, Masatsugu; Takahashi, Satoru; Nishimoto, Masazumi; Okuda, Akihiko

    2011-07-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can self-renew indefinitely under the governance of ESC-specific transcriptional circuitries in which each transcriptional factor regulates distinct or overlapping sets of genes with other factors. c-Myc is a key player that is crucially involved in maintaining the undifferentiated state and the self-renewal of ESCs. However, the mechanism by which c-Myc helps preserve the ESC status is still poorly understood. Here we addressed this question by performing loss-of-function studies with the Max gene, which encodes the best-characterized partner protein for all Myc family proteins. Although Myc/Max complexes are widely regarded as crucial regulators of the ESC status, our data revealed that ESCs do not absolutely require these complexes in certain contexts and that this requirement is restricted to empirical ESC culture conditions without a MAPK inhibitor.

  15. Role of MYC-Regulated Long Noncoding RNAs in Cell Cycle Regulation and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Taewan; Jeon, Young-Jun; Cui, Ri; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Peng, Yong; Kim, Sung-Hak; Tili, Esmerina; Alder, Hansjuerg

    2015-01-01

    Background: The functions of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in several cancers, but the roles of lncRNAs in colorectal cancer (CRC) are less well understood. The transcription factor MYC is known to regulate lncRNAs and has been implicated in cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Methods: CRC cells and tissues were profiled to identify lncRNAs differentially expressed in CRC, from which we further selected MYC-regulated lncRNAs. We used luciferase promoter assay, ChIP, RNA pull-down assay, deletion mapping assay, LC-MS/MS and RNA immunoprecipitation to determine the mechanisms of MYC regulation of lncRNAs. Moreover, soft agar assay and in vivo xenograft experiments (four athymic nude mice per group) provided evidence of MYC-regulated lncRNAs in cancer cell transformation and tumorigenesis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for survival analyses. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: We identified lncRNAs differentially expressed in CRC (P < .05, greater than two-fold) and verified four lncRNAs upregulated and two downregulated in CRC cells and tissues. We further identified MYC-regulated lncRNAs, named MYCLos. The MYC-regulated MYCLos may function in cell proliferation and cell cycle by regulating MYC target genes such as CDKN1A (p21) and CDKN2B (p15), suggesting new regulatory mechanisms of MYC-repressed target genes through lncRNAs. RNA binding proteins including HuR and hnRNPK are involved in the function of MYCLos by interacting with MYCLo-1 and MYCLo-2, respectively. Knockdown experiments also showed that MYCLo-2, differentially expressed not only in CRC but also in prostate cancer, has a role in cancer transformation and tumorigenesis. Conclusions: Our results provide novel regulatory mechanisms in MYC function through lncRNAs and new potential lncRNA targets of CRC. PMID:25663692

  16. SIRT1 Limits Adipocyte Hyperplasia through c-Myc Inhibition*

    PubMed Central

    Abdesselem, Houari; Madani, Aisha; Hani, Ahmad; Al-Noubi, Muna; Goswami, Neha; Ben Hamidane, Hisham; Billing, Anja M.; Pasquier, Jennifer; Bonkowski, Michael S.; Halabi, Najeeb; Dalloul, Rajaa; Sheriff, Mohamed Z.; Mesaeli, Nasrin; ElRayess, Mohamed; Sinclair, David A.; Graumann, Johannes; Mazloum, Nayef A.

    2016-01-01

    The expansion of fat mass in the obese state is due to increased adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia. The molecular mechanism that drives adipocyte hyperplasia remains unknown. The NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), a key regulator of mammalian metabolism, maintains proper metabolic functions in many tissues, counteracting obesity. Here we report that differentiated adipocytes are hyperplastic when SIRT1 is knocked down stably in mouse 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This phenotype is associated with dysregulated adipocyte metabolism and enhanced inflammation. We also demonstrate that SIRT1 is a key regulator of proliferation in preadipocytes. Quantitative proteomics reveal that the c-Myc pathway is altered to drive enhanced proliferation in SIRT1-silenced 3T3-L1 cells. Moreover, c-Myc is hyperacetylated, levels of p27 are reduced, and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) is activated upon SIRT1 reduction. Remarkably, differentiating SIRT1-silenced preadipocytes exhibit enhanced mitotic clonal expansion accompanied by reduced levels of p27 as well as elevated levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ) and c-Myc, which is also hyperacetylated. c-Myc activation and enhanced proliferation phenotype are also found to be SIRT1-dependent in proliferating mouse embryonic fibroblasts and differentiating human SW872 preadipocytes. Reducing both SIRT1 and c-Myc expression in 3T3-L1 cells simultaneously does not induce the adipocyte hyperplasia phenotype, confirming that SIRT1 controls adipocyte hyperplasia through c-Myc regulation. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of adipocyte hyperplasia will open new avenues toward understanding obesity. PMID:26655722

  17. Phosphorylation-Coupled Proteolysis of the Transcription Factor MYC2 Is Important for Jasmonate-Signaled Plant Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Qingzhe; Yan, Liuhua; Tan, Dan; Chen, Rong; Sun, Jiaqiang; Gao, Liyan; Dong, Meng-Qiu; Wang, Yingchun; Li, Chuanyou

    2013-01-01

    As a master regulator of jasmonic acid (JA)–signaled plant immune responses, the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) Leu zipper transcription factor MYC2 differentially regulates different subsets of JA–responsive genes through distinct mechanisms. However, how MYC2 itself is regulated at the protein level remains unknown. Here, we show that proteolysis of MYC2 plays a positive role in regulating the transcription of its target genes. We discovered a 12-amino-acid element in the transcription activation domain (TAD) of MYC2 that is required for both the proteolysis and the transcriptional activity of MYC2. Interestingly, MYC2 phosphorylation at residue Thr328, which facilitates its turnover, is also required for the MYC2 function to regulate gene transcription. Together, these results reveal that phosphorylation-coupled turnover of MYC2 stimulates its transcription activity. Our results exemplify that, as with animals, plants employ an “activation by destruction” mechanism to fine-tune their transcriptome to adapt to their ever-changing environment. PMID:23593022

  18. Specific regulation of mRNA cap methylation by the c-Myc and E2F1 transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Michael D.; Cowling, Victoria H.

    2009-01-01

    Methylation of the mRNA 5′ guanosine cap is essential for efficient gene expression. The 5′methyl cap binds to eIF4E, which is the first step in the recruitment of mRNA to the 40S ribosomal subunit. To investigate whether mRNA cap methylation is regulated in a gene-specific manner, we established a method to detect the relative level of cap methylation on specific mRNAs. We found that two transcription factors, c-Myc and E2F1, induce cap methylation of their transcriptional target genes, and therefore, c-Myc and E2F1 upregulate gene expression by simultaneously inducing transcription and promoting translation. c-Myc-induced cap methylation is greater than transcriptional induction for the majority of its target genes, indicating that this is a major mechanism by which Myc regulates gene expression. PMID:19137018

  19. Reconstitution of an E box-binding Myc:Max complex with recombinant full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Farina, Anthony; Faiola, Francesco; Martinez, Ernest

    2004-04-01

    The c-Myc oncoprotein (Myc) is a DNA sequence-specific transcription factor that regulates transcription of a wide variety of genes involved in the control of cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis and its deregulated expression is implicated in many types of human cancer. Myc has an N-terminal transcription activation domain (TAD) that interacts with various coactivators and a C-terminal basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLHZip) domain required for E box-specific DNA-binding and heterodimerization with its obligatory bHLHZip protein partner Max. The analysis of the mechanisms by which the Myc:Max complex regulates transcription at the molecular level in vitro has been hampered by the difficulty in obtaining highly pure recombinant Myc:Max heterodimers that contain full-length Myc with its complete TAD domain and that have sequence-specific DNA-binding activity. Here, we describe a simple method to reconstitute recombinant Myc:Max complexes from highly purified full-length proteins expressed in Escherichia coli that are soluble and highly active in E box-specific DNA-binding in vitro. The reconstituted Myc:Max complexes are stable and lack Max:Max homodimers. This procedure should facilitate the characterization of the DNA-binding and transcription activation functions of full-length Myc:Max complexes in vitro and in particular the role of Myc TAD-interacting cofactors and Myc:Max post-translational modifications.

  20. Interactions between Myc and MondoA transcription factors in metabolism and tumourigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Blake R; Ayer, Donald E

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic reprogramming towards aerobic glycolysis is a common feature of transformed cells and can be driven by a network of transcription factors. It is well established that c-Myc and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) contribute to metabolic reprogramming by driving the expression of glycolytic target genes. More recently, the c-Myc-related transcription factor MondoA has been shown to restrict glucose uptake and aerobic glycolysis via its induction of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP). Three recent studies demonstrate that complex and cancer type-specific interactions between c-Myc, MondoA and HIF-1α underlie metabolism, tumourigenesis and drug response. In triple-negative breast cancer, c-Myc blocks MondoA-dependent activation of TXNIP to stimulate aerobic glycolysis. In contrast, in neuroblastoma, N-Myc requires MondoA for metabolic reprogramming and tumourigenesis. Finally, the therapeutic response of BRAFV600E melanoma cells to vemurafenib requires downregulation of c-Myc and HIF-1α and upregulation of MondoA-TXNIP, and the subsequent reprogramming away from aerobic glycolysis. In this minireview we highlight the findings in these three studies and present a working model to explain why c-Myc and MondoA function cooperatively in some cancers and antagonistically in others. PMID:26469830

  1. A Myc-driven self-reinforcing regulatory network maintains mouse embryonic stem cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Fagnocchi, Luca; Cherubini, Alessandro; Hatsuda, Hiroshi; Fasciani, Alessandra; Mazzoleni, Stefania; Poli, Vittoria; Berno, Valeria; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Reinbold, Rolland; Endele, Max; Schroeder, Timm; Rocchigiani, Marina; Szkarłat, Żaneta; Oliviero, Salvatore; Dalton, Stephen; Zippo, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell identity depends on the integration of extrinsic and intrinsic signals, which directly influence the maintenance of their epigenetic state. Although Myc transcription factors play a major role in stem cell self-renewal and pluripotency, their integration with signalling pathways and epigenetic regulators remains poorly defined. We addressed this point by profiling the gene expression and epigenetic pattern in ESCs whose growth depends on conditional Myc activity. Here we show that Myc potentiates the Wnt/β-catenin signalling pathway, which cooperates with the transcriptional regulatory network in sustaining ESC self-renewal. Myc activation results in the transcriptional repression of Wnt antagonists through the direct recruitment of PRC2 on these targets. The consequent potentiation of the autocrine Wnt/β-catenin signalling induces the transcriptional activation of the endogenous Myc family members, which in turn activates a Myc-driven self-reinforcing circuit. Thus, our data unravel a Myc-dependent self-propagating epigenetic memory in the maintenance of ESC self-renewal capacity. PMID:27301576

  2. Driver or passenger effects of augmented c-Myc and Cdc20 in gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Ping; Zhou, Xinhui; Liu, Qun; Fuller, Gregory N.; Phillips, Lynette M.; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cdc20 and c-Myc are commonly overexpressed in a broad spectrum of cancers, including glioblastoma (GBM). Despite this clear association, whether c-Myc and Cdc20 overexpression is a driver or passenger event in gliomagenesis remains unclear. Results Both c-Myc and Cdc20 induced the proliferation of primary glial progenitor cells. c-Myc also promoted the formation of soft agar anchorage-independent colonies. In the RCAS/Ntv-a glia-specific transgenic mouse model, c-Myc increased the GBM incidence from 19.1% to 47.4% by 12 weeks of age when combined with kRas and Akt3 in Ntv-a INK4a-ARF (also known as CDKN2A)-null mice. In contrast, Cdc20 decreased the GBM incidence from 19.1% to 9.1%. Moreover, cell differentiation was modulated by c-Myc in kRas/Akt3-induced GBM on the basis of Nestin/GFAP expression (glial progenitor cell differentiation), while Cdc20 had no effect on primary glial progenitor cell differentiation. Materials and Methods We used glial progenitor cells from Ntv-a newborn mice to evaluate the role of c-Myc and Cdc20 in the proliferation and transformation of GBM in vitro and in vivo. We further determined whether c-Myc and Cdc20 have a driver or passenger role in GBM development using kRas/Akt3 signals in a RCAS/Ntv-a mouse model. Conclusions These results suggest that the driver or passenger of oncogene signaling is dependent on cellular status. c-Myc is a driver when combined with kRas/Akt3 oncogenic signals in gliomagenesis, whereas Cdc20 overexpression is a passenger. Inhibition of cell differentiation of c-Myc may be a target for anti-glioma therapy. PMID:26993778

  3. BET inhibitor OTX015 targets BRD2 and BRD4 and decreases c-MYC in acute leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Berrou, Jeannig; Dupont, Mélanie; Bertrand, Sibyl; Masse, Aline; Raffoux, Emmanuel; Itzykson, Raphaël; Delord, Marc; Riveiro, Maria E.; Herait, Patrice; Baruchel, André; Dombret, Hervé; Gardin, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The bromodomain (BRD) and extraterminal (BET) proteins including BRD2, BRD3 and BRD4 have been identified as key targets for leukemia maintenance. A novel oral inhibitor of BRD2/3/4, the thienotriazolodiazepine compound OTX015, suitable for human use, is available. Here we report its biological effects in AML and ALL cell lines and leukemic samples. Exposure to OTX015 lead to cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis at submicromolar concentrations in acute leukemia cell lines and patient-derived leukemic cells, as described with the canonical JQ1 BET inhibitor. Treatment with JQ1 and OTX15 induces similar gene expression profiles in sensitive cell lines, including a c-MYC decrease and an HEXIM1 increase. OTX015 exposure also induced a strong decrease of BRD2, BRD4 and c-MYC and increase of HEXIM1 proteins, while BRD3 expression was unchanged. c-MYC, BRD2, BRD3, BRD4 and HEXIM1 mRNA levels did not correlate however with viability following exposure to OTX015. Sequential combinations of OTX015 with other epigenetic modifying drugs, panobinostat and azacitidine have a synergic effect on growth of the KASUMI cell line. Our results indicate that OTX015 and JQ1 have similar biological effects in leukemic cells, supporting OTX015 evaluation in a Phase Ib trial in relapsed/refractory leukemia patients. PMID:25989842

  4. The use of FISH-comet to detect c-Myc and TP 53 damage in extended-term lymphocyte cultures treated with terbuthylazine and carbofuran.

    PubMed

    Mladinic, Marin; Zeljezic, Davor; Shaposhnikov, Sergey A; Collins, Andrew R

    2012-05-20

    Terbuthylazine and carbofuran are suspected to cause non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and lung cancer. We evaluated the effects of prolonged exposure to low concentrations on primary DNA damage by comet assay, and on the structural integrity of c-Myc and TP 53 genes by FISH-comet. Another novelty in studying these pesticides' genotoxicity is the use of 14-day extended-term human lymphocyte cultures. Concentrations corresponded to values of ADI and OEL: for terbuthylazine 0.58 ng/ml and 8 ng/ml; for carbofuran 8 ng/ml and 21.6 ng/ml, respectively. A possible effect of metabolic activation (S9) was also considered. Carbofuran treatment induced a significant migration of DNA into the tail in a concentration-dependent manner, while for terbuthylazine the effect was significant only at the higher concentration. Terbuthylazine caused migration of both c-Myc signals into the comet tail. A significant occurrence of TP 53 signals in the tail was observed at 8 ng/ml. Prolonged carbofuran treatment significantly elevated the migration of a single c-Myc signal into the tail in a concentration-dependent manner. With S9, distribution of signals shifted toward increased presence of both signals in tail. Our results showed impaired structural integrity of c-Myc and TP 53 due to prolonged exposure to terbuthylazine and carbofuran.

  5. Targeting of c-myc and beta-globin coding sequences to cytoskeletal-bound polysomes by c-myc 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, J; Campbell, G; Piechaczyk, M; Blanchard, J M

    1994-01-01

    The influence of the 3' untranslated region on mRNA localization was investigated by measuring the distribution of myc, beta-globin and hybrid myc-globin mRNAs between free, cytoskeletal-bound and membrane-bound polysomes in cells transfected with either control or chimeric gene constructs. c-myc sequences and beta-globin-coding sequences linked to the myc 3' untranslated region were present at greatest enrichment in cytoskeletal-bound polysomes. beta-Globin mRNA and myc-coding sequences linked to the beta-globin 3' untranslated region were recovered largely in the free polysomes. In situ hybridization confirmed that replacement of the c-myc 3' untranslated region by that of globin caused a relocalization of the mRNA. The results suggest that mRNA localization in differentiated eukaryotic cells depends on a mechanism that involves directional information in the 3' untranslated region of mRNAs. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8129712

  6. The Dysregulation of Polyamine Metabolism in Colorectal Cancer Is Associated with Overexpression of c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than Enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Snezhkina, Anastasiya V.; Lipatova, Anastasiya V.; Sadritdinova, Asiya F.; Kardymon, Olga L.; Fedorova, Maria S.; Kaprin, Andrey D.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is well known that the chronic inflammation can promote the progression of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recently, a number of studies revealed a potential association between colorectal inflammation, cancer progression, and infection caused by enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF). Bacterial enterotoxin activates spermine oxidase (SMO), which produces spermidine and H2O2 as byproducts of polyamine catabolism, which, in turn, enhances inflammation and tissue injury. Using qPCR analysis, we estimated the expression of SMOX gene and ETBF colonization in CRC patients. We found no statistically significant associations between them. Then we selected genes involved in polyamine metabolism, metabolic reprogramming, and inflammation regulation and estimated their expression in CRC. We observed overexpression of SMOX, ODC1, SRM, SMS, MTAP, c-Myc, C/EBPβ (CREBP), and other genes. We found that two mediators of metabolic reprogramming, inflammation, and cell proliferation c-Myc and C/EBPβ may serve as regulators of polyamine metabolism genes (SMOX, AZIN1, MTAP, SRM, ODC1, AMD1, and AGMAT) as they are overexpressed in tumors, have binding site according to ENCODE ChIP-Seq data, and demonstrate strong coexpression with their targets. Thus, increased polyamine metabolism in CRC could be driven by c-Myc and C/EBPβ rather than ETBF infection. PMID:27433286

  7. Selective inhibition of c-Myc/Max dimerization and DNA binding by small molecules.

    PubMed

    Kiessling, Anke; Sperl, Bianca; Hollis, Angela; Eick, Dirk; Berg, Thorsten

    2006-07-01

    bZip and bHLHZip protein family members comprise a large fraction of eukaryotic transcription factors and need to bind DNA in order to exert most of their fundamental biological roles. Their binding to DNA requires homo- or heterodimerization via alpha-helical domains, which generally do not contain obvious binding sites for small molecules. We have identified two small molecules, dubbed Mycro1 and Mycro2, which inhibit the protein-protein interactions between the bHLHZip proteins c-Myc and Max. Mycros are the first inhibitors of c-Myc/Max dimerization, which have been demonstrated to inhibit DNA binding of c-Myc with preference over other dimeric transcription factors in vitro. Mycros inhibit c-Myc-dependent proliferation, gene transcription, and oncogenic transformation in the low micromolar concentration range. Our data support the idea that dimeric transcription factors can be druggable even in the absence of obvious small-molecule binding pockets.

  8. [Advances Research on C-MYC Proto-oncogene in Multiple Myeloma -Review].

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Guo, Wen-Jian; Yao, Ron-Xin

    2016-08-01

    Multiple myeloma(MM) as one of the most common tumors of hmatologic system, is characterized by malignant proliferation of plasma cells, and the chemotherapy is the main therapeutic method. MM is an incurable disease because of drug-resistance of MM cells. Although the pathogenesis of MM remains unknown, the chromosome abnormalities exit in half of the patients, particularly the highly expressed gene C-MYC. Furthermore, plenty of clinical researches indicated a high expression level of C-MYC implied worse progression and/or poor prognosis of MM. Recently, the work exploiting the compounds targeting MYC has made substantial progress, even in the MM therapy. In this article, briefly the recent advances of the research on C-MYC proto-oncogene in multiple myeloma are reviewed. PMID:27531809

  9. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents

    PubMed Central

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  10. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs. PMID:27412232

  11. IDH-mutant glioma specific association of rs55705857 located at 8q24.21 involves MYC deregulation.

    PubMed

    Oktay, Yavuz; Ülgen, Ege; Can, Özge; Akyerli, Cemaliye B; Yüksel, Şirin; Erdemgil, Yiğit; Durası, I Melis; Henegariu, Octavian Ioan; Nanni, E Paolo; Selevsek, Nathalie; Grossmann, Jonas; Erson-Omay, E Zeynep; Bai, Hanwen; Gupta, Manu; Lee, William; Turcan, Şevin; Özpınar, Aysel; Huse, Jason T; Sav, M Aydın; Flanagan, Adrienne; Günel, Murat; Sezerman, O Uğur; Yakıcıer, M Cengiz; Pamir, M Necmettin; Özduman, Koray

    2016-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs55705857, located in a non-coding but evolutionarily conserved region at 8q24.21, is strongly associated with IDH-mutant glioma development and was suggested to be a causal variant. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this association has remained unknown. With a case control study in 285 gliomas, 316 healthy controls, 380 systemic cancers, 31 other CNS-tumors, and 120 IDH-mutant cartilaginous tumors, we identified that the association was specific to IDH-mutant gliomas. Odds-ratios were 9.25 (5.17-16.52; 95% CI) for IDH-mutated gliomas and 12.85 (5.94-27.83; 95% CI) for IDH-mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas. Decreasing strength with increasing anaplasia implied a modulatory effect. No somatic mutations were noted at this locus in 114 blood-tumor pairs, nor was there a copy number difference between risk-allele and only-ancestral allele carriers. CCDC26 RNA-expression was rare and not different between the two groups. There were only minor subtype-specific differences in common glioma driver genes. RNA sequencing and LC-MS/MS comparisons pointed to significantly altered MYC-signaling. Baseline enhancer activity of the conserved region specifically on the MYC promoter and its further positive modulation by the SNP risk-allele was shown in vitro. Our findings implicate MYC deregulation as the underlying cause of the observed association. PMID:27282637

  12. Oncogenic KRAS triggers MAPK-dependent errors in mitosis and MYC-dependent sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents.

    PubMed

    Perera, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2016-07-14

    Oncogenic KRAS induces cell proliferation and transformation, but little is known about its effects on cell division. Functional genetic screens have recently revealed that cancer cell lines expressing oncogenic KRAS are sensitive to interference with mitosis, but neither the mechanism nor the uniformity of anti-mitotic drug sensitivity connected with mutant KRAS expression are yet clear. Here, we report that acute expression of oncogenic KRAS in HeLa cells induces mitotic delay and defects in chromosome segregation through mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation and de-regulated expression of several mitosis-related genes. These anomalies are accompanied by increased sensitivity to anti-mitotic agents, a phenotype dependent on the transcription factor MYC and its downstream target anti-apoptotic protein BCL-XL. Unexpectedly, we find no correlation between KRAS mutational status or MYC expression levels and anti-mitotic drug sensitivity when surveying a large database of anti-cancer drug responses. However, we report that the co-existence of KRAS mutations and high MYC expression predicts anti-mitotic drug sensitivity. Our findings reveal a novel function of oncogenic KRAS in regulating accurate mitotic progression and suggest new avenues to therapeutically target KRAS-mutant tumours and stratify patients in ongoing clinical trials of anti-mitotic drugs.

  13. Critical B-lymphoid cell intrinsic role of endogenous MCL-1 in c-MYC-induced lymphomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, S; Kelly, G L; Delbridge, A R D; Kelly, P N; Bouillet, P; Adams, J M; Strasser, A

    2016-01-01

    Evasion of apoptosis is critical for tumorigenesis, and sustained survival of nascent neoplastic cells may depend upon the endogenous levels of pro-survival BCL-2 family members. Indeed, previous studies using gene-targeted mice revealed that BCL-XL, but surprisingly not BCL-2, is critical for the development of c-MYC-induced pre-B/B lymphomas. However, it remains unclear whether another pro-survival BCL-2 relative contributes to their development. MCL-1 is an intriguing candidate, because it is required for cell survival during early B-lymphocyte differentiation. It is expressed abnormally high in several types of human B-cell lymphomas and is implicated in their resistance to chemotherapy. To test the B-cell intrinsic requirement for endogenous MCL-1 in lymphoma development, we conditionally deleted Mcl-1 in B-lymphoid cells of Eμ-Myc transgenic mice. We found that MCL-1 loss in early B-lymphoid progenitors delayed MYC-driven lymphomagenesis. Moreover, the lymphomas that arose when MCL-1 levels were diminished appeared to have been selected for reduced levels of BIM and/or increased levels of BCL-XL. These results underscore the importance of MCL-1 in lymphoma development and show that alterations in the levels of other cell death regulators can compensate for deficiencies in MCL-1 expression. PMID:26962682

  14. Characterization of cis-regulatory elements of the c-myc promoter responding to human GM-CSF or mouse interleukin 3 in mouse proB cell line BA/F3 cells expressing the human GM-CSF receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, S; Ishida, S; Koike, K; Arai, K

    1995-01-01

    Interleukin 3 (IL-3) or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activates c-fos, c-jun, and c-myc genes and proliferation in both hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. Using a series of deletion mutants of the beta subunit of human GM-CSF receptor (hGMR) and inhibitors of tyrosine kinase, two distinct signaling pathways, one for activation of c-fos and c-jun genes, and the other for cell proliferation and activation of c-myc gene have been elucidated. In contrast to wealth of information on the pathway leading to activation of c-fos/c-jun genes, knowledge of the latter is scanty. To clarify the mechanisms of activation of c-myc gene by cytokines, we established a transient transfection assay in mouse proB cell line BA/F3 cells expressing hGMR. Analyses of hGMR beta subunit mutants revealed two cytoplasmic regions involved in activation of the c-myc promoter, one is essential and the other is dispensable but enhances the activity. These regions are located at the membrane proximal and the distal regions covering amino acid positions 455-544 and 544-589, respectively. Characterization of cis-acting regulatory elements of the c-myc gene showed that the region containing the P2 promoter initiation site is sufficient to mediate the response to mIL-3 or hGM-CSF. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay using an oligonucleotide corresponding to the distal putative E2F binding site revealed that p107/E2F complex, the negative regulator of E2F, decreased, and free E2F increased after mIL-3 stimulation. These results support the thesis that mIL-3 or hGM-CSF regulates the c-myc promoter by altering composition of the E2F complexes at E2F binding site. Images PMID:7579683

  15. E1a promotes c-Myc-dependent replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Valero, María Llanos; Cimas, Francisco Jose; Arias, Laura; Melgar-Rojas, Pedro; García, Elena; Callejas-Valera, Juan Luis; García-Cano, Jesús; Serrano-Oviedo, Leticia; Ángel de la Cruz-Morcillo, Miguel; Sánchez-Pérez, Isabel; Sánchez-Prieto, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    The E1a gene from adenovirus is known to be a potent inducer of chemo/radiosensitivity in a wide range of tumors. However, the molecular bases of its radiosensitizer properties are still poorly understood. In an attempt to study this effect, U87MG cells, derived from a radio-resistant tumor as glioblastoma, where infected with lentivirus carrying E1a gene developing an acute sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The induction of radiosensitivity correlated with a marked G2/M phase accumulation and a potent apoptotic response. Our findings demonstrate that c-Myc plays a pivotal role in E1a-associated radiosensitivity through the induction of a replicative stress situation, as our data support by genetic approaches, based in interference and overexpression in U87MG cells. In fact, we present evidence showing that Chk1 is a novel transcriptional target of E1a gene through the effect exerted by this adenoviral protein onto c-Myc. Moreover, c-Myc upregulation also explains the marked phosphorylation of H2AX associated to E1a expression in the absence of DNA damage. Indeed, all these observations were applicable to other experimental models, such as T98G, LN-405 and A172, rendering the same pattern in terms of radiosensitivity, cell cycle distribution, upregulation of Chk1, c-Myc, and phosphorylation pattern of H2AX. In summary, our data propose a novel mechanism to explain how E1a mediates radiosensitivity through the signaling axis E1a→c-Myc→ replicative stress situation. This novel mechanism of E1a-mediated radiosensitivity could be the key to open new possibilities in the current therapy of glioblastoma. PMID:24196438

  16. The Metastasis Suppressor, N-MYC Downstream-regulated Gene-1 (NDRG1), Down-regulates the ErbB Family of Receptors to Inhibit Downstream Oncogenic Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Menezes, Sharleen V; Sahni, Sumit; Kalinowski, Danuta S; Bae, Dong-Hun; Lane, Darius J R; Richardson, Des R

    2016-01-15

    N-MYC downstream-regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent growth and metastasis suppressor that acts through its inhibitory effects on a wide variety of cellular signaling pathways, including the TGF-β pathway, protein kinase B (AKT)/PI3K pathway, RAS, etc. To investigate the hypothesis that its multiple effects could be regulated by a common upstream effector, the role of NDRG1 on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and other members of the ErbB family, namely human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3), was examined. We demonstrate that NDRG1 markedly decreased the expression and activation of EGFR, HER2, and HER3 in response to the epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand, while also inhibiting formation of the EGFR/HER2 and HER2/HER3 heterodimers. In addition, NDRG1 also decreased activation of the downstream MAPKK in response to EGF. Moreover, novel anti-tumor agents of the di-2-pyridylketone class of thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, which markedly up-regulate NDRG1, were found to inhibit EGFR, HER2, and HER3 expression and phosphorylation in cancer cells. However, the mechanism involved appeared dependent on NDRG1 for di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, but was independent of this metastasis suppressor for di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone. This observation demonstrates that small structural changes in thiosemicarbazones result in marked alterations in molecular targeting. Collectively, these results reveal a mechanism for the extensive downstream effects on cellular signaling attributed to NDRG1. Furthermore, this study identifies a novel approach for the treatment of tumors resistant to traditional EGFR inhibitors. PMID:26534963

  17. Differential regulation of the c-Myc/Lin28 axis discriminates subclasses of rearranged MLL leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lili; Sun, Yuqing; Wang, Jingya; Jiang, Hui; Muntean, Andrew G.

    2016-01-01

    MLL rearrangements occur in myeloid and lymphoid leukemias and are generally associated with a poor prognosis, however this varies depending on the fusion partner. We modeled acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in mice using various MLL fusion proteins (MLL-FPs) and observed significantly different survival outcomes. To better understand the differences between these leukemias, we examined the genome wide expression profiles of leukemic cells transformed with different MLL-FPs. RNA-sequencing and pathway analysis identified the c-Myc transcriptional program as one of the top distinguishing features. c-Myc protein levels were highly correlative with AML disease latency in mice. Functionally, overexpression of c-Myc resulted in a more aggressive proliferation rate in MLL-FP cell lines. While all MLL-FP transformed cells displayed sensitivity to BET inhibitors, high c-Myc expressing cells showed greater resistance to Brd4 inhibition. The Myc target Lin28B was also differentially expressed in MLL-FP cell lines in agreement with c-Myc expression. Examination of Lin28B miRNAs targets revealed that let-7g was significantly increased in leukemic cells associated with the longest disease latency and forced let-7g expression induced differentiation of leukemic blasts. Thus, differential regulation of the c-Myc/Lin28/let-7g program by different MLL-FPs is functionally related to disease latency and BET inhibitor resistance in MLL leukemias. PMID:27007052

  18. Gene Silencing and Haploinsufficiency of Csk Increase Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Moon; Ji, Su-Min; Park, So-Yon; Kim, Marina E.; Jigden, Baigalmaa; Lim, Ji Eun; Hwang, Sue-Yun; Lee, Young-Ho; Oh, Bermseok

    2016-01-01

    Objective Recent genome-wide association studies have identified 33 human genetic loci that influence blood pressure. The 15q24 locus is one such locus that has been confirmed in Asians and Europeans. There are 21 genes in the locus within a 1-Mb boundary, but a functional link of these genes to blood pressure has not been reported. We aimed to identify a causative gene for blood pressure change in the 15q24 locus. Methods and Results CSK and ULK3 were selected as candidate genes based on eQTL analysis studies that showed the association between gene transcript levels and the lead SNP (rs1378942). Injection of siRNAs for mouse homologs Csk, Ulk3, and Cyp1a2 (negative control) showed reduced target gene mRNA levels in vivo. However, Csk siRNA only increased blood pressure while Ulk3 and Cyp1a2 siRNA did not change it. Further, blood pressure in Csk+/- heterozygotes was higher than in wild-type, consistent with what we observed in Csk siRNA-injected mice. We confirmed that haploinsufficiency of Csk increased the active form of Src in Csk+/- mice aorta. We also showed that inhibition of Src by PP2, a Src inhibitor decreased high blood pressure in Csk+/- mice and the active Src in Csk+/- mice aorta and in Csk knock-down vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting blood pressure regulation by Csk through Src. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that Csk is a causative gene in the 15q24 locus and regulates blood pressure through Src, and these findings provide a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of hypertension. PMID:26751575

  19. Loss of PRDM11 promotes MYC-driven lymphomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Fog, Cathrine Kolster; Asmar, Fazila; Côme, Christophe; Jensen, Klaus Thorleif; Johansen, Jens Vilstrup; Kheir, Tony Bou; Jacobsen, Linda; Friis, Carsten; Louw, Alison; Rosgaard, Louise; Øbro, Nina Friesgaard; Marquart, Hanne Vibeke; Anthonsen, Kristian; Braat, Arie Koen; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Ralfkiaer, Elisabeth; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Lund, Anders Henrik

    2015-02-19

    The PR-domain (PRDM) family of genes encodes transcriptional regulators, several of which are deregulated in cancer. By using a functional screening approach, we sought to identify novel tumor suppressors among the PRDMs. Here we demonstrate oncogenic collaboration between depletion of the previously uncharacterized PR-domain family member Prdm11 and overexpression of MYC. Overexpression of PRDM11 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. Prdm11 knockout mice are viable, and loss of Prdm11 accelerates MYC-driven lymphomagenesis in the Eµ-Myc mouse model. Moreover, we show that patients with PRDM11-deficient diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) have poorer overall survival and belong to the nongerminal center B-cell-like subtype. Mechanistically, genome-wide mapping of PRDM11 binding sites coupled with transcriptome sequencing in human DLBCL cells evidenced that PRDM11 associates with transcriptional start sites of target genes and regulates important oncogenes such as FOS and JUN. Hence, we characterize PRDM11 as a putative novel tumor suppressor that controls the expression of key oncogenes, and we add new mechanistic insight into B-cell lymphomagenesis.

  20. Alterations in exon 1 of c-myc and expression of p62c-myc in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, J J; Landers, R J; Crowley, M; Healy, I; Kealy, W F; Hogan, J; Doyle, C T

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) positive and negative squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix for structural alterations in exon 1 c-myc; and to investigate the expression pattern of p62, the protein product of c-myc. MATERIAL: Archival paraffin wax embedded tissues of cervical squamous cell carcinomas, stage I and II, retrieved from the files of the department of pathology, University College Cork, Ireland: 40 cases were examined for alterations in exon 1 of c-myc; 57 cases were used for immunocytochemical p62 analysis. METHODS: c-myc exon 1 PCR on HPV positive and negative stage I and II cervical squamous cell carcinomas was performed using primers designed to fragile sites in exon 1 of the c-myc oncogene, which are frequently involved in translocation phenomena and deletions in other neoplasms. This region is bordered by two promoter sequences P1 and P2. In addition, the expression of p62 was evaluated using the monoclonal antibody Mycl-9E10. RESULTS: Alterations in exon 1 of c-myc were shown in 7.5% of squamous cell carcinomas of the cervix. Changes in exon 1 and 2 of c-myc were also found in COLO 320 cells and Raji cells. These alterations were due to small deletions within exon 1 of c-myc, but point polymorphisms occurring within the priming sites (in one case) may also have occurred. The alterations uncovered appeared "clonal," as replicate samples showed the same amplicon band pattern. Expression of c-myc was variable, with cytoplasmic staining patterns predominating. All cases which showed exon 1 alterations were HPV positive and had strong nuclear positivity on p62 immunocytochemistry. CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in exon 1 of c-myc occur in a minority of cervical cancers and there was increased expression of p62 in a cohort of HPV positive and negative cervical squamous cell carcinomas. Exon 1 alterations may provide an alternative route to c-myc activation in early squamous cell carcinoma. Images PMID:9462237

  1. DNA sequences that mediate attenuation of transcription from the mouse protooncogene myc.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, S; Bishop, J M

    1989-01-01

    Expression of the protooncogene myc is regulated by multiple mechanisms and is probably involved in the control of cellular proliferation. Modulation of transcriptional elongation by attenuation within exon 1 of the myc gene is thought to play an important role in determining levels of myc RNA in both normal and tumor cells. We show that the first exon of mouse myc contains specific DNA sequences that may mediate transcriptional attenuation. A 180-nucleotide DNA fragment derived from the 3' end of exon 1 reduced transcriptional elongation by polymerase II when placed within an intron of the human alpha 1-globin gene and assayed by transfection into HeLa cells. A 36-nucleotide sequence that resembles a variety of transcriptional termination signals was located within this myc fragment but was by itself insufficient to cause attenuation when placed within the alpha-globin gene. Modulation of transcriptional elongation through specific DNA sequences within a gene may thus provide a mechanism for regulating its expression. Images PMID:2463629

  2. Detection of the c-myc oncogene product in colonic polyps and carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, J.; Evan, G.; Watson, J.; Sikora, K.

    1986-01-01

    The c-myc oncogene has been implicated in the processes of normal cell proliferation and differentiation. Elevated levels of c-myc mRNA and its gene product (p62c-myc), have been detected in a variety of solid tumours and cultured cel lines. Its precise role in normal cell function and in neoplastic transformation and progression has yet to be elucidated. We have used a monoclonal antibody, raised by peptide immunisation, to determine the distribution by immunoperoxidase staining of the c-myc oncogene product in archival specimens of colonic polyps and carcinomas. Samples from 42 patients with colon carcinoma, 24 with benign polyps and 15 normal colon biopsies were examined. Normal colon revealed maximum staining in the mid-zone of the crypts, corresponding to the zone of differentiation and maturation. The staining was predominantly cytoplasmic. Adenomatous polyps revealed the most intense pattern of staining in areas of dysplastic change. Colonic tumours showed a wide range of staining. Well differentiated tumours contained more cytoplasmic p62c-myc than poorly differentiated tumours. These findings suggest that the c-myc oncogene product may play an important role in the evolution of colonic neoplasia. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:3511934

  3. MYC oncogene overexpression drives renal cell carcinoma in a mouse model through glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, Emelyn H.; Eberlin, Livia S.; Dang, Vanessa M.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Gabay, Meital; Adam, Stacey J.; Bellovin, David I.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Philbrick, William M.; Garcia-Ocana, Adolfo; Casey, Stephanie C.; Li, Yulin; Dang, Chi V.; Zare, Richard N.; Felsher, Dean W.

    2015-01-01

    The MYC oncogene is frequently mutated and overexpressed in human renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, there have been no studies on the causative role of MYC or any other oncogene in the initiation or maintenance of kidney tumorigenesis. Here, we show through a conditional transgenic mouse model that the MYC oncogene, but not the RAS oncogene, initiates and maintains RCC. Desorption electrospray ionization–mass-spectrometric imaging was used to obtain chemical maps of metabolites and lipids in the mouse RCC samples. Gene expression analysis revealed that the mouse tumors mimicked human RCC. The data suggested that MYC-induced RCC up-regulated the glutaminolytic pathway instead of the glycolytic pathway. The pharmacologic inhibition of glutamine metabolism with bis-2-(5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)ethyl sulfide impeded MYC-mediated RCC tumor progression. Our studies demonstrate that MYC overexpression causes RCC and points to the inhibition of glutamine metabolism as a potential therapeutic approach for the treatment of this disease. PMID:25964345

  4. MYC-mediated synthetic lethality for treatment of hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Zhang, Xin A; Xie, Wei; Li, Xiaoqing; Huang, Shiang

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated c-MYC expression is found in many human malignancies. MYC activation induces multiple lineages of hematological malignancies in single Myc transgenic mice. MYC inactivation causes tumor regression. MYC is therefore an attractive target for cancer treatment. However, little progress has been made in the development and application of targeted MYC inactivation in clinical practice. In double Myc transgenic mouse models, Myc-driven leukemogenesis and lymphomagenesis can be accelerated by transduction of non-MYC oncogenes, leading to dual addiction to MYC and the non-MYC oncogenes. Wang et al. (2004) first established the concept of MYC-mediated synthetic lethality (MYC-SL). MYC overexpression sensitized cells to TRAILand DR5-agonist-induced apoptosis. This suggests that MYC-dependent tumor cells may be killed by targeting partner oncogenes of MYC. Many small molecule inhibitors (SMIs) have been proven to induce MYC-SL by targeting AUK-B, Brd4, CDK1, CHK1, MCL-1, the mTOR/4E-BP1/eIF4E pathway, and PIM1/2. Compared with conventional treatment approaches, SMI-induced MYC-SL displays highly selective anticancer activity and much lower cytotoxicity to normal cells. SMI-induced MYC-SL can reverse eIF4F- and PIM2-induced multiple chemoresistance. The combination of an SMI with chemotherapeutic agents can elevate chemotherapy efficacy by enhancing chemosensitivity. This combination will be a promising novel approach to treating MYC-dependent tumors by inducing MYC-SL. PMID:25564254

  5. An AU-Rich Sequence Element (UUUN[A/U]U) Downstream of the Edited C in Apolipoprotein B mRNA Is a High-Affinity Binding Site for Apobec-1: Binding of Apobec-1 to This Motif in the 3′ Untranslated Region of c-myc Increases mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anant, Shrikant; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2000-01-01

    Apobec-1, the catalytic subunit of the mammalian apolipoprotein B (apoB) mRNA-editing enzyme, is a cytidine deaminase with RNA binding activity for AU-rich sequences. This RNA binding activity is required for Apobec-1 to mediate C-to-U RNA editing. Filter binding assays, using immobilized Apobec-1, demonstrate saturable binding to a 105-nt apoB RNA with a Kd of ∼435 nM. A series of AU-rich templates was used to identify a high-affinity (∼50 nM) binding site of consensus sequence UUUN[A/U]U, with multiple copies of this sequence constituting the high-affinity binding site. In order to determine whether this consensus site could be functionally demonstrated from within an apoB RNA, circular-permutation analysis was performed, revealing one major (UUUGAU) and one minor (UU) site located 3 and 16 nucleotides, respectively, downstream of the edited base. Secondary-structure predictions reveal a stem-loop flanking the edited base with Apobec-1 binding to the consensus site(s) at an open loop. A similar consensus (AUUUA) is present in the 3′ untranslated regions of several mRNAs, including that of c-myc, that are known to undergo rapid degradation. In this context, it is presumed that the consensus motif acts as a destabilizing element. As an independent test of the ability of Apobec-1 to bind to this sequence, F442A cells were transfected with Apobec-1 and the half-life of c-myc mRNA was determined following actinomycin D treatment. These studies demonstrated an increase in the half-life of c-myc mRNA from 90 to 240 min in control versus Apobec-1-expressing cells. Apobec-1 expression mutants, in which RNA binding activity is eliminated, failed to alter c-myc mRNA turnover. Taken together, the data establish a consensus binding site for Apobec-1 embedded in proximity to the edited base in apoB RNA. Binding to this site in other target RNAs raises the possibility that Apobec-1 may be involved in other aspects of RNA metabolism, independent of its role as an apoB RNA

  6. Hsa-let-7a functions as a tumor suppressor in renal cell carcinoma cell lines by targeting c-myc

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yongchao; Yin, Bingde; Zhang, Changcun; Zhou, Libin; Fan, Jie

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the first to test the let-7a/c-myc loop in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Let-7a down-regulated c-myc in three renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc target genes were down-regulated because of the let-7a-mediated down-regulation of c-myc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The let-7a/c-myc loop has a significant function in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. -- Abstract: Widespread functions of the c-myc pathway play a crucial role in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) carcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated the connection between proto-oncogenic c-myc and anti-neoplastic hsa-let-7a (let-7a) in RCC cell lines. The levels of c-myc and let-7a in 3 RCC cell lines (769P, Caki-1 and 786O) were measured after transfecting the cells with let-7a mimics or a negative control. The change in c-myc protein level was confirmed by Western blot. The anti-neoplastic function of let-7a was evaluated using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) for proliferation analysis and cell flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. The changes of downstream targets of c-myc were measured using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results suggest for the first time that let-7a acts as a tumor suppressor in RCC cell lines by down-regulating c-myc and c-myc target genes such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D1 (CCND1) and the miR17-92 cluster, which is accompanied by proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest.

  7. Protein Subcellular Relocalization Increases the Retention of Eukaryotic Duplicate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Byun, S. Ashley; Singh, Sarabdeep

    2013-01-01

    Gene duplication is widely accepted as a key evolutionary process, leading to new genes and novel protein functions. By providing the raw genetic material necessary for functional expansion, the mechanisms that involve the retention and functional diversification of duplicate genes are one of the central topics in evolutionary and comparative genomics. One proposed source of retention and functional diversification is protein subcellular relocalization (PSR). PSR postulates that changes in the subcellular location of eukaryotic duplicate proteins can positively modify function and therefore be beneficial to the organism. As such, PSR would promote retention of those relocalized duplicates and result in significantly lower death rates compared with death rates of nonrelocalized duplicate pairs. We surveyed both relocalized and nonrelocalized duplicate proteins from the available genomes and proteomes of 59 eukaryotic species and compared their relative death rates over a Ks range between 0 and 1. Using the Cox proportional hazard model, we observed that the death rates of relocalized duplicate pairs were significantly lower than the death rates of the duplicates without relocalization in most eukaryotic species examined in this study. These observations suggest that PSR significantly increases retention of duplicate genes and that it plays an important, but currently underappreciated, role in the evolution of eukaryotic genomes. PMID:24265504

  8. Chemical intervention of the NM23-H2 transcriptional programme on c-MYC via a novel small molecule

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Chan; Lin, Jing; Hou, Jin-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Yun; Chen, Shuo-Bin; Chen, Ai-Chun; Ou, Tian-Miao; Tan, Jia-Heng; Li, Ding; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu

    2015-01-01

    c-MYC is an important oncogene that is considered as an effective target for anticancer therapy. Regulation of this gene's transcription is one avenue for c-MYC-targeting drug design. Direct binding to a transcription factor and generating the intervention of a transcriptional programme appears to be an effective way to modulate gene transcription. NM23-H2 is a transcription factor for c-MYC and is proven to be related to the secondary structures in the promoter. Here, we first screened our small-molecule library for NM23-H2 binders and then sifted through the inhibitors that could target and interfere with the interaction process between NM23-H2 and the guanine-rich promoter sequence of c-MYC. As a result, a quinazolone derivative, SYSU-ID-01, showed a significant interference effect towards NM23-H2 binding to the guanine-rich promoter DNA sequence. Further analyses of the compound–protein interaction and the protein–DNA interaction provided insight into the mode of action for SYSU-ID-01. Cellular evaluation results showed that SYSU-ID-01 could abrogate NM23-H2 binding to the c-MYC promoter, resulting in downregulation of c-MYC transcription and dramatically suppressed HeLa cell growth. These findings provide a new way of c-MYC transcriptional control through interfering with NM23-H2 binding to guanine-rich promoter sequences by small molecules. PMID:26117539

  9. Mutational landscape of EGFR-, MYC-, and Kras-driven genetically engineered mouse models of lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, David G.; Politi, Katerina; Bhutkar, Arjun; Chen, Frances K.; Song, Xiaoling; Pirun, Mono; Santiago, Philip M.; Kim-Kiselak, Caroline; Platt, James T.; Lee, Emily; Hodges, Emily; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Socci, Nicholas D.; Hannon, Gregory J.; Jacks, Tyler; Varmus, Harold

    2016-01-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of cancer are increasingly being used to assess putative driver mutations identified by large-scale sequencing of human cancer genomes. To accurately interpret experiments that introduce additional mutations, an understanding of the somatic genetic profile and evolution of GEMM tumors is necessary. Here, we performed whole-exome sequencing of tumors from three GEMMs of lung adenocarcinoma driven by mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), mutant Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras), or overexpression of MYC proto-oncogene. Tumors from EGFR- and Kras-driven models exhibited, respectively, 0.02 and 0.07 nonsynonymous mutations per megabase, a dramatically lower average mutational frequency than observed in human lung adenocarcinomas. Tumors from models driven by strong cancer drivers (mutant EGFR and Kras) harbored few mutations in known cancer genes, whereas tumors driven by MYC, a weaker initiating oncogene in the murine lung, acquired recurrent clonal oncogenic Kras mutations. In addition, although EGFR- and Kras-driven models both exhibited recurrent whole-chromosome DNA copy number alterations, the specific chromosomes altered by gain or loss were different in each model. These data demonstrate that GEMM tumors exhibit relatively simple somatic genotypes compared with human cancers of a similar type, making these autochthonous model systems useful for additive engineering approaches to assess the potential of novel mutations on tumorigenesis, cancer progression, and drug sensitivity. PMID:27702896

  10. RUNX3 is down-regulated in glioma by Myc-regulated miR-4295.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinxing; Zheng, Jihui; Diao, Hongyu; Liu, Yunhui

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs are increasingly reported as tumour suppressors that regulate gene expression after transcription. Our results demonstrated that miR-4295 is overexpression in glioma tissues and its level is significantly correlated with clinical stage. We also found that miR-4295 inhibited the cell G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis leading to promoted cell proliferation and activity. The murine modelling study revealed that female nude mice injected with U87/anti-miR-4295 exhibit subcutaneous tumours in the right groin. Compared with anti-NC, the tumour volume was significantly decreased in anti-miR-4295 treatment group. Furthermore, we confirmed miR-4295 mediates the expression of RUNX3 by targeting its 3'untranslation region. In addition, N-myc protein also could bind to the promoter of pri-miR-4295 and inhibit the expression of RUNX3 in glioma cells. These results validate a pathogenetic role of a miR-4295 in gliomas and establish a potentially regulatory and signalling pathway involving N-myc/miR-4295/RUNX3 in gliomas. PMID:26756701

  11. Histone H2AX suppresses translocations in lymphomas of Eμ-c-Myctransgenic mice that contain a germline amplicon of tumor-promoting genes

    PubMed Central

    Fusello, Angela; Horowitz, Julie; Yang-Iott, Katherine; Brady, Brenna L; Yin, Bu; Rowh, Marta AW; Rappaport, Eric; Bassing, Craig H

    2013-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) can restrain the ability of oncogenes to cause genomic instability and drive malignant transformation. The gene encoding the histone H2AX DDR factor maps to 11q23, a region frequently altered in human cancers. Since H2ax functions as a haploinsufficient suppressor of B lineage lymphomas with c-Myc amplification and/or translocation, we determined the impact of H2ax expression on the ability of deregulated c-Myc expression to cause genomic instability and drive transformation of B cells. Neither H2ax deficiency nor haploinsufficiency affected the rate of mortality of Eμ-c-Myc mice from B lineage lymphomas with genomic deletions and amplifications. Yet H2ax functioned in a dosage-dependent manner to prevent unbalanced translocations in Eμ-c-Myc tumors, demonstrating that H2ax functions in a haploinsufficient manner to suppress allelic imbalances and limit molecular heterogeneity within and among Eμ-c-Myc lymphomas. Regardless of H2ax copy number, all Eμ-c-Myc tumors contained identical amplification of chromosome 19 sequences spanning 20 genes. Many of these genes encode proteins with tumor-promoting activities, including Cd274, which encodes the PD-L1 programmed death ligand that induces T cell apoptosis and enables cancer cells to escape immune surveillance. This amplicon was in non-malignant B and T cells and non-lymphoid cells, linked to the Eμ-c-Myc transgene, and associated with overexpression of PD-L1 on non-malignant B cells. Our data demonstrate that, in addition to deregulated c-Myc expression, non-malignant B lineage lymphocytes of Eμ-c-Myc transgenic mice may have constitutive amplification and increased expression of other tumor-promoting genes. PMID:23966158

  12. c-Myc inhibits Ras-mediated differentiation of pheochromocytoma cells by blocking c-Jun up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Vaqué, José P; Fernández-García, Belén; García-Sanz, Pablo; Ferrandiz, Nuria; Bretones, Gabriel; Calvo, Fernando; Crespo, Piero; Marín, María C; León, Javier

    2008-02-01

    Although mutant Ras proteins were originally described as transforming oncoproteins, they induce growth arrest, senescence, and/or differentiation in many cell types. c-Myc is an oncogenic transcription factor that cooperates with Ras in cellular transformation and oncogenesis. However, the Myc-Ras relationship in cellular differentiation is largely unknown. Here, we have analyzed the effects of c-Myc on PC12-derived cells (UR61 cell line), harboring an inducible N-Ras oncogene. In these cells, Ras activation induces neuronal-like differentiation by a process involving c-Jun activation. We found that c-Myc inhibited Ras-mediated differentiation by a mechanism that involves the blockade of c-Jun induction in response to Ras signal. Accordingly, ectopically expressed c-Jun could bypass c-Myc impediment of Ras-induced differentiation and activator protein 1 activation. Interestingly, it did not rescue the proliferative arrest elicited by Ras and did not enhance the differentiation-associated apoptosis. The blockade of Ras-mediated induction of c-Jun takes place at the level of c-Jun proximal promoter. Mutational analysis revealed that c-Myc regions involved in DNA binding and transactivation are required to block differentiation and c-Jun induction. c-Myc does not seem to require Miz-1 to inhibit differentiation and block c-Jun induction. Furthermore, Max is not required for c-Myc activity, as UR61 cells lack a functional Max gene. c-Myc-inhibitory effect on the Ras/c-Jun connection is not restricted to UR61 cells as it can occur in other cell types as K562 or HEK293. In conclusion, we describe a novel interplay between c-Myc and c-Jun that controls the ability of Ras to trigger the differentiation program of pheochromocytoma cells.

  13. Increasingly branched rolling circle amplification for the cancer gene detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongling; Xu, Jianguo; Wang, Zhenmeng; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Jia, Lee

    2016-12-15

    An increasingly branched rolling circle amplification (IB-RCA) which contains a padlock probe (PP) and a structurally tailored molecular beacon (MB) was innovatively developed for highly sensitive detection of cancer gene, Kras gene codon 12. In this system, the PP can be circularized after hybridization with the precisely-matched target DNA, while the stem of MB can be also opened by target DNA, resulting in hybridization with the circularized PP to generate a long tandem single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product. Since the MB is also designed to hybridize with ssDNA product, the newly-opened MBs are able to trigger the next RCA reactions, therapy producing branched rolling circle amplification (RCA) products and in turn leading to the increasingly branched RCA (IB-RCA). This alternately and continuously operates hybridization-based MB opening and opened MBs-triggered RCA. As a result, a great number of MBs are opened that is associated with a dramatically amplified fluorescent signal, enabling to quantify target DNA down to 100 fM. This sensing method demonstrates a new concept of IB-RCA amplification even in a simple way to efficiently transduce the fluorescence signal, accomplishing the highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer gene. PMID:27569300

  14. Increasingly branched rolling circle amplification for the cancer gene detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongling; Xu, Jianguo; Wang, Zhenmeng; Wu, Zai-Sheng; Jia, Lee

    2016-12-15

    An increasingly branched rolling circle amplification (IB-RCA) which contains a padlock probe (PP) and a structurally tailored molecular beacon (MB) was innovatively developed for highly sensitive detection of cancer gene, Kras gene codon 12. In this system, the PP can be circularized after hybridization with the precisely-matched target DNA, while the stem of MB can be also opened by target DNA, resulting in hybridization with the circularized PP to generate a long tandem single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) product. Since the MB is also designed to hybridize with ssDNA product, the newly-opened MBs are able to trigger the next RCA reactions, therapy producing branched rolling circle amplification (RCA) products and in turn leading to the increasingly branched RCA (IB-RCA). This alternately and continuously operates hybridization-based MB opening and opened MBs-triggered RCA. As a result, a great number of MBs are opened that is associated with a dramatically amplified fluorescent signal, enabling to quantify target DNA down to 100 fM. This sensing method demonstrates a new concept of IB-RCA amplification even in a simple way to efficiently transduce the fluorescence signal, accomplishing the highly sensitive and selective detection of cancer gene.

  15. Myc Promoter-Binding Protein-1 (MBP-1) Is a Novel Potential Prognostic Marker in Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Contino, Flavia; Mazzarella, Claudia; Sbacchi, Silvia; Roz, Elena; Lupo, Carmelo; Perconti, Giovanni; Giallongo, Agata; Migliorini, Paola; Marrazzo, Antonio; Feo, Salvatore

    2010-01-01

    Background Alpha-enolase is a glycolytic enzyme that catalyses the formation of phosphoenolpyruvate in the cell cytoplasm. α-Enolase and the predominantly nuclear Myc promoter-binding protein-1 (MBP-1) originate from a single gene through the alternative use of translational starting sites. MBP-1 binds to the P2 c-myc promoter and competes with TATA-box binding protein (TBP) to suppress gene transcription. Although several studies have shown an antiproliferative effect of MBP-1 overexpression on several human cancer cells, to date detailed observations of α-enolase and MBP-1 relative expression in primary tumors versus normal tissues and their correlation with clinicopathological features have not been undertaken. Methodology and Findings We analyzed α-enolase and MBP-1 expression in normal breast epithelium and primary invasive ductal breast carcinoma (IDC) from 177 patients by Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses, using highly specific anti-α-enolase monoclonal antibodies. A significant increase in the expression of cytoplasmic α-enolase was observed in 98% of the tumors analysed, compared to normal tissues. Nuclear MBP-1 was found in almost all the normal tissues while its expression was retained in only 35% of the tumors. Statistically significant associations were observed among the nuclear expression of MBP-1 and ErbB2 status, Ki-67 expression, node status and tumor grade. Furthermore MBP-1 expression was associated with good survival of patients with IDC. Conclusions MBP-1 functions in repressing c-myc gene expression and the results presented indicate that the loss of nuclear MBP-1 expression in a large number of IDC may be a critical step in the development and progression of breast cancer and a predictor of adverse outcome. Nuclear MBP-1 appears to be a novel and valuable histochemical marker with potential prognostic value in breast cancer. PMID:20886042

  16. A long noncoding RNA connects c-Myc to tumor metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chiu-Lien; Wang, Ling-Yu; Yu, Yen-Ling; Chen, Hong-Wu; Srivastava, Shiv; Petrovics, Gyorgy; Kung, Hsing-Jien

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. In prostate cancer, prostate cancer gene expression marker 1 (PCGEM1) is an androgen-induced prostate-specific lncRNA whose overexpression is highly associated with prostate tumors. PCGEM1’s tumorigenic potential has been recently shown to be in part due to its ability to activate androgen receptor (AR). Here, we report a novel function of PCGEM1 that provides growth advantages for cancer cells by regulating tumor metabolism via c-Myc activation. PCGEM1 promotes glucose uptake for aerobic glycolysis, coupling with the pentose phosphate shunt to facilitate biosynthesis of nucleotide and lipid, and generates NADPH for redox homeostasis. We show that PCGEM1 regulates metabolism at a transcriptional level that affects multiple metabolic pathways, including glucose and glutamine metabolism, the pentose phosphate pathway, nucleotide and fatty acid biosynthesis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The PCGEM1-mediated gene regulation takes place in part through AR activation, but predominantly through c-Myc activation, regardless of hormone or AR status. Significantly, PCGEM1 binds directly to target promoters, physically interacts with c-Myc, promotes chromatin recruitment of c-Myc, and enhances its transactivation activity. We also identified a c-Myc binding domain on PCGEM1 that contributes to the PCGEM1-dependent c-Myc activation and target induction. Together, our data uncover PCGEM1 as a key transcriptional regulator of central metabolic pathways in prostate cancer cells. By being a coactivator for both c-Myc and AR, PCGEM1 reprograms the androgen network and the central metabolism in a tumor-specific way, making it a promising target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25512540

  17. c-MYC is a radiosensitive locus in human breast cells

    PubMed Central

    Wade, M A; Sunter, N J; Fordham, S E; Long, A; Masic, D; Russell, L J; Harrison, C J; Rand, V; Elstob, C; Bown, N; Rowe, D; Lowe, C; Cuthbert, G; Bennett, S; Crosier, S; Bacon, C M; Onel, K; Scott, K; Scott, D; Travis, L B; May, F E B; Allan, J M

    2015-01-01

    Ionising radiation is a potent human carcinogen. Epidemiological studies have shown that adolescent and young women are at increased risk of developing breast cancer following exposure to ionising radiation compared with older women, and that risk is dose-dependent. Although it is well understood which individuals are at risk of radiation-induced breast carcinogenesis, the molecular genetic mechanisms that underlie cell transformation are less clear. To identify genetic alterations potentially responsible for driving radiogenic breast transformation, we exposed the human breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A to fractionated doses of X-rays and examined the copy number and cytogenetic alterations. We identified numerous alterations of c-MYC that included high-level focal amplification associated with increased protein expression. c-MYC amplification was also observed in primary human mammary epithelial cells following exposure to radiation. We also demonstrate that the frequency and magnitude of c-MYC amplification and c-MYC protein expression is significantly higher in breast cancer with antecedent radiation exposure compared with breast cancer without a radiation aetiology. Our data also demonstrate extensive intratumor heterogeneity with respect to c-MYC copy number in radiogenic breast cancer, suggesting continuous evolution at this locus during disease development and progression. Taken together, these data identify c-MYC as a radiosensitive locus, implicating this oncogenic transcription factor in the aetiology of radiogenic breast cancer. PMID:25531321

  18. Positive selection of gene-modified cells increases the efficacy of pancreatic cancer suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Cascallo, Manel; Gros, Alena; Fillat, Cristina; Alemany, Ramon

    2009-11-01

    Thymidine kinase (TK)-mediated suicide gene therapy has been considered for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, despite a bystander effect, the proportion of transduced tumor cells has proven too low to result in efficacy. We propose the use of a drug-selectable marker (MDR1) to enrich TK-expressing cells using chemotherapy. This enrichment or positive selection phase may increase the efficacy of suicide gene therapy. To test this strategy, we generated stable NP18MDR/TK-GFP transfectants and showed docetaxel resistance in vivo. Mixed tumors of MDR/TK-expressing cells and parental NP18 cells were established and docetaxel was used to increase the proportion of TK-expressing cells. After this positive selection phase, suicide gene therapy with ganciclovir was applied. Upon positive selection, the proportion of TK-expressing cells increased from 4% to 22%. Subsequent suicide gene therapy was more effective compared with a control group without positive selection. Starting with 10% of TK-expressing cells the positive-negative selection strategy completely inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, these results suggest that a positive-negative selection strategy based on MDR and TK genes represents an efficient way to increase the proportion of TK-expressing cells in the tumor and the efficacy of TK-mediated suicide gene therapy.

  19. A single gene mutation that increases maize seed weight

    SciTech Connect

    Giroux, M.J.; Shaw, J.; Hannah, L.C. |

    1996-06-11

    The maize endosperm-specific gene shrunken2 (Sh2) encodes the large subunit of the heterotetrameric starch synthetic enzyme adenosine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP; EC 2.7.7.27). Here we exploit an in vivo, site-specific mutagenesis system to create short insertion mutations in a region of the gene known to be involved in the allosteric regulation of AGP. The site-specific mutagen is the transposable element dissociation (Ds). Approximately one-third (8 of 23) of the germinal revertants sequenced restored the wild-type sequence, whereas the remaining revertants contained insertions of 3 or 6 bp. All revertants retained the original reading frame 3 feet to the insertion site and involved the addition of tyrosine and/or serine. Each insertion revertant reduced total AGP activity and the amount of the SH2 protein. The revertant containing additional tyrosine and serine residues increased seed weight 11-18% without increasing or decreasing the percentage of starch. Other insertion revertants lacking an additional serine reduced seed weight. Reduced sensitivity to phosphate, a long-known inhibitor of AGP, was found in the high seed-weight revertant. This alteration is likely universally important since insertion of tyrosine and serine in the potato large subunit of AGP at the comparable position and expression in Escherichia coli also led to a phosphate-insensitive enzyme. These results show that single gene mutations giving rise to increased seed weight, and therefore perhaps yield, are clearly possible in a plant with a long history of intensive and successful breeding efforts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Synergistic Induction of Potential Warburg Effect in Zebrafish Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Co-Transgenic Expression of Myc and xmrk Oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Zheng, Weiling; Li, Hankun; Li, Caixia; Gong, Zhiyuan

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have generated inducible liver tumor models by transgenic expression of Myc or xmrk (activated EGFR homolog) oncogenes in zebrafish. To investigate the interaction of the two oncogenes, we crossed the two transgenic lines and observed more severe and faster hepatocarcinogenesis in Myc/xmrk double transgenic zebrafish than either single transgenic fish. RNA-Seq analyses revealed distinct changes in many molecular pathways among the three types of liver tumors. In particular, we found dramatic alteration of cancer metabolism based on the uniquely enriched pathways in the Myc/xmrk tumors. Critical glycolytic genes including hk2, pkm and ldha were significantly up-regulated in Myc/xmrk tumors but not in either single oncogene-induced tumors, suggesting a potential Warburg effect. In RT-qPCR analyses, the specific pkm2 isoformin Warburg effect was found to be highly enriched in the Myc/xmrk tumors but not in Myc or xmrk tumors, consistent with the observations in many human cancers with Warburg effect. Moreover, the splicing factor genes (hnrnpa1, ptbp1a, ptbp1b and sfrs3b) responsible for generating the pkm isoform were also greatly up-regulated in the Myc/xmrk tumors. As Pkm2 isoform is generally inactive and causes incomplete glycolysis to favor anabolism and tumor growth, by treatment with a Pkm2-specific activator, TEPP-46, we further demonstrated that activation of Pkm2 suppressed the growth of oncogenic liver as well as proliferation of liver cells. Collectively, our Myc/xmrk zebrafish model suggests synergetic effect of EGFR and MYC in triggering Warburg effect in the HCC formation and may provide a promising in vivo model for Warburg effect.

  1. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Goo; Huang, Mingqian; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A; Megason, Sean G; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration.

  2. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Goo; Huang, Mingqian; Obholzer, Nikolaus D; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A; Megason, Sean G; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:27351484

  3. Myc and Fgf Are Required for Zebrafish Neuromast Hair Cell Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Obholzer, Nikolaus D.; Sun, Shan; Li, Wenyan; Petrillo, Marco; Dai, Pu; Zhou, Yi; Cotanche, Douglas A.; Megason, Sean G.; Li, Huawei; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Unlike mammals, the non-mammalian vertebrate inner ear can regenerate the sensory cells, hair cells, either spontaneously or through induction after hair cell loss, leading to hearing recovery. The mechanisms underlying the regeneration are poorly understood. By microarray analysis on a chick model, we show that chick hair cell regeneration involves the activation of proliferation genes and downregulation of differentiation genes. Both MYC and FGF are activated in chick hair cell regeneration. Using a zebrafish lateral line neuromast hair cell regeneration model, we show that the specific inhibition of Myc or Fgf suppresses hair cell regeneration, demonstrating that both pathways are essential to the process. Rapid upregulation of Myc and delayed Fgf activation during regeneration suggest a role of Myc in proliferation and Fgf in differentiation. The dorsal-ventral pattern of fgfr1a in the neuromasts overlaps with the distribution of hair cell precursors. By laser ablation, we show that the fgfr1a-positive supporting cells are likely the hair cell precursors that directly give rise to new hair cells; whereas the anterior-posterior fgfr1a-negative supporting cells have heightened proliferation capacity, likely to serve as more primitive progenitor cells to replenish lost precursors after hair cell loss. Thus fgfr1a is likely to mark compartmentalized supporting cell subtypes with different capacities in renewal proliferation and hair cell regeneration. Manipulation of c-MYC and FGF pathways could be explored for mammalian hair cell regeneration. PMID:27351484

  4. Parp-1 genetic ablation in Ela-myc mice unveils novel roles for Parp-1 in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bosch, Neus; Iglesias, Mar; Munné-Collado, Jessica; Martínez-Cáceres, Carlos; Moreno, Mireia; Guerra, Carmen; Yélamos, Jose; Navarro, Pilar

    2014-10-01

    Pancreatic cancer has a dismal prognosis and is currently the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. The inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1), the major protein responsible for poly(ADP-ribosy)lation in response to DNA damage, has emerged as a promising treatment for several tumour types. Here we aimed to elucidate the involvement of Parp-1 in pancreatic tumour progression. We assessed Parp-1 protein expression in normal, preneoplastic and pancreatic tumour samples from humans and from K-Ras- and c-myc-driven mouse models of pancreatic cancer. Parp-1 was highly expressed in acinar cells in normal and cancer tissues. In contrast, ductal cells expressed very low or undetectable levels of this protein, both in a normal and in a tumour context. The Parp-1 expression pattern was similar in human and mouse samples, thereby validating the use of animal models for further studies. To determine the in vivo effects of Parp-1 depletion on pancreatic cancer progression, Ela-myc-driven pancreatic tumour development was analysed in a Parp-1 knock-out background. Loss of Parp-1 resulted in increased tumour necrosis and decreased proliferation, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Interestingly, Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice displayed fewer ductal tumours than their Ela-myc:Parp-1(+/+) counterparts, suggesting that Parp-1 participates in promoting acinar-to-ductal metaplasia, a key event in pancreatic cancer initiation. Moreover, impaired macrophage recruitment can be responsible for the ADM blockade found in the Ela-myc:Parp-1(-/-) mice. Finally, molecular analysis revealed that Parp-1 modulates ADM downstream of the Stat3-MMP7 axis and is also involved in transcriptional up-regulation of the MDM2, VEGFR1 and MMP28 cancer-related genes. In conclusion, the expression pattern of Parp-1 in normal and cancer tissue and the in vivo functional effects of Parp-1 depletion point to a novel role for this protein in pancreatic carcinogenesis and shed light

  5. microRNA-206 impairs c-Myc-driven cancer in a synthetic lethal manner by directly inhibiting MAP3K13

    PubMed Central

    Han, Han; Chen, Yuxing; Cheng, Li; Prochownik, Edward V.; Li, Youjun

    2016-01-01

    c-Myc (Myc) is one of the most frequently dysregulated oncogenic transcription factors in human cancer. By functionally screening a microRNA (miR) library, we identified miR-206 as being a synthetic lethal in Myc over-expressing human cancer cells. miR-206 inhibited MAP3K13, which resulted in Myc protein de-stabilization, and an inhibition of anchorage-independent growth and in vivo tumorigenesis by Myc over-expressing human cancer cells. Eliminating MAP3K13 by shRNA recapitulated the effects caused by miR-206, thus supporting the idea that miR-206's effect on Myc was mediated through MAP3K13. Conversely, enforced expression of MAP3K13 stabilized Myc by promoting its N-terminal phosphorylation and enhancing its transcriptional activity. Gene expression analyses of breast cancers expressing high levels of Myc indicated that low miR-206 expression and high MAP3K13 expression correlated with poor patient survival. The critical link between miR-206 and MAP3K13 in the development of Myc over-expressing human cancers suggests potential points of therapeutic intervention for this molecular sub-category. PMID:26918941

  6. Combinatorial gene therapy renders increased survival in cirrhotic rats

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis ranks as the second cause of death in México's productive-age population. This pathology is characterized by acummulation of fibrillar proteins in hepatic parenchyma causing synthetic and metabolic disfunction. Remotion of excessive fibrous proteins might result in benefit for subjects increasing survival index. The goal of this work was to find whether the already known therapeutical effect of human urokinase Plasminogen Activator and human Matrix Metalloprotease 8 extends survival index in cirrhotic animals. Methods Wistar rats (80 g) underwent chronic intoxication with CCl4: mineral oil for 8 weeks. Cirrhotic animals were injected with a combined dose of Ad-delta-huPA plus Ad-MMP8 (3 × 1011 and 1.5 × 1011 vp/Kg, respectively) or with Ad-beta-Gal (4.5 × 1011) and were killed after 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 days. Then, liver and serum were collected. An additional set of cirrhotic animals injected with combined gene therapy was also monitored for their probability of survival. Results Only the cirrhotic animals treated with therapeutical genes (Ad-delta-huPA+Ad-MMP-8) showed improvement in liver fibrosis. These results correlated with hydroxyproline determinations. A significant decrement in alpha-SMA and TGF-beta1 gene expression was also observed. Cirrhotic rats treated with Ad-delta-huPA plus Ad-MMP8 had a higher probability of survival at 60 days with respect to Ad-beta-Gal-injected animals. Conclusion A single administration of Ad-delta-huPA plus Ad-MMP-8 is efficient to induce fibrosis regression and increase survival in experimental liver fibrosis. PMID:20509929

  7. Quinazoline derivative QPB-15e stabilizes the c-myc promoter G-quadruplex and inhibits tumor growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zeng; Liu, Chen; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Zhang, Lei; He, Jinhui; Li, Jun

    2016-01-01

    The ribozyme-sensitive element NHE-III1 in the P1 promoter region of the important proto-oncogene c-myc contains many guanine (G)-rich sequences. Induction and stabilization of the G-quadruplex formed by NHE-III1 can downregulate c-myc expression. In the present study, we found that QPB-15e, a quinazoline derivative designed and synthesized by our laboratory, binds to and stabilizes the c-myc G-quadruplex in vitro, thereby inhibiting double-stranded DNA replication, downregulating c-myc gene expression and arresting cancer cell proliferation. PCR termination experiments showed that QPB-15e blocked double-stranded DNA replication by inducing or stabilizing the c-myc G-quadruplex. FRET-melting further confirmed that QPB-15e improved the stability of the G-quadruplex, and CD spectroscopy indicated that the compound interacted directly with the G-rich sequence. In competitive dialysis experiments, QPB-15e bound preferentially to quadruplex DNA in various structures, especially the G-quadruplex within the c-myc promoter region. Moreover, QPB-15e reduced the weights and volumes of tumors transplanted into nude mice. These findings strongly suggest that QPB-15e is a c-myc G-quadruplex ligand with anti-tumor properties, and may be efficacious for treating cancer in humans. PMID:27144522

  8. Quinazoline derivative QPB-15e stabilizes the c-myc promoter G-quadruplex and inhibits tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Zeng; Liu, Chen; Huang, Cheng; Meng, Xiaoming; Zhang, Lei; He, Jinhui; Li, Jun

    2016-06-01

    The ribozyme-sensitive element NHE-III1 in the P1 promoter region of the important proto-oncogene c-myc contains many guanine (G)-rich sequences. Induction and stabilization of the G-quadruplex formed by NHE-III1 can downregulate c-myc expression. In the present study, we found that QPB-15e, a quinazoline derivative designed and synthesized by our laboratory, binds to and stabilizes the c-myc G-quadruplex in vitro, thereby inhibiting double-stranded DNA replication, downregulating c-myc gene expression and arresting cancer cell proliferation. PCR termination experiments showed that QPB-15e blocked double-stranded DNA replication by inducing or stabilizing the c-myc G-quadruplex. FRET-melting further confirmed that QPB-15e improved the stability of the G-quadruplex, and CD spectroscopy indicated that the compound interacted directly with the G-rich sequence. In competitive dialysis experiments, QPB-15e bound preferentially to quadruplex DNA in various structures, especially the G-quadruplex within the c-myc promoter region. Moreover, QPB-15e reduced the weights and volumes of tumors transplanted into nude mice. These findings strongly suggest that QPB-15e is a c-myc G-quadruplex ligand with anti-tumor properties, and may be efficacious for treating cancer in humans.

  9. Sodium arsenite alters cell cycle and MTHFR, MT1/2, and c-Myc protein levels in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz-Ramos, Ruben; Lopez-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Albores, Arnulfo; Hernandez-Ramirez, Raul U.; Cebrian, Mariano E.

    2009-12-15

    There is limited available information on the effects of arsenic on enzymes participating in the folate cycle. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of sodium arsenite on the protein levels of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) and its further relationship with the expression MT1/2 and c-myc in MCF-7 cells. Arsenite treatment (0-10 muM) for 4 h decreased MTHFR levels in a concentration-dependent fashion without significant effects on DHFR. The effects on MTHFR were observed at arsenite concentrations not significantly affecting cell viability. We also observed an increase in S-phase recruitment at all concentrations probed. Lower concentrations (< 5 muM) induced cell proliferation, showing a high proportion of BrdU-stained cells, indicating a higher DNA synthesis rate. However, higher concentrations (>= 5 muM) or longer treatment periods induced apoptosis. Arsenite also induced dose-dependent increases in MT1/2 and c-Myc protein levels. The levels of MTHFR were inversely correlated to MT1/2 and c-Myc overexpression and increased S-phase recruitment. Our findings indicate that breast epithelial cells are responsive to arsenite and suggest that exposure may pose a risk for breast cancer. The reductions in MTHFR protein levels contribute to understand the mechanisms underlying the induction of genes influencing growth regulation, such as c-myc and MT1/2. However, further research is needed to ascertain if the effects here reported following short-time and high-dose exposure are relevant for human populations chronically exposed to low arsenic concentrations.

  10. Role of GLI1 and NDRG1 in Increased Resistance to Apoptosis Induction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng; Rom, William N; Koshiji, Minori; Mo, Yiqun; Hosomi, Yukio; Tchou-Wong, Kam-Meng

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of GLI1 expression in PW mouse embryo fibroblasts and H441 lung carcinoma cells. Ectopic expression of GLI1 in PW cells induced anchorage-independent growth and increased resistance to staurosporine-induced apoptosis, and overexpression of GLI1 in H441 cells caused resistance to apoptosis induced by staurosporine and etoposide. GLI1 expression in both H441 and PW cells was associated with increased expression of NDRG1, a gene known to be downregulated by the MYC family of proteins, indicating that upregulation of NDRG1 by GLI1 is not cell-type specific. Consistent with suppression of NDRG1 by c-MYC and N-MYC, increased NDRG1 expression correlated with decreased expression of c-MYC and N-MYC in GLI1-expressing H441 and GLI1-expressing PW cells, respectively. Downregulation of GLI1 expression in A549 cells by siRNA transfection increased sensitivity to etoposide-induced apoptosis, and downregulation of NDRG1 expression in H441 cells by siRNA transfection increased sensitivity to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Of clinical significance, inhibition of GLI1 and NDRG1 expression may increase sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Strategies that aim to inhibit GLI1 function and NDRG1 expression may be useful for targeted therapy of cancers induced by the SHH-GLI signaling pathway. PMID:26349604

  11. Telomerase gene therapy in adult and old mice delays aging and increases longevity without increasing cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes de Jesus, Bruno; Vera, Elsa; Schneeberger, Kerstin; Tejera, Agueda M; Ayuso, Eduard; Bosch, Fatima; Blasco, Maria A

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in aging research is to improve health during aging. In the case of mice, genetic manipulations that shorten or lengthen telomeres result, respectively, in decreased or increased longevity. Based on this, we have tested the effects of a telomerase gene therapy in adult (1 year of age) and old (2 years of age) mice. Treatment of 1- and 2-year old mice with an adeno associated virus (AAV) of wide tropism expressing mouse TERT had remarkable beneficial effects on health and fitness, including insulin sensitivity, osteoporosis, neuromuscular coordination and several molecular biomarkers of aging. Importantly, telomerase-treated mice did not develop more cancer than their control littermates, suggesting that the known tumorigenic activity of telomerase is severely decreased when expressed in adult or old organisms using AAV vectors. Finally, telomerase-treated mice, both at 1-year and at 2-year of age, had an increase in median lifespan of 24 and 13%, respectively. These beneficial effects were not observed with a catalytically inactive TERT, demonstrating that they require telomerase activity. Together, these results constitute a proof-of-principle of a role of TERT in delaying physiological aging and extending longevity in normal mice through a telomerase-based treatment, and demonstrate the feasibility of anti-aging gene therapy. PMID:22585399

  12. Cardiac mesenchymal progenitors differentiate into adipocytes via Klf4 and c-Myc

    PubMed Central

    Kami, D; Kitani, T; Kawasaki, T; Gojo, S

    2016-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of differentiated cells to pluripotent stem cells has great potential to improve our understanding of developmental biology and disorders such as cancers, and has implications for regenerative medicine. In general, the effects of transcription factors (TFs) that are transduced into cells can be influenced by pre-existing transcriptional networks and epigenetic modifications. However, previous work has identified four key TFs, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc, which can reprogram various differentiated cells to generate induced pluripotent stem cells. Here, we show that in the heart, the transduction of cardiac mesenchymal progenitors (CMPs) with Klf4 and c-Myc (KM) was sufficient to drive the differentiation of these cells into adipocytes without the use of adipogenic stimulation cocktail, that is, insulin, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and dexamethasone. KM-transduced CMPs exhibited a gradually increased expression of adipogenic-related genes, such as C/Ebpα, Pparγ and Fabp4, activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) signaling pathway, inactivation of the cell cycle-related pathway and formation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets within 10 days. In contrast, NIH3T3 fibroblasts, 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells transduced with KM did not differentiate into adipocytes. Both in vitro and in vivo cardiac ischemia reperfusion injury models demonstrated that the expression of KM genes sharply increased following a reperfusion insult. These results suggest that ectopic adipose tissue formation in the heart following myocardial infarction results from CMPs that express KM following a stress response. PMID:27077806

  13. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues. PMID:26314861

  14. Aspirin and salicylic acid decrease c-Myc expression in cancer cells: a potential role in chemoprevention.

    PubMed

    Ai, Guoqiang; Dachineni, Rakesh; Muley, Pratik; Tummala, Hemachand; Bhat, G Jayarama

    2016-02-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between regular aspirin use and reduced colon cancer incidence and mortality; however, the pathways by which it exerts its anti-cancer effects are still not fully explored. We hypothesized that aspirin's anti-cancer effect may occur through downregulation of c-Myc gene expression. Here, we demonstrate that aspirin and its primary metabolite, salicylic acid, decrease the c-Myc protein levels in human HCT-116 colon and in few other cancer cell lines. In total cell lysates, both drugs decreased the levels of c-Myc in a concentration-dependent fashion. Greater inhibition was observed in the nucleus than the cytoplasm, and immunofluorescence studies confirmed these observations. Pretreatment of cells with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, partially prevented the downregulatory effect of both aspirin and salicylic acid, suggesting that 26S proteasomal pathway is involved. Both drugs failed to decrease exogenously expressed DDK-tagged c-Myc protein levels; however, under the same conditions, the endogenous c-Myc protein levels were downregulated. Northern blot analysis showed that both drugs caused a decrease in c-Myc mRNA levels in a concentration-dependent fashion. High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that aspirin taken up by cells was rapidly metabolized to salicylic acid, suggesting that aspirin's inhibitory effect on c-Myc may occur through formation of salicylic acid. Our result suggests that salicylic acid regulates c-Myc level at both transcriptional and post-transcription levels. Inhibition of c-Myc may represent an important pathway by which aspirin exerts its anti-cancer effect and decrease the occurrence of cancer in epithelial tissues.

  15. Pre-clinical analysis of changes in intra-cellular biochemistry of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells due to c-Myc silencing.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Vishal; Vaidyanathan, Muthukumar; Janardhanam, Vanisree Arambakkam; Bradner, James E

    2014-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) is an aggressive form of brain Tumor that has few cures. In this study, we analyze the anti-proliferative effects of a new molecule JQ1 against GBMs induced in Wistar Rats. JQ1 is essentially a Myc inhibitor. c-Myc is also known for altering the biochemistry of a tumor cell. Therefore, the study is intended to analyze certain other oncogenes associated with c-Myc and also the change in cellular biochemistry upon c-Myc inhibition. The quantitative analysis of gene expression gave a co-expressive pattern for all the three genes involved namely; c-Myc, Bcl-2, and Akt. The cellular biochemistry analysis by transmission electron microscopy revealed high glycogen and lipid aggregation in Myc inhibited cells and excessive autophagy. The study demonstrates the role of c-Myc as a central metabolic regulator and Bcl-2 and Akt assisting in extending c-Myc half-life as well as in regulation of autophagy, so as to regulate cell survival on the whole. The study also demonstrates that transient treatment by JQ1 leads to aggressive development of tumor and therefore, accelerating death, emphasizing the importance of dosage fixation, and duration for clinical use in future.

  16. A switch from Myc:Max to Mad:Max heterocomplexes accompanies monocyte/macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ayer, D E; Eisenman, R N

    1993-11-01

    Mad is a basic-helix-loop-helix-zipper protein that heterodimerizes with Max in vitro. Mad:Max heterodimers recognize the same E-box-related DNA-binding sites as Myc:Max heterodimers. However, in transient transfection assays Myc and Mad influence transcription in opposite ways through interaction with Max; Myc activates while Mad represses transcription. Here, we demonstrate that Mad protein is induced rapidly upon differentiation of cells of the myeloid lineage. The Mad protein is synthesized in human cells as a 35-kD nuclear phosphoprotein with an extremely short half-life (t1/2 = 15-30 min) and can be detected in vivo in a complex with Max. In the undifferentiated U937 monocyte cell line Max was found complexed with Myc but not Mad. However, Mad:Max complexes began to accumulate as early as 2 hr after induction of macrophage differentiation with TPA. By 48 hr following TPA treatment only Mad:Max complexes were detectable. These data show that differentiation is accompanied by a change in the composition of Max heterocomplexes. We speculate that this switch in heterocomplexes results in a change in the transcriptional regulation of Myc:Max target genes required for cell proliferation.

  17. Differential induction of cytolytic susceptibility by E1A, myc, and ras oncogenes in immortalized cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, J L; May, D L; Wilson, B A; Walker, T A

    1989-01-01

    The E1A oncogene of adenovirus serotypes 2 and 5 induces susceptibility to the cytolytic effects of natural killer lymphocytes and activated macrophages when expressed in infected and transformed mammalian cells (cytolysis-susceptible phenotype). E1A and the oncogenes v-myc, long-terminal-repeat-promoted c-myc, and activated c-ras share the ability to immortalize transfected low-passage rodent cells. The cytolytic phenotypes of well-characterized rodent cell lines immortalized by these three oncogenes were defined. In contrast to target cells expressing the intact E1A gene, myc- and ras-expressing, immortalized primary transfectants were resistant to lysis by both types of killer cell populations. The same patterns of susceptibility (E1A) and resistance (myc and ras) to cytolysis were observed in oncogene-transfected continuous rat (REF52) and mouse (NIH 3T3) cell lines, indicating that differences in the cytolytic phenotypes associated with expression of these oncogenes are not due to cell selection during immortalization. The results suggest that the E1A oncogene may possess a functional domain that is different from those of other oncogenes, such as myc and ras, and that the activity linked to this postulated domain is dissociable from the process of immortalization. Images PMID:2526229

  18. Prostaglandin E₂ increases fibroblast gene-specific and global DNA methylation via increased DNA methyltransferase expression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Steven K; Scruggs, Anne M; Donaghy, Jake; McEachin, Richard C; Fisher, Aaron S; Richardson, Bruce C; Peters-Golden, Marc

    2012-09-01

    Although alterations in DNA methylation patterns have been associated with specific diseases and environmental exposures, the mediators and signaling pathways that direct these changes remain understudied. The bioactive lipid mediator prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) has been shown to exert a myriad of effects on cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation. Here, we report that PGE(2) also signals to increase global DNA methylation and DNA methylation machinery in fibroblasts. HumanMethylation27 BeadChip array analysis of primary fetal (IMR-90) and adult lung fibroblasts identified multiple genes that were hypermethylated in response to PGE(2). PGE(2), compared with nontreated controls, increased expression and activity (EC(50)∼10(7) M) of one specific isoform of DNA methyltransferase, DNMT3a. Silencing of DNMT3a negated the ability of PGE(2) to increase DNMT activity. The increase in DNMT3a expression was mediated by PGE(2) signaling via its E prostanoid 2 receptor and the second messenger cAMP. PGE(2), compared with the untreated control, increased the expression and activity of Sp1 and Sp3 (EC(50)∼3×10(7) M), transcription factors known to increase DNMT3a expression, and inhibition of these transcription factors abrogated the PGE(2) increase of DNMT3a expression. These findings were specific to fibroblasts, as PGE(2) decreased DNMT1 and DNMT3a expression in RAW macrophages. Taken together, these findings establish that DNA methylation is regulated by a ubiquitous bioactive endogenous mediator. Given that PGE(2) biosynthesis is modulated by environmental toxins, various disease states, and commonly used pharmacological agents, these findings uncover a novel mechanism by which alterations in DNA methylation patterns may arise in association with disease and certain environmental exposures.

  19. Modulation of Cellular Migration and Survival by c-Myc through the Downregulation of Urokinase (uPA) and uPA Receptor▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Alfano, Daniela; Votta, Giuseppina; Schulze, Almut; Downward, Julian; Caputi, Mario; Stoppelli, Maria Patrizia; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2010-01-01

    It has been proposed that c-Myc proapoptotic activity accounts for most of its restraint of tumor formation. We established a telomerase-immortalized human epithelial cell line expressing an activatable c-Myc protein. We found that c-Myc activation induces, in addition to increased sensitivity to apoptosis, reductions in cell motility and invasiveness. Transcriptome analysis revealed that urokinase (uPA) and uPA receptor (uPAR) were strongly downregulated by c-Myc. Evidence is provided that the repression of uPA and uPAR may account for most of the antimigratory and proapoptotic activities of c-Myc. c-Myc is known to cooperate with Ras in cellular transformation. We therefore investigated if this cooperation could converge in the control of uPA/uPAR expression. We found that Ras is able to block the effects of c-Myc activation on apoptosis and cellular motility but not on cell invasiveness. Accordingly, the activation of c-Myc in the context of Ras expression had only minor influence on uPAR expression but still had a profound repressive effect on uPA expression. Thus, the differential regulation of uPA and uPAR by c-Myc and Ras correlates with the effects of these two oncoproteins on cell motility, invasiveness, and survival. In conclusion, we have discovered a novel link between c-Myc and uPA/uPAR. We propose that reductions of cell motility and invasiveness could contribute to the inhibition of tumorigenesis by c-Myc and that the regulation of uPA and uPAR expression may be a component of the ability of c-Myc to reduce motility and invasiveness. PMID:20123981

  20. Prolonged survival in hepatocarcinoma patients with increased regucalcin gene expression: HepG2 cell proliferation is suppressed by overexpression of regucalcin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Masayoshi; Osuka, Satoru; Weitzmann, M Neale; El-Rayes, Bassel F; Shoji, Mamoru; Murata, Tomiyasu

    2016-10-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common malignant cancers worldwide and ranks third in overall global cancer-related mortality rates. Importantly, in this study gene expression data demonstrate that prolonged survival in HCC patients is associated with increased regucalcin gene expression. Regucalcin has been shown to play a pivotal role as a transcription repressor and diminished expression or activity of regucalcin may play a key role in the development of human carcinogenesis. Indeed, overexpression of regucalcin suppressed the proliferation, cell death, and migration of human HCC HepG2 cells in vitro. Mechanistically, regucalcin induced G1 and G2/M phase cell cycle arrest of HepG2 cells through suppression of multiple signaling pathways including Ras, Akt, MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK and by increasing the tumor suppressors p53 and Rb. Furthermore, the oncogenes c-fos and c-myc were suppressed by overexpression of regucalcin, and overexpression of regucalcin caused an increase in p21 and a decrease in NF-κB p65 and β-catenin. These findings suggest that regucalcin may play a potential role as a suppressor of human HCC, and that diminished expression of regucalcin may predispose patients to development of HCC. Overexpression of regucalcin may constitute a novel therapeutic approach to treating HCC. PMID:27633001

  1. MYC cis-Elements in PsMPT Promoter Is Involved in Chilling Response of Paeonia suffruticosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaoqing; Dong, Lei; Liu, Chunying; Song, Wenwen; Liu, Jingjing; Gai, Shupeng

    2016-01-01

    The MPT transports Pi to synthesize ATP. PsMPT, a chilling-induced gene, was previously reported to promote energy metabolism during bud dormancy release in tree peony. In this study, the regulatory elements of PsMPT promoter involved in chilling response were further analyzed. The PsMPT transcript was detected in different tree peony tissues and was highly expressed in the flower organs, including petal, stigma and stamen. An 1174 bp of the PsMPT promoter was isolated by TAIL-PCR, and the PsMPT promoter::GUS transgenic Arabidopsis was generated and analyzed. GUS staining and qPCR showed that the promoter was active in mainly the flower stigma and stamen. Moreover, it was found that the promoter activity was enhanced by chilling, NaCl, GA, ACC and NAA, but inhibited by ABA, mannitol and PEG. In transgenic plants harboring 421 bp of the PsMPT promoter, the GUS gene expression and the activity were significantly increased by chilling treatment. When the fragment from -421 to -408 containing a MYC cis-element was deleted, the chilling response could not be observed. Further mutation analysis confirmed that the MYC element was one of the key motifs responding to chilling in the PsMPT promoter. The present study provides useful information for further investigation of the regulatory mechanism of PsMPT during the endo-dormancy release. PMID:27228117

  2. C-Myc negatively controls the tumor suppressor PTEN by upregulating miR-26a in glioblastoma multiforme cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Pin; Nie, Quanmin; Lan, Jin; Ge, Jianwei; Qiu, Yongming; Mao, Qing

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •The c-Myc oncogene directly upregulates miR-26a expression in GBM cells. •ChIP assays demonstrate that c-Myc interacts with the miR-26a promoter. •Luciferase reporter assays show that PTEN is a specific target of miR-26a. •C-Myc–miR-26a suppression of PTEN may regulate the PTEN/AKT pathway. •Overexpression of c-Myc enhances the proliferative capacity of GBM cells. -- Abstract: The c-Myc oncogene is amplified in many tumor types. It is an important regulator of cell proliferation and has been linked to altered miRNA expression, suggesting that c-Myc-regulated miRNAs might contribute to tumor progression. Although miR-26a has been reported to be upregulated in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the mechanism has not been established. We have shown that ectopic expression of miR-26a influenced cell proliferation by targeting PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene that is inactivated in many common malignancies, including GBM. Our findings suggest that c-Myc modulates genes associated with oncogenesis in GBM through deregulation of miRNAs via the c-Myc–miR-26a–PTEN signaling pathway. This may be of clinical relevance.

  3. Myc-Is this the oncogene from Hell?

    PubMed

    Soucek, Laura; Evan, Gerard

    2002-06-01

    A new paper implicates the Myc oncoprotein in the direct induction of DNA damage and consequent genome instability in cultured cells. However, it is less clear whether Myc induces the same genetic pandemonium in vivo.

  4. MYC amplification in multiple marker chromosomes and EZH2 microdeletion in a man with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Zhifu; Abdallah, Al-Ola; Govindarajan, Rangaswamy; Mehta, Paulette; Emanuel, Peter D; Papenhausen, Peter; Schichman, Steven A

    2015-03-01

    The role of MYC and EZH2 in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) pathogenesis is poorly understood. Herein we present a case of AML with MYC amplification in marker chromosomes and a microdeletion of chromosome 7 below cytogenetic resolution. The karyotype of the patient's bone marrow aspirate showed three to five marker chromosomes in all dividing cells without other structural or numerical chromosomal abnormalities. Analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with a probe specific for the human MYC gene revealed amplification of the oncogene localized to the marker chromosomes. Using whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarray analysis, an approximately 4.4 Mb amplicon containing the MYC gene was identified with an estimated amplification of about 30 copies per leukemic cell and, thus, an average of about 8 copies per marker chromosome. A 6.4 Mb hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7 within band q36.1 was also found by SNP microarray analysis in a cellular-equivalent dosage of 50%. The microdeletion spans multiple genes, including EZH2, a gene with well-known cancer association. No mutation was found in the remaining EZH2 allele by next generation gene sequencing. The combination of MYC amplification and EZH2 deletion, which has not been described previously in AML, may suggest a synergistic role of the two oncogenes in the pathogenesis of the patient's acute leukemia.

  5. MycN Is Critical for the Maintenance of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie Ting; Weng, Zhi Hui; Tsang, Kam Sze; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Jiang, Xiao Hua

    2016-01-01

    The biologic studies of human neural crest stem cells (hNCSCs) are extremely challenging due to the limited source of hNCSCs as well as ethical and technical issues surrounding isolation of early human embryonic tissues. On the other hand, vast majority of studies on MycN have been conducted in human tumor cells, thus, the role of MycN in normal human neural crest development is completely unknown. In the present study, we determined the role of MycN in hNCSCs isolated from in vitro-differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). For the first time, we show that suppression of MycN in hNCSCs inhibits cell growth and cell cycle progression. Knockdown of MycN in hNCSCs increases the expression of Cdkn1a, Cdkn2a and Cdkn2b, which encodes the cyclin-dependent kinases p21CIP1, p16 INK4a and p15INK4b. In addition, MycN is involved in the regulation of human sympathetic neurogenesis, as knockdown of MycN enhances the expression of key transcription factors involved in sympathetic neuron differentiation, including Phox2a, Phox2b, Mash1, Hand2 and Gata3. We propose that unlimited source of hNCSCs provides an invaluable platform for the studies of human neural crest development and diseases.

  6. Myc overexpression enhances of epicardial contribution to the developing heart and promotes extensive expansion of the cardiomyocyte population

    PubMed Central

    Villa del Campo, Cristina; Lioux, Ghislaine; Carmona, Rita; Sierra, Rocío; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón; Clavería, Cristina; Torres, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Myc is an essential regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Myc overexpression promotes the homeostatic expansion of cardiomyocyte populations by cell competition, however whether this applies to other cardiac lineages remains unknown. The epicardium contributes signals and cells to the developing and adult injured heart and exploring strategies for modulating its activity is of great interest. Using inducible genetic mosaics, we overexpressed Myc in the epicardium and determined the differential expansion of Myc-overexpressing cells with respect to their wild type counterparts. Myc-overexpressing cells overcolonized all epicardial-derived lineages and showed increased ability to invade the myocardium and populate the vasculature. We also found massive colonization of the myocardium by Wt1Cre-derived Myc-overexpressing cells, with preservation of cardiac development. Detailed analyses showed that this contribution is unlikely to derive from Cre activity in early cardiomyocytes but does not either derive from established epicardial cells, suggesting that early precursors expressing Wt1Cre originate the recombined cardiomyocytes. Myc overexpression does not modify the initial distribution of Wt1Cre-recombined cardiomyocytes, indicating that it does not stimulate the incorporation of early expressing Wt1Cre lineages to the myocardium, but differentially expands this initial population. We propose that strategies using epicardial lineages for heart repair may benefit from promoting cell competitive ability. PMID:27752085

  7. CLL Cells Respond to B-Cell Receptor Stimulation with a MicroRNA/mRNA Signature Associated with MYC Activation and Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pede, Valerie; Rombout, Ans; Vermeire, Jolien; Naessens, Evelien; Mestdagh, Pieter; Robberecht, Nore; Vanderstraeten, Hanne; Van Roy, Nadine; Vandesompele, Jo; Speleman, Frank; Philippé, Jan; Verhasselt, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a disease with variable clinical outcome. Several prognostic factors such as the immunoglobulin heavy chain variable genes (IGHV) mutation status are linked to the B-cell receptor (BCR) complex, supporting a role for triggering the BCR in vivo in the pathogenesis. The miRNA profile upon stimulation and correlation with IGHV mutation status is however unknown. To evaluate the transcriptional response of peripheral blood CLL cells upon BCR stimulation in vitro, miRNA and mRNA expression was measured using hybridization arrays and qPCR. We found both IGHV mutated and unmutated CLL cells to respond with increased expression of MYC and other genes associated with BCR activation, and a phenotype of cell cycle progression. Genome-wide expression studies showed hsa-miR-132-3p/hsa-miR-212 miRNA cluster induction associated with a set of downregulated genes, enriched for genes modulated by BCR activation and amplified by Myc. We conclude that BCR triggering of CLL cells induces a transcriptional response of genes associated with BCR activation, enhanced cell cycle entry and progression and suggest that part of the transcriptional profiles linked to IGHV mutation status observed in isolated peripheral blood are not cell intrinsic but rather secondary to in vivo BCR stimulation. PMID:23560086

  8. An Intergenic Regulatory Region Mediates Drosophila Myc -Induced Apoptosis and Blocks Tissue Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Can; Tintó, Sergio Casas; Li, Guangyao; Lin, Nianwei; Chung, Michelle; Moreno, Eduardo; Moberg, Kenneth H.; Zhou, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Induction of cell autonomous apoptosis following oncogene-induced overproliferation is a major tumor-suppressive mechanism in vertebrates. However the detailed mechanism mediating this process remains enigmatic. In this study we demonstrate that dMyc-induced cell-autonomous apoptosis in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster relies on an intergenic sequence termed the IRER (Irradiation Responsive Enhancer Region). The IRER mediates expression of surrounding pro-apoptotic genes, and we use an in vivo reporter of the IRER chromatin state to gather evidence that epigenetic control of DNA accessibility within the IRER is an important determinant of the strength of this response to excess dMyc. In prior work we showed that the IRER also mediates P53-dependent induction of pro-apoptotic genes following DNA damage, and the chromatin conformation within IRER is regulated by Polycomb group-mediated histone modifications. dMyc-induced apoptosis and the P53-mediated DNA damage response thus overlap in a requirement for the IRER. The epigenetic mechanisms controlling IRER accessibility appear to set thresholds for the P53 and dMyc-induced expression of apoptotic genes in vivo and may have a profound impact on cellular sensitivity to oncogene-induced stress. PMID:24931167

  9. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in brassica.

    PubMed

    Rood, S B; Williams, P H; Pearce, D; Murofushi, N; Mander, L N; Pharis, R P

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode [ein/ein]) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A(3) (GA(3)) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA(1) and GA(3) were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using [(2)H]GA(1), as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA(20) and GA(1), and the rate of GA(19) metabolism were simultaneously analyzed at day 7 by feeding [(2)H(2)]GA(19) and measuring metabolites [(2)H(2)]GA(20) and [(2)H(2)]GA(1) and endogenous GA(20) and GA(1), with [(2)H(5)]GA(20) and [(2)H(5)]GA(1) as quantitative internal standards. Levels of GA(1) and GA(20) were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA(20) and GA(1) were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA(1) biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of [(3)H]GA(20) to [(3)H]GA(1) was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA(1) biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A(1) and A(3). The enhanced GA production probably underlies the accelerated shoot growth and development, and particularly, the increased shoot elongation.

  10. Clinical significance of high c-MYC and low MYCBP2 expression and their association with Ikaros dysfunction in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ge, Zheng; Guo, Xing; Li, Jianyong; Hartman, Melanie; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Dovat, Sinisa; Song, Chunhua

    2015-12-01

    Increased expression of c-MYC is observed in both Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) and T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (T-ALL). MYC binding protein 2 (MYCBP2) is a probable E3 ubiquitin ligase and its function in leukemia is unknown. IKZF1 deletion is associated with the development and poor outcome of ALL. Here, we observed significant high c-MYC expression and low MYCBP2 expression in adult ALL patients. Patients with high c-MYC expression and/or low MYCBP2 expression had higher WBC counts and a higher percentage of CD34+ or CD33+ cells, as well as splenomegaly, liver infiltration, higher BM blasts, and lower CR rate. Ikaros bound to the regulatory regions of c-MYC and MYCBP2, suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in ALL cells. Expression of c-MYC mRNA was significantly higher in patients with IKZF1 deletion; conversely MYCBP2 mRNA expression was significantly lower in those patients. A CK2 inhibitor, which acts as an Ikaros activator, also suppressed c-MYC and increased MYCBP2 expression in an Ikaros (IKZF1) dependent manner in the ALL cells. In summary, our data indicated the correlation of high c-MYC expression, low MYCBP2 expression and high c-MYC plus low MYCBP2 expression with high-risk factors and proliferation markers in adult ALL patients. Our data also revealed an oncogenic role for an Ikaros/MYCBP2/c-MYC axis in adult ALL, providing a mechanism of target therapies that activate Ikaros in adult ALL.

  11. Discovery of a Family of Genomic Sequences Which Interact Specifically with the c-MYC Promoter to Regulate c-MYC Expression

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shelia D.; Rouchka, Eric C.; Miller, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex forming sequences are particularly enriched in the promoter regions of eukaryotic genes, especially of oncogenes. One of the most well studied G-quadruplex forming sequences is located in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 of the c-MYC promoter region. The oncoprotein c-MYC regulates a large array of genes which play important roles in growth regulation and metabolism. It is dysregulated in >70% of human cancers. The silencer NHEIII1 located upstream of the P1 promoter regulates up-to 80% of c-MYC transcription and includes a G-quadruplex structure (Pu27) that is required for promoter inhibition. We have identified, for the first time, a family of seventeen G-quadruplex-forming motifs with >90% identity with Pu27, located on different chromosomes throughout the human genome, some found near or within genes involved in stem cell maintenance or neural cell development. Notably, all members of the Pu27 family interact specifically with NHEIII1 sequence, in vitro. Crosslinking studies demonstrate that Pu27 oligonucleotide binds specifically to the C-rich strand of the NHEIII1 resulting in the G-quadruplex structure stabilization. Pu27 homologous sequences (Pu27-HS) significantly inhibit leukemic cell lines proliferation in culture. Exposure of U937 cells to the Pu27-HS induces cell growth inhibition associated with cell cycle arrest that is most likely due to downregulation of c-MYC expression at the RNA and/or protein levels. Expression of SOX2, another gene containing a Pu27-HS, was affected by Pu27-HS treatment as well. Our data suggest that the oligonucleotides encoding the Pu27 family target complementary DNA sequences in the genome, including those of the c-MYC and SOX2 promoters. This effect is most likely cell type and cell growth condition dependent. The presence of genomic G-quadruplex-forming sequences homologous to Pu27 of c-MYC silencer and the fact that they interact specifically with the parent sequence suggest a common

  12. Discovery of a Family of Genomic Sequences Which Interact Specifically with the c-MYC Promoter to Regulate c-MYC Expression.

    PubMed

    Rezzoug, Francine; Thomas, Shelia D; Rouchka, Eric C; Miller, Donald M

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplex forming sequences are particularly enriched in the promoter regions of eukaryotic genes, especially of oncogenes. One of the most well studied G-quadruplex forming sequences is located in the nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 of the c-MYC promoter region. The oncoprotein c-MYC regulates a large array of genes which play important roles in growth regulation and metabolism. It is dysregulated in >70% of human cancers. The silencer NHEIII1 located upstream of the P1 promoter regulates up-to 80% of c-MYC transcription and includes a G-quadruplex structure (Pu27) that is required for promoter inhibition. We have identified, for the first time, a family of seventeen G-quadruplex-forming motifs with >90% identity with Pu27, located on different chromosomes throughout the human genome, some found near or within genes involved in stem cell maintenance or neural cell development. Notably, all members of the Pu27 family interact specifically with NHEIII1 sequence, in vitro. Crosslinking studies demonstrate that Pu27 oligonucleotide binds specifically to the C-rich strand of the NHEIII1 resulting in the G-quadruplex structure stabilization. Pu27 homologous sequences (Pu27-HS) significantly inhibit leukemic cell lines proliferation in culture. Exposure of U937 cells to the Pu27-HS induces cell growth inhibition associated with cell cycle arrest that is most likely due to downregulation of c-MYC expression at the RNA and/or protein levels. Expression of SOX2, another gene containing a Pu27-HS, was affected by Pu27-HS treatment as well. Our data suggest that the oligonucleotides encoding the Pu27 family target complementary DNA sequences in the genome, including those of the c-MYC and SOX2 promoters. This effect is most likely cell type and cell growth condition dependent. The presence of genomic G-quadruplex-forming sequences homologous to Pu27 of c-MYC silencer and the fact that they interact specifically with the parent sequence suggest a common

  13. IDH-mutant glioma specific association of rs55705857 located at 8q24.21 involves MYC deregulation

    PubMed Central

    Oktay, Yavuz; Ülgen, Ege; Can, Özge; Akyerli, Cemaliye B.; Yüksel, Şirin; Erdemgil, Yiğit; Durası, İ. Melis; Henegariu, Octavian Ioan; Nanni, E. Paolo; Selevsek, Nathalie; Grossmann, Jonas; Erson-Omay, E. Zeynep; Bai, Hanwen; Gupta, Manu; Lee, William; Turcan, Şevin; Özpınar, Aysel; Huse, Jason T.; Sav, M. Aydın; Flanagan, Adrienne; Günel, Murat; Sezerman, O. Uğur; Yakıcıer, M. Cengiz; Pamir, M. Necmettin; Özduman, Koray

    2016-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism rs55705857, located in a non-coding but evolutionarily conserved region at 8q24.21, is strongly associated with IDH-mutant glioma development and was suggested to be a causal variant. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this association has remained unknown. With a case control study in 285 gliomas, 316 healthy controls, 380 systemic cancers, 31 other CNS-tumors, and 120 IDH-mutant cartilaginous tumors, we identified that the association was specific to IDH-mutant gliomas. Odds-ratios were 9.25 (5.17–16.52; 95% CI) for IDH-mutated gliomas and 12.85 (5.94–27.83; 95% CI) for IDH-mutated, 1p/19q co-deleted gliomas. Decreasing strength with increasing anaplasia implied a modulatory effect. No somatic mutations were noted at this locus in 114 blood-tumor pairs, nor was there a copy number difference between risk-allele and only-ancestral allele carriers. CCDC26 RNA-expression was rare and not different between the two groups. There were only minor subtype-specific differences in common glioma driver genes. RNA sequencing and LC-MS/MS comparisons pointed to significantly altered MYC-signaling. Baseline enhancer activity of the conserved region specifically on the MYC promoter and its further positive modulation by the SNP risk-allele was shown in vitro. Our findings implicate MYC deregulation as the underlying cause of the observed association. PMID:27282637

  14. Cooperative antiproliferative effect of coordinated ectopic expression of DLC1 tumor suppressor protein and silencing of MYC oncogene expression in liver cancer cells: Therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuyu; Zhou, Xiaoling; Tone, Paul; Durkin, Marian E.; Popescu, Nicholas C.

    2016-01-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common types of cancer and has a very poor prognosis; thus, the development of effective therapies for the treatment of advanced HCC is of high clinical priority. In the present study, the anti-oncogenic effect of combined knockdown of c-Myc expression and ectopic restoration of deleted in liver cancer 1 (DLC1) expression was investigated in human liver cancer cells. Expression of c-Myc in human HCC cells was knocked down by stable transfection with a Myc-specific short hairpin (sh) RNA vector. DLC1 expression in Huh7 cells was restored by adenovirus transduction, and the effects of DLC1 expression and c-Myc knockdown on Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA) levels, cell proliferation, soft agar colony formation and cell invasion were measured. Downregulation of c-Myc or re-expression of DLC1 led to a marked reduction in RhoA levels, which was associated with decreases in cell proliferation, soft agar colony formation and invasiveness; this inhibitory effect was augmented with a combination of DLC1 transduction and c-Myc suppression. To determine whether liver cell-specific delivery of DLC1 was able to enhance the inhibitory effect of c-Myc knockdown on tumor growth in vivo, DLC1 vector DNA complexed with galactosylated polyethylene glycol-linear polyethyleneimine was administered by tail vein injection to mice bearing subcutaneous xenografts of Huh7 cells transfected with shMyc or control shRNA. A cooperative inhibitory effect of DLC1 expression and c-Myc knockdown on the growth of Huh7-derived tumors was observed, suggesting that targeted liver cell delivery of DLC1 and c-Myc shRNA may serve as a possible gene therapy modality for the treatment of human HCC. PMID:27446476

  15. Cdk2 deficiency decreases ras/CDK4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L

    2007-10-15

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development, causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also shown that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin, loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induced epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decreased incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathologic analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2-/- tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report of K5Myc/CDK4-/-, K5Myc/CDK2-/- mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall, we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved.

  16. Cdk2 deficiency decrease ras/cdk4-dependent malignant progression, but not myc-induced tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Macias, Everardo; Kim, Yongbaek; Miliani de Marval, Paula L.; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Rodriguez-Puebla, Marcelo L.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously shown that forced expression of CDK4 in mouse skin (K5CDK4 mice) results in increased susceptibility to squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) development in a chemical carcinogenesis protocol. This protocol induces skin papilloma development causing a selection of cells bearing activating Ha-ras mutations. We have also demonstrated that myc-induced epidermal proliferation and oral tumorigenesis (K5Myc mice) depends on CDK4 expression. Biochemical analysis of K5CDK4 and K5Myc epidermis as well as skin tumors showed that keratinocyte proliferation is mediated by CDK4 sequestration of p27Kip1 and p21Cip1, and activation of CDK2. Here, we studied the role of CDK2 in epithelial tumorigenesis. In normal skin loss of CDK2 rescues CDK4-induced, but not myc-induce epidermal hyperproliferation. Ablation of CDK2 in K5CDK4 mice results in decrease incidences and multiplicity of skin tumors as well as malignant progression to SCC. Histopathological analysis showed that K5CDK4 tumors are drastically more aggressive than K5CDK4/CDK2−/− tumors. On the other hand, we show that CDK2 is dispensable for myc-induced tumorigenesis. In contrast to our previous report K5Myc/CDK4−/− mice, K5Myc/CDK2−/− mice developed oral tumors with the same frequency as K5Myc mice. Overall we have established that ras-induced tumors are more susceptible to CDK2 ablation than myc-induced tumors, suggesting that the efficacy of targeting CDK2 in tumor development and malignant progression is dependent on the oncogenic pathway involved. PMID:17942901

  17. A mutant gene that increases gibberellin production in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Rood, S.B. ); Williams, P.H. ); Pearce, D.; Pharis, R.P. ); Murofushi, Noboru ); Mander, L.N. )

    1990-07-01

    A single gene mutant (elongated internode (ein/ein)) with accelerated shoot elongation was identified from a rapid cycling line of Brassica rapa. Relative to normal plants, mutant plants had slightly accelerated floral development, greater stem dry weights, and particularly, increased internode and inflorescence elongation. The application of the triazole plant growth retardant, paclobutrazol, inhibited shoot elongation, returning ein to a more normal phenotype. Conversely, exogenous gibberellin A{sub 3} (GA{sub 3}) can convert normal genotypes to a phenotype resembling ein. The content of endogenous GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 3} were estimated by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring using ({sup 2}H)GA{sub 1} as a quantitative internal standard and at day 14 were 1.5- and 12.1-fold higher per stem, respectively, in ein than in normal plants, although GA concentrations were more similar. The endogenous levels of GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1}, and the rate of GA{sub 19} metabolism were simultaneously analyzed. Levels of GA{sub 1} and GA{sub 20} were 4.6- and 12.9-fold higher, respectively, and conversions to GA{sub 20} and GA{sub 1} were 8.3 and 1.3 times faster in ein than normal plants. Confirming the enhanced rate of GA{sub 1} biosynthesis in ein, the conversion of ({sup 3}H)GA{sub 20} to ({sup 3}H) GA{sub 1} was also faster in ein than in the normal genotype. Thus, the ein allele results in accelerated GA{sub 1} biosynthesis and an elevated content of endogenous GAs, including the dihydroxylated GAs A{sub 1} and A{sub 3}.

  18. Evaluation of the antitumor effects of c-Myc-Max heterodimerization inhibitor 100258-F4 in ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiandong; Ma, Xiaoli; Jones, Hannah M; Chan, Leo Li-Ying; Song, Fang; Zhang, Weiyuan; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Zhou, Chunxiao

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is the most lethal gynecological cancer due to its silent onset and recurrence with resistance to chemotherapy. Overexpression of oncogene c-Myc is one of the most frequently encountered events present in ovarian carcinoma. Disrupting the function of c-Myc and its downstream target genes is a promising strategy for cancer therapy. Our objective was to evaluate the potential effects of small-molecule c-Myc inhibitor, 10058-F4, on ovarian carcinoma cells and the underlying mechanisms by which 10058-F4 exerts its actions. Using MTT assay, colony formation, flow cytometry and Annexin V FITC assays, we found that 10058-F4 significantly inhibited cell proliferation of both SKOV3 and Hey ovarian cancer cells in a dose dependent manner through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle G1 arrest. Treatment with 10058-F4 reduced cellular ATP production and ROS levels in SKOV3 and Hey cells. Consistently, primary cultures of ovarian cancer treated with 10058-F4 showed induction of caspase-3 activity and inhibition of cell proliferation in 15 of 18 cases. The response to 10058-F4 was independent the level of c-Myc protein over-expression in primary cultures of ovarian carcinoma. These novel findings suggest that the growth of ovarian cancer cells is dependent upon c-MYC activity and that targeting c-Myc-Max heterodimerization could be a potential therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancer.

  19. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells without Myc from mouse and human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masato; Koyanagi, Michiyo; Tanabe, Koji; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Ichisaka, Tomoko; Aoi, Takashi; Okita, Keisuke; Mochiduki, Yuji; Takizawa, Nanako; Yamanaka, Shinya

    2008-01-01

    Direct reprogramming of somatic cells provides an opportunity to generate patient- or disease-specific pluripotent stem cells. Such induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells were generated from mouse fibroblasts by retroviral transduction of four transcription factors: Oct3/4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc. Mouse iPS cells are indistinguishable from embryonic stem (ES) cells in many respects and produce germline-competent chimeras. Reactivation of the c-Myc retrovirus, however, increases tumorigenicity in the chimeras and progeny mice, hindering clinical applications. Here we describe a modified protocol for the generation of iPS cells that does not require the Myc retrovirus. With this protocol, we obtained significantly fewer non-iPS background cells, and the iPS cells generated were consistently of high quality. Mice derived from Myc(-) iPS cells did not develop tumors during the study period. The protocol also enabled efficient isolation of iPS cells without drug selection. Furthermore, we generated human iPS cells from adult dermal fibroblasts without MYC.

  20. Expression of c-myc and induction of DNA synthesis by platelet-poor plasma in human diploid fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrari, S.; Calabretta, B.; Battini, R.; Cosenza, S.C.; Owen, T.A.; Soprano, K.J.; Baserga, R. )

    1988-01-01

    When WI-38 human diploid fibroblasts become confluent, they stop synthesizing DNA and dividing. Addition of serum causes the quiescent cell to reenter the cell cycle. Prolonged quiescence after confluence decreases and delays the response to serum. For a few days after reaching confluence. WI-38 cells also respond to platelet-poor plasma. During this period, although not cycling, WI-38 cells still express c-myc and other growth-regulated genes, as measured by steady-state RNA levels. If the quiescence is prolonged further, c-myc expression (and that of two other growth-regulated genes) is no longer detectable, and its disappearance coincides with a loss of response to platelet-poor plasma. These results suggest that, also under physiological conditions, the expression of c-myc and other growth-regulated genes can cooperate with platelet-poor plasma in inducing cellular DNA synthesis in human diploid fibroblasts.

  1. Role of SWI/SNF in acute leukemia maintenance and enhancer-mediated Myc regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Junwei; Whyte, Warren A.; Zepeda-Mendoza, Cinthya J.; Milazzo, Joseph P.; Shen, Chen; Roe, Jae-Seok; Minder, Jessica L.; Mercan, Fatih; Wang, Eric; Eckersley-Maslin, Melanie A.; Campbell, Amy E.; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Shareef, Sarah; Zhu, Zhu; Kendall, Jude; Muhar, Matthias; Haslinger, Christian; Yu, Ming; Roeder, Robert G.; Wigler, Michael H.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Zuber, Johannes; Spector, David L.; Young, Richard A.; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer cells frequently depend on chromatin regulatory activities to maintain a malignant phenotype. Here, we show that leukemia cells require the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex for their survival and aberrant self-renewal potential. While Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF, is known to suppress tumor formation in several cell types, we found that leukemia cells instead rely on Brg1 to support their oncogenic transcriptional program, which includes Myc as one of its key targets. To account for this context-specific function, we identify a cluster of lineage-specific enhancers located 1.7 Mb downstream from Myc that are occupied by SWI/SNF as well as the BET protein Brd4. Brg1 is required at these distal elements to maintain transcription factor occupancy and for long-range chromatin looping interactions with the Myc promoter. Notably, these distal Myc enhancers coincide with a region that is focally amplified in ∼3% of acute myeloid leukemias. Together, these findings define a leukemia maintenance function for SWI/SNF that is linked to enhancer-mediated gene regulation, providing general insights into how cancer cells exploit transcriptional coactivators to maintain oncogenic gene expression programs. PMID:24285714

  2. Wild-type p53 binds to MYC promoter G-quadruplex

    PubMed Central

    Petr, Marek; Helma, Robert; Polášková, Alena; Krejčí, Aneta; Dvořáková, Zuzana; Kejnovská, Iva; Navrátilová, Lucie; Adámik, Matej; Vorlíčková, Michaela; Brázdová, Marie

    2016-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four-stranded nucleic acid structures that are implicated in the regulation of transcription, translation and replication. Genome regions enriched in putative G-quadruplex motifs include telomeres and gene promoters. Tumour suppressor p53 plays a critical role in regulatory pathways leading to cell cycle arrest, DNA repair and apoptosis. In addition to transcriptional regulation mediated via sequence-specific DNA binding, p53 can selectively bind various non-B DNA structures. In the present study, wild-type p53 (wtp53) binding to G-quadruplex formed by MYC promoter nuclease hypersensitive element (NHE) III1 region was investigated. Wtp53 binding to MYC G-quadruplex is comparable to interaction with specific p53 consensus sequence (p53CON). Apart from the full-length wtp53, its isolated C-terminal region (aa 320–393) as well, is capable of high-affinity MYC G-quadruplex binding, suggesting its critical role in this type of interaction. Moreover, wtp53 binds to MYC promoter region containing putative G-quadruplex motif in two wtp53-expressing cell lines. The results suggest that wtp53 binding to G-quadruplexes can take part in transcriptional regulation of its target genes. PMID:27634752

  3. Role of SWI/SNF in acute leukemia maintenance and enhancer-mediated Myc regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junwei; Whyte, Warren A; Zepeda-Mendoza, Cinthya J; Milazzo, Joseph P; Shen, Chen; Roe, Jae-Seok; Minder, Jessica L; Mercan, Fatih; Wang, Eric; Eckersley-Maslin, Melanie A; Campbell, Amy E; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Shareef, Sarah; Zhu, Zhu; Kendall, Jude; Muhar, Matthias; Haslinger, Christian; Yu, Ming; Roeder, Robert G; Wigler, Michael H; Blobel, Gerd A; Zuber, Johannes; Spector, David L; Young, Richard A; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2013-12-15

    Cancer cells frequently depend on chromatin regulatory activities to maintain a malignant phenotype. Here, we show that leukemia cells require the mammalian SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex for their survival and aberrant self-renewal potential. While Brg1, an ATPase subunit of SWI/SNF, is known to suppress tumor formation in several cell types, we found that leukemia cells instead rely on Brg1 to support their oncogenic transcriptional program, which includes Myc as one of its key targets. To account for this context-specific function, we identify a cluster of lineage-specific enhancers located 1.7 Mb downstream from Myc that are occupied by SWI/SNF as well as the BET protein Brd4. Brg1 is required at these distal elements to maintain transcription factor occupancy and for long-range chromatin looping interactions with the Myc promoter. Notably, these distal Myc enhancers coincide with a region that is focally amplified in ∼3% of acute myeloid leukemias. Together, these findings define a leukemia maintenance function for SWI/SNF that is linked to enhancer-mediated gene regulation, providing general insights into how cancer cells exploit transcriptional coactivators to maintain oncogenic gene expression programs.

  4. Increasing the complexity: new genes and new types of albinism.

    PubMed

    Montoliu, Lluís; Grønskov, Karen; Wei, Ai-Hua; Martínez-García, Mónica; Fernández, Almudena; Arveiler, Benoît; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Riazuddin, Saima; Suzuki, Tamio; Ahmed, Zubair M; Rosenberg, Thomas; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Albinism is a rare genetic condition globally characterized by a number of specific deficits in the visual system, resulting in poor vision, in association with a variable hypopigmentation phenotype. This lack or reduction in pigment might affect the eyes, skin, and hair (oculocutaneous albinism, OCA), or only the eyes (ocular albinism, OA). In addition, there are several syndromic forms of albinism (e.g. Hermansky-Pudlak and Chediak-Higashi syndromes, HPS and CHS, respectively) in which the described hypopigmented and visual phenotypes coexist with more severe pathological alterations. Recently, a locus has been mapped to the 4q24 human chromosomal region and thus represents an additional genetic cause of OCA, termed OCA5, while the gene is eventually identified. In addition, two new genes have been identified as causing OCA when mutated: SLC24A5 and C10orf11, and hence designated as OCA6 and OCA7, respectively. This consensus review, involving all laboratories that have reported these new genes, aims to update and agree upon the current gene nomenclature and types of albinism, while providing additional insights from the function of these new genes in pigment cells. PMID:24066960

  5. Effect of c-myc on the ultrastructural structure of cochleae in guinea pigs with noise induced hearing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Yu; Zhong, Cuiping; Hong, Liu; Wang, Ye; Qiao, Li; Qiu, Jianhua

    2009-12-18

    Noise over-stimulation may induce hair cells loss and hearing deficit. The c-myc oncogene is a major regulator for cell proliferation, growth, and apoptosis. However, the role of this gene in the mammalian cochlea is still unclear. The study was designed to firstly investigate its function under noise condition, from the aspect of cochlear ultrastructural changes. We had established the adenoviral vector of c-myc gene and delivered the adenovirus suspension into the scala tympani of guinea pigs 4 days before noise exposure. The empty adenoviral vectors were injected as control. Then, all subjects were exposed to 4-kHz octave-band noise at 110 dB SPL for 8 h/day, 3 days consecutively. Auditory thresholds were assessed by auditory brainstem response, prior to and 7 days following noise exposure. On the seventh days after noise exposure, the cochlear sensory epithelia surface was observed microscopically and the cochleae were taken to study the ultrastructural changes. The results indicated that auditory threshold shift after noise exposure was higher in the ears treated with Ad.EGFP than that treated with Ad.c-myc-EGFP. Stereocilia loss and the disarrangement of outer hair cells were observed, with greater changes found in the Ad.EGFP group. Also, the ultrastructure changes were severe in the Ad.EGFP group, but not obvious in the Ad.c-myc-EGFP group. Therefore, c-myc gene might play an unexpected role in hearing functional and morphological protection from acoustic trauma.

  6. Intraductal delivery of adenoviruses targets pancreatic tumors in transgenic Ela-myc mice and orthotopic xenografts.

    PubMed

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Miguel Camacho-Sánchez, Juan; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p less than 0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors.

  7. Intraductal Delivery of Adenoviruses Targets Pancreatic Tumors in Transgenic Ela-myc Mice and Orthotopic Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    José, Anabel; Sobrevals, Luciano; Camacho-Sánchez, Juan Miguel; Huch, Meritxell; Andreu, Núria; Ayuso, Eduard; Navarro, Pilar; Alemany, Ramon; Fillat, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Gene-based anticancer therapies delivered by adenoviruses are limited by the poor viral distribution into the tumor. In the current work we have explored the feasibility of targeting pancreatic tumors through a loco-regional route. We have taken advantage of the ductal network in the pancreas to retrogradelly inject adenoviruses through the common bile duct in two different mouse models of pancreatic carcinogenesis: The transgenic Ela-myc mice that develop mixed neoplasms displaying both acinar-like and duct-like neoplastic cells affecting the whole pancreas; and mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 orthotopic xenografts that constitute a model of localized human neoplastic tumors. We studied tumor targeting and the anticancer effects of newly thymidine kinase-engineered adenoviruses both in vitro and in vivo, and conducted comparative studies between intraductal or intravenous administration. Our data indicate that the intraductal delivery of adenovirus efficiently targets pancreatic tumors in the two mouse models. The in vivo application of AduPARTKT plus ganciclovir (GCV) treatment induced tumor regression in Ela-myc mice. Moreover, the intraductal injection of ICOVIR15-TKT oncolytic adenoviruses significantly improved mean survival of mice bearing PANC-1 and BxPC-3 pancreatic xenografts from 30 to 52 days and from 20 to 68 days respectively (p<0.0001) when combined with GCV. Of notice, both AduPARTKT and ICOVIR15-TKT antitumoral responses were stronger by ductal viral application than intravenously, in line with the 38-fold increase in pancreas transduction observed upon ductal administration. In summary our data show that cytotoxic adenoviruses retrogradelly injected to the pancreas can be a feasible approach to treat localized pancreatic tumors. PMID:23328228

  8. Inhibition of serine palmitoyltransferase by myriocin, a natural mycotoxin, causes induction of c-myc in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    He, Quanren; Johnson, Victor J; Osuchowski, Marcin F; Sharma, Raghubir P

    2004-04-01

    Myriocin, a fungal metabolite isolated from Myriococcum albomyces, Isaria sinclairi, and Mycelia sterilia, is a potent inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), a key enzyme in de novo synthesis of sphingolipids. To evaluate the biological effects of myriocin in vivo, we investigated the levels of free sphingoid bases and expression of selected genes regulating cell growth in mouse liver. Male Balb/c mice, weighing 22 g were injected intraperitoneally with myriocin at 0, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0 mg kg(-1) body weight daily for 5 days. Animals were euthanized 24 hours after the last treatment. Levels of plasma alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were not significantly altered by the treatment. A dose-dependent decrease in free sphinganine but not sphingosine was detected by high performance liquid chromatography in both liver and kidney. The decrease of free sphinganine paralleled the decrease in SPT activity. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis on liver mRNA revealed an increase in expression of c-myc, but no changes in tumor necrosis factor alpha, transforming growth factor beta, and hepatocyte growth factor. Results showed that myriocin blocked de novo synthesis of sphingolipids in vivo by SPT inhibition and induced c-myc expression in liver. PMID:15180163

  9. Selective Targeting of CTNNB1-, KRAS- or MYC-Driven Cell Growth by Combinations of Existing Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Uitdehaag, Joost C. M.; de Roos, Jeroen A. D. M.; van Doornmalen, Antoon M.; Prinsen, Martine B. W.; Spijkers-Hagelstein, Jill A. P.; de Vetter, Judith R. F.; de Man, Jos; Buijsman, Rogier C.; Zaman, Guido J. R.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of combination drug treatment in cancer therapy is to improve response rate and to decrease the probability of the development of drug resistance. Preferably, drug combinations are synergistic rather than additive, and, ideally, drug combinations work synergistically only in cancer cells and not in non-malignant cells. We have developed a workflow to identify such targeted synergies, and applied this approach to selectively inhibit the proliferation of cell lines with mutations in genes that are difficult to modulate with small molecules. The approach is based on curve shift analysis, which we demonstrate is a more robust method of determining synergy than combination matrix screening with Bliss-scoring. We show that the MEK inhibitor trametinib is more synergistic in combination with the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib than with vemurafenib, another BRAF inhibitor. In addition, we show that the combination of MEK and BRAF inhibitors is synergistic in BRAF-mutant melanoma cells, and additive or antagonistic in, respectively, BRAF-wild type melanoma cells and non-malignant fibroblasts. This combination exemplifies that synergistic action of drugs can depend on cancer genotype. Next, we used curve shift analysis to identify new drug combinations that specifically inhibit cancer cell proliferation driven by difficult-to-drug cancer genes. Combination studies were performed with compounds that as single agents showed preference for inhibition of cancer cells with mutations in either the CTNNB1 gene (coding for β-catenin), KRAS, or cancer cells expressing increased copy numbers of MYC. We demonstrate that the Wnt-pathway inhibitor ICG-001 and trametinib acted synergistically in Wnt-pathway-mutant cell lines. The ERBB2 inhibitor TAK-165 was synergistic with trametinib in KRAS-mutant cell lines. The EGFR/ERBB2 inhibitor neratinib acted synergistically with the spindle poison docetaxel and with the Aurora kinase inhibitor GSK-1070916 in cell lines with MYC amplification

  10. Myc induced miR-144/451 contributes to the acquired imatinib resistance in chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Li; Wang, Sitao; Chen, Renan; Wu, Yanlan; Zhang, Bei; Huang, Siyong; Zhang, Jingyi; Xiao, Fang; Wang, Meng; Liang, Yingmin

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Increased c-myc expression in imatinib resistant CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc contributes the imatinib resistance in CML cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc transcriptionally reduces the expression of miR-144/451 in K562R cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Restoration of miR-144/451 reverses the resistance of K562R cells to imatinib. -- Abstract: Imatinib resistance remains the big hurdle for CML therapy. Previous study reveals that c-myc is important for bcr-abl CML cell proliferation, while its role in imatinib resistance is largely unknown. In this study, we first found that c-myc expression is upregulated in imatinib resistant K562R cells, which in turn enhances the expression of miR-144/451. Knockdown of c-myc or restoration of miR-144/451 in the K562R cells sensitizes K562R cells to imatinib therapy. Our study here reveals an regulatory pathway between myc and miR-144/451 and highlights that targeting either myc or miR-144/451 might be valuable for eliminating the imatinib resistant CML cells.

  11. The Role of MIZ-1 in MYC-Dependent Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Katrin E.; Walz, Susanne; von Eyss, Björn; Wolf, Elmar; Athineos, Dimitris; Sansom, Owen; Eilers, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A hallmark of MYC-transformed cells is their aberrant response to antimitogenic signals. Key examples include the inability of MYC-transformed cells to arrest proliferation in response to antimitogenic signals such as TGF-β or DNA damage and their inability to differentiate into adipocytes in response to hormonal stimuli. Given the plethora of antimitogenic signals to which a tumor cell is exposed, it is likely that the ability to confer resistance to these signals is central to the transforming properties of MYC in vivo. At the same time, the inability of MYC-transformed cells to halt cell-cycle progression on stress may establish a dependence on mutations that impair or disable apoptosis. We propose that the interaction of MYC with the zinc finger protein MIZ-1 mediates resistance to antimitogenic signals. In contrast to other interactions of MYC, there is currently little evidence that MIZ-1 associates with MYC in normal, unperturbed cells. The functional interaction of both proteins becomes apparent at oncogenic expression levels of MYC and association with MIZ-1 mediates both oncogenic functions of MYC as well as tumor-suppressive responses to oncogenic levels of MYC. PMID:24296348

  12. Piperlongumine inhibits LMP1/MYC-dependent mouse B-lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seong-Su; Tompkins, Van S.; Son, Dong-Ju; Kamberos, Natalie L.; Stunz, Laura L.; Halwani, Ahmad; Bishop, Gail A.; Janz, Siegfried

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Mouse model of human Burkitt lymphoma revealed cancer inhibition by PL. •Treatment with PL led to apoptosis of malignant but not normal B cells. •PL inhibited LMP1–NF-κB–Myc-dependent target genes including p21-encoding Cdkn1a. •PL holds promise for new interventions approaches to hematologic malignancies. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (PL), isolated from the fruit of Long pepper, Piper longum, is a cancer-inhibiting compound that selectively kills tumor cells while sparing their normal counterparts. Here we evaluated the efficacy with which PL suppresses malignant B cells derived from a newly developed, double-transgenic mouse model of human endemic Burkitt lymphoma (BL), designated mCD40-LMP1/iMyc{sup Eμ}. PL inhibited tumor cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner and induced apoptosis of neoplastic but not normal B cells. Treatment with PL resulted in downregulation of EBV-encoded LMP1, cellular Myc, constitutive NF-κB activity, and a host of LMP1-Myc-NF-κB-regulated target genes including Aurka, Bcat1, Bub1b, Ccnb1, Chek1, Fancd2, Tfrc and Xrcc6. Of note, p21{sup Cip1}-encoding Cdkn1a was suppressed independent of changes in Trp53 mRNA levels and p53 DNA-binding activity. Considering the central role of the LMP1–NF-κB–Myc axis in B-lineage neoplasia, these findings further our understanding of the mechanisms by which PL inhibits B-lymphoma and provide a preclinical rationale for the inclusion of PL in new interventions in blood cancers.

  13. Gamabufotalin triggers c-Myc degradation via induction of WWP2 in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao; Deng, Sa; Zhang, Baojing; Huo, Xiaokui; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Xiaobo; Zhong, Yuping; Ma, Xiaochi

    2016-01-01

    Deciding appropriate therapy for multiple myeloma (MM) is challenging because of the occurrence of multiple chromosomal changes and the fatal nature of the disease. In the current study, gamabufotalin (GBT) was isolated from toad venom, and its tumor-specific cytotoxicity was investigated in human MM cells. We found GBT inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis with the IC50 values <50 nM. Mechanistic studies using functional approaches identified GBT as an inhibitor of c-Myc. Further analysis showed that GBT especially evoked the ubiquitination and degradation of c-Myc protein, thereby globally repressing the expression of c-Myc target genes. GBT treatment inhibited ERK and AKT signals, while stimulating the activation of JNK cascade. An E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase, WWP2, was upregulated following JNK activation and played an important role in c-Myc ubiquitination and degradation through direct protein-protein interaction. The antitumor effect of GBT was validated in a xenograft mouse model and the suppression of MM-induced osteolysis was verified in a SCID-hu model in vivo. Taken together, our study identified the potential of GBT as a promising therapeutic agent in the treatment of MM. PMID:26894970

  14. hTERT, MYC and TP53 deregulation in gastric preneoplastic lesions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gastric cancer is a serious public health problem in Northern Brazil and in the world due to its high incidence and mortality. Despite the severity of the disease, more research is needed to better understand the molecular events involved in this intestinal-type gastric carcinogenesis process. Since precancerous lesions precede intestinal-type gastric cancer, here, we evaluated the hTERT, MYC, and TP53 mRNA and protein expression, as well as TP33 copy number, in gastric preneoplastic lesions. Methods We evaluated 19 superficial gastritis, 18 atrophic gastritis, and 18 intestinal metaplasia from cancer-free individuals of Northern Brazil. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR was used to analyze the mRNA expression and immunohistochemical methods were used to assess protein immunoreactivity in tissue samples. The number of TP53 gene copies was investigated in gastric diseases by quantitative PCR. Results We observed hTERT, MYC, and p53 immunoreactivity only in intestinal metaplasia samples. The immunoreactivity of these proteins was strongly associated with each other. A significantly higher MYC mRNA expression was observed in intestinal metaplasia compared to gastritis samples. Loss of TP53 was also only detected in intestinal metaplasia specimens. Conclusions We demonstrated that hTERT, MYC, and TP53 are deregulated in intestinal metaplasia of individuals from Northern Brazil and these alterations may facilitate tumor initiation. PMID:22768805

  15. The human cut homeodomain protein represses transcription from the c-myc promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Dufort, D; Nepveu, A

    1994-01-01

    Studies of the c-myc promoter have shown that efficient transcription initiation at the P2 start site as well as the block to elongation of transcription require the presence of the ME1a1 protein binding site upstream of the P2 TATA box. Following fractionation by size exclusion chromatography, three protein-ME1a1 DNA complexes, a, b, and c, were detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A cDNA encoding a protein present in complex c was isolated by screening of an expression library with an ME1a1 DNA probe. This cDNA was found to encode the human homolog of the Drosophila Cut homeodomain protein. The bacterially expressed human Cut (hu-Cut) protein bound to the ME1a1 site, and antibodies against hu-Cut inhibited the ME1a1 binding activity c in nuclear extracts. In cotransfection experiments, the hu-Cut protein repressed transcription from the c-myc promoter, and this repression was shown to be dependent on the presence of the ME1a1 site. Using a reporter construct with a heterologous promoter, we found that c-myc exon 1 sequences were also necessary, in addition to the ME1a1 site, for repression by Cut. Taken together, these results suggest that the human homolog of the Drosophila Cut homeodomain protein is involved in regulation of the c-myc gene. Images PMID:8196661

  16. Mei-P26 Mediates Tissue-Specific Responses to the Brat Tumor Suppressor and the dMyc Proto-Oncogene in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana; Boulan, Laura; Perez, Lidia; Milán, Marco

    2014-01-01

    TRIM-NHL proteins are a family of translational regulators that control cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation during development. Drosophila Brat and Mei-P26 TRIM-NHL proteins serve as tumor suppressors in stem cell lineages and have been proposed to exert this action, in part, via the repression of the protooncogene dMyc. Here we analyze the role of Brat, Mei-P26, and dMyc in regulating growth in Drosophila imaginal discs. As in stem cell lineages, Brat and Mei-P26 repress dMyc in epithelial cells by acting at the post-transcriptional and protein level, respectively. Analysis of cell and organ size unravel that Mei-P26 mediates tissue-specific responses to Brat and dMyc activities. Loss-of-function of brat and overexpression of dMyc induce overgrowth in stem cell lineages and eventually can participate in tumor formation. In contrast, an increase in Mei-P26 levels inhibits growth of epithelial cells in these two conditions. Upon depletion of Brat, Mei-P26 up-regulation prevents an increase in dMyc protein levels and leads to tissue undergrowth. This mechanism appears to be tissue-specific since Mei-P26 is not upregulated in brain tumors resulting from brat loss-of-function. Driving Mei-P26 expression in these tumors —mimicking the situation in epithelial cells— is sufficient to prevent dMyc accumulation, thus rescuing the overgrowth. Finally, we show that Mei-P26 upregulation mediates dMyc-induced apoptosis and limits dMyc growth potential in epithelial cells. These findings shed light on the tumor suppressor roles of TRIM-NHL proteins and underscore a new mechanism that maintains tissue homeostasis upon dMyc deregulation. PMID:24990993

  17. Salinomycin Suppresses PDGFRβ, MYC, and Notch Signaling in Human Medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shuang; Wang, Fengfei; Zhang, Ying; Johnson, Max R; Qian, Steven; Wu, Min; Wu, Erxi

    2014-01-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common childhood brain tumor. Despite improved therapy and management, approximately 30% of patients die of the disease. To search for a more effective therapeutic strategy, the effects of salinomycin were tested on cell proliferation, cell death, and cell cycle progression in human MB cell lines. The results demonstrated that salinomycin inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell death , and disrupts cell cycle progression in MB cells. Salinomycin was also tested on the expression levels of key genes involved in proliferation and survival signaling and revealed that salinomycin down-regulates the expression of PDGFRβ, MYC, p21 and Bcl-2 as well as up-regulates the expression of cyclin A. In addition, the results reveal that salinomycin suppresses the expression of Hes1 and Hes5 in MB cells. Our data shed light on the potential of using salinomycin as a novel therapeutic agent for patients with MB. PMID:25478603

  18. Determination of binding constant of transcription factor myc-max/max-max and E-box DNA: the effect of inhibitors on the binding.

    PubMed

    Park, Seyeon; Chung, Sunah; Kim, Kyung-Mee; Jung, Kyung-Chae; Park, Chihoon; Hahm, Eun-Ryeong; Yang, Chul-Hak

    2004-02-24

    The truncated myc and max proteins, only containing basic regions and helix-loop-helix/zipper (b/HLH/Zip) regions were over-expressed in E. coli and used for the determination of the binding constant and of the inhibitory mechanism on myc-max (or max-max)-DNA complex formation. The association kinetic constants (k(1) and k(-1)) of truncated max-max or myc-max dimer and DNA were determined as k(1)=(1.7+/-0.6)x10(5) M(-1) s(-1), k(-1)=(3.4+/-1.2)x10(-2) s(-1) for max-max and DNA or k(1)=(2.1+/-0.7)x10(5) M(-1) s(-1), k(-1)=(3.2+/-1.4)x10(-2) s(-1) for myc-max and DNA. The equilibrium binding constant (K(1)) was determined using these kinetic parameters [K(XXD)=(7.8+/-2.6)x10(6) M(-1) for max-max and DNA or K(XYD)=(6.9+/-2.2)x10(6) M(-1) for myc-max and DNA]. The binding constants of myc-max or max-max dimer formation were K(XX)=(2.6+/-0.9)x10(5) M(-1) or K(XY)=(1.3+/-0.4)x10(4) M(-1), respectively. When truncated proteins were used, the max-max dimer formation was easier than the myc-max dimer formation, contrary to the physiologically determined case. This leads us to deduce that domains other than b/HLH/Zip are very important for the transcriptional regulatory activity in physiological conditions. The truncated myc and max proteins, which were expressed in E. coli and contained only b/HLH/Zip regions were also used for the screening of inhibitors of myc-max-DNA complex formation. A synthesized curcuminoid, 1,7-bis(4-methyl-3-nitrophenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione (curcuminoid 004), showed the most potent inhibition out of the synthesized curcuminoids, in competition with DNA. The dissociation constant of max-max dimer and the inhibitor was 9 microM, when investigated using in vitro expressed b/HLH/Zip dimer proteins. The curcuminoid 004 showed an inhibitory effect on the binding of myc-max protein to the E-box element in SNU16 cells, and suppressed the expression of myc target genes including ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), cdc25a and c-myc in myc over

  19. ATM promotes apoptosis and suppresses tumorigenesis in response to Myc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusapati, Raju V.; Rounbehler, Robert J.; Hong, Sungki; Powers, John T.; Yan, Mingshan; Kiguchi, Kaoru; McArthur, Mark J.; Wong, Paul K.; Johnson, David G.

    2006-01-01

    Overexpression of the c-myc oncogene contributes to the development of a significant number of human cancers. In response to deregulated Myc activity, the p53 tumor suppressor is activated to promote apoptosis and inhibit tumor formation. Here we demonstrate that p53 induction in response to Myc overexpression requires the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase, a major regulator of the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks. In a transgenic mouse model overexpressing Myc in squamous epithelial tissues, inactivation of Atm suppresses apoptosis and accelerates tumorigenesis. Deregulated Myc expression induces DNA damage in primary transgenic keratinocytes and the formation of H2AX and phospho-SMC1 foci in transgenic tissue. These findings suggest that Myc overexpression causes DNA damage in vivo and that the ATM-dependent response to this damage is critical for p53 activation, apoptosis, and the suppression of tumor development. p53 | DNA damage

  20. Determination of the allelic frequencies of an L-myc and a p53 polymorphism in human lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Weston, A; Ling-Cawley, H M; Caporaso, N E; Bowman, E D; Hoover, R N; Trump, B F; Harris, C C

    1994-04-01

    The L-myc and p53 genes have been implicated in lung cancer. Both of these genes have restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) that could account for differential expression or activity of variant forms. An EcoRI restriction site in the L-myc gene was previously reported to be a predictor of poor prognosis in Japanese lung cancer patients. There are several RFLPs in the p53 gene. In exon 4 there is a polymorphism that codes for either an arginine or proline residue at codon 72. We previously reported the frequency of DNA-RFLPs at these gene loci revealed by EcoRI and AccII respectively. Here we report results from a study comparing lung cancer cases (n = 31) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease controls (n = 49). No association was found between these RFLPs and disease status. Previous observations that the frequencies of these RFLPs varied by race were confirmed. The p53 arginine allele was found to be more common in Caucasians (0.71) than African-Americans (0.50). The EcoRI restriction site present allele in L-myc was more frequent in African-Americans (0.71) than Caucasians (0.49). Thus, the allelic frequency for L-myc was similar in African-Americans to that reported for Japanese, and the allelic frequency for p53 was similar in Caucasians to that reported for Japanese.

  1. Hierarchical phosphorylation at N-terminal transformation-sensitive sites in c-Myc protein is regulated by mitogens and in mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Lutterbach, B; Hann, S R

    1994-01-01

    The N-terminal domain of the c-Myc protein has been reported to be critical for both the transactivation and biological functions of the c-Myc proteins. Through detailed phosphopeptide mapping analyses, we demonstrate that there is a cluster of four regulated and complex phosphorylation events on the N-terminal domain of Myc proteins, including Thr-58, Ser-62, and Ser-71. An apparent enhancement of Ser-62 phosphorylation occurs on v-Myc proteins having a mutation at Thr-58 which has previously been correlated with increased transforming ability. In contrast, phosphorylation of Thr-58 in cells is dependent on a prior phosphorylation of Ser-62. Hierarchical phosphorylation of c-Myc is also observed in vitro with a specific glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha, unlike the promiscuous phosphorylation observed with other glycogen synthase kinase 3 alpha and 3 beta preparations. Although both p42 mitogen-activated protein kinase and cdc2 kinase specifically phosphorylate Ser-62 in vitro and cellular phosphorylation of Thr-58/Ser-62 is stimulated by mitogens, other in vivo experiments do not support a role for these kinases in the phosphorylation of Myc proteins. Unexpectedly, both the Thr-58 and Ser-62 phosphorylation events, but not other N-terminal phosphorylation events, can occur in the cytoplasm, suggesting that translocation of the c-Myc proteins to the nucleus is not required for phosphorylation at these sites. In addition, there appears to be an unusual block to the phosphorylation of Ser-62 during mitosis. Finally, although the enhanced transforming properties of Myc proteins correlates with the loss of phosphorylation at Thr-58 and an enhancement of Ser-62 phosphorylation, these phosphorylation events do not alter the ability of c-Myc to transactivate through the CACGTG Myc/Max binding site. Images PMID:8035827

  2. Intracellular leucine zipper interactions suggest c-Myc hetero-oligomerization.

    PubMed Central

    Dang, C V; Barrett, J; Villa-Garcia, M; Resar, L M; Kato, G J; Fearon, E R

    1991-01-01

    The physiological significance of in vitro leucine zipper interactions was studied by the use of two strategies which detect specific protein-protein interactions in mammalian cells. Fusion genes were constructed which produce chimeric proteins containing leucine zipper domains from several proteins fused either to the DNA-binding domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae GAL4 protein or to the transcriptional activation domain of the herpes simplex virus VP16 protein. Previous studies in mammalian cells have demonstrated that a single chimeric polypeptide containing these two domains will activate transcription of a reporter gene present downstream of the GAL4 DNA-binding site. Similarly, if the GAL4 DNA-binding domain of a chimeric protein could be complexed through leucine zipper interactions with the VP16 activation domain of another chimeric protein, then transcriptional activation of the reporter gene would be detected. Using this strategy for detecting leucine zipper interactions, we observed homo-oligomerization between leucine zipper domains of the yeast protein GCN4 and hetero-oligomerization between leucine zipper regions from the mammalian transcriptional regulating proteins c-Jun and c-Fos. In contrast, homo-oligomerization of the leucine zipper domain from c-Myc was not detectable in cells. The inability of the c-Myc leucine zipper to homo-oligomerize strongly in cells was confirmed independently. The second strategy to detect leucine zipper interactions takes advantage of the observation that the addition of nuclear localization sequences to a cytoplasmic protein will allow the cytoplasmic protein to be transported to and retained in the nucleus. Chimeric genes encoding proteins with sequences from a cytoplasmic protein fused either to the GCN4 or c-Myc leucine zipper domains were constructed. Experiments with the c-Myc chimeric protein failed to demonstrate transport of the cytoplasmic marker protein to the nucleus in cells expressing the wild-type c-Myc

  3. Long-range oncogenic activation of Igh-c-myc translocations by the Igh 3' regulatory region.

    PubMed

    Gostissa, Monica; Yan, Catherine T; Bianco, Julia M; Cogné, Michel; Pinaud, Eric; Alt, Frederick W

    2009-12-10

    B-cell malignancies, such as human Burkitt's lymphoma, often contain translocations that link c-myc or other proto-oncogenes to the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus (IgH, encoded by Igh). The nature of elements that activate oncogenes within such translocations has been a long-standing question. Translocations within Igh involve DNA double-strand breaks initiated either by the RAG1/2 endonuclease during variable, diversity and joining gene segment (V(D)J) recombination, or by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID, also known as AICDA) during class switch recombination (CSR). V(D)J recombination in progenitor B (pro-B) cells assembles Igh variable region exons upstream of mu constant region (Cmu) exons, which are the first of several sets of C(H) exons ('C(H) genes') within a C(H) locus that span several hundred kilobases (kb). In mature B cells, CSR deletes Cmu and replaces it with a downstream C(H) gene. An intronic enhancer (iEmu) between the variable region exons and Cmu promotes V(D)J recombination in developing B cells. Furthermore, the Igh 3' regulatory region (Igh3'RR) lies downstream of the C(H) locus and modulates CSR by long-range transcriptional enhancement of C(H) genes. Transgenic mice bearing iEmu or Igh3'RR sequences fused to c-myc are predisposed to B lymphomas, demonstrating that such elements can confer oncogenic c-myc expression. However, in many B-cell lymphomas, Igh-c-myc translocations delete iEmu and place c-myc up to 200 kb upstream of the Igh3'RR. Here we address the oncogenic role of the Igh3'RR by inactivating it in two distinct mouse models for B-cell lymphoma with Igh-c-myc translocations. We show that the Igh3'RR is dispensable for pro-B-cell lymphomas with V(D)J recombination-initiated translocations, but is required for peripheral B-cell lymphomas with CSR-associated translocations. As the Igh3'RR is not required for CSR-associated Igh breaks or Igh-c-myc translocations in peripheral B-cell lymphoma progenitors, we conclude that

  4. Dual Targeting of Bromodomain and Extraterminal Domain Proteins, and WNT or MAPK Signaling, Inhibits c-MYC Expression and Proliferation of Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Tögel, Lars; Nightingale, Rebecca; Chueh, Anderly C; Jayachandran, Aparna; Tran, Hoanh; Phesse, Toby; Wu, Rui; Sieber, Oliver M; Arango, Diego; Dhillon, Amardeep S; Dawson, Mark A; Diez-Dacal, Beatriz; Gahman, Timothy C; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Shiau, Andrew K; Mariadason, John M

    2016-06-01

    Inhibitors of the bromodomain and extraterminal domain (BET) protein family attenuate the proliferation of several tumor cell lines. These effects are mediated, at least in part, through repression of c-MYC. In colorectal cancer, overexpression of c-MYC due to hyperactive WNT/β-catenin/TCF signaling is a key driver of tumor progression; however, effective strategies to target this oncogene remain elusive. Here, we investigated the effect of BET inhibitors (BETi) on colorectal cancer cell proliferation and c-MYC expression. Treatment of 20 colorectal cancer cell lines with the BETi JQ1 identified a subset of highly sensitive lines. JQ1 sensitivity was higher in cell lines with microsatellite instability but was not associated with the CpG island methylator phenotype, c-MYC expression or amplification status, BET protein expression, or mutation status of TP53, KRAS/BRAF, or PIK3CA/PTEN Conversely, JQ1 sensitivity correlated significantly with the magnitude of c-MYC mRNA and protein repression. JQ1-mediated c-MYC repression was not due to generalized attenuation of β-catenin/TCF-mediated transcription, as JQ1 had minimal effects on other β-catenin/TCF target genes or β-catenin/TCF reporter activity. BETi preferentially target super-enhancer-regulated genes, and a super-enhancer in c-MYC was recently identified in HCT116 cells to which BRD4 and effector transcription factors of the WNT/β-catenin/TCF and MEK/ERK pathways are recruited. Combined targeting of c-MYC with JQ1 and inhibitors of these pathways additively repressed c-MYC and proliferation of HCT116 cells. These findings demonstrate that BETi downregulate c-MYC expression and inhibit colorectal cancer cell proliferation and identify strategies for enhancing the effects of BETi on c-MYC repression by combinatorial targeting the c-MYC super-enhancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1217-26. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26983878

  5. E mu/S mu transposition into Myc is sometimes a precursor for T(12;15) translocation in mouse B cells.

    PubMed

    Kovalchuk, Alexander L; Kim, Joong Su; Janz, Siegfried

    2003-05-01

    Misguided immunoglobulin (Ig) class switch recombination (CSR) has been implicated in the origin of Myc-activating chromosomal translocations, T(12;15), in BALB/c mouse plasmacytomas (PCTs). CSR has also been involved in the progression of T(12;15); for example, the approximation of Myc to the 3'-C alpha enhancer. This study provides evidence for an additional mechanism by which aberrant CSR may facilitate T(12;15): transposition of Ig heavy-chain (IgH) sequences to Myc. Five IgH transposons containing the intronic heavy-chain enhancer, E mu, and a truncated switch mu region, S mu, were found in the first intron of Myc in lymph node cells of IL-6 transgenic BALB/c mice. In two cases E mu/S mu transposition primed Myc to get involved in apparent trans-chromosomal CSR to C gamma 1, presumably leading to T(12;15). Translocations preceded by E mu/S mu transposition can sometimes be distinguished from de novo translocations by molecular fingerprints in translocation breakpoint regions (Ig switch region [S] inversions and unusual gene orders in composite S regions). The presence of such fingerprints in some PCTs suggests that the tumors sometimes evolve from transposition-bearing precursors. We propose that E mu/S mu transposition to Myc may facilitate plasmacytomagenesis by sensitizing Myc to undergo T(12;15) translocation. T(12;15), in turn, juxtaposes Myc to the 3'-C alpha enhancer, which appears to be required for deregulating Myc in a manner that is conducive to PCT development.

  6. The Arabidopsis bHLH Transcription Factors MYC3 and MYC4 Are Targets of JAZ Repressors and Act Additively with MYC2 in the Activation of Jasmonate Responses[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Chini, Andrea; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chico, José-Manuel; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Geerinck, Jan; Eeckhout, Dominique; Schweizer, Fabian; Godoy, Marta; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Pauwels, Laurens; Witters, Erwin; Puga, María Isabel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Goossens, Alain; Reymond, Philippe; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) trigger an important transcriptional reprogramming of plant cells to modulate both basal development and stress responses. In spite of the importance of transcriptional regulation, only one transcription factor (TF), the Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix MYC2, has been described so far as a direct target of JAZ repressors. By means of yeast two-hybrid screening and tandem affinity purification strategies, we identified two previously unknown targets of JAZ repressors, the TFs MYC3 and MYC4, phylogenetically closely related to MYC2. We show that MYC3 and MYC4 interact in vitro and in vivo with JAZ repressors and also form homo- and heterodimers with MYC2 and among themselves. They both are nuclear proteins that bind DNA with sequence specificity similar to that of MYC2. Loss-of-function mutations in any of these two TFs impair full responsiveness to JA and enhance the JA insensitivity of myc2 mutants. Moreover, the triple mutant myc2 myc3 myc4 is as impaired as coi1-1 in the activation of several, but not all, JA-mediated responses such as the defense against bacterial pathogens and insect herbivory. Our results show that MYC3 and MYC4 are activators of JA-regulated programs that act additively with MYC2 to regulate specifically different subsets of the JA-dependent transcriptional response. PMID:21335373

  7. Discovery of methyl 4'-methyl-5-(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxylate, an improved small-molecule inhibitor of c-Myc-max dimerization.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Jay; Wang, Huabo; Yap, Jeremy L; Sabato, Philip E; Hu, Angela; Prochownik, Edward V; Fletcher, Steven

    2014-10-01

    c-Myc is a basic helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-ZIP) transcription factor that is responsible for the transcription of a wide range of target genes involved in many cancer-related cellular processes. Over-expression of c-Myc has been observed in, and directly contributes to, a variety of human cancers including those of the hematopoietic system, lung, prostate and colon. To become transcriptionally active, c-Myc must first dimerize with Myc-associated factor X (Max) via its own bHLH-ZIP domain. A proven strategy towards the inhibition of c-Myc oncogenic activity is to interfere with the structural integrity of the c-Myc-Max heterodimer. The small molecule 10074-G5 is an inhibitor of c-Myc-Max dimerization (IC50 =146 μM) that operates by binding and stabilizing c-Myc in its monomeric form. We have identified a congener of 10074-G5, termed 3jc48-3 (methyl 4'-methyl-5-(7-nitrobenzo[c][1,2,5]oxadiazol-4-yl)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-carboxylate), that is about five times as potent (IC50 =34 μM) at inhibiting c-Myc-Max dimerization as the parent compound. 3jc48-3 exhibited an approximate twofold selectivity for c-Myc-Max heterodimers over Max-Max homodimers, suggesting that its mode of action is through binding c-Myc. 3jc48-3 inhibited the proliferation of c-Myc-over-expressing HL60 and Daudi cells with single-digit micromolar IC50 values by causing growth arrest at the G0 /G1 phase. Co-immunoprecipitation studies indicated that 3jc48-3 inhibits c-Myc-Max dimerization in cells, which was further substantiated by the specific silencing of a c-Myc-driven luciferase reporter gene. Finally, 3jc48-3's intracellular half-life was >17 h. Collectively, these data demonstrate 3jc48-3 to be one of the most potent, cellularly active and stable c-Myc inhibitors reported to date.

  8. Definition of a Skp2-c-Myc Pathway to Expand Human Beta-cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwa