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Sample records for increased radiation resistance

  1. Transfection of rat embryo cells with mutant p53 increases the intrinsic radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, F.S.; Su, M.; Gerweck, L.; Schmidt, E.V.; Borek, C.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.

    1994-11-01

    Dominant oncogenic sequences have been shown to modulate the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells of both human and murine tumor cell lines. Whether transfection with candidate tumor-suppressor genes can modulate intrinsic radiation sensitivity is unknown. The data presented here demonstrate that transfection of rat embryo cells with a mutant p53 allele can increase the intrinsic radiation resistance of cells in vitro. First, transfection with mutant p53 resulted in transformed cellular morphology. Second, the transfected clone and the corresponding pooled population of transfected clones were more resistant to ionizing radiation in vitro. Last, analyses of the parameters of cell kinetics suggested that the radiobiological effects were unlikely to be due to altered parameters of cell kinetics at the time of irradiation, suggesting that mutant p53 altered the intrinsic radiation resistance of transfected cells by a more direct mechanism. Further experimentation will be necessary to develop a mechanistic approach for the study of these alterations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Growth differentiation factor 15 as a radiation-induced marker in oral carcinoma increasing radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Schiegnitz, Eik; Kämmerer, Peer W; Rode, Katharina; Schorn, Thomas; Brieger, Jürgen; Al-Nawas, Bilal

    2016-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is involved in tumor pathogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study was an investigation of the potential influence of GDF15 on radioresistance of OSCC cells in vitro. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines were irradiated with 0, 2, or 6 Gy, and GDF15 expression in the supernatant per survived cell colony was examined with ELISA. Non-irradiated and OSCC cell lines irradiated with 6 Gy were evaluated for GDF15 expression using immunofluorescent staining. For further investigation of GDF15 effects on radioresistance, a GDF15 knockdown model in a human OSCC cell line was established, and apoptotic activity after radiation was measured using the Caspase-Glo 3/7 system. ELISA and immunofluorescent staining indicated an increased GDF15 expression in 5 OSCC cell lines compared with human gingival epithelial cells. Irradiation with two and six gray resulted in a significant elevation of GDF15 expression per survived cell colony in the irradiated OSCC cell lines (P < 0.001). Furthermore, a dose-dependent expression of GDF15 was seen. Immunofluorescent staining confirmed an elevated GDF15 expression in irradiated OSCC cell lines (n = 10; P ≤ 0.001). Apoptotic activity was significantly increased after irradiation in the GDF15 knockdown group compared with control cells (n = 24; P < 0.001). This study describes for the first time the vital role of GDF15 both in tumorigenesis and in radioresistance of OSCC cells. With its anti-apoptotic effects, GDF15 possibly promotes tumor progression and might protect carcinoma cells against irradiation effects. Consequently, GDF15 may be a promising therapeutic target in oral cancer. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  4. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOEpatents

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  5. Increase in bacteriophage radiation resistance as a result of enhanced expression of stress systems in host cells

    SciTech Connect

    Verbenko, V.N.; Kalinin, V.L.

    1995-12-01

    By means of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) of proteins from radiation-resistant Gam{sup r} mutants of Escherichia coli, it was shown that induction and elimination of RecA protein in these mutants are kinetically more rapid than in wild type cells, and heat-shock proteins (HSP) are hyperproduced even at a normal temperature (32{degrees}C). {gamma}- and UV-irradiated bacteriophages were used to study the results of simultaneous enhanced expression of two stress repair systems. Radiation-resistant mutants are similar to wild type cells in their ability to reactivate phages {Lambda}cI, {phi}80 vir, and T4D inactivated by {gamma}-rays and UV-light. W-reactivation of {gamma}-irradiated phages {Lambda} and {phi}80 is respectively 1.5 and 1.2 times higher in Gam{sup r} cells in which maximal W-reactivation was observed at wide range of doses (from 300 to 2000 Gy), whereas in wild type cells the peak C of W-reactivation was registered at doses of 400 to 450 Gy. The phage {Lambda}, {gamma}-irradiated upon adsorption on the cells of a radiation-resistant mutant, was two times more resistant to {gamma}-rays (DMF = 2 at LD{sub 10}) than when irradiated upon adsorption on wild type cells. Postirradiation degradation of the phage {Lambda} DNA, when irradiated within Gam{sup r} cells, was significantly lower than in wild type cells, and preirradiation of the cells decreased phage DNA degradation (12% in Gam{sup r} cells and 30% in wild-type cells). The role of an increased HSP level and expression of SOS-regulon in radiation resistance and possible interaction of stress systems in bacterial cells are discussed. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Mechanisms of plant resistance to increased solar ultraviolet-B radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Teramura, A.H.; Sullivan, J.H.

    1988-05-01

    Since the major conclusions of the project are being disseminated via the scientific literature, the final report consists of a compilation of 11 articles and manuscripts on the effects of ultraviolet-B radiation (UVB) on soybean growth and yield, stress interactions with UVB, and effects of UVB on seedling growth in conifers (the Pinaceae). The effects of UVB on soybeans under field and greenhouse conditions, and under water stress, drought stress and phosphorus deficiency were studied. Soybean yields, seed quality, and physiology, including seed fatty acid and sterol composition, were determined.

  7. CpG-ODN 7909 increases radiation sensitivity of radiation-resistant human lung adenocarcinoma cell line by overexpression of Toll-like receptor 9.

    PubMed

    Yan, Li; Xu, Guoxiong; Qiao, Tiankui; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Sujuan; Li, Xuan

    2013-09-01

    Radioresistance is one of the main reasons for the failure of radiotherapy in lung cancer. The aim of this study was to establish a radiation-resistant lung cancer cell line, to evaluate whether CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide (CpG-ODN) 7909 could increase its radiosensitivity and to explore the relevant mechanisms. The radioresistant cell line, referred to as R-A549, was generated by reduplicative fractionated irradiation from the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. The radioresistance of R-A549 cells were confirmed by the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8), cell viability assay, and clonogenic assay. Cell growth kinetics, morphological feature, and radiosensitivity were compared between the original A549 cells and R-A549 cells treated with or without CpG-ODN 7909 or radiation. To further explore the potential mechanisms of radiosensitivity, the cell cycle distributions and the expression of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9) were examined by Western blot and flow cytometry. The R-A549 cell line was generated and its radioresistance was further confirmed. CpG-ODN 7909 was found to increase much more radiosensitivity of R-A549 cells under combined treatments with CpG-ODN 7909 and radiation compared with its control group without any treatments. They presented their respective D0 1.33 ± 0.20 Gy versus 1.76 ± 0.25 Gy with N 3.44 ± 1.01 versus 4.96 ± 0.32. Further, there was a larger cell population of R-A549 cells under combined treatment in the G2/M phase compared with the control group after treatment with CpG-ODN7909 or radiation alone at 24 and 48 hour. The expression level of TLR-9 in R-A549 cells was found higher than in A549 cells. These results suggested that CpG-ODN 7909 increased the radiosensitivity of R-A549 cells, which might be mediated via the upregulated TLR-9 and prolonged cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase compared with A549 cells.

  8. Adaptation of Bacillus subtilis cells to Archean-like UV climate: relevant hints of microbial evolution to remarkably increased radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Wassmann, Marko; Moeller, Ralf; Reitz, Günther; Rettberg, Petra

    2010-01-01

    In a precursory study for the space experiment ADAPT ("Molecular adaptation strategies of microorganisms to different space and planetary UV climate conditions"), cells of Bacillus subtilis 168 were continuously cultured for 700 generations under periodic polychromatic UV irradiation (200-400 nm) to model the suggested UV radiation environment on early Earth at the origin of the first microbial ecosystem during the Archean eon when Earth lacked a significant ozone layer. Populations that evolved under UV stress were about 3-fold more resistant than the ancestral and non-UV-evolved populations. UV-evolved cells were 7-fold more resistant to ionizing radiation than their non-UV-exposed evolved relatives and ancestor. In addition to the acquired increased UV resistance, further changes in microbial stress response to hydrogen peroxide, increased salinity, and desiccation were observed in UV-evolved cells. This indicates that UV-sensitive ancestral cells are capable of adapting to periodically applied UV stress via the evolution of cells with an increased UV resistance level and further enhanced responses to other environmental stressors, which thereby allows them to survive and reproduce under extreme UV radiation as a selection pressure.

  9. Intrinsic radiation resistance in human chondrosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moussavi-Harami, Farid; Mollano, Anthony; Martin, James A.; Ayoob, Andrew; Domann, Frederick E.; Gitelis, Steven; Buckwalter, Joseph A. . E-mail: joseph-buckwalter@uiowa.edu

    2006-07-28

    Human chondrosarcomas rarely respond to radiation treatment, limiting the options for eradication of these tumors. The basis of radiation resistance in chondrosarcomas remains obscure. In normal cells radiation induces DNA damage that leads to growth arrest or death. However, cells that lack cell cycle control mechanisms needed for these responses show intrinsic radiation resistance. In previous work, we identified immortalized human chondrosarcoma cell lines that lacked p16{sup ink4a}, one of the major tumor suppressor proteins that regulate the cell cycle. We hypothesized that the absence of p16{sup ink4a} contributes to the intrinsic radiation resistance of chondrosarcomas and that restoring p16{sup ink4a} expression would increase their radiation sensitivity. To test this we determined the effects of ectopic p16{sup ink4a} expression on chondrosarcoma cell resistance to low-dose {gamma}-irradiation (1-5 Gy). p16{sup ink4a} expression significantly increased radiation sensitivity in clonogenic assays. Apoptosis did not increase significantly with radiation and was unaffected by p16{sup ink4a} transduction of chondrosarcoma cells, indicating that mitotic catastrophe, rather than programmed cell death, was the predominant radiation effect. These results support the hypothesis that p16{sup ink4a} plays a role in the radiation resistance of chondrosarcoma cell lines and suggests that restoring p16 expression will improve the radiation sensitivity of human chondrosarcomas.

  10. Head Resistance Due to Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinschmidt, R V; Parsons, S R

    1920-01-01

    Part 1 deals with the head resistance of a number of common types of radiator cores at different speeds in free air, as measured in the wind tunnel at the bureau of standards. This work was undertaken to determine the characteristics of various types of radiator cores, and in particular to develop the best type of radiator for airplanes. Some 25 specimens of core were tested, including practically all the general types now in use, except the flat plate type. Part 2 gives the results of wind tunnel tests of resistance on a model fuselage with a nose radiator. Part 3 presents the results of preliminary tests of head resistance of a radiator enclosed in a streamlined casing. Special attention is given to the value of wing radiator and of the radiator located in the open, especially when it is provided with a properly designed streamlined casing.

  11. Apoptotic resistance to ionizing radiation in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia frequently involves increased NF-kappaB survival pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Weston, Victoria J; Austen, Belinda; Wei, Wenbin; Marston, Eliot; Alvi, Azra; Lawson, Sarah; Darbyshire, Philip J; Griffiths, Mike; Hill, Frank; Mann, Jill R; Moss, Paul A H; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2004-09-01

    To investigate possible causes of the variable response to treatment in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to establish potential novel therapeutic targets, we used ionizing radiation (IR) exposure as a model of DNA damage formation to identify tumors with resistance to p53-dependent apoptosis. Twenty-one of 40 ALL tumors responded normally to IR, exhibiting accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins and cleavage of caspases 3, 7, and 9 and of PARP1. Nineteen tumors exhibited apoptotic resistance and lacked PARP1 and caspase cleavage; although 15 of these tumors had normal accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins, examples exhibited abnormal expression of TRAF5, TRAF6, and cIAP1 after IR, suggesting increased NF-kappaB prosurvival signaling as the mechanism of apoptotic resistance. The presence of a hyperactive PARP1 mutation in one tumor was consistent with such increased NF-kappaB activity. PARP1 inhibition restored p53-dependent apoptosis after IR in these leukemias by reducing NF-kappaB DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In the remaining 4 ALL tumors, apoptotic resistance was associated with a TP53 mutation or with defective activation of p53. We conclude that increased NF-kappaB prosurvival signaling is a frequent mechanism by which B-precursor ALL tumors develop apoptotic resistance to IR and that PARP1 inhibition may improve the DNA damage response of these leukemias.

  12. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ; Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A; Brolo, AG

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  13. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  14. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  15. Radiation resistance of acinetobacter spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The radiation resistance of 78 different strains of Acinetobacter sp. 42 from clinical isolates and 36 from other sources were compared with 15 clinical isolates and 12 other strains from Denmark. None of the Canadian strains was as resistant as resistant-enhanced Danish strains. Four strains had D 10 values of 3.1-3.6 kGy. Irradiated and unirradiated cells from all strains grew well, when cultured in Trypticase-Soy Broth at 30°C. Most cultures grew after overnight incubation. It was concluded that there would be no difficulty in detecting these strains, using ISO methodology for establishing the radiation sterilization dose for devices.

  16. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  17. Radiation Resistance of Soil Azotobacter

    PubMed Central

    Vela, Gerard R.; Wyss, Orville

    1965-01-01

    Vela, Gerard R. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, Tex.), and Orville Wyss. Radiation resistance of soil Azotobacter. J. Bacteriol. 89:1280–1285. 1965.—Quantitative recovery of Azotobacter from soils subjected to γ-radiation from a cobalt-60 source showed the soil populations to be much more highly resistant than isolates from such cultures grown on laboratory media. Even in the encysted state, the laboratory populations were reduced 10,000-fold by exposure to 200 kr, whereas the soil populations were not measurably reduced by that dose. PMID:14292998

  18. Resistance patterns between cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) and ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    De Pooter, C.M.; Scalliet, P.G.; Elst, H.J.; Huybrechts, J.J.; Gheuens, E.E.; Van Oosterom, A.T.; Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.; De Bruijn, E.A. )

    1991-09-01

    Cross-resistance between cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) and radiation resistance has been suggested from clinical and experimental data. To determine whether cross-resistance patterns between both cytotoxic approaches exist, resistance against CDDP and ionizing radiation was induced separately in human ovarian cancer cells in a cross-over design. Subsequently sensitivity changes were determined for both treatment modalities. CDDP resistance was induced previously, and resistant cells were grown at three different levels of CDDP:0 ng/ml; 250 ng/ml; and 500 ng/ml. Resistance with resistance factor (RF) 3.4 to 5.1 proved to be stable, since withdrawal of CDDP pressure for at least 6 mo did not alter resistance patterns. CDDP-resistant cells also demonstrated stable resistance against ionizing radiation, with RF ranging from 1.7 to 2.0. The resistance patterns could not be explained by differences in growth kinetics and DNA content. Resistance to ionizing radiation was induced in the same human ovarian cancer cells as used for CDDP resistance studies. Exposure with 1.5 Gy of intermittent irradiation during 6 mo, at time intervals of 48 h, resulted in cells which were able to grow under chronic ionizing radiation pressure. RF was 2.0; the resistance was lost after 6 mo of culturing without ionizing radiation pressure. With intermittent radiation doses of 0.5 and 1.0 Gy, no significant resistance could be induced. Cells intermittently exposed to 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 Gy during 6 mo demonstrated increased sensitivity to CDDP, with 0.22 less than RF less than 0.43. Increased sensitivity was associated with proportionally increased formation of the platinum-DNA adducts.

  19. Optical imaging of radiation-induced metabolic changes in radiation-sensitive and resistant cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhallak, Kinan; Jenkins, Samir V.; Lee, David E.; Greene, Nicholas P.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Griffin, Robert J.; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2017-06-01

    Radiation resistance remains a significant problem for cancer patients, especially due to the time required to definitively determine treatment outcome. For fractionated radiation therapy, nearly 7 to 8 weeks can elapse before a tumor is deemed to be radiation-resistant. We used the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD+NADH) to identify early metabolic changes in radiation-resistant lung cancer cells. These radiation-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells were developed by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated doses of radiation (2 Gy). Although there were no significant differences in the optical redox ratio between the parental and resistant cell lines prior to radiation, there was a significant decrease in the optical redox ratio of the radiation-resistant cells 24 h after a single radiation exposure (p=0.01). This change in the redox ratio was indicative of increased catabolism of glucose in the resistant cells after radiation and was associated with significantly greater protein content of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), a key promoter of glycolytic metabolism. Our results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio could provide a rapid method of determining radiation resistance status based on early metabolic changes in cancer cells.

  20. Radiation damage in high-resistivity silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Goradia, C.

    High-resistivity silicon solar cells exhibit reduced radiation damage when light is incident on the gridded back surface. Under back illumination, radiation damage decreases as cell resistivity increases; under front illumination, radiation damage increases as cell resistivity increases. Thin back-illuminated cells outperform conventional 10 omega cm 50 and 200 micron cells at low 1-MeV electron fluences. However, at higher fluences, the conventional cells exhibit superior radiation resistance. This is attributed to the low BOL diffusion lengths observed in the thin, sack-illuminated cell. These results are discussed in terms of injected charge distributions, electric fields in the cell base, and the effects of a dominant boron-oxygen defect.

  1. Radiation damage in high-resistivity silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Goradia, C.

    1985-01-01

    High-resistivity silicon solar cells exhibit reduced radiation damage when light is incident on the gridded back surface. Under back illumination, radiation damage decreases as cell resistivity increases; under front illumination, radiation damage increases as cell resistivity increases. Thin back-illuminated cells outperform conventional 10 omega cm 50 and 200 micron cells at low 1-MeV electron fluences. However, at higher fluences, the conventional cells exhibit superior radiation resistance. This is attributed to the low BOL diffusion lengths observed in the thin, sack-illuminated cell. These results are discussed in terms of injected charge distributions, electric fields in the cell base, and the effects of a dominant boron-oxygen defect.

  2. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  3. Resistance of Marine Bacterioneuston to Solar Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Agogué, Hélène; Joux, Fabien; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Lebaron, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    A total of 90 bacterial strains were isolated from the sea surface microlayer (i.e., bacterioneuston) and underlying waters (i.e., bacterioplankton) from two sites of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The strains were identified by sequence analysis, and growth recovery was investigated after exposure to simulated solar radiation. Bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton isolates were subjected to six different exposure times, ranging from 0.5 to 7 h of simulated noontime solar radiation. Following exposure, the growth of each isolate was monitored, and different classes of resistance were determined according to the growth pattern. Large interspecific differences among the 90 marine isolates were observed. Medium and highly resistant strains accounted for 41% and 22% of the isolates, respectively, and only 16% were sensitive strains. Resistance to solar radiation was equally distributed within the bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton. Relative contributions to the highly resistant class were 43% for γ-proteobacteria and 14% and 8% for α-proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides (CFB) group, respectively. Within the γ-proteobacteria, the Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas genera appeared to be highly resistant to solar radiation. The majority of the CFB group (76%) had medium resistance. Our study further provides evidence that pigmented bacteria are not more resistant to solar radiation than nonpigmented bacteria. PMID:16151115

  4. Resistance of marine bacterioneuston to solar radiation.

    PubMed

    Agogué, Hélène; Joux, Fabien; Obernosterer, Ingrid; Lebaron, Philippe

    2005-09-01

    A total of 90 bacterial strains were isolated from the sea surface microlayer (i.e., bacterioneuston) and underlying waters (i.e., bacterioplankton) from two sites of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. The strains were identified by sequence analysis, and growth recovery was investigated after exposure to simulated solar radiation. Bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton isolates were subjected to six different exposure times, ranging from 0.5 to 7 h of simulated noontime solar radiation. Following exposure, the growth of each isolate was monitored, and different classes of resistance were determined according to the growth pattern. Large interspecific differences among the 90 marine isolates were observed. Medium and highly resistant strains accounted for 41% and 22% of the isolates, respectively, and only 16% were sensitive strains. Resistance to solar radiation was equally distributed within the bacterioneuston and bacterioplankton. Relative contributions to the highly resistant class were 43% for gamma-proteobacteria and 14% and 8% for alpha-proteobacteria and the Cytophaga/Flavobacterium/Bacteroides (CFB) group, respectively. Within the gamma-proteobacteria, the Pseudoalteromonas and Alteromonas genera appeared to be highly resistant to solar radiation. The majority of the CFB group (76%) had medium resistance. Our study further provides evidence that pigmented bacteria are not more resistant to solar radiation than nonpigmented bacteria.

  5. Soybean resistance to stink bugs (Nezara viridula and Piezodorus guildinii) increases with exposure to solar UV-B radiation and correlates with isoflavonoid content in pods under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Zavala, Jorge A; Mazza, Carlos A; Dillon, Francisco M; Chludil, Hugo D; Ballaré, Carlos L

    2015-05-01

    Solar UV-B radiation (280-315 nm) has a significant influence on trophic relationships in natural and managed ecosystems, affecting plant-insect interactions. We explored the effects of ambient UV-B radiation on the levels of herbivory by stink bugs (Nezara viridula and Piezodorus guildinii) in field-grown soybean crops. The experiments included two levels of UV-B radiation (ambient and attenuated UV-B) and four soybean cultivars known to differ in their content of soluble leaf phenolics. Ambient UV-B radiation increased the accumulation of the isoflavonoids daidzin and genistin in the pods of all cultivars. Soybean crops grown under attenuated UV-B had higher numbers of unfilled pods and damaged seeds than crops grown under ambient UV-B radiation. Binary choice experiments with soybean branches demonstrated that stink bugs preferred branches of the attenuated UV-B treatment. We found a positive correlation between percentage of undamaged seeds and the contents of daidzin and genistin in pods. Our results suggest that constitutive and UV-B-induced isoflavonoids increase plant resistance to stink bugs under field conditions.

  6. Collagen I confers gamma radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Azorin, E; González-Martínez, P R; Azorin, J

    2012-12-01

    The effect of collagen on the response of somatomammotroph tumor cells (GH3) to gamma, radiation therapy was studied in vitro. After incubating confluent GH3 cell monolayers in a serum-free, maintaining medium, either with or without collagen, the monolayers were irradiated with 137Cs, gamma radiation. Collagen reduces cell mortality via ERK1/2 activation, abolishing gamma radiation, cell death, and promotes cell invasion when acting in synergy with collagen and in association with the, MAPK/ERK1/2 signaling pathway activation. The presence of collagen in somatomammotroph tumors, confers resistance to radiation.

  7. Targeting Notch to overcome radiation resistance.

    PubMed

    Yahyanejad, Sanaz; Theys, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2016-02-16

    Radiotherapy represents an important therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer cells. However, it often fails to eliminate all tumor cells because of the intrinsic or acquired treatment resistance, which is the most common cause of tumor recurrence. Emerging evidences suggest that the Notch signaling pathway is an important pathway mediating radiation resistance in tumor cells. Successful targeting of Notch signaling requires a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to be safe and effective. Here we summarize the role of Notch in mediating resistance to radiotherapy, the different strategies to block Notch in cancer cells and how treatment scheduling can improve tumor response. Finally, we discuss a need for reliable Notch related biomarkers in specific tumors to measure pathway activity and to allow identification of a subset of patients who are likely to benefit from Notch targeted therapies.

  8. Targeting Notch to overcome radiation resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yahyanejad, Sanaz; Theys, Jan; Vooijs, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy represents an important therapeutic strategy in the treatment of cancer cells. However, it often fails to eliminate all tumor cells because of the intrinsic or acquired treatment resistance, which is the most common cause of tumor recurrence. Emerging evidences suggest that the Notch signaling pathway is an important pathway mediating radiation resistance in tumor cells. Successful targeting of Notch signaling requires a thorough understanding of Notch regulation and the context-dependent interactions between Notch and other therapeutically relevant pathways. Understanding these interactions will increase our ability to design rational combination regimens that are more likely to be safe and effective. Here we summarize the role of Notch in mediating resistance to radiotherapy, the different strategies to block Notch in cancer cells and how treatment scheduling can improve tumor response. Finally, we discuss a need for reliable Notch related biomarkers in specific tumors to measure pathway activity and to allow identification of a subset of patients who are likely to benefit from Notch targeted therapies. PMID:26713603

  9. Isolation of Radiation-Resistant Bacteria from Mars Analog Antarctic Dry Valleys by Preselection, and the Correlation between Radiation and Desiccation Resistance.

    PubMed

    Musilova, Michaela; Wright, Gary; Ward, John M; Dartnell, Lewis R

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radiation-resistant microorganisms can survive doses of ionizing radiation far greater than are present in the natural environment. Radiation resistance is believed to be an incidental adaptation to desiccation resistance, as both hazards cause similar cellular damage. Desert soils are, therefore, promising targets to prospect for new radiation-resistant strains. This is the first study to isolate radiation-resistant microbes by using gamma-ray exposure preselection from the extreme cold desert of the Antarctic Dry Valleys (a martian surface analogue). Halomonads, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, were the most numerous survivors of the highest irradiation exposures. They were studied here for the first time for both their desiccation and irradiation survival characteristics. In addition, the association between desiccation and radiation resistance has not been investigated quantitatively before for a broad diversity of microorganisms. Thus, a meta-analysis of scientific literature was conducted to gather a larger data set. A strong correlation was found between desiccation and radiation resistance, indicating that an increase in the desiccation resistance of 5 days corresponds to an increase in the room-temperature irradiation survival of 1 kGy. Irradiation at -79°C (representative of average martian surface temperatures) increases the microbial radiation resistance 9-fold. Consequently, the survival of the cold-, desiccation-, and radiation-resistant organisms isolated here has implications for the potential habitability of dormant or cryopreserved life on Mars. Extremophiles-Halomonas sp.-Antarctica-Mars-Ionizing radiation-Cosmic rays.

  10. Stacked RADFETs for increased radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connell, B.; Kelleher, A.; Lane, W.; Adams, L.

    1996-06-01

    Hitherto, pMOS Radiation Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (RADFETs) have not been able to detect doses in the milli-rad range, which are required for low dose clinical/personnel applications. This paper reports on further investigation of a design approach, where RADFETs are connected in a stacked sequence so that increased radiation sensitivity is obtained. The radiation sensitivity obtained for 40 stacked RADFETs is approximately 220 times the single RADFET sensitivity. This enables radiation sensitivities in the milli-rad range to be measured. Theoretical equations governing the threshold voltage of a MOS device as a function of bulk-source voltage are used to theoretically evaluate the output voltage of the stacked structure. Measurement and theory are found to agree closely in this analysis. Percent drift and % fading of the single RADFET, as a function of total radiation induced shift in V{sub T}, is similar to that of the stacked structure.

  11. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Confalonieri, F.; Sommer, S.

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  12. Archway for Radiation and Micrometeorite Occurrence Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giersch, Louis R.

    2012-01-01

    The environmental conditions of the Moon require mitigation if a long-term human presence is to be achieved for extended periods of time. Radiation, micrometeoroid impacts, high-velocity debris, and thermal cycling represent threats to crew, equipment, and facilities. For decades, local regolith has been suggested as a candidate material to use in the construction of protective barriers. A thickness of roughly 3m is sufficient protection from both direct and secondary radiation from cosmic rays and solar protons; this thickness is sufficient to reduce radiation exposure even during solar flares. NASA has previously identified a need for innovations that will support lunar habitats using lightweight structures because the reduction of structural mass translates directly into additional up and down mass capability that would facilitate additional logistics capacity and increased science return for all mission phases. The development of non-pressurized primary structures that have synergy with the development of pressurized structures is also of interest. The use of indigenous or in situ materials is also a well-known and active area of research that could drastically improve the practicality of human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. The Archway for Radiation and Micrometeorite Occurrence Resistance (ARMOR) concept is a new, multifunctional structure that acts as radiation shielding and micrometeorite impact shielding for long-duration lunar surface protection of humans and equipment. ARMOR uses a combination of native regolith and a deployed membrane jacket to yield a multifunctional structure. ARMOR is a robust and modular system that can be autonomously assembled on-site prior to the first human surface arrival. The system provides protection by holding a sufficiently thick (3 m) archshaped shell of local regolith around a central cavity. The regolith is held in shape by an arch-shaped jacket made of strong but deployable material. No regolith processing is

  13. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  14. Resistance and Cooling Power of Various Radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R H

    1928-01-01

    This reports combines the wind tunnel results of radiator tests made at the Navy Aerodynamical Laboratory in Washington during the summers of 1921, 1925, and 1926. In all, 13 radiators of various types and capacities were given complete tests for figure of merit. Twelve of these were tested for resistance to water flow and a fourteenth radiator was tested for air resistance alone, its heat dissipating capacity being known. All the tests were conducted in the 8 by 8 foot tunnel, or in its 4 by 8 foot restriction, by the writer and under conditions as nearly the same as possible. That is to say, as far as possible, the general arrangement and condition of the apparatus, the observation intervals, the ratio of water flow per unit of cooling surface, the differential temperatures, and the air speeds were the same for all.

  15. Fires increase Amazon forest productivity through increases in diffuse radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rap, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Mercado, L.; Reddington, C. L.; Haywood, J. M.; Ellis, R. J.; Phillips, O. L.; Artaxo, P.; Bonal, D.; Restrepo Coupe, N.; Butt, N.

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric aerosol scatters solar radiation increasing the fraction of diffuse radiation and the efficiency of photosynthesis. We quantify the impacts of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) on diffuse radiation and plant photosynthesis across Amazonia during 1998-2007. Evaluation against observed aerosol optical depth allows us to provide lower and upper BBA emissions estimates. BBA increases Amazon basin annual mean diffuse radiation by 3.4-6.8% and net primary production (NPP) by 1.4-2.8%, with quoted ranges driven by uncertainty in BBA emissions. The enhancement of Amazon basin NPP by 78-156 Tg C a-1 is equivalent to 33-65% of the annual regional carbon emissions from biomass burning. This NPP increase occurs during the dry season and acts to counteract some of the observed effect of drought on tropical production. We estimate that 30-60 Tg C a-1 of this NPP enhancement is within woody tissue, accounting for 8-16% of the observed carbon sink across mature Amazonian forests.

  16. Ionizing radiation increases systemic nanoparticle tumor accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Giustini, A.J.; Petryk, A.A.; Hoopes, P.J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticle-based therapies are currently being explored for both the imaging and treatment of primary and metastatic cancers. Effective nanoparticle cancer therapy requires significant accumulations of nanoparticles within the tumor environment. Various techniques have been used to improve tumor nanoparticle uptake and biodistribution. Most notable of these techniques are the use of tumor-specific-peptide-conjugated nanoparticles and chemical modification of the nanoparticles with immune-evading polymers. Another strategy for improving the tumor uptake of the nanoparticles is modification of the tumor microenvironment with a goal of enhancing the enhanced permeability and retention effect inherent to solid tumors. We demonstrate a two-fold increase in the tumor accumulation of systemically delivered iron oxide nanoparticles following a single, 15 Gy radiation dose in a syngeneic mouse breast tumor model. This increase in nanoparticle tumor accumulation correlates with a radiation-induced decrease in tumor interstitial pressure and a subsequent increase in vascular permeability. PMID:22633900

  17. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  18. Radiation resistivity of polyacenaphthylene-grafted polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Kiyoshi; Kawase, Kaoru; Yamakita, Hiromi

    Thin poly (ethylene-g-acenaphthylene) films prepared by the vapor-phase grafting method were subjected to the γ-irradiation in air, and various changes in tensile and structural properties of the film were investigated by comparing with those of the untreated or crosslinked polyethylene film. Polyethylene got to lose its inherent necking property by oxidative degradation and to be brittle-fractured by the irradiation dose less than 100 Mrad in air. The polyacenaphthylene-grafted polyethylenes (extent of grafting, ˜ 54 by {100( P-P°) }/{P°}), however, kept their ductility up to 200 Mrad or more, and the rate of increase in elastic modulus as well as yield strength with the increasing irradiation dose was considerably lower than that of untreated or crosslinked polyethylene. The effect of the grafting extent, and that of the irradiation dose-rate on the fracture energy were also examined. The weight increase of polyethylene due to the oxygen consumption and the resulting formation of carbonyl group which proceeded proportionally with the irradiation dose were remarkably suppressed by the grafting, whereas the double bond formation seemed to be unaffected by it. The grafted film held the original content of gel fraction unchanged during the irradiation in air, but the average molecular weight of the sol fraction decreased gradually. Meanwhile, the gel fraction of the crosslinked polyethylene was degenerated by a small dose of irradiation. The analysis of gaseous products revealed the formation of water, methanol, acetaldehyde and so forth from the irradiated grafted film. The grafting procedure and the subsequent irradiation of the grafted film did not affect the degree of crystallinity of the backbone polyethylene. The role played by the grafted polyacenaphthylene for endowing the radiation resistivity to polyethylene and its inherent limitation in effect were discussed from the structural point of view of the grafted film.

  19. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing micro-organisms. Eradi cation techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation-based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the nonspore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use. The high flux of cosmic rays during space travel and onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of microbial life. Thus, radiation-resistant microorganisms are of particular concern that can survive extreme radiation, desiccation, and low temperatures experienced during space travel. Spore-forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate these extreme conditions. Since the Viking era, spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Members of the non-sporeforming bacterial community such as Deinococcus radiodurans can survive acute exposures to ionizing radiation (5 kGy), ultraviolet light (1 kJ/m2), and desiccation (years). These resistive phenotypes of Deinococcus enhance the

  20. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2012-01-01

    There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation-resistant, non-spore-forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequent proliferation on another solar body. Such forward contamination would jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. The prime focus of NASA s planetary protection efforts is the development of strategies for inactivating resistance-bearing microorganisms. Eradification techniques can be designed to target resistance-conferring microbial populations by first identifying and understanding their physiologic and biochemical capabilities that confers its elevated tolerance (as is being studied in Deinococcus phoenicis, as a result of this description). Furthermore, hospitals, food, and government agencies frequently use biological indicators to ensure the efficacy of a wide range of radiation- based sterilization processes. Due to their resistance to a variety of perturbations, the non-spore forming D. phoenicis may be a more appropriate biological indicator than those currently in use. The high flux of cosmic rays during space travel and onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of microbial life. Thus, radiation-resistant microorganisms are of particular concern that can survive extreme radiation, desiccation, and low temperatures experienced during space travel. Spore-forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate these extreme conditions. Since the Viking era, spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. Members of the non-spore-forming bacterial community such as Deinococcus radiodurans can survive acute exposures to ionizing radiation (5 kGy), ultraviolet light (1 kJ/sq m), and desiccation (years). These resistive phenotypes of Deinococcus enhance the

  1. Ethanologenic bacteria with increased resistance to furfural

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Elliot Norman; Jarboe, Laura R.; Yomano, Lorraine P.; York, Sean W.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2015-10-06

    The invention relates to bacterium that have increased resistance to furfural and methods of preparation. The invention also relates to methods of producing ethanol using the bacterium and corresponding kits.

  2. Three Cases of Levodopa-Resistant Parkinsonism After Radiation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Raja; Jimenez-Shahed, Joohi; Itin, Ilia

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Male, 77 • Female, 44 • Male, 9 Final Diagnosis: Radiation induced parkinsonism Symptoms: Slowness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Neurology Objective: Unusual or unexpected effect of treatment Background: Unequivocal brain radiation-induced parkinsonism has so far been reported in only in two pediatric patients. However, with the rising incidence rates for brain tumors in industrialized countries and the consequential increased exposure to cranial radiotherapy, clinicians might become more exposed to this entity. Case Report: Three patients were treated for intraparenchymal brain tumor with resection, chemotherapy, and whole brain radiation. One patient developed leukoencephalopathy and parkinsonism within one year of treatment, one developed it seven years after treatment completion, and one developed dementia, parkinsonism and cerebral infracts 40 years after whole brain radiation. Brain MRIs and a DaTscan were obtained. All patients failed a trial of carbidopa/levodopa. We suggest that the brain radiation exposure was responsible for levodopa resistant parkinsonism, cognitive decline, and diffuse leukoencephalopathy. Conclusions: Although rare, radiation therapy-induced parkinsonism might be responsible for levodopa-resistant parkinsonism. PMID:27909286

  3. Gamma radiation resistance of spin Seebeck devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagmur, A.; Uchida, K.; Ihara, K.; Ioka, I.; Kikkawa, T.; Ono, M.; Endo, J.; Kashiwagi, K.; Nakashima, T.; Kirihara, A.; Ishida, M.; Saitoh, E.

    2016-12-01

    Thermoelectric devices based on the spin Seebeck effect (SSE) were irradiated with gamma (γ) rays with the total dose of around 3 × 105 Gy in order to investigate the γ-radiation resistance of the devices. To demonstrate this, Pt/Ni0.2Zn0.3Fe2.5O4/Glass and Pt/Bi0.1Y2.9Fe5O12/Gd3Ga5O12 SSE devices were used. We confirmed that the thermoelectric, magnetic, and structural properties of the SSE devices are not affected by the γ-ray irradiation. This result demonstrates that SSE devices are applicable to thermoelectric generation even in high radiation environments.

  4. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.

    1987-02-11

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01 to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties. 4 figs.

  5. Radiation resistant austenitic stainless steel alloys

    DOEpatents

    Maziasz, Philip J.; Braski, David N.; Rowcliffe, Arthur F.

    1989-01-01

    An austenitic stainless steel alloy, with improved resistance to radiation-induced swelling and helium embrittlement, and improved resistance to thermal creep at high temperatures, consisting essentially of, by weight percent: from 16 to 18% nickel; from 13 to 17% chromium; from 2 to 3% molybdenum; from 1.5 to 2.5% manganese; from 0.01 to 0.5% silicon; from 0.2 to 0.4% titanium; from 0.1 to 0.2% niobium; from 0.1 to 0.6% vanadium; from 0.06 to 0.12% carbon; from 0.01% to 0.03% nitrogen; from 0.03 to 0.08% phosphorus; from 0.005 to 0.01% boron; and the balance iron, and wherein the alloy may be thermomechanically treated to enhance physical and mechanical properties.

  6. Ultraviolet radiation resistance in Halobacterium salinarium

    SciTech Connect

    Kristoff, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    An obvious characteristic of wild type H. salinarium is its red pigmentation. A non-pigmented mutant was isolated to test the role of pigmentation in UV radiation resistance. Survival curves of UV-irradiated wild type and mutant cells show that pigmentation does not play a direct role in protecting DNA from UV damage. Pigmentation does play a role, however, in repairing UV damage. UV-irradiated wild type cells show more efficient recovery by photoreactivation with 405 nm light than do UV-irradiated non-pigmented mutants. High internal cation concentrations found in H. salinarium may also be partly responsible for the relative resistance of H. salinarium to UV radiation by causing the DNA to assume a conformation less conducive to the production of pyrimidine dimers. In vitro irradiation of DNA extracted from H. salinarium, dissolved in solutions of different ionic strengths, indicate that pyrimidine dimers may not form as readily in DNA which is in an environment with high salt concentration.

  7. Space radiation resistant transparent polymeric materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.

    1977-01-01

    A literature search in the field of ultraviolet and charged particle irradiation of polymers was utilized in an experimental program aimed at the development of radiation stable materials for space applications. The rationale utilized for material selection and the synthesis, characterization and testing performed on several selected materials is described. Among the materials tested for ultraviolet stability in vacuum were: polyethyleneoxide, polyvinylnaphthalene, and the amino resin synthesized by the condensation of o-hydroxybenzoguanamine with formaldehyde. Particularly interesting was the radiation behavior of poly(ethyleneoxide), irradiation did not cause degradation of optical properties but rather an improvement in transparency as indicated by a decrease in solar absorptance with increasing exposure time.

  8. Isolation of Radiation-Resistant Bacteria from Mars Analog Antarctic Dry Valleys by Preselection, and the Correlation between Radiation and Desiccation Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Gary; Ward, John M.; Dartnell, Lewis R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Extreme radiation–resistant microorganisms can survive doses of ionizing radiation far greater than are present in the natural environment. Radiation resistance is believed to be an incidental adaptation to desiccation resistance, as both hazards cause similar cellular damage. Desert soils are, therefore, promising targets to prospect for new radiation-resistant strains. This is the first study to isolate radiation-resistant microbes by using gamma-ray exposure preselection from the extreme cold desert of the Antarctic Dry Valleys (a martian surface analogue). Halomonads, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, were the most numerous survivors of the highest irradiation exposures. They were studied here for the first time for both their desiccation and irradiation survival characteristics. In addition, the association between desiccation and radiation resistance has not been investigated quantitatively before for a broad diversity of microorganisms. Thus, a meta-analysis of scientific literature was conducted to gather a larger data set. A strong correlation was found between desiccation and radiation resistance, indicating that an increase in the desiccation resistance of 5 days corresponds to an increase in the room-temperature irradiation survival of 1 kGy. Irradiation at −79°C (representative of average martian surface temperatures) increases the microbial radiation resistance 9-fold. Consequently, the survival of the cold-, desiccation-, and radiation-resistant organisms isolated here has implications for the potential habitability of dormant or cryopreserved life on Mars. Key Words: Extremophiles—Halomonas sp.—Antarctica—Mars—Ionizing radiation—Cosmic rays. Astrobiology 15, 1076–1090. PMID:26684506

  9. Venous resistance increases during rat anaphylactic shock.

    PubMed

    Cui, Sen; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Wei; Takano, Hiromichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2008-06-01

    Anaphylactic shock is a sudden, life-threatening allergic reaction associated with severe hypotension. The increased venous resistance accounts for the anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized dogs. However, the change in peripheral vascular resistances during anaphylactic hypotension in other animals such as rats is not known. We measured the mean circulatory filling pressure using the mechanical occlusion method of inflation of the right atrial balloon along with systemic arterial pressure (Psa), central venous pressure, and portal venous pressure. Cardiac output was also measured with the thermodilution method. From these hemodynamic variables, we calculated the total peripheral and venous (Rv) resistances during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. These hemodynamic variables were compared with those in the hemorrhagic shock. After an intravenous injection of 0.6 mg antigen ovalbumin in sensitized rats, Psa decreased from 119 +/- 4 to 43 +/- 2 mmHg, cardiac output decreased from 84.5 +/- 5.7 to 37.8 +/- 2.1 mL min, central venous pressure decreased from 0.9 +/- 0.1 to 0.1 +/- 0.1 mmHg, and mean circulatory filling pressure also decreased from 6.0 +/- 0.2 to 5.2 +/- 0.3 mmHg. Thus, the Rv increased from 0.06 +/- 0.05 to 0.15 +/- 0.02 mmHg mL(-1) min(-1), but total peripheral resistance did not significantly change. Portal venous pressure also increased from 5.6 +/- 0.5 to 21.5 +/- 0.9 mmHg. Hematocrit markedly increased from the baseline values of 43% +/- 1% to 55% +/- 1% at 15 min after antigen. During hemorrhagic shock, Psa decreased in the manner similar to anaphylactic shock; however, Rv did not significantly change, and portal venous pressure decreased. In conclusion, in rat anaphylactic shock, a substantial increase in Rv presumably due to hepatic venoconstriction may decrease venous return, resulting in systemic hypotension.

  10. Elevated Rate of Genome Rearrangements in Radiation-Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Repar, Jelena; Supek, Fran; Klanjscek, Tin; Warnecke, Tobias; Zahradka, Ksenija; Zahradka, Davor

    2017-01-01

    A number of bacterial, archaeal, and eukaryotic species are known for their resistance to ionizing radiation. One of the challenges these species face is a potent environmental source of DNA double-strand breaks, potential drivers of genome structure evolution. Efficient and accurate DNA double-strand break repair systems have been demonstrated in several unrelated radiation-resistant species and are putative adaptations to the DNA damaging environment. Such adaptations are expected to compensate for the genome-destabilizing effect of environmental DNA damage and may be expected to result in a more conserved gene order in radiation-resistant species. However, here we show that rates of genome rearrangements, measured as loss of gene order conservation with time, are higher in radiation-resistant species in multiple, phylogenetically independent groups of bacteria. Comparison of indicators of selection for genome organization between radiation-resistant and phylogenetically matched, nonresistant species argues against tolerance to disruption of genome structure as a strategy for radiation resistance. Interestingly, an important mechanism affecting genome rearrangements in prokaryotes, the symmetrical inversions around the origin of DNA replication, shapes genome structure of both radiation-resistant and nonresistant species. In conclusion, the opposing effects of environmental DNA damage and DNA repair result in elevated rates of genome rearrangements in radiation-resistant bacteria. PMID:28188144

  11. Radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols under neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szhogina, A. A.; Shilin, V. A.; Sedov, V. P.; Lebedev, V. T.

    2016-07-01

    The endohedral metallofullerenols Me@C2 n (OH)38-40 + C2 n (OH)38-40 ( Me = Tb, Sc, Gd, Fe, Pr, Mo) have been obtained and their radiation resistance under irradiation by a neutron flux of 8 × 1013 cm-2 s-1 has been studied. The factors affecting the radiation resistance of endohedral metallofullerenols are discussed.

  12. Experiments on the resistance of airplane wheels and radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1924-01-01

    Experiments were made on the resistance of four airplane wheels of different sizes and coverings and two Lamblin radiators. The results show the important influence of the wheel coverings. The closing of a shutter, which was fitted to one of the radiators, considerably lessened the resistance.

  13. Evolution of radiation resistance in a complex microenvironment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, So Hyun; Austin, Robert; Mehta, Monal; Kahn, Atif

    2013-03-01

    Radiation treatment responses in brain cancers are typically associated with short progression-free intervals in highly lethal malignancies such as glioblastomas. Even as patients routinely progress through second and third line salvage therapies, which are usually empirically selected, surprisingly little information exists on how cancer cells evolve resistance. We will present experimental results showing how in the presence of complex radiation gradients evolution of resistance to radiation occurs. Sponsored by the NCI/NIH Physical Sciences Oncology Centers

  14. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1991-06-24

    We proposed an investigation of genetically-determined individual differences in sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The model organism is Drosophila melanogaster. The gene coding for Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) is the target locus, but the effects of variation in other components of the genome that modulate SOD levels are also taken into account. SOD scavenges oxygen radicals generated during exposure to ionizing radiation. It has been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Two alleles, S and F, are commonly found in natural populations of D. melanogaster; in addition we have isolated from a natural population null'' (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide an ideal model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CA1. The roles of SOD level in radioresistance are being investigated in a series of experiments that measure the somatic and germ-line effects of increasing doses of ionizing radiation. In addition, we have pursued an unexpected genetic event-namely the nearly simultaneous transformation of several lines homozygous for the SOD null'' allele into predominately S lines. Using specifically designed probes and DNA amplification by means of the Tag polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we have shown that (1) the null allele was still present in the transformed lines, but was being gradually replaced by the S allele as a consequence of natural selection; and (2) that the transformation was due to the spontaneous deletion of a 0.68 Kb truncated P-element, the insertion of which is characteristic of the CA1 null allele.

  15. Radiation resistance studies of amorphous silicon films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.; Payson, J. Scott

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon thin films were irradiated with 2.00 MeV helium ions using fluences ranging from 1E11 to 1E15 cm(-2). The films were characterized using photothermal deflection spectroscopy and photoconductivity measurements. The investigations show that the radiation introduces sub-band-gap states 1.35 eV below the conduction band and the states increase supralinearly with fluence. Photoconductivity measurements suggest the density of states above the Fermi energy is not changing drastically with fluence.

  16. Radiation and Heat Resistance of Moraxella-Acinetobacter in Meats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-01-23

    growth 7 Vacuum packaging and impact on growth of resistant isolates .... 7 Effect of fat content of meat on radiation and heat resistance of...approximately 10 cells per ml. Storage for culture main- tenance after growth was at 3-5*C. Vacuum packaging and impact on growth of resistant isolates...sensitive to reduced oxygen occur- ring with vacuum packaging of foods (Maxcy et al., 1976). Furthermore, most of the radiation-resiscant M-A were

  17. Radiation Resistant Vanadium-Graphene Nanolayered Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youbin; Baek, Jinwook; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Sangmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jeon, Seokwoo; Han, Seung Min

    2016-04-01

    Ultra high strength V-graphene nanolayers were developed for the first time that was demonstrated to have an excellent radiation tolerance as revealed by the He+ irradiation study. Radiation induced hardening, evaluated via nanopillar compressions before and after He+ irradiation, is significantly reduced with the inclusion of graphene layers; the flow stresses of V-graphene nanolayers with 110 nm repeat layer spacing showed an increase of 25% while pure V showed an increase of 88% after He+ dosage of 13.5 dpa. The molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that the graphene interface can spontaneously absorb the nearby crystalline defects that are produced from a collision cascade, thereby enhancing the lifetime of the V-graphene nanolayers via this self-healing effect. In addition, the impermeability of He gas through the graphene resulted in suppression of He bubble agglomerations that in turn reduced embrittlement. In-situ SEM compression also showed the ability of graphene to hinder crack propagation that suppressed the failure.

  18. Radiation Resistant Vanadium-Graphene Nanolayered Composite

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youbin; Baek, Jinwook; Kim, Sunghwan; Kim, Sangmin; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jeon, Seokwoo; Han, Seung Min

    2016-01-01

    Ultra high strength V-graphene nanolayers were developed for the first time that was demonstrated to have an excellent radiation tolerance as revealed by the He+ irradiation study. Radiation induced hardening, evaluated via nanopillar compressions before and after He+ irradiation, is significantly reduced with the inclusion of graphene layers; the flow stresses of V-graphene nanolayers with 110 nm repeat layer spacing showed an increase of 25% while pure V showed an increase of 88% after He+ dosage of 13.5 dpa. The molecular dynamics simulations confirmed that the graphene interface can spontaneously absorb the nearby crystalline defects that are produced from a collision cascade, thereby enhancing the lifetime of the V-graphene nanolayers via this self-healing effect. In addition, the impermeability of He gas through the graphene resulted in suppression of He bubble agglomerations that in turn reduced embrittlement. In-situ SEM compression also showed the ability of graphene to hinder crack propagation that suppressed the failure. PMID:27098407

  19. Synthesis and radiation resistance of fullerenes and fullerene derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shilin, V. A.; Lebedev, V. T.; Sedov, V. P.; Szhogina, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The parameters of an electric-arc facility for the synthesis of fullerenes and endohedral metallofullerenes are optimized. The resistance of C60 and C70 fullerenes and C60(OH)30 and C70(OH)30 fullerenols against neutron irradiation is studied. It is established that the radiation resistance of the fullerenes is higher than that of the fullerenols, but the radiation resistance of the Gd@C2 n endometallofullerenes is lower than that of the corresponding Gd@C2 n (OH)38 fullerenols. The radiation resistance of mixtures of Me@C2 n (OH)38 ( Me = Gd, Tb, Sc, Fe, and Pr) endometallofullerenes with C60(OH)30 is determined. The factors affecting the radiation resistance of the fullerenes and fullerenols are discussed.

  20. Radiation-resistant polymer-based photonics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Nichter, James E.; Nash, Fazio; Haas, Franz; Szep, Attila A.; Michalak, Richard J.; Flusche, B.; Repak, Paul L.; Brost, George A.; Pirich, Andrew R.; Craig, Douglas M.; Le, Dang T.; Cardimona, David A.; Fetterman, Harold R.; Tsap, Boris; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Barto, Richard R.; Zeng, Tingying; Wood, David; Claus, Richard O.

    2004-10-01

    Empirical data regarding the radiation induced responses of Mach Zehnder interferometric electro-optic polymer based modulators (PBMs) operating at 1310 and 1550 nm and broadband InP quantum dot (QD) polymer photodetectors (PPDs) operating into the near infrared (NIR) are reported. Modulators composed of spun-on materials and hybrid electostatically self assembled (ESA) and spun-on NLO materials are examined for changes to their half-wave voltage and insertion losses following a gamma-ray total dose of 163 krad(Si) and irradiation by 25.6 MeV protons at a fluence of ~1011 cm-2. Pre- and post- irradiation responses of ESA grown polymer detectors using InP QDs are examined for photovoltage degradation and aging effects. The data indicates and excellent potential for developing polymer based photonic (PBP) devices with increased radiation resistance suitable for transition to photonic space applications.

  1. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) in Drosophila melanogaster seeking to understand the enzyme's role in cell protection against ionizing radiation are reported. Components of the investigation include molecular characterization of the gene; measuring the response of different genotypes to increasing levels of radiation; and investigation of the processes that maintain the Sod polymorphism in populations. While two alleles, S and F, are commonly found at the Sod locus in natural populations of D. melanogaster we have isolated from a natural population a null (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide a model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CAl. The radioprotective effects of SOD can be established by showing protective effects for the various genotypes that correspond to those inequalities. Because the allele variants studied are derived from natural populations, the proposed investigation avoids problems that arise when mutants obtained my mutagenesis are used. Moreover, each allele is studied in multiple genetic backgrounds, so that we correct for effects attributable to other loci by randomizing these effects.

  2. Biology of Extreme Radiation Resistance: The Way of Deinococcus radiodurans

    PubMed Central

    Krisko, Anita; Radman, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is a champion of extreme radiation resistance that is accounted for by a highly efficient protection against proteome, but not genome, damage. A well-protected functional proteome ensures cell recovery from extensive radiation damage to other cellular constituents by molecular repair and turnover processes, including an efficient repair of disintegrated DNA. Therefore, cell death correlates with radiation-induced protein damage, rather than DNA damage, in both robust and standard species. From the reviewed biology of resistance to radiation and other sources of oxidative damage, we conclude that the impact of protein damage on the maintenance of life has been largely underestimated in biology and medicine. PMID:23818498

  3. Protein Acetylation in Procaryotes Increases Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K.

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysine residues is conserved in all three kingdoms; however, its role in prokaryotes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that acetylation enables the reference bacterium Escherichia coli to withstand environmental stress. Specifically, the bacterium reaches higher cell densities and becomes more resistant to heat and oxidative stress when its proteins are acetylated as shown by deletion of the gene encoding acetyltransferase YfiQ and the gene encoding deacetylase CobB as well as by overproducing YfiQ and CobB. Furthermore, we show that the increase in oxidative stress resistance with acetylation is due to the induction of catalase activity through enhanced katG expression. We also found that two-component system proteins CpxA, PhoP, UvrY, and BasR are associated with cell catalase activity and may be responsible as the connection between bacterial acetylation and the stress response. This is the first demonstration of a specific environmental role of acetylation in prokaryotes. PMID:21703240

  4. Protein acetylation in prokaryotes increases stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qun; Wood, Thomas K

    2011-07-15

    Acetylation of lysine residues is conserved in all three kingdoms; however, its role in prokaryotes is unknown. Here we demonstrate that acetylation enables the reference bacterium Escherichia coli to withstand environmental stress. Specifically, the bacterium reaches higher cell densities and becomes more resistant to heat and oxidative stress when its proteins are acetylated as shown by deletion of the gene encoding acetyltransferase YfiQ and the gene encoding deacetylase CobB as well as by overproducing YfiQ and CobB. Furthermore, we show that the increase in oxidative stress resistance with acetylation is due to the induction of catalase activity through enhanced katG expression. We also found that two-component system proteins CpxA, PhoP, UvrY, and BasR are associated with cell catalase activity and may be responsible as the connection between bacterial acetylation and the stress response. This is the first demonstration of a specific environmental role of acetylation in prokaryotes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The role of depressed metabolism in increased radio resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    Studies are presented of the physiology of depressed metabolism, radio-resistance in depressed metabolic states, comparative aspects of depressed metabolism, and gastrointestinal responses to ionizing radiation. Specific data cover helium-cold induced hypothermia in white rats and hamsters, and radiation responses and intestinal absorption in the gerbil.

  6. Radiation Resistance and Injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    PubMed Central

    El-Zawahry, Yehia A.; Rowley, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25°C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and −30°C, the D value of strain IP107 was 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at −20°C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at −20°C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at −20°C, nor did storage at −20°C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25°C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36°C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36°C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5°C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36°C for 1 day than at 5°C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation. PMID:570017

  7. Analysis of DNA methylation and gene expression in radiation-resistant head and neck tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofei; Liu, Liang; Mims, Jade; Punska, Elizabeth C; Williams, Kristin E; Zhao, Weiling; Arcaro, Kathleen F; Tsang, Allen W; Zhou, Xiaobo; Furdui, Cristina M

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to radiation therapy constitutes a significant challenge in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC). Alteration in DNA methylation is thought to play a role in this resistance. Here, we analyzed DNA methylation changes in a matched model of radiation resistance for HNSCC using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Our results show that compared to radiation-sensitive cells (SCC-61), radiation-resistant cells (rSCC-61) had a significant increase in DNA methylation. After combining these results with microarray gene expression data, we identified 84 differentially methylated and expressed genes between these 2 cell lines. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed ILK signaling, glucocorticoid receptor signaling, fatty acid α-oxidation, and cell cycle regulation as top canonical pathways associated with radiation resistance. Validation studies focused on CCND2, a protein involved in cell cycle regulation, which was identified as hypermethylated in the promoter region and downregulated in rSCC-61 relative to SCC-61 cells. Treatment of rSCC-61 and SCC-61 with the DNA hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'deoxycitidine increased CCND2 levels only in rSCC-61 cells, while treatment with the control reagent cytosine arabinoside did not influence the expression of this gene. Further analysis of HNSCC data from The Cancer Genome Atlas found increased methylation in radiation-resistant tumors, consistent with the cell culture data. Our findings point to global DNA methylation status as a biomarker of radiation resistance in HNSCC, and suggest a need for targeted manipulation of DNA methylation to increase radiation response in HNSCC. PMID:25961636

  8. Design of radiation resistant metallic multilayers for advanced nuclear systems

    SciTech Connect

    Zhernenkov, Mikhail E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Gill, Simerjeet E-mail: gills@bnl.gov; Stanic, Vesna; DiMasi, Elaine; Kisslinger, Kim; Ecker, Lynne; Baldwin, J. Kevin; Misra, Amit; Demkowicz, M. J.

    2014-06-16

    Helium implantation from transmutation reactions is a major cause of embrittlement and dimensional instability of structural components in nuclear energy systems. Development of novel materials with improved radiation resistance, which is of the utmost importance for progress in nuclear energy, requires guidelines to arrive at favorable parameters more efficiently. Here, we present a methodology that can be used for the design of radiation tolerant materials. We used synchrotron X-ray reflectivity to nondestructively study radiation effects at buried interfaces and measure swelling induced by He implantation in Cu/Nb multilayers. The results, supported by transmission electron microscopy, show a direct correlation between reduced swelling in nanoscale multilayers and increased interface area per unit volume, consistent with helium storage in Cu/Nb interfaces in forms that minimize dimensional changes. In addition, for Cu/Nb layers, a linear relationship is demonstrated between the measured depth-dependent swelling and implanted He density from simulations, making the reflectivity technique a powerful tool for heuristic material design.

  9. Radiation Effects of Commercial Resistive Random Access Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Wilcox, Edward; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Figueiredo, Marco; Buchner, Stephen; Khachatrian, Ani; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We present results for the single-event effect response of commercial production-level resistive random access memories. We found that the resistive memory arrays are immune to heavy ion-induced upsets. However, the devices were susceptible to single-event functional interrupts, due to upsets from the control circuits. The intrinsic radiation tolerant nature of resistive memory makes the technology an attractive consideration for future space applications.

  10. Development of radiation resistant electrical cable insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, B. S.; Soo, P.; Mackenzie, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    Two new polyethylene cable insulations have been formulated for nuclear applications and have been tested under gamma radiation. Both insulations are based on low density polyethylene, one with PbO and the other with Sb2O3 as additives. The test results show that the concept of using inorganic antioxidants to retard radiation initiated oxidation (RIO) is viable. PbO is more effective than Sb2O3 in minimizing RIO.

  11. Electrical resistivity of radiation disordered oxide BaNb sub 4 O sub 6

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, S.A.; Goshchitskii, B.N.; Karkin, A.E.; Mirmelstein, A.V.; Voronin, V.I.; Parkhomenko, V.D. ); Zubkov, V.G.; Perelyaev, V.N.; Berger, I.F.; Kontzevaya, I.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of radiation disorder on the electrical resistivity of the metallic non-superconducting BaNb{sub 4}O{sub 6} oxide has been investigated. It is shown that variation of electrical resistivity {rho} of this compound under disorder is typical of metallic systems, i.e. residual resistivity increases linearly with defect concentration while the temperature dependence of {rho} changes slightly. Such a behavior qualitatively differs from the previously observed unusual behavior of HTSC with similar crystal structure.

  12. Towards understanding the extreme radiation resistance of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Holloman, William K; Schirawski, Jan; Holliday, Robin

    2007-12-01

    Ustilago maydis is a phytopathogenic fungus exhibiting extreme resistance to UV and ionizing radiation. The molecular mechanisms underlying this resistance are as yet unknown. The recently determined genome sequence was examined for clues to the radiation resistance, focusing on proteins in homologous recombination, but there was little that was unusual about them. Furthermore, by comparison, its recombinational repair system seems to be only minimally related to the extended synthesis-dependent DNA strand-annealing system of Deinococcus radiodurans. Thus, consideration should be given to the possibility that incremental structural changes in repair proteins or their elevated expression are the basis for the extreme radiation resistance in U. maydis. Evolution of a system enabling the survival of U. maydis under such conditions could be a secondary consequence of adaptation to an environment of continual genotoxic stress encountered in its habitat.

  13. Increased occupational radiation doses: nuclear fuel cycle.

    PubMed

    Bouville, André; Kryuchkov, Victor

    2014-02-01

    The increased occupational doses resulting from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident that occurred in Ukraine in April 1986, the reactor accident of Fukushima that took place in Japan in March 2011, and the early operations of the Mayak Production Association in Russia in the 1940s and 1950s are presented and discussed. For comparison purposes, the occupational doses due to the other two major reactor accidents (Windscale in the United Kingdom in 1957 and Three Mile Island in the United States in 1979) and to the main plutonium-producing facility in the United States (Hanford Works) are also covered but in less detail. Both for the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident and the routine operations at Mayak, the considerable efforts made to reconstruct individual doses from external irradiation to a large number of workers revealed that the recorded doses had been overestimated by a factor of about two.Introduction of Increased Occupational Exposures: Nuclear Industry Workers. (Video 1:32, http://links.lww.com/HP/A21).

  14. Longevity, oxygen toxicity and radiation-enhanced resistance to oxygen in tribolium confusum

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y.J.

    1985-01-01

    Sublethal doses of ionizing radiation increase longevity in a variety of insects suggesting that irradiation may retard the age-dependent decline of physiological functions. There have been no systematic investigations of the response of irradiated populations to stress, however. The authors have demonstrated that resistance of adult flour beetles, Tribolium confusum, to oxygen poisoning declines progressively with age. They have examined oxygen resistance of irradiated populations of T. confusum as a function of age at irradiation, of time after irradiation, and of radiation dose and of dose-modifying factors. Shortly after gamma-irradiation, flour beetles exhibited a decline in resistance to oxygen toxicity. Then, about two weeks after irradiation, the LD/sub 50/ exposure time in pure oxygen was much greater than that of nonirradiated beetles, and this enhanced resistance persisted for about 6 months. The magnitude of the enhancement was a function of dose, decreased with increasing age at irradiation, and was modified by radiation factors. Sublethal irradiation under anoxia, at low dose rate, or with dose fractionation reduced the development of oxygen resistance to approximately the same degree that it reduced acute radiation lethality . Radiation-enhanced resistance to stress may be an important factor in the increased longevity of irradiated insects.

  15. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Aravindan, Natarajan; Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen; Natarajan, Mohan

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  16. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Sangyong; Bahn, Yong-Sun

    2016-11-29

    The basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has been known to be highly radiation resistant and has been found in fatal radioactive environments such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the radiation resistance phenotype of C. neoformans, we identified genes affected by gamma radiation through genome-wide transcriptome analysis and characterized their functions. We found that genes involved in DNA damage repair systems were upregulated in response to gamma radiation. Particularly, deletion of recombinase RAD51 and two DNA-dependent ATPase genes, RAD54 and RDH54, increased cellular susceptibility to both gamma radiation and DNA-damaging agents. A variety of oxidative stress response genes were also upregulated. Among them, sulfiredoxin contributed to gamma radiation resistance in a peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that genes involved in molecular chaperone expression, ubiquitination systems, and autophagy were induced, whereas genes involved in the biosynthesis of proteins and fatty acids/sterols were downregulated. Most importantly, we discovered a number of novel C. neoformans genes, the expression of which was modulated by gamma radiation exposure, and their deletion rendered cells susceptible to gamma radiation exposure, as well as DNA damage insults. Among these genes, we found that a unique transcription factor containing the basic leucine zipper domain, named Bdr1, served as a regulator of the gamma radiation resistance of C. neoformans by controlling expression of DNA repair genes, and its expression was regulated by the evolutionarily conserved DNA damage response protein kinase Rad53. Taken together, the current transcriptome and functional analyses contribute to the understanding of the unique molecular mechanism of the radiation-resistant fungus C. neoformans IMPORTANCE: Although there are no natural environments under intense radiation, some living organisms

  17. Gamma radiation induced resistivity changes in Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tundwal, Ambika; Kumar, V.; Datta, A.

    2017-03-01

    Monte Carlo Code JA-IPU is used for estimation of Frenkel pairs and their effect on change of resistivity of Iron on irradiation by gamma spectrum of Co60. The Code includes three cascade processes of incident gamma, produced electrons and recoiled atoms and simulation of the lattice structure of the target material. Change in experimentally measured resistivity of Iron is found to vary with number of Frenkel pairs as (x - 1) ln N d .

  18. RADIATION RESISTANT HTS QUADRUPOLES FOR RIA.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.; ANERELLA,M.; HARRISON,M.; ET AL.

    2004-10-03

    Extremely high radiation, levels with accumulated doses comparable to those in nuclear reactors than in accelerators, and very high heat loads ({approx}15 kw) make the quadrupole magnets in the fragment separator one of the most challenging elements of the proposed Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). Removing large heat loads, protecting the superconducting coils against quenching, the long term survivability of magnet components, and in particular, insulation that can retain its functionality in such a harsh environment, are the major challenges associated with such magnets. A magnet design based on commercially available high temperature superconductor (HTS) and stainless steel tape insulation has been developed. HTS will efficiently remove these large heat loads and stainless steel can tolerate these large radiation doses. Construction of a model magnet has been started with several coils already built and tested. This paper presents the basic magnet design, results of the coil tests, the status and the future plans. In addition, preliminary results of radiation calculations are also presented.

  19. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; ...

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size ofmore » ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.« less

  20. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M₂₃C₆ precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  1. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  2. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments.

    PubMed

    Sun, C; Zheng, S; Wei, C C; Wu, Y; Shao, L; Yang, Y; Hartwig, K T; Maloy, S A; Zinkle, S J; Allen, T R; Wang, H; Zhang, X

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304 L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500 °C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M(23)C(6) precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments.

  3. Superior radiation-resistant nanoengineered austenitic 304L stainless steel for applications in extreme radiation environments

    PubMed Central

    Sun, C.; Zheng, S.; Wei, C. C.; Wu, Y.; Shao, L.; Yang, Y.; Hartwig, K. T.; Maloy, S. A.; Zinkle, S. J.; Allen, T. R.; Wang, H.; Zhang, X.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear energy provides more than 10% of electrical power internationally, and the increasing engagement of nuclear energy is essential to meet the rapid worldwide increase in energy demand. A paramount challenge in the development of advanced nuclear reactors is the discovery of advanced structural materials that can endure extreme environments, such as severe neutron irradiation damage at high temperatures. It has been known for decades that high dose radiation can introduce significant void swelling accompanied by precipitation in austenitic stainless steel (SS). Here we report, however, that through nanoengineering, ultra-fine grained (UFG) 304L SS with an average grain size of ~100 nm, can withstand Fe ion irradiation at 500°C to 80 displacements-per-atom (dpa) with moderate grain coarsening. Compared to coarse grained (CG) counterparts, swelling resistance of UFG SS is improved by nearly an order of magnitude and swelling rate is reduced by a factor of 5. M23C6 precipitates, abundant in irradiated CG SS, are largely absent in UFG SS. This study provides a nanoengineering approach to design and discover radiation tolerant metallic materials for applications in extreme radiation environments. PMID:25588326

  4. Radiation Resistance Studies of Amorphous Silicon Alloy Photovoltaic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodyard, James R.

    1994-01-01

    The radiation resistance of commercial solar cells fabricated from hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloys was investigated. A number of different device structures were irradiated with 1.0 MeV protons. The cells were insensitive to proton fluences below 1E12 sq cm. The parameters of the irradiated cells were restored with annealing at 200 C. The annealing time was dependent on proton fluence. Annealing devices for one hour restores cell parameters for fluences below lE14 sq cm require longer annealing times. A parametric fitting model was used to characterize current mechanisms observed in dark I-V measurements. The current mechanisms were explored with irradiation fluence, and voltage and light soaking times. The thermal generation current density and quality factor increased with proton fluence. Device simulation shows the degradation in cell characteristics may be explained by the reduction of the electric field in the intrinsic layer.

  5. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    SciTech Connect

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel; Duin, Adri C. T. van; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-18

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  6. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; van Duin, Adri C. T.; So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju; Kiwi, Miguel; Bringa, Eduardo M.

    2016-07-01

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  7. Research of radiation resistant Er doped fiber for space detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jian-ping; Zhang, Ge; Wang, Pu-pu; Li, Run-dong; Jiang, Cong; Xiao, Chun

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, erbium doped fibers for space detection are researched for feature of radiation resistance. Fibers with different coated carbon are hydrogen loaded and radiated, and too thick of carbon layer around fiber would not bring best radiation-resistant performance, since thick carbon layer would make the entering of hydrogen difficult. We also research the duration of saturated hydrogen loading under the high and low temperature respectively, and it's found that the fibers' photo sensitivities tend to be flat after some days. Hydrogen is reloaded into the fibers which have been loaded once, this help us to deep understand the mechanism of hydrogen loading for the fiber gratings. Loss and wave width changes are also researched under different radiation dose.

  8. Theory of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance of oil radiators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mariamov, N B

    1942-01-01

    In the present report the coefficients of heat transfer and hydraulic resistance are theoretically obtained for the case of laminar flow of a heated viscous liquid in a narrow rectangular channel. The results obtained are applied to the computation of oil radiators, which to a first approximation may be considered as made up of a system of such channels. In conclusion, a comparison is given of the theoretical with the experimental results obtained from tests on airplane oil radiators.

  9. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The very reactive superoxide anion O[sub 2] is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20[sub 2][sup [minus

  10. Numerical Analysis for Radiation Resistant InGaP Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elfiky, Dalia; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Sasaki, Takuo; Elnawawy, Mohamed; Eldesouky, Tarek; Ghitas, Ahmed

    2011-07-01

    Numerical analyses are carried out to optimize radiation resistant of InGaP solar cell under the effect of low energy protons. The radiation degradation parameters of InGaP used to investigate the effect of cell configuration, base thickness, junction depth, base carrier concentration, and AlInP window layer. Numerical analyses for both cells structure n-p and p-n shows that, the n-p structure is more radiation resistant in a solar cell with shallow junction (0.05 µm), thin base thickness (0.4 µm) and low base carrier concentration (1 ×1016 cm-3), while p-n cell structure is relatively radiation resistant in deep junction solar cell (0.1 µm) with thin base thickness and low base carrier concentration. The formation of AlInP window layer increases the radiation resistant of p-n cell structure, while no significant change in the radiation resistant of n-p cell structure was observed due to the formation of AlInP.

  11. MTOR inhibition reversed drug resistance after combination radiation with erlotinib in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Hongqing; Bai, Jing; Chang, Joe Y; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping

    2016-12-20

    To investigate the effects of mTOR inhibition on drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after combined radiation and erlotinib therapy. Combined radiation and erlotinib therapy produced clear radiosensitization effects both in vitro and in vivo; however, tumor cells remained drug resistant. Additionally, combined radiation and erlotinib therapy significantly increased p-AKT and p-P70 levels. After mTOR inhibition, the number of surviving cells significantly decreased compared with that before inhibition, and the in vivo growth curve was significantly reduced. The effects of combined radiation and erlotinib therapy on tumor inhibition and drug resistance were evaluated by in vitro survival curves in PC9 lung adenocarcinoma cell line and in vivo growth curves in nude mouse xenograft tumor model respectively. The association between tumor drug resistance and the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B/mechanistic target of rapamycin (PI3K-AKT-mTOR) pathway was measured by western blot, assessing the changes in protein kinase B (AKT), phosphor-AKT (p-AKT), P70, and p-P70 protein levels. MTOR was inhibited using everolimus, and changes in AKT, p-AKT, P70, and p-P70 levels were observed. Furthermore, changes in in vitro survival curves, and in vivo growth curves before and after mTOR inhibition were evaluated to confirm its effects on drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after combined radiation and TKI therapy. mTOR was associated with drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after radiation combined with TKI, and MTOR inhibition reversed drug resistance in lung adenocarcinoma after combined radiation and TKI therapy.

  12. Modeling of secondary radiation damage in LIGA PMMA resist exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ting, Aili

    2003-01-01

    Secondary radiation during LIGA PMMA resist exposure adversely affects feature definition, sidewall taper and overall sidewall offset. Additionally, it can degrade the resist adjacent to the substrate, leading to the loss of free-standing features through undercutting during resist development or through mechanical failure of the degraded material. The source of this radiation includes photoelectrons, Auger electrons, fluorescence photons, etc. Sandia"s Integrated Tiger Series (ITS), a coupled electron/photon Monte Carlo transport code, was used to compute dose profiles within 1 to 2 microns of the absorber edge and near the interface of the resist with a metallized substrate. The difficulty of sub-micron resolution requirement was overcome by solving a few local problems having carefully designed micron-scale geometries. The results indicate a 2-μm dose transition region near the absorber edge resulting from PMMA"s photoelectrons. This region leads to sidewall offset and to tapered sidewalls following resist development. The results also show a dose boundary layer of around 1 μm near the substrate interface due to electrons emitted from the substrate metallization layer. The maximum dose at the resist bottom under the absorber can be very high and can lead to feature loss during development. This model was also used to investigate those resist doses resulting from multi-layer substrate.

  13. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiations and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    2000-06-01

    The major objective of this project is to understand the genetic basis for resistance of humans to radiations and chemicals. In the fission yeast S. pombe, a gene called rad9 plays a key role in promoting resistance to DNA damaging agents and controlling cell cycle progression after radiation or chemical exposure. This investigation focuses on the characterization of a human homologue of this yeast gene, called HRAD9, with the longterm goal of developing the gene as a genetic marker to predict inherent susceptibility to the deleterious health effects caused by DNA damage. The aims concern a molecular characterization of HRAD9 and determination of its role in mediating the cellular response to radiations and chemicals, as well as its potential role in carcinogenesis.

  14. [Shielding ability of lead loaded radiation resistant gloves].

    PubMed

    Kawano, T; Ebihara, H

    1990-02-01

    The shielding ability of radiation resistant gloves was examined. The gloves are made of lead loaded (as PbO2) polyvinyl chloride resin and are about 0.4 mm in thickness (70 mg/cm2). Eleven test pieces were sampled from each of three gloves (total 33) and the transmission rates for radiations (X-ray or gamma-ray) through the test pieces were measured with radiation sources, 99mTc, 57Co, 133Ba, 133Xe and 241Am. The differences of the transmission rates for radiations by the positions of the gloves were smaller than 15%, and the differences by three gloves were smaller than 5% in the case of 60 keV and 141 keV radiations. The average transmission rates for radiations in the 33 test pieces were about 40% for 30 keV radiation, about 90% for 80 keV and 140 keV radiations. The shielding characteristic of the gloves is equivalent to about 0.026 mm thick lead plate.

  15. Energy Metabolism in a Matched Model of Radiation Resistance for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mims, Jade; Bansal, Nidhi; Bharadwaj, Manish S.; Chen, Xiaofei; Molina, Anthony J.; Tsang, Allen W.; Furdui, Cristina M.

    2015-01-01

    While radiation therapy is commonly used for treating cancer, radiation resistance can limit long-term control of the disease. In this study, we investigated the reprogramming of the energy metabolism in radiosensitive and radioresistant head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) using a preclinical matched model of radiation resistance. Our investigation found that radioresistant rSCC-61 cells: 1. They display increased glucose uptake and decreased fatty acid uptake; 2. They deviate from the classical Warburg effect by diverting the glycolytic flux into the pentose phosphate pathway; 3. They are more dependent on glucose than glutamine metabolism to support growth; 4. They have decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation; 5. They have enhanced fatty acid biosynthesis by increasing the expression of fatty acid synthase; and 6. They utilize endogenous fatty acids to meet the energy demands for proliferation. Inhibition of fatty acid synthase with orlistat or FASN siRNA resulted in increased cytotoxicity and sensitivity to radiation in rSCC-61 cells. These results demonstrate the potential of combination therapy using radiation and orlistat or other inhibitors of lipid and energy metabolism for treating radiation resistance in HNSCC. PMID:25738895

  16. Energy metabolism in a matched model of radiation resistance for head and neck squamous cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Mims, Jade; Bansal, Nidhi; Bharadwaj, Manish S; Chen, Xiaofei; Molina, Anthony J; Tsang, Allen W; Furdui, Cristina M

    2015-03-01

    While radiation therapy is commonly used for treating cancer, radiation resistance can limit long-term control of the disease. In this study, we investigated the reprogramming of the energy metabolism in radiosensitive and radioresistant head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) using a preclinical matched model of radiation resistance. Our investigation found that radioresistant rSCC-61 cells: 1. They display increased glucose uptake and decreased fatty acid uptake; 2. They deviate from the classical Warburg effect by diverting the glycolytic flux into the pentose phosphate pathway; 3. They are more dependent on glucose than glutamine metabolism to support growth; 4. They have decreased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation; 5. They have enhanced fatty acid biosynthesis by increasing the expression of fatty acid synthase; and 6. They utilize endogenous fatty acids to meet the energy demands for proliferation. Inhibition of fatty acid synthase with orlistat or FASN siRNA resulted in increased cytotoxicity and sensitivity to radiation in rSCC-61 cells. These results demonstrate the potential of combination therapy using radiation and orlistat or other inhibitors of lipid and energy metabolism for treating radiation resistance in HNSCC.

  17. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina; Gaidamakova, Elena; Matrosova, Vera; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla L.; Copeland, A; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam L; Mavromatis, K; Pitluck, Samual; Richardson, P M; Detter, J. Chris; Brettin, Tom; Saunders, Elizabeth H; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M; Wolf, Yuri; Sorokin, Alexei; Gerasimova, Anna; Gelfand, Mikhail; Fredrickson, James K; Koonin, Eugene; Daly, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  18. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    SciTech Connect

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  19. Effect of temperature on resistance of LEDs based on AlGaAs heterostructures to 60Co gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gradoboev, A. V.; Rubanov, P. V.; Sednev, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the study of the change in the parameters of IR LEDs based on AlGaAs double heterostructures under 60Co gamma irradiation with regard to irradiation temperature. The study indicated several consecutive stages of LED emissive power lowering under ionizing radiation. Increased temperature during gamma irradiation enhances radiation resistance at the first stage due to radiation-stimulated defect annealing, which reduces relative contribution of the first stage to the overall emissive power lowering. It was found that in exposure at temperature more than 380 K, the first stage of LED emissive power lowering is completely eliminated. At the second stage, increase in resistance is caused by the decreased relative contribution of the less stable first stage to the overall emissive power lowering. The maximum resistance of LEDs to gamma radiation depends on radiation resistance of metal-semiconductor contacts.

  20. Radiation induction of drug resistance in RIF-1 tumors and tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hopwood, L.E.; Moulder, J.E. )

    1989-11-01

    The RIF-1 tumor cell line contains a small number of cells (1-20 per 10(6) cells) that are resistant to various single antineoplastic drugs, including 5-fluorouracil (5FU), methotrexate (MTX), and adriamycin (ADR). For 5FU the frequency of drug resistance is lower for tumor-derived cells than for cells from cell culture; for MTX the reverse is true, and for ADR there is no difference. In vitro irradiation at 5 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU, MTX, and ADR. In vivo irradiation at 3 Gy significantly increased the frequency of drug-resistant cells for 5FU and MTX, but not for ADR. The absolute risk for in vitro induction of MTX, 5FU, and ADR resistance, and for in vivo induction of 5FU resistance, was 1-3 per 10(6) cells per Gy; but the absolute risk for in vivo induction of MTX resistance was 54 per 10(6) cells per Gy. The frequency of drug-resistant cells among individual untreated tumors was highly variable; among individual irradiated tumors the frequency of drug-resistant cells was significantly less variable. These studies provide supporting data for models of the development of tumor drug resistance, and imply that some of the drug resistance seen when chemotherapy follows radiotherapy may be due to radiation-induced drug resistance.

  1. Terahertz radiation increases genomic instability in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Korenstein-Ilan, Avital; Barbul, Alexander; Hasin, Pini; Eliran, Alon; Gover, Avraham; Korenstein, Rafi

    2008-08-01

    Terahertz radiation is increasingly being applied in new and evolving technologies applied in areas such as homeland security and medical imaging. Thus a timely assessment of the potential hazards and health effects of occupational and general population exposure to THz radiation is required. We applied continuous-wave (CW) 0.1 THz radiation (0.031 mW/ cm(2)) to dividing lymphocytes for 1, 2 and 24 h and examined the changes in chromosome number of chromosomes 1, 10, 11 and 17 and changes in the replication timing of their centromeres using interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Chromosomes 11 and 17 were most vulnerable (about 30% increase in aneuploidy after 2 and 24 h of exposure), while chromosomes 1 and 10 were not affected. We observed changes in the asynchronous mode of replication of centromeres 11, 17 and 1 (by 40%) after 2 h of exposure and of all four centromeres after 24 h of exposure (by 50%). It is speculated that these effects are caused by radiation-induced low-frequency collective vibrational modes of proteins and DNA. Our results demonstrate that exposure of lymphocytes in vitro to a low power density of 0.1 THz radiation induces genomic instability. These findings, if verified, may suggest that such exposure may result in an increased risk of cancer.

  2. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation. [Annual report, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-12-31

    The very reactive superoxide anion O{sub 2} is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20{sub 2}{sup {minus}} + 2H {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. SOD had been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Evidence that genetic differences may affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation has been shown in Drosophila since differences have been shown to exist between strains and resistance to radiation can evolve under natural selection.

  3. Comparative radiation resistance, temperature dependence and performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by the open tube capped diffusion and by the closed tube uncapped diffusion of sulfur into Czochralski-grown p-type substrates are compared. Differences found in radiation resistance were attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. Both sets of cells showed superior radiation resistance to that of gallium arsenide cells, in agreement with previous results. No correlation was, however, found between the open-circuit voltage and the temperature dependence of the maximum power.

  4. Comparative radiation resistance, temperature dependence and performance of diffused junction indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Ghandhi, S. K.; Borrego, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells whose p-n junctions were processed by the open tube capped diffusion and by the closed tube uncapped diffusion of sulfur into Czochralski-grown p-type substrates are compared. Differences found in radiation resistance were attributed to the effects of increased base dopant concentration. Both sets of cells showed superior radiation resistance to that of gallium arsenide cells, in agreement with previous results. No correlation was, however, found between the open-circuit voltage and the temperature dependence of the maximum power.

  5. Design principles for radiation-resistant solid solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuler, Thomas; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Bellon, Pascal; Averback, Robert

    2017-05-01

    We develop a multiscale approach to quantify the increase in the recombined fraction of point defects under irradiation resulting from dilute solute additions to a solid solution. This methodology provides design principles for radiation-resistant materials. Using an existing database of solute diffusivities, we identify Sb as one of the most efficient solutes for this purpose in a Cu matrix. We perform density-functional-theory calculations to obtain binding and migration energies of Sb atoms, vacancies, and self-interstitial atoms in various configurations. The computed data informs the self-consistent mean-field formalism to calculate transport coefficients, allowing us to make quantitative predictions of the recombined fraction of point defects as a function of temperature and irradiation rate using homogeneous rate equations. We identify two different mechanisms according to which solutes lead to an increase in the recombined fraction of point defects; at low temperature, solutes slow down vacancies (kinetic effect), while at high temperature, solutes stabilize vacancies in the solid solution (thermodynamic effect). Extension to other metallic matrices and solutes are discussed.

  6. Thin N-I-P radiation resistant solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.

    1983-01-01

    Several sets of N-I-P sola cells were fabricated from high resistivity silicon to test the effectiveness of various methods for hardening these devices against radiation. Different substrate materials were used to provide information on the effects of dopant concentration, silicon type, and the presence of oxygen. In some cells, P-type float-zone refined silicon of 800, 8000 and 15,000 omega-cm resistivity was used to provide a basis for studying resistivity and purity effects. In other cells, N-type silicon (approximately 800 omega-cm) was used to allow a comparison of dopant type. Oxygen-rich, crucible-grown, silicon (approximately 100 omega-cm, p-type) will provide information on purity effects and defect gettering. Lithium was introduced into different types of silicon to determine if mobile ions can reduce radiation induced defects in high resistivity material. Thin cells (2 mil) were fabricated to study the effects of cell thickness and carrier injection on radiation damage. The electrical characteristics of the different sets of cells were measured, analyzed, and compared prior to shipment of the cells to NASA/Lewis for irradiation.

  7. Radiation resistance of quartz glass for VUV discharge lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, A.; Kühn, B.; Arnold, E.; Schilling, F.-J.; Witzke, H.-D.

    2005-09-01

    Electrically-fused quartz glass, flame-fused quartz glass and plasma-fused quartz glass as well as synthetic fused silica samples were irradiated stepwise with a high energy Xe barrier discharge excimer lamp at 172 nm. VUV spectra were measured before and after every irradiation step. The results show that the VUV transmittance and the resistance against high energy radiation strongly depend on the quartz glass type, as well as on the thermal pretreatment of the quartz glass samples. In electrically-fused and plasma-fused quartz glass the VUV transmission decreases by the formation of oxygen deficiency and E' centres with absorption bands at 163 nm and 215 nm. Best irradiation resistance is found in synthetic fused silica and in thermally treated flame-fused quartz glass. Photoluminescence spectra measured under excitation with a KrF excimer laser before and after irradiation indicate fundamental differences in the SiO2 network structure of the different quartz glass types. Whereas a poor radiation resistance correlates with a blue photoluminescence band at 390 nm, the photoluminescence of flame-fused quartz glass changes from blue to green by a thermal treatment which is correlated with a significant improvement of radiation resistance. A simplified model is presented referring to hydride and oxygen deficiency centres as precursors to colour centre formation in different types of quartz glass.

  8. Extreme resistance of bdelloid rotifers to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Gladyshev, Eugene; Meselson, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Rotifers of class Bdelloidea are common invertebrate animals with highly unusual characteristics, including apparently obligate asexuality, the ability to resume reproduction after desiccation at any life stage, and a paucity of transposable genetic elements of types not prone to horizontal transmission. We find that bdelloids are also extraordinarily resistant to ionizing radiation (IR). Reproduction of the bdelloids Adineta vaga and Philodina roseola is much more resistant to IR than that of Euchlanis dilatata, a rotifer belonging to the desiccation-intolerant and facultatively sexual class Monogononta, and all other animals for which we have found relevant data. By analogy with the desiccation- and radiation-resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans, we suggest that the extraordinary radiation resistance of bdelloid rotifers is a consequence of their evolutionary adaptation to survive episodes of desiccation encountered in their characteristic habitats and that the damage incurred in such episodes includes DNA breakage that is repaired upon rehydration. Such breakage and repair may have maintained bdelloid chromosomes as colinear pairs and kept the load of transposable genetic elements low and may also have contributed to the success of bdelloid rotifers in avoiding the early extinction suffered by most asexuals.

  9. Development of resistant materials to beam impact and radiation damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi; Kokawa, Hiroyuki; Okamura, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Akira; Yamamura, Tsutomu; Hara, Nobuyoshi; Akao, Noboru; Futakawa, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Kenji

    2006-09-01

    Materials that have strong resistance to both beam impact (or shock-wave) and radiation damage are required for the beam target of an intense accelerator and space applications. Recently, Futakawa et al. found in their experiments that Kolsterising specimens have a stronger resistance to pitting than SS316 CW. A similar effect can be expected for other hardening treatments, and new material development is hopeful. Accordingly, we have started the development of high-performance materials by organizing the project team from KEK, JAEA and universities. In this paper, the scope of the project is introduced. Recent topics involve the development of intergranular crack (IGC)-resistant austenitic stainless-steel, AlN-TiN ceramics and cladding techniques of thin tantalum or CrN film on a tungsten target by means of a molten-salt method and ion-beam-enhanced deposition. New observations on corrosion resistance are presented.

  10. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    DR. Howard B. Lieberman

    2001-05-11

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage.

  11. Pathology effects at radiation doses below those causing increased mortality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, Bruce A.; Gavrilova, Natalia; Grahn, Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Mortality data from experiments conducted at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on the long-term effects of external whole-body irradiation on B6CF(1) mice were used to investigate radiation-induced effects at intermediate doses of (60)Co gamma rays or fission-spectrum neutrons either delivered as a single exposure or protracted over 60 once-weekly exposures. Kaplan-Meier analyses were used to identify the lowest dose in the ANL data (within radiation quality, pattern of exposure, and sex) at which radiation-induced mortality caused by primary tumors could be detected (approximately 1-2 Gy for gamma rays and 10-15 cGy for neutrons). Doses at and below these levels were then examined for radiation-induced shifts in the spectrum of pathology detected at death. To do this, specific pathology events were pooled into larger assemblages based on whether they were cancer, cardiovascular disease or non-neoplastic diseases detected within the lungs and pleura, liver and biliary tract, reproductive organs, or urinary tract. Cancer and cardiovascular disease were further subdivided into categories based on whether they caused death, contributed to death, or were simply observed at death. Counts of how often events falling within each of these combined pathology categories occurred within a mouse were then used as predictor variables in logistic regression to determine whether irradiated mice could be distinguished from control mice. Increased pathology burdens were detected in irradiated mice at doses lower than those causing detectable shifts in mortality-22 cGy for gamma rays and 2 cGy for neutrons. These findings suggest that (1) models based on mortality data alone may underestimate radiation effects, (2) radiation may have adverse health consequences (i.e. elevated health risks) even when mortality risks are not detected, and (3) radiation-induced pathologies other than cancer do occur, and they involve multiple organ systems.

  12. Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-González, Mario Xavier; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Genevaux, Pierre; Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Heeb, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different γ radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to γ radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations. PMID:26976674

  13. Resistance of Feather-Associated Bacteria to Intermediate Levels of Ionizing Radiation near Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-González, Mario Xavier; Czirják, Gábor Árpád; Genevaux, Pierre; Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Heeb, Philipp

    2016-03-15

    Ionizing radiation has been shown to produce negative effects on organisms, although little is known about its ecological and evolutionary effects. As a study model, we isolated bacteria associated with feathers from barn swallows Hirundo rustica from three study areas around Chernobyl differing in background ionizing radiation levels and one control study site in Denmark. Each bacterial community was exposed to four different γ radiation doses ranging from 0.46 to 3.96 kGy to test whether chronic exposure to radiation had selected for resistant bacterial strains. Experimental radiation duration had an increasingly overall negative effect on the survival of all bacterial communities. After exposure to γ radiation, bacteria isolated from the site with intermediate background radiation levels survived better and produced more colonies than the bacterial communities from other study sites with higher or lower background radiation levels. Long-term effects of radiation in natural populations might be an important selective pressure on traits of bacteria that facilitate survival in certain environments. Our findings indicate the importance of further studies to understand the proximate mechanisms acting to buffer the negative effects of ionizing radiation in natural populations.

  14. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate.

    PubMed

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian; Rokni-Zadeh, Hassan

    2016-03-10

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Kocuria rhizophila RF, a Radiation-Resistant Soil Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Mehrabadi, Jalil Fallah; Mirzaie, Amir; Ahangar, Nahid; Rahimi, Arian

    2016-01-01

    Kocuria rhizophila RF, a soil isolate from Iran, is a radiation-resistant bacterium. Only a limited amount of genomic information for radiation-resistant bacteria is currently available. Here, we report the draft genome sequence of this bacterium, providing knowledge to aid in the discovery of the genomic basis of its resistance to radiation. PMID:26966202

  16. The resistive bolometer for radiated power measurement on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Y. M.; Hu, L. Q.; Mao, S. T.; Chen, K. Y.; Lin, S. Y.; Collaboration: EAST Diagnostics Team

    2012-09-15

    The resistive bolometer system has been successfully employed on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for the first time to measure the radiated power of plasma. The bolometer detectors are based on 4 {mu}m thick Pt absorbers deposited on 1.5 {mu}m thick SiN membranes. The system consists of 3 cameras with a total of 48 channels. The detector and the system setup are described in detail. The detector calibration and typical measurement results are presented as well.

  17. Radiation Resistance of Fluorite-Structured Nuclear Oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Garrido, Frederico; Moll, Sandra; Thome, Lionel; Vincent, Laetitia; Nowicki, Lech; Sattonnay, Gaeel

    2009-03-10

    Fluorite-structure oxides are radiation-resistant materials making them ideal candidates for uses as nuclear fuels or as inert matrices for actinide transmutation. The radiation tolerance of urania and cubic zirconia single crystals was investigated by external ion irradiation in predominating domains of electronic and nuclear stopping of bombarding particles. Damage kinetics show that the behavior of the two investigated fluorite-type oxides is almost the same: (i) at low-energy a two-stage disordering process is exhibited--first a ballistic step due to the formation of radiation-induced defects and second a crystal fragmentation induced by the formation of gas bubbles at large concentration-; (ii) at high energy a one-stage damage kinetics associated with the formation of ion tracks whose overlapping at high fluence results in the formation of nanometer-sized domains with a small disorientation.

  18. Therapeutic Implications for Overcoming Radiation Resistance in Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Liu, Pengda; Lim, Ji Hong; Lee, Yong Heon; Lee, Tae Ho; Chang, Kyu Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR), such as X-rays and gamma (γ)-rays, mediates various forms of cancer cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. Among them, apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe are the main mechanisms of IR action. DNA damage and genomic instability contribute to IR-induced cancer cell death. Although IR therapy may be curative in a number of cancer types, the resistance of cancer cells to radiation remains a major therapeutic problem. In this review, we describe the morphological and molecular aspects of various IR-induced types of cell death. We also discuss cytogenetic variations representative of IR-induced DNA damage and genomic instability. Most importantly, we focus on several pathways and their associated marker proteins responsible for cancer resistance and its therapeutic implications in terms of cancer cell death of various types and characteristics. Finally, we propose radiation-sensitization strategies, such as the modification of fractionation, inflammation, and hypoxia and the combined treatment, that can counteract the resistance of tumors to IR. PMID:26569225

  19. Therapeutic Implications for Overcoming Radiation Resistance in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Liu, Pengda; Lim, Ji Hong; Lee, Yong Heon; Lee, Tae Ho; Chang, Kyu Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-11-10

    Ionizing radiation (IR), such as X-rays and gamma (γ)-rays, mediates various forms of cancer cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. Among them, apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe are the main mechanisms of IR action. DNA damage and genomic instability contribute to IR-induced cancer cell death. Although IR therapy may be curative in a number of cancer types, the resistance of cancer cells to radiation remains a major therapeutic problem. In this review, we describe the morphological and molecular aspects of various IR-induced types of cell death. We also discuss cytogenetic variations representative of IR-induced DNA damage and genomic instability. Most importantly, we focus on several pathways and their associated marker proteins responsible for cancer resistance and its therapeutic implications in terms of cancer cell death of various types and characteristics. Finally, we propose radiation-sensitization strategies, such as the modification of fractionation, inflammation, and hypoxia and the combined treatment, that can counteract the resistance of tumors to IR.

  20. Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A

    2015-01-01

    When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself.

  1. Solution Radioactivated by Hadron Radiation Can Increase Sister Chromatid Exchanges

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Junko; Yurkon, Charles R.; Fujii, Yoshihiro; Fujisawa, Hiroshi; Kato, Sayaka; Brents, Colleen A.; Uesaka, Mitsuru; Fujimori, Akira; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kato, Takamitsu A.

    2015-01-01

    When energetic particles irradiate matter, it becomes activated by nuclear reactions. Radioactivation induced cellular effects are not clearly understood, but it could be a part of bystander effects. This investigation is aimed at understanding the biological effects from radioactivation in solution induced by hadron radiation. Water or phosphate buffered saline was activated by being exposed to hadron radiation including protons, carbon- and iron-ions. 1 mL of radioactivated solution was transferred to flasks with Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells cultured in 5 mL of complete media. The induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) was used to observe any increase in DNA damage responses. The energy spectrum and the half-lives of the radioactivation were analyzed by NaI scintillation detector in order to identify generated radionuclides. In the radioactivated solution, 511 keV gamma-rays were observed, and their half-lives were approximately 2 min, 10 min, and 20 min. They respectively correspond to the beta+ decay of 15O, 13N, and 11C. The SCE frequencies in CHO cells increased depending on the amount of radioactivation in the solution. These were suppressed with a 2-hour delayed solution transfer or pretreatment with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Our results suggest that the SCE induction by radioactivated solution was mediated by free radicals produced by the annihilated gamma-rays. Since the SCE induction and DMSO modulation are also reported in radiation-induced bystander effects, our results imply that radioactivation of the solution may have some contribution to the bystander effects from hadron radiation. Further investigations are required to assess if radioactivation effects would attribute an additional level of cancer risk of the hadron radiation therapy itself. PMID:26657140

  2. Increased exposure of Southern Ocean phytoplankton to ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubin, Dan; Arrigo, Kevin R.; van Dijken, Gert L.

    2004-05-01

    Satellite remote sensing of both surface solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and chlorophyll over two decades shows that biologically significant ultraviolet radiation increases began to occur over the Southern Ocean three years before the ozone ``hole'' was discovered. Beginning in October 1983, the most frequent occurrences of enhanced UVR over phytoplankton-rich waters occurred in the Weddell Sea and Indian Ocean sectors of the Southern Ocean, impacting 60% of the surface biomass by the late 1990s. These results suggest two reasons why more serious impacts to the base of the marine food web may not have been detected by field experiments: (1) the onset of UVR increases several years before dedicated field work began may have impacted the most sensitive organisms long before such damage could be detected, and (2) most biological field work has so far not taken place in Antarctic waters most extensively subjected to enhanced UVR.

  3. Plankton, antarctic food chain base, respond to increased ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Dybas, C.

    1992-12-01

    With the growth of the austral spring ozone hole phytoplankton in antarctic waters beneath the depleted ozone layer are now being exposed to twice the amount of ultraviolet radiation as organisms outside the hole. This briefly describes the results of a major study examining this issue. A significant observation was a decrease in phytoplankton production by a minimum of 6-12 percent. Implications for other life forms are discussed briefly along with the effects of increased UV light on the whole ecosystem.

  4. Radiation sensitivity of Salmonella isolates relative to resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol or gentamicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemira, Brendan A.; Lonczynski, Kelly A.; Sommers, Christopher H.

    2006-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance of inoculated bacteria is a commonly used selective marker. Bacteria resistant to the antibiotic nalidixic acid have been shown to have an increased sensitivity to irradiation. The purpose of this research was to screen a collection of Salmonella isolates for antibiotic resistance and determine the association, if any, of antibiotic resistance with radiation sensitivity. Twenty-four clinical isolates of Salmonella were screened for native resistance to multiple concentrations of ampicillin (Amp), chloramphenicol (Chl), or gentamicin (Gm). Test concentrations were chosen based on established clinical minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels, and isolates were classified as either sensitive or resistant based on their ability to grow at or above the MIC. Salmonella cultures were grown overnight at (37 °C) in antibiotic-amended tryptic soy broth (TSB). Native resistance to Gm was observed with each of the 24 isolates (100%). Eight isolates (33%) were shown to be resistant to Amp, while seven isolates (29%) were shown to be resistant to Chl. In separate experiments, Salmonella cultures were grown overnight (37 °C) in TSB, centrifuged, and the cell pellets were re-suspended in phosphate buffer. The samples were then gamma irradiated at doses up to 1.0 kGy. The D10 values (the ionizing radiation dose required to reduce the viable number of microorganisms by 90%) were determined for the 24 isolates and they ranged from 0.181 to 0.359 kGy. No correlation was found between the D10 value of the isolate and its sensitivity or resistance to each of the three antibiotics. Resistance to Amp or Chl is suggested as appropriate resistance marker for Salmonella test strains to be used in studies of irradiation.

  5. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against extreme climate events, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Although early results suggested that biodiversity might provide both resistance and resilience (sensu rapid recovery) of ecosystem productivity to drought, ...

  6. Modified developer increases line resolution in photosensitive resist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Standard developer solution is mixed with dipropyl carbonate. This reduces swelling in the photosensitive resist and permits application of relatively thick films with minimal pinhole formation and increased line resolution.

  7. Radiation resistance of lactobacilli isolated from radurized meat relative to growth and environment.

    PubMed Central

    Hastings, J W; Holzapfel, W H; Niemand, J G

    1986-01-01

    Of 113 lactobacilli isolated from radurized (5 kGy) minced meat, 7 Lactobacillus sake strains, 1 L. curvatus strain, and 1 L. farciminis strain were used for radiation resistance studies in a semisynthetic substrate (i.e., modified MRS broth). Five reference Lactobacillus spp., one Staphylococcus aureus strain, and one Salmonella typhimurium strain were used for comparative purposes. All L. sake isolates exhibited the phenomenon of being more resistant to gamma-irradiation in the exponential (log) phase than in the stationary phase of their growth cycles by a factor of 28%. Four references strains also exhibited this phenomenon, with L. sake (DSM 20017) showing a 68% increase in resistance in the log phase over the stationary phase. This phenomenon was not common to all bacteria tested and is not common to all strains with high radiation resistance. Four L. sake isolates and three reference strains were used in radiation sensitivity testing in a natural food system (i.e., meat). The bacteria were irradiated in minced meat and packaged under four different conditions (air, vacuum, CO2, and N2). Organisms exhibited the highest death rate (lowest D10 values [doses required to reduce the logarithm of the bacterial population by 1] ) under CO2 packaging conditions, but resistance to irradiation was increased under N2. The D10 values of the isolates were generally greater than those of the reference strains. The D10 values were also higher (approximately two times) in meat than in semisynthetic growth medium. PMID:3096207

  8. Theory of the high base resistivity n(+)pp(+) silicon solar cell and its application to radiation damage effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Weinberg, I.

    1985-01-01

    Particulate radiation in space is a principal source of silicon solar cell degradation, and an investigation of cell radiation damage at higher base resistivities appears to have implication toward increasing solar cell and, therefore, useful satellite lifetimes in the space environment. However, contrary to expectations, it has been found that for cells with resistivities of 84 and 1250 ohm cm, the radiation resistance decreases as cell base resistivity increases. An analytical solar-cell computer model was developed with the objective to determine the reasons for this unexpected behavior. The present paper has the aim to describe the analytical model and its use in interpreting the behavior, under irradiation, of high-resistivity solar cells. Attention is given to boundary conditions at the space-charge region edges, cell currents, cell voltages, the generation of the theoretical I-V characteristic, experimental results, and computer calculations.

  9. Theory of the high base resistivity n(+)pp(+) silicon solar cell and its application to radiation damage effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Weinberg, I.

    1985-01-01

    Particulate radiation in space is a principal source of silicon solar cell degradation, and an investigation of cell radiation damage at higher base resistivities appears to have implication toward increasing solar cell and, therefore, useful satellite lifetimes in the space environment. However, contrary to expectations, it has been found that for cells with resistivities of 84 and 1250 ohm cm, the radiation resistance decreases as cell base resistivity increases. An analytical solar-cell computer model was developed with the objective to determine the reasons for this unexpected behavior. The present paper has the aim to describe the analytical model and its use in interpreting the behavior, under irradiation, of high-resistivity solar cells. Attention is given to boundary conditions at the space-charge region edges, cell currents, cell voltages, the generation of the theoretical I-V characteristic, experimental results, and computer calculations.

  10. Resistance of colorectal cancer cells to radiation and 5-FU is associated with MELK expression

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Seungho; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} MELK expression significantly increased when the cells are exposed to radiation or 5-FU. {yields} Suppression of MELK caused cell cycle changes and decrease in proliferation. {yields} Radiation or 5-FU treatment after MELK suppression by siRNA induced growth inhibition. -- Abstract: It was reported that the local recurrence would be caused by cancer stem cells acquiring chemo- and radio-resistance. Recently, one of the potential therapeutic targets for colorectal and other cancers has been identified, which is maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase (MELK). MELK is known as an embryonic and neural stem cell marker, and associated with the cell survival, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. In this study, SNU-503, which is a rectal cancer cell line, was treated with radiation or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and elevation of the MELK expression level was observed. Furthermore, the cell line was pre-treated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) against MELK mRNA before treatment of radiation or 5-FU and its effects on cell cycle and proliferation were observed. We demonstrated that knockdown of MELK reduced the proliferation of cells with radiation or 5-FU treatment. In addition, MELK suppression caused changes in cell cycle. In conclusion, MELK could be associated with increased resistance of colorectal cancer cells against radiation and 5-FU.

  11. Multidrug-Resistant Acinetobacter spp.: Increasingly Problematic Nosocomial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyungwon; Yong, Dongeun; Jeong, Seok Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria have increasingly been resisting to antimicrobial therapy. Recently, resistance problem has been relatively much worsened in Gram-negative bacilli. Acinetobacter spp. are typical nosocomial pathogens causing infections and high mortality, almost exclusively in compromised hospital patients. Acinetobacter spp. are intrinsically less susceptible to antibiotics than Enterobacteriaceae, and have propensity to acquire resistance. A surveillance study in Korea in 2009 showed that resistance rates of Acinetobacter spp. were very high: to fluoroquinolone 67%, to amikacin 48%, to ceftazidime 66% and to imipenem 51%. Carbapenem resistance was mostly due to OXA type carbapenemase production in A. baumannii isolates, whereas it was due to metallo-β-lactamase production in non-baumannii Acinetobacter isolates. Colistin-resistant isolates were rare but started to be isolated in Korea. Currently, the infection caused by multidrug-resistant A. baumannii is among the most difficult ones to treat. Analysis at tertiary care hospital in 2010 showed that among the 1,085 isolates of Acinetobacter spp., 14.9% and 41.8% were resistant to seven, and to all eight antimicrobial agents tested, respectively. It is known to be difficult to prevent Acinetobacter spp. infection in hospitalized patients, because the organisms are ubiquitous in hospital environment. Efforts to control resistant bacteria in Korea by hospitals, relevant scientific societies and government agencies have only partially been successful. We need concerted multidisciplinary efforts to preserve the efficacy of currently available antimicrobial agents, by following the principles of antimicrobial stewardship. PMID:22028150

  12. Elastic Resistance Effectiveness on Increasing Strength of Shoulders and Hips.

    PubMed

    Picha, Kelsey J; Almaddah, Muataz R; Barker, Jordan; Ciochetty, Tavis; Black, W Scott; Uhl, Tim L

    2017-09-12

    Elastic resistance is a common training method used to gain strength. Currently, progression with elastic resistance is based on the perceived exertion of the exercise or completion of targeted repetitions; exact resistance is typically unknown. This study's objective is to determine if knowledge of load during elastic resistance exercise will increase strength gains during exercises. Participants were randomized into two strength training groups, elastic resistance only and elastic resistance using a load cell (LC) that displays force during exercise. The LC group used a Smart Handle (Patterson Medical Supply, Chicago, IL) to complete all exercises. Each participant completed the same exercises three times weekly for 8 weeks. The LC group was provided with a set load for exercises whereas the elastic resistance only group was not. Participant's strength was tested at baseline and program completion, measuring isometric strength for shoulder abduction (SAb), shoulder external rotation (SER), hip abduction (HAb), and hip extension (HEx). Independent t-tests were used to compare the normalized torques between groups. No significant differences were found between groups. Shoulder strength gains did not differ between groups (SAb p>0.05; SER p>0.05). Hip strength gains did not differ between groups (HAb p>0.05; HEx p>0.05). Both groups increased strength due to individual supervision, constantly evaluating degree of difficulty associated with exercise and providing feedback while using elastic resistance. Using a LC is as effective as supervised training and could provide value in a clinic setting when patients are working unsupervised.

  13. Urinary Phthalates and Increased Insulin Resistance in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Spanier, Adam J.; Sathyanarayana, Sheela; Attina, Teresa M.; Blustein, Jan

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Di-2-ethylhexylphthalate (DEHP) is an environmental chemical commonly found in processed foods. Phthalate exposures, in particular to DEHP, have been associated with insulin resistance in adults, but have not been studied in adolescents. METHODS: Using cross-sectional data from 766 fasting 12- to 19-year-olds in the 2003–2008 NHANES, we examined associations of phthalate metabolites with continuous and categorical measures of homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). RESULTS: Controlling for demographic and behavioral factors, diet, continuous age, BMI category, and urinary creatinine, for each log (roughly threefold) increase in DEHP metabolites, a 0.27 increase (95% confidence interval 0.14–0.40; P < .001) in HOMA-IR was identified. Compared with the first tertile of DEHP metabolite in the study population (14.5% insulin resistant), the third tertile had 21.6% prevalence (95% confidence interval 17.2%–26.0%; P = .02). Associations persisted despite controlling for bisphenol A, another endocrine-disrupting chemical commonly found in foods, and HOMA-IR and insulin resistance were not significantly associated with metabolites of lower molecular weight phthalates commonly found in cosmetics and other personal care products. CONCLUSIONS: Urinary DEHP concentrations were associated with increased insulin resistance in this cross-sectional study of adolescents. This study cannot rule out the possibility that insulin-resistant children ingest food with higher phthalate content, or that insulin-resistant children excrete more DEHP. PMID:23958772

  14. Demonstration of reduced radiation losses in hohlraums made from cocktail mixtures by measuring increased radiation temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Schein, J; Rosen, M; Suter, L; Wallace, R; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Campbell, K; Gunther, J; Hammel, B; Landen, O; Sores, C; Olson, R; Rochau, G; Wilkens, H; Kaae, J; Kilkenny, J; Nikroo, A; Regan, S; Meyerhoffer, D

    2006-11-03

    We present results from experiments, numerical simulations, and analytic modeling that demonstrate enhanced radiation confinement of hohlraums made from cocktail materials. We summarize the results from several previous planar sample experiments that showed the potential promise of cocktails. We then discuss a series of more recent hohlraum experiments that attempted to demonstrate enhanced radiation confinement. Once we understood the importance of oxygen contamination in increasing the specific heat and wall losses of uranium-based cocktails, we implemented new manufacturing and handling techniques for cocktail hohlraums that led to our demonstration of a significant increase in radiation temperature (up to +7eV at 300 eV) compared to a pure Au hohlraum. This data agrees well with modeling and suggests we can expect an 18% reduction in wall loss (and 10% reduction in laser energy) for the current ignition design by switching to cocktail hohlraums.

  15. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

    PubMed

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general diversity patterns, despite increased mutation levels at the single

  16. Effects of intracellular Mn on the radiation resistance of the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kimberly M; Yu, Jerry; Robinson, Courtney K; Noboru, Tomiya; Lee, Yuan C; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2013-05-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) is of particular interest in biology because its exposure results in severe oxidative stress to the cell's macromolecules. Our recent work with extremophiles supports the idea that IR resistance is most likely achieved by a metabolic route, effected by manganese (Mn) antioxidants. Biochemical analysis of "super-IR resistant" mutants of H. salinarum, evolved over multiple cycles of exposure to high doses of IR, confirmed the key role for Mn antioxidants in the IR resistance of this organism. Analysis of the proteome of H. salinarum "super-IR resistant" mutants revealed increased expression for proteins involved in energy metabolism, replenishing the cell with reducing equivalents depleted by the oxidative stress inflicted by IR. Maintenance of redox homeostasis was also activated by the over-expression of coenzyme biosynthesis pathways involved in redox reactions. We propose that in H. salinarum, increased tolerance to IR is a combination of metabolic regulatory adjustments and the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes.

  17. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes.

    PubMed

    Isbell, Forest; Craven, Dylan; Connolly, John; Loreau, Michel; Schmid, Bernhard; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bezemer, T Martijn; Bonin, Catherine; Bruelheide, Helge; de Luca, Enrica; Ebeling, Anne; Griffin, John N; Guo, Qinfeng; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Lanta, Vojtěch; Manning, Pete; Meyer, Sebastian T; Mori, Akira S; Naeem, Shahid; Niklaus, Pascal A; Polley, H Wayne; Reich, Peter B; Roscher, Christiane; Seabloom, Eric W; Smith, Melinda D; Thakur, Madhav P; Tilman, David; Tracy, Benjamin F; van der Putten, Wim H; van Ruijven, Jasper; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Wilsey, Brian; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-10-22

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against climate extremes, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Early results suggested that the ecosystem productivity of diverse grassland plant communities was more resistant, changing less during drought, and more resilient, recovering more quickly after drought, than that of depauperate communities. However, subsequent experimental tests produced mixed results. Here we use data from 46 experiments that manipulated grassland plant diversity to test whether biodiversity provides resistance during and resilience after climate events. We show that biodiversity increased ecosystem resistance for a broad range of climate events, including wet or dry, moderate or extreme, and brief or prolonged events. Across all studies and climate events, the productivity of low-diversity communities with one or two species changed by approximately 50% during climate events, whereas that of high-diversity communities with 16-32 species was more resistant, changing by only approximately 25%. By a year after each climate event, ecosystem productivity had often fully recovered, or overshot, normal levels of productivity in both high- and low-diversity communities, leading to no detectable dependence of ecosystem resilience on biodiversity. Our results suggest that biodiversity mainly stabilizes ecosystem productivity, and productivity-dependent ecosystem services, by increasing resistance to climate events. Anthropogenic environmental changes that drive biodiversity loss thus seem likely to decrease ecosystem stability, and restoration of biodiversity to increase it, mainly by changing the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate events.

  18. Biodiversity increases the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isbell, Forest; Craven, Dylan; Connolly, John; Loreau, Michel; Schmid, Bernhard; Beierkuhnlein, Carl; Bezemer, T. Martijn; Bonin, Catherine; Bruelheide, Helge; de Luca, Enrica; Ebeling, Anne; Griffin, John N.; Guo, Qinfeng; Hautier, Yann; Hector, Andy; Jentsch, Anke; Kreyling, Jürgen; Lanta, Vojtěch; Manning, Pete; Meyer, Sebastian T.; Mori, Akira S.; Naeem, Shahid; Niklaus, Pascal A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Reich, Peter B.; Roscher, Christiane; Seabloom, Eric W.; Smith, Melinda D.; Thakur, Madhav P.; Tilman, David; Tracy, Benjamin F.; van der Putten, Wim H.; van Ruijven, Jasper; Weigelt, Alexandra; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wilsey, Brian; Eisenhauer, Nico

    2015-10-01

    It remains unclear whether biodiversity buffers ecosystems against climate extremes, which are becoming increasingly frequent worldwide. Early results suggested that the ecosystem productivity of diverse grassland plant communities was more resistant, changing less during drought, and more resilient, recovering more quickly after drought, than that of depauperate communities. However, subsequent experimental tests produced mixed results. Here we use data from 46 experiments that manipulated grassland plant diversity to test whether biodiversity provides resistance during and resilience after climate events. We show that biodiversity increased ecosystem resistance for a broad range of climate events, including wet or dry, moderate or extreme, and brief or prolonged events. Across all studies and climate events, the productivity of low-diversity communities with one or two species changed by approximately 50% during climate events, whereas that of high-diversity communities with 16-32 species was more resistant, changing by only approximately 25%. By a year after each climate event, ecosystem productivity had often fully recovered, or overshot, normal levels of productivity in both high- and low-diversity communities, leading to no detectable dependence of ecosystem resilience on biodiversity. Our results suggest that biodiversity mainly stabilizes ecosystem productivity, and productivity-dependent ecosystem services, by increasing resistance to climate events. Anthropogenic environmental changes that drive biodiversity loss thus seem likely to decrease ecosystem stability, and restoration of biodiversity to increase it, mainly by changing the resistance of ecosystem productivity to climate events.

  19. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-10

    cellular damge caused by ionizing radiation and ultraviolet light. Deinococcus radiodurans; Lactobacillus plantarurn; cyanobacteria ; radiation...6 3. K. S. Makarova and MICHAEL J. DALY (2010) Comparative genomics of stress response systems in Deinococcus bacteria. Bacterial Stress Responses...In Press) Abstract | The prospect of comparative genomics resolving the seemingly paradoxical mechanism of extreme radiation resistance in

  20. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    SciTech Connect

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  1. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening.

    PubMed

    Kimme-Smith, C; Bassett, L W; Gold, R H; Chow, S

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  2. Resistance of platelet proteins to effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Prodouz, K.N.; Habraken, J.W.; Moroff, G. )

    1990-12-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood components prevents lymphocyte-induced graft-versus-host disease after transfusion in immunocompromised individuals. In this report we demonstrate the resistance of blood platelet proteins to gamma radiation-induced protein cleavage and aggregate formation when platelet concentrates were treated with a dose of 5000 rad. Results of one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total platelet protein and cytoskeletal protein preparations indicate that platelet proteins are neither cleaved nor cross-linked under these conditions of irradiation. These results support those of a previous study that documented the lack of any adverse effect of 5000 rad gamma radiation on in vitro platelet properties.

  3. Evaluation of the role of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in the radiation resistance of Deinococcus.

    PubMed

    Shashidhar, Ravindranath; Kumar, Sanjukta A; Misra, Hari S; Bandekar, Jayant R

    2010-03-01

    Antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant metabolites appear to have different roles in the oxidative stress resistance responses of radiation-resistant bacteria belonging to the Deinococcus-Thermus group. Twelve distinct strains belonging to 7 Deinococcus species were characterized for their responses to hydrogen peroxide, ciprofloxacin, and ionizing radiation. The levels of catalase and peroxidase activities in these strains showed a positive correlation with resistance to hydrogen peroxide and ciprofloxacin. However, the levels of these enzymes and carotenoids did not appear to contribute significantly to radiation resistance. Our findings support the idea that enzymatic defense systems are not sufficient to account for the extreme radiation resistance of Deinococcus species. Consistent with previously published reports, the Deinococcus strains had high intracellular manganese/iron ratios. No significant correlation was found between intracellular manganese/iron ratios and radiation resistance within different Deinococcus species, suggesting that other components are involved in conferring radiation resistance.

  4. A Novel Radiation-Induced p53 Mutation Is Not Implicated in Radiation Resistance via a Dominant-Negative Effect

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yunguang; Myers, Carey Jeanne; Dicker, Adam Paul; Lu, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the mutations that confer radiation resistance is crucial to developing mechanisms to subvert this resistance. Here we describe the creation of a radiation resistant cell line and characterization of a novel p53 mutation. Treatment with 20 Gy radiation was used to induce mutations in the H460 lung cancer cell line; radiation resistance was confirmed by clonogenic assay. Limited sequencing was performed on the resistant cells created and compared to the parent cell line, leading to the identification of a novel mutation (del) at the end of the DNA binding domain of p53. Levels of p53, phospho-p53, p21, total caspase 3 and cleaved caspase 3 in radiation resistant cells and the radiation susceptible (parent) line were compared, all of which were found to be similar. These patterns held true after analysis of p53 overexpression in H460 cells; however, H1299 cells transfected with mutant p53 did not express p21, whereas those given WT p53 produced a significant amount, as expected. A luciferase assay demonstrated the inability of mutant p53 to bind its consensus elements. An MTS assay using H460 and H1299 cells transfected with WT or mutant p53 showed that the novel mutation did not improve cell survival. In summary, functional characterization of a radiation-induced p53 mutation in the H460 lung cancer cell line does not implicate it in the development of radiation resistance. PMID:24558369

  5. Radiation resistance of electro-optic polymer-based modulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Nichter, James E.; Nash, Fazio D.; Haas, Franz; Szep, Attila A.; Michalak, Richard J.; Flusche, Brian M.; Cook, Paul R.; McEwen, Tom A.; McKeon, Brian F.; Payson, Paul M.; Brost, George A.; Pirich, Andrew R.; Castaneda, Carlos; Tsap, Boris; Fetterman, Harold R.

    2005-05-01

    Mach-Zehnder interferometric electro-optic polymer modulators composed of highly nonlinear phenyltetraene bridge-type chromophores within an amorphous polycarbonate host matrix were investigated for their resistance to gamma rays and 25.6 MeV protons. No device failures were observed and the majority of irradiated modulators exhibited decreases in half-wave voltage and optical insertion losses compared to nonirradiated control samples undergoing aging processes. Irradiated device responses were attributed to scission, cross-linking, and free volume processes. The data suggests that strongly poled devices are less likely to de-pole under the influence of ionizing radiation.

  6. Thermal instability of a radiative and resistive coronal plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sparks, L.; Van Hoven, G.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal instability is believed to determine the evolution and formation of cool structures in the solar atmosphere such as the transition region and prominences (or filaments). The linear modes that arise in a sheared, force-free, magnetic field due to thermal instability are studied numerically. Previous studies have considered separately modes that arise due to the effects of radiation, compression, anisotropic thermal conduction, and ohmic heating. Here the results of such studies are integrated, first by presenting simple arguments that illustrate the essential physics of ideal, sheared-field, condensation modes, and second by showing numerically how finite resistivity affects the condensational instability in parameter regimes applicable to the solar corona.

  7. Does EMT Contribute to Radiation Resistance in Human Breast Cancer?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    to radiation. For this we will use a CDH1 (E-cadherin gene) expression vector from OriGene Technologies Inc. This vector has the cDNA for CDH1 ...control vector, we will excise out the CDH1 gene and use the re-ligated backbone vector to prepare cells stably expressing the control vector. The...MDA-MB-231 cells with the pTet- On-Advanced vector and select G418 resistant cells. We will insert the cDNA for CDH1 into the pTRE- Tight vector and

  8. Extremophiles: radiation resistance microbial reserves and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Singh, O V; Gabani, P

    2011-04-01

    Micro-organisms with the ability to survive in extreme environmental conditions are known as 'extremophiles'. Currently, extremophiles have caused a sensation in the biotechnology/pharmaceutical industries with their novel compounds, known as 'extremolytes'. The potential applications of extremolytes are being investigated for human therapeutics including anticancer drugs, antioxidants, cell cycle-blocking agents, anticholesteric drugs, etc. It is hypothesized that the majority of ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-resistant micro-organisms can be used to develop anticancer drugs to prevent skin damage from UVR. The metabolites from UVR-resistant microbes are a great source of potential therapeutic applications in humans. This article aims to discuss the potentials of extremolytes along with their therapeutic implications of UVR extremophiles. The major challenges of therapeutic development using extremophiles are also discussed. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Increased metacyclogenesis of antimony-resistant Leishmania donovani clinical lines.

    PubMed

    Ouakad, M; Vanaerschot, M; Rijal, S; Sundar, S; Speybroeck, N; Kestens, L; Boel, L; De Doncker, S; Maes, I; Decuypere, S; Dujardin, J-C

    2011-09-01

    Mathematical models predict that the future of epidemics of drug-resistant pathogens depends in part on the competitive fitness of drug-resistant strains. Considering metacyclogenesis (differentiation process essential for infectivity) as a major contributor to the fitness of Leishmania donovani, we tested its relationship with pentavalent antimony (SbV) resistance in clinical lines. Different methods for the assessment of metacyclogenesis were cross-validated: gene expression profiling (META1 and SHERP), morphometry (microscopy and FACS), in vitro infectivity to macrophages and resistance to complement lysis. This was done on a model constituted by 2 pairs of reference strains cloned from a SbV-resistant and -sensitive isolate. We selected the most adequate parameter and extended the analysis of metacyclogenesis diversity to a sample of 20 clinical lines with different in vitro susceptibility to the drug. The capacity of metacyclogenesis, as measured by the complement lysis test, was shown to be significantly higher in SbV-resistant clinical lines of L. donovani than in SbV-sensitive lines. Together with other lines of evidence, it is concluded that L. donovani constitutes a unique example and model of drug-resistant pathogens with traits of increased fitness. These findings raise a fundamental question about the potential risks of selecting more virulent pathogens through massive chemotherapeutic interventions.

  10. Improved ozone resistance of styrene-butadiene rubber cured by a combination of sulfur and ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basfar, A. A.; Silverman, Joseph

    1995-09-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) studies performed in this work indicate that high ozone resistance of Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) formulations cured by a combination of sulfur and ionizing radiation is associated with unusually high vinyl concentration. On the other hand, sulfur cured SBR formulations with low vinyl concentration have poor ozone resistance. Curing with peroxides which involves chemistry similar to that of radiation curing, also leads to high vinyl concentration (relative to sulfur curing) and high ozone resistance. Increasing the absorbed dose in sulfur-radiation cured samples decreased the high vinyl content to a point where the ozone resistance declined greatly. Carbon black was shown to reduce the absorption of both the transvinylene and the vinyl unsaturation groups, but not to the same extent in all formulations. Also, The carbon black seems to play a greater role in the absorption of the unsaturation as sulfur increases.

  11. Increasing antimicrobial resistance and narrowing therapeutics in typhoidal salmonellae.

    PubMed

    Kaurthe, Jaspal

    2013-03-01

    Multidrug-resistant typhoid fever (MDRTF) is a major public health problem in developing countries and is an emerging problem in the developed world. Because of the difficulties in preventing typhoid by public health measures or immunization in developing countries, great reliance is placed on antimicrobial chemotherapy. The treatment should commence as soon as the clinical diagnosis is made rather than after the results of antimicrobial susceptibility tests but the existence of MDRTF poses a serious clinical dilemma in the selection of empiric antimicrobial therapy. With the widespread emergence and spread of strains resistant to chloramphenicol, ampicillin and trimethoprim, ciprofloxacin became the drug of choice for the treatment of typhoid fever. However, of late the efficacy of fluoroquinolones too has been questioned, mainly due to increasing reports of increasing defervescence time and poor patient response. This indicates that the organism has begun to develop resistance to fluoroquinolones, and is corroborated by a steady increase in Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin. The therapeutics of ciprofloxacin-resistant enteric fever narrows down to third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins and azithromycin. However, the emergence of extended-spectrum b-lactamases (ESBLs) in typhoidal Salmonellae poses a new challenge and would greatly limit the therapeutic options leaving only tigecycline and carbepenems as secondary antimicrobial drugs. This increasing resistance is alarming and emphasizes the need of effective preventive measures to control typhoid and to limit the unnecessary use of antibiotics.

  12. Mechanisms of linear energy transfer-dependent radiation resistance in myeloid leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haro, Kurtis John

    Ionizing radiations (IRs) of high linear energy transfer (LET), such as alpha particles, produce fundamentally different forms of DNA damage in cells than conventional low LET radiation, such as gamma rays. Alpha particle therapies have recently emerged as important potential treatments of cancer, particularly for relatively easily-accessible malignancies of the hematopoietic system. Therefore, we created stable radioresistant myeloid leukemia HL60 cell clones derived after irradiation from either gamma rays (RG) or alpha particles (RA) in order to understand whether resistance to high LET (IR) was possible and the potential differences in radioresistance that could arise from radiations of different LET. Repeated irradiations yielded radioresistant HL60 clones and, regardless of derivation, displayed similar levels of resistance to IR of either type of radiation. The resistant phenotype in each type of radioresistant clone was driven by similar, multifactorial changes that included significant reductions in apoptosis, a decreased late G2/M checkpoint accumulation that was indicative of increased genomic instability, as well as more robust repair of specific types of DNA lesions that included DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The relative changes in resistance to alpha particles, however, were substantially lower than the increase in resistance to gamma rays. The data suggest that these processes were interdependent, as inhibition of homology directed repair in the resistant clones sensitized them to gamma IR to a larger extent than naive HL60 cells. Finally, we identified the downregulation of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1) in gamma-resistant cells but not in alpha-resistant cells. Short-hairpin RNA-mediated reductions in expression of IRP1 in radiation-naive HL60 cells led to significant radioresistance to gamma rays, but not alpha particles. The IRP1-mediated radioresistance was associated with changes in iron-mediated oxidative stress that led to significant

  13. Increased quinolone resistance among typhoid Salmonella isolated from Egyptian patients.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Fatma O I; Ahmed, Hazem A; Khairy, Rasha M M; Abdelwahab, Sayed F

    2014-05-14

    Typhoid fever is endemic in Egypt; and quinolones are the empirical treatment of choice. There are very limited data reporting quinolone resistance among Egyptian typhoidal Salmonella isolates. We previously reported that all typhoidal Salmonella were sensitive to quinolones. This study aimed to isolate and identify typhoidal Salmonella from cases suffering from enteric fever at Minia Governorate, Egypt, determine their quinolone resistance patterns, compare them to those reported 20 years ago, and test gyrA mutation as a possible mechanism for quinolone resistance. Stool samples from Widal-positive subjects were screened by culture on suitable media and were identified biochemically. The identified isolates were tested for resistance against three representatives of the first three quinolone generations, namely nalidixic acid (NAL), levofloxacin (LEV), and norfloxacin (NOR). The gyrA gene was amplified and sequenced to detect point mutation(s) conferring quinolone resistance. Out of 230 stool samples (from patients with Widal anti-O titers of ≥ 1/160), 40 isolates were S. enterica serovar Typhi (97.5%) and Paratyphi A (2.5%). Six (15%) isolates were resistant to at least one of the quinolones, compared to 0% in 1993. In this regard, 15%, 7.5%, and 2.5% of the isolates were resistant to NAL, both NAL and LEV, and all three quinolones tested, respectively. Sequencing of the gyrA gene revealed point mutations at position 83 and/or 87 of the gyrA gene only among the resistant isolates. There has been an increase in quinolone-resistant typhoidal Salmonella in Egypt over time.

  14. Remarkable increase in fluoroquinolone-resistant Mycoplasma genitalium in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Mina; Ito, Shin; Yasuda, Mitsuru; Tsuchiya, Tomohiro; Hatazaki, Kyoko; Takanashi, Masaki; Ezaki, Takayuki; Deguchi, Takashi

    2014-09-01

    We determined the prevalence of macrolide and fluoroquinolone resistance-associated mutations in Mycoplasma genitalium DNA specimens from men with non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) and analysed their effects on antibiotic treatments of M. genitalium infections. In this retrospective study, we examined antibiotic resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA, gyrA and parC genes of M. genitalium and the association of the mutations with microbiological outcomes of antibiotic treatments in men with M. genitalium-positive NGU. No macrolide resistance-associated mutations in the 23S rRNA gene were observed in 27 M. genitalium DNA specimens in 2011 and in 24 in 2012. However, 5 of 17 in 2013 had 23S rRNA mutations. Three of 15 in 2011, 6 of 19 in 2012 and 8 of 17 in 2013 had fluoroquinolone resistance-associated alterations in ParC. Three in 2013 had both the antibiotic resistance-associated alterations coincidentally. In two men with M. genitalium harbouring 23S rRNA mutations, the mycoplasma persisted after treatment with a regimen of 2 g of extended-release azithromycin (AZM-SR) once daily for 1 day. All nine men with mycoplasma harbouring ParC alterations were microbiologically cured with a regimen of 100 mg of sitafloxacin twice daily for 7 days. Macrolide- or fluoroquinolone-resistant M. genitalium appears to be increasing, and the increase in fluoroquinolone-resistant mycoplasmas is especially remarkable in Japan. Mycoplasmas harbouring 23S rRNA mutations would be resistant to the AZM-SR regimen, but those harbouring ParC alterations would still be susceptible to the sitafloxacin regimen. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Sealing Force Increasing of ACM Gasket through Electron Beam Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, D. J.; Batalha, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Rubber is an engineering material largely used as sealing parts, in form of O-rings, solid gaskets and liquid gaskets, materials applied in liquid state with posterior vulcanization and sealing. Stress relaxation is a rubber characteristic which impacts negatively in such industrial applications (rings and solid gaskets). This work has the purpose to investigate the use of electron beam radiation (EB) as a technology able to decrease the stress relaxation in acrylic rubber (ACM), consequently increasing the sealing capability of this material. ACM samples were irradiated with dose of 100 kGy and 250 kGy, its behavior was comparatively investigated using, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and compression stress relaxation (CSR) experiments. The results obtained by DMA shown an increase of Tg and changes in dynamic mechanical behavior.

  16. Increased OLED radiative efficiency using a directive optical antenna.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, S; Blair, S

    2010-08-02

    We investigate the improvement in efficiency of organic light emitting diodes/displays (OLEDs) by embedding a typical OLED structure within a metallic patch grating resonator. A patch grating resonator is similar to the more familiar Fabry-Perot resonator, except that one mirror of the resonator is a metallic patch grating with a pitch approximately lambda /2 that reduces lateral propagation of radiative emission. FDTD simulations of the proposed structure indicate a potential 71% increase in emitted power over that of a reference OLED structure, and an additional 5% gain from adding an ITO spacer adjacent to the metallic electrode layer (for a total 76% increase). Implementation of this structure requires little to no modification of the OLED manufacturing process.

  17. Development of High-Fiber-Volume, Radiation-Resistant, Hig-Pressure Laminates for Cryogenic Applications

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Reed

    2001-04-15

    Three new composite laminates have been developed for use as structural supports, thermal insulation in cryogenic and radiation environments. Boron-free, woven glass cloth has been preimpregnated with three types of resin systems. The organic resin systems are multifunctional and are much less sensitive to radiation than the epoxy systems used in G-10CR and G-11CR. The laminates are fabricated by curing the preimpregnated glass cloth under high pressure to produce higher glass content (70-74 vol. %). Higher glass content is beneficial because (1) it increases the laminate strength and stiffness; (2) it leads to more isotropic composite properties; and (3) it increases the overall radiation resistance because half and the amount of organic resin content is used. The cost of at least one of the laminates is comparable to that of G-10CR. Elastic, short-beam shear, thermal contraction, and flexural properties have been measured.

  18. Studies of antibiotic resistant mutants of Bacteroides fragilis obtained by Cs-137 ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Azghani, A.O.

    1986-01-01

    The genus Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobic bacillus normally found in the upper respiratory tract, the colon, and the genitourinary system. The project reported here was undertaken because of the high frequency of hospital infections attributed to B. fragilis, and the increased resistance of the bacteria to commonly used antibiotics. Cs-137 gamma irradiation was used to induce antibiotic resistant mutants in B. fragilis in the presence of Escherichia coli B/r membrane fragments, employed as reducing agent. Based on a dose-survival curve, an effective radiation dose of 1.54 x 10/sup 4/R (3.99 C/Kg) was used to induce mutations to rifampicin and tetracycline resistance in the test organism. The antibiotic resistant mutants of B. fragilis were utilized to reveal the mechanism by which this group of organisms becomes resistant to select chemotherapeutic agents. Studies on tetracycline resistant mutants of B. fragilis isolated after irradiation, suggest that the resistance to this antibiotic is associated with the outer membrane permeability. The difference in inhibitory action of rifampicin on RNA polymerase activity, from rifampicin sensitive and resistant strains of B. fragilis, reveals that this enzyme is a possible suitable target for inhibition of bacterial growth in anaerobes by rifampicin.

  19. Down-regulation of PERK enhances resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Oommen, Deepu Prise, Kevin M.

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •PERK enhances the sensitivity of cancer cells to ionizing radiation. •Down-regulation of PERK results in enhanced DNA repair. •Ionizing radiation-induced apoptosis is inhibited in PERK-down regulated cancer cells. -- Abstract: Although, ionizing radiation (IR) has been implicated to cause stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), how ER stress signaling and major ER stress sensors modulate cellular response to IR is unclear. Protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is an ER transmembrane protein which initiates unfolded protein response (UPR) or ER stress signaling when ER homeostasis is disturbed. Here, we report that down-regulation of PERK resulted in increased clonogenic survival, enhanced DNA repair and reduced apoptosis in irradiated cancer cells. Our study demonstrated that PERK has a role in sensitizing cancer cells to IR.

  20. Increasing antimicrobial resistance among Shigella isolates in the Bushehr, Iran.

    PubMed

    Gharibi, O; Zangene, S; Mohammadi, N; Mirzaei, K; Karimi, A; Gharibi, A; Khajehiean, A

    2012-02-01

    Antibiotics are drugs used for treatment of infections caused by bacteria. Misuse and overuse of these drugs have contributed to phenomena known as antibiotic resistance. In this research, the antimicrobial resistance of the Shigella has been determined. This descriptive research analyzed registered laboratory data of patients referred to Fatemeh Zahra Hospital of the Bushehr, Iran. Shigella was isolated from their cultured sample from the year 2002-2008. In this study, the total of 121 registered Shigella collected from 2002-2008 were analyzed. There were 62 cases of S. sonnei, 46 cases of S. flexneri, eight cases of S. boydii and five cases of S. dysenteriae among them. Furthermore, two cases of Shigella sonnei were collected from the blood and the rest from the watery stools of the infected patients. The following is the resistance pattern of these organisms; to ciprofloxacin, 4.25%; ceftizoxime, 8.62%; nalidixic acid, 12.12%; co-trimoxazole, 86.13% and to tetracycline, 93.02%. Results ofantibiogram showed that highest rate of drug resistance belongs to tetracycline and co-trimoxazole and the lowest belongs to ciprofloxacin and ceftizoxime. One of the important issue for clinicians, now a day is drug resistance of microorganisms. This phenomenon is increasing due to some factors such as improper use of antibiotics and irrational prescribing. These factors lead to development of new drug resistant species.

  1. Accelerated Radiation-Damping for Increased Spin Equilibrium (ARISE)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Susie Y.; Witzel, Thomas; Wald, Lawrence L.

    2008-01-01

    Control of the longitudinal magnetization in fast gradient echo sequences is an important factor enabling the high efficiency of balanced Steady State Free Precession (bSSFP) sequences. We introduce a new method for accelerating the return of the longitudinal magnetization to the +z-axis that is independent of externally applied RF pulses and shows improved off-resonance performance. The Accelerated Radiation damping for Increased Spin Equilibrium (ARISE) method uses an external feedback circuit to strengthen the Radiation Damping (RD) field. The enhanced RD field rotates the magnetization back to the +z-axis at a rate faster than T1 relaxation. The method is characterized in gradient echo phantom imaging at 3T as a function of feedback gain, phase, and duration and compared with results from numerical simulations of the Bloch equations incorporating RD. A short period of feedback (10ms) during a refocused interval of a crushed gradient echo sequence allowed greater than 99% recovery of the longitudinal magnetization when very little T2 relaxation has time to occur. Appropriate applications might include improving navigated sequences. Unlike conventional flip-back schemes, the ARISE “flip-back” is generated by the spins themselves, thereby offering a potentially useful building block for enhancing gradient echo sequences. PMID:18956463

  2. Cisplatin-resistant cells express increased levels of a factor that recognizes damaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, G.; Chang, E. )

    1990-05-01

    Cancer treatment with the drug cisplatin is often thwarted by the emergence of drug-resistant cells. To study this phenomenon, the authors identified two independent cellular factors that recognize cisplatin-damaged DNA. One of the two factors, designated XPE binding factor, is deficient in complementation group E of xeroderma pigmentosum, an inherited disease characterized by defective repair of DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation, cisplatin, and other agents. Human tumor cell lines selected for resistance to cisplatin showed more efficient DNA repair and increased expression of XPE binding factor. These results suggest that XPE binding factor may be responsible, at least in part, for the development of cisplatin resistance in human tumors and that the mechanism may be increased DNA repair.

  3. Estimation of Radiation Resistance Values of Microorganisms in Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Anellis, Abe; Werkowski, Stanley

    1968-01-01

    Several statistical methods, including the conventional technique of Schmidt and Nank, were evaluated for estimating radiation resistance values of various strains of Clostridium botulinum by the use of partial spoilage data from an inoculated ham pack study. Procedures based on quantal response were preferred. The tedious but rigorous probit maximum likelihood determination was used as a standard of comparison. Weibull's graphical treatment was the method of choice because it is simple to utilize, it is mathematically sound, and its ld50 values agreed closely with the reference standard. In addition, it offers a means for analyzing the type of microbial death kinetics that occur in the pack (exponential, normal, log normal, or mixed distributions), and it predicts the probability of microbial death with any radiation dose used, as well as the dose needed to destroy any given number of organisms, without the need to assume the death pattern of the partial spoilage data. The Weibull analysis indicated a normal type kinetics of death for C. botulinum spores in irradiated cured ham rather than an exponential order of death, as assumed by the Schmidt-Nank formula. The Weibull 12D equivalent of a radiation process, or the minimal radiation dose (MRD), for cured ham was consistently higher than both the experimental sterilizing dose (ESD) and the Schmidt-Nank average MRD. The latter calculation was lower than the ESD in three of the five instances examined, which seems unrealistic. The Spearman-Kärber estimate was favored as the arithmetic technique on the bases of ease of computation, close agreement with the reference method, and providing confidence limits for the ld50 values. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:4877658

  4. Estimation of radiation resistance values of microorganisms in food products.

    PubMed

    Anellis, A; Werkowski, S

    1968-09-01

    Several statistical methods, including the conventional technique of Schmidt and Nank, were evaluated for estimating radiation resistance values of various strains of Clostridium botulinum by the use of partial spoilage data from an inoculated ham pack study. Procedures based on quantal response were preferred. The tedious but rigorous probit maximum likelihood determination was used as a standard of comparison. Weibull's graphical treatment was the method of choice because it is simple to utilize, it is mathematically sound, and its ld(50) values agreed closely with the reference standard. In addition, it offers a means for analyzing the type of microbial death kinetics that occur in the pack (exponential, normal, log normal, or mixed distributions), and it predicts the probability of microbial death with any radiation dose used, as well as the dose needed to destroy any given number of organisms, without the need to assume the death pattern of the partial spoilage data. The Weibull analysis indicated a normal type kinetics of death for C. botulinum spores in irradiated cured ham rather than an exponential order of death, as assumed by the Schmidt-Nank formula. The Weibull 12D equivalent of a radiation process, or the minimal radiation dose (MRD), for cured ham was consistently higher than both the experimental sterilizing dose (ESD) and the Schmidt-Nank average MRD. The latter calculation was lower than the ESD in three of the five instances examined, which seems unrealistic. The Spearman-Kärber estimate was favored as the arithmetic technique on the bases of ease of computation, close agreement with the reference method, and providing confidence limits for the ld(50) values.

  5. Radiation-resistant erbium-doped-nanoparticles optical fiber for space applications.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jérémie; Myara, Mikhaël; Troussellier, Laurent; Burov, Ekaterina; Pastouret, Alain; Boivin, David; Mélin, Gilles; Gilard, Olivier; Sotom, Michel; Signoret, Philippe

    2012-01-30

    We demonstrate for the first time a radiation-resistant Erbium-Doped Fiber exhibiting performances that can fill the requirements of Erbium-Doped Fiber Amplifiers for space applications. This is based on an Aluminum co-doping atom reduction enabled by Nanoparticules Doping-Process. For this purpose, we developed several fibers containing very different erbium and aluminum concentrations, and tested them in the same optical amplifier configuration. This work allows to bring to the fore a highly radiation resistant Erbium-doped pure silica optical fiber exhibiting a low quenching level. This result is an important step as the EDFA is increasingly recognized as an enabling technology for the extensive use of photonic sub-systems in future satellites.

  6. Low-temperature radiation-resistant material for ball-bearing retainers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desau, P. O.; Emmons, W. F.

    1970-01-01

    Radiation resistant material, made of polyimide polymers and S-glass cloth, is used in ball bearing retainers for extreme environments. Material displays satisfactory wear resistance, lubricity, and stability. Results of comparative tests with fluorocarbon materials are given.

  7. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has been known to be highly radiation resistant and has been found in fatal radioactive environments such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the radiation resistance phenotype of C. neoformans, we identified genes affected by gamma radiation through genome-wide transcriptome analysis and characterized their functions. We found that genes involved in DNA damage repair systems were upregulated in response to gamma radiation. Particularly, deletion of recombinase RAD51 and two DNA-dependent ATPase genes, RAD54 and RDH54, increased cellular susceptibility to both gamma radiation and DNA-damaging agents. A variety of oxidative stress response genes were also upregulated. Among them, sulfiredoxin contributed to gamma radiation resistance in a peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that genes involved in molecular chaperone expression, ubiquitination systems, and autophagy were induced, whereas genes involved in the biosynthesis of proteins and fatty acids/sterols were downregulated. Most importantly, we discovered a number of novel C. neoformans genes, the expression of which was modulated by gamma radiation exposure, and their deletion rendered cells susceptible to gamma radiation exposure, as well as DNA damage insults. Among these genes, we found that a unique transcription factor containing the basic leucine zipper domain, named Bdr1, served as a regulator of the gamma radiation resistance of C. neoformans by controlling expression of DNA repair genes, and its expression was regulated by the evolutionarily conserved DNA damage response protein kinase Rad53. Taken together, the current transcriptome and functional analyses contribute to the understanding of the unique molecular mechanism of the radiation-resistant fungus C. neoformans. PMID:27899501

  8. Risk assessment for the harmful effects of UVB radiation on the immunological resistance to infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Goettsch, W; Garssen, J; Slob, W; de Gruijl, F R; Van Loveren, H

    1998-01-01

    Risk assessment comprises four steps: hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. In this study, the effects of increased ultraviolet B(UVB, 280-315 nm) radiation on immune functions and the immunological resistance to infectious diseases in rats were analyzed according to this strategy. In a parallelogram approach, nonthreshold mathematical methods were used to estimate the risk for the human population after increased exposure to UVB radiation. These data demonstrate, using a worst-case strategy (sensitive individuals, no adaptation), that exposure for approximately 90 min (local noon) at 40 degrees N in July might lead to 50% suppression of specific T-cell mediated responses to Listeria monocytogenes in humans who were not preexposed to UVB (i.e., not adapted). Additionally, a 5% decrease in the thickness of the ozone layer might shorten this exposure time by approximately 2.5%. These data demonstrate that UVB radiation, at doses relevant to outdoor exposure, may affect the specific cellular immune response to Listeria bacteria in humans. Whether this will also lead to a lowered resistance (i.e.,increased pathogenic load) in humans is not known, although it was demonstrated that UVB-induced immunosuppression in rats was sufficient to increase the pathogenic load. Epidemiology studies are needed to validate and improve estimates for the potential effects of increased UVB exposure on infectious diseases in humans. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9435148

  9. Radiation-resistant B-1 cells: A possible initiating cells of neoplastic transformation.

    PubMed

    Guimarães-Cunha, Caroline Ferreira; Alvares-Saraiva, Anuska Marcelino; de Souza Apostolico, Juliana; Popi, Ana Flavia

    2016-07-01

    The role of B-1 cells in the hyperproliferative hematologic disease has been described. Several reports bring evidences that B-1 cells are the main cell population in the chronic lymphatic leukemia. It is also described that these cells have an important involvement in the lupus erythematous systemic. The murine model used to investigate both disease models is NZB/NZW. Data from literature point that mutation in micro-RNA 15a and 16 are the responsible for the B-1 hyperplasia in these mice. Interestingly, it was demonstrated that NZB/NZW B-1 cells are radioresistant, contrariwise to observe in other mouse lineage derived B-1 cells and B-2 cells. However, some reports bring evidences that a small percentage of B-1 cells in healthy mice are also able to survive to irradiation. Herein, we aim to investigate the malignant potential of ionizing-radiation resistant B-1 cells in vitro. Our main goal is to establish a model that mimics the neoplastic transformation originate to a damage exposure of DNA, and not only related to intrinsic mutations. Data shown here demonstrated that radiation-resistant B-1 cells were able to survive long periods in culture. Further, these cells show proliferation index increase in relation to non-irradiated B-1 cells. In addition, radiation resistant B-1 cells showed hyperploid, morphologic alterations, increased induction of apoptosis after anti-IgM stimulation. Based on these results, we could suggest that radiation resistant B-1 cells showed some modifications in that could be related to induction of malignant potential.

  10. Plant adaptogens increase lifespan and stress resistance in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Wiegant, F A C; Surinova, S; Ytsma, E; Langelaar-Makkinje, M; Wikman, G; Post, J A

    2009-02-01

    Extracts of plant adaptogens such as Eleutherococcus senticosus (or Acanthopanax senticosus) and Rhodiola rosea can increase stress resistance in several model systems. We now show that both extracts also increase the mean lifespan of the nematode C. elegans in a dose-dependent way. In at least four independent experiments, 250 microg/ml Eleutherococcus (SHE-3) and 10-25 microg/ml Rhodiola (SHR-5) significantly increased life span between 10 and 20% (P < 0.001), increased the maximum lifespan with 2-3 days and postponed the moment when the first individuals in a population die, suggesting a modulation of the ageing process. With higher concentrations, less effect was observed, whereas at the highest concentrations tested (2500 microg/ml Eleutherococcus and 250 microg/ml Rhodiola) a lifespan shortening effect was observed of 15-25% (P < 0.001). Both adaptogen extracts were also able to increase stress resistance in C. elegans: against a relatively short heat shock (35 degrees C during 3 h) as well as chronic heat treatment at 26 degrees C. An increase against chronic oxidative stress conditions was observed in mev-1 mutants, and during exposure of the wild type nematode to paraquat (10 mM) or UV stress, be it less efficiently. Concerning the mode of action: both adaptogens induce translocation of the DAF-16 transcription factor from the cytoplasm into the nucleus, suggesting a reprogramming of transcriptional activities favoring the synthesis of proteins involved in stress resistance (such as the chaperone HSP-16) and longevity. Based on these observations, it is suggested that adaptogens are experienced as mild stressors at the lifespan-enhancing concentrations and thereby induce increased stress resistance and a longer lifespan.

  11. Modification of silicone sealant to improve gamma radiation resistance, by addition of protective agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Pérez, Giovanni; Burillo, Guillermina

    2013-09-01

    Poly (dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) sealant (SS) was modified with the addition of different protective compounds to conserve its physical-chemical properties during gamma irradiation. 2-Vinyl naphthalene (2-VN), bisphenol-A (BPA) and poly (vinyl carbazole) (PVK) were used to evaluate radiation protection through the crosslinking effect of radiation. The samples were irradiated with doses from 100 kGy to 500 kGy at room temperature in air, with a 60Co gamma source, and the changes in molecular weight, thermal behavior, elastic properties and infrared spectra (FTIR-ATR) absorbance analysis were determined. The molecular weight of unmodified silicone sealant increases with the absorbed dose because of crosslinking as predominant effect. However, the crosslinking effect was inhibited with the addition of protective agent due to the aromatic compounds present. Modified silicone sealant films present better radiation resistance than unmodified system.

  12. Energetics and the resistive tearing mode - Effects of Joule heating and radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinolfson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The contribution of energy flux to the dynamics of magnetic field reconnection is analytically studied in order to determine the influence of Joule heating and radiation on the linear development of the tearing instability in slab geometry. A temperature-dependent Coulomb-like resistivity is used to provide the coupling between the dynamics and the energy equation. Analytical expressions are derived for the growth rates utilizing constant-psi and long-wavelength approximations. The solutions indicate the occurrence of several modes in addition to the usual tearing mode, several of which have relatively slow, complex growth rates. At large values of the magnetic Reynolds number, there are at least two modes with purely exponential growth when the radiative loss decreases with increasing temperature. If the radiation is neglected, the Joule heating alone also results in two modes with real, positive growth at large S. Below a particular value of S, all the modes are generally stabilized.

  13. Heterochromatin domain number correlates with X-ray and carbon-ion radiation resistance in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsutoshi; Imai, Takashi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Shimokawa, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Although it is known that cancer cells can develop radiation resistance after repeated exposures to X rays, the underlying mechanisms and characteristics of this radiation-induced resistance of cancer cells are not well understood. Additionally, it is not known whether cells that develop X-ray resistance also would develop resistance to other types of radiation such as heavy-ions including carbon ions (C-ion). In this study, we established X-ray resistant cancer cell lines by delivering repeated exposures to X rays, and then assessed whether the cells were resistant to carbon ions. The mouse squamous cell carcinoma cell line, NR-S1, was X irradiated six times with 10 Gy, and the X-ray resistant cancer cells named X60 and ten subclones were established. Significant X-ray resistance was induced in four of the subclones (X60, X60-H2, X60-A3 and X60-B12). The X60 cells and all of the subclones were resistant to carbon ions. The correlation analysis between radioresistance and morphological characteristics of these cells showed that X-ray (R=0.74) and C-ion (R=0.79) resistance correlated strongly with the number of heterochromatin domains. Moreover, the numbers of γ-H2AX foci remaining in irradiated X60 cells and radioresistant subclones X60-A3 and X60-H2 were lower than in the NR-S1 cells after X-ray or C-ion irradiation, indicating that X60 cells and the radioresistant subclones rapidly repaired the DNA double-strand breaks compared with NR-S1 cells. Our findings suggest that the underlying causal mechanisms of X-ray and C-ion radiation resistance may overlap, and that an increase in heterochromatin domain number may be an indicator of X-ray and C-ion resistance.

  14. Synergistic interaction between UVB radiation and temperature increases susceptibility to parasitic infection in a fish

    PubMed Central

    Cramp, Rebecca L.; Reid, Stefanie; Seebacher, Frank; Franklin, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    Levels of UVB radiation (UVB) and mean temperatures have increased substantially over recent decades in many regions of the world. Both stressors independently can compromise immune function, disease resistance and fitness in fish. The impact of UVB can also be exacerbated by interactions with environmental temperatures. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that UVB and temperature act synergistically to influence patterns of energy consumption and susceptibility to disease. We exposed mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, to a factorial design of low and high UVB levels and low (18°C) and high (25°C) temperatures. The combination of high UVB and high temperature interacted synergistically to suppress metabolism and exacerbate infection intensity by the fish pathogen whitespot (Ichtyhophthirius multifiliis). Given the rapid changes in the thermal environment globally, the interaction between UVB and temperatures on energy use and disease resistance could pose significant problems for aquatic animal health in the context of both pre-existing and emerging diseases. PMID:25252833

  15. ABC transporter activity linked to radiation resistance and molecular subtype in pediatric medulloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Wendy J; Crowther, Lisa M; Little, Erica B; Freeman, Ruth; Harliwong, Ivon; Veleva, Desi; Hassall, Timothy E; Remke, Marc; Taylor, Michael D; Hallahan, Andrew R

    2013-10-04

    Resistance to radiation treatment remains a major clinical problem for patients with brain cancer. Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, and occurs in the cerebellum. Though radiation treatment has been critical in increasing survival rates in recent decades, the presence of resistant cells in a substantial number of medulloblastoma patients leads to relapse and death. Using the established medulloblastoma cell lines UW228 and Daoy, we developed a novel model system to enrich for and study radiation tolerant cells early after radiation exposure. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, dead cells and cells that had initiated apoptosis were removed, allowing surviving cells to be investigated before extensive proliferation took place. Isolated surviving cells were tumorigenic in vivo and displayed elevated levels of ABCG2, an ABC transporter linked to stem cell behavior and drug resistance. Further investigation showed another family member, ABCA1, was also elevated in surviving cells in these lines, as well as in early passage cultures from pediatric medulloblastoma patients. We discovered that the multi-ABC transporter inhibitors verapamil and reserpine sensitized cells from particular patients to radiation, suggesting that ABC transporters have a functional role in cellular radiation protection. Additionally, verapamil had an intrinsic anti-proliferative effect, with transient exposure in vitro slowing subsequent in vivo tumor formation. When expression of key ABC transporter genes was assessed in medulloblastoma tissue from 34 patients, levels were frequently elevated compared with normal cerebellum. Analysis of microarray data from independent cohorts (n = 428 patients) showed expression of a number of ABC transporters to be strongly correlated with certain medulloblastoma subtypes, which in turn are associated with clinical outcome. ABC transporter inhibitors are already being trialed clinically, with the aim of decreasing

  16. ABC transporter activity linked to radiation resistance and molecular subtype in pediatric medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resistance to radiation treatment remains a major clinical problem for patients with brain cancer. Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor of childhood, and occurs in the cerebellum. Though radiation treatment has been critical in increasing survival rates in recent decades, the presence of resistant cells in a substantial number of medulloblastoma patients leads to relapse and death. Methods Using the established medulloblastoma cell lines UW228 and Daoy, we developed a novel model system to enrich for and study radiation tolerant cells early after radiation exposure. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, dead cells and cells that had initiated apoptosis were removed, allowing surviving cells to be investigated before extensive proliferation took place. Results Isolated surviving cells were tumorigenic in vivo and displayed elevated levels of ABCG2, an ABC transporter linked to stem cell behavior and drug resistance. Further investigation showed another family member, ABCA1, was also elevated in surviving cells in these lines, as well as in early passage cultures from pediatric medulloblastoma patients. We discovered that the multi-ABC transporter inhibitors verapamil and reserpine sensitized cells from particular patients to radiation, suggesting that ABC transporters have a functional role in cellular radiation protection. Additionally, verapamil had an intrinsic anti-proliferative effect, with transient exposure in vitro slowing subsequent in vivo tumor formation. When expression of key ABC transporter genes was assessed in medulloblastoma tissue from 34 patients, levels were frequently elevated compared with normal cerebellum. Analysis of microarray data from independent cohorts (n = 428 patients) showed expression of a number of ABC transporters to be strongly correlated with certain medulloblastoma subtypes, which in turn are associated with clinical outcome. Conclusions ABC transporter inhibitors are already being

  17. Method for increased sensitivity of radiation detection and measurement

    DOEpatents

    Miller, Steven D.

    1994-01-01

    Dose of radiation to which a body of crystalline material has been exposed is measured by exposing the body to optical radiation at a first wavelength, which is greater than about 540 nm, and measuring optical energy emitted from the body by luminescence at a second wavelength, which is longer than the first wavelength. Reduced background is accomplished by more thorough annealing and enhanced radiation induced luminescence is obtained by treating the crystalline material to coalesce primary damage centers into secondary damage centers.

  18. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05% Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t/sub 50%/). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t/sub 50%/ values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt/sub 50%/) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  19. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  20. The manufacture and properties of radiation resistant laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Benzinger, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    The fusion reactor applications of laminates, especially in the area of superconducting magnets and industrial thermoetting laminates, are large scale and potentially widespread. This study invesitigates several variants of G-10CR and G-11CR laminates with a view toward improving radiation resistance and mechanical strength as well as cost. The particle filler selected for the experiment was quartz (pure Si0/sub 2/); the polyimide variant was a selection from the aromatic diamine bismaleimide family (Kerimid 601); and, to improve both mechanical properties and radiation effects, a satin-style fabric woven from S-2 glass was used to reinforce one of the polyimide variants. The experiment was carried out at Spaulding Fibre Company. It was found that variants of the SCR grade laminants made with S-2 glass provide higher mechanical strength and less residual radioactivity than E-glass laminates. After irradiation it was found that the polyimide variant was less damaged and remained 5 to 10 times stronger than G-10CR and G-11CR epoxides. Results from other programs coincide.

  1. Accumulation of Phosphatidic Acid Increases Vancomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sutterlin, Holly A.; Zhang, Sisi

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contributes to the robust permeability barrier of the outer membrane, preventing entry of toxic molecules such as antibiotics. Mutations in lptD, the beta-barrel component of the LPS transport and assembly machinery, compromise LPS assembly and result in increased antibiotic sensitivity. Here, we report rare vancomycin-resistant suppressors that improve barrier function of a subset of lptD mutations. We find that all seven suppressors analyzed mapped to the essential gene cdsA, which is responsible for the conversion of phosphatidic acid to CDP-diacylglycerol in phospholipid biosynthesis. These cdsA mutations cause a partial loss of function and, as expected, accumulate phosphatidic acid. We show that this suppression is not confined to mutations that cause defects in outer membrane biogenesis but rather that these cdsA mutations confer a general increase in vancomycin resistance, even in a wild-type cell. We use genetics and quadrupole time of flight (Q-TOF) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to show that accumulation of phosphatidic acid by means other than cdsA mutations also increases resistance to vancomycin. We suggest that increased levels of phosphatidic acid change the physical properties of the outer membrane to impede entry of vancomycin into the periplasm, hindering access to its target, an intermediate required for the synthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall. PMID:24957626

  2. Assessment of Resistance of Bacillus Horneckiae Endospores to UV Radiation and Function of Their Extraneous Layer in Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachariah, Malcolm M.; Vaishampayan, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Spore-forming microbes are highly resistant to various physical and chemical conditions, which include ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress, and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary surfaces. The spore's resistance might be due to their metabolically dormant state, and/or by the presence of a series of protective structures that encase the interior-most compartment, the core, which houses the spore chromosome. These spores have multiple layers surrounding the cell that are not found in vegetative cells, and some species have an outer layer of proteins and glycoproteins termed the "exosporium" or a fibrous "extraneous layer" (EL). Bacillus horneckiae is an EL-producing novel sporeformer isolated from a Phoenix spacecraft assembly clean room, and it has previously demonstrated resistance to UV radiation up to 1000 J/m(sup 2). The EL appears to bind B. horneckiae spores into large aggregations, or biofilms, and may confer some UV resistance to the spores. Multiple culturing and purification schemes were tried to achieve high purity spores because vegetative cells would skew UV resistance results. An ethanol-based purification scheme produced high purity spores. Selective removal of the EL from spores was attempted with two schemes: a chemical extraction method and physical extraction (sonication). Results from survival rates in the presence and absence of the external layer will provide a new understanding of the role of biofilms and passive resistance that may favor survival of biological systems in aggressive extra-terrestrial environments. The chemical extraction method decreased viable counts of spores and lead to an inconclusive change UV resistance relative to non-extracted spores. The physical extraction method lead to non-aggregated spores and did not alter viability; however, it produced UV resistance profiles similar to non-extracted spores. In addition to the EL-removal study, samples of B. horneckiae spores dried on

  3. Assessment of Resistance of Bacillus Horneckiae Endospores to UV Radiation and Function of Their Extraneous Layer in Resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachariah, Malcolm M.; Vaishampayan, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Spore-forming microbes are highly resistant to various physical and chemical conditions, which include ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress, and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary surfaces. The spore's resistance might be due to their metabolically dormant state, and/or by the presence of a series of protective structures that encase the interior-most compartment, the core, which houses the spore chromosome. These spores have multiple layers surrounding the cell that are not found in vegetative cells, and some species have an outer layer of proteins and glycoproteins termed the "exosporium" or a fibrous "extraneous layer" (EL). Bacillus horneckiae is an EL-producing novel sporeformer isolated from a Phoenix spacecraft assembly clean room, and it has previously demonstrated resistance to UV radiation up to 1000 J/m(sup 2). The EL appears to bind B. horneckiae spores into large aggregations, or biofilms, and may confer some UV resistance to the spores. Multiple culturing and purification schemes were tried to achieve high purity spores because vegetative cells would skew UV resistance results. An ethanol-based purification scheme produced high purity spores. Selective removal of the EL from spores was attempted with two schemes: a chemical extraction method and physical extraction (sonication). Results from survival rates in the presence and absence of the external layer will provide a new understanding of the role of biofilms and passive resistance that may favor survival of biological systems in aggressive extra-terrestrial environments. The chemical extraction method decreased viable counts of spores and lead to an inconclusive change UV resistance relative to non-extracted spores. The physical extraction method lead to non-aggregated spores and did not alter viability; however, it produced UV resistance profiles similar to non-extracted spores. In addition to the EL-removal study, samples of B. horneckiae spores dried on

  4. Increased Vascular Resistance with Hemoglobin-Based Oxygen Carriers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    vascular resistance. Swine resuscitated with otofHb exhibited the rapid onset of marked systemic hypertension . The blood pressure rose within seconds...virtual absence of red blood cells (3), hemoglobin solutions have produced hypertension irn animals or have not supported an increase in cardiac output...with blood volume expansion. Half of all the humans administered hemoglobin in published trials demonstrated hypertension (4), and a recent human

  5. Sensitivity of Global Climate Model Simulations to Increased Stomatal Resistance and C02 Increases*.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; McGuffie, K.; Gross, C.

    1995-07-01

    Increasing levels of atmospheric C02 will not only modify climate, they will also likely increase the water-use efficiency of plants by decreasing stomatal openings. The effect of the imposition of `doubled stomatal resistance' on climate is investigated in off-line simulations with the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme @BATS) and in two sets of global climate model simulations: for present-day and doubled atmospheric CO2, concentrations. The anticipated evapotranspiration decrease is seen most clearly in the boreal forests in the summer although, for the present-day climate @but not at 2 × C02), there are also noticeable responses in the tropical forests in South America. In the latitude zone 44°N to 58°N, evapotranspiration decreases by 15 W m2, temperatures increase by +2 K, and the sensible heat flux by +15 W m2. Soil moisture is often, but less extensively, increased, which can cause increases in runoff. The responses at 2 × C02 are larger in the 44°N to 58°N zone than elsewhere. Globally, the impact of imposing a doubled stomatal resistance in the present-day climate is an increase in the annually averaged surface air temperature of 0.13 K and a reduction in total precipitation of 0.82%. If both the atmospheric C02 content and the stomatal resistance are doubled, the global response in surface air temperature and precipitation are +2.72 K and +5.01% compared with +2.67 K and +7.73% if CO2 is doubled but stomatal resistance remains unchanged as in the usual `greenhouse' experiment. Doubling stomatal resistance as well as atmospheric C02 results in increased soil moisture in northern midlatitudes in summer.

  6. Increasing pesticide-resistant ectoparasitic infections may increase pesticide poisoning risks in children.

    PubMed

    Diaz, James H

    2008-01-01

    Head louse and scabies mite infestations are common among pre-school and school-age children, and topical pesticides are frequently prescribed to treat such conditions. Ectoparasite resistance to the safest and most commonly prescribed pyrethrin/pyrethroid pesticides for ectoparasitic infections has, however, been increasing since the 1980s. The increasing resistance of these arthropods to the safest pesticides may lead to greater use of more toxic, alternative pesticides to control infestations and to prevent institutional outbreaks. MEDLINE and Cochrane searches, 1966-2008, were conducted to assess the impact of increasing pesticide resistance on prescribing practices for ectoparasitic infections and to describe the evolving global epidemiology of pediatric poisonings by more toxic pediculicides and miticides, including carbamates, organochlorines, and organophosphates. Pharmacists, physicians, and poison control personnel should be fully informed about increasing pesticide resistance among the most commonly encountered ectoparasites of children and the institutionalized and be prepared to prevent and to treat accidental home and institutional pesticide poisonings with more toxic pesticides.

  7. Sunlight-Exposed Biofilm Microbial Communities Are Naturally Resistant to Chernobyl Ionizing-Radiation Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    Background The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. Methodology/Principal Findings To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general

  8. Immobilisation increases yeast cells' resistance to dehydration-rehydration treatment.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Rozenfelde, Linda; Pavlovska, Ilona; Rapoport, Alexander

    2014-08-20

    This study was performed with the goal of revealing if the dehydration procedure used in our new immobilisation method noticeably decreases the viability of yeast cells in immobilised preparations. Various yeasts were used in this research: Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells that were rather sensitive to dehydration and had been aerobically grown in an ethanol-containing medium, a recombinant strain of S. cerevisiae grown in aerobic conditions which were completely non-resistant to dehydration and an anaerobically grown bakers' yeast strain S. cerevisiae, as well as a fairly resistant Pichia pastoris strain. Experiments performed showed that immobilisation of all these strains essentially increased their resistance to a dehydration-rehydration treatment. The increase of cells' viability (compared with control cells dehydrated in similar conditions) was from 30 to 60%. It is concluded that a new immobilisation method, which includes a dehydration stage, does not lead to an essential loss of yeast cell viability. Correspondingly, there is no risk of losing the biotechnological activities of immobilised preparations. The possibility of producing dry, active yeast preparations is shown, for those strains that are very sensitive to dehydration and which can be used in biotechnology in an immobilised form. Finally, the immobilisation approach can be used for the development of efficient methods for the storage of recombinant yeast strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi Yue, Wu

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM.

  10. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  11. Radiation Resistance of XLPE Nano-dielectrics for Advanced Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Duckworth, Robert C; Polyzos, Georgios; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Aytug, Tolga; Leonard, Keith J; Sauers, Isidor

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has been renewed interest in nuclear reactor safety, particularly as commercial reactors are approaching 40 years service and lifetime extensions are considered, as well as for new reactor building projects around the world. The materials that are currently used in cabling for instrumentation, reactor control, and communications include cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), ethylene propylene rubber (EPR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), neoprene, and chlorosulfonated polyethylene. While these materials show suitable radiation tolerance in laboratory tests, failures before their useful lifetime occur due to the combined environmental effects of radiation, temperature and moisture, or operation under abnormal conditions. In addition, the extended use of commercial reactors beyond their original service life places a greater demand on insulating materials to perform beyond their current ratings in these nuclear environments. Nanocomposite materials that are based on XLPE and other epoxy resins incorporating TiO2, MgO, SiO2, and Al2O3 nanoparticles are being fabricated using a novel in-situ method established at ORNL to demonstrate materials with increased resistance to radiation. As novel nanocomposite dielectric materials are developed, characterization of the non-irradiated and irradiated nanodielectrics will lead to a knowledge base that allow for dielectric materials to be engineered with specific nanoparticle additions for maximum benefit to wide-variety of radiation environments found in nuclear reactors. This paper presents the initial findings on the development of XLPE-based SiO2 nano-composite dielectrics in the context of electrical performance and radiation degradation.

  12. Gamma radiation resistant Fabry-Perot fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hanying; Miller, Don W.; Talnagi, Joseph

    2002-08-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1998 completed a study of emerging technologies that could be applicable to measurement systems in nuclear power plants [H. M. Hashemian [et al.], "Advanced Instrumentation and Maintenance Technologies for Nuclear Power Plants," NUREG/CR-5501 (1998)]. This study concluded that advanced fiber optic sensing technology is an emerging technology that should be investigated. It also indicated that there had been very little research related to performance evaluation of fiber optic sensors in nuclear plant harsh environments, although substantial research has been performed on nuclear radiation effects on optical fibers in the last two decades. A type of Fabry-Perot fiber optic temperature sensor, which is manufactured by Fiso Technologies in Canada, is qualified to be a candidate for potential applications in nuclear radiation environment due to its unique signal processing technique and its resistance to power loss. The gamma irradiation effects on this type of sensors are investigated in this article. Two sensors were irradiated in a gamma irradiation field and one of them was irradiated up to a total gamma dose of 133 Mrad. The sensor on-line performance was monitored during each gamma irradiation test. Furthermore, the sensor static and dynamic performance before and after each irradiation test were evaluated according to the Standard ISA-dS67.06.01 ("Performance Monitoring for Nuclear Safety-Related Instrument Channels in Nuclear Power Plants", Standard ISA-dS67.06.01, Draft 7, Instrument Society of America, 1999). Although several abnormal phenomena were observed, analysis shows that gamma irradiation is not accredited to the abnormal behavior, which implies that this type of sensor is suitable to a gamma irradiation environment with a high gamma dose.

  13. Radiation-resistant erbium-doped silica fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Zotov, K V; Likhachev, M E; Tomashuk, A L; Bubnov, M M; Yashkov, M V; Gur'yanov, A N

    2007-10-31

    It is shown that the service life of erbium-doped fibres can be increased many times under conditions of an elevated radiation level by loading the fibre glass network with molecular hydrogen. Backdiffusion of hydrogen from the fibre in the process of its operation is virtually excluded for the fibre covered with a hermetic carbon coating. It is shown that this technique of fibre preparation allows one to slow down significantly degradation of the lasing properties of erbium fibres under the conditions characteristic of space applications. (special issue devoted to the 25th anniversary of the a.m. prokhorov general physics institute)

  14. Increased diffuse radiation fraction does not significantly accelerate plant growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angert, Alon; Krakauer, Nir

    2010-05-01

    A recent modelling study (Mercado et al., 2009) claims that increased numbers of scattering aerosols are responsible for a substantial fraction of the terrestrial carbon sink in recent decades because higher diffuse light fraction enhances plant net primary production (NPP). Here we show that observations of atmospheric CO2 seasonal cycle and tree ring data indicate that the relation between diffuse light and NPP is actually quite weak on annual timescales. The inconsistency of these data with the modelling results may arise because the relationships used to quantify the enhancement of NPP were calibrated with eddy covariance measurements of hourly carbon uptake. The effect of diffuse-light fraction on carbon uptake could depend on timescale, since this effect varies rapidly as sun angle and cloudiness change, and since plants can respond dynamically over various timescales to change in incoming radiation. Volcanic eruptions, such as the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in 1991, provide the best available tests for the effect of an annual-scale increase in the diffuse light fraction. Following the Pinatubo Eruption, in 1992 and 1993, a sharp decrease in the atmospheric CO2 growth rate was observed. This could have resulted from enhanced plant carbon uptake. Mercado et al. (2009) argue that largely as a result of the (volcanic aerosol driven) increase in diffuse light fraction, NPP was elevated in 1992, particularly between 25° N-45° N where annual NPP was modelled to be ~0.8 PgC (~10%) above average. In a previous study (Angert et al., 2004) a biogeochemical model (CASA) linked to an atmospheric tracer model (MATCH), was used to show that a diffuse-radiation driven increase in NPP in the extratropics will enhance carbon uptake mostly in summer, leading to a lower CO2 seasonal minimum. Here we use a 'toy model' to show that this conclusion is general and model-independent. The model shows that an enhanced sink of 0.8 PgC, similar to that modelled by Mercado et al. (2009

  15. Cerium clustering and radiation damage resistance in aluminophosphate and silicophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygel, Jennifer Lynn

    Cerium oxide is a well-known additive for increasing resistance to radiation damage in glass by preventing electrons and holes freed by irradiation from becoming trapped at defect sites and inducing optical absorption bands which can severely darken the glass. Phosphate glasses provide a unique opportunity for studying radiation damage resistance due to their high rare-earth solubility, ˜25 mol%. Two series of glasses, nominally AlP3O9-CeP 3O9 and CeP3O9-SiP2O 7, were synthesized to investigate structure-property relationships in a range of compositions near the metaphosphate. The presence of cerium clustering, or sharing of oxygen between cerium cations, was predicted using the chain fragment cluster model, an extension of earlier models for rare-earth phosphate glasses. Using the atom% composition determined by XPS from vacuum fracture surfaces, and cation coordination measured by Ce K-edge EXAFS, 29Si CPMG NMR, and 27Al MAS NMR, it was determined that clustering occurs for glasses containing ≥ 14 mol% Ce2O3 in the aluminophosphate glass series and ≥ 18 mol% Ce2O3 in the silicophosphate glass series. Many measured properties have been observed to correlate with the presence or absence of cerium clustering, cluster size, or other concomitant structural changes, including: visible coloration, density, refractive index, Ce3+ photoluminescence, and Ce3+ paramagnetic resonance. Additionally, radiation damage resistance was identified in the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate glasses which were predicted to have clustered cerium cations through the absence of radiation-induced phosphorus-related paramagnetic defects. This resistance is attributed to a structural implication of clustering. Specifically, cerium cations will be in close proximity to defect precursor sites at the concentrations required for clustering and are thus able to prevent localization of electrons and holes on those sites. Finally, irradiation-induced optical absorption was measured in all

  16. Development of the radiation-resistant strain of Moraxella osloensis and effect of penicillin G on its growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sangyong; Yun, Hyejeong; Joe, Minho; Kim, Dongho

    2009-07-01

    A series of repeated exposures to γ-radiation with intervening outgrowth of survivors was used to develop radioresistant cultures of Moraxella osloensis that have been recognized as potential pathogenic microorganism. The D10 value of the radiation-resistant strain, 5.903±0.006 kGy, was increased by four-fold compared to the parent wild-type strain, 1.637±0.004 kGy. Since most strains of M. osloensis are sensitive to penicillin, we have surveyed the sensitivity of radiation-resistant strain to this antibiotic. When the optical density was monitored after the addition of penicillin G, the radioresistant strain appeared to be more resistant to only a low concentration of penicillin G (0.5 U/ml) than the parent strain. Interestingly, however, there was no apparent difference in the number of viable cells between both strains. Scanning electron microscope data showed that the resistance cells were generally larger than the parent cells, suggesting that this increase in size may cause a higher optical density of radioresistant cells. In conclusion, radiation mutation does not affect the penicillin resistance of M. osloensis.

  17. Extremely high UV-C radiation resistant microorganisms from desert environments with different manganese concentrations.

    PubMed

    Paulino-Lima, Ivan Glaucio; Fujishima, Kosuke; Navarrete, Jesica Urbina; Galante, Douglas; Rodrigues, Fabio; Azua-Bustos, Armando; Rothschild, Lynn Justine

    2016-10-01

    Desiccation resistance and a high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio contribute to ionizing radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans. We hypothesized that this was a general phenomenon and thus developed a strategy to search for highly radiation-resistant organisms based on their natural environment. While desiccation is a typical feature of deserts, the correlation between radiation resistance and the intracellular Mn/Fe ratio of indigenous microorganisms or the Mn/Fe ratio of the environment, has not yet been described. UV-C radiation is highly damaging to biomolecules including DNA. It was used in this study as a selective tool because of its relevance to early life on earth, high altitude aerobiology and the search for life beyond Earth. Surface soil samples were collected from the Sonoran Desert, Arizona (USA), from the Atacama Desert in Chile and from a manganese mine in northern Argentina. Microbial isolates were selected after exposure to UV-C irradiation and growth. The isolates comprised 28 genera grouped within six phyla, which we ranked according to their resistance to UV-C irradiation. Survival curves were performed for the most resistant isolates and correlated with their intracellular Mn/Fe ratio, which was determined by ICP-MS. Five percent of the isolates were highly resistant, including one more resistant than D. radiodurans, a bacterium generally considered the most radiation-resistant organism, thus used as a model for radiation resistance studies. No correlation was observed between the occurrence of resistant microorganisms and the Mn/Fe ratio in the soil samples. However, all resistant isolates showed an intracellular Mn/Fe ratio much higher than the sensitive isolates. Our findings could represent a new front in efforts to harness mechanisms of UV-C radiation resistance from extreme environments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Minimal increase in genetic diversity enhances predation resistance.

    PubMed

    Koh, Kai S; Matz, Carsten; Tan, Chuan H; LE, Hoang L; Rice, Scott A; Marshall, Dustin J; Steinberg, Peter D; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2012-04-01

    The importance of species diversity to emergent, ecological properties of communities is increasingly appreciated, but the importance of within-species genetic diversity for analogous emergent properties of populations is only just becoming apparent. Here, the properties and effects of genetic variation on predation resistance in populations were assessed and the molecular mechanism underlying these emergent effects was investigated. Using biofilms of the ubiquitous bacterium Serratia marcescens, we tested the importance of genetic diversity in defending biofilms against protozoan grazing, a main source of mortality for bacteria in all natural ecosystems. S. marcescens biofilms established from wild-type cells produce heritable, stable variants, which when experimentally combined, persist as a diverse assemblage and are significantly more resistant to grazing than either wild type or variant biofilms grown in monoculture. This diversity effect is biofilm-specific, a result of either facilitation or resource partitioning among variants, with equivalent experiments using planktonic cultures and grazers resulting in dominance by a single resistant strain. The variants studied are all the result of single nucleotide polymorphisms in one regulatory gene suggesting that the benefits of genetic diversity in clonal biofilms can occur through remarkably minimal genetic change. The findings presented here provide a new insight on the integration of genetics and population ecology, in which diversity arising through minimal changes in genotype can have major ecological implications for natural populations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Hypoxia increases muscle hypertrophy induced by resistance training.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Akinobu; Sugita, Masaaki; Kato, Ko; Fukuda, Aki; Sudo, Akihiro; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2010-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that low-intensity resistance training with vascular occlusion (kaatsu training) induces muscle hypertrophy. A local hypoxic environment facilitates muscle hypertrophy during kaatsu training. We postulated that muscle hypertrophy can be more efficiently induced by placing the entire body in a hypoxic environment to induce muscle hypoxia followed by resistance training. Fourteen male university students were randomly assigned to hypoxia (Hyp) and normoxia (Norm) groups (n = 7 per group). Each training session proceeded at an exercise intensity of 70% of 1 repetition maximum (RM), and comprised four sets of 10 repetitions of elbow extension and flexion. Students exercised twice weekly for 6 wk and then muscle hypertrophy was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging and muscle strength was evaluated based on 1RM. Muscle hypertrophy was significantly greater for the Hyp-Ex (exercised flexor of the hypoxia group) than for the Hyp-N (nonexercised flexor of the hypoxia group) or Norm-Ex flexor (P < .05, Bonferroni correction). Muscle hypertrophy was significantly greater for the Hyp-Ex than the Hyp-N extensor. Muscle strength was significantly increased early (by week 3) in the Hyp-Ex, but not in the Norm-Ex group. This study suggests that resistance training under hypoxic conditions improves muscle strength and induces muscle hypertrophy faster than under normoxic conditions, thus representing a promising new training technique.

  20. Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Russel, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by an Ames-led project team under a 4-year DOE-ITP sponsored project titled, 'Advanced Wear-resistant Nanocomposites for Increased Energy Efficiency.' The Report serves as the project deliverable for the CPS agreement number 15015. The purpose of this project was to develop and commercialize a family of lightweight, bulk composite materials that are highly resistant to degradation by erosive and abrasive wear. These materials, based on AlMgB{sub 14}, are projected to save over 30 TBtu of energy per year when fully implemented in industrial applications, with the associated environmental benefits of eliminating the burning of 1.5 M tons/yr of coal and averting the release of 4.2 M tons/yr of CO{sub 2} into the air. This program targeted applications in the mining, drilling, machining, and dry erosion applications as key platforms for initial commercialization, which includes some of the most severe wear conditions in industry. Production-scale manufacturing of this technology has begun through a start-up company, NewTech Ceramics (NTC). This project included providing technical support to NTC in order to facilitate cost-effective mass production of the wear-resistant boride components. Resolution of issues related to processing scale-up, reduction in energy intensity during processing, and improving the quality and performance of the composites, without adding to the cost of processing were among the primary technical focus areas of this program. Compositional refinements were also investigated in order to achieve the maximum wear resistance. In addition, synthesis of large-scale, single-phase AlMgB{sub 14} powder was conducted for use as PVD sputtering targets for nanocoating applications.

  1. A patient-specific computational model of hypoxia-modulated radiation resistance in glioblastoma using 18F-FMISO-PET.

    PubMed

    Rockne, Russell C; Trister, Andrew D; Jacobs, Joshua; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea J; Neal, Maxwell L; Hendrickson, Kristi; Mrugala, Maciej M; Rockhill, Jason K; Kinahan, Paul; Krohn, Kenneth A; Swanson, Kristin R

    2015-02-06

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive primary brain tumour that has poor prognosis despite aggressive treatment. A hallmark of these tumours is diffuse invasion into the surrounding brain, necessitating a multi-modal treatment approach, including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. We have previously demonstrated the ability of our model to predict radiographic response immediately following radiation therapy in individual GBM patients using a simplified geometry of the brain and theoretical radiation dose. Using only two pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging scans, we calculate net rates of proliferation and invasion as well as radiation sensitivity for a patient's disease. Here, we present the application of our clinically targeted modelling approach to a single glioblastoma patient as a demonstration of our method. We apply our model in the full three-dimensional architecture of the brain to quantify the effects of regional resistance to radiation owing to hypoxia in vivo determined by [(18)F]-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (FMISO-PET) and the patient-specific three-dimensional radiation treatment plan. Incorporation of hypoxia into our model with FMISO-PET increases the model-data agreement by an order of magnitude. This improvement was robust to our definition of hypoxia or the degree of radiation resistance quantified with the FMISO-PET image and our computational model, respectively. This work demonstrates a useful application of patient-specific modelling in personalized medicine and how mathematical modelling has the potential to unify multi-modality imaging and radiation treatment planning.

  2. A patient-specific computational model of hypoxia-modulated radiation resistance in glioblastoma using 18F-FMISO-PET

    PubMed Central

    Rockne, Russell C.; Trister, Andrew D.; Jacobs, Joshua; Hawkins-Daarud, Andrea J.; Neal, Maxwell L.; Hendrickson, Kristi; Mrugala, Maciej M.; Rockhill, Jason K.; Kinahan, Paul; Krohn, Kenneth A.; Swanson, Kristin R.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive primary brain tumour that has poor prognosis despite aggressive treatment. A hallmark of these tumours is diffuse invasion into the surrounding brain, necessitating a multi-modal treatment approach, including surgery, radiation and chemotherapy. We have previously demonstrated the ability of our model to predict radiographic response immediately following radiation therapy in individual GBM patients using a simplified geometry of the brain and theoretical radiation dose. Using only two pre-treatment magnetic resonance imaging scans, we calculate net rates of proliferation and invasion as well as radiation sensitivity for a patient's disease. Here, we present the application of our clinically targeted modelling approach to a single glioblastoma patient as a demonstration of our method. We apply our model in the full three-dimensional architecture of the brain to quantify the effects of regional resistance to radiation owing to hypoxia in vivo determined by [18F]-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography (FMISO-PET) and the patient-specific three-dimensional radiation treatment plan. Incorporation of hypoxia into our model with FMISO-PET increases the model–data agreement by an order of magnitude. This improvement was robust to our definition of hypoxia or the degree of radiation resistance quantified with the FMISO-PET image and our computational model, respectively. This work demonstrates a useful application of patient-specific modelling in personalized medicine and how mathematical modelling has the potential to unify multi-modality imaging and radiation treatment planning. PMID:25540239

  3. Analog of microwave-induced resistance oscillations induced in GaAs heterostructures by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, T.; Dmitriev, I. A.; Kozlov, D. A.; Schneider, M.; Jentzsch, B.; Kvon, Z. D.; Olbrich, P.; Bel'kov, V. V.; Bayer, A.; Schuh, D.; Bougeard, D.; Kuczmik, T.; Oltscher, M.; Weiss, D.; Ganichev, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We report on the study of terahertz radiation-induced MIRO-like oscillations of magnetoresistivity in GaAs heterostructures. Our experiments provide an answer on two most intriguing questions—effect of radiation helicity and the role of the edges—yielding crucial information for an understanding of the MIRO (microwave-induced resistance oscillations) origin. Moreover, we demonstrate that the range of materials exhibiting radiation-induced magneto-oscillations can be largely extended by using high-frequency radiation.

  4. Cox-2-derived PGE2 induces Id1-dependent radiation resistance and self-renewal in experimental glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cook, Peter J; Thomas, Rozario; Kingsley, Philip J; Shimizu, Fumiko; Montrose, David C; Marnett, Lawrence J; Tabar, Viviane S; Dannenberg, Andrew J; Benezra, Robert

    2016-10-01

    In glioblastoma (GBM), Id1 serves as a functional marker for self-renewing cancer stem-like cells. We investigated the mechanism by which cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) induces Id1 and increases GBM self-renewal and radiation resistance. Mouse and human GBM cells were stimulated with dimethyl-PGE2 (dmPGE2), a stabilized form of PGE2, to test for Id1 induction. To elucidate the signal transduction pathway governing the increase in Id1, a combination of short interfering RNA knockdown and small molecule inhibitors and activators of PGE2 signaling were used. Western blotting, quantitative real-time (qRT)-PCR, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays were employed. Sphere formation and radiation resistance were measured in cultured primary cells. Immunohistochemical analyses were carried out to evaluate the Cox-2-Id1 axis in experimental GBM. In GBM cells, dmPGE2 stimulates the EP4 receptor leading to activation of ERK1/2 MAPK. This leads, in turn, to upregulation of the early growth response1 (Egr1) transcription factor and enhanced Id1 expression. Activation of this pathway increases self-renewal capacity and resistance to radiation-induced DNA damage, which are dependent on Id1. In GBM, Cox-2-derived PGE2 induces Id1 via EP4-dependent activation of MAPK signaling and the Egr1 transcription factor. PGE2-mediated induction of Id1 is required for optimal tumor cell self-renewal and radiation resistance. Collectively, these findings identify Id1 as a key mediator of PGE2-dependent modulation of radiation response and lend insight into the mechanisms underlying radiation resistance in GBM patients. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Genetics of resistance to the African trypanosomes. IV. Resistance of radiation chimeras to Trypanosoma rhodesiense infection

    SciTech Connect

    DeGee, A.L.; Mansfield, J.M.

    1984-08-01

    The cellular bases of resistance to the African trypanosomes were examined in inbred mice. As part of these studies, reciprocal bone marrow cell transplants were performed between H-2 compatible mice which differ in relative resistance to Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense infection. Relatively resistant C57BL/10 mice, intermediate A.By mice, and least resistant C3H.SW mice that were reconstituted after lethal irradiation with syngeneic bone marrow cells displayed resistance and immunity characteristic of the homologous donor strain. When C57BL/10 mice were reconstituted with C3H.SW mouse bone marrow cells they retained the ability to produce antibodies to trypanosome surface antigen but the antibody titers were significantly reduced. Control of parasitemia and mean survival time were reduced in these chimeras, but differed significantly from C3H.SW mice. A. By mice that received cells from C57BL/10 donors exhibited antibody responses and survival times similar to the C57BL/10 mice. Survival times of A.By mice given syngeneic cells or C3H.SW cells were the same, but the antibody responses of A.By mice given C3H.SW cells were lower than those of A.By mice given syngeneic cells. C3H.SW mice reconstituted with C57BL/10 bone marrow cells were capable of making antibodies and controlling parasitemia, in marked contrast to the absence of such responses in C3H.SW mice reconstituted with syngeneic cells. Survival times, however, were indistinguishable from those of C3H.SW mice given syngeneic cells. Thus, resistance to T.B. rhodesiense was shown for the first time to depend on donor bone marrow derived cells as well as upon radiation-resistant cells/factors associated with host genetic background. Also, parasite-specific IgM antibody responses seem to be regulated by a mechanism which does not depend on bone marrow derived cells alone, and the presence of such immune responses is not linked to survival time.

  6. Sensitivity of global climate model simulations to increased stomatal resistance and CO{sub 2} increases

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; McGuffie, K.; Gross, C.

    1995-07-01

    Increasing levels of atmospheric CO{sub 2} will not only modify climate, they will also likely increase the water-use efficiency of plants by decreasing stomatal openings. The effect of the imposition of {open_quotes}doubled stomatal resistance{close_quotes} on climate is investigated in off-line simulations with the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS) and in two sets of global climate model simulations: for present-day and doubled atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The anticipated evapotranspiration decrease is seen most clearly in the boreal forests in the summer although, for the present-day climate (but not at 2 x CO{sub 2}), there are also noticeable responses in the tropical forests in South America. In the latitude zone 44{degrees}N to 58{degrees}N, evapotranspiration decreases by -15 W m{sup 2}, temperatures increase by =2 K, and the sensible heat flux by +15 W m{sup {minus}2}. Soil moisture is often, but less extensively, increased, which can cause increases in runoff. The responses at 2 x CO{sub 2} are larger in the 44{degrees}N to 58{degrees}N zone than elsewhere. Globally, the impact of imposing a doubled stomatal resistance in the present-day climate is an increase in the annually averaged surface air temperature of 0.13 K and a reduction in total precipitation of -0.82%. If both the atmospheric CO{sub 2} content and the stomatal resistance are doubled, the global response in surface air temperature and precipitation are +2.72 K and +5.01% compared with +2.67 K and + 7.73% if CO{sub 2} is doubled but stomatal resistance remains unchanged as in the usual {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} experiment. Doubling stomatal resistance as well as atmospheric CO{sub 2} results in increased soil moisture in northern midlatitudes in summer. 40 refs.. 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Evolution of extreme resistance to ionizing radiation via genetic adaptation of DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Rose T; Klingele, Audrey J; Cabot, Eric L; Schackwitz, Wendy S; Martin, Jeffrey A; Martin, Joel; Wang, Zhong; Wood, Elizabeth A; Pennacchio, Christa; Pennacchio, Len A; Perna, Nicole T; Battista, John R; Cox, Michael M

    2014-01-01

    By directed evolution in the laboratory, we previously generated populations of Escherichia coli that exhibit a complex new phenotype, extreme resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). The molecular basis of this extremophile phenotype, involving strain isolates with a 3-4 order of magnitude increase in IR resistance at 3000 Gy, is now addressed. Of 69 mutations identified in one of our most highly adapted isolates, functional experiments demonstrate that the IR resistance phenotype is almost entirely accounted for by only three of these nucleotide changes, in the DNA metabolism genes recA, dnaB, and yfjK. Four additional genetic changes make small but measurable contributions. Whereas multiple contributions to IR resistance are evident in this study, our results highlight a particular adaptation mechanism not adequately considered in studies to date: Genetic innovations involving pre-existing DNA repair functions can play a predominant role in the acquisition of an IR resistance phenotype. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01322.001 PMID:24596148

  8. Intermittent hypoxia selects for genotypes and phenotypes that increase survival, invasion, and therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Verduzco, Daniel; Lloyd, Mark; Xu, Liping; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Gatenby, Robert A; Gillies, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia in tumors correlates with greater risk of metastases, increased invasiveness, and resistance to systemic and radiation therapy. The evolutionary dynamics that links specific adaptations to hypoxia with these observed tumor properties have not been well investigated. While some tumor populations may experience fixed hypoxia, cyclical and stochastic transitions from normoxia to hypoxia are commonly observed in vivo. Although some phenotypic adaptations to this cyclic hypoxia are likely reversible, we hypothesize that some adaptations may become fixed through mutations promoted by hypoxia-induced genomic instability. Here we seek to identify genetic alterations and corresponding stable phenotypes that emerge following cyclic hypoxia. Although these changes may originate as adaptations to this specific environmental stress, their fixation in the tumor genome may result in their observation in tumors from regions of normoxia, a condition known as pseudohypoxia. We exposed several epithelial cell lines to 50 cycles of hypoxia-normoxia, followed by culture in normoxia over a period of several months. Molecular analyses demonstrated permanent changes in expression of several oncogenes and tumor-suppressors, including p53, E-cadherin, and Hif-1α. These changes were associated with increased resistance to multiple cytotoxins, increased survival in hypoxia and increased anchorage-independent growth. These results suggest cycles of hypoxia encountered in early cancers can select for specific and stable genotypic and phenotypic properties that persist even in normoxic conditions, which may promote tumor progression and resistance to therapy.

  9. Rain-induced increase in background radiation detected by Radiation Portal Monitors.

    PubMed

    Livesay, R J; Blessinger, C S; Guzzardo, T F; Hausladen, P A

    2014-11-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to enhance partner country capability to deter, detect, and interdict the illicit movement of special nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma-ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates primarily from the wet-deposition of two radioactive daughters of (222)Rn, namely, (214)Pb and (214)Bi. In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and high-purity germanium spectra. The data verify that these radionuclides are responsible for the largest environmental background fluctuations in RPMs. Analytical expressions for the detector response function in Poly-Vinyl Toluene have been derived. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  10. Rain-Induced Increase in Background Radiation Detected by Radiation Portal Monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Hausladen, Paul; Blessinger, Christopher S; Guzzardo, Tyler; Livesay, Jake

    2012-07-01

    A complete understanding of both the steady state and transient background measured by Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) is essential to predictable system performance, as well as maximization of detection sensitivity. To facilitate this understanding, a test bed for the study of natural background in RPMs has been established at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This work was performed in support of the Second Line of Defense Program's mission to detect the illicit movement of nuclear material. In the present work, transient increases in gamma ray counting rates in RPMs due to rain are investigated. The increase in background activity associated with rain, which has been well documented in the field of environmental radioactivity, originates from the atmospheric deposition of two radioactive daughters of radon-222, namely lead-214 and bismuth-214 (henceforth {sup 222}Rn, {sup 214}Pb and {sup 214}Bi). In this study, rainfall rates recorded by a co-located weather station are compared with RPM count rates and High Purity Germanium spectra. The data verifies these radionuclides are responsible for the dominant transient natural background fluctuations in RPMs. Effects on system performance and potential mitigation strategies are discussed.

  11. Perivascular fluid cuffs decrease lung compliance by increasing tissue resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Kevin; Alvarez, Diego F.; King, Judy A.; Stevens, Troy

    2010-01-01

    Objective Lung inflammation causes perivascular fluid cuffs to form around extra-alveolar blood vessels; however, the physiologic consequences of such cuffs remain poorly understood. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that perivascular fluid cuffs, without concomitant alveolar edema, are sufficient to decrease lung compliance. Design Prospective, randomized, controlled study. Setting Research laboratory. Subjects One hundred twenty male CD40 rats. Interventions To test this hypothesis, the plant alkaloid thapsigargin was used to activate store-operated calcium entry and increase cytosolic calcium in endothelium. Thapsigargin was infused into a central venous catheter of intact, sedated, and mechanically ventilated rats. Measurements Static and dynamic lung mechanics and hemodynamics were measured continuously. Main Results Thapsigargin produced perivascular fluid cuffs along extra-alveolar vessels but did not cause alveolar flooding or blood gas abnormalities. Lung compliance dose-dependently decreased after thapsigargin infusion, attributable to an increase in tissue resistance that was attributed to increased tissue damping and tissue elastance. Airway resistance was not changed. Neither central venous pressure nor left ventricular end diastolic pressure was altered by thapsigargin. Heart rate did not change, although thapsigargin decreased pressure over time sufficient to reduce cardiac output by 50%. Infusion of the type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitor, rolipram, prevented thapsigargin from inducing perivascular cuffs and decreasing lung compliance. Rolipram also normalized pressure over time and corrected the deficit in cardiac output. Conclusions Our findings resolve for the first time that perivascular cuff formation negatively impacts mechanical coupling between the bronchovascular bundle and the lung parenchyma, decreasing lung compliance without impacting central venous pressure. PMID:20400904

  12. Adropin deficiency is associated with increased adiposity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ganesh Kumar, K; Zhang, Jingying; Gao, Su; Rossi, Jari; McGuinness, Owen P; Halem, Heather H; Culler, Michael D; Mynatt, Randall L; Butler, Andrew A

    2012-07-01

    Adropin is a secreted peptide that improves hepatic steatosis and glucose homeostasis when administered to diet-induced obese mice. It is not clear if adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by signals of metabolic state. Moreover, the significance of a decline in adropin expression with obesity with respect to metabolic disease is also not clear. We investigated the regulation of serum adropin by metabolic status and diet. Serum adropin levels were high in chow-fed conditions and were suppressed by fasting and diet-induced obesity (DIO). High adropin levels were observed in mice fed a high-fat low carbohydrate diet, whereas lower levels were observed in mice fed a low-fat high carbohydrate diet. To investigate the role of adropin deficiency in metabolic homeostasis, we generated adropin knockout mice (AdrKO) on the C57BL/6J background. AdrKO displayed a 50%-increase in increase in adiposity, although food intake and energy expenditure were normal. AdrKO also exhibited dyslipidemia and impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production (EndoR(a)) in hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp conditions, suggesting insulin resistance. While homo- and heterozygous carriers of the null adropin allele exhibited normal DIO relative to controls, impaired glucose tolerance associated with weight gain was more severe in both groups. In summary, adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by fasting and feeding. In fed conditions, adropin levels are regulated dietary macronutrients, and increase with dietary fat content. Adropin is not required for regulating food intake, however, its functions impact on adiposity and are involved in preventing insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance.

  13. Adropin Deficiency Is Associated With Increased Adiposity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K. Ganesh; Zhang, Jingying; Gao, Su; Rossi, Jari; McGuinness, Owen P.; Halem, Heather H.; Culler, Michael D.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Butler, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    Adropin is a secreted peptide that improves hepatic steatosis and glucose homeostasis when administered to diet-induced obese mice. It is not clear if adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by signals of metabolic state. Moreover, the significance of a decline in adropin expression with obesity with respect to metabolic disease is also not clear. We investigated the regulation of serum adropin by metabolic status and diet. Serum adropin levels were high in chow-fed conditions and were suppressed by fasting and diet-induced obesity (DIO). High adropin levels were observed in mice fed a high-fat low carbohydrate diet, whereas lower levels were observed in mice fed a low-fat high carbohydrate diet. To investigate the role of adropin deficiency in metabolic homeostasis, we generated adropin knockout mice (AdrKO) on the C57BL/6J background. AdrKO displayed a 50%-increase in increase in adiposity, although food intake and energy expenditure were normal. AdrKO also exhibited dyslipidemia and impaired suppression of endogenous glucose production (EndoRa) in hyperinsulinemic–euglycemic clamp conditions, suggesting insulin resistance. While homo- and heterozygous carriers of the null adropin allele exhibited normal DIO relative to controls, impaired glucose tolerance associated with weight gain was more severe in both groups. In summary, adropin is a peptide hormone regulated by fasting and feeding. In fed conditions, adropin levels are regulated dietary macronutrients, and increase with dietary fat content. Adropin is not required for regulating food intake, however, its functions impact on adiposity and are involved in preventing insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:22318315

  14. Muscle fiber size increases following resistance training in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Dalgas, U; Stenager, E; Jakobsen, J; Petersen, T; Overgaard, K; Ingemann-Hansen, T

    2010-11-01

    To test the hypothesis that lower body progressive resistance training (PRT) leads to an increase of the muscle fiber cross-sectional area (CSA) and a shift in the proportion of fiber types in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The present study was a two-arm, randomized controlled trial (RCT). Thirty-eight MS patients (Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) 3-5.5) were randomized to a PRT group (Exercise, n = 19) or a control group (Control, n = 19). The Exercise group performed a biweekly 12-week lower body PRT program [five exercises progressing from 15RM (Repetition Maximum) towards 8RM], whereas the Control group maintained their usual daily activity level during the trial period. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were taken before (pre) and after the trial (post). Thigh volume (TV) was estimated from anthropometric measurements. Isokinetic muscle strength of the knee extensors (KE) and flexors (KF) were evaluated at slow (90(°)/s) and fast (180(°)/s) angular velocities. In the Exercise group the mean CSA of all muscle fibers (7.9 ± 15.4% vs. -3.5 ± 9.0%, p = 0.03) and of type II muscle fibers (14.0 ± 19.4% vs. -2.6 ± 15.5%, p = 0.02) increased in comparison with the Control group. No changes occurred in the proportion of fiber types in the Exercise group. Neither was there any change in total TV. Isokinetic strength at KE180, KF90 and KF180 improved significantly after PRT when compared with the control group (10.2-21.3%, p ≤ 0.02). We conclude that progressive resistance training induces a compensatory increase of muscle fiber size in patients with the central nervous system disorder, multiple sclerosis.

  15. Low-salt diet increases insulin resistance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rajesh; Williams, Gordon H; Hurwitz, Shelley; Brown, Nancy J; Hopkins, Paul N; Adler, Gail K

    2011-07-01

    Low-salt (LS) diet activates the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, both of which can increase insulin resistance (IR). We investigated the hypothesis that LS diet is associated with an increase in IR in healthy subjects. Healthy individuals were studied after 7 days of LS diet (urine sodium <20 mmol/d) and 7 days of high-salt (HS) diet (urine sodium >150 mmol/d) in a random order. Insulin resistance was measured after each diet and compared statistically, unadjusted and adjusted for important covariates. One hundred fifty-two healthy men and women, aged 39.1 ± 12.5 years (range, 18-65) and with body mass index of 25.3 ± 4.0 kg/m(2), were included in this study. Mean (SD) homeostasis model assessment index was significantly higher on LS compared with HS diet (2.8 ± 1.6 vs 2.4 ± 1.7, P < .01). Serum aldosterone (21.0 ± 14.3 vs 3.4 ± 1.5 ng/dL, P < .001), 24-hour urine aldosterone (63.0 ± 34.0 vs 9.5 ± 6.5 μg/d, P < .001), and 24-hour urine norepinephrine excretion (78.0 ± 36.7 vs 67.9 ± 39.8 μg/d, P < .05) were higher on LS diet compared with HS diet. Low-salt diet was significantly associated with higher homeostasis model assessment index independent of age, sex, blood pressure, body mass index, serum sodium and potassium, serum angiotensin II, plasma renin activity, serum and urine aldosterone, and urine epinephrine and norepinephrine. Low-salt diet is associated with an increase in IR. The impact of our findings on the pathogenesis of diabetes and cardiovascular disease needs further investigation.

  16. Effect of temperature on the radiation resistance of virulent Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Christopher H; Niemira, Brendan A; Tunick, Michael; Boyd, Glenn

    2002-07-01

    Yersinia enterocolitica, a food-borne pathogen, can be eliminated from meat using ionizing radiation. Commercial facilities may irradiate meat at refrigeration or frozen temperature, or packed in dry ice if the facility does not have refrigeration capabilities. The effect of temperature on the radiation resistance of Y. enterocolitica that contained the 70 kb large virulence plasmid was determined. A mixture of four Y. enterocolitica strains was inoculated into ground pork, which was then vacuum-packed, equilibrated to refrigeration or sub-freezing temperatures, and irradiated to doses of 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 kGy. The D(10) value, the radiation dose required to reduce the number of viable Y. enterocolitica by 90%, increased as product temperature decreased with values of 0.19, 0.19, 0.21, 0.40, 0.40. 0.38, and 0.55 kGy being obtained at +5, 0, -5, -10. -15, -20 and -76 °C, respectively. Meat product temperature should be considered when selecting a radiation dose required for elimination of Y. enterocolitica.

  17. Altered radiation responses of breast cancer cells resistant to hormonal therapy.

    PubMed

    Luzhna, Lidiya; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-30

    Endocrine therapy agents (the selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators such as tamoxifen or the selective ER down-regulators such as ICI 182,780) are key treatment regimens for hormone receptor-positive breast cancers. While these drugs are very effective in controlling ER-positive breast cancer, many tumors that initially respond well to treatment often acquire drug resistance, which is a major clinical problem. In clinical practice, hormonal therapy agents are commonly used in combination or sequence with radiation therapy. Tamoxifen treatment and radiotherapy improve both local tumor control and patient survival. However, tamoxifen treatment may render cancer cells less responsive to radiation therapy. Only a handful of data exist on the effects of radiation on cells resistant to hormonal therapy agents. These scarce data show that cells that were resistant to tamoxifen were also resistant to radiation. Yet, the existence and mechanisms of cross-resistance to endocrine therapy and radiation therapy need to be established. Here, we for the first time examined and compared radiation responses of MCF-7 breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7/S0.5) and two antiestrogen resistant cell lines derived from MCF-7/S0.5: the tamoxifen resistant MCF-7/TAMR-1 and ICI 182,780 resistant MCF-7/182R-6 cell lines. Specifically, we analyzed the radiation-induced changes in the expression of genes involved in DNA damage, apoptosis, and cell cycle regulation. We found that the tamoxifen-resistant cell line in contrast to the parental and ICI 182,780-resistant cell lines displayed a significantly less radiation-induced decrease in the expression of genes involved in DNA repair. Furthermore, we show that MCF-7/TAMR-1 and MCF-7/182R-6 cells were less susceptible to radiation-induced apoptosis as compared to the parental line. These data indicate that tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer cells have a reduced sensitivity to radiation treatment. The current study may therefore serve as a

  18. Increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation by targeting the homologous recombination pathway in glioma initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yi Chieh; Roberts, Tara L; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Kozlov, Sergei; Fazry, Shazrul; Bruce, Zara C; Ensbey, Kathleen S; Walker, David G; Boyd, Andrew W; Lavin, Martin F

    2014-12-01

    Glioblastoma is deemed the most malignant form of brain tumour, particularly due to its resistance to conventional treatments. A small surviving group of aberrant stem cells termed glioma initiation cells (GICs) that escape surgical debulking are suggested to be the cause of this resistance. Relatively quiescent in nature, GICs are capable of driving tumour recurrence and undergo lineage differentiation. Most importantly, these GICs are resistant to radiotherapy, suggesting that radioresistance contribute to their survival. In a previous study, we demonstrated that GICs had a restricted double strand break (DSB) repair pathway involving predominantly homologous recombination (HR) associated with a lack of functional G1/S checkpoint arrest. This unusual behaviour led to less efficient non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair and overall slower DNA DSB repair kinetics. To determine whether specific targeting of the HR pathway with small molecule inhibitors could increase GIC radiosensitivity, we used the Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated inhibitor (ATMi) to ablate HR and the DNA-dependent protein kinase inhibitor (DNA-PKi) to inhibit NHEJ. Pre-treatment with ATMi prior to ionizing radiation (IR) exposure prevented HR-mediated DNA DSB repair as measured by Rad51 foci accumulation. Increased cell death in vitro and improved in vivo animal survival could be observed with combined ATMi and IR treatment. Conversely, DNA-PKi treatment had minimal impact on GICs ability to resolve DNA DSB after IR with only partial reduction in cell survival, confirming the major role of HR. These results provide a mechanistic insight into the predominant form of DNA DSB repair in GICs, which when targeted may be a potential translational approach to increase patient survival. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Potato tuber herbivory increases resistance to aboveground lepidopteran herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pavan; Ortiz, Erandi Vargas; Garrido, Etzel; Poveda, Katja; Jander, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Plants mediate interactions between aboveground and belowground herbivores. Although effects of root herbivory on foliar herbivores have been documented in several plant species, interactions between tuber-feeding herbivores and foliar herbivores are rarely investigated. We report that localized tuber damage by Tecia solanivora (Guatemalan tuber moth) larvae reduced aboveground Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) performance on Solanum tuberosum (potato). Conversely, S. exigua leaf damage had no noticeable effect on belowground T. solanivora performance. Tuber infestation by T. solanivora induced systemic plant defenses and elevated resistance to aboveground herbivores. Lipoxygenase 3 (Lox3), which contributes to the synthesis of plant defense signaling molecules, had higher transcript abundance in T. solanivora-infested leaves and tubers than in equivalent control samples. Foliar expression of the hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HQT) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase I (HMGR1) genes, which are involved in chlorogenic acid and steroidal glycoalkaloid biosynthesis, respectively, also increased in response to tuber herbivory. Leaf metabolite profiling demonstrated the accumulation of unknown metabolites as well as the known potato defense compounds chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine. When added to insect diet at concentrations similar to those found in potato leaves, chlorogenic acid, α-solanine, and α-chaconine all reduced S. exigua larval growth. Thus, despite the fact that tubers are a metabolic sink tissue, T. solanivora feeding elicits a systemic signal that induces aboveground resistance against S. exigua and S. frugiperda by increasing foliar abundance of defensive metabolites.

  20. The effects of low-level ionizing radiation and copper exposure on the incidence of antibiotic resistance in lentic biofilm bacteria.

    PubMed

    McArthur, J Vaun; Dicks, Christian A; Bryan, A Lawrence; Tuckfield, R Cary

    2017-09-01

    Environmental reservoirs of antibiotic resistant bacteria are poorly understood. Understanding how the environment selects for resistance traits in the absence of antibiotics is critical in developing strategies to mitigate this growing menace. Indirect or co-selection of resistance by environmental pollution has been shown to increase antibiotic resistance. However no attention has been given to the effects of low-level ionizing radiation or the interactions between radiation and heavy metals on the maintenance or selection for antibiotic resistance (AR) traits. Here we explore the effect of radiation and copper on antibiotic resistance. Bacteria were collected from biofilms in two ponds - one impacted by low-level radiocesium and the other an abandoned farm pond. Through laboratory controlled experiments we examined the effects of increasing concentrations of copper on the incidence of antibiotic resistance. Differences were detected in the resistance profiles of the controls from each pond. Low levels (0.01 mM) of copper sulfate increased resistance but 0.5 mM concentrations of copper sulfate depressed the AR response in both ponds. A similar pattern was observed for levels of multiple antibiotic resistance per isolate. The first principal component response of isolate exposure to multiple antibiotics showed significant differences among the six isolate treatment combinations. These differences were clearly visualized through a discriminant function analysis, which showed distinct antibiotic resistance response patterns based on the six treatment groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Accumulation of Mn(II) in Deinococcus radiodurans Facilitates Gamma-Radiation Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Daly, Michael J.; Gaidamakova, E; Matrosova, V; Vasilenko, A; Zhai, M; Venkateswaran, Amudhan; Hess, M; Omelchenko, M V.; Kostandarithes, Heather M.; Makarova, S; Wackett, L. P.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Ghosal, D

    2004-11-05

    Deinococcus radiodurans is extremely resistant to ionizing radiation. How this bacterium can grow under chronic gamma-radiation (50 Gy/hour) or recover from acute doses greater than 10 kGy is unknown. We show that D. radiodurans accumulates very high intracellular manganese and low iron levels compared to radiation sensitive bacteria, and resistance exhibits a concentration-dependent response to Mn(II). Among the most radiation-resistant bacterial groups reported, Deinococcus, Enterococcus, Lactobacillus and cyanobacteria spp. accumulate Mn(II). In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis and Pseudomonas putida have high Fe but low intracellular Mn concentrations and are very sensitive. We propose that Mn(II) accumulation facilitates recovery from radiation injury.

  2. Optimization of a conical antenna for pulse radiation - An efficient design using resistive loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, James G.; Smith, Glenn S.

    1993-07-01

    The conical monopole antenna with a section of continuous resistive loading is considered as a radiator for temporally short, broad-bandwidth pulses. The geometrical details of the coaxial feed and the resistive loading are varied to optimize this structure for pulse radiation. Compared with the perfectly conducting cone, the optimized resistive cone radiates a better reproduction of the pulse excitation with no loss in amplitude, and has internal reflections that are much smaller in amplitude. Graphical displays of the field surrounding the antenna are used to give insight into the physical processes for transient radiation from this antenna. Experimental models were constructed to verify the optimization and demonstrate the practicality of the design. Measurements of both the reflected voltage in the feed line and the time-varying radiated field are in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations.

  3. Inhibition of TGF-β signaling in normal lung epithelial cells confers resistance to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Anna; Zagurovskaya, Marianna; Gupta, Seema; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To address the functional role of radiation-induced TGF-β signaling in normal epithelial background, we selected spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell line derived from the normal lung tissue of dominant-negative mutant of TGF-β RII (ΔRII) transgenic mouse that expressed conditionally ΔRII under the control of metallothionein promoter (MT-1) and assessed it's impact on radio-sensitivity. Method and Materials Spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell culture (SILECC) was established and all analyses were performed within 50 passages. Colony-forming and TUNEL assays were used to assess the clonogenic inhibition and apoptosis respectively. Western blot analysis was performed to assess the kinetics of p21, bax and RII proteins. TGF-β responsive promoter activity was measured using dual-luciferase reporter assay. Results Exposure to ZnSO4 inhibited TGF-β signaling induced either by recombinant TGF-β1 or ionizing radiation. SILECC treated either with ZnSO4 or neutralizing antibody against TGF-β showed a significant increase in radio-resistance when compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, the expression of the ΔRII inhibited the radiation-induced up-regulation of the TGF-β effector gene p21waf1/cip1.. Conclusions Our findings imply that inhibition of radiation-induced TGF-β signaling via abrogation of RII function enhances radio-resistance of the normal lung epithelial cells, and this can be directly attributed to the loss of TGF-β signaling function. PMID:17448872

  4. MiR-224 expression increases radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Upraity, Shailendra; Kazi, Sadaf; Padul, Vijay; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2014-05-30

    Highlights: • MiR-224 expression in established glioblastoma cell lines and sporadic tumor tissues is low. • Exogenous miR-224 expression was found to increase radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • MiR-224 expression brought about 55–60% reduction in API5 expression levels. • Transfection with API5 siRNA increased radiation sensitivity of glioblastoma cells. • Low miR-224 and high API5 expression correlated with worse survival of GBM patients. - Abstract: Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly aggressive primary malignant brain tumor. The intrinsic resistance of this brain tumor limits the efficacy of administered treatment like radiation therapy. In the present study, effect of miR-224 expression on growth characteristics of established GBM cell lines was analyzed. MiR-224 expression in the cell lines as well as in primary GBM tumor tissues was found to be low. Exogenous transient expression of miR-224 using either synthetic mimics or stable inducible expression using doxycycline inducible lentiviral vector carrying miR-224 gene, was found to bring about 30–55% reduction in clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells. MiR-224 expression reduced clonogenic potential of U87 MG cells by 85–90% on irradiation at a dose of 6 Gy, a dose that brought about 50% reduction in clonogenic potential in the absence of miR-224 expression. MiR-224 expression in glioblastoma cells resulted in 55–65% reduction in the expression levels of API5 gene, a known target of miR-224. Further, siRNA mediated down-regulation of API5 was also found to have radiation sensitizing effect on glioblastoma cell lines. Analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas data showed lower miR-224 expression levels in male GBM patients to correlate with poorer survival. Higher expression levels of miR-224 target API5 also showed significant correlation with poorer survival of GBM patients. Up-regulation of miR-224 or down-regulation of its target API5 in combination with radiation therapy

  5. National Alliance for Radiation Readiness: Leveraging Partnerships to Increase Preparedness.

    PubMed

    Blumenstock, James S; Allen, Meredith

    2016-02-01

    The National Alliance for Radiation Readiness (NARR) is an alliance of 16 national member organizations that have banded together to serve as the collective "voice of health" in radiological preparedness through: • participation in national dialogues on radiological emergency issues; • provision of thoughtful feedback on documents, policies, and guidelines; and • convening of partners to raise awareness of and resolve radiological emergency issues. NARR benefits from the intersection and interaction of public health, radiation control, healthcare, and emergency management professionals--all with an interest in bolstering the nation's preparedness for a radiological or nuclear incident. NARR is able to provide a unique perspective on radiological and nuclear preparedness by creating multi-disciplinary workgroups to develop guidance, recommendations, and provide subject matter feedback. NARR aims to build response and recovery capacity and capabilities by supporting the sharing of resources and tools, including technical methods and information through the development of an online clearinghouse. NARR also aims to identify and disseminate best practices, as well as define and educate on the roles and responsibilities of local, state, and federal government and the numerous agencies involved with the response to a radiological emergency.

  6. Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation

    SciTech Connect

    Hazawa, Masaharu; Tomiyama, Kenichi; Saotome-Nakamura, Ai; Obara, Chizuka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Gotoh, Takaya; Tanaka, Izumi; Yakumaru, Haruko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Tajima, Katsushi

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Radiation increases cellular uptake of exosomes. • Radiation induces colocalization of CD29 and CD81. • Exosomes selectively bind the CD29/CD81 complex. • Radiation increases the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. - Abstract: Exosomes mediate intercellular communication, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) or their secreted exosomes affect a number of pathophysiologic states. Clinical applications of MSC and exosomes are increasingly anticipated. Radiation therapy is the main therapeutic tool for a number of various conditions. The cellular uptake mechanisms of exosomes and the effects of radiation on exosome–cell interactions are crucial, but they are not well understood. Here we examined the basic mechanisms and effects of radiation on exosome uptake processes in MSC. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes. Radiation markedly enhanced the initial cellular attachment to exosomes and induced the colocalization of integrin CD29 and tetraspanin CD81 on the cell surface without affecting their expression levels. Exosomes dominantly bound to the CD29/CD81 complex. Knockdown of CD29 completely inhibited the radiation-induced uptake, and additional or single knockdown of CD81 inhibited basal uptake as well as the increase in radiation-induced uptake. We also examined possible exosome uptake processes affected by radiation. Radiation-induced changes did not involve dynamin2, reactive oxygen species, or their evoked p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent endocytic or pinocytic pathways. Radiation increased the cellular uptake of exosomes through CD29/CD81 complex formation. These findings provide essential basic insights for potential therapeutic applications of exosomes or MSC in combination with radiation.

  7. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0582 TITLE: ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL...Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0582 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6... therapy , which represents a primary treatment modality for localized prostate cancer. In the fifth year of this grant period, we have accomplished

  8. Increase of Ionizing Radiation at the Pfotzer Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Enrique; Carmichael-Coker, Michele

    2015-04-01

    Verso l'alto is a multi-disciplinary research and development project whose goal is to gain insight into the cosmic ray profile of the atmosphere and geolocation of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) over North Carolina, USA. This experiment is comprised of high-altitude weather balloons carrying radiation, pressure and temperature detectors. Eight successful balloon flights have been completed from October 2012-June 2014. Live tracking and telemetry of the flight is performed by an amateur radio communications payload, and beacon coordinates are uploaded to aprs.fi for real-time access online. We conclude that fluctuation peaks within the tropopause are due to the Pfotzer Maximum. Other statistically significant peaks within the time scale of minutes are observed. All data sets confirm peak counts within the Pfotzer Maximum, ranging from altitudes 13.4-22 km (44,146-72,441 feet).

  9. Increased susceptibility to radiofrequency radiation due to pharmacological agents

    SciTech Connect

    Jauchem, J.R.; Frei, M.R.; Heinmets, F.

    1984-11-01

    The effects of chlorpromazine, methysergide, and propranolol on thermal responses to 2.8 GHz radiofrequency radiation were examined in anesthetized rats. During intermittent exposure at an average power density of 60 mW/sq cm (specific absorption rate, 14 W/kg), when colonic temperature was not allowed to rise above 39.5 C, none of the pharmacological agents had any significant effects on thermal responses. When exposure was continued until lethal temperatures resulted, animals which were administered chlorpromazine, methysergide, or propranolol exhibited significantly shorter survival times than saline-treated animals. Propranolol administration caused the greatest decrease in survival time and resulted in a significantly lower lethal temperature than that which occurred in saline-treated animals. 29 references.

  10. Carboxylesterase-mediated insecticide resistance: Quantitative increase induces broader metabolic resistance than qualitative change.

    PubMed

    Cui, Feng; Li, Mei-Xia; Chang, Hai-Jing; Mao, Yun; Zhang, Han-Ying; Lu, Li-Xia; Yan, Shuai-Guo; Lang, Ming-Lin; Liu, Li; Qiao, Chuan-Ling

    2015-06-01

    Carboxylesterases are mainly involved in the mediation of metabolic resistance of many insects to organophosphate (OP) insecticides. Carboxylesterases underwent two divergent evolutionary events: (1) quantitative mechanism characterized by the overproduction of carboxylesterase protein; and (2) qualitative mechanism caused by changes in enzymatic properties because of mutation from glycine/alanine to aspartate at the 151 site (G/A151D) or from tryptophan to leucine at the 271 site (W271L), following the numbering of Drosophila melanogaster AChE. Qualitative mechanism has been observed in few species. However, whether this carboxylesterase mutation mechanism is prevalent in insects remains unclear. In this study, wild-type, G/A151D and W271L mutant carboxylesterases from Culex pipiens and Aphis gossypii were subjected to germline transformation and then transferred to D. melanogaster. These germlines were ubiquitously expressed as induced by tub-Gal4. In carboxylesterase activity assay, the introduced mutant carboxylesterase did not enhance the overall carboxylesterase activity of flies. This result indicated that G/A151D or W271L mutation disrupted the original activities of the enzyme. Less than 1.5-fold OP resistance was only observed in flies expressing A. gossypii mutant carboxylesterases compared with those expressing A. gossypii wild-type carboxylesterase. However, transgenic flies universally showed low resistance to OP insecticides compared with non-transgenic flies. The flies expressing A. gossypii W271L mutant esterase exhibited 1.5-fold resistance to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide compared with non-transgenic flies. The present transgenic Drosophila system potentially showed that a quantitative increase in carboxylesterases induced broader resistance of insects to insecticides than a qualitative change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Near-surface silica does not increase radiative heat dissipation from plant leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olof Björn, Lars; Li, Shaoshan

    2011-07-01

    It has been suggested that plants are able to increase radiative heat dissipation from their leaves by depositing near-surface silica, in this way increasing emissivity of infrared radiation and lowering leaf temperature. In order to test this theory, we have compared emissivity and radiative dissipation over the mid-infrared range 2.5-22.3 μm of leaves of plants that accumulate silica and plants that do not. Our data do not support the theory that accumulation of silica increases radiative heat dissipation by plant leaves.

  12. A NUMERICAL TREATMENT OF ANISOTROPIC RADIATION FIELDS COUPLED WITH RELATIVISTIC RESISTIVE MAGNETOFLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki R.; Ohsuga, Ken

    2013-08-01

    We develop a numerical scheme for solving fully special relativistic, resistive radiation magnetohydrodynamics. Our code guarantees conservation of total mass, momentum, and energy. The radiation energy density and the radiation flux are consistently updated using the M-1 closure method, which can resolve an anisotropic radiation field, in contrast to the Eddington approximation, as well as the flux-limited diffusion approximation. For the resistive part, we adopt a simple form of Ohm's law. The advection terms are explicitly solved with an approximate Riemann solver, mainly the Harten-Lax-van Leer scheme; the HLLC and HLLD schemes are also solved for some tests. The source terms, which describe the gas-radiation interaction and the magnetic energy dissipation, are implicitly integrated, relaxing the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition even in an optically thick regime or a large magnetic Reynolds number regime. Although we need to invert 4 Multiplication-Sign 4 matrices (for the gas-radiation interaction) and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 matrices (for the magnetic energy dissipation) at each grid point for implicit integration, they are obtained analytically without preventing massive parallel computing. We show that our code gives reasonable outcomes in numerical tests for ideal magnetohydrodynamics, propagating radiation, and radiation hydrodynamics. We also applied our resistive code to the relativistic Petschek-type magnetic reconnection, revealing the reduction of the reconnection rate via radiation drag.

  13. Enhanced Radiation Resistance of Methanosarcina soligelidi SMA-21, a New Methanogenic Archaeon Isolated from a Siberian Permafrost-Affected Soil in Direct Comparison to Methanosarcina barkeri.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Daria; Moeller, Ralf; Rettberg, Petra; Wagner, Dirk

    2015-11-01

    Permafrost-affected soils are characterized by a high abundance and diversity of methanogenic communities, which are considered suitable model organisms for potential life on Mars. Methanogens from Siberian permafrost have been proven to be highly resistant against divers stress conditions such as subzero temperatures, desiccation, and simulated thermophysical martian conditions. Here, we studied the radiation resistance of the currently described new species Methanosarcina soligelidi SMA-21, which was isolated from a Siberian permafrost-affected soil, in comparison to Methanosarcina barkeri, which is used as a reference organism from a nonpermafrost soil environment. Both strains were exposed to solar UV and ionizing radiation to assess their limits of survival. Methanosarcina soligelidi exhibit an increase in radiation resistance to UV (2.5- to 13.8-fold) and ionizing radiation (46.6-fold) compared to M. barkeri. The F10 (UVC) and D10 (X-rays) values of M. soligelidi are comparable to values for the well-known, highly radioresistant species Deinococcus radiodurans. In contrast, the radiation response of M. barkeri was highly sensitive to UV and ionizing radiation comparably to Escherichia coli and other radiosensitive microorganisms. This study showed that species of the same genus respond differently to UV and ionizing radiation, which might reflect the adaptation of Methanosarcina soligelidi SMA-21 to the harsh environmental conditions of the permafrost habitat. Methanogenic archaea-Environmental UV-Ionizing radiation-Permafrost-Radiation resistance-Mars.

  14. Lin28 mediates radiation resistance of breast cancer cells via regulation of caspase, H2A.X and Let-7 signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linbo; Yuan, Chao; Lv, Kezhen; Xie, Shuduo; Fu, Peifen; Liu, Xiaojiao; Chen, Yongxia; Qin, Chuan; Deng, Wuguo; Hu, Wenxian

    2013-01-01

    Resistance to radiation therapy is a major obstacle for the effective treatment of cancers. Lin28 has been shown to contribute to breast tumorigenesis; however, the relationship between Lin28 and radioresistance remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the association of Lin28 with radiation resistance and identified the underlying mechanisms of action of Lin28 in human breast cancer cell lines. The results showed that the expression level of Lin28 was closely associated with resistance to radiation treatment. The T47D cancer cell line, which highly expresses Lin28, is more resistant to radiation than MCF7, Bcap-37 or SK-BR-3 cancer cell lines, which have low-level Lin28 expression. Transfection with Lin28 siRNA significantly led to an increase of sensitivity to radiation. By contrast, stable expression of Lin28 in breast cancer cells effectively attenuated the sensitivity to radiation treatment. Stable expression of Lin28 also significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis. Moreover, further studies have shown that caspases, H2A.X and Let-7 miRNA were the molecular targets of Lin28. Stable expression of Lin28 and treatment with radiation induced H2AX expression, while inhibited p21 and γ-H2A.X. Overexpression of Let-7 enhanced the sensitivities to radiation in breast cancer cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Lin28 might be one mechanism underlying radiation resistance, and Lin28 could be a potential target for overcoming radiation resistance in breast cancer.

  15. Silicon space solar cells: progression and radiation-resistance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Atteq ur; Lee, Sang Hee; Lee, Soo Hong

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, an overview of the solar cell technology based on silicon for applications in space is presented. First, the space environment and its effects on the basis of satellite orbits, such as geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO), are described. The space solar cell technology based on silicon-based materials, including thin-film silicon solar cells, for use in space was appraised. The evolution of the design for silicon solar cell for use in space, such as a backsurface field (BSF), selective doping, and both-side passivation, etc., is illustrated. This paper also describes the nature of radiation-induced defects and the models proposed for understanding the output power degradation in silicon space solar cells. The phenomenon of an anomalous increase in the short-circuit current ( I sc) in the fluence irradiation range from 2 × 1016 cm-2 to 5 × 1016 cm-2 is also described explicitly from the view point of the various presented models.

  16. Acid ceramidase in prostate cancer radiation therapy resistance and relapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Joseph C.

    Prostate tumor cell escape from ionizing radiation (IR)-induced killing can lead to disease progression and relapse. Sphingolipids such as ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate influence signal transduction pathways that regulate stress response in cancer cells. In particular, metabolism of apoptotic ceramide constitutes an important survival adaptation. Assessments of enzyme activity, mRNA, and protein demonstrated preferential upregulation of the ceramide deacylating enzyme acid ceramidase (AC) in irradiated cancer cells. Promoter-reporter and ChIP-qPCR assays revealed AC transcription by activator protein 1 (AP-1) is sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of de novo ceramide biosynthesis, identifying a protective feedback mechanism that mitigates the effects of IR-induced ceramide. Deregulation of c-Jun, in particular, induced marked radiosensitization in vitro and in vivo, which was rescued by ectopic AC over-expression. AC over-expression in prostate cancer clonogens surviving 80 Gray fractionated irradiation was associated with increased radioresistance and proliferation, suggesting a role in radiotherapy failure and relapse. Indeed, immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate cancer tissues revealed higher levels of AC after radiotherapy failure than therapy-naive adenocarcinoma, PIN, or benign tissues. By genetically downregulating AC with small interfering RNA (siRNA), we observed radiosensitization of cells using clonogenic and cytotoxicity assays. Finally, treatment with lysosomotropic small molecule inhibitors of AC, LCL385 or LCL521, induced prostate cancer xenograft radiosensitization and long-term suppression, suggesting AC is a tractable target for adjuvant radiotherapy.

  17. A study on measurement of radiation resistance of Pyronema domesticum sclerotia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoshuang, Y. Y.; Ailian, W. W.; Ying, Z. Z.

    2000-03-01

    Measurements of radiation resistance have been carried out using two strains of Pyronema domesticum which were isolated from Chinese cotton swab gauze. A "sand-washing" technique was developed to overcome the difficulties when harvesting sclerotia spores from cultured plates and preparing spore suspensions for further use. Three types of microbial preparations, spore suspension, inoculated cotton and spore dot, were exposed to gamma radiation. A dose-survival curve method and a fraction positive method were employed to determine radiation resistance. D 10 values derived from this study are within the range of 2.0-3.0 kGy. Concerns associated with the current study indicate that further work is needed.

  18. Low-intensity resistance training after high-intensity resistance training can prevent the increase of central arterial stiffness.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Masuhara, M; Ikuta, K

    2013-05-01

    Although high-intensity resistance training increases arterial stiffness, low-intensity resistance training reduces arterial stiffness. The present study investigates the effect of low-intensity resistance training before and after high-intensity resistance training on arterial stiffness. 30 young healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a group that performed low-intensity resistance training before high-intensity resistance training (BLRT, n=10), a group that performed low-intensity resistance training after high-intensity resistance training (ALRT, n=10) and a sedentary control group (n=10). The BLRT and ALRT groups performed resistance training at 80% and 50% of one repetition maximum twice each week for 10 wk. Arterial stiffness was measured using carotid-femoral and femoral-ankle pulse wave velocity (PWV). One-repetition maximum strength in the both ALRT and BLRT significantly increased after the intervention (P<0.05 to P<0.01). Both carotid-femoral PWV and femoral-ankle PWV after combined training in the ALRT group did not change from before training. In contrast, carotid-femoral PWV after combined training in the BLRT group increased from before training (P <0.05). Femoral-ankle PWV after combined training in the both BLRT and ALRT groups did not change from before training. These results suggest that although arterial stiffness is increased by low-intensity resistance training before high-intensity resistance training, performing low-intensity resistance training thereafter can prevent the increase of arterial stiffness.

  19. Multiple-stress tolerance of ionizing radiation-resistant bacterial isolates obtained from various habitats: correlation between stresses.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Manish; Chaturvedi, Ruchi; Tamhane, Dhruti; Vyas, Pranav; Archana, G; Apte, Shree; Bandekar, J; Desai, Anjana

    2007-02-01

    Isolation of five ionizing radiation (IR)-resistant bacteria by screening of isolates from various habitats classified as common and stressed is reported. IR-resistant isolates exhibited varying degrees of resistance to gamma-radiation and were classified as highly and moderately radiation resistant. Resistance to ultraviolet (UV) radiation correlated well with gamma-radiation resistance, whereas a comparable desiccation resistance for all the highly and moderately radiation-resistant isolates was observed. However, salt tolerance failed to correlate with IR resistance, indicating a divergent evolution of the salt tolerance and radiation resistance. Characterization of isolates by the amplified rDNA restriction analysis profiling attested to the clustering of these isolates with their stress phenotype. 16S rRNA gene-based analysis of the isolates showed that the bacteria with similar-resistance physiologies clustered together and belonged to related genera. Hydrogen peroxide resistance and mitomycin survival patterns of the isolates indicated the roles of oxidative-stress tolerance in desiccation survival and recombination repair in higher radiation resistance, respectively.

  20. Present status and prospects of R&D of radiation-resistant semiconductor devices at JAEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, H.

    2013-05-01

    Research and development of radiation resistant semiconductor devices have been performed at Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) for their application to electronic system used in harsh environments like space, accelerator and nuclear facilities. Such devices are also indispensable for robots and equipment necessary for decommissioning of the damaged reactors at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plants. For this purpose, we have fabricated transistors based on a wide band-gap semiconductor SiC and examined their radiation degradation. As a result, SiC-based transistors exhibited no significant degradation up to 1MGy, indicating their excellent radiation resistance. Recent our R&Ds of radiation resistant devices based on SiC are summarized and reviewed.

  1. Cobalt-60 gamma radiation increased the nitric oxide generation in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Guang Zhen; Chen, Feng Rong; Bu, Ding Fang; Wang, Shu Heng; Pang, Yong Zheng; Tang, Chao Shu

    2004-05-07

    Radiation is a promising and new treatment for restenosis following angioplasty. Nitric oxide has been proposed as a potential "anti-restenotic" molecule. We radiated the cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells with Cobalt-60 gamma radiation at doses of 14 and 25Gy and observed nitrite production, cGMP content, L-arginine uptake, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity, and the gene expression of iNOS. Results showed that radiation at doses of 14 and 25Gy increased cGMP content by 92.4% and 86.4%, respectively. Radiation at the dose of 25Gy increased the iNOS activity and nitrite content, but radiation at the dose of 14Gy had no significant effect on iNOS activity and NO production. Both doses of radiation significantly decreased the L-arginine transport. Radiation at the doses of 14 and 25Gy increased iNOS gene expression significantly, which was consistent with the effect of radiation on iNOS activity. In conclusion, radiation induces the NO generation by up-regulating the iNOS activity.

  2. Why are breast cancer stem cells resistant to radiation?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    mutant (amino acids 501-625)- induced apoptosis occurs through the JNK/p38-Bax- dependent mitochondrial pathway. J. Cell. Biochem., 92, 1257-1270...C for various times (0.5-12 hr) before western blot analysis (Fig. 6C). As shown in Figure 6C, ionizing radiation- induced phosphorylation of ATM ...Cells were incubated with rabbit Figure 6. Ionizing radiation- induced phosphorylation of ATM and effect of ATM inhibitor CP466722 on radiosensitivity

  3. Phytosphingosine in combination with ionizing radiation enhances apoptotic cell death in radiation-resistant cancer cells through ROS-dependent and -independent AIF release.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon-Taek; Kim, Min-Jung; Kang, Young-Hee; Choi, Soon-Young; Lee, Jae-Hoon; Choi, Jung-A; Kang, Chang-Mo; Cho, Chul-Koo; Kang, Seongman; Bae, Sangwoo; Lee, Yun-Sil; Chung, Hee Yong; Lee, Su-Jae

    2005-02-15

    The use of chemical modifiers as radiosensitizers in combination with low-dose irradiation may increase the therapeutic effect on cancer by overcoming a high apoptotic threshold. Here, we showed that phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation enhanced apoptotic cell death of radiation-resistant human T-cell lymphoma in a caspase-independent manner. Combination treatment induced an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, mitochondrial relocalization of B-cell lymphoma-2(Bcl-2)-associated X protein (Bax), poly-adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1) activation, and nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). siRNA targeting of AIF effectively protected cells from the combination treatment-induced cell death. An antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), inhibited Bax relocalization and AIF translocation but not PARP-1 activation. Moreover, transfection of Bax-siRNA significantly inhibited AIF translocation. Pretreatment of PARP-1 inhibitor, DPQ (3,4-dihydro-5-[4-(1-piperidinyl)-butoxy]-1(2H)-isoquinolinone), or PARP-1-siRNA also partially attenuated AIF translocation, whereas the same treatment did not affect intracellular ROS level and Bax redistribution. Taken together, these results demonstrate that enhancement of cell death of radiation-resistant cancer cells by phytosphingosine treatment in combination with gamma-radiation is mediated by nuclear translocation of AIF, which is in turn mediated both by ROS-dependent Bax relocalization and ROS-independent PARP-1 activation. The molecular signaling pathways that we elucidated in this study may provide potential drug targets for radiation sensitization of cancers refractive to radiation therapy.

  4. Whole apple extracts increase lifespan, healthspan and resistance to stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Vayndorf, Elena M; Lee, Siu Sylvia; Liu, Rui Hai

    2013-07-01

    Regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is associated with reduced risk of age-related functional decline and chronic diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. These effects are primarily attributed to phytochemicals, plant compounds with a wide range of biological activities and health benefits. Apples, the top contributor of fruit phenolics in American diets, have high antioxidant, antiproliferative and chemopreventive activity in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known about their effects on aging. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of whole apple phytochemical extracts on lifespan, healthspan and resistance to various stresses in vivo using C. elegans as a model. The mean and maximum lifespan of animals treated with 2.5, 5 and 10 mg/ml whole apple extracts increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner by up to 39 and 25%, respectively. Healthspan also significantly improved as indicated by improved motility and reduced lipofuscin accumulation. Animals pre-treated with whole apple extracts were more resistant to stresses such as heat, UV radiation, paraquat-induced oxidative stress, and pathogenic infection, suggesting that cellular defense and immune system functions also improved. Our findings indicate that, in C. elegans, whole apple extracts slow aging, extend lifespan, improve healthspan, and enhance resistance to stress.

  5. Selection for increased desiccation resistance in Drosophila melanogaster: Additive genetic control and correlated responses for other stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.A.; Parsons, P.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Previously we found that Drosophila melanogaster lines selected for increased desiccation resistance have lowered metabolic rate and behavioral activity levels, and show correlated responses for resistance to starvation and a toxic ethanol level. These results were consistent with a prediction that increased resistance to many environmental stresses may be genetically correlated because of a reduction in metabolic energy expenditure. Here we present experiments on the genetic basis of the selection response and extend the study of correlated responses to other stresses. The response to selection was not sex-specific and involved X-linked and autosomal genes acting additively. Activity differences contributed little to differences in desiccation resistance between selected and control lines. Selected lines had lower metabolic rates than controls in darkness when activity was inhibited. Adults from selected lines showed increased resistance to a heat shock, {sup 60}Co-gamma-radiation, and acute ethanol and acetic acid stress. The desiccation, ethanol and starvation resistance of isofemale lines set up from the F2s of a cross between one of the selected and one of the control lines were correlated. Selected and control lines did not differ in ether-extractable lipid content or in resistance to acetone, ether or a cold shock.

  6. Increasing Drug Resistance in Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Jessica; Moodley, Prashini; Moodley, Salona; Babaria, Palav; Ramtahal, Melissa; Heysell, Scott K.; Li, Xuan; Moll, Anthony P.; Friedland, Gerald; Sturm, A. Willem; Gandhi, Neel R.

    2011-01-01

    We expanded second-line tuberculosis (TB) drug susceptibility testing for extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from South Africa. Of 19 patients with extensively drug-resistant TB identified during February 2008–April 2009, 13 (68%) had isolates resistant to all 8 drugs tested. This resistance leaves no effective treatment with available drugs in South Africa. PMID:21392446

  7. Radiation resistance of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Uckun, F.M. Childrens Cancer Group, Arcadia, CA ); Aeppli, D.; Song, C.W. )

    1993-11-15

    Detailed comparative analyses of the radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) were performed to achieve a better understanding of clinical radiation resistance in ALL. The radiation sensitivity of primary clonogenic blasts from 74 children with newly diagnosed ALL was analyzed using leukemic progenitor cell (LPC) assays. Primary bone marrow blasts from all 74 patients were exposed to ionizing radiation and subsequently assayed for LPC-derived blast colony formation. Radiation survival curves of LPC were constructed for each of the newly diagnosed patients using computer programs for the single-hit multitarget as well as the linear quadratic models of cell survival. A marked interpatient variation in intrinsic radiation sensitivity was observed between LPC populations. The SF[sub 2] values ranged from 0.01 to 1.00. Patients were divided into groups according to their sex, age, WBC at diagnosis, cell cycle distribution of leukemic blasts, and immunophenotype. Only immunophenotype provided a significant correlation with the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of LPC. Patients with B-lineage ALL had higher SF[sub 2] and smaller [alpha] values than T-lineage ALL patients, consistent with greater intrinsic radiation resistance at the level of LPC. Notably, 43% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 27% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with SF[sub 2] [ge] 0.5. Similarly, 66% of B-lineage ALL cases, but only 37% of T-lineage ALL cases had LPC with [alpha] values [le] 0.4 Gy[sup [minus]1]. Combining the two indicators of radiation resistance, they found that only 34% of the B-lineage ALL patients had none of the two parameters in the respective critical regions, while 63% of the T-lineage patients had none. In multivariate analyses, the immunophenotypic B-lineage affiliation was the only significant predictor of radiation resistance at the level of LPC. 42 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. MO-E-213-01: Increasing Role of Medical Physicist in Radiation Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Rehani, M.

    2015-06-15

    The focus of work of medical physicists in 1980’s was on quality control and quality assurance. Radiation safety was important but was dominated by occupational radiation protection. A series of over exposures of patients in radiotherapy, nuclear medicine and observation of skin injuries among patients undergoing interventional procedures in 1990’s started creating the need for focus on patient protection. It gave medical physicists new directions to develop expertise in patient dosimetry and dose management. Publications creating awareness on cancer risks from CT in early part of the current century and over exposures in CT in 2008 brought radiation risks in public domain and created challenging situations for medical physicists. Increasing multiple exposures of individual patient and patient doses of few tens of mSv or exceeding 100 mSv are increasing the role of medical physicists. Expansion of usage of fluoroscopy in the hands of clinical professionals with hardly any training in radiation protection shall require further role for medical physicists. The increasing publications in journals, recent changes in Safety Standards, California law, all increase responsibilities of medical physicists in patient protection. Newer technological developments in dose efficiency and protective devices increase percentage of time devoted by medical physicists on radiation protection activities. Without radiation protection, the roles, responsibilities and day-to-day involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic radiology becomes questionable. In coming years either medical radiation protection may emerge as a specialty or medical physicists will have to keep major part of day-to-day work on radiation protection. Learning Objectives: To understand how radiation protection has been increasing its role in day-to-day activities of medical physicist To be aware about international safety Standards, national and State regulations that require higher attention to radiation

  9. Out of band radiation effects on resist patterning

    SciTech Connect

    George, Simi A .; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Our previous work estimated the expected out-of-band (OOB) flare contribution at the wafer level assuming that there is a given amount of OOB at the collector focus. We found that the OOB effects are wavelength, resist, and pattern dependent. In this paper, results from rigorous patterning evaluation of multiple OOB-exposed resists using the SEMATECH Berkeley 0.3-NA MET are presented. A controlled amount of OOB is applied to the resist films before patterning is completed with the MET. LER and process performance above the resolution limit and at the resolution limits are evaluated and presented. The results typically show a negative impact on LER and process performance after the OOB exposures except in the case of single resist formulation, where resolution and performance improvement was observed.

  10. Pyrroloquinoline quinone and a quinoprotein kinase support γ-radiation resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans and regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra Singh; Desai, Shruti Sumeet; Misra, Hari Sharan

    2013-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its extraordinary resistance to various DNA damaging agents including γ-radiation and desiccation. The pqqE:cat and Δdr2518 mutants making these cells devoid of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) and a PQQ inducible Ser/Thr protein kinase, respectively, became sensitive to γ-radiation. Transcriptome analysis of these mutants showed differential expression of the genes including those play roles in oxidative stress tolerance and (DSB) repair in D. radiodurans and in genome maintenance and stress response in other bacteria. Escherichia coli cells expressing DR2518 and PQQ showed improved resistance to γ-radiation, which increased further when both DR2518 and PQQ were present together. Although, profiles of genes getting affected in these mutants were different, there were still a few common genes showing similar expression trends in both the mutants and some others as reported earlier in oxyR and pprI mutant of this bacterium. These results suggested that PQQ and DR2518 have independent roles in γ-radiation resistance of D. radiodurans but their co-existence improves radioresistance further, possibly by regulating differential expression of the genes important for bacterial response to oxidative stress and DNA damage. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Basal DNA repair machinery is subject to positive selection in ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria.

    PubMed

    Sghaier, Haïtham; Ghedira, Kaïs; Benkahla, Alia; Barkallah, Insaf

    2008-06-21

    Ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) show a surprising capacity for adaptation to ionizing radiation and desiccation. Positive Darwinian selection is expected to play an important role in this trait, but no data are currently available regarding the role of positive adaptive selection in resistance to ionizing-radiation and tolerance of desiccation. We analyzed the four known genome sequences of IRRB (Deinococcus geothermalis, Deinococcus radiodurans, Kineococcus radiotolerans, and Rubrobacter xylanophilus) to determine the role of positive Darwinian selection in the evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation and tolerance of desiccation. We used the programs MultiParanoid and DnaSP to deduce the sets of orthologs that potentially evolved due to positive Darwinian selection in IRRB. We find that positive selection targets 689 ortholog sets of IRRB. Among these, 58 ortholog sets are absent in ionizing-radiation-sensitive bacteria (IRSB: Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus). The most striking finding is that all basal DNA repair genes in IRRB, unlike many of their orthologs in IRSB, are subject to positive selection. Our results provide the first in silico prediction of positively selected genes with potential roles in the molecular basis of resistance to gamma-radiation and tolerance of desiccation in IRRB. Identification of these genes provides a basis for future experimental work aimed at understanding the metabolic networks in which they participate.

  12. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Kimberly M.; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell. PMID:23209374

  13. Role of Mn2+ and compatible solutes in the radiation resistance of thermophilic bacteria and archaea.

    PubMed

    Webb, Kimberly M; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn(2+)-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  14. Afatinib increases sensitivity to radiation in non-small cell lung cancer cells with acquired EGFR T790M mutation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shirong; Zheng, Xiaoliang; Huang, Haixiu; Wu, Kan; Wang, Bing; Chen, Xufeng; Ma, Shenglin

    2015-03-20

    Afatinib is a second-generation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor and has shown a significant clinical benefit in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with EGFR-activating mutations. However, the potential therapeutic effects of afatinib combining with other modalities, including ionizing radiation (IR), are not well understood. In this study, we developed a gefitinib-resistant cell subline (PC-9-GR) with a secondary EGFR mutation (T790M) from NSCLC PC-9 cells after chronic exposures to increasing doses of gefitinib. The presence of afatinib significantly increases the cell killing effect of radiation in PC-9-GR cells harboring acquired T790M, but not in H1975 cells with de novo T790M or in H460 cells that express wild-type EGFR. In PC-9-GR cells, afatinib remarkable blocks baseline of EGFR and ERK phosphorylations, and causes delay of IR-induced AKT phosphorylation. Afatinib treatment also leads to increased apoptosis and suppressed DNA damage repair in irradiated PC-9-GR cells, and enhanced tumor growth inhibition when combined with IR in PC-9-GR xenografts. Our findings suggest a potential therapeutic impact of afatinib as a radiation sensitizer in lung cancer cells harboring acquired T790M mutation, providing a rationale for a clinical trial with combination of afatinib and radiation in NSCLCs with EGFR T790M mutation.

  15. Elimination of Listeria monocytogenes in sausage meat by combination treatment: Radiation and radiation-resistant bacteriocins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgis, Mélanie; Stotz, Viviane; Dupont, Claude; Salmieri, Stéphane; Khan, Ruhul A.; Lacroix, Monique

    2012-08-01

    Two new bacteria were isolated from human feces and were designated MT 104 and MT 162. They were able to produce bacteriocins that are active against five strains of Listeria monocytogenes. Bacteriocins produced by these isolated strains had 100% and 82.35% residual activity when they were treated by gamma radiation at doses of 4 and 40 kGy, respectively. A reduction of 1.0, 1.5 and 3 log CFU/g of L. monocytogenes was observed in sausage meat when treated with bacteriocins from MT 104, MT 162, and nisin, respectively. For synergic effect, the D10 value in presence of the bacteriocins produced by MT 104 showed a 1.08 fold increased relative sensitivity of L. monocytogenes as compared to control after 5 days. The highest synergic effect was observed in presence of nisin which led to 1.61 fold increased relative sensitivity. Combined treatments with nisin and γ-irradiation showed a synergic antimicrobial effect in meat after 24 h and 5 days of storage. A synergic effect was observed only after 5 days at 4 °C for the bacteriocin from MT 104, as compared to the bacteriocin produced by MT 162 that had only an additive antimicrobial effect in all conditions.

  16. Regional Differences in Metronidazole Resistance and Increasing Clarithromycin Resistance among Helicobacter pylori Isolates from Japan

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mototsugu; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Kim, Jae J.; Reddy, Rita; Asaka, Masahiro; Kashima, Kei; Osato, Michael S.; El-Zaatari, Fouad A. K.; Graham, David Y.; Kwon, Dong H.

    2000-01-01

    The patterns of antibiotic resistance in Helicobacter pylori were assessed in two different regions in Japan. Overall, prevalences of resistance to metronidazole and clarithromycin were 12.4 and 12.9%, respectively. While there was no difference in clarithromycin resistance, the prevalence of metronidazole resistance was significantly higher in Kyoto (23.8%) than in Sapporo (8.1%). From 1996 to 1999, the prevalence of metronidazole resistance did not change but the prevalence of clarithromycin resistance doubled (from 9.1 to 18.7%). PMID:10898707

  17. Cyanobacteria: photosynthetic factories combining biodiversity, radiation resistance, and genetics to facilitate drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Dive, Vincent; Chauvat, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are ancient, abundant, and widely diverse photosynthetic prokaryotes, which are viewed as promising cell factories for the ecologically responsible production of chemicals. Natural cyanobacteria synthesize a vast array of biologically active (secondary) metabolites with great potential for human health, while a few genetic models can be engineered for the (low level) production of biofuels. Recently, genome sequencing and mining has revealed that natural cyanobacteria have the capacity to produce many more secondary metabolites than have been characterized. The corresponding panoply of enzymes (polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthases) of interest for synthetic biology can still be increased through gene manipulations with the tools available for the few genetically manipulable strains. In this review, we propose to exploit the metabolic diversity and radiation resistance of cyanobacteria, and when required the genetics of model strains, for the production and radioactive ((14)C) labeling of bioactive products, in order to facilitate the screening for new drugs.

  18. Resistance Exercise and Inflammation in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Adjuvant Radiation Therapy: Mediation Analysis From a Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martina E; Meynköhn, Anna; Habermann, Nina; Wiskemann, Joachim; Oelmann, Jan; Hof, Holger; Wessels, Sabine; Klassen, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Potthoff, Karin; Steindorf, Karen; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2016-02-01

    To explore the mediating role of inflammatory parameters in the development of fatigue, pain, and potentially related depressive symptoms during radiation therapy for breast cancer and its mitigation by resistance exercise. Breast cancer patients scheduled for adjuvant radiation therapy were randomized to 12-week progressive resistance exercise training (EX) or a relaxation control group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) were measured in serum samples collected before, at the end, and 6 weeks after radiation therapy from 103 chemotherapy-naïve participants. Fatigue was assessed with the multidimensional Fatigue Assessment Questionnaire, pain with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30, and depressive symptoms with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. Analysis of covariance models, partial correlations, Freedman-Schatzkin tests, and R(2) effect-size measures for mediation were calculated. The analysis of covariance models revealed a significant intervention effect on IL-6 (P=.010) and the IL-6/IL-1ra ratio (P=.018), characterized by a marked increase during radiation therapy among controls, but no significant change in EX. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist did not change significantly in either group (P=.88). Increased IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra levels at the end of radiation therapy were significantly associated with increased physical fatigue and pain 6 weeks after radiation. We observed significant partial mediation by IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra of the effect of resistance exercise on physical fatigue (Freedman-Schatzkin P=.023 and P<.001) and pain (both P<.001). Hereby IL-6 and IL-6/IL-1ra mediated between 15% and 24% of the variance of physical fatigue and pain explained by the intervention. This randomized, controlled trial showed a significantly increased proinflammatory cytokine level after adjuvant radiation therapy in breast cancer patients. This effect was counteracted by

  19. Radiation Tolerant Interfaces: Influence of Local Stoichiometry at the Misfit Dislocation on Radiation Damage Resistance of Metal/Oxide Interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Shutthanandan, Vaithiyalingam; Choudhury, Samrat; Manandhar, Sandeep; ...

    2017-04-24

    The interaction of radiation with materials controls the performance, reliability, and safety of many structures in nuclear power systems. Revolutionary improvements in radiation damage resistance may be attainable if methods can be found to manipulate interface properties to give optimal interface stability and point defect recombination capability. To understand how variations in interface properties such as misfit dislocation density and local chemistry affect radiation-induced defect absorption and recombination, a model system of metallic CrxV1-x (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) epitaxial films deposited on MgO(001) single crystal substrates has been explored in this paper. By controlling film composition, the lattice mismatchmore » between the film and MgO is adjusted to vary the misfit dislocation density at the metal/oxide interface. The stability of these interfaces under various irradiation conditions is studied experimentally and theoretically. The results indicate that, unlike at metal/metal interfaces, the misfit dislocation density does not dominate radiation damage tolerance at metal/oxide interfaces. Rather, the stoichiometry and the location of the misfit dislocation extra half-plane (in the metal or the oxide) drive radiation-induced defect behavior. Finally, together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity of defect recombination to interfacial chemistry and provide new avenues for engineering radiation-tolerant nanomaterials for next-generation nuclear power plants.« less

  20. Development of high temperature, high radiation resistant silicon semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whorl, C. A.; Evans, A. W.

    1972-01-01

    The development of a hardened silicon power transistor for operation in severe nuclear radiation environments at high temperature was studied. Device hardness and diffusion techniques are discussed along with the geometries of hardened power transistor chips. Engineering drawings of 100 amp and 5 amp silicon devices are included.

  1. Increased tumor necrosis factor alpha mRNA after cellular exposure to ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Hallahan, D E; Spriggs, D R; Beckett, M A; Kufe, D W; Weichselbaum, R R

    1989-01-01

    We report that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) mRNA is increased after treatment with x-rays in certain human sarcoma cells. An increase in TNF-alpha mRNA is accompanied by the increased production of TNF-alpha protein. TNF-alpha enhances radiation lethality in both TNF-alpha-producing and -nonproducing tumor cells. These data suggest that, in addition to the direct cytotoxic effects of x-rays, production of TNF-alpha may add to radiation lethality through autocrine and paracrine mechanisms. Combinations of TNF-alpha and therapeutic radiation may be useful in clinical cancer therapy. Images PMID:2602359

  2. [Increased efficacy of radiation protection against fission neutrons using unithiol].

    PubMed

    Grachev, S A; Sverdlov, A G; Nikanorova, N G; Timoshenko, S I

    1999-01-01

    It was found that the combination of unithiol (Sodium salt of 2,3-dimercapto-1-propansulfonic acid) with cystamine and AET diminished their toxicity. The optimum ratio for the antitoxic effect is 0.5 molar equivalent of unithiol per radioprotective 1.0 equivalent of thiol. Animals withstand big doses of protectors well, that gives an opportunity to use increased amounts of cystamine and AET. In the experiments with circular irradiation of male (CBA x C57B1)F1 mice weighing 18-22 g with fission neutrons (the neutron mean energy was 0.85 MeV, the contribution of gamma-quanta to the total was 25%, dose rate was 14 cGy/min) it was shown that the combination of unithiol with cystamine and AET enhances their radioprotective effect: the DRF of cystamine (150 mg/kg)--1.1, and the DRF of the combination of cystamine (300 mg/kg) with unithiol (152 mg/kg)--1.2; the DRF of AET (150 mg/kg)--1.2, the DRF of the combination of AET (300 mg/kg) with unithiol--1.4. Thus, the enhancement of dose of the radioprotectors, which was made possible as a result of their combination with unithiol, leads to enhancement of efficacy of chemical protection against fission neutron irradiation as much as 10-20%. Efficacy of AET is found to be comparable to efficacy of this protector in conditions of X-rays irradiation.

  3. Methods of increasing the erosion resistance of powder metallurgy steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kulu, P.A.

    1987-09-01

    The authors comparatively assess the effects of a variety of surface hardening methods--including carburizing, boriding, chromizing, and carbochromizing, as well as the flame, plasma arc, and detonation spraying of nickel and molybdenum coatings--on the wear, corrosion resistance, and pore structure of steel 45, and outline testing procedures used to arrive at their results.

  4. Increasing the frost resistance of facade glazed tiles

    SciTech Connect

    Egerev, V.M.; Zotov, S.N.; Romanova, G.P.

    1986-09-01

    The authors investigate the protective properties of a coating of boron oxides and zirconium oxides applied as a glaze to ceramic tiles by conducting a series of tests to determine the frost resistance, the propensity to absorb water, the moisture expansion coefficient, the fracture behavior, and the effect of thermal cycling on the oxides. Results are graphed and tabulated.

  5. Alternative reinforcement increases resistance to change: Pavlovian or operant contingencies?

    PubMed Central

    Nevin, J A; Tota, M E; Torquato, R D; Shull, R L

    1990-01-01

    Two multiple-schedule experiments with pigeons examined the effect of adding food reinforcement from an alternative source on the resistance of the reinforced response (target response) to the decremental effects of satiation and extinction. In Experiment 1, key pecks were reinforced by food in two components according to variable-interval schedules and, in some conditions, food was delivered according to variable-time schedules in one of the components. The rate of key pecking in a component was negatively related to the proportion of reinforcers from the alternative (variable-time) source. Resistance to satiation and extinction, in contrast, was positively related to the overall rate of reinforcement in the component. Experiment 2 was conceptually similar except that the alternative reinforcers were contingent on a specific concurrent response. Again, the rate of the target response varied as a function of its relative reinforcement, but its resistance to satiation and extinction varied directly with the overall rate of reinforcement in the component stimulus regardless of its relative reinforcement. Together the results of the two experiments suggest that the relative reinforcement of a response (the operant contingency) determines its rate, whereas the stimulus-reinforcement contingency (a Pavlovian contingency) determines its resistance to change. PMID:2341820

  6. A National Radiation Oncology Medical Student Clerkship Survey: Didactic Curricular Components Increase Confidence in Clinical Competency

    SciTech Connect

    Jagadeesan, Vikrant S.; Raleigh, David R.; Koshy, Matthew; Howard, Andrew R.; Chmura, Steven J.; Golden, Daniel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Students applying to radiation oncology residency programs complete 1 or more radiation oncology clerkships. This study assesses student experiences and perspectives during radiation oncology clerkships. The impact of didactic components and number of clerkship experiences in relation to confidence in clinical competency and preparation to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident are evaluated. Methods and Materials: An anonymous, Internet-based survey was sent via direct e-mail to all applicants to a single radiation oncology residency program during the 2012-2013 academic year. The survey was composed of 3 main sections including questions regarding baseline demographic information and prior radiation oncology experience, rotation experiences, and ideal clerkship curriculum content. Results: The survey response rate was 37% (70 of 188). Respondents reported 191 unique clerkship experiences. Of the respondents, 27% (19 of 70) completed at least 1 clerkship with a didactic component geared towards their level of training. Completing a clerkship with a didactic component was significantly associated with a respondent's confidence to function as a first-year radiation oncology resident (Wilcoxon rank–sum P=.03). However, the total number of clerkships completed did not correlate with confidence to pursue radiation oncology as a specialty (Spearman ρ P=.48) or confidence to function as a first year resident (Spearman ρ P=.43). Conclusions: Based on responses to this survey, rotating students perceive that the majority of radiation oncology clerkships do not have formal didactic curricula. Survey respondents who completed a clerkship with a didactic curriculum reported feeling more prepared to function as a radiation oncology resident. However, completing an increasing number of clerkships does not appear to improve confidence in the decision to pursue radiation oncology as a career or to function as a radiation oncology resident. These results

  7. The radiation resistance of thermoset plastics—V. Epoxy plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilfrich, H.-P.; Wilski, H.

    Flexural strength, impact strength and dielectric properties of an epoxy plastic (bispherol A-based epoxy resin cured with aromatic diamines) with inorganic fillers remained unchanged after irradiation at high dose rate up to 10 MGy. Measurements of heat deflection temperature and sol fraction indicated, however, a deterioration of the resin. The same results were obtained after irradiation in the presence of air at extremely low dose rate (irradiation time: 10 years). Electrical surface resistance and tracking resistance worsened after irradiation. In addition, both of these surface-dependent properties were markedly influenced by the dose rate.

  8. Resistance of YAG:Nd sup 3+ laser frequency converters to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharkin, B. I.; Kulevskiy, L. A.; Nikolayev, V. N.; Toropkin, G. N.

    1986-02-01

    This study presents a review of published work on the radiation resistance of YAG:Nd sup 3+ laser frequency converters, and describes the results of experiments on the influence of gamma-irradiation of nonlinear crystals on the output characteristics of YAG:Nd sup 3+ lasers with second-harmonic generation inside or outside the cavity. The influence of radiation on the optical properties of nonlinear crystals is investigated. It is found that radiation degrades the generation of optical harmonics in YAG:ND sup 3+ lasers employing nonlinear elements made of SDA, DSDA, LiIO3 and DKDR crystals, starting at doses of 10 to the 5th power - 10 to the 6th power rad. Deuterized nonlinear crystals are found to be more resistant to ionizing radiation.

  9. Helicity-dependent photocurrent in the resistive Ag/Pd films excited by IR laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mikheev, G M; Saushin, A S; Vanyukov, V V

    2015-07-31

    It is shown that in resistive Ag/Pd films manufactured according to the thick-film technology, in the case of oblique incidence of laser radiation of nanosecond duration at a wavelengths of 1350 – 2100 nm, a photon-drag photocurrent arises in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence, dependent on the ellipticity and sign of circular polarisation of incident radiation. This photocurrent consists of the so-called circular and linear contributions, which are, respectively, dependent on and independent of the sign of circular polarisation. In this wavelength range, the amplitude of the circular contribution is many times greater than that of the linear contribution. The results allow the use of resistive Ag/Pd films for the development and manufacture of innovative sensors of the sign of circular polarisation of pulsed laser radiation, operating in a wide spectral range. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  10. Electrical resistivity of carbon black-filled high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composite containing radiation crosslinked HDPE particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Myong-Goo; Nho, Young Chang

    2001-04-01

    The room-temperature volume resistivity of high-density polyethylene (HDPE)-carbon black (CB) blends containing previously radiation crosslinked HDPE powder was studied. The results showed that the room-temperature volume resistivity decreases with increasing concentration of crosslinked HDPE powder. It is considered that the crosslinked HDPE particles act as a filler that increases the CB volume fraction in the HDPE matrix. The results of an optical microscope observation indicated that the crosslinked polymer particles are dispersed in the HDPE/CB composite. This effect of the crosslinked particles is attributed to the fact that the crosslinked mesh size of the HDPE particles is so small that the CB particles cannot go inside them. The effect of 60Co γ-ray and electron beam (EB) irradiation on the positive temperature coefficient, negative temperature coefficient and electrical resistivity behavior of the blends were studied.

  11. Composite plasma electrolytic oxidation to improve the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Donghyun; Sung, Dahye; Lee, Junghoon; Kim, Yonghwan; Chung, Wonsub

    2015-12-01

    A composite plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) was performed for enhancing the thermal radiation performance and corrosion resistance on an Al alloy by dispersing cupric oxide (CuO) particles in a conventional PEO electrolyte. Cu-based oxides (CuO and Cu2O) formed by composite PEO increased the emissivity of the substrate to 0.892, and made the surface being dark color, similar to a black body, i.e., an ideal radiator. In addition, the corrosion resistance was analyzed using potentio-dynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests in 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution. An optimum condition of 10 ampere per square decimeter (ASD) current density and 30 min processing time produced appropriate surface morphologies and coating thicknesses, as well as dense Cu- and Al-based oxides that constituted the coating layers.

  12. Genetic resistance in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. I. Analysis of the mechanism of LeR resistance using radiation chimeras

    SciTech Connect

    Pelfrey, C.M.; Waxman, F.J.; Whitacre, C.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that has been extensively studied in the rat. The Lewis rat is highly susceptible to the induction of EAE, while the Lewis resistant (LeR) rat is known to be resistant. In this paper, we demonstrate that the LeR rat, which was derived from the Lewis strain by inbreeding of fully resistant animals, is histocompatible with the Lewis strain. Radiation chimeras, a tool for distinguishing between immunologic and nonimmunologic resistance mechanisms, were utilized to analyze the cellular mechanisms involved in genetic resistance to EAE. By transplanting bone marrow cells from LeR rats into irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to EAE induction. Likewise, transplanting Lewis bone marrow cells into irradiated LeR recipients rendered LeR rats susceptible. Mixed lymphoid cell chimeras using bone marrow, spleen, and thymus cells in Lewis recipient rats revealed individual lymphoid cell types and cell interactions that significantly affected the incidence and severity of EAE. Our results suggest that LeR resistance is mediated by hematopoietic/immune cells, and that cells located in the spleen appear to play a critical role in the resistance/susceptibility to EAE induction. Depletion of splenic adherent cells did not change the patterns of EAE resistance. In vivo cell mixing studies suggested the presence of a suppressor cell population in the LeR spleen preparations which exerted an inhibitory effect on Lewis autoimmune responses. Thus, the mechanism of LeR resistance appears to be different from that in other EAE-resistant animals.

  13. Radiation resistance testing of high-density polyethylene. [Gamma rays

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, D.R.; Adams, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical tests following gamma inrradiation and creep tests during irradiation have been conducted on high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to assess the adequacy of this material for use in high-integrity containers (HICs). These tests were motivated by experience in nuclear power plants in which polyethylene electrical insulation detoriorated more rapidly than expected due to radiation-induced oxidation. This suggested that HDPE HICs used for radwaste disposal might degrade more rapidly than would be expected in the absence of the radiation field. Two types of HDPE, a highly cross-linked rotationally molded material and a non-cross-linked blow molded material, were used in these tests. Gamma-ray irradiations were performed at several dose rates in environments of air, Barnwell and Hanford backfill soils, and ion-exchange resins. The results of tensile and bend testing on these materials following irradiation will be presented along with preliminary results on creep during irradiation.

  14. Radiation-resistant optical fiber amplifiers for satellite communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampoulidis, L.; Edmunds, J.; Kechagias, M.; Stevens, G.; Farzana, J.; Welch, M.; Kehayas, E.

    2017-02-01

    Optical fiber amplifiers are key building blocks in laser communication terminals and telecom photonic payloads. In this paper we present 1.55μm booster amplifiers and pre-amplifiers suitable for satellite to ground, inter-satellite links and flexible photonic payloads. We validate the designs in the relevant space environment by characterizing the performance against ionizing radiation and report on functional performance of the amplifiers over temperature, in thermal vacuum and after vibration and mechanical shock.

  15. Graphene damage effects on radiation-resistance and configuration of copper–graphene nanocomposite under irradiation: A molecular dynamics study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Liu, Jian; Li, Huan; Chen, Da

    2016-12-01

    Metal–graphene nanocomposite is a kind of potential radiation tolerant material. Graphene damage of the composite is inevitable within radiation environments. In this paper, two kinds of copper–graphene nanocomposite (CGNC) systems containing perfect graphene and prefabricated damage graphene, respectively, were adopted to expound the influences of graphene damage on the properties (radiation-resistance and configuration) of CGNC under irradiation by atomistic simulations. In the CGNC containing perfect graphene, the increasing graphene damage induced by the increase of the number of cascades, did not obviously impair the role of copper–graphene interface in keeping the properties of CGNC. In the CGNC containing prefabricated damage graphene, the properties of CGNC would significantly deteriorate once the radius of prefabricated damage exceeds 10 Å, and even stacking fault tetrahedral would occur in the CGNC. The results highlighted that prefabricated graphene damage have greater effects on the change of the properties of CGNC. Therefore, it is very necessary to maintain the structural integrity of graphene for improving the radiation-resistance and configuration of CGNC.

  16. Graphene damage effects on radiation-resistance and configuration of copper–graphene nanocomposite under irradiation: A molecular dynamics study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Hai; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Liu, Jian; Li, Huan; Chen, Da

    2016-01-01

    Metal–graphene nanocomposite is a kind of potential radiation tolerant material. Graphene damage of the composite is inevitable within radiation environments. In this paper, two kinds of copper–graphene nanocomposite (CGNC) systems containing perfect graphene and prefabricated damage graphene, respectively, were adopted to expound the influences of graphene damage on the properties (radiation-resistance and configuration) of CGNC under irradiation by atomistic simulations. In the CGNC containing perfect graphene, the increasing graphene damage induced by the increase of the number of cascades, did not obviously impair the role of copper–graphene interface in keeping the properties of CGNC. In the CGNC containing prefabricated damage graphene, the properties of CGNC would significantly deteriorate once the radius of prefabricated damage exceeds 10 Å, and even stacking fault tetrahedral would occur in the CGNC. The results highlighted that prefabricated graphene damage have greater effects on the change of the properties of CGNC. Therefore, it is very necessary to maintain the structural integrity of graphene for improving the radiation-resistance and configuration of CGNC. PMID:27982109

  17. Radiation response of drug-resistant variants of a human breast cancer cell line: The effect of glutathione depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Lehnert, S.; Greene, D.; Batist, G. )

    1990-11-01

    Two drug-resistant variants of the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 have been shown previously to exhibit radiation resistance associated with an increase in the size of the shoulder on the radiation survival curve. In the present study, glutathione (GSH) depletion was achieved by exposure of cells to buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) with, in some cases, additional treatment with dimethyl fumarate. Levels of GSH in the adriamycin-resistant subline MCF-7 ADRR are initially lower than in the other two sublines and are depleted to a greater extent by exposure to BSO. Wild-type MCF-7 cells are not sensitized by GSH depletion when irradiated under aerated conditions but are sensitized under hypoxic conditions to an extent which is related to the level of GSH depletion. In contrast both the drug-resistant sublines (MCF-7 ADRR and the melphalan-resistant line MCF-7 MLNR) are radiosensitized by GSH depletion under both aerated and hypoxic conditions. It is hypothesized that in the case of the MCF-7 ADRR cell line, which expresses high levels of the GSH-associated redox enzyme systems, GSH-S-transferase and GSH-peroxidase (GSH-Px), radiosensitization results when GSH-Px is inhibited in GSH-depleted cells. The reasons for radiosensitization of aerated MCF-7 MLNR cells cannot be explained on this basis, however, and other factors are being examined.

  18. Staphylococci in community-acquired infections: Increased resistance to penicillin.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, G B; Chidi, C C; Macon, W L

    1976-01-01

    One hundred patients with community-acquired staphylococcal infections of the skin and soft tissues were treated in the Emergency Ward of Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital from June to October of 1974. Each staphylococcal infection was considered community-acquired if, within two weeks prior to being treated for the first time, the patient had not received antibiotics, had not been hospitalized, and had not been in contact with other recently hospitalized persons. Of 100 community-acquired staphylococcal infections, 85 were resistant to penicillin. Almost no resistance to other tested antibiotics was observed. Unless indicated otherwise by bacteriologic testing, penicillin is a poor drug of choice in those skin and soft tissue infections suspected of harboring staphylococci. PMID:1267491

  19. Molecular investigation of the radiation resistance of edible cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    PubMed Central

    Badri, Hanène; Monsieurs, Pieter; Coninx, Ilse; Wattiez, Ruddy; Leys, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to characterize in detail the response of Arthrospira to ionizing radiation, to better understand its radiation resistance capacity. Live cells of Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were irradiated with 60Co gamma rays. This study is the first, showing that Arthrospira is highly tolerant to gamma rays, and can survive at least 6400 Gy (dose rate of 527 Gy h−1), which identified Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 as a radiation resistant bacterium. Biochemical, including proteomic and transcriptomic, analysis after irradiation with 3200 or 5000 Gy showed a decline in photosystem II quantum yield, reduced carbon fixation, and reduced pigment, lipid, and secondary metabolite synthesis. Transcription of photo-sensing and signaling pathways, and thiol-based antioxidant systems was induced. Transcriptomics did show significant activation of ssDNA repair systems and mobile genetic elements (MGEs) at the RNA level. Surprisingly, the cells did not induce the classical antioxidant or DNA repair systems, such superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzyme and the RecA protein. Arthrospira cells lack the catalase gene and the LexA repressor. Irradiated Arthrospira cells did induce strongly a group of conserved proteins, of which the function in radiation resistance remains to be elucidated, but which are a promising novel routes to be explored. This study revealed the radiation resistance of Arthrospira, and the molecular systems involved, paving the way for its further and better exploitation. PMID:25678338

  20. Failure of synthetic muramyl dipeptide to increase antibacterial resistance.

    PubMed Central

    Finger, H; Wirsing von König, C H

    1980-01-01

    Synthetic muranyl dipeptide, which potentiates antibody production and cellular immune responses at a dosage of 100 to 500 micrograms, did not enhance resistance to intravenous infection with a sublethal dose of 2 X 10(3) to 4 X 10(3) viable Listeria monocytogenes cells in mice when intraperitoneally injected either 20 min or 5 days before infection. Similarly, blockade of the mononuclear phagocyte system by dextran sulfate 500 could not be overcome by pretreatment with muramyl dipeptide. In contrast, dextran sulfate 500-induced loss of antibacterial resistance was found to be completely abolished by intraperitoneal injection of 3 X 10(9) killed Bordetella pertussis organisms when given 4 days before injection of dextran sulfate 500, i.e., 5 days before infection. B. pertussis were also effective in enhancing antibacterial resistance when administered 5 days before infection. The different behavior of the two adjuvants tested is assumed to be due to their different nonspecific proliferative capacities. Thus, B. pertussis are assumed to act by direct stimulation of the mononuclear phagocyte system whereas muramyl dipeptide does not. PMID:6155329

  1. On the radiation resistance of planar Gunn diodes with δ-doped layers

    SciTech Connect

    Obolenskaya, E. S. Churin, A. Yu.; Obolensky, S. V.; Murel, A. V.; Shashkin, V. I.

    2015-11-15

    The radiation resistance of planar Gunn diodes is investigated. Based on the results of measurements of the pulsed current–voltage characteristics and computer simulations it is shown that the use of δ layers of doping impurities contributes to the higher radiation resistance of planar diodes by an order of magnitude compared to conventional Gunn diodes. The results of this study make it possible to formulate methodical guidelines to reduce the amount of computational and experimental studies without a considerable decrease in their informativity.

  2. Effect of Ni content on thermal and radiation resistance of VVER RPV steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Gurovich, B. A.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Frolov, A. S.; Fedotova, S. V.; Zhurko, D. A.; Krikun, E. V.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper thermal stability and radiation resistance of VVER-type RPV steels for pressure vessels of advanced reactors with different nickel content were studied. A complex of microstructural studies and mechanical tests of the steels in different states (after long thermal exposures, provoking embrittling heat treatment and accelerated neutron irradiation) was carried out. It is shown that nickel content (other things being equal) determines the extent of materials degradation under influence of operational factors: steels with a lower nickel concentration demonstrate a higher thermal stability and radiation resistance.

  3. Pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR) increase labile iron in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Moser, Justin C; Rawal, Malvika; Wagner, Brett A; Du, Juan; Cullen, Joseph J; Buettner, Garry R

    2013-01-01

    Labile iron, i.e. iron that is weakly bound and is relatively unrestricted in its redox activity, has been implicated in both the pathogenesis as well as treatment of cancer. Two cancer treatments where labile iron may contribute to their mechanism of action are pharmacological ascorbate and ionizing radiation (IR). Pharmacological ascorbate has been shown to have tumor-specific toxic effects due to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. By catalyzing the oxidation of ascorbate, labile iron can enhance the rate of formation of hydrogen peroxide; labile iron can also react with hydrogen peroxide. Here we have investigated the magnitude of the labile iron pool in tumor and normal tissue. We also examined the ability of pharmacological ascorbate and IR to change the size of the labile iron pool. Although a significant amount of labile iron was seen in tumors (MIA PaCa-2 cells in athymic nude mice), higher levels were seen in murine tissues that were not susceptible to pharmacological ascorbate. Pharmacological ascorbate and irradiation were shown to increase the labile iron in tumor homogenates from this murine model of pancreatic cancer. As both IR and pharmacological ascorbate may rely on labile iron for their effects on tumor tissues, our data suggest that pharmacological ascorbate could be used as a radio-sensitizing agent for some radio-resistant tumors.

  4. Flame-retardant EPDM compounds containing phenanthrene to enhance radiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Shu-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; An, You; Li, Chuang; Gao, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Hong-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) compounds with good flame-retardant and γ-ray radiation resistant properties were prepared by adding complex flame retardants and phenathrene. The resultant EPDM formulations have a long time to ignition (TTI >46 s), a low peak heat release rate (PHRR 341 kW/m2) and a high limited oxygen index (LOI >30). Effects of γ-ray radiation on the resultant flame-retardant EPDM was investigated. The formulated EPDM is a crosslinking dominated polymer under γ-ray radiation. The γ-ray radiation resistant property of EPDM was enhanced by adding phenanthrene. Elongation at break of EPDM formulated with phenanthrene could retain 91% after being irradiated to 0.3 MGy and still retains 40% elongation even after being irradiated to 0.9 MGy, which is much better the control. It is expected that the formulated flame-retardant and radiation resistant EPDM materials could meet the requirements for use in radiation environments.

  5. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 mRad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  6. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 Mrad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  7. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 Mrad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  8. Assessment of Gamma Radiation Resistance of Spores Isolated from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility During MSL Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chopra, Arsh; Ramirez, Gustavo A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Vaishampayan, Parag A.

    2011-01-01

    Spore forming bacteria, a common inhabitant of spacecraft assembly facilities, are known to tolerate extreme environmental conditions such as radiation, desiccation, and high temperatures. Since the Viking era (early 1970's), spores have been utilized to assess the degree and level of microbiological contamination on spacecraft and their associated spacecraft assembly facilities. There is a growing concern that desiccation and extreme radiation resistant spore forming microorganisms associated with spacecraft surfaces can withstand space environmental conditions and subsequently proliferate on another solar body. Such forward contamination would certainly jeopardize future life detection or sample return technologies. It is important to recognize that different classes of organisms are critical while calculating the probability of contamination, and methods must be devised to estimate their abundances. Microorganisms can be categorized based on radiation sensitivity as Type A, B, C, and D. Type C represents spores resistant to radiation (10% or greater survival above 0.8 mRad gamma radiation). To address these questions we have purified 96 spore formers, isolated during planetary protection efforts of Mars Science Laboratory assembly for gamma radiation resistance. The spores purified and stored will be used to generate data that can be used further to model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  9. Assessment of the impact of increased solar ultraviolet radiation upon marine ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandyke, H.; Worrest, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Data was provided to assess the potential impact upon marine ecosystems if space shuttle operations contribute to a reduction of the stratospheric ozone layer. The potential for irreversible damage to the productivity, structure and/or functioning of a model estuarine ecosystem by increased UV-B radiation was established. The sensitivity of key community components (the primary producers) to increased UV-B radiation was delineated.

  10. Indication of increasing solar ultraviolet-B radiation flux in alpine regions

    SciTech Connect

    Blumthaler, M.; Ambach, W. )

    1990-04-13

    Measurements at the Jungfraujoch High Mountain Station (Swiss Alps, 47{degree}N, 3,576 meters above sea level) indicate that there has been a slight increase of about 1% per year in the flux of solar ultraviolet-B radiation (290 to 330 nanometers) since 1981. A Robertson-Berger detector was used to measure solar erythemal radiation. The increase can be related to a long-term ozone depletion.

  11. Increasing Spectrum in Antimicrobial Resistance of Shigella Isolates in Bangladesh: Resistance to Azithromycin and Ceftriaxone and Decreased Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin

    PubMed Central

    Mahbubur, Rahman; Shoma, Shereen; Rashid, Harunur; Arifeen, Shams El; Baqui, A.H.; Siddique, A.K.; Nair, G.B.; Sack, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance of Shigella isolates in Bangladesh, during 2001-2002, was studied and compared with that of 1991-1992 to identify the changes in resistance patterns and trends. A significant increase in resistance to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole (from 52% to 72%, p<0.01) and nalidixic acid (from 19% to 51%, p<0.01) was detected. High, but unchanged, resistance to tetracycline, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol, low resistance to mecillinam (resistance 3%, intermediate 3%), and to emergence of resistance to azithromycin (resistance 16%, intermediate 62%) and ceftriaxone/cefixime (2%) were detected in 2001-2002. Of 266 recent isolates, 63% were resistant to ≥3 anti-Shigella drugs (multidrug-resistant [MDR]) compared to 52% of 369 strains (p<0.007) in 1991-1992. Of 154 isolates tested by E-test in 2001-2002, 71% were nalidixic acid-resistant (minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC] ≥32 μg/mL) and had 10-fold higher MIC90 (0.25 μg/mL) to ciprofloxacin than that of nalidixic acid-susceptible strains exhibiting decreased ciprofloxacin susceptibility, which were detected as ciprofloxacin-susceptible and nalidixic acid-resistant by the disc-diffusion method. These strains were frequently associated with MDR traits. High modal MICs were observed to azithromycin (MIC 6 μg/mL) and nalidixic acid (MIC 128 μg/mL) and low to ceftriaxone (MIC 0.023 μg/mL). Conjugative R-plasmids-encoded extended-spectrum ß-lactamase was responsible for resistance to ceftriaxone/cefixime. The growing antimicrobial resistance of Shigella is worrying and mandates monitoring of resistance. Pivmecillinam or ciprofloxacin might be considered for treating shigellosis with caution. PMID:17985817

  12. Resistance of a lizard (the green anole, Anolis carolinensis; Polychridae) to ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cope, R.B.; Fabacher, D.L.; Lieske, C.; Miller, C.A.

    2001-01-01

    The green anole (Anolis carolinensis) is the most northerly distributed of its Neotropical genus. This lizard avoids a winter hibernation phase by the use of sun basking behaviors. Inevitably, this species is exposed to high doses of ambient solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Increases in terrestrial ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation secondary to stratospheric ozone depletion and habitat perturbation potentially place this species at risk of UVR-induced immunosuppression. Daily exposure to subinflammatory UVR (8 kJ/m2/day UV-B, 85 kJ/m2/day ultraviolet A [UV-A]), 6 days per week for 4 weeks (total cumulative doses of 192 kJ/m2 UV-B, 2.04 ?? 103 kJ/m2 UV-A) did not suppress the anole's acute or delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to horseshoe crab hemocyanin. In comparison with the available literature UV-B doses as low as 0.1 and 15.9 kJ/m2 induced suppression of DTH responses in mice and humans, respectively. Exposure of anoles to UVR did not result in the inhibition of ex vivo splenocyte phagocytosis of fluorescein labeled Escherichia coli or ex vivo splenocyte nitric oxide production. Doses of UV-B ranging from 0.35 to 45 k J/m2 have been reported to suppress murine splenic/ peritoneal macrophage phagocytosis and nitric oxide production. These preliminary studies demonstrate the resistance of green anoles to UVR-induced immunosuppression. Methanol extracts of anole skin contained two peaks in the ultraviolet wavelength range that could be indicative of photoprotective substances. However, the resistance of green anoles to UVR is probably not completely attributable to absorption by UVR photoprotective substances in the skin but more likely results from a combination of other factors including absorption by the cutis and absorption and reflectance by various components of the dermis.

  13. Radiation-hard ceramic Resistive Plate Chambers for forward TOF and T0 systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akindinov, A.; Dreyer, J.; Fan, X.; Kämpfer, B.; Kiselev, S.; Kotte, R.; Garcia, A. Laso; Malkevich, D.; Naumann, L.; Nedosekin, A.; Plotnikov, V.; Stach, D.; Sultanov, R.; Voloshin, K.

    2017-02-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers with ceramic electrodes are the main candidates for a use in precise multi-channel timing systems operating in high-radiation conditions. We report the latest R&D results on these detectors aimed to meet the requirements of the forward T0 counter at the CBM experiment. RPC design, gas mixture, limits on the bulk resistivity of ceramic electrodes, efficiency, time resolution, counting rate capabilities and ageing test results are presented.

  14. Intestinal and peri-tumoral lymphatic endothelial cells are resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sung, Hoon Ki; Morisada, Tohru; Cho, Chung-Hyun; Oike, Yuichi; Lee, Jayhun; Sung, Eon Ki; Chung, Jae Hoon; Suda, Toshio; Koh, Gou Young . E-mail: gykoh@kaist.ac.kr

    2006-06-30

    Radiation therapy is a widely used cancer treatment, but it is unable to completely block cancer metastasis. The lymphatic vasculature serves as the primary route for metastatic spread, but little is known about how lymphatic endothelial cells respond to radiation. Here, we show that lymphatic endothelial cells in the small intestine and peri-tumor areas are highly resistant to radiation injury, while blood vessel endothelial cells in the small intestine are relatively sensitive. Our results suggest the need for alternative therapeutic modalities that can block lymphatic endothelial cell survival, and thus disrupt the integrity of lymphatic vessels in peri-tumor areas.

  15. Mitochondrial amplification selectively increases doxorubicin sensitivity in breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance.

    PubMed

    Skildum, Andrew; Dornfeld, Kenneth; Wallace, Kendall

    2011-10-01

    The metabolic phenotype of cancer, characterized by uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, is an attractive pharmacological target for sensitizing cancer cells to therapies that rely on oxidative stress for their tumor specific cytotoxicity. The identification of specific cancer sub-types for which metabolic priming of tumors prior to chemotherapy is beneficial is critical, particularly in heterogeneous diseases such as breast cancer. The effects of the thiazolidinedione drug troglitazone were examined in normal mammary epithelial cells and cancer cell lines representing three clinically relevant breast cancer phenotypes. Endpoints measured were PGC1α mRNA expression, proliferation, cell cycle phase distribution, mitochondrial capacity and superoxide generation, and sensitivity to the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin. Troglitazone increases expression of PGC1α, a key mediator of mitochondrial biogenesis, in normal mammary epithelial cells and in breast cancer cell lines. The induction of PGC1α mRNA is at least partially dependent on PPARγ activation. In estrogen receptor negative cells and cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance, troglitazone treatment increased mitochondrial superoxide production and mitochondrial capacity. At pharmacologically achievable doses, troglitazone pretreatment significantly enhanced the sensitivity of cancer cells to the chemotherapy agent doxorubicin. This effect was most dramatic in estrogen receptor positive cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance, in which troglitazone and doxorubicin combined had superadditive effects compared to treatment with either agent alone. In contrast, troglitazone treatment did not appreciably sensitize non-malignant mammary epithelial cells to doxorubicin induced cytotoxicity, despite increasing PGC1α mRNA. These data suggest that troglitazone or a similarly acting compound could be used to selectively prime tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of

  16. Molecular and physiological strategies to increase aluminum resistance in plants.

    PubMed

    Inostroza-Blancheteau, Claudio; Rengel, Zed; Alberdi, Miren; de la Luz Mora, María; Aquea, Felipe; Arce-Johnson, Patricio; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie

    2012-03-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a primary limitation to plant growth on acid soils. Root meristems are the first site for toxic Al accumulation, and therefore inhibition of root elongation is the most evident physiological manifestation of Al toxicity. Plants may resist Al toxicity by avoidance (Al exclusion) and/or tolerance mechanisms (detoxification of Al inside the cells). The Al exclusion involves the exudation of organic acid anions from the root apices, whereas tolerance mechanisms comprise internal Al detoxification by organic acid anions and enhanced scavenging of free oxygen radicals. One of the most important advances in understanding the molecular events associated with the Al exclusion mechanism was the identification of the ALMT1 gene (Al-activated malate transporter) in Triticum aestivum root cells, which codes for a plasma membrane anion channel that allows efflux of organic acid anions, such as malate, citrate or oxalate. On the other hand, the scavenging of free radicals is dependent on the expression of genes involved in antioxidant defenses, such as peroxidases (e.g. in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum), catalases (e.g. in Capsicum annuum), and the gene WMnSOD1 from T. aestivum. However, other recent findings show that reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced stress may be due to acidic (low pH) conditions rather than to Al stress. In this review, we summarize recent findings regarding molecular and physiological mechanisms of Al toxicity and resistance in higher plants. Advances have been made in understanding some of the underlying strategies that plants use to cope with Al toxicity. Furthermore, we discuss the physiological and molecular responses to Al toxicity, including genes involved in Al resistance that have been identified and characterized in several plant species. The better understanding of these strategies and mechanisms is essential for improving plant performance in acidic, Al-toxic soils.

  17. Increasing corrosion resistance of carbon steels by surface laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polsky, V. I.; Yakushin, V. L.; Dzhumaev, P. S.; Petrovsky, V. N.; Safonov, D. V.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents results of investigation of the microstructure, elemental composition and corrosion resistance of the samples of low-alloy steel widely used in the engineering, after the application of laser cladding. The level of corrosion damage and the corrosion mechanism of cladded steel samples were established. The corrosion rate and installed discharge observed at the total destruction of cladding were obtained. The regularities of structure formation in the application of different powder compositions were obtained. The optimal powder composition that prevents corrosion of samples of low-carbon low-alloy steel was established.

  18. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiations and Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    1999-06-01

    The major goal of the research project is to define the role of HRAD9 in the response of cells to radiation or chemical exposure, and to establish this gene as a genetic marker to predict predisposition to the deleterious health effects that may result after exposure to these agents. HRAD9 is a human homologue of fission yeast S. pombe rad9, a gene known to promote radioresistance and chemoresistance, and to regulate cell cycle progression after DNA is damaged or DNA replication is incomplete -i.e., it mediates cell cycle checkpoint control. Therefore, HRAD9 likely plays an important role in humans to determine the biological consequences of DNA damage.

  19. A possible radiation-resistant solar cell geometry using superlattices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goradia, C.; Clark, R.; Brinker, D.

    1985-01-01

    A solar cell structure is proposed which uses a GaAs nipi doping superlattice. An important feature of this structure is that photogenerated minority carriers are very quickly collected in a time shorter than bulk lifetime in the fairly heavily doped n and p layers and these carriers are then transported parallel to the superlattice layers to selective ohmic contacts. Assuming that these already-separated carriers have very long recombination lifetimes, due to their across an indirect bandgap in real space, it is argued that the proposed structure may exhibit superior radiation tolerance along with reasonably high beginning-of-life efficiency.

  20. Ionizing-radiation resistance in the desiccation-tolerant cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billi, D.; Friedmann, E. I.; Hofer, K. G.; Caiola, M. G.; Ocampo-Friedmann, R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of X-ray irradiation on cell survival, induction, and repair of DNA damage was studied by using 10 Chroococcidiopsis strains isolated from desert and hypersaline environments. After exposure to 2.5 kGy, the percentages of survival for the strains ranged from 80 to 35%. In the four most resistant strains, the levels of survival were reduced by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude after irradiation with 5 kGy; viable cells were recovered after exposure to 15 kGy but not after exposure to 20 kGy. The severe DNA damage evident after exposure to 2.5 kGy was repaired within 3 h, and the severe DNA damage evident after exposure to 5 kGy was repaired within 24 h. The increase in trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity in the culture supernatant after irradiation with 2.5 kGy might have been due to cell lysis and/or an excision process involved in DNA repair. The radiation resistance of Chroococcidiopsis strains may reflect the ability of these cyanobacteria to survive prolonged desiccation through efficient repair of the DNA damage that accumulates during dehydration.

  1. Ionizing-Radiation Resistance in the Desiccation-Tolerant Cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis

    PubMed Central

    Billi, Daniela; Friedmann, E. Imre; Hofer, Kurt G.; Caiola, Maria Grilli; Ocampo-Friedmann, Roseli

    2000-01-01

    The effect of X-ray irradiation on cell survival, induction, and repair of DNA damage was studied by using 10 Chroococcidiopsis strains isolated from desert and hypersaline environments. After exposure to 2.5 kGy, the percentages of survival for the strains ranged from 80 to 35%. In the four most resistant strains, the levels of survival were reduced by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude after irradiation with 5 kGy; viable cells were recovered after exposure to 15 kGy but not after exposure to 20 kGy. The severe DNA damage evident after exposure to 2.5 kGy was repaired within 3 h, and the severe DNA damage evident after exposure to 5 kGy was repaired within 24 h. The increase in trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity in the culture supernatant after irradiation with 2.5 kGy might have been due to cell lysis and/or an excision process involved in DNA repair. The radiation resistance of Chroococcidiopsis strains may reflect the ability of these cyanobacteria to survive prolonged desiccation through efficient repair of the DNA damage that accumulates during dehydration. PMID:10742231

  2. Elevated Mutagenesis Does Not Explain the Increased Frequency of Antibiotic Resistant Mutants in Starved Aging Colonies

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Sophia; Hershberg, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The frequency of mutants resistant to the antibiotic rifampicin has been shown to increase in aging (starved), compared to young colonies of Eschierchia coli. These increases in resistance frequency occur in the absence of any antibiotic exposure, and similar increases have also been observed in response to additional growth limiting conditions. Understanding the causes of such increases in the frequency of resistance is important for understanding the dynamics of antibiotic resistance emergence and spread. Increased frequency of rifampicin resistant mutants in aging colonies is cited widely as evidence of stress-induced mutagenesis (SIM), a mechanism thought to allow bacteria to increase mutation rates upon exposure to growth-limiting stresses. At the same time it has been demonstrated that some rifampicin resistant mutants are relatively fitter in aging compared to young colonies, indicating that natural selection may also contribute to increased frequency of rifampicin resistance in aging colonies. Here, we demonstrate that the frequency of mutants resistant to both rifampicin and an additional antibiotic (nalidixic-acid) significantly increases in aging compared to young colonies of a lab strain of Escherichia coli. We then use whole genome sequencing to demonstrate conclusively that SIM cannot explain the observed magnitude of increased frequency of resistance to these two antibiotics. We further demonstrate that, as was previously shown for rifampicin resistance mutations, mutations conferring nalidixic acid resistance can also increase fitness in aging compared to young colonies. Our results show that increases in the frequency of antibiotic resistant mutants in aging colonies cannot be seen as evidence of SIM. Furthermore, they demonstrate that natural selection likely contributes to increases in the frequency of certain antibiotic resistance mutations, even when no selection is exerted due to the presence of antibiotics. PMID:24244205

  3. Radiative forcing perturbation due to observed increases in tropospheric ozone at Hohenpeissenberg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Wei-Chyung; Bojkov, Rumen D.; Zhuang, Yi-Cheng

    1994-01-01

    The effect on surface temperature due to changes in atmospheric O3 depends highly on the latitude where the change occurs. Previous sensitivity calculations indicate that ozone changes in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are more effective in causing surface temperature change (Wang et al., 1980). Long term ground-based observations show that tropospheric ozone, especially at the tropopause region, has been increasing at middle and high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NATO, 1988; Quadrennial Ozone Symposium, 1992). These increases will enhance the greenhouse effect and increase the radiative forcing to the troposphere-surface system, which is opposite to the negative radiative forcing calculated from the observed stratospheric ozone depletion recently reported in WMO (1992). We used more than two thousands regularly measured ozonesondes providing reliable vertical O3 distribution at Hohenpeissenberg (47N; 11E) for the 1967-1990 to study the instantaneous solar and longwave radiative forcing the two decades 1971-1990 and compare the forcing with those caused by increasing CO2, CH4, N2O, and CFCs. Calculations are also made to compare the O3 radiative forcing between stratospheric depletion and tropospheric increase. Results indicate that the O3 changes will induce a positive radiative forcing dominated by tropospheric O3 increase and the magnitude of the forcing is comparable to that due to CO2 increases during the two decades. The significant implications of the tropospheric O3 increase to the global climate are discussed.

  4. Luminescence and radiation resistance of undoped NaI crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Shiran, N. Boiaryntseva, I.; Gektin, A.; Gridin, S.; Shlyakhturov, V.; Vasuykov, S.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • The performance of NaI scintillators depends on luminescence properties. • A criterion of crystals’ purity level is radiation colorability at room temperature. • The traces of the most dangerous impurities were detected. • Crucial role in efficiency of pure NaI scintillator play the crystal perfection. - Abstract: Undoped NaI single crystal is an excellent scintillator at low temperature. However, scintillation parameters of different quality crystals vary in a wide range, significantly exceeding measurement error. Experimental data demonstrate the features of luminescence, radiation induced coloration, and afterglow dependence on the quality of nominally pure crystals. It is found that defects level that allows to elucidate artefacts introduced by traces of harmful impurities corresponds to 3 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −3} that significantly overhead accuracy of chemical and absorption analysis. It is shown that special raw material treatment before and during the single crystal growth allows to reach NaI purity level that avoids impurities influence to the basic luminescence data.

  5. Applications of a high temperature radiation resistant electrical insulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, M. H.

    Electrical components are being developed for service inside the reactor vessel of Fast Breeder Reactors. These components will function in an exceptionally hostile environment combining high temperature (1000 F), chemical activity (liquid sodium), and nuclear radiation (fast neutron fluences to 1021 n/sq cm). Two components which are being developed are an electromagnetically actuated shutdown system and an induction motor. The successful development of a glass-alumina insulation which is suitable for operation at high temperature and in high radiation fields is the key technological advance that has resulted in the development of these components. The insulation is applied by a dipping process similar to conventional enamel insulation utilizing a slurry of glass-alumina in an organic binder. Drying at modest temperature results in a green flexible coating that is adherent to the wire. After the wire is formed into the desired component, the wire is fired at high temperature to eliminate the binder and to fuse the glass mixture to the wire. Electromagnetic coils thus fabricated have been operated for more than 18 months in sodium systems from 850 to 1100 F.

  6. Radiation degradation behavior of chlorine-containing vinyl copolymers. Search for improved electron-beam resists

    SciTech Connect

    Helbert, J.N.; Poindexter, E.H.; Pittman, C.U. Jr.; Chen, C.Y.

    1980-06-01

    Vinyl copolymers with high radiation degradation sensitivity have been synthesized by copolymerizing vinylidene chloride (VDC), CH/sub 2/ = CCl/sub 2/, with methyl methacrylate (MMA), methacrylonitrile, methyl ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylate, and dimethyl itaconate using emulsion techniques. In addition, copolymers of methyl ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylate with methyl methacrylate and poly(..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile) were studied. Introduction of vinylidene chloride into methyl methacrylate polymers caused a sharp increase in G/sub s/ even at relatively low VDC incorporation. Upon 29% VDC incorporation, the G/sub s/ value increased from 1.3 (homopolymer of MMA) to 3.4. G/sub s/ was found to be a linear function of copolymer content for several systems, but G/sub x/ was not. At higher VDC levels, the increase in G/sub s/ was countered by increases in G/sub x/. At lower VDC levels, G/sub x/ was suppressed below the values predicted by a linear G/sub x/ dependence on composition for such systems as VDC/MMA, MCA/MMA, and ..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile/MMA. The VDC/MMA copolymer (29% VDC) gave a sensitivity of 4.0 x 10/sup -5/ C/cm/sup 2/ to electron beam exposure using the 0% unexposed resist thickness loss criterion and is 2 to 3 times more sensitive than PMMA. Poly(..cap alpha..-chloroacrylonitrile) is a negative resist with a sensitivity of 5 x 10/sup -5/ C/cm/sup 2/ using one-micron line images for testing.

  7. Radiation-Resistant Micrococcus luteus SC1204 and Its Proteomics Change Upon Gamma Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wuyuan; Yang, Yang; Gao, Peng; Chen, Hao; Wen, Wenting; Sun, Qun

    2016-06-01

    To explore the radiation-resistance mechanisms in bacteria, a radiation-resistant strain SC1204 was isolated from the surrounding area of a (60)Co-γ radiation facility. SC1204 could survive up to 8 kGy dose of gamma irradiation and was identified as Micrococcus luteus by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. Its proteomic changes under 2-kGy irradiation were examined by two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF-TOF/MS analysis. The results showed that at least 24 proteins displayed significant changes (p < 0.05) at expression level under the radiation stress, among which 22 were successfully identified and classified into the major functional categories of metabolism, energy production and conservation, translation, ribosomal structure, and biogenesis. Among these proteins, leucyl aminopeptidase involved in synthesis of glutathione was the most abundant induced protein during postirradiation recovery, indicating that anti-oxidation protection was the most important line of defense in SC1204 against radiation. The next abundant protein was phosphoribosyl aminoimidazole carboxamide formyltransferase/IMP cyclohydrolase (AICAR Tfase/IMPCH), the key enzyme in the biosynthetic pathway of purine that is anti-radiation compound. Other proteins changing significantly (p < 0.05) after radiation exposure included urocanate hydratase, dihydrolipoyl dehydrogenase, succinyl-CoA synthetase subunit alpha, phosphoglycerate kinase, cell division protein FtsZ, elongation factor Ts and Tu, translation elongation factor Tu and G, 30S ribosomal protein S1, histidyl-tRNA synthetase, and arginyl-tRNA synthetase, which were considered to be the key proteins in urocanate metabolism, tricarboxylic acid cycle, glycolysis, cell division process, and synthesis process of proteins. Therefore, these proteins may also play important roles in radiation resistance in M. luteus.

  8. Differences in correlation of mRNA gene expression in mice sensitive and resistant to radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, C.J.; Piedboeuf, B.; Finkelstein, J.N.; Baggs, R.; Rubin, P.

    1995-05-01

    Fibrosis, characterized by the accumulation of collagen, is a late result of thoracic irradiation. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix protein and transforming growth factor {beta} mRNA expression are altered late in the course of pulmonary fibrosis after irradiation, and then to determine if these changes differ between two strains of mice which vary in their sensitivity to radiation. Radiation-sensitive (C57BL/6) and radiation-resistant (C3H/HeJ) mice were irradiated with a single dose of 5 or 12.5 Gy to the thorax. Total lung RNA was prepared and immobilized by Northern and slot blotting and hybridized with radiolabeled cDNA probes for collagens I, III and IV, fibronectin, and transforming growth factor {beta}{sub 1} and {beta}{sub 3}. Autoradiographic data were quantified by video densitometry and results normalized to a control probe encoding for glyceralde-hyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. Alterations in mRNA abundance were observed in the sensitive mice at all times, while levels in the resistant mice were unaffected until 26 weeks after irradiation. The relationship between extracellular matrix protein per se and increased mRNA abundance suggests that late matrix protein accumulation may be a function of gene expression. Differences in levels of transforming growth factor {beta}mRNA may lead to strain-dependent variation in fibrotic response and may also contribute to the radiation-induced component of pulmonary fibrosis. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Increase in larval gut proteolytic activities and Bti resistance in the Dengue fever mosquito.

    PubMed

    Tetreau, Guillaume; Stalinski, Renaud; David, Jean-Philippe; Després, Laurence

    2013-02-01

    The bioinsecticide Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) is increasingly used worldwide for mosquito control. Although no established resistance to Bti has been described in the field so far, a resistant Aedes aegypti strain (LiTOX strain) was selected in the laboratory using field-collected leaf litter containing Bti toxins. This selected strain exhibits a moderate resistance level to Bti, but a high resistance level to individual Cry toxins. As Bti contains four different toxins, generalist resistance mechanisms affecting mosquito tolerance to different toxins were expected in the resistant strain. In the present work, we show that the resistant strain exhibits an increase of various gut proteolytic activities including trypsins, leucine-aminopeptidases, and carboxypeptidase A activities. These elevated proteolytic activities resulted in a faster activation of Cry4Aa protoxins while Cry4Ba or Cry11Aa were not affected. These results suggest that changes in proteolytic activities may contribute to Bti resistance in mosquitoes together with other mechanisms.

  10. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    SciTech Connect

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  11. RADIATION-RESISTANT FIBER OPTIC STRAIN SENSORS FOR SNS TARGET INSTRUMENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    Blokland, Willem; Bryan, Jeff; Riemer, Bernie; Sangrey, Robert L; Wendel, Mark W; Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    Measurement of stresses and strains in the mercury tar-get vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is important to understand the structural dynamics of the target. This work reports the development of radiation-resistant fiber optic strain sensors for the SNS target in-strumentation.

  12. Fitness cost of resistance to Bt cotton linked with increased gossypol content in pink bollworm larvae.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer L; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Orth, Robert G; Gassmann, Aaron J; Head, Graham; Tabashnik, Bruce E; Carrière, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Fitness costs of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops occur in the absence of Bt toxins, when individuals with resistance alleles are less fit than individuals without resistance alleles. As costs of Bt resistance are common, refuges of non-Bt host plants can delay resistance not only by providing susceptible individuals to mate with resistant individuals, but also by selecting against resistance. Because costs typically vary across host plants, refuges with host plants that magnify costs or make them less recessive could enhance resistance management. Limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms causing fitness costs, however, hampers attempts to increase costs. In several major cotton pests including pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), resistance to Cry1Ac cotton is associated with mutations altering cadherin proteins that bind this toxin in susceptible larvae. Here we report that the concentration of gossypol, a cotton defensive chemical, was higher in pink bollworm larvae with cadherin resistance alleles than in larvae lacking such alleles. Adding gossypol to the larval diet decreased larval weight and survival, and increased the fitness cost affecting larval growth, but not survival. Across cadherin genotypes, the cost affecting larval growth increased as the gossypol concentration of larvae increased. These results suggest that increased accumulation of plant defensive chemicals may contribute to fitness costs associated with resistance to Bt toxins.

  13. Fitness Cost of Resistance to Bt Cotton Linked with Increased Gossypol Content in Pink Bollworm Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Jennifer L.; Ellers-Kirk, Christa; Orth, Robert G.; Gassmann, Aaron J.; Head, Graham; Tabashnik, Bruce E.; Carrière, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Fitness costs of resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) crops occur in the absence of Bt toxins, when individuals with resistance alleles are less fit than individuals without resistance alleles. As costs of Bt resistance are common, refuges of non-Bt host plants can delay resistance not only by providing susceptible individuals to mate with resistant individuals, but also by selecting against resistance. Because costs typically vary across host plants, refuges with host plants that magnify costs or make them less recessive could enhance resistance management. Limited understanding of the physiological mechanisms causing fitness costs, however, hampers attempts to increase costs. In several major cotton pests including pink bollworm (Pectinophora gossypiella), resistance to Cry1Ac cotton is associated with mutations altering cadherin proteins that bind this toxin in susceptible larvae. Here we report that the concentration of gossypol, a cotton defensive chemical, was higher in pink bollworm larvae with cadherin resistance alleles than in larvae lacking such alleles. Adding gossypol to the larval diet decreased larval weight and survival, and increased the fitness cost affecting larval growth, but not survival. Across cadherin genotypes, the cost affecting larval growth increased as the gossypol concentration of larvae increased. These results suggest that increased accumulation of plant defensive chemicals may contribute to fitness costs associated with resistance to Bt toxins. PMID:21738799

  14. Progression-related loss of stromal Caveolin 1 levels fosters the growth of human PC3 xenografts and mediates radiation resistance

    PubMed Central

    Panic, Andrej; Ketteler, Julia; Reis, Henning; Sak, Ali; Herskind, Carsten; Maier, Patrick; Rübben, Herbert; Jendrossek, Verena; Klein, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Despite good treatment results in localized prostate tumors, advanced disease stages usually have a pronounced resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The membrane protein caveolin-1 (Cav1) functions here as an important oncogene. Therefore we examined the impact of stromal Cav1 expression for tumor growth and sensitivity to ionizing radiation (IR). Silencing of Cav1 expression in PC3 cells resulted in increased tumor growth and a reduced growth delay after IR when compared to tumors generated by Cav1-expressing PC3 cells. The increased radiation resistance was associated with increasing amounts of reactive tumor stroma and a Cav1 re-expression in the malignant epithelial cells. Mimicking the human situation these results were confirmed using co-implantation of Cav1-silenced PC3 cells with Cav1-silenced or Cav1-expressing fibroblasts. Immunohistochemically analysis of irradiated tumors as well as human prostate tissue specimen confirmed that alterations in stromal-epithelial Cav1 expressions were accompanied by a more reactive Cav1-reduced tumor stroma after radiation and within advanced prostate cancer tissues which potentially mediates the resistance to radiation treatment. Conclusively, the radiation response of human prostate tumors is critically regulated by Cav1 expression in stromal fibroblasts. Loss of stromal Cav1 expression in advanced tumor stages may thus contribute to resistance of these tumors to radiotherapy. PMID:28112237

  15. Technology of wear resistance increase of surface elements of friction couples using solid lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgunov, A. P.; Masyagin, V. B.; Derkach, V. V.; Matveev, N. A.

    2017-06-01

    Based on the results of experimental investigations in wear resistance increase using lamellar solid lubricants the technology of wear resistance increase of surface elements of friction couples by applying solid lubricants is developed with the following surface plastic deformation providing enough bond strength of solid lubricant with an element surface and increasing operational life.

  16. Ras Labs.-CASIS-ISS NL experiment for synthetic muscle: resistance to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Sandberg, Eric; Albers, Leila N.; Rodriguez, Simone; Gentile, Charles A.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Hitchner, Robert; Taylor, James; Hoffman, Dan; Cylinder, David; Moy, Leon; Mark, Patrick S.; Prillaman, Daniel L.; Nordarse, Robert; Menegus, Michael J.; Ratto, Jo Ann; Thellen, Christopher; Froio, Danielle; Furlong, Cosme; Razavi, Payam; Valenza, Logan; Hablani, Surbhi; Fuerst, Tyler; Gallucci, Sergio; Blocher, Whitney; Liffland, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    In anticipation of deep space travel, new materials are being explored to assist and relieve humans in dangerous environments, such as high radiation, extreme temperature, and extreme pressure. Ras Labs Synthetic Muscle - electroactive polymers (EAPs) that contract and expand at low voltages - which mimic the unique gentle-yet-strong nature of human tissue, is a potential asset to manned space travel through protective gear and human assist robotics and for unmanned space exploration through deep space. Generation 3 Synthetic Muscle was proven to be resistant to extreme temperatures, and there were indications that these materials may also be radiation resistant. The purpose of the Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS Experiment is to test the radiation resistivity of the third and fourth generation of these EAPs, as well as to make them even more radiation resistant or radiation hardened. On Earth, exposure of the Generation 3 and Generation 4 EAPs to a Cs-137 radiation source for 47.8 hours with a total dose of 305.931 kRad of gamma radiation was performed at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) at Princeton University, followed by pH, peroxide, Shore Hardness Durometry, and electroactivity testing to determine the inherent radiation resistivity of these contractile EAPs and to determine whether the EAPs could be made even more radiation resistant through the application of appropriate additives and coatings. The on Earth preliminary tests determined that selected Ras Labs EAPs were not only inherently radiation resistant, but with the appropriate coatings and additives, could be made even more radiation resistant. Gforce testing to over 10 G's was performed at US Army's ARDEC Labs, with excellent results, in preparation for space flight to the International Space Station National Laboratory (ISS-NL). Selected samples of Generation 3 and Generation 4 Synthetic Muscle™, with various additives and coatings, were launched to the ISS-NL on April

  17. Prediction of Ionizing Radiation Resistance in Bacteria Using a Multiple Instance Learning Model.

    PubMed

    Aridhi, Sabeur; Sghaier, Haïtham; Zoghlami, Manel; Maddouri, Mondher; Nguifo, Engelbert Mephu

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) are important in biotechnology. In this context, in silico methods of phenotypic prediction and genotype-phenotype relationship discovery are limited. In this work, we analyzed basal DNA repair proteins of most known proteome sequences of IRRB and ionizing-radiation-sensitive bacteria (IRSB) in order to learn a classifier that correctly predicts this bacterial phenotype. We formulated the problem of predicting bacterial ionizing radiation resistance (IRR) as a multiple-instance learning (MIL) problem, and we proposed a novel approach for this purpose. We provide a MIL-based prediction system that classifies a bacterium to either IRRB or IRSB. The experimental results of the proposed system are satisfactory with 91.5% of successful predictions.

  18. The spe-10 mutant has longer life and increased stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Cypser, J R; Johnson, T E

    1999-01-01

    We investigated the life span of spe-10 mutant nematodes. We also tested resistance of spe-10 mutants to ultraviolet (UV) light, heat, and paraquat and examined the relationship between resistance to UV light and the fertility defect of these animals. The spe-10 mutation significantly increased mean life span. Additionally, the mutation significantly increased resistance to both UV light and to heat. Resistance to paraquat was not significantly different from that of wild-type, nor were any dauers formed at 27 degrees C. No significant correlation was found between the UV resistance and the fertility defect, nor was the UV resistance attributable to a hormetic effect. These results reinforce the importance of stress resistance in specifying increased life span and indirectly suggest that this fertility defect is not a direct cause of life span extension.

  19. UV-B radiation increases anthocyanin levels in cotyledons and inhibits the growth of common buckwheat seedlings.

    PubMed

    Dębski, Henryk; Szwed, Magdalena; Wiczkowski, WiesŁaw; Szawara-Nowak, Dorota; Bączek, Natalia; Horbowicz, Marcin

    2016-12-01

    The impact of short-term UV-B treatment on the content of individual flavonoids and photosynthetic pigments in cotyledons and the growth of common buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench) seedlings was investigated. Seeds of four common buckwheat cultivars were germinated in darkness over a period of 4 days and acclimatized for 2 days under a 16/8 h light/dark photoperiod at 24/18 °C day/night, and exposure to 100-120 μmol ∙ m(-2) ∙ s(-1) of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Seedlings were divided into three batches, including two batches subjected to different doses of UV-B (5 W ∙ m(-2) and 10 W ∙ m(-2), one hour per day) for 5 days, and a control group exposed to PAR only. Exposure to UV-B increased anthocyanin levels in the cotyledons of all examined cultivars, it inhibited hypocotyl elongation, but did not affect the content of photosynthetic pigments. Flavone concentrations increased in cv. Red Corolla and Kora, remained constant in cv. Panda and decreased in cv. Hruszowska. Exposure to UV-B decreased rutin levels in cv. Hruszowska, but not in the remaining cultivars. Cultivars Hruszowska, Panda and Kora appeared to be less resistant to UV-B than Red Corolla. Higher resistance to UV-B radiation in Red Corolla can probably be attributed to its higher content of anthocyanins and rutin in comparison with the remaining cultivars.

  20. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni.

  1. HIV drug resistance in infants increases with changing prevention of mother-to-child transmission regimens.

    PubMed

    Poppe, Lisa K; Chunda-Liyoka, Catherine; Kwon, Eun H; Gondwe, Clement; West, John T; Kankasa, Chipepo; Ndongmo, Clement B; Wood, Charles

    2017-08-24

    The objectives of this study were to determine HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) prevalence in Zambian infants upon diagnosis, and to determine how changing prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) drug regimens affect drug resistance. Dried blood spot (DBS) samples from infants in the Lusaka District of Zambia, obtained during routine diagnostic screening, were collected during four different years representing three different PMTCT drug treatment regimens. DNA extracted from dried blood spot samples was used to sequence a 1493 bp region of the reverse transcriptase gene. Sequences were analyzed via the Stanford HIVDRdatabase (http://hivdb.standford.edu) to screen for resistance mutations. HIVDR in infants increased from 21.5 in 2007/2009 to 40.2% in 2014. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance increased steadily over the sampling period, whereas nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistance and dual class resistance both increased more than threefold in 2014. Analysis of drug resistance scores in each group revealed increasing strength of resistance over time. In 2014, children with reported PMTCT exposure, defined as infant prophylaxis and/or maternal treatment, showed a higher prevalence and strength of resistance compared to those with no reported exposure. HIVDR is on the rise in Zambia and presents a serious problem for the successful lifelong treatment of HIV-infected children. PMTCT affects both the prevalence and strength of resistance and further research is needed to determine how to mitigate its role leading to resistance.

  2. Resistance to Increasing Chemical Classes of Fungicides by Virtue of "Selection by Association" in Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Hu, Meng-Jun; Cox, Kerik D; Schnabel, Guido

    2016-12-01

    Previous research has shown that Botrytis cinerea isolates with resistance to multiple chemical classes of fungicides exist in eastern strawberry fields. In this study, the fungicide resistance profiles of 2,130 isolates from flowers of commercial strawberry fields located in multiple states was determined over four consecutive strawberry production seasons. Producers were asked to alternate single-site fungicides that were considered low risk in their specific location based on resistance monitoring results in their fields. This recommendation led to an increase of chemical class diversity used in the spray programs. Results indicated that simultaneous resistance in individual isolates to two, three, four, five, six, and seven classes of fungicides increased over time. The increase in chemical class resistances within isolates was likely due to a process we termed "selection by association", where fungicide resistance traits were often linked to the trait being selected rather than the selectable trait itself. Data analysis also indicated that the odds were highest for isolates resistant to one chemical class (1CCR) to be resistant to thiophanate-methyl; for 2CCR isolates to be resistant to thiophanate-methyl and pyraclostrobin; and for 3CCR isolates to be resistant to thiophanate-methyl, pyraclostrobin, and either cyprodinil or fenhexamid. We hypothesize that the more chemical classes are used in a spray program, the faster isolates will be selected with increasing numbers of chemical class resistances by virtue of selection by association if such isolates preexist in the population.

  3. Radiation resistance of biological reagents for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Vafadari, Cyrus; Lui, Clarissa S; Cascio, Ethan; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-01-01

    Life on Mars, if it exists, may share a common ancestry with life on Earth derived from meteoritic transfer of microbes between the planets. One means to test this hypothesis is to isolate, detect, and sequence nucleic acids in situ on Mars, then search for similarities to known common features of life on Earth. Such an instrument would require biological and chemical components, such as polymerase and fluorescent dye molecules. We show that reagents necessary for detection and sequencing of DNA survive several analogues of the radiation expected during a 2-year mission to Mars, including proton (H-1), heavy ion (Fe-56, O-18), and neutron bombardment. Some reagents have reduced performance or fail at higher doses. Overall, our findings suggest it is feasible to utilize space instruments with biological components, particularly for mission durations of up to several years in environments without large accumulations of charged particles, such as the surface of Mars, and have implications for the meteoritic transfer of microbes between planets.

  4. Radiation resistance of sequencing chips for in situ life detection.

    PubMed

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Lui, Clarissa S; Zlatkovsky, Ilya; Papalias, Chris W; Bolander, Jarie; Myers, Jason W; Bustillo, James; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Life beyond Earth may be based on RNA or DNA if such life is related to life on Earth through shared ancestry due to meteoritic exchange, such as may be the case for Mars, or if delivery of similar building blocks to habitable environments has biased the evolution of life toward utilizing nucleic acids. In this case, in situ sequencing is a powerful approach to identify and characterize such life without the limitations or expense of returning samples to Earth, and can monitor forward contamination. A new semiconductor sequencing technology based on sensing hydrogen ions released during nucleotide incorporation can enable massively parallel sequencing in a small, robust, optics-free CMOS chip format. We demonstrate that these sequencing chips survive several analogues of space radiation at doses consistent with a 2-year Mars mission, including protons with solar particle event-distributed energy levels and 1 GeV oxygen and iron ions. We find no measurable impact of irradiation at 1 and 5 Gy doses on sequencing quality nor on low-level hardware characteristics. Further testing is required to study the impacts of soft errors as well as to characterize performance under neutron and gamma irradiation and at higher doses, which would be expected during operation in environments with significant trapped energetic particles such as during a mission to Europa. Our results support future efforts to use in situ sequencing to test theories of panspermia and/or whether life has a common chemical basis.

  5. Increasing Trend of Resistance to Penicillin, Tetracycline, and Fluoroquinolone Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae from Pakistan (1992–2009)

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Kauser; Nizamuddin, Summiya; Irfan, Seema; Khan, Erum; Malik, Faisal; Zafar, Afia

    2011-01-01

    Emergence and spread of drug resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae is global concern. We evaluated trends of antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae over years 1992–2009 in Pakistan. Resistance rates were compared between years (2007–2009) and (1992–2006). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) criteria using the disk diffusion methodology against penicillin, ceftriaxone, tetracycline and ofloxacin. Additional antibiotics tested in 100 strains isolated during 2007–2009, included cefotaxime, cefoxitin, cefuroxime, cefipime, ceftazidime, ceftizoxime, cefixime, cefpodoxime, spectinomycin and azithromycin. Neisseria gonorrhoeae ATCC 49226 was used as control. Chi-square for trend analysis was conducted to assess resistance trend over the study period. During study period significant increase in combined resistance to penicillin, tetracycline and ofloxacin was observed (P value <0.01). Resistance rates during the two study period also increased significantly (P value <0.01). Ceftriaxone resistance was not observed. None of the isolates were found to be resistant or with intermediate sensitivity to additional antibiotics. Our findings suggest that penicillin, ciprofloxacin, tetracycline should not be used in the empirical treatment of gonorrhea in Pakistan. Ceftriaxone and cefixime should be the first line therapy; however periodic MICs should be determined to identify emergence of strains with reduced susceptibility. PMID:21941568

  6. Role of graphene layers on the radiation resistance of copper-graphene nanocomposite: Inhibiting the expansion of thermal spike

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2017-09-01

    Metal-graphene nanocomposites are expected to have excellent radiation resistance. The intrinsic role of the graphene layers (GrLs) in their performance has not been fully understood. Five copper-graphene nanocomposite (CGNC) systems were used to investigate the detailed mechanisms underpinning this behaviour by atomistic simulation. Results showed that GrLs can reduce the formation, growth, and intensity of the thermal spike of CGNC; this effect became more evident with the increasing number of layers of graphene. The role of the GrLs can be explained by three mechanisms: first, the ultra-strength C-C bonds of graphene hindered the penetration of high-energy atoms, second, the number of recoiled atoms decreased with the increasing number of layers of graphene, and third, the energy dissipation along the graphene planes also indirectly weakened the damage caused to the entire system. These mechanisms may provide a pathway to prevent material degradation in extreme radiation environments.

  7. Unbiased analysis of pancreatic cancer radiation resistance reveals cholesterol biosynthesis as a novel target for radiosensitisation

    PubMed Central

    Souchek, J J; Baine, M J; Lin, C; Rachagani, S; Gupta, S; Kaur, S; Lester, K; Zheng, D; Chen, S; Smith, L; Lazenby, A; Johansson, S L; Jain, M; Batra, S K

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite its promise as a highly useful therapy for pancreatic cancer (PC), the addition of external beam radiation therapy to PC treatment has shown varying success in clinical trials. Understanding PC radioresistance and discovery of methods to sensitise PC to radiation will increase patient survival and improve quality of life. In this study, we identified PC radioresistance-associated pathways using global, unbiased techniques. Methods: Radioresistant cells were generated by sequential irradiation and recovery, and global genome cDNA microarray analysis was performed to identify differentially expressed genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells. Ingenuity pathway analysis was performed to discover cellular pathways and functions associated with differential radioresponse and identify potential small-molecule inhibitors for radiosensitisation. The expression of FDPS, one of the most differentially expressed genes, was determined in human PC tissues by IHC and the impact of its pharmacological inhibition with zoledronic acid (ZOL, Zometa) on radiosensitivity was determined by colony-forming assays. The radiosensitising effect of Zol in vivo was determined using allograft transplantation mouse model. Results: Microarray analysis indicated that 11 genes (FDPS, ACAT2, AG2, CLDN7, DHCR7, ELFN2, FASN, SC4MOL, SIX6, SLC12A2, and SQLE) were consistently associated with radioresistance in the cell lines, a majority of which are involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. We demonstrated that knockdown of farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS), a branchpoint enzyme of the cholesterol synthesis pathway, radiosensitised PC cells. FDPS was significantly overexpressed in human PC tumour tissues compared with healthy pancreas samples. Also, pharmacologic inhibition of FDPS by ZOL radiosensitised PC cell lines, with a radiation enhancement ratio between 1.26 and 1.5. Further, ZOL treatment resulted in radiosensitisation of PC tumours in an allograft mouse model

  8. Disruption of SLX4-MUS81 Function Increases the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Underwood, Tracy S A; Kung, Jong; Wang, Meng; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Held, Kathryn D; Hong, Theodore S; Efstathiou, Jason A; Willers, Henning

    2016-05-01

    Clinical proton beam therapy has been based on the use of a generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ∼1.1. However, emerging data have suggested that Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination pathway defects can lead to a variable RBE, at least in vitro. We investigated the role of SLX4 (FANCP), which acts as a docking platform for the assembly of multiple structure-specific endonucleases, in the response to proton irradiation. Isogenic cell pairs for the study of SLX4, XPF/ERCC1, MUS81, and SLX1 were irradiated at the mid-spread-out Bragg peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer 2.5 keV/μm) or with 250 kVp x-rays, and the clonogenic survival fractions were determined. To estimate the RBE of the protons relative to cobalt-60 photons (Co60Eq), we assigned a RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to x-rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were used to monitor the damage responses, and the cell cycle distributions were assessed by flow cytometry. The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor olaparib was used for comparison. Loss of SLX4 function resulted in an enhanced proton RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.42 compared with 1.11 for wild-type cells (at a survival fraction of 0.1; P<.05), which correlated with increased persistent DNA double-strand breaks in cells in the S/G2 phase. Genetic analysis identified the SLX4-binding partner MUS81 as a mediator of resistance to proton radiation. Both proton irradiation and olaparib treatment resulted in a similar prolonged accumulation of RAD51 foci in SLX4/MUS81-deficient cells, suggesting a common defect in the repair of DNA replication fork-associated damage. A defect in the FA pathway at the level of SLX4 results in hypersensitivity to proton radiation, which is, at least in part, due to impaired MUS81-mediated processing of replication forks that stall at clustered DNA damage. In vivo and clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings in human cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  9. Disruption of SLX4-MUS81 Function Increases the Relative Biological Effectiveness of Proton Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Underwood, Tracy S. A.; Kung, Jong; Wang, Meng; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Paganetti, Harald; Held, Kathryn D.; Hong, Theodore S.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Willers, Henning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s) Clinical proton beam therapy has been based on the use of a generic relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ~1.1. However, emerging data suggest that Fanconi Anemia (FA) and homologous recombination pathway defects may lead to a variable RBE, at least in-vitro. Here, we investigated the role of SLX4 (FANCP), which acts as a docking platform for the assembly of multiple structure-specific endonucleases, in the response to proton irradiation. Methods and Materials Isogenic cell pairs for the study of SLX4, XPF/ERCC1, MUS81, and SLX1 were irradiated at the mid-Spread-Out Bragg Peak of a clinical proton beam (linear energy transfer, 2.5 keV/μm) or with 250 kVp X-rays, and clonogenic survival fractions (SF) were determined. To estimate the RBE of protons relative to Cobalt-60 photons (Co60eq), we assigned a RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.1 to X-rays to correct the physical dose measured. Standard DNA repair foci assays were employed to monitor damage responses, and cell cycle distributions were assessed by flow cytometry. The PARP inhibitor olaparib was used for comparison. Results Loss of SLX4 function resulted in an enhanced proton RBE(Co60Eq) of 1.42 compared to 1.11 for wild-type cells (at SF=0.1, p<0.05) which correlated with increased persistent DNA double-strand breaks in cells in S/G2 phase. Genetic analysis identified the SLX4-binding partner MUS81 as a mediator of resistance to proton radiation. Both proton irradiation and olaparib treatment resulted in a similar prolonged accumulation of RAD51 foci in SLX4/MUS81-deficient cells, suggesting a common defect in the repair of DNA replication fork-associated damage. Conclusions A defect in the FA pathway at the level of SLX4 results in hypersensitivity to proton radiation, which is at least in part due to impaired MUS81-mediated processing of replication forks that stall at clustered DNA damages. In-vivo and clinical studies are needed to confirm these findings in human cancers. PMID:27084631

  10. Increased insulin resistance in men with unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Ragaa; El-Faissal, Yahia; Kamel, Ahmed; Kamal, Omnia; Aboulserour, Gamal; Aboulghar, Mohamed; Fahmy, Ibrahim

    2017-08-24

    This prospective case-control study aimed to test the presence of insulin resistance (IR) in men with unexplained infertility. We included two groups: the study group including 160 infertile men with unexplained oligozoospermia (sperm count <10 × 10(6)/ml) and normal hormonal profile, and the control group of 79 men with proven fertility within the preceding year. A fasting blood test measured IR, FSH, LH, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, high-density lipoprotein and triglycerides. Insulin level was significantly higher in the study group (13.67 ± 10.44) compared with the control group (5.46 ± 3.15), P < 0.0001, and IR was significantly higher in the study group, P < 0.0001. FSH was significantly (P < 0.0001) higher in the study group (4.71 ± 2.57) than the control group (3.15 ± 1.92). LH was significantly higher in the study group (4.98 ± 2.41) compared with the control group (3.15 ± 1.12), P < 0.0001. Total cholesterol was significantly higher in the study group (198.29 ± 37.52) than the control group (182.45 ± 35.92), P < 0.05. In conclusion, IR in men with unexplained infertility may be a cause of reproductive and metabolic abnormalities. The benefit of insulin-sensitizing agents for these patients should be tested. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Radiation resistance of (Ni,Fe)Cr2O4 spinels by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Brutzel, Laurent; Alvarez, Pierre; Chartier, Alain

    2014-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out to study primary radiation damage in NiCr2O4 and FeCr2O4 spinels, which are part of the corrosion layer of the vapour generators used in nuclear reactors. The radiation resistance of both spinels is evaluated by studying point defect recombination processes, threshold displacement energies, and 20 keV displacement cascades initiated with different PKA masses. Results are mainly in agreement with previous studies involving MgAl2O4 showing that radiation facilitates the transition to inverse spinel structure or NaCl structure. However, we find some differences between the two studied spinels indicating that NiCr2O4 is more sensitive to radiation.

  12. Solar radiation increases suicide rate after adjusting for other climate factors in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Jee, Hee-Jung; Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Yu Jin; Choi, Nari; An, Hyonggin; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2017-03-01

    Previous studies have indicated that suicide rates have significant seasonal variations. There is seasonal discordance between temperature and solar radiation due to the monsoon season in South Korea. We investigated the seasonality of suicide and assessed its association with climate variables in South Korea. Suicide rates were obtained from the National Statistical Office of South Korea, and climatic data were obtained from the Korea Meteorological Administration for the period of 1992-2010. We conducted analyses using a generalized additive model (GAM). First, we explored the seasonality of suicide and climate variables such as mean temperature, daily temperature range, solar radiation, and relative humidity. Next, we identified confounding climate variables associated with suicide rate. To estimate the adjusted effect of solar radiation on the suicide rate, we investigated the confounding variables using a multivariable GAM. Suicide rate showed seasonality with a pattern similar to that of solar radiation. We found that the suicide rate increased 1.008 times when solar radiation increased by 1 MJ/m(2) after adjusting for other confounding climate factors (P < 0.001). Solar radiation has a significant linear relationship with suicide after adjusting for region, other climate variables, and time trends. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Arachidonic acid metabolites mediate the radiation-induced increase in glomerular albumin permeability.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mukut; McCarthy, Ellen T; Sharma, Ram; Fish, Brian L; Savin, Virginia J; Cohen, Eric P; Moulder, John E

    2006-01-01

    Radiation-induced renal injury is characterized by proteinuria, hypertension, and progressive decline in renal function. We have previously shown that in vivo or in vitro irradiation of glomeruli with a single dose of radiation (9.5 Gy) increases glomerular albumin permeability (P(alb)) within 1 hr. The current studies tested the hypothesis that this early radiation-induced increase in P(alb) is caused by the release of arachidonic acid and by the generation of specific arachidonic acid metabolites. Glomeruli obtained from WAG/Rij/MCW rats and cultured rat glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells were studied after irradiation (9.5 Gy, single dose). Arachidonic acid release and eicosanoid synthesis by glomeruli or cultured glomerular cells were measured after irradiation, and the effect of inhibitors of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and cyclooxygenase (COX) on the irradiation-induced increase in P(alb) was assessed. Arachidonic acid release was demonstrated within 10 mins of irradiation of isolated glomeruli and monolayer cultures of glomerular epithelial and mesangial cells. Prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) and PGE2 release was increased after irradiation of isolated glomeruli. Blocking arachidonic acid release or COX activity before irradiation completely prevented the increase in P(alb). COX inhibition immediately after irradiation also diminished the radiation-induced increase in P(alb). We conclude that arachidonic acid and its COX metabolites play an essential role in the early cellular changes that lead to the radiation-induced increase in P(alb). Understanding of the early epigenetic effects of irradiation may lead to new intervention strategies against radiation-induced injury of normal tissues.

  14. Genetic engineering for increasing fungal and bacterial disease resistance in crop plants.

    PubMed

    Wally, Owen; Punja, Zamir K

    2010-01-01

    We review the current and future potential of genetic engineering strategies used to make fungal and bacterial pathogen-resistant GM crops, illustrating different examples of the technologies and the potential benefits and short-falls of the strategies. There are well- established procedures for the production of transgenic plants with resistance towards these pathogens and considerable progress has been made using a range of new methodologies. There are no current commercially available transgenic plant species with increased resistance towards fungal and bacterial pathogens; only plants with increased resistance towards viruses are available. With an improved understanding of plant signaling pathways in response to a range of other pathogens, such as fungi, additional candidate genes for achieving resistance are being investigated. The potential for engineering plants for resistance against individual devastating diseases or for plants with resistance towards multiple pathogens is discussed in detail.

  15. Does employee resistance during a robbery increase the risk of customer injury?

    PubMed

    Yau, Rebecca K; Casteel, Carri; Nocera, Maryalice; Bishop, Stephanie F; Peek-Asa, Corinne

    2015-04-01

    Retail business robberies can lead to employee and customer injury. Previous work demonstrates that employee resistance increases employee injury risk; limited research has investigated customer injuries. This study examines associations between employee resistance against perpetrators and the risk of customer injury. Retail and service robbery reports were obtained from a metropolitan police department. Generalized estimating equations estimated risk ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Customers were injured in 75 out of 697 robberies. Employees resisted the perpetrator in 32 out of 697 robberies. Customers had higher injury risk when employees resisted the perpetrator, compared with robberies where employees did not resist (adjusted risk ratio [95% CI], 2.6 [1.5 to 4.5]). Employee resistance against a perpetrator during a robbery increased customer injury risk. Businesses can train employees to not resist during a robbery, providing benefits for both customers and the business itself.

  16. Peri-operative radiation exposure: Are overweight patients at increased risks?

    PubMed

    Dalgleish, S; Hince, A; Finlayson, D F

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify if there was a correlation between body mass index (BMI) and intra-operative radiation exposure. A retrospective review of 81 patients who had sliding hip screw fixation for femoral neck fractures in one year was completed, recording body mass index (BMI), screening time, dose area product (DAP), American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) grade, seniority of operating surgeon and complexity of the fracture configuration. There was a statistically significant correlation between dose area product and BMI. There was no statistically significant relationship between screening time and BMI. There was no statistical difference between ASA grade, seniority of surgeon, or complexity of fracture configuration and dose area product. Simulated stochastic risks were increased for overweight patients. Overweight patients are exposed to increased doses of radiation regardless of length of screening time. Surgeons and theatre staff should be aware of the increased radiation exposure during fixation of fractures in overweight patients and, along with radiographers, ensure steps are taken to minimise these risks. Whilst such radiation dosages may have little adverse effect for individual patients, these findings may be of more relevance and concern to staff that will be exposed to increased radiation.

  17. Assessment of the impact of increased solar ultraviolet radiation upon marine ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Worrest, R. C.; Vandyke, H.

    1978-01-01

    Reduction of the earth's ozone layer, with a resultant increase in transmission of solar ultraviolet radiation in the 290 to 320nm waveband (UV-B), via space shuttle operations through the stratosphere is considered. It is shown that simulated solar ultraviolet radiation can, under experimental conditions, detrimentally affect the marine organisms that form the base of the food web of oceanic and estuarine ecosystems. Whether a small increase in biologically harmful ultraviolet radiation might overwhelm these mechanisms and produce changes that will have damaging consequences to the biosphere is discussed. The potential for irreversible damage to the productivity, structure and/or functioning of a model estuarine ecosystem by increased UV-B radiation and whether these ecosystems are highly stable or amenable to adaptive change is studied. Data are provided to assess the potential impact upon marine ecosystems if space shuttle operations contribute to a reduction of the stratospheric ozone layer and the sensitivity of key community components to increased UV-B radiation is examined.

  18. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  19. NBS1 knockdown by small interfering RNA increases ionizing radiation mutagenesis and telomere association in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ying; Lim, Chang U K.; Williams, Eli S.; Zhou, Junqing; Zhang, Qinming; Fox, Michael H.; Bailey, Susan M.; Liber, Howard L.

    2005-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations which lead to decreased function of the NBS1 gene are responsible for Nijmegen breakage syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive hereditary disorder that imparts an increased predisposition to development of malignancy. The NBS1 protein is a component of the MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex that plays a critical role in cellular responses to DNA damage and the maintenance of chromosomal integrity. Using small interfering RNA transfection, we have knocked down NBS1 protein levels and analyzed relevant phenotypes in two closely related human lymphoblastoid cell lines with different p53 status, namely wild-type TK6 and mutated WTK1. Both TK6 and WTK1 cells showed an increased level of ionizing radiation-induced mutation at the TK and HPRT loci, impaired phosphorylation of H2AX (gamma-H2AX), and impaired activation of the cell cycle checkpoint regulating kinase, Chk2. In TK6 cells, ionizing radiation-induced accumulation of p53/p21 and apoptosis were reduced. There was a differential response to ionizing radiation-induced cell killing between TK6 and WTK1 cells after NBS1 knockdown; TK6 cells were more resistant to killing, whereas WTK1 cells were more sensitive. NBS1 deficiency also resulted in a significant increase in telomere association that was independent of radiation exposure and p53 status. Our results provide the first experimental evidence that NBS1 deficiency in human cells leads to hypermutability and telomere associations, phenotypes that may contribute to the cancer predisposition seen among patients with this disease.

  20. Composites for Increased Wear Resistance: Current Achievements and Future Prospects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, J. K.

    1984-01-01

    The various ways in which reductions in wear and/or friction can be achieved by the use of composite materials are reviewed. Reinforced plastics are emphasized and it is shown that fillers and fibers reduce wear via several mechanisms additional to their role of increasing overall mechanical strength, preferential transfer, counter face abrasion, preferential load support, or third-body formation on either the composite or its counterface. Examples are given from recent work on thin layer composites of the type widely used as dry bearings in aircraft flight control mechanisms. Developments in metal based composites and carbon-carbon composites for high energy brakes are discussed. The aspects which could benefit by increased fundamental understanding identified and the types of composites which appear to have greatest potential for further growth are indicated.

  1. Radiation-resistant extremophiles and their potential in biotechnology and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V

    2013-02-01

    Extremophiles are organisms able to thrive in extreme environmental conditions. Microorganisms with the ability to survive high doses of radiation are known as radioresistant or radiation-resistant extremophiles. Excessive or intense exposure to radiation (i.e., gamma rays, X-rays, and particularly UV radiation) can induce a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions, which can lead to different forms of cancer. However, some populations of microorganisms thrive under different types of radiation due to defensive mechanisms provided by primary and secondary metabolic products, i.e., extremolytes and extremozymes. Extremolytes (including scytonemin, mycosporine-like amino acids, shinorine, porphyra-334, palythine, biopterin, and phlorotannin, among others) are able to absorb a wide spectrum of radiation while protecting the organism's DNA from being damaged. The possible commercial applications of extremolytes include anticancer drugs, antioxidants, cell-cycle-blocking agents, and sunscreens, among others. This article aims to review the strategies by which microorganisms thrive in extreme radiation environments and discuss their potential uses in biotechnology and the therapeutic industry. The major challenges that lie ahead are also discussed.

  2. Assessment of the impact of increased solar ultraviolet radiation upon marine ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandyke, H.

    1977-01-01

    Specifically, the study has addressed the following: (1) potential for irreversible damage to the productivity, structure and/or functioning of a model estuarine ecosystem by increased UV-B radiation or ecosystems highly stable or amenable to adaptive change, and (2) the sensitivity of key community components (the primary producers, consumers, and decomposers) to increased UV-B radiation. Three areas of study were examined during the past year: (1) a continuation of the study utilizing the two seminatural ecosystem chambers, (2) a pilot study utilizing three flow-through ecosystem tanks enclosed in a small, outdoor greenhouse, and (3) sensitivity studies of representative primary producers and consumers.

  3. Impact of increasing Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation on photosynthetic processes.

    PubMed

    Kataria, Sunita; Jajoo, Anjana; Guruprasad, Kadur N

    2014-08-01

    Increased UV-B radiation on the earth's surface due to depletion of stratospheric ozone layer is one of the changes of current climate-change pattern. The deleterious effects of UV-B radiation on photosynthesis and photosynthetic productivity of plants are reviewed. Perusal of relevant literature reveals that UV-B radiation inflicts damage to the photosynthetic apparatus of green plants at multiple sites. The sites of damage include oxygen evolving complex, D1/D2 reaction center proteins and other components on the donor and acceptor sides of PS II. The radiation inactivates light harvesting complex II and alters gene expression for synthesis of PS II reaction center proteins. Mn cluster of water oxidation complex is the most important primary target of UV-B stress whereas D1 and D2 proteins, quinone molecules and cytochrome b are the subsequent targets of UV-B. In addition, photosynthetic carbon reduction is also sensitive to UV-B radiation which has a direct effect on the activity and content of Rubisco. Some indirect effects of UV-B radiation include changes in photosynthetic pigments, stomatal conductance and leaf and canopy morphology. The failure of protective mechanisms makes PS II further vulnerable to the UV-B radiation. Reactive oxygen species are involved in UV-B induced responses in plants, both as signaling and damaging agents. Exclusion of ambient UV components under field conditions results in the enhancement of the rate of photosynthesis, PS II efficiency and subsequently increases the biomass accumulation and crop yield. It is concluded that predicted future increase in UV-B irradiation will have significant impact on the photosynthetic efficiency and the productivity of higher plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systematic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H sub 1 and H sub 2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure. (Author)

  5. Antihistamines block radiation-induced increased intestinal blood flow in canines

    SciTech Connect

    Cockerham, L.G.; Doyle, T.F.; Donlon, M.A.; Gossett-Hagerman, C.J.

    1985-06-01

    Radiation-induced systemic hypotension is accompanied by increased intestinal blood flow (IBF) and an increased hematocrit (HCT) in dogs. Histamine infusion leads to increased IBF and intestinal edema with consequent secretion of fluid into the intestinal lumen. This study was performed to determine whether these effects could be diminished by prior administration of H1 and H2 histamine blockers. Dogs were given an iv infusion of mepyramine (0.5 mg/min) and cimetidine (0.25 mg/min) for 1 hr before and for 1 hr after radiation (H1 and H2 blockers, respectively). Mean systemic arterial blood pressure (MBP), IBF, and HCT were monitored for 2 hr. Systemic plasma histamine levels were determined simultaneously. Data obtained indicated that the H1 and H2 blockers, given simultaneously, were successful in blocking the increased IBF and the increased HCT seen after 100 Gy, whole-body, gamma radiation. However, the postradiation hypotension was only somewhat affected, with the MBP falling to a level 28% below the preradiation level. Plasma histamine levels reached a sharp peak, as much as 20% above baseline, at 4 min postradiation. These findings implicate histamine in the radiation-induced increase in IBF and HCT but not for the gradual decrease in postradiation blood pressure.

  6. Method and apparatus for increasing resistance of bipolar buried layer integrated circuit devices to single-event upsets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoutendyk, John A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Bipolar transistors fabricated in separate buried layers of an integrated circuit chip are electrically isolated with a built-in potential barrier established by doping the buried layer with a polarity opposite doping in the chip substrate. To increase the resistance of the bipolar transistors to single-event upsets due to ionized particle radiation, the substrate is biased relative to the buried layer with an external bias voltage selected to offset the built-in potential just enough (typically between about +0.1 to +0.2 volt) to prevent an accumulation of charge in the buried-layer-substrate junction.

  7. DNA repair and resistance to UV-B radiation in western spotted frogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blaustein, A.R.; Hays, J.B.; Hoffman, P.D.; Chivers, D.P.; Kiesecker, J.M.; Leonard, W.P.; Marco, A.; Olson, D.H.; Reaser, J.K.; Anthony, R.G.

    1999-01-01

    We assessed DNA repair and resistance to solar radiation in eggs of members of the western spotted frog complex (Rana pretiosa and R. luteiventris), species whose populations are suffering severe range reductions and declines. Specifically, we measured the activity of photoreactivating enzyme (photolyase) in oocytes of spotted frogs. In some species, photoreactivation is the most important mechanism for repair of UV-damaged DNA. Using field experiments, we also compared the hatching success of spotted frog embryos at natural oviposition sites at three elevations, where some embryos were subjected to ambient levels of UV-B radiation and others were shielded from UV-B radiation. Compared with other amphibians, photolyase activities in spotted frogs were relatively high. At all sites, hatching success was unaffected by UV-B. Our data support the interpretation that amphibian embryos with relatively high levels of photolyase are more resistant to UV-B radiation than those with lower levels of photolyase. At the embryonic stage, UV-B radiation does not presently seem to be contributing to the population declines of spotted frogs.

  8. Radiation resistance: Cancer stem cells (CSCs) and their enigmatic pro-survival signaling.

    PubMed

    Skvortsova, Ira; Debbage, Paul; Kumar, Vinod; Skvortsov, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    Despite the fact that radiation therapy is a highly effective therapeutic approach, a small intratumoral cell subpopulation known as "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) is radiation-resistant and possesses specific molecular properties protecting it against radiation-induced damage. The exact mechanisms of this radioresistance are still not fully elucidated, but they relate to these cells' enhanced DNA repair capacities and their low intracellular ROS concentrations, resulting from their up-regulation of ROS scavengers. The low ROS content is accompanied by disturbances in cell cycle regulation, so it can be assumed that either CSCs are quiescent or dormant themselves, or that this cell population consists of at least two cell subpopulations: the normally and the slowly proliferating cells (quiescent or dormant cells). Slowly dividing CSCs show concomitant dysregulation of the signaling molecules mediating both cell cycle progression and maintenance of cell stemness. Despite a massive accumulation of data concerning the mechanisms underlying DNA damage response in CSCs, it represents a challenge to researchers in the era of personalized medicine to elucidate the role of intracellular ROS and of signaling pathways associated with the radiation resistance of these cells; there is a clear need to understand the molecular mechanisms helping CSCs to survive radiation exposure.

  9. Low-Temperature Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans and Antarctic Dry Valley Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dartnell, Lewis R.; Hunter, Stephanie J.; Lovell, Keith V.; Coates, Andrew J.; Ward, John M.

    2010-09-01

    The high flux of cosmic rays onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of martian microbial life. Here, we determined the survival responses of several bacterial strains to ionizing radiation exposure while frozen at a low temperature characteristic of the martian near-subsurface. Novel psychrotolerant bacterial strains were isolated from the Antarctic Dry Valleys, an environmental analogue of the martian surface, and identified by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny as representatives of Brevundimonas, Rhodococcus, and Pseudomonas genera. These isolates, in addition to the known radioresistant extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to gamma rays while frozen on dry ice (-79°C). We found D. radiodurans to exhibit far greater radiation resistance when irradiated at -79°C than was observed in similar studies performed at higher temperatures. This greater radiation resistance has important implications for the estimation of potential survival times of microorganisms near the martian surface. Furthermore, the most radiation resistant of these Dry Valley isolates, Brevundimonas sp. MV.7, was found to show 99% 16S rRNA gene similarity to contaminant bacteria discovered in clean rooms at both Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers and so is of prime concern to efforts in the planetary protection of Mars from our lander probes. Results from this experimental irradiation, combined with previous radiation modeling, indicate that Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 emplaced only 30 cm deep in martian dust could survive the cosmic radiation for up to 100,000 years before suffering 106 population reduction.

  10. Low-temperature ionizing radiation resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans and Antarctic Dry Valley bacteria.

    PubMed

    Dartnell, Lewis R; Hunter, Stephanie J; Lovell, Keith V; Coates, Andrew J; Ward, John M

    2010-09-01

    The high flux of cosmic rays onto the unshielded surface of Mars poses a significant hazard to the survival of martian microbial life. Here, we determined the survival responses of several bacterial strains to ionizing radiation exposure while frozen at a low temperature characteristic of the martian near-subsurface. Novel psychrotolerant bacterial strains were isolated from the Antarctic Dry Valleys, an environmental analogue of the martian surface, and identified by 16S rRNA gene phylogeny as representatives of Brevundimonas, Rhodococcus, and Pseudomonas genera. These isolates, in addition to the known radioresistant extremophile Deinococcus radiodurans, were exposed to gamma rays while frozen on dry ice (-79°C). We found D. radiodurans to exhibit far greater radiation resistance when irradiated at -79°C than was observed in similar studies performed at higher temperatures. This greater radiation resistance has important implications for the estimation of potential survival times of microorganisms near the martian surface. Furthermore, the most radiation resistant of these Dry Valley isolates, Brevundimonas sp. MV.7, was found to show 99% 16S rRNA gene similarity to contaminant bacteria discovered in clean rooms at both Kennedy and Johnson Space Centers and so is of prime concern to efforts in the planetary protection of Mars from our lander probes. Results from this experimental irradiation, combined with previous radiation modeling, indicate that Brevundimonas sp. MV.7 emplaced only 30 cm deep in martian dust could survive the cosmic radiation for up to 100,000 years before suffering 10⁶ population reduction.

  11. Plant Responses to Increased UV-B Radiation: A Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAntoni, H. L.; Skiles, J. W.; Armstrong, R.; Coughlan, J.; Daleo, G.; Mayoral, A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ozone decrease implies more ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Increased UV-B radiation triggers responses by living organisms. Despite the large potential impacts on vegetation, little is known about UV-B effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial ecosystems, asses the risks, and produce reliable data for prediction. Screening pigments are part of one of the protective mechanism in plants. Higher concentrations of screening pigments in leaves may be interpreted as a response to increased UV radiation. If the screening effect is not sufficient, important molecules will be disturbed by incoming radiation. Thus, genetics, photosynthesis, growth, plant and leaf shape and size, and pollen grains may be affected. This will have an impact on ecosystem dynamics, structure and productivity. It is necessary to monitor selected terrestrial ecosystems to permit detection and interpretation of changes attributable to global climate change and depleted ozone shield. The objectives of this project are: (1) To identify and measure indicators of the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation on terrestrial plants; (2) to select indicators with the greatest responses to UV-B exposure; (3) to test, adapt or create ecosystem models that use the information gathered by this project for prediction and to enhance our understanding of the effects of increased UV-B radiation on terrestrial ecosystems. As a first step to achieve these objectives we propose a three-year study of forest and steppe vegetation on the North slope of the Brooks Range (within the Arctic circle, in Alaska), in the Saguaro National Monument (near Tucson, Arizona) and in the forests and steppes of Patagonia (Argentina). We selected (1) vegetation north of the Polar Circle because at 70N there is 8% risk of plant damage due to increased UV-B radiation; (2) the foothills of Catalina Mountains

  12. Plant Responses to Increased UV-B Radiation: A Research Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DAntoni, H. L.; Skiles, J. W.; Armstrong, R.; Coughlan, J.; Daleo, G.; Mayoral, A.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ozone decrease implies more ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation reaching the surface of the Earth. Increased UV-B radiation triggers responses by living organisms. Despite the large potential impacts on vegetation, little is known about UV-B effects on terrestrial ecosystems. Long-term ecological studies are needed to quantify the effects of increased UV radiation on terrestrial ecosystems, asses the risks, and produce reliable data for prediction. Screening pigments are part of one of the protective mechanism in plants. Higher concentrations of screening pigments in leaves may be interpreted as a response to increased UV radiation. If the screening effect is not sufficient, important molecules will be disturbed by incoming radiation. Thus, genetics, photosynthesis, growth, plant and leaf shape and size, and pollen grains may be affected. This will have an impact on ecosystem dynamics, structure and productivity. It is necessary to monitor selected terrestrial ecosystems to permit detection and interpretation of changes attributable to global climate change and depleted ozone shield. The objectives of this project are: (1) To identify and measure indicators of the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation on terrestrial plants; (2) to select indicators with the greatest responses to UV-B exposure; (3) to test, adapt or create ecosystem models that use the information gathered by this project for prediction and to enhance our understanding of the effects of increased UV-B radiation on terrestrial ecosystems. As a first step to achieve these objectives we propose a three-year study of forest and steppe vegetation on the North slope of the Brooks Range (within the Arctic circle, in Alaska), in the Saguaro National Monument (near Tucson, Arizona) and in the forests and steppes of Patagonia (Argentina). We selected (1) vegetation north of the Polar Circle because at 70N there is 8% risk of plant damage due to increased UV-B radiation; (2) the foothills of Catalina Mountains

  13. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-12-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals.

  14. Unusual resistance to ionizing radiation of the viruses of kuru, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, and scrapie.

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, C J; Gajdusek, D C; Latarjet, R

    1978-01-01

    The titers of several preparations of kuru. Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, and scrapie viruses were reduced by only 1/10th or less by high doses of gamma radiation of 50 kGy and by only 1/10th-1/1000th or less for 200 kGy. This unusual radiation resistance of the two human viruses further links them with the scrapie virus and suggests that the genetic information of all three viruses is considerably smaller than that of any other known viruses of mammals. PMID:104301

  15. Inhibition of Transforming Growth Factor-{beta} Signaling in Normal Lung Epithelial Cells Confers Resistance to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reeves, Anna; Zagurovskaya, Marianna; Gupta, Seema; Shareef, Mohammed M.; Mohiuddin, Mohammed; Ahmed, Mansoor M. . E-mail: mmahmed@geisinger.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To address the functional role of radiation-induced transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) signaling in a normal epithelial background, we selected a spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell line derived from the normal lung tissue of a dominant-negative mutant of the TGF-{beta} RII ({delta}RII) transgenic mouse that conditionally expressed {delta}RII under the control of the metallothionein promoter (MT-1), and assessed this cell line's response to radiation. Methods and Materials: A spontaneously immortalized lung epithelial cell culture (SILECC) was established and all analyses were performed within 50 passages. Colony-forming and terminal transferase dUPT nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays were used to assess clonogenic inhibition and apoptosis, respectively. Western-blot analysis was performed to assess the kinetics of p21, bax, and RII proteins. Transforming growth factor-{beta}-responsive promoter activity was measured using dual-luciferase reporter assay. Results: Exposure to ZnSO{sub 4} inhibited TGF-{beta} signaling induced either by recombinant TGF-{beta}1 or ionizing radiation. The SILECC, treated with either ZnSO{sub 4} or neutralizing antibody against TGF-{beta}, showed a significant increase in radio-resistance compared to untreated cells. Furthermore, the expression of {delta}RII inhibited the radiation-induced up-regulation of the TGF-{beta} effector gene p21{sup waf1/cip1}. Conclusions: Our findings imply that inhibition of radiation-induced TGF-{beta} signaling via abrogation of the RII function enhances the radio-resistance of normal lung epithelial cells, and this can be directly attributed to the loss of TGF-{beta} signaling function.

  16. Bortezomib-resistance is associated with increased levels of proteasome subunits and apoptosis-avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yi-Xin; Yang, Jia-Hua; Saitsu, Hirotomo

    2016-01-01

    Bortezomib (BTZ), a proteasome inhibitor, is the first proteasome inhibitor to be used in clinical practice. Here we investigated the mechanisms underlying acquired bortezomib resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Using stepwise selection, we established two acquired bortezomib-resistant HCC cell lines, a bortezomib-resistant HepG2 cell line (HepG2/BTZ) and bortezomib-resistant HuH7 cell line (HuH7/BTZ). The 50% inhibitory concentration values of HepG2/BTZ and HuH7/BTZ were respectively 15- and 39-fold higher than those of parental cell lines. Sequence analysis of the bortezomib-binding pocket in the β5-subunit showed no mutation. However, bortezomib-resistant HCC cells had increased expression of β1 and β5 proteasome subunits. These alterations of proteasome expression were accompanied by a weak degree of proteasome inhibition in bortezomib-resistant cells than that in wild-type cells after bortezomib exposure. Furthermore, bortezomib-resistant HCC cells acquired resistance to apoptosis. Bortezomib up-regulated pro-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-2 protein family, Bax and Noxa in wild-type HCC cells. However, in bortezomib-resistant HCC cells, resistance to apoptosis was accompanied by loss of the ability to stabilize and accumulate these proteins. Thus, increased expression and increased activity of proteasomes constitute an adaptive and auto regulatory feedback mechanism to allow cells to survive exposure bortezomib. PMID:27769058

  17. Altered Physiological Function, Not Structure, Drives Increased Radiation-Use Efficiency of Soybean Grown at Elevated CO2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Previous studies of elevated carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) on crop canopies have found that radiation-use efficiency is increased more than radiation-interception efficiency. It is assumed that increased radiation-use efficiency is due to changes in leaf-level physiology; however, canopy stru...

  18. Ionizing radiation-induced mutant frequencies increase transiently in male germ cells of older mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guogang; McMahan, C Alex; Hildreth, Kim; Garcia, Rebecca A; Herbert, Damon C; Walter, Christi A

    2012-05-15

    Spontaneous mutant frequency in the male germline increases with age, thereby increasing the risk of siring offspring with genetic disorders. In the present study we investigated the effect of age on ionizing radiation-induced male germline mutagenesis. lacI transgenic mice were treated with ionizing radiation at 4-, 15- and 26-month-old, and mutant frequencies were determined for pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids at 15 days or 49 days after ionizing radiation treatment. Cells collected 15 days after treatment were derivatives of irradiated differentiating spermatogenic cells while cells collected 49 days later were derivatives of spermatogonial stem cells. The results showed that (1) spontaneous mutant frequency increased in spermatogenic cells recovered from nonirradiated old mice (26-months-old), particularly in the round spermatids; (2) mutant frequencies were significantly increased in round spermatids obtained from middle-aged mice (15-months-old) and old age mice (26-months-old) at 15 and 49 days after irradiation compared to the sham-treated old mice; and (3) pachytene spermatocytes obtained from 15- or 26-month-old mice displayed a significantly increased mutant frequency at 15 days post irradiation. This study indicates that age modulates the mutagenic response to ionizing radiation in the male germline.

  19. Increasing oxygenation and radiation sensitivity following photodynamic therapy with verteporfin in the RIF-1 tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogue, Brian W.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Demidenko, Eugene; Wilmot, Carmen M.; Chen, Bin; Swartz, Harold M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2003-06-01

    The combination of verteporfin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) wiht radiaiton therapy from an orthovoltage device has been examiend in the radiation induced fibrosarcoma tumor model. PDT with verteporfin using a 3 hour delay between injection and the time of optical irradiation has been shown to cause a significant rise in overlal tumor oxygenation. It was huypothesized that this mechanism arises from the reduced oxygen consumption from cells where the PDT has targeted the mitochondria and shut down cellular respiration. Tumor blood flow was measured and found to be still be patent immediately following therapy. This increasing oxygenation was thought to provide an opportunity to increase the radiation sensitivity of the tumor immediately following PDT. When this type of treatment was combined with radiation therapy, a delay in the tumor regrowth time demonstrated that the combined effect was greater than additive. Further study of this phenomenon will provide a more complete mechanistic understanding of the effect and possibly provide a viable pre-treatment for radiation therapy of tumore that increases the therapeutic ratio. This effect could be used to either increase the radiaton dose without increasing the side effects or decrease the dose needed for the same effect on the tumor.

  20. Recovery of viability and radiation resistance by heat-injured conidia of Penicillium expansum Lk. ex Thom.

    PubMed

    Baldy, R W; Sommer, N F; Buckley, P M

    1970-05-01

    Spores heated in water at 54 C for up to 1 hr were plated on nutrient agar immediately or held for 3 days in aerated water at 23 C and then plated. Under these conditions, holding was optimal for recovery, increasing survival percentage up to 20-fold over values for immediate plating. Recovery was prevented partially or completely, however, when spores were held in any of the following solutions: glucose, potassium phosphate, ammonium or sodium acetate, sodium azide, or 2,4-dinitrophenol, or in the sodium or potassium salts of pyruvate, and tricarboxylic acid cycle acids. Both anaerobiosis and incubation at 0 C prevented recovery. Survivors of a heat treatment were more sensitive to gamma radiation than were unheated spores. Conditions which affected the recovery of viability had the same effect on restoration of radiation resistance. Thus, many of the processes for restoration of radiation resistance seem involved also in recovery of viability after heating. After a 99% inactivating treatment (about 30 min at 54 C), heated spores respired as fast as unheated spores, or faster. Malate, citrate, succinate, and acetate stimulated respiration in unheated spores and inhibited it in heated spores.

  1. RelB regulates manganese superoxide dismutase gene and resistance to ionizing radiation of prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Holley, Aaron K.; Xu, Yong; St. Clair, Daret K.; St. Clair, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation therapy is in the front line for treatment of localized prostate cancer. However, a significant percentage of patients have radiation-resistant disease. The NF-κB pathway is an important factor for radiation resistance, and the classical (canonical) pathway is thought to confer protection of prostate cancer cells from ionizing radiation. Recently, the alternative (non-canonical) pathway, which is involved in prostate cancer aggressiveness, has also been shown to be important for radiation resistance in prostate cancer. The alternative NF-κB pathway component RelB protects prostate cancer cells from the detrimental effects of ionizing radiation, in part, by stimulating expression of the mitochondria-localized antioxidant enzyme manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). Blocking RelB activation suppresses MnSOD expression and sensitizes prostate cancer cells to radiation. These results suggest that RelB-mediated modulation of the antioxidant capacity of prostate cancer cells is an important mechanism of radiation resistance. Therefore, targeting RelB activation may prove to be a valuable weapon in the oncologist’s arsenal to defeat aggressive and radiation-resistant prostate cancer. PMID:20649549

  2. Diffuse radiation increases global ecosystem-level water-use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffat, A. M.; Reichstein, M.; Cescatti, A.; Knohl, A.; Zaehle, S.

    2012-12-01

    Current environmental changes lead not only to rising atmospheric CO2 levels and air temperature but also to changes in air pollution and thus the light quality of the solar radiation reaching the land-surface. While rising CO2 levels are thought to enhance photosynthesis and closure of stomata, thus leading to relative water savings, the effect of diffuse radiation on transpiration by plants is less clear. It has been speculated that the stimulation of photosynthesis by increased levels of diffuse light may be counteracted by higher transpiration and consequently water depletion and drought stress. Ultimately, in water co-limited systems, the overall effect of diffuse radiation will depend on the sensitivity of canopy transpiration versus photosynthesis to diffuse light, i.e. whether water-use efficiency changes with relative levels of diffuse light. Our study shows that water-use efficiency increases significantly with higher fractions of diffuse light. It uses the ecosystem-atmosphere gas-exchange observations obtained with the eddy covariance method at 29 flux tower sites. In contrast to previous global studies, the analysis is based directly on measurements of diffuse radiation. Its effect on water-use efficiency was derived by analyzing the multivariate response of carbon and water fluxes to radiation and air humidity using a purely empirical approach based on artificial neural networks. We infer that per unit change of diffuse fraction the water-use efficiency increases up to 40% depending on diffuse fraction levels and ecosystem type. Hence, in regions with increasing diffuse radiation positive effects on primary production are expected even under conditions where water is co-limiting productivity.

  3. Resisting sarcolemmal rupture: dystrophin repeats increase membrane-actin stiffness.

    PubMed

    Sarkis, Joe; Vié, Véronique; Winder, Steve J; Renault, Anne; Le Rumeur, Elisabeth; Hubert, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin is an essential part of a membrane protein complex that provides flexible support to muscle fiber membranes. Loss of dystrophin function leads to membrane fragility and muscle-wasting disease. Given the importance of cytoskeletal interactions in strengthening the sarcolemma, we have focused on actin-binding domain 2 of human dystrophin, constituted by repeats 11 to 15 of the central domain (DYS R11-15). We previously showed that DYS R11-15 also interacts with membrane lipids. We investigated the shear elastic constant (μ) and the surface viscosity (η(s)) of Langmuir phospholipid monolayers mimicking the inner leaflet of the sarcolemma in the presence of DYS R11-15 and actin. The initial interaction of 100 nM DYS R11-15 with the monolayers slightly modifies their rheological properties. Injection of 0.125 μM filamentous actin leads to a strong increase of μ and η(s,) from 0 to 5.5 mN/m and 2.4 × 10(-4) N · s/m, respectively. These effects are specific to DYS R11-15, require filamentous actin, and depend on phospholipid nature and lateral surface pressure. These findings suggest that the central domain of dystrophin contributes significantly to the stiffness and the stability of the sarcolemma through its simultaneous interactions with the cytoskeleton and lipid membrane. This mechanical link is likely to be a major contributing factor to the shock absorber function of dystrophin and muscle sarcolemmal integrity on mechanical stress.

  4. A study of the deposition of carbide coatings on graphite fibers. [to increase electrical resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suplinskas, R. J.; Henze, T. W.

    1979-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition of boron carbide and silicon carbide on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistance was studied. Silicon carbide coatings were applied without degradation of the mechanical properties of the filaments. These coatings typically added 1000 ohms to the resistance of a filament as measured between two mercury pools. When SiC-coated filaments were oxidized by refluxing in boiling phosphoric acid, average resistance increased by an additional 1000 ohms; in addition resistance increases as high as 150 K ohms and breakdown voltages as high as 17 volts were noted. Data on boron carbide coatings indicated that such coatings would not be effective in increasing resistance, and would degrade the mechanical properties.

  5. Resistance of lichens to simulated galactic cosmic radiation: limits of survival capacity and biosignature detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Torre Noetzel, Rosa; Miller, Ana Z.; Cubero, Beatriz; Raguse, Marina; Meessen, Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Space constitutes an extremely harmful environment for survival of terrestrial organisms. Amongst extremophiles on Earth, lichens are one of the most resistant organisms to harsh terrestrial environments, as well as some species of microorganisms, such as bacteria (Moeller et al., 2010), criptoendolithic cyanobacteria and lithic fungi (de los Ríos et al. 2004). To study the survival capacity of lichens to the harmful radiation environment of space, we have selected the lichen Circinaria gyrosa, an astrobiological model defined by its high capacity of resistance to space conditions (De la Torre et al. 2010) and to a simulated Mars environment (Sanchez et al., 2012). Samples were irradiated with four types of space-relevant ionizing radiation in the STARLIFE campaign: helium and iron ion doses (up to 2,000 Gy), X-ray doses (up to 5,000 Gy) and ultra-high γ-ray doses (from 6 to 113 kGy). Results on resistance of C. gyrosa to space-relevant ionizing radiation and its post-irradiation viability were obtained by: (i) chlorophyll a fluorescence of photosystem II (PS II); (ii) epifluorescence microscopy; (iii) confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), and (iv) field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM). Results of photosynthetic activity and epifluorescence showed no significant changes on the viability of C. gyrosa with increasing doses of helium and iron ions as well as X-rays. In contrast, γ-irradiation elicited significant dose-correlated effects as revealed by all applied techniques. Relevant is the presence of whewellite-like crystals, detected by FESEM on C. gyrosa thalli after high irradiation doses, which has been also identified in previous Mars simulation studies (Böttcher et al., 2014). These studies contribute to the better understanding of the adaptability of extremophile organisms to harsh environments, as well as to estimate the habitability of a planet's surface, like Mars; they will be important for planning experiments on the search of life

  6. The performance of RPCs with bakelite electrodes of various resistivity under high radiation fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Górski, M.; Królikowski, J.

    2000-12-01

    Three medium-size Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) with bakelite electrodes having resistivity of 5×10 8, 5×10 9 and 3×10 10 Ω cm were tested in the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN in 1997, 1998 and 1999. The 2 mm gap modules working in an Inverted Double Gap configuration filled with gas mixtures containing freon C 2H 2F 4 and operated in avalanche mode exhibit wide efficiency plateau, good time resolution and small time walk due to rate variation even at intensities as high as 1 kHz/ cm2/ gap of a continuous radiation flux.

  7. Resistance of radiation-induced tropical wood-polymer composites to fungal degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chia, L. H. L.; Lim, V. S. L.; Yap, M. G. S.

    The resistance of six tropical hardwoods to fungal degradation by two wild-type strains of Phanerochaete chrysosporium Burdsall was investigated using vermiculite burial and wood-block weight loss techniques. Radiation-induced wood-polymer composites (WPC), based on two hardwoods Ramin and Rubber-wood with methyl methacrylate, were prepared, and samples were also exposed to the wood-rotting fungus. A significant improvement in resistance to fungal decay was observed in the WPC. Scanning-electron micrographs of the two woods and their composites after fungal degradation are presented and discussed.

  8. Some Characteristics of the Resistance Transfer Factor (RTF) Episome as Determined by Inactivation with Tritium, P32, and Gamma Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Painter, Robert B.; Ginoza, Herbert S.

    1966-01-01

    The resistance transfer factor (RTF) episome was studied by measuring its inactivation by Co60 gamma radiation, by incorporated P32, and by tritium incorporated as tritium-labeled thymine. The D37 for Co60 irradiation was 7 to 9 × 104 rad. Growth of the bacteria harboring the RTF in BUdR (bromouracil deoxyriboside) increased the sensitivity of the RTF to the gamma radiation. The RTF was markedly inactivated by tritium after growth of the host (thymine requiring) bacteria in tritium-labeled thymine, thus further establishing the presence of thymine in the genome of the RTF. Assuming the efficiency of inactivation by P32 to be 10%, the phosphorus content of the RTF was estimated to be about 2 × 105 P atoms/episome. The data suggest the RTF contains double stranded DNA with a molecular weight of the order of 3 to 8 × 107. PMID:5335449

  9. Microbial radio-resistance of Salmonella Typhimurium in egg increases due to repetitive irradiation with electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tesfai, Adiam T.; Beamer, Sarah K.; Matak, Kristen E.; Jaczynski, Jacek

    2011-04-01

    Ionizing radiation improves food safety. However, foodborne pathogens develop increased resistance in response to sub-lethal stresses such as heat, pH, antibiotics, etc. Therefore, it is hypothesized that foodborne pathogens may develop increased radio-resistance to electron beam (e-beam) radiation. The objective was to determine if D10-value for Salmonella Typhimurium in de-shelled raw egg (egg white and yolk mixed together) increases due to repetitive processing with e-beam at sub-lethal doses. Survivors were enumerated on non-selective (TSA) and selective (XLD) media. Survivors from the highest dose were isolated and used in subsequent e-beam cycle. This process was repeated four times for a total of five e-beam cycles. D10-values for S. Typhimurium enumerated on TSA and XLD following each e-beam cycle were calculated as inverse reciprocal of the slope of survivor curves. D10-values for the ATCC strain were 0.59±0.031 and 0.46±0.022 kGy on TSA and XLD, respectively. However, following the fifth e-beam cycle, the respective D10-values increased (P<0.05) to 0.69±0.026 and 0.61±0.029 kGy, respectively. S. Typhimurium showed a trend (P>0.05) to develop radio-resistance faster on selective media, likely due to facilitated selection of radio-resistant cells within microbial population following each e-beam cycle. For all five e-beam cycles, S. Typhimurium had higher (P<0.05) D10-values on non-selective media, indicating that sub-lethal injury followed by cellular repair and recovery are important for radio-resistance and inactivation of this microorganism. This study demonstrated that e-beam efficiently inactivates S. Typhimurium in raw egg; however, similar to other inactivation techniques and factors affecting microbial growth, S. Typhimurium develops increased radio-resistance if repetitively processed with e-beam at sub-lethal doses.

  10. Phenotypical and biochemical characterisation of resistance for parasitic weed (Orobanche foetida Poir.) in radiation-mutagenised mutants of chickpea.

    PubMed

    Brahmi, Ines; Mabrouk, Yassine; Brun, Guillaume; Delavault, Philippe; Belhadj, Omrane; Simier, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Some radiation-mutagenised chickpea mutants potentially resistant to the broomrape, Orobanche foetida Poir., were selected through field trials. The objectives of this work were to confirm resistance under artificial infestation, in pots and mini-rhizotron systems, and to determine the developmental stages of broomrape affected by resistance and the relevant resistance mechanisms induced by radiation mutagenesis. Among 30 mutants tested for resistance to O. foetida, five shared strong resistance in both pot experiments and mini-rhizotron systems. Resistance was not complete, but the few individuals that escaped resistance displayed high disorders of shoot development. Results demonstrated a 2-3-fold decrease in stimulatory activity of root exudates towards broomrape seed germination in resistant mutants in comparison with non-irradiated control plants and susceptible mutants. Resistance was associated with an induction of broomrape necrosis early during infection. When infested, most of the resistant mutants shared enhanced levels of soluble phenolic contents, phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity, guaiacol peroxidase activity and polyphenol oxidase activity, in addition to glutathione and notably ascorbate peroxidase gene expression in roots. Results confirmed enhanced resistance in chickpea radiation-mutagenised mutants, and demonstrated that resistance is based on alteration of root exudation, presumed cell-wall reinforcement and change in root oxidative status in response to infection. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Value of increasing film processing time to reduce radiation dose during mammography

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, S.E.; Yagan, R.; Oravec, D.; Shah, Z. )

    1990-12-01

    We systematically tested the effects on radiation dose and image quality of increasing the mammographic film processing time from the standard 90 sec to 3 min. Hurter and Driffield curves were obtained for a Kodak Min-R-OM1-SO177 screen-film combination processed with Kodak chemistry. Image contrast and radiation dose were measured for two tissue-equivalent breast phantoms. We also compared sequential pairs of mammograms, one processed at 90 sec and one at 3 min, from 44 patients on the basis of nine categories of image quality. Increased processing time reduced breast radiation dose by 30%, increased contrast by 11%, and produced slight overall gains in image quality. Simple modifications can convert a 90-sec processor to a 3-min unit. We recommend that implementation of extended processing be considered, especially by those centers that obtain a large number of screening mammograms. Three-minute film processing can reduce breast radiation dose by 30% and increase contrast by 11% without compromising image quality.

  12. Chitosan Microparticles Exert Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Activity against Antibiotic-Resistant Micro-organisms without Increasing Resistance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhengxin; Kim, Donghyeon; Adesogan, Adegbola T; Ko, Sanghoon; Galvao, Klibs; Jeong, Kwangcheol Casey

    2016-05-04

    Antibiotic resistance is growing exponentially, increasing public health concerns for humans and animals. In the current study, we investigated the antimicrobial features of chitosan microparticles (CM), engineered from chitosan by ion gelation, seeking potential application for treating infectious disease caused by multidrug resistant microorganisms. CM showed excellent antimicrobial activity against a wide range of microorganisms, including clinically important antibiotic-resistant pathogens without raising resistant mutants in serial passage assays over a period of 15 days, which is a significantly long passage compared to tested antibiotics used in human and veterinary medicine. In addition, CM treatment did not cause cross-resistance, which is frequently observed with other antibiotics and triggers multidrug resistance. Furthermore, CM activity was examined in simulated gastrointestinal fluids that CM encounter when orally administered. Antimicrobial activity of CM was exceptionally strong to eliminate pathogens completely. CM at a concentration of 0.1 μg/mL killed E. coli O157:H7 (5 × 10(8) CFU/mL) completely in synthetic gastric fluid within 20 min. Risk assessment of CM, in an in vitro animal model, revealed that CM did not disrupt the digestibility, pH or total volatile fatty acid production, indicating that CM likely do not affect the functionality of the rumen. Given all the advantages, CM can serve as a great candidate to treat infectious disease, especially those caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens without adverse side effects.

  13. Effect of nano-oxide particle size on radiation resistance of iron-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Weizong; Li, Lulu; Valdez, James A.; Saber, Mostafa; Zhu, Yuntian; Koch, Carl C.; Scattergood, Ronald O.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation resistance of Fe-14Cr alloys under 200 keV He irradiation at 500 °C was systematically investigated with varying sizes of nano oxide Zr, Hf and Cr particles. It is found that these nano oxide particles acted as effective sites for He bubble formation. By statistically analyzing 700-1500 He bubbles at the depth of about 150-700 nm from a series of HRTEM images for each sample, we established the variation of average He bubble size, He bubble density, and swelling percentage along the depth, and found them to be consistent with the He concentration profile calculated from the SIRM program. Oxide particles with sizes less than 3.5-4 nm are found most effective for enhancing radiation resistance in the studied alloy systems.

  14. A novel fast response and radiation-resistant scintillator detector for beam loss monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Y.; Tang, Z.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Shao, M.

    2017-07-01

    At high luminosity area, beam loss monitor with fast response and high radiation resistance is crucial for accelerator operation. In this article, we report the design and test results of a fast response and radiation-resistant scintillator detector as the beam loss monitor for high luminosity collider, especially at low energy region such as RFQ. The detector is consisted of a 2 cm× 2 cm× 0.5 cm LYSO crystal readout by a 6 mm × 6 mm Silicon photomultiplier. Test results from various radioactive sources show that the detector has good sensitivity to photons from tens of keV to several MeV with good linearity and energy resolution (23% for 60 keV γ-ray). For field test, two such detectors are installed outside of the vacuum chamber shell of an 800 MeV electron storage ring. The details of the test and results are introduced.

  15. ROS/Autophagy/Nrf2 Pathway Mediated Low-Dose Radiation Induced Radio-Resistance in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ni; Wu, Lijun; Yuan, Hang; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) can induce radio-resistance to following high dose radiation in various mammalian cells. The protective role of LDIR has been thought to be associated with the overall outcomes of cancer radiotherapy. NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in maintaining cellular oxidative equilibrium. Since oxidative stress has been indicated to be a mediator of LDIR induced radio-resistance, the role of Nrf2 in this process was investigated in this research. Our results showed that in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell, 5cGy alpha particle induced radio-resistance to following 75cGy alpha particle radiation. The expression level of Nrf2 and its target Heme Oxygenase-1(HO-1) increased after 5cGy radiation. Both the shRNA of Nrf2 and the chemical inhibitor of HO-1 suppressed the induced radio-resistance, indicating the involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in this process. Further, we found 5cGy radiation stimulated autophagy process in A549. Inhibition of the autophagy process resulted in suppression of the radio-resistance and the induced expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) blocked the autophagy process induced by 5cGy alpha particle, the upregulation of Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as the induced radio-resistance. In conclusion, ROS elevation caused by LDIR promoted Autophagy/Nrf2-HO-1 and conferred radio-resistance in A549.

  16. ROS/Autophagy/Nrf2 Pathway Mediated Low-Dose Radiation Induced Radio-Resistance in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ni; Wu, Lijun; Yuan, Hang; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) can induce radio-resistance to following high dose radiation in various mammalian cells. The protective role of LDIR has been thought to be associated with the overall outcomes of cancer radiotherapy. NF-E2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that plays pivotal roles in maintaining cellular oxidative equilibrium. Since oxidative stress has been indicated to be a mediator of LDIR induced radio-resistance, the role of Nrf2 in this process was investigated in this research. Our results showed that in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cell, 5cGy alpha particle induced radio-resistance to following 75cGy alpha particle radiation. The expression level of Nrf2 and its target Heme Oxygenase-1(HO-1) increased after 5cGy radiation. Both the shRNA of Nrf2 and the chemical inhibitor of HO-1 suppressed the induced radio-resistance, indicating the involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant pathway in this process. Further, we found 5cGy radiation stimulated autophagy process in A549. Inhibition of the autophagy process resulted in suppression of the radio-resistance and the induced expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) blocked the autophagy process induced by 5cGy alpha particle, the upregulation of Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as the induced radio-resistance. In conclusion, ROS elevation caused by LDIR promoted Autophagy/Nrf2-HO-1 and conferred radio-resistance in A549. PMID:26078725

  17. Design and construction of a radiation resistant quadrupole using metal oxide insulated CICC

    SciTech Connect

    Albert F. Zeller

    2012-12-28

    The construction of a engineering test model of a radiation resistant quadrupole is described. The cold-iron quadrupole uses coils fabricated from metal-oixide (synthetic spinel) insulated Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC). The superconductor is NbTi in a copper matrix. The quadrupole is designed to produce a pole-tip field of 2 T with an operating current of 7,000 A.

  18. Radiation-Resistant Hybrid Lotus Effect for Achieving Photoelectrocatalytic Self-Cleaning Anticontamination Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Edward W.; Pirich, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment involving radiation-resistant hydrophobic coatings is planned for space exposure and experimental testing on the International Space Station (ISS) in 2011. The Lotus biocide coatings are designed for supporting space exploration missions. This innovation is an antibacterial, anti-contamination, and self-cleaning coating that uses nano-sized semiconductor semimetal oxides to neutralize biological pathogens and toxic chemicals, as well as to mitigate dust accumulation (see figure). The Lotus biocide coating is thin (approximately microns thick), lightweight, and the biocide properties will not degrade with time or exposure to biological or chemical agents. The biocide is stimulated chemically (stoichiometric reaction) through exposure to light (photocatalysis), or by an applied electric field (electrocatalysis). The hydrophobic coating samples underwent preliminary high-energy proton and alpha-ray (helium ion) irradiations at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88" cyclotron and demonstrated excellent radiation resistance for a portion of the Galactic Cosmic Ray (GRC) and Solar Proton spectrum. The samples will undergo additional post-flight studies when returned to Earth to affirm further the radiation resistance properties of the space exposed coatings.

  19. Radiation Effects of n-type, Low Resistivity, Spiral Silicon Drift Detector Hybrid Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen W.; De Geronimo G.; Carini, G.A.; Gaskin, J.A.; Keister, J.W.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Siddons, D.P.; Smith, G.C.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2011-11-15

    We have developed a new thin-window, n-type, low-resistivity, spiral silicon drift detector (SDD) array - to be used as an extraterrestrial X-ray spectrometer (in varying environments) for NASA. To achieve low-energy response, a thin SDD entrance window was produced using a previously developed method. These thin-window devices were also produced on lower resistivity, thinner, n-type, silicon material, effectively ensuring their radiation hardness in anticipation of operation in potentially harsh radiation environments (such as found around the Jupiter system). Using the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility beam line RERS1, we irradiated a set of suitable diodes up to 5 Mrad and the latest iteration of our ASICs up to 12 Mrad. Then we irradiated two hybrid detectors consisting of newly, such-produced in-house (BNL) SDD chips bonded with ASICs with doses of 0.25 Mrad and 1 Mrad. Also we irradiated another hybrid detector consisting of previously produced (by KETEK) on n-type, high-resistivity SDD chip bonded with BNL's ASICs with a dose of 1 Mrad. The measurement results of radiated diodes (up to 5 Mrad), ASICs (up to 12 Mrad) and hybrid detectors (up to 1 Mrad) are presented here.

  20. Corn pollen polysaccharides: composition of radiation-resistant nutrients and bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weihong; Wenxin, Gao; Sun, Yeqing

    Corn pollen contains significant levels of free amino acids and protein, which greatly contribute to the biological function of corn pollen. However, to date there is no report in either China or abroad on research regarding the specific radiation-resistant composition in corn pollen includ-ing pollen polysaccharide. Reports on corn pollen polysaccharide have been mostly focused on immunological competence and anti-tumor functions. This study emphasized the optimization of the technical conditions for the extraction of corn pollen polysaccharide and the analysis of the corn pollen polysaccharide's structure. On that basis, we have developed in vitro experi-ments with corn pollen polysaccharide and report on its antioxidant functional activity. Our innovation lies in defining the specific composition of the radiation-resistant nutrients and active compounds as well as identifying the structure of the active compounds. We have successfully separated the active radiation-resistant functional factors, which are of great significance for astronauts and other special groups. Our results lay the groundwork for further research and development of corn pollen polysaccharide and ingredient technology.

  1. Radiation effects of n-type, low resistivity, spiral silicon drift detector hybrid systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Carini, G. A.; De Geronimo, G.; Gaskin, J. A.; Keister, J. W.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B. D.; Siddons, D. P.; Smith, G. C.; Verbitskaya, E.

    2011-10-01

    We have developed a new thin-window, n-type, low-resistivity, spiral silicon drift detector (SDD) array - to be used as an extraterrestrial X-ray spectrometer (in varying environments) for NASA. To achieve low-energy response, a thin SDD entrance window was produced using a previously developed method. These thin-window devices were also produced on lower resistivity, thinner, n-type, silicon material, effectively ensuring their radiation hardness in anticipation of operation in potentially harsh radiation environments (such as found around the Jupiter system). Using the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility beam line RERS1, we irradiated a set of suitable diodes up to 5 Mrad and the latest iteration of our ASICs up to 12 Mrad. Then we irradiated two hybrid detectors consisting of newly, such-produced in-house (BNL) SDD chips bonded with ASICs with doses of 0.25 Mrad and 1 Mrad. Also we irradiated another hybrid detector consisting of previously produced (by KETEK) on n-type, high-resistivity SDD chip bonded with BNL's ASICs with a dose of 1 Mrad. The measurement results of radiated diodes (up to 5 Mrad), ASICs (up to 12 Mrad) and hybrid detectors (up to 1 Mrad) are presented here.

  2. Identifying circumstances under which high insecticide dose increases or decreases resistance selection.

    PubMed

    Helps, J C; Paveley, N D; van den Bosch, F

    2017-09-07

    Insect management strategies for agricultural crop pests must reduce selection for insecticide resistant mutants while providing effective control of the insect pest. One management strategy that has long been advocated is the application of insecticides at the maximum permitted dose. This has been found, under some circumstances, to be able to prevent the resistance allele frequency from increasing. However this approach may, under different circumstances, lead to rapid selection for resistance to the insecticide. To test when a high dose would be an effective resistance management strategy, we present a flexible deterministic model of a population of an insect pest of agricultural crops. The model includes several possible life-history traits including sexual or asexual reproduction, diploid or haplodiploid genetics, univoltine or multivoltine life cycle, so that the high dose strategy can be tested for many different insect pests. Using this model we aim to identify the key characteristics of pests that make either a high dose or a low dose of insecticide optimal for resistance management. Two outputs are explored: firstly whether the frequency of the resistance allele increases over time or remains low indefinitely; and secondly whether lowering the dose of insecticide applied reduces or increases the rate of selection for the resistance allele. It is demonstrated that with high immigration resistance can be suppressed. This suppression however, is rarely lost if the insecticide dose is reduced, and is absent altogether when individuals move from the treated population back into an untreated population. Reducing the dose of insecticide often resulted in slower development of resistance, except where the population combined a high influx of less resistant individuals into the treated population, a recessive resistance gene and a high efficacy, in which case reducing the dose of insecticide could result in faster selection for resistance. Copyright © 2017

  3. Increased intracranial pressure in mini-pigs exposed to simulated solar particle event radiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, JK; Muehlmatt, A; Savage, A; Lin, L; Kennedy, AR

    2014-01-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) during space flight have stimulated an area of research in space medicine. It is widely speculated that elevations in ICP contribute to structural and functional ocular changes, including deterioration in vision, which is also observed during space flight. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in OP occurring as a result of ionizing radiation exposure (at doses and dose-rates relevant to solar particle event radiation). We used a large animal model, the Yucatan mini-pig, and were able to obtain measurements over a 90 day period. This is the first investigation to show long term recordings of ICP in a large animal model without an invasive craniotomy procedure. Further, this is the first investigation reporting increased ICP after radiation exposure. PMID:25242832

  4. Increased intracranial pressure in mini-pigs exposed to simulated solar particle event radiation.

    PubMed

    Sanzari, Jk; Muehlmatt, A; Savage, A; Lin, L; Kennedy, Ar

    2014-02-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) during space flight have stimulated an area of research in space medicine. It is widely speculated that elevations in ICP contribute to structural and functional ocular changes, including deterioration in vision, which is also observed during space flight. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in OP occurring as a result of ionizing radiation exposure (at doses and dose-rates relevant to solar particle event radiation). We used a large animal model, the Yucatan mini-pig, and were able to obtain measurements over a 90 day period. This is the first investigation to show long term recordings of ICP in a large animal model without an invasive craniotomy procedure. Further, this is the first investigation reporting increased ICP after radiation exposure.

  5. Increased intracranial pressure in mini-pigs exposed to simulated solar particle event radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Muehlmatt, Amy; Savage, Alexandria; Lin, Liyong; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2014-02-01

    Changes in intracranial pressure (ICP) during space flight have stimulated an area of research in space medicine. It is widely speculated that elevations in ICP contribute to structural and functional ocular changes, including deterioration in vision, which is also observed during space flight. The aim of this study was to investigate changes in opening pressure (OP) occurring as a result of ionizing radiation exposure (at doses and dose-rates relevant to solar particle event radiation). We used a large animal model, the Yucatan mini-pig, and were able to obtain measurements over a 90 day period. This is the first investigation to show long term recordings of ICP in a large animal model without an invasive craniotomy procedure. Further, this is the first investigation reporting increased ICP after radiation exposure.

  6. Nested radiations and the pulse of angiosperm diversification: increased diversification rates often follow whole genome duplications.

    PubMed

    Tank, David C; Eastman, Jonathan M; Pennell, Matthew W; Soltis, Pamela S; Soltis, Douglas E; Hinchliff, Cody E; Brown, Joseph W; Sessa, Emily B; Harmon, Luke J

    2015-07-01

    Our growing understanding of the plant tree of life provides a novel opportunity to uncover the major drivers of angiosperm diversity. Using a time-calibrated phylogeny, we characterized hot and cold spots of lineage diversification across the angiosperm tree of life by modeling evolutionary diversification using stepwise AIC (MEDUSA). We also tested the whole-genome duplication (WGD) radiation lag-time model, which postulates that increases in diversification tend to lag behind established WGD events. Diversification rates have been incredibly heterogeneous throughout the evolutionary history of angiosperms and reveal a pattern of 'nested radiations' - increases in net diversification nested within other radiations. This pattern in turn generates a negative relationship between clade age and diversity across both families and orders. We suggest that stochastically changing diversification rates across the phylogeny explain these patterns. Finally, we demonstrate significant statistical support for the WGD radiation lag-time model. Across angiosperms, nested shifts in diversification led to an overall increasing rate of net diversification and declining relative extinction rates through time. These diversification shifts are only rarely perfectly associated with WGD events, but commonly follow them after a lag period. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Radiation effects on the fibrinolytic system and their relation to hemorrhagic diathesis and increased endothelial permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Ballelos, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of wholebody X-irradiation on the fibrinolytic system, the causes of radiation-induced changes in plasmin (fibrinolytic) activity, and the contribution of increased plasmin activity to increased capillary (endothelial) permeability and hemorrhagic diathesis. The parameters evaluated using adult, male, Rochester ex-Wistar rats were: (1) plasmin, plasminogen, and plasminogen activator levels in plasma within one month after 425, 655, or 885 rad and at 3.5, 7 and 12 months after 425 rad, by a modified caseinolytic method; (2) tissue plasminogen activator activity (TPAA) in heart, kidneys, lungs, liver, pancreas and spleen, by a fibrin plate method (885 rad); (3) vascular permeability, by a radioisotopic method (885 rad); and (4) gross hemorrhagic response, scored for severity. The dose-dependent changes described in plasmin, plasminogen and plasminogen activator were multi-phasic. Epsilon-amino-caproic acid (0.3 gm/kg body weight) prevented the immediate and early radiation effects on these fibrinolytic components, and partially inhibited the later effects (within one month) whether administered only as a single injection before irradiation or maintained by daily water intake thereafter. The kidneys, spleen and pancreas were markedly susceptible to radiation-induced changes in TPAA. The lungs and liver showed significant changes in capillary permeability, which correlated positively with changes in vascular volume and blood plasmin and plasminogen activator levels. Increased plasmin (fibrinolytic) activity, superimposed on a hemostatic apparatus already impaired because of thrombocytopenia, contributed to hemorrhagic diathesis in acute radiation sickness.

  8. Mixed-Methods Resistance Training Increases Power and Strength of Young and Older Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Hakkinen, Arja; McCormick, Matt; Volek, Jeff; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week, mixed-methods resistance training program on young and older men. Although results confirmed some age-related reductions in muscle strength and power, the older men demonstrated similar capacity to the younger men for increases in muscle strength and power via an appropriate, periodized resistance training…

  9. Mixed-Methods Resistance Training Increases Power and Strength of Young and Older Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, Robert U.; Hakkinen, Keijo; Hakkinen, Arja; McCormick, Matt; Volek, Jeff; Kraemer, William J.

    2002-01-01

    Examined the effects of a 10-week, mixed-methods resistance training program on young and older men. Although results confirmed some age-related reductions in muscle strength and power, the older men demonstrated similar capacity to the younger men for increases in muscle strength and power via an appropriate, periodized resistance training…

  10. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy. PMID:27478804

  11. Carcinoembryonic Antigen Expression and Resistance to Radiation and 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Apoptosis and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Eftekhar, Ebrahim; Jaberie, Hajar; Naghibalhossaini, Fakhraddin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of tumor resistance is critical for cancer therapy. In this study, we investigated the effect of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) overexpression on UV-and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced apoptosis and autophagy in colorectal cancer cells. We used histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, NaB and DNA demethylating agent, 5-azacytidine (5-AZA) to induce CEA expression in HT29/219 and SW742 colorectal cancer cell lines. MTT assay was used to measure IC50 value of the cells exposed to graded concentrations of 5- FU with either 0.1 mM NaB or 1 μM 5-AZA for 72 h . Using CHO- and SW742-CEA transfectants, we also investigated the effect of CEA expression on UV- and 5-FU-induced apoptosis and autophagy. Treatment of HT29/219 cell line with NaB and 5-AZA increased CEA expression by 29% and 31%, respectively. Compared with control cells, the IC50 value for 5-FU of NaB and 5-AZA-treated cells increased by 40% and 57%, respectively. Treatment of SW742 cells with NaB or 5-AZA increased neither CEA expression nor the IC50 value for 5-FU. In comparison to parental cells, CEA expression also significantly protected transfected cells against UV-induced apoptosis. Decreased proportions of autophagy and apoptosis were also observed in 5-FU treated SW742- and CHO-CEA transfectants. We conclude that CEA expression can effectively protect colorectal cancer cells against radiation and drug-induced apoptosis and autophagy.

  12. Increased Expression of MuRF1 Is Associated with Radiation-induced Laryngeal Muscle Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaochen; Pires, Leonardo; Browne, J Dale; Sullivan, Christopher A; Zhao, Weiling; Feng, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Laryngeal muscles play an important role in breathing, sound production and trachea protection against food. Laryngeal dysfunctions during radiotherapy for head and neck cancers are common. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the early effect of radiation on the laryngeal muscles in vivo and possible mechanisms involved in this process. Eight-week-old female C57bl/ mice received neck irradiation with a single dose of 25 Gy and bilateral thyroarytenoid (TA) muscles of mice were collected at day 3, 7 and 10 post-irradiation for evaluating muscle size, myosins, myosin heavy chain (MyHC) composition and MuRF1 protein levels. A significant reduction in the size of muscle fibers and myosins in the TA muscles were observed at days 3, 7, 10 after radiation (p<0.05). The loss of IIB myosin was more severe than that of IIA/X myosins at day 7 post-irradiation (75% vs. 64%). MuRF1 protein level was markedly increased at day 7 and 10 after radiation (p<0.05). Radiation induced an acute muscle fiber atrophy and myosin loss in the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. MuRF1 may play an important role in the radiation-induced protein degradation in the laryngeal muscles and warrants further investigation. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  13. Fitness costs of increased cataract frequency and cumulative radiation dose in natural mammalian populations from Chernobyl.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Philipp; Boratyński, Zbyszek; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders P

    2016-01-27

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens that reduces light transmission to the retina, and it decreases the visual acuity of the bearer. The prevalence of cataracts in natural populations of mammals, and their potential ecological significance, is poorly known. Cataracts have been reported to arise from high levels of oxidative stress and a major cause of oxidative stress is ionizing radiation. We investigated whether elevated frequencies of cataracts are found in eyes of bank voles Myodes glareolus collected from natural populations in areas with varying levels of background radiation in Chernobyl. We found high frequencies of cataracts in voles collected from different areas in Chernobyl. The frequency of cataracts was positively correlated with age, and in females also with the accumulated radiation dose. Furthermore, the number of offspring in female voles was negatively correlated with cataract severity. The results suggest that cataracts primarily develop as a function of ionizing background radiation, most likely as a plastic response to high levels of oxidative stress. It is therefore possible that the elevated levels of background radiation in Chernobyl affect the ecology and fitness of local mammals both directly through, for instance, reduced fertility and indirectly, through increased cataractogenesis.

  14. Fitness costs of increased cataract frequency and cumulative radiation dose in natural mammalian populations from Chernobyl

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Philipp; Boratyński, Zbyszek; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.

    2016-01-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens that reduces light transmission to the retina, and it decreases the visual acuity of the bearer. The prevalence of cataracts in natural populations of mammals, and their potential ecological significance, is poorly known. Cataracts have been reported to arise from high levels of oxidative stress and a major cause of oxidative stress is ionizing radiation. We investigated whether elevated frequencies of cataracts are found in eyes of bank voles Myodes glareolus collected from natural populations in areas with varying levels of background radiation in Chernobyl. We found high frequencies of cataracts in voles collected from different areas in Chernobyl. The frequency of cataracts was positively correlated with age, and in females also with the accumulated radiation dose. Furthermore, the number of offspring in female voles was negatively correlated with cataract severity. The results suggest that cataracts primarily develop as a function of ionizing background radiation, most likely as a plastic response to high levels of oxidative stress. It is therefore possible that the elevated levels of background radiation in Chernobyl affect the ecology and fitness of local mammals both directly through, for instance, reduced fertility and indirectly, through increased cataractogenesis. PMID:26814168

  15. Mathematical Analysis of Space Radiator Segmenting for Increased Reliability and Reduced Mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2001-01-01

    Spacecraft for long duration deep space missions will need to be designed to survive micrometeoroid bombardment of their surfaces some of which may actually be punctured. To avoid loss of the entire mission the damage due to such punctures must be limited to small, localized areas. This is especially true for power system radiators, which necessarily feature large surface areas to reject heat at relatively low temperature to the space environment by thermal radiation. It may be intuitively obvious that if a space radiator is composed of a large number of independently operating segments, such as heat pipes, a random micrometeoroid puncture will result only in the loss of the punctured segment, and not the entire radiator. Due to the redundancy achieved by independently operating segments, the wall thickness and consequently the weight of such segments can be drastically reduced. Probability theory is used to estimate the magnitude of such weight reductions as the number of segments is increased. An analysis of relevant parameter values required for minimum mass segmented radiators is also included.

  16. Shortwave and longwave radiative contributions to global warming under increasing CO2

    PubMed Central

    Donohoe, Aaron; Armour, Kyle C.; Pendergrass, Angeline G.; Battisti, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In response to increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2, high-end general circulation models (GCMs) simulate an accumulation of energy at the top of the atmosphere not through a reduction in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR)—as one might expect from greenhouse gas forcing—but through an enhancement of net absorbed solar radiation (ASR). A simple linear radiative feedback framework is used to explain this counterintuitive behavior. It is found that the timescale over which OLR returns to its initial value after a CO2 perturbation depends sensitively on the magnitude of shortwave (SW) feedbacks. If SW feedbacks are sufficiently positive, OLR recovers within merely several decades, and any subsequent global energy accumulation is because of enhanced ASR only. In the GCM mean, this OLR recovery timescale is only 20 y because of robust SW water vapor and surface albedo feedbacks. However, a large spread in the net SW feedback across models (because of clouds) produces a range of OLR responses; in those few models with a weak SW feedback, OLR takes centuries to recover, and energy accumulation is dominated by reduced OLR. Observational constraints of radiative feedbacks—from satellite radiation and surface temperature data—suggest an OLR recovery timescale of decades or less, consistent with the majority of GCMs. Altogether, these results suggest that, although greenhouse gas forcing predominantly acts to reduce OLR, the resulting global warming is likely caused by enhanced ASR. PMID:25385628

  17. Shortwave and longwave radiative contributions to global warming under increasing CO2.

    PubMed

    Donohoe, Aaron; Armour, Kyle C; Pendergrass, Angeline G; Battisti, David S

    2014-11-25

    In response to increasing concentrations of atmospheric CO2, high-end general circulation models (GCMs) simulate an accumulation of energy at the top of the atmosphere not through a reduction in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR)—as one might expect from greenhouse gas forcing—but through an enhancement of net absorbed solar radiation (ASR). A simple linear radiative feedback framework is used to explain this counterintuitive behavior. It is found that the timescale over which OLR returns to its initial value after a CO2 perturbation depends sensitively on the magnitude of shortwave (SW) feedbacks. If SW feedbacks are sufficiently positive, OLR recovers within merely several decades, and any subsequent global energy accumulation is because of enhanced ASR only. In the GCM mean, this OLR recovery timescale is only 20 y because of robust SW water vapor and surface albedo feedbacks. However, a large spread in the net SW feedback across models (because of clouds) produces a range of OLR responses; in those few models with a weak SW feedback, OLR takes centuries to recover, and energy accumulation is dominated by reduced OLR. Observational constraints of radiative feedbacks—from satellite radiation and surface temperature data—suggest an OLR recovery timescale of decades or less, consistent with the majority of GCMs. Altogether, these results suggest that, although greenhouse gas forcing predominantly acts to reduce OLR, the resulting global warming is likely caused by enhanced ASR.

  18. Pulmonary rapidly adapting receptor stimulation does not increase airway resistance in anesthetized rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yu, J; Zhang, J F; Roberts, A M; Collins, L C; Fletcher, E C

    1999-09-01

    In open-chest artificially ventilated rabbits, removal followed by replacement of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP maneuver) favors stimulation of airway rapidly adapting receptors (RARs). The purpose of the present study was to determine whether activation of RARs can cause bronchoconstriction. We measured airway pressure, airflow, and tidal volume, and calculated dynamic lung compliance and total lung resistance. PEEP maneuver increased airway pressure swings (16.4 +/- 4% above control; p = 0.0016) and decreased compliance (to 84.8 +/- 2.8% of control; p = 0.0002) without changing resistance (108.0 +/- 4.4% of control; p = 0.85). On the other hand, the resistance increased greatly (93 +/- 13%, p < 0.01) after intravenous injection of acetylcholine or electrical stimulation of vagal efferents, indicating that our system could detect increases in the resistance. In a separate group, we stimulated RARs by stroking the trachea with a cotton tip (tickling), tickling produced cough, manifested by increased pressure and flow without resistance changing. These changes were abolished after paralysis with succinylcholine. Because we did not detect an increase in airflow resistance during activation of RARs by the PEEP maneuver and tickling, we conclude that increase in resistance may not be an important reflex component of airway RARs.

  19. The contribution of agricultural insecticide use to increasing insecticide resistance in African malaria vectors.

    PubMed

    Reid, Molly C; McKenzie, F Ellis

    2016-02-19

    The fight against malaria is increasingly threatened by failures in vector control due to growing insecticide resistance. This review examines the recent primary research that addresses the putative relationship between agricultural insecticide use and trends in insecticide resistance. To do so, descriptive evidence offered by the new research was categorized, and additional factors that impact the relationship between agricultural insecticide use and observed insecticide resistance in malaria vectors were identified. In 23 of the 25 relevant recent publications from across Africa, higher resistance in mosquito populations was associated with agricultural insecticide use. This association appears to be affected by crop type, farm pest management strategy and urban development.

  20. Effect of red blood cell rigidity on tumor blood flow: increase in viscous resistance during hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Sevick, E M; Jain, R K

    1991-05-15

    Elevated glucose level and low pH have been shown to increase red blood cell (RBC) rigidity. This increased rigidity has been proposed as one factor which mediates the tumor blood flow (TBF) reduction during hyperglycemia by (a) causing RBC entrapment and hence increasing geometric resistance and (b) increasing viscous resistance to blood flow. However, due to the inability to measure these resistances in vivo in tumors directly, the relative contribution of RBC rigidity in TBF reduction has not been quantified. In the present study, blood flow resistance was measured in "tissue-isolated" mammary adenocarcinoma R3230AC perfused ex vivo with (a) normally deformable, (b) glutaraldehyde-hardened, and (c) glucose-incubated RBC suspensions. Flow resistance measured during tumor perfusion with Krebs-Henseleit buffer prior to and following perfusion with the glutaraldehyde-hardened RBC suspensions showed no significant change, suggesting constant geometric resistance and lack of RBC entrapment. Instead, our measurements indicated increased viscous resistance with loss of deformability due to glutaraldehyde and glucose incubation even though glucose incubation did not significantly alter the apparent blood viscosity measured in vitro. Thus, the TBF reduction during hyperglycemia may be due to subtle changes in RBC deformability. These results suggest the development of strategies to increase the delivery of drugs or oxygen must take into account any changes in intratumor viscous resistance. For example, the increase in the oxygen-carrying capacity of blood using RBC transfusion or fluorocarbon emulsions may be offset by the increase in viscous resistance and the corresponding reduction in TBF.

  1. Radiation Increases Invasion of Gene-Modified Mesenchymal Stem Cells into Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Zielske, Steven P.; Livant, Donna L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.

    2009-11-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells in the bone marrow that have been found to migrate to tumors, suggesting a potential use for cancer gene therapy. MSCs migrate to sites of tissue damage, including normal tissues damaged by radiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of tumor radiotherapy on the localization of lentivirus-transduced MSCs to tumors. Methods and Materials: MSCs were labeled with a lipophilic dye to investigate their migration to colon cancer xenografts. Subsequently, the MSCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector to model gene therapy and mark the infused MSCs. LoVo tumor xenografts were treated with increasing radiation doses to assess the effect on MSC localization, which was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MSC invasion efficiency was determined in an invasion assay. Results: MSCs migrated to tumor xenografts of various origins, with few cells found in normal tissues. A lentiviral vector efficiently transduced MSCs in the presence, but not the absence, of hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). When LoVo tumors were treated with increasing radiation doses, more MSCs were found to migrate to them than to untreated tumors. Irradiation increased MSC localization in HT-29 and MDA-MB-231, but not UMSCC1, xenografts. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in tumors did not correlate with the basal levels of MSC infiltration; however, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was modestly elevated in irradiated tumors. Media from irradiated LoVo cells stimulated MSC invasion into basement membranes. Conclusion: These findings suggest that radiation-induced injury can be used to target MSCs to tumors, which might increase the effectiveness of MSC cancer gene therapy. The production of tumor-derived factors in response to radiation stimulates MSC invasion.

  2. Radiation increases invasion of gene-modified mesenchymal stem cells into tumors.

    PubMed

    Zielske, Steven P; Livant, Donna L; Lawrence, Theodore S

    2009-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells in the bone marrow that have been found to migrate to tumors, suggesting a potential use for cancer gene therapy. MSCs migrate to sites of tissue damage, including normal tissues damaged by radiation. In this study, we investigated the effect of tumor radiotherapy on the localization of lentivirus-transduced MSCs to tumors. MSCs were labeled with a lipophilic dye to investigate their migration to colon cancer xenografts. Subsequently, the MSCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector to model gene therapy and mark the infused MSCs. LoVo tumor xenografts were treated with increasing radiation doses to assess the effect on MSC localization, which was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. MSC invasion efficiency was determined in an invasion assay. MSCs migrated to tumor xenografts of various origins, with few cells found in normal tissues. A lentiviral vector efficiently transduced MSCs in the presence, but not the absence, of hexadimethrine bromide (Polybrene). When LoVo tumors were treated with increasing radiation doses, more MSCs were found to migrate to them than to untreated tumors. Irradiation increased MSC localization in HT-29 and MDA-MB-231, but not UMSCC1, xenografts. Monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression in tumors did not correlate with the basal levels of MSC infiltration; however, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 was modestly elevated in irradiated tumors. Media from irradiated LoVo cells stimulated MSC invasion into basement membranes. These findings suggest that radiation-induced injury can be used to target MSCs to tumors, which might increase the effectiveness of MSC cancer gene therapy. The production of tumor-derived factors in response to radiation stimulates MSC invasion.

  3. Image gently, step lightly: increasing radiation dose awareness in pediatric interventions through an international social marketing campaign.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Manrita K; Goske, Marilyn J; Coley, Brian J; Connolly, Bairbre; Racadio, John; Yoshizumi, Terry T; Utley, Tara; Strauss, Keith J

    2009-09-01

    In the past several decades, advances in imaging and interventional techniques have been accompanied by an increase in medical radiation dose to the public. Radiation exposure is even more important in children, who are more sensitive to radiation and have a longer lifespan during which effects may manifest. To address radiation safety in pediatric computed tomography, in 2008 the Alliance for Radiation Safety in Pediatric Imaging launched an international social marketing campaign entitled Image Gently. This article describes the next phase of the Image Gently campaign, entitled Step Lightly, which focuses on radiation safety in pediatric interventional radiology.

  4. Study of fatigue resistance of chemical and radiation crosslinked medical grade ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene.

    PubMed

    Baker, D A; Hastings, R S; Pruitt, L

    1999-09-15

    The aim of this work is to understand the role of chemical and radiation induced crosslinking on the fatigue crack propagation resistance of medical grade ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). In recent years, the need to improve the tribological performance of UHMWPE used in total joint replacements has resulted in the widespread utilization of crosslinking as a method to improve wear resistance. Although crosslinking has been shown to drastically improve the wear resistance of the polymer, the potential trade-off in fatigue properties has yet to be addressed. Fatigue crack propagation resistance is a concern in tibial inserts where large cyclic stresses are sufficient to drive the growth of subsurface cracks that potentially contribute to delamination wear mechanisms. For clinical relevance, the combined effects of sterilization and aging are examined in two commercially available crosslinked resins. Nonsterile and unaged resins serve as a control. To evaluate the effect of crosslinking, a comparison is made to uncrosslinked resins. Scanning electron microscopy is used to provide an understanding of fatigue fracture mechanisms in the crosslinked polymers. The results of this study show that the current level of crosslinking used in orthopedic resins for enhanced wear resistance is not beneficial for fatigue crack propagation resistance.

  5. Top-surface imaging resists for lithography with strongly attenuated radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ray-Chaudhuri, A.; Kubiak, G.; Henderson, C.; Wheeler, D.; Pollagi, T.

    1997-09-01

    Strong resist photoabsorption at wavelengths below 248 nm necessitates the use of a thin layer imaging (TLI) scheme for microlithography using 193 nm, 157 nm, or 13.4 nm radiation. Previous to this work, a TLI process commonly known as silylated top surface imaging (TSI) was developed by a Sandia/AT and T team for use in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) at 13.4 nm. Using this bilayer process, 0.13 {micro}m resolution with 87{degree} sidewalls in 0.7 {micro}m of resist was achieved for EUV exposures. New imaging layer polymers, silylation reagents and crosslinkers, and process conditions were screened for improvement in this TSI process with the ultimate goal of demonstrating a resist technology capable of 0.10 {micro}m critical dimension (CD). The results of these attempted improvements to the TSI process are described in this report.

  6. Distribution of radiation resistances of microbiological contaminants of a cotton-based medical product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan Aoshuang; Tallentire, Alan

    1995-02-01

    A distribution of radiation resistances of microorganisms has been compiled from the results of D 10 determinations of isolates recovered from a cotton-based medical product. In all, 250 organisms were isolated from a total microbial population of around 21,000 organisms present on about 170 g of product. D 10 values of the isolates fall within the range of 0.5 to 3.6 kGy. The findings indicate that organisms having a D 10 value greater than 3.6 kGy occur amongst contaminants on this cotton product at a probability of less than 1 in 5000. The overall resistance of the population of organisms found in the present study is somewhat less than that of the 'Standard Distribution of Resistances' used in 'AAMI dose setting methods'.

  7. Patterning Characteristics of a Chemically-Amplified Negative Resist in Synchrotron Radiation Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deguchi, Kimiyoshi; Miyoshi, Kazunori; Ishii, Tetsuyoshi; Matsuda, Tadahito

    1992-09-01

    To explore the applicability of synchrotron radiation X-ray lithography for fabricating sub-quartermicron devices, we investigate the patterning characteristics of the chemically-amplified negative resist SAL601-ER7. Since these characteristics depend strongly on the conditions of the chemical amplification process, the effects of post-exposure baking and developing conditions on sensitivity and resolution are examined. The resolution-limiting factors are investigated, revealing that pattern collapse during the development process and fog caused by Fresnel diffraction, photo-electron scattering, and acid diffusion in the resist determine the resolution and the maximum aspect ratio of the lines and spaces pattern. Using the model of a swaying beam supported at one end, it is shown that pattern collapse depends on the resist pattern’s flexural stiffness. Patterning stability, which depends on the delay time between exposure and baking, is also discussed.

  8. Increase in isolation of extended spectrum beta lactamase producing multidrug resistant non typhoidal Salmonellae in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Jabeen, Kauser; Zafar, Afia; Irfan, Seema; Khan, Erum; Mehraj, Vikram; Hasan, Rumina

    2010-04-22

    Increasing resistance to quinolones and ceftriaxone in non typhoidal Salmonellae is a global concern. Resistance to quinolone and 3rd generation cephalosporin amongst non typhoidal Salmonellae (NTS) from Pakistan has been reported in this study. Retrospective analysis of laboratory data was conducted (1990-2006). NTS were isolated and identified from clinical samples using standard microbiological techniques. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Kirby Bauer. Extended spectrum beta lactamase production (ESBL) was detected using combined disc method. Ciprofloxacin sensitivity was detected by nalidixic acid screening method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ciprofloxacin was determined by agar dilution method. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 13. Analysis of 1967 NTS isolates showed a significant increase in ciprofloxacin resistance from 23% in 2002 to 50.5% in 2006, with increased mean MIC values from 0.6 to 1.3 ug/mL. Ceftriaxone resistant NTS also increased and ESBL production was seen in 98.7% isolates. These isolates exhibited high resistance against amoxicillin clavulanic acid (57%), gentamicin (69%), amikacin (44%) and piperacillin tazobactam (30%). No resistance to carbapenem was seen. Ceftriaxone resistance was significantly higher in children <1 year, in invasive isolates and in Salmonella Typhimurium. Increase in quinolone and ceftriaxone NTS is a serious threat to public health requiring continuous surveillance and use of appropriate screening tests for laboratory detection.

  9. Sucralose Increases Antimicrobial Resistance and Stimulates Recovery of Escherichia coli Mutants.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yilin; Li, Rongyan; Jiang, Mingshan; Wang, Xiuhong

    2017-07-01

    Because of heavy use of antimicrobials, antimicrobial resistance in bacteria has become of great concern. The effect of some widely used food additives such as sucralose on bacteria in the gut and the environment has also drawn increasing attention. In this study, we investigated the interaction between antimicrobials and sucralose impacting antimicrobial resistance and mutation of Escherichia coli (E. coli). To examine antimicrobial resistance and mutation frequency, different subinhibitory concentrations of sucralose were added to cultures of E.coli BW25113 that were then treated with antimicrobials, oxolinic acid, or moxifloxacin. Then the E.coli were assayed for bacterial survival and recovery of mutants resistant to an unrelated antimicrobial, rifampicin. Pre-treatment of E.coli BW25113 with 1/2 minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of sucralose increased the survival rate in oxolinic acid or moxifloxacin. A 1/3 MIC of sucralose increased rifampicin-resistant mutation rate of E.coli BW25113 after 72 h, while rifampicin-resistant mutation rate was increased when co-treated with 1/8 MIC, 1/4 MIC, 1/3 MIC sucralose, and oxolinic acid after 24 h. Sucralose can increase the antimicrobial resistance and mutation frequency of E.coli to some antimicrobials.

  10. Increase in Antibiotic-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacterial Infections in Febrile Neutropenic Children

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of bacteremia caused by Gram-negative bacteria has increased recently in febrile neutropenic patients with the increase of antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections. This study aimed to identify the distribution of causative bacteria and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in bacteremia diagnosed in febrile neutropenic children. Materials and Methods The medical records of febrile neutropenic children diagnosed with bacteremia between 2010 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. The causative bacteria and proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria were investigated and compared yearly during the study period. The clinical impact of antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections was also determined. Results A total of 336 bacteremia episodes were identified. During the entire study period, 181 (53.9%) and 155 (46.1%) episodes were caused by Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, respectively. Viridans streptococci (25.9%), Klebsiella spp. (16.7%), and Escherichia coli (16.4%) were the most frequent causative bacteria. The overall distribution of causative bacteria was not significantly different annually. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were identified in 85 (25.3%) episodes, and the proportion of antibiotic-resistant bacteria was not significantly different annually. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacteria, and they accounted for 30.6% (n = 34) of the identified E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci were most common among antibiotic-resistant Gram-positive bacteria, and it accounted for 88.5% (n = 23) of the identified coagulase-negative staphylococci. Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, especially antibiotic-resistant Gram-negative bacterial infections, caused significantly higher mortality due to bacteremia compared with non-antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections (P <0

  11. Nuclear-radiation-actuated valve. [Patent application; for increasing coolant flow to blanket

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Schively, D.P.

    1982-01-19

    The present invention relates to a breeder reactor blanket fuel assembly coolant system valve which increases coolant flow to the blanket fuel assembly to minimize long-term temperature increases caused by fission of fissile fuel created from fertile fuel through operation of the breeder reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  12. Determination of the radiation resistance order of high explosives by the two dimensional correlation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Heliang; Hao, Xiaofei; Luo, Yiwei; Xu, Jinjiang; Zhong, Fachun; Xu, Ruijuan

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (2DXPS) was employed to obtain the radiation resistance order of high explosives. Mixed hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (CL-20) and 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) were irradiated by X-ray radiation. The time-dependent N1s XPS spectra were collected. 2DXPS was used to analyze the variation of the binding energy peaks. The main degradation time of TATB was longer than that of CL-20. CL-20 changes occurred prior to that of TATB during radiation. These changes suggest that TATB exhibited higher radiation resistance property than CL-20. 2DXPS is a very useful method to distinguish the radiation resistance orders of materials.

  13. Increased pyrethroid resistance in malaria vectors and decreased bed net effectiveness, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Toé, Kobié H; Jones, Christopher M; N'Fale, Sagnon; Ismail, Hanafy M; Dabiré, Roch K; Ranson, Hilary

    2014-10-01

    Malaria control is dependent on insecticides. Increases in prevalence of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors across Africa are well-documented. However, few attempts have been made to quantify the strength of this resistance and link it to the effectiveness of control tools. Using quantitative bioassays, we show that in Burkina Faso pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes has increased in intensity in recent years and now exceeds 1,000-fold. In laboratory assays, this level of resistance renders insecticides used to impregnate bed nets ineffective. Thus, the level of personal and community protection afforded by long-lasting insecticide-treated net campaigns will probably be reduced. Standardized methods are needed to quantify resistance levels in malaria vectors and link these levels to failure of vector control methods.

  14. Increased Pyrethroid Resistance in Malaria Vectors and Decreased Bed Net Effectiveness, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Toé, Kobié H.; Jones, Christopher M.; N’Fale, Sagnon; Ismail, Hanafy M.; Dabiré, Roch K.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria control is dependent on insecticides. Increases in prevalence of insecticide resistance in malaria vectors across Africa are well-documented. However, few attempts have been made to quantify the strength of this resistance and link it to the effectiveness of control tools. Using quantitative bioassays, we show that in Burkina Faso pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes has increased in intensity in recent years and now exceeds 1,000-fold. In laboratory assays, this level of resistance renders insecticides used to impregnate bed nets ineffective. Thus, the level of personal and community protection afforded by long-lasting insecticide-treated net campaigns will probably be reduced. Standardized methods are needed to quantify resistance levels in malaria vectors and link these levels to failure of vector control methods. PMID:25279965

  15. Drug resistance in Shigella dysenteriae, S flexneri and S boydii in England and Wales: increasing incidence of resistance to trimethoprim.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, R J; Threlfall, E J; Ward, L R; Rowe, B

    1984-01-01

    A total of 2753 strains of shigella belonging to subgroups A, B, and C that were isolated from patients in England and Wales during the period from 1979 to mid-1983 were studied. Of these, 1690 (61%) were from patients recently returned from abroad or in contact with recent travellers, and 760 (45%) of these affected travellers from the Indian subcontinent. The number of strains resistant to sulphonamides and streptomycin remained at a high level throughout (average 76% and 72% respectively). Resistance to tetracyclines, ampicillin, and chloramphenicol rose, reaching 63%, 51%, and 48%, respectively, in 1982. Strains resistant to trimethoprim were seen in substantial numbers for the first time and increased from 1.3% of all strains in 1979 to 9.9% in 1982 and 16.8% in the first half of 1983. The proportion of patients with recent foreign contact was notably smaller among those with strains resistant to trimethoprim than among those with strains sensitive to trimethoprim. The increase in resistance to trimethoprim might partly result from the use in Britain of compounds containing trimethoprim for the treatment of shigellosis. PMID:6423079

  16. Acquired resistance to oxaliplatin is not directly associated with increased resistance to DNA damage in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000, a newly established oxaliplatin-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS

    PubMed Central

    Saintas, Emily; Abrahams, Liam; Ahmad, Gulshan T.; Ajakaiye, Anu-Oluwa M.; AlHumaidi, Abdulaziz S. H. A. M.; Ashmore-Harris, Candice; Clark, Iain; Dura, Usha K.; Fixmer, Carine N.; Ike-Morris, Chinedu; Mato Prado, Mireia; Mccullough, Danielle; Mishra, Shishir; Schöler, Katia M. U.; Timur, Husne; Williamson, Maxwell D. C.; Alatsatianos, Markella; Bahsoun, Basma; Blackburn, Edith; Hogwood, Catherine E.; Lithgow, Pamela E.; Rowe, Michelle; Yiangou, Lyto; Rothweiler, Florian; Cinatl, Jindrich; Zehner, Richard; Baines, Anthony J.; Garrett, Michelle D.; Gourlay, Campbell W.; Griffin, Darren K.; Gullick, William J.; Hargreaves, Emma; Howard, Mark J.; Lloyd, Daniel R.; Rossman, Jeremy S.; Smales, C. Mark; Tsaousis, Anastasios D.; von der Haar, Tobias; Wass, Mark N.

    2017-01-01

    The formation of acquired drug resistance is a major reason for the failure of anti-cancer therapies after initial response. Here, we introduce a novel model of acquired oxaliplatin resistance, a sub-line of the non-MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS that was adapted to growth in the presence of 4000 ng/mL oxaliplatin (SK-N-ASrOXALI4000). SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells displayed enhanced chromosomal aberrations compared to SK-N-AS, as indicated by 24-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Moreover, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were resistant not only to oxaliplatin but also to the two other commonly used anti-cancer platinum agents cisplatin and carboplatin. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells exhibited a stable resistance phenotype that was not affected by culturing the cells for 10 weeks in the absence of oxaliplatin. Interestingly, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells showed no cross resistance to gemcitabine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin and UVC radiation, alternative treatments that like platinum drugs target DNA integrity. Notably, UVC-induced DNA damage is thought to be predominantly repaired by nucleotide excision repair and nucleotide excision repair has been described as the main oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage repair system. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were also more sensitive to lysis by influenza A virus, a candidate for oncolytic therapy, than SK-N-AS cells. In conclusion, we introduce a novel oxaliplatin resistance model. The oxaliplatin resistance mechanisms in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells appear to be complex and not to directly depend on enhanced DNA repair capacity. Models of oxaliplatin resistance are of particular relevance since research on platinum drugs has so far predominantly focused on cisplatin and carboplatin. PMID:28192521

  17. Acquired resistance to oxaliplatin is not directly associated with increased resistance to DNA damage in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000, a newly established oxaliplatin-resistant sub-line of the neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS.

    PubMed

    Saintas, Emily; Abrahams, Liam; Ahmad, Gulshan T; Ajakaiye, Anu-Oluwa M; AlHumaidi, Abdulaziz S H A M; Ashmore-Harris, Candice; Clark, Iain; Dura, Usha K; Fixmer, Carine N; Ike-Morris, Chinedu; Mato Prado, Mireia; Mccullough, Danielle; Mishra, Shishir; Schöler, Katia M U; Timur, Husne; Williamson, Maxwell D C; Alatsatianos, Markella; Bahsoun, Basma; Blackburn, Edith; Hogwood, Catherine E; Lithgow, Pamela E; Rowe, Michelle; Yiangou, Lyto; Rothweiler, Florian; Cinatl, Jindrich; Zehner, Richard; Baines, Anthony J; Garrett, Michelle D; Gourlay, Campbell W; Griffin, Darren K; Gullick, William J; Hargreaves, Emma; Howard, Mark J; Lloyd, Daniel R; Rossman, Jeremy S; Smales, C Mark; Tsaousis, Anastasios D; von der Haar, Tobias; Wass, Mark N; Michaelis, Martin

    2017-01-01

    The formation of acquired drug resistance is a major reason for the failure of anti-cancer therapies after initial response. Here, we introduce a novel model of acquired oxaliplatin resistance, a sub-line of the non-MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-AS that was adapted to growth in the presence of 4000 ng/mL oxaliplatin (SK-N-ASrOXALI4000). SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells displayed enhanced chromosomal aberrations compared to SK-N-AS, as indicated by 24-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridisation. Moreover, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were resistant not only to oxaliplatin but also to the two other commonly used anti-cancer platinum agents cisplatin and carboplatin. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells exhibited a stable resistance phenotype that was not affected by culturing the cells for 10 weeks in the absence of oxaliplatin. Interestingly, SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells showed no cross resistance to gemcitabine and increased sensitivity to doxorubicin and UVC radiation, alternative treatments that like platinum drugs target DNA integrity. Notably, UVC-induced DNA damage is thought to be predominantly repaired by nucleotide excision repair and nucleotide excision repair has been described as the main oxaliplatin-induced DNA damage repair system. SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells were also more sensitive to lysis by influenza A virus, a candidate for oncolytic therapy, than SK-N-AS cells. In conclusion, we introduce a novel oxaliplatin resistance model. The oxaliplatin resistance mechanisms in SK-N-ASrOXALI4000 cells appear to be complex and not to directly depend on enhanced DNA repair capacity. Models of oxaliplatin resistance are of particular relevance since research on platinum drugs has so far predominantly focused on cisplatin and carboplatin.

  18. Ionizing radiation-induced cell death is partly caused by increase of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species in normal human fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Suzuki, Keiji; Yamashita, Shunichi; Mori, Hiromu

    2015-04-01

    Radiation-induced cell death is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, in this study we found that a delayed increase of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) is responsible for some of the radiation-induced cell death in normal human fibroblast cells. We have previously reported that there is a delayed increase of mitochondrial (·)O2(-), measured using MitoSOX™ Red reagent, due to gamma irradiation. This is dependent on Drp1 localization to mitochondria. Here, we show that knockdown of Drp1 expression reduces the level of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) remaining 3 days after 6 Gy irradiation. Furthermore, cells with knockdown of Drp1 expression are more resistant to gamma radiation. We then tested whether the delayed increase of ROS causes DNA damage. The antioxidant, 2-glucopyranoside ascorbic acid (AA-2G), was applied before or after irradiation to inhibit ROS production during irradiation or to inhibit delayed ROS production from mitochondria. Interestingly, 1 h after exposure, the AA-2G treatment reduced the level of DSBs remaining 3 days after 6 Gy irradiation. In addition, irradiated AA-2G-treated cells were more resistant to radiation than the untreated cells. These results indicate that delayed mitochondrial ROS production may cause some of the cell death after irradiation.

  19. Tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting overcomes radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Joe Y. . E-mail: jychang@mdanderson.org; Zhang Xiaochun; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cheung, Rex; Fang Bingliang

    2006-04-01

    Purpose: To overcome radiation resistance in esophageal adenocarcinoma by tumor-specific apoptotic gene targeting using tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Methods and Materials: Adenoviral vector Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD with a tumor-specific human telomerase reverse transcription promoter was used to transfer TRAIL gene to human esophageal adenocarcinoma and normal human lung fibroblastic cells (NHLF). Activation of apoptosis was analyzed by Western blot, fluorescent activated cell sorting, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate labeling (TUNEL) assay. A human esophageal adenocarcinoma mouse model was treated with intratumoral injections of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus local radiotherapy. Results: The combination of Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy increased the cell-killing effect in all esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines but not in NHLF cells. This combination also significantly reduced clonogenic formation (p < 0.05) and increased sub-G1 deoxyribonucleic acid accumulation in cancer cells (p < 0.05). Activation of apoptosis by Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD plus radiotherapy was demonstrated by activation of caspase-9, caspase-8, and caspase-3 and cleaved poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase in vitro and TUNEL assay in vivo. Combined Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD and radiotherapy dramatically inhibited tumor growth and prolonged mean survival in the esophageal adenocarcinoma model to 31.6 days from 16.7 days for radiotherapy alone and 21.5 days for Ad/TRAIL-F/RGD alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The combination of tumor-specific TRAIL gene targeting and radiotherapy enhances the effect of suppressing esophageal adenocarcinoma growth and prolonging survival.

  20. CT-fluoroscopy in chest interventional radiology: sliding scale of imaging parameters based on radiation exposure dose and factors increasing radiation exposure dose.

    PubMed

    Yamao, Yoshikazu; Yamakado, K; Takaki, H; Yamada, T; Kodama, H; Nagasawa, N; Nakatsuka, A; Uraki, J; Takeda, K

    2013-02-01

    To verify the usefulness of a sliding scale of imaging parameters to reduce radiation exposure during chest interventional radiology (IR), and to identify factors that increase radiation exposure in order to obtain acceptable computed tomography (CT)-fluoroscopy image quality. The institutional review board approved this retrospective study, for which the need for informed consent was waived. Interventional radiologists determined the optimal CT-fluoroscopy imaging parameters using the sliding scale based on the radiation exposure dose. The imaging parameters were changed from those generating low radiation (120 kV/10 mA, 1.2 mGy/s) to others generating higher radiation exposure until acceptable image quality was obtained for each procedure. Validation of the imaging parameter sliding scale was done using regression analysis. Factors that increase radiation exposure were identified using multiple regression analysis. In 125 patients, 217 procedures were performed, of which 72 procedures (33.2%, 72/217) were performed with imaging parameters of minimum radiation exposure, but increased radiation exposure was necessary in 145 (66.8%, 145/217). Significant correlation was found between the radiation exposure dose and the percentage achievement of acceptable image quality (R(2) = 0.98). Multivariate regression analysis showed that high body weight (p < 0.0001), long device passage (p < 0.0001), and lesions above the aortic arch (p = 0.04) were significant independent factors increasing radiation exposure. Although increased radiation exposure dose might be necessary to obtain acceptable chest CT-fluoroscopy images depending on the patient, lesion, and procedure characteristics, a sliding scale of imaging parameters helps to reduce radiation exposure. Copyright © 2012 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Overexpression of AKR1C3 significantly enhances human prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xian-Shu; Li, Yi; Yu, Hongliang; Xiong, Wei; Yu, Hao; Wang, Wen; Li, Yingbo; Teng, Yingqi; Zhou, Demin

    2016-01-01

    Aldo-keto reductase 1C3(AKR1C3) is an enzyme involved in prostaglandins metabolism. Studies suggest that AKR1C3 has a pivotal role in the radioresistance of esophageal cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, yet the role of AKR1C3 in prostate cancer cells radiation resistance has not yet been clarified. In our study, we established a stable overexpressing AKR1C3 cell line (AKR1C3-over) derived from the prostate cell line DU145 and its control cell line (Control). We conducted colony formation assay to determine the role of AKR1C3 in radioresistance and we used its chemical inhibitor to detect whether it can restored the sensitivity of the acquired tumor cells. Flow cytometry assay was carried out to detect IR-induced ROS accumulation. Elisa was adopted to dedect the concentration of PGF2α in the suspension of the cells after 6GY radiation. Western blotting was used to dedect the MAPK and PPAR γ. The results demonstrated that overexpression of AKR1C3 in prostate cancer can result in radioresistance and suppression of AKR1C3 via its chemical inhibitor indocin restored the sensitivity of the acquired tumor cells. According to the flow cytometry assay, ROS was decreased by 80% in DU145-over cells. Also overexpression of AKR1C3 could result in the accumulation of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), which can not only promote prostate cancer cell 's proliferation but also could enhance prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation and activated the MAPK pathway and inhibited the expression of PPARγ. In conclusion, we found that overexpression of AKR1C3 significantly enhanced human prostate cancer cells resistance to radiation through activation of MAPK pathway. PMID:27385003

  2. Coordinate regulation of proteins associated with radiation resistance in cultured insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, A.; Koval, T.M.

    1994-04-01

    Cultured TN-368 lepidopteran insect cells exhibit a pronounced resistance to the lethal effects of a variety of physical agents, including X rays and 254 nm UV light, as well as a large number of chemicals. The resistance to ionizing radiation has previously been associated with an inducible process which is not expressed in unirradiated cells or cells receiving less than some minimal amount of radiation necessary for activating the process. The studies in this paper were initiated in an attempt to identify and characterize the inducible proteins associated with the marked radiation resistance of the TN-368 cells. Cells were exposed to doses of 0, 25, 64 or 350 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays and incubated either for 3 h in medium containing [{sup 35}S]methionine or for 2 h without labeling. Labeled cells were separated into nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions and proteins were analyzed on two-dimensional polyacrylamide gels. Unlabeled cells were used to isolate total RNA which was translated in vitro in a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system with {sup 35}S label. These translation products were also analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis. Gamma irradiation of the TN-368 cells resulted in the de novo synthesis of several proteins as well as the complete inhibition of others. The number of such proteins identified was 19. These proteins ranged in size from 18-73 kDa, with a pI distribution of 4.7 to 6.1. In addition to the unique proteins, a large number of other proteins were also either up- or down-regulated. These observations were made in both nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions as well as in the translation products of RNA produced after irradiation. These studies indicate that RNA and protein synthesis in lepidopteran cells are coordinately regulated in response to ionizing radiation and may participate in the pronounced radioresistance of the TN-368 cells. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Dietary Pectin Increases Intestinal Crypt Stem Cell Survival following Radiation Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sureban, Sripathi M.; May, Randal; Qu, Dongfeng; Chandrakesan, Parthasarathy; Weygant, Nathaniel; Ali, Naushad; Lightfoot, Stan A.; Ding, Kai; Umar, Shahid; Schlosser, Michael J.; Houchen, Courtney W.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal damage is a devastating adverse effect of radiation therapy. We have recently reported that expression of Dclk1, a Tuft cell and tumor stem cell (TSC) marker, 24h after high dose total-body gamma-IR (TBI) can be used as a surrogate marker for crypt survival. Dietary pectin has been demonstrated to possess chemopreventive properties, whereas its radioprotective property has not been studied. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of dietary pectin on ionizing radiation (IR)-induced intestinal stem cell (ISC) deletion, crypt and overall survival following lethal TBI. C57BL/6 mice received a 6% pectin diet and 0.5% pectin drinking water (pre-IR mice received pectin one week before TBI until death; post-IR mice received pectin after TBI until death). Animals were exposed to TBI (14 Gy) and euthanized at 24 and 84h post-IR to assess ISC deletion and crypt survival respectively. Animals were also subjected to overall survival studies following TBI. In pre-IR treatment group, we observed a three-fold increase in ISC/crypt survival, a two-fold increase in Dclk1+ stem cells, increased overall survival (median 10d vs. 7d), and increased expression of Dclk1, Msi1, Lgr5, Bmi1, and Notch1 (in small intestine) post-TBI in pectin treated mice compared to controls. We also observed increased survival of mice treated with pectin (post-IR) compared to controls. Dietary pectin is a radioprotective agent; prevents IR-induced deletion of potential reserve ISCs; facilitates crypt regeneration; and ultimately promotes overall survival. Given the anti-cancer activity of pectin, our data support a potential role for dietary pectin as an agent that can be administered to patients receiving radiation therapy to protect against radiation-induces mucositis. PMID:26270561

  4. Arctic stratospheric ozone depletion and increased UVB radiation: potential impacts to human health.

    PubMed

    De Fabo, Edward C

    2005-12-01

    Contrary to popular belief, stratospheric ozone depletion, and the resultant increase in solar UV-B (280-320 nm), are unlikely to fully recover soon. Notwithstanding the success of the Montreal Protocol in reducing the amount of ozone destroying chemicals into the stratosphere, the life-times of these compounds are such that even with full compliance with the Protocol by all countries, it will be decades before stratospheric ozone could return to pre-1980 levels. This raises the question, therefore, of what will happen to biological processes essential to the maintenance of life on earth which are sensitive to damage by increased UV-B radiation, particularly those involved with human health? The polar regions, because of the vagaries of climate and weather, are the bellwether for stratospheric ozone depletion and will, therefore, be the first to experience impacts due to increases in solar UV-B radiation. The impacts of these are incompletely understood and cannot be predicted with certainty. While some UV-B impacts on human health are recognized, much is unknown, unclear and uncertain. Thus, this paper attempts, as a first approximation, to point out potential impacts to the health and welfare of human inhabitants of the Arctic due to increased solar UV-B radiation associated with stratospheric ozone depletion. As will be seen, much more data is critically needed before adequate risk assessment can occur.

  5. Increased sensitivity to platinum drugs of cancer cells with acquired resistance to trabectedin

    PubMed Central

    Colmegna, B; Uboldi, S; Frapolli, R; Licandro, S A; Panini, N; Galmarini, C M; Badri, Nadia; Spanswick, V J; Bingham, J P; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Erba, E; Hartley, J A; D'Incalci, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: In order to investigate the mechanisms of acquired resistance to trabectedin, trabectedin-resistant human myxoid liposarcoma (402-91/T) and ovarian carcinoma (A2780/T) cell lines were derived and characterised in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Resistant cell lines were obtained by repeated exposures to trabectedin. Characterisation was performed by evaluating drug sensitivity, cell cycle perturbations, DNA damage and DNA repair protein expression. In vivo experiments were performed on A2780 and A2780/T xenografts. Results: 402-91/T and A2780/T cells were six-fold resistant to trabectedin compared with parental cells. Resistant cells were found to be hypersensitive to UV light and did not express specific proteins involved in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway: XPF and ERCC1 in 402-91/T and XPG in A2780/T. NER deficiency in trabectedin-resistant cells was associated with the absence of a G2/M arrest induced by trabectedin and with enhanced sensitivity (two-fold) to platinum drugs. In A2780/T, this collateral sensitivity, confirmed in vivo, was associated with an increased formation of DNA interstrand crosslinks. Conclusions: Our finding that resistance to trabectedin is associated with the loss of NER function, with a consequent increased sensitivity to platinum drugs, provides the rational for sequential use of these drugs in patients who have acquired resistance to trabectedin. PMID:26633559

  6. Potential health effects of climatic change: Effects of increased ultraviolet radiation on man

    SciTech Connect

    Urbach, F. )

    1991-12-01

    There is scientific evidence that stratospheric ozone concentration has declined over the Northern Hemisphere in the past 20 years, and projections based on various assumption s about future release of chlorofluorocarbon gases and other contaminants suggest that this decline will continue into the next century. The effects on human health secondary to increase in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation are expected to consist of increases in nonmelanoma skin cancer and malignant melanoma of the skin, possible alteration of immune response, and development of lens cataracts. The recent and projected increases in skin cancer and changes in human immune responses are discussed. 19 refs.

  7. Potential health effects of climatic change: effects of increased ultraviolet radiation on man.

    PubMed Central

    Urbach, F

    1991-01-01

    There is scientific evidence that stratospheric ozone concentration has declined over the Northern Hemisphere in the past 20 years, and projections based on various assumptions about future release of chlorofluorocarbon gases and other contaminants suggest that this decline will continue into the next century. The effects on human health secondary to increase in biologically effective ultraviolet radiation are expected to consist of increases in nonmelanoma skin cancer and malignant melanoma of the skin, possible alteration of immune response, and development of lens cataracts. The recent and projected increases in skin cancer and changes in human immune responses are discussed. PMID:1820263

  8. Simulated microgravity increases heavy ion radiation-induced apoptosis in human B lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Dang, Bingrong; Yang, Yuping; Zhang, Erdong; Li, Wenjian; Mi, Xiangquan; Meng, Yue; Yan, Siqi; Wang, Zhuanzi; Wei, Wei; Shao, Chunlin; Xing, Rui; Lin, Changjun

    2014-03-03

    Microgravity and radiation, common in space, are the main factors influencing astronauts' health in space flight, but their combined effects on immune cells are extremely limited. Therefore, the effect of simulated microgravity on heavy ion radiation-induced apoptosis, and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-sensitive apoptosis signaling were investigated in human B lymphoblast HMy2.CIR cells. Simulated microgravity was achieved using a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor at 37°C for 30 min. Heavy carbon-ion irradiation was carried out at 300 MeV/u, with a linear energy transfer (LET) value of 30 keV/μm and a dose rate of 1Gy/min. Cell survival was evaluated using the Trypan blue exclusion assay. Apoptosis was indicated by Annexin V/propidium iodide staining. ROS production was assessed by cytometry with a fluorescent probe dichlorofluorescein. Malondialdehyde was detected using a kit. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and caspase-3 activation were measured by immunoblotting. Simulated microgravity decreased heavy ion radiation-induced cell survival and increased apoptosis in HMy2.CIR cells. It also amplified heavy ion radiation-elicited intracellular ROS generation, which induced ROS-sensitive ERK/MKP-1/caspase-3 activation in HMy2.CIR cells. The above phenomena could be reversed by the antioxidants N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and quercetin. These results illustrated that simulated microgravity increased heavy ion radiation-induced cell apoptosis, mediated by a ROS-sensitive signal pathway in human B lymphoblasts. Further, the antioxidants NAC and quercetin, especially NAC, might be good candidate drugs for protecting astronauts' and space travelers' health and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Poor Baseline Pulmonary Function May Not Increase the Risk of Radiation-Induced Lung Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingbo; Cao, Jianzhong; Yuan, Shuanghu; Arenberg, Douglas; Stanton, Paul; Tatro, Daniel; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Poor pulmonary function (PF) is often considered a contraindication to definitive radiation therapy for lung cancer. This study investigated whether baseline PF was associated with radiation-induced lung toxicity (RILT) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients treated with CRT and tested for PF at baseline were eligible. Baseline predicted values of forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusion capacity of lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) were analyzed. Additional factors included age, gender, smoking status, Karnofsky performance status, coexisting chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), tumor location, histology, concurrent chemotherapy, radiation dose, and mean lung dose (MLD) were evaluated for RILT. The primary endpoint was symptomatic RILT (SRILT), including grade ≥2 radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Results: There was a total of 260 patients, and SRILT occurred in 58 (22.3%) of them. Mean FEV1 values for SRILT and non-SRILT patients were 71.7% and 65.9% (P=.077). Under univariate analysis, risk of SRILT increased with MLD (P=.008), the absence of COPD (P=.047), and FEV1 (P=.077). Age (65 split) and MLD were significantly associated with SRILT in multivariate analysis. The addition of FEV1 and age with the MLD-based model slightly improved the predictability of SRILT (area under curve from 0.63-0.70, P=.088). Conclusions: Poor baseline PF does not increase the risk of SRILT, and combining FEV1, age, and MLD may improve the predictive ability.

  10. Ocean acidification mediates photosynthetic response to UV radiation and temperature increase in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2012-10-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is responsible for progressive ocean acidification, ocean warming as well as decreased thickness of upper mixing layer (UML), thus exposing phytoplankton cells not only to lower pH and higher temperatures but also to higher levels of solar UV radiation. In order to evaluate the combined effects of ocean acidification, UV radiation and temperature, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a model organism and examined its physiological performance after grown under two CO2 concentrations (390 and 1000 μatm) for more than 20 generations. Compared to the ambient CO2 level (390 μatm), growth at the elevated CO2 concentration increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of cells and partially counteracted the harm to PS II (photosystem II) caused by UV-A and UV-B. Such an effect was less pronounced under increased temperature levels. The ratio of repair to UV-B induced damage decreased with increased NPQ, reflecting induction of NPQ when repair dropped behind the damage, and it was higher under the ocean acidification condition, showing that the increased pCO2 and lowered pH counteracted UV-B induced harm. As for photosynthetic carbon fixation rate which increased with increasing temperature from 15 to 25 °C, the elevated CO2 and temperature levels synergistically interacted to reduce the inhibition caused by UV-B and thus increase the carbon fixation.

  11. Method of increasing radiation sensitivity by inhibition of beta one integrin

    DOEpatents

    Park, Catherine; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-11-17

    A method for increasing or monitoring apoptosis in tumor cells by the co-administration of ionizing radiation and an anti-integrin antibody. Increasing apoptosis reduces tumor growth in vivo and in a cell culture model. The antibody is directed against the beta-1 integrin subunit and is inhibitory of beta-1 integrin signaling. Other molecules having an inhibitory effect on beta-1 integrin, either in signaling or in binding to its cognate extracellular receptors may also be used. The present method is particularly of interest in treatment of tumor cells associated with breast cancer, wherein radiation is currently used alone. The present method further contemplates a monoclonal antibody suitable for human administration that may further comprise a radioisotope attached thereto.

  12. High Dietary Iron and Radiation Exposure Increase Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Blood and Liver of Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Jennifer L. L.; Theriot, Corey A.; Wu, Honglu; Smith, Scott M.; Zwart, Sara R.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure and increased iron (Fe) status independently cause oxidative damage that can result in protein, lipid, and DNA oxidation. During space flight astronauts are exposed to both increased radiation and increased Fe stores. Increased body Fe results from a decrease in red blood cell mass and the typically high Fe content of the food system. In this study we investigated the combined effects of radiation exposure (0.375 Gy of Cs-137 every other day for 16 days for a total of 3 Gy) and high dietary Fe (650 mg Fe/kg diet compared to 45 mg Fe/kg for controls) in Sprague-Dawley rats (n=8/group). Liver and serum Fe were significantly increased in the high dietary Fe groups. Likewise, radiation treatment increased serum ferritin and Fe concentrations. These data indicate that total body Fe stores increase with both radiation exposure and excess dietary Fe. Hematocrit decreased in the group exposed to radiation, providing a possible mechanism for the shift in Fe indices after radiation exposure. Markers of oxidative stress were also affected by both radiation and high dietary Fe, evidenced by increased liver glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and serum catalase as well as decreased serum GPX. We thus found preliminary indications of synergistic effects of radiation exposure and increased dietary Fe, warranting further study. This study was funded by the NASA Human Research Project.

  13. Inhibition of miR-630 enhances the cell resistance to radiation by directly targeting CDC14A in human glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Chao; Xue, Zhi-Xiao

    2017-01-01

    Radio-resistance becomes a large obstacle for effective cancer treatment. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in response to radiation. However, the underlying mechanism of miR-630 on the radio-resistance of human glioma is less elucidated. In this study, we found that miR-630 was downregulated in glioma cell lines after radiation. MiR-630 inhibition enhanced the survival fraction, cell number in S stage and colony formation ability in glioma cells after radiation, while miR-630 overexpression resulted in inverse effects. By detecting the molecular mechanism of miR-630, we validated that CDC14A was a direct target of miR-630 and miR-630 suppressed CDC14A protein level. CDC14A overexpression can attenuate the inhibitory roles of miR-630 in survival fraction and cell proliferation. Finally, in vivo study demonstrated that miR-630 inhibition increased the volumes of xenografts bearing with glioma cells after radiation. In conclusion, our data indicate that anti-miR-630 enhances the radio-resistance of human glioma cells by targeting CDC14A, implying that miR-630 may act as a novel therapeutic target for enhancing the radiation efficiency on glioma patients. PMID:28386351

  14. MicroRNA-21 modulates radiation resistance through upregulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α-promoted glycolysis in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shumei; Wang, Renben; Yan, Hongjiang; Jin, Linzhi; Dou, Xue; Chen, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer affects the transcription of target genes, and profoundly influences cancer‑associated signaling pathways. Radiation resistance is a major problem encountered in the treatment of cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the role of miRNA (miR)‑21 in the development of radiation resistance in non‑small cell lung cancer cells. A radiation‑resistant cell line was generated from A549 cells. Significant upregulation of miR‑21 was detected in the radioresistant cancer cells, as compared with the radiosensitive cells, and overexpression of miR‑21 rendered A549 parental cells resistant to radiation. In addition, glycolysis was increased in the radioresistant cells, as compared with the sensitive cells. Furthermore, hypoxia‑inducible factor‑1α (HIF1α) was upregulated by miR‑21 in radioresistant cells, resulting in promotion of the key enzymes of glycolysis. Inhibition of HIF1α by small interfering RNA suppressed glycolysis and resensitized the cancer cells to radiation, whereas the recovery of HIF1α in miR‑21‑inhibited radioresistant cells resulted in recovery of radioresistance. In conclusion, the present study suggested that miR‑21 may modulate radioresistance through the upregulation of HIF1α. These results may provide a novel perspective on miRNA for the development of anti-radioresistance drugs.

  15. Correcting radiation survey data to account for increased leakage during intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Kairn, T.; Crowe, S. B.; Trapp, J. V.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments require more beam-on time and produce more linac head leakage to deliver similar doses to conventional, unmodulated, radiotherapy treatments. It is necessary to take this increased leakage into account when evaluating the results of radiation surveys around bunkers that are, or will be, used for IMRT. The recommended procedure of applying a monitor-unit based workload correction factor to secondary barrier survey measurements, to account for this increased leakage when evaluating radiation survey measurements around IMRT bunkers, can lead to potentially costly overestimation of the required barrier thickness. This study aims to provide initial guidance on the validity of reducing the value of the correction factor when applied to different radiation barriers (primary barriers, doors, maze walls, and other walls) by evaluating three different bunker designs.Methods: Radiation survey measurements of primary, scattered, and leakage radiation were obtained at each of five survey points around each of three different radiotherapy bunkers and the contribution of leakage to the total measured radiation dose at each point was evaluated. Measurements at each survey point were made with the linac gantry set to 12 equidistant positions from 0° to 330°, to assess the effects of radiation beam direction on the results.Results: For all three bunker designs, less than 0.5% of dose measured at and alongside the primary barriers, less than 25% of the dose measured outside the bunker doors and up to 100% of the dose measured outside other secondary barriers was found to be caused by linac head leakage.Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that IMRT workload corrections are unnecessary, for survey measurements made at and alongside primary barriers. Use of reduced IMRT workload correction factors is recommended when evaluating survey measurements around a bunker door, provided that a subset of the measurements used in

  16. Correcting radiation survey data to account for increased leakage during intensity modulated radiotherapy treatments.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Crowe, S B; Trapp, J V

    2013-11-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatments require more beam-on time and produce more linac head leakage to deliver similar doses to conventional, unmodulated, radiotherapy treatments. It is necessary to take this increased leakage into account when evaluating the results of radiation surveys around bunkers that are, or will be, used for IMRT. The recommended procedure of applying a monitor-unit based workload correction factor to secondary barrier survey measurements, to account for this increased leakage when evaluating radiation survey measurements around IMRT bunkers, can lead to potentially costly overestimation of the required barrier thickness. This study aims to provide initial guidance on the validity of reducing the value of the correction factor when applied to different radiation barriers (primary barriers, doors, maze walls, and other walls) by evaluating three different bunker designs. Radiation survey measurements of primary, scattered, and leakage radiation were obtained at each of five survey points around each of three different radiotherapy bunkers and the contribution of leakage to the total measured radiation dose at each point was evaluated. Measurements at each survey point were made with the linac gantry set to 12 equidistant positions from 0° to 330°, to assess the effects of radiation beam direction on the results. For all three bunker designs, less than 0.5% of dose measured at and alongside the primary barriers, less than 25% of the dose measured outside the bunker doors and up to 100% of the dose measured outside other secondary barriers was found to be caused by linac head leakage. Results of this study suggest that IMRT workload corrections are unnecessary, for survey measurements made at and alongside primary barriers. Use of reduced IMRT workload correction factors is recommended when evaluating survey measurements around a bunker door, provided that a subset of the measurements used in this study are repeated for the

  17. Increased survival of experimentally evolved antimicrobial peptide-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an animal host

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Adam J; Purves, Joanne; Rolff, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed as new class of antimicrobial drugs, following the increasing prevalence of bacteria resistant to antibiotics. Synthetic AMPs are functional analogues of highly evolutionarily conserved immune effectors in animals and plants, produced in response to microbial infection. Therefore, the proposed therapeutic use of AMPs bears the risk of ‘arming the enemy’: bacteria that evolve resistance to AMPs may be cross-resistant to immune effectors (AMPs) in their hosts. We used a panel of populations of Staphylococcus aureus that were experimentally selected for resistance to a suite of individual AMPs and antibiotics to investigate the ‘arming the enemy’ hypothesis. We tested whether the selected strains showed higher survival in an insect model (Tenebrio molitor) and cross-resistance against other antimicrobials in vitro. A population selected for resistance to the antimicrobial peptide iseganan showed increased in vivo survival, but was not more virulent. We suggest that increased survival of AMP-resistant bacteria almost certainly poses problems to immune-compromised hosts. PMID:25469169

  18. A Low-Power, Radiation-Resistant, Silicon-Drift-Detector Array for Extraterrestrial Element Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey B. D.; De Geronimo G.; Gaskin, J.A.; Elsner, R.F.; Chen, W.; Carini, G.A.; Keister, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Siddons, D.P.; Smith, G.

    2012-02-08

    We are developing a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) for measuring the abundances of light surface elements (C to Fe) fluoresced by ambient radiation on remote airless bodies. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is demonstrated by its inclusion on three recent lunar missions and by exciting new data that have recently been announced from the Messenger Mission to Mercury. The SDD-XRS instrument that we have been developing offers excellent energy resolution and an order of magnitude lower power requirement than conventional CCDs, making much higher sensitivities possible with modest spacecraft resources. In addition, it is significantly more radiation resistant than x-ray CCDs and therefore will not be subject to the degradation that befell recent lunar instruments. In fact, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it applicable even to the harsh environment of the Jovian system where it can be used to map the light surface elements of Europa. In this paper, we first discuss our element-mapping science-measurement goals. We then derive the necessary instrument requirements to meet these goals and discuss our current instrument development status with respect to these requirements.

  19. A low-power, radiation-resistant, Silicon-Drift-Detector array for extraterrestrial element mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Gaskin, J. A.; Elsner, R. F.; Chen, W.; Carini, G. A.; De Geronimo, G.; Keister, J.; Li, S.; Li, Z.; Siddons, D. P.; Smith, G.

    2012-02-01

    We are developing a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) for measuring the abundances of light surface elements (C to Fe) fluoresced by ambient radiation on remote airless bodies. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is demonstrated by its inclusion on three recent lunar missions and by exciting new data that have recently been announced from the Messenger Mission to Mercury. The SDD-XRS instrument that we have been developing offers excellent energy resolution and an order of magnitude lower power requirement than conventional CCDs, making much higher sensitivities possible with modest spacecraft resources. In addition, it is significantly more radiation resistant than x-ray CCDs and therefore will not be subject to the degradation that befell recent lunar instruments. In fact, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it applicable even to the harsh environment of the Jovian system where it can be used to map the light surface elements of Europa. In this paper, we first discuss our element-mapping science-measurement goals. We then derive the necessary instrument requirements to meet these goals and discuss our current instrument development status with respect to these requirements.

  20. Ocean acidification mediates photosynthetic response to UV radiation and temperature increase in the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Y.; Gao, K.; Villafañe, V. E.; Helbling, E. W.

    2012-06-01

    Increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is responsible for progressive ocean acidification, ocean warming as well as decreased thickness of upper mixing layer (UML), thus exposing phytoplankton cells not only to lower pH and higher temperatures but also to higher levels of solar UV radiation. In order to evaluate the combined effects of ocean acidification, UV radiation and temperature, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as a model organism and examined its physiological performance after grown under two CO2 concentrations (390 and 1000 µatm) for more than 20 generations. Compared to the ambient CO2 level (390 µatm), growth at the elevated CO2 concentration increased non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of cells and partially counteracted the harm to PSII caused by UV-A and UV-B. Such an effect was less pronounced under increased temperature levels. As for photosynthetic carbon fixation, the rate increased with increasing temperature from 15 to 25 °C, regardless of their growth CO2 levels. In addition, UV-induced inhibition of photosynthesis was inversely correlated to temperature. The ratio of repair to UV-induced damage showed inverse relationship with increased NPQ, showing higher values under the ocean acidification condition against UV-B, reflecting that the increased pCO2 and lowered pH counteracted UV-B induced harm.

  1. Terrestrial ecosystems, increased solar ultraviolet radiation, and interactions with other climate change factors.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, M M; Bornman, J F; Ballaré, C L; Flint, S D; Kulandaivelu, G

    2007-03-01

    , such as diminished growth, acclimation responses of plants to UV-B radiation and interactions of plants with consumer organisms such as insects and plant pathogens. The response to UV-B radiation involves both the initial stimulus by solar radiation and transmission of signals within the plants. Resulting changes in gene expression induced by these signals may have elements in common with those elicited by other environmental factors, and generate overlapping functional (including acclimation) responses. Concurrent responses of terrestrial systems to the combination of enhanced UV-B radiation and other global change factors (increased temperature, CO2, available nitrogen and altered precipitation) are less well understood. Studies of individual plant responses to combinations of factors indicate that plant growth can be augmented by higher CO2 levels, yet many of the effects of UV-B radiation are usually not ameliorated by the elevated CO2. UV-B radiation often increases both plant frost tolerance and survival under extreme high temperature conditions. Conversely, extreme temperatures sometimes influence the UV-B radiation sensitivity of plants directly. Plants that endure water deficit stress effectively are also likely to be tolerant of high UV-B flux. Biologically available nitrogen is exceeding historical levels in many regions due to human activities. Studies show that plants well supplied with nitrogen are generally more sensitive to UV-B radiation. Technical issues concerning the use of biological spectral weighting functions (BSWFs) have been further elucidated. The BSWFs, which are multiplication factors assigned to different wavelengths giving an indication of their relative biological effectiveness, are critical to the proper conduct and interpretation of experiments in which organisms are exposed to UV radiation, both in the field and in controlled environment facilities. The characteristics of BSWFs vary considerably among different plant processes, such

  2. Modulation of DNA methylation levels sensitizes doxorubicin-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cells to radiation-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Luzhna, Lidia; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2010-02-05

    Chemoresistant tumors often fail to respond to other cytotoxic treatments such as radiation therapy. The mechanisms of chemo- and radiotherapy cross resistance are not fully understood and are believed to be epigenetic in nature. We hypothesize that MCF-7 cells and their doxorubicin-resistant variant MCF-7/DOX cells may exhibit different responses to ionizing radiation due to their dissimilar epigenetic status. Similar to previous studies, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells harbor much lower levels of global DNA methylation than MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells had lower background apoptosis levels and were less responsive to radiation than MCF-7 cells. Decreased radiation responsiveness correlated to significant global DNA hypomethylation in MCF-7/DOX cells. Here, for the first time, we show that the radiation resistance of MCF-7/DOX cells can be reversed by an epigenetic treatment - the application of methyl-donor SAM. SAM-mediated reversal of DNA methylation led to elevated radiation sensitivity in MCF-7/DOX cells. Contrarily, application of SAM on the radiation sensitive and higher methylated MCF-7 cells resulted in a decrease in their radiation responsiveness. This data suggests that a fine balance of DNA methylation is needed to insure proper radiation and drug responsiveness.

  3. Increasing trends in primary NNRTI resistance among newly HIV-1-diagnosed individuals in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Duran, Adriana; Bouzas, María Belen; Zapiola, Ines; Vila, Marcelo; Indyk, Debbie; Bissio, Emiliano; Salomon, Horacio; Dilernia, Dario A

    2013-01-01

    Objective Our objective was to estimate primary resistance in an urban setting in a developing country characterized by high antiretroviral (ARV) coverage over the diagnosed population and also by an important proportion of undiagnosed individuals, in order to determine whether any change in primary resistance occurred in the past five years. Design We carried out a multi-site resistance surveillance study according to WHO HIV resistance guidelines, using a weighted sampling technique based on annual HIV case reports per site. Methods Blood samples were collected from 197 drug-naive HIV-1-infected individuals diagnosed between March 2010 and August 2011 at 20 HIV voluntary counselling and testing centres in Buenos Aires. Clinical records of enrolled patients at the time of diagnosis were compiled. Viral load and CD4 counts were performed on all samples. The pol gene was sequenced and the resistance profile determined. Phylogenetic analysis was performed by neighbour-joining (NJ) trees and bootscanning analysis. Results We found that 12 (7.9%) of the 152 successfully sequenced samples harboured primary resistance mutations, of which K103N and G190A were the most prevalent. Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) resistance mutations were largely the most prevalent (5.9%), accounting for 75% of all primary resistance and exhibiting a significant increase (p=0.0072) in prevalence during the past 10 years as compared to our previous study performed in 1997–2000 and in 2003–2005. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) and protease inhibitor primary resistance were low and similar to the one previously reported. Conclusions Levels of primary NNRTI resistance in Buenos Aires appear to be increasing in the context of a sustained ARV coverage and a high proportion of undiagnosed HIV-positive individuals. PMID:24093951

  4. IGF-1 bioavailability is increased by resistance training in older women with low bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Parkhouse, W S; Coupland, D C; Li, C; Vanderhoek, K J

    2000-02-07

    We investigated if long-term resistance training would increase insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) bioavailabilty at rest in older women (68+/-1 years) with low bone mineral density. IGF-1 levels were significantly lower (P<0.05), and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins -1 and -3 (IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3) significantly higher than an age-matched healthy normal group. Resistance training resulted in significant (P<0.05) increases in repetition maximums across all exercises (range 41-78%). Resting IGF-1 levels were significantly (P<0.05) elevated (70%) by the resistance training whereas no significant changes occurred in IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3 levels. IGFBP-1/IGF-1 and IGFBP-3/IGF-1 ratios were significantly decreased (approximately - 50%) as a result of resistance training (P<0.05). Thus, IGF-1 bioavailability was increased as a result of resistance training induced increases in IGF-1 levels in older women with low bone mineral density. These alterations in the IGF-1 system may be contributing to the significant strength gain observed with the resistance training in this population.

  5. ClC-3 expression enhances etoposide resistance by increasing acidification of the late endocytic compartment.

    PubMed

    Weylandt, Karsten H; Nebrig, Maxim; Jansen-Rosseck, Nils; Amey, Joanna S; Carmena, David; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Higgins, Christopher F; Sardini, Alessandro

    2007-03-01

    Resistance to anticancer drugs and consequent failure of chemotherapy is a complex problem severely limiting therapeutic options in metastatic cancer. Many studies have shown a role for drug efflux pumps of the ATP-binding cassette transporters family in the development of drug resistance. ClC-3, a member of the CLC family of chloride channels and transporters, is expressed in intracellular compartments of neuronal cells and involved in vesicular acidification. It has previously been suggested that acidification of intracellular organelles can promote drug resistance by increasing drug sequestration. Therefore, we hypothesized a role for ClC-3 in drug resistance. Here, we show that ClC-3 is expressed in neuroendocrine tumor cell lines, such as BON, LCC-18, and QGP-1, and localized in intracellular vesicles co-labeled with the late endosomal/lysosomal marker LAMP-1. ClC-3 overexpression increased the acidity of intracellular vesicles, as assessed by acridine orange staining, and enhanced resistance to the chemotherapeutic drug etoposide by almost doubling the IC(50) in either BON or HEK293 cell lines. Prevention of organellar acidification, by inhibition of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, reduced etoposide resistance. No expression of common multidrug resistance transporters, such as P-glycoprotein or multidrug-related protein-1, was detected in either the BON parental cell line or the derivative clone overexpressing ClC-3. The probable mechanism of enhanced etoposide resistance can be attributed to the increase of vesicular acidification as consequence of ClC-3 overexpression. This study therefore provides first evidence for a role of intracellular CLC proteins in the modulation of cancer drug resistance.

  6. Dose- and time-dependent increase of lysosomal enzymes in embryonic cartilage in vitro after ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Cornelissen, M.; de Ridder, L. )

    1990-09-01

    Radiation doses of 20, 50 or 100 Gy caused the same time related decrease for RNA and proteoglycan (PG) synthesis in embryonic cartilage in vitro (4 days culture). In this paper, participation of lysosomes in this radiation response is investigated. Therefore, we employ a cytochemical method using beta-glycerophosphate as substrate for acid phosphatase (AP) detection. Increase of AP was found 2 days after irradiation and increased during the whole culture period. The increase was more pronounced with a higher radiation dose. Stimulation of AP activity explains the observed radiation response of RNA and PG synthesis.

  7. Cytoplasmic superoxide dismutase and catalase activity and resistance to radiation lethality in murine tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Rosenberg, S.O.

    1986-05-01

    Reduced species of molecular oxygen are produced by the interaction of ionizing radiation with aqueous solutions containing molecular oxygen. The enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) are thought to function in vivo as scavengers of metabolically produced peroxide and superoxide respectively. SOD has been shown to protect against the lethal effects of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. The authors have investigated the relationship between the cytosolic SOD catalase content and the sensitivity to radiation lethality of a number of murine cell lines (402AX, EL-4, MB-2T3, MB-4, MEL, P-815, SAI, SP-2, and SV-3T3). K/sub i/(CN/sup -/) for murine Cu-Zn-SOD was determined to be 6.8 x 10/sup -6/ M. No cytosolic Mn-SOD activity was found in any of the cell lines studied. No correlation was found between the cytosolic Cu-Zn-SOD or cytosolic catalase activity and the resistance to radiation lethality or the murine cell lines studied.

  8. GM trees with increased resistance to herbivores: trait efficiency and their potential to promote tree growth

    PubMed Central

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E. Petter

    2015-01-01

    Climate change, as well as a more intensive forestry, is expected to increase the risk of damage by pests and pathogens on trees, which can already be a severe problem in tree plantations. Recent development of biotechnology theoretically allows for resistance enhancement that could help reduce these risks but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of benefits and tradeoffs with pest resistant GM (genetically modified) trees. We synthesized the current knowledge on the effectiveness of GM forest trees with increased resistance to herbivores. There is ample evidence that induction of exogenous Bacillus thuringiensis genes reduce performance of target pests whereas upregulation of endogenous resistance traits e.g., phenolics, generates variable results. Our review identified very few studies estimating the realized benefits in tree growth of GM trees in the field. This is concerning as the realized benefit with insect resistant GM plants seems to be context-dependent and likely manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. Future studies of secondary pest species and resistance evolution in pest to GM trees should be prioritized. But most importantly we need more long-term field tests to evaluate the benefits and risks with pest resistant GM trees. PMID:25983736

  9. Clinical Management of an Increasing Threat: Outpatient Urinary Tract Infections Due to Multidrug-Resistant Uropathogens.

    PubMed

    Walker, Emily; Lyman, Alessandra; Gupta, Kalpana; Mahoney, Monica V; Snyder, Graham M; Hirsch, Elizabeth B

    2016-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most commonly treated bacterial infections. Over the past decade, antimicrobial resistance has become an increasingly common factor in the management of outpatient UTIs. As treatment options for multidrug-resistant (MDR) uropathogens are limited, clinicians need to be aware of specific clinical and epidemiological risk factors for these infections. Based on available literature, the activity of fosfomycin and nitrofurantoin remain high for most cases of MDR Escherichia coli UTIs. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole retains clinical efficacy, but resistance rates are increasing internationally. Beta-lactam agents have the highest rates of resistance and lowest rates of clinical success. Fluoroquinolones have high resistance rates among MDR uropathogens and are being strongly discouraged as first-line agents for UTIs. In addition to accounting for local resistance rates, consideration of patient risk factors for resistance and pharmacological principles will help guide optimal empiric treatment of outpatient UTIs. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. GM trees with increased resistance to herbivores: trait efficiency and their potential to promote tree growth.

    PubMed

    Hjältén, Joakim; Axelsson, E Petter

    2015-01-01

    Climate change, as well as a more intensive forestry, is expected to increase the risk of damage by pests and pathogens on trees, which can already be a severe problem in tree plantations. Recent development of biotechnology theoretically allows for resistance enhancement that could help reduce these risks but we still lack a comprehensive understanding of benefits and tradeoffs with pest resistant GM (genetically modified) trees. We synthesized the current knowledge on the effectiveness of GM forest trees with increased resistance to herbivores. There is ample evidence that induction of exogenous Bacillus thuringiensis genes reduce performance of target pests whereas upregulation of endogenous resistance traits e.g., phenolics, generates variable results. Our review identified very few studies estimating the realized benefits in tree growth of GM trees in the field. This is concerning as the realized benefit with insect resistant GM plants seems to be context-dependent and likely manifested only if herbivore pressure is sufficiently high. Future studies of secondary pest species and resistance evolution in pest to GM trees should be prioritized. But most importantly we need more long-term field tests to evaluate the benefits and risks with pest resistant GM trees.

  11. Earth Radiation Budget Satellite extraterrestrial solar constant measurements - 1986-1987 increasing trend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Michael A.; Natarajan, Sudha M.; Edmonds, William L.; Mecherikunnel, Ann T.; Kyle, H. Lee

    1988-01-01

    From June 1986 through Nov 1987, the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) pyrheliometric measurements indicated that the solar constant was increasing approximately +0.02 percent per year. Earlier ERBS measurements indicated that the solar constant was declining approximately -0.03 percent per year during the 1984 through mid-1986 period. Since mid-1986 represents the beginning of solar cycle 22, it is believed that the reversal in the long-term solar constant trend may be linked to increased solar activity associated with the beginning of the 11-year sunspot cycle. The typical value of the solar constant was found to be 1365 Wm-2.

  12. Earth Radiation Budget Satellite extraterrestrial solar constant measurements - 1986-1987 increasing trend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Robert B., III; Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Harrison, Edwin F.; Gibson, Michael A.; Natarajan, Sudha M.; Edmonds, William L.; Mecherikunnel, Ann T.; Kyle, H. Lee

    1988-01-01

    From June 1986 through Nov 1987, the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) pyrheliometric measurements indicated that the solar constant was increasing approximately +0.02 percent per year. Earlier ERBS measurements indicated that the solar constant was declining approximately -0.03 percent per year during the 1984 through mid-1986 period. Since mid-1986 represents the beginning of solar cycle 22, it is believed that the reversal in the long-term solar constant trend may be linked to increased solar activity associated with the beginning of the 11-year sunspot cycle. The typical value of the solar constant was found to be 1365 Wm-2.

  13. Molecular exploration of the highly radiation resistant cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badri, Hanène; Leys, Natalie; Wattiez, Ruddy

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) is a photosynthetic cyanobacterium able to use sunlight to release oxygen from water and remove carbon dioxide and nitrate from water. In addition, it is suited for human consumption (edible). For these traits, the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of the life support system MELiSSA for recycling oxygen, water, and food during future long-haul space missions. However, during such extended missions, Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 will be exposed to continuous artificial illumination and harmful cosmic radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate how Arthrospira will react and behave when exposed to such stress environment. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was exposed to high gamma rays doses in order to unravel in details the response of this bacterium following such stress. Test results showed that after acute exposure to high doses of 60Co gamma radiation upto 3200 Gy, Arthrospira filaments were still able to restart photosynthesis and proliferate normally. Doses above 3200 Gy, did have a detrimental effect on the cells, and delayed post-irradiation proliferation. The photosystem activity, measured as the PSII quantum yield immediately after irradiation, decreased significantly at radiation doses above 3200 Gy. Likewise through pigment content analysis a significant decrease in phycocyanin was observed following exposure to 3200 Gy. The high tolerance of this bacterium to 60Co gamma rays (i.e. ca. 1000x more resistant than human cells for example) raised our interest to investigate in details the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind this amazing resistance. Optimised DNA, RNA and protein extraction methods and a new microarray chip specific for Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were developed to identify the global cellular and molecular response following exposure to 3200 Gy and 5000 Gy A total of 15,29 % and 30,18 % genes were found differentially expressed in RNA

  14. Excitotoxic and Radiation Stress Increase TERT Levels in the Mitochondria and Cytosol of Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons.

    PubMed

    Eitan, Erez; Braverman, Carmel; Tichon, Ailone; Gitler, Daniel; Hutchison, Emmette R; Mattson, Mark P; Priel, Esther

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is the catalytic subunit of telomerase, an enzyme that elongates telomeres at the ends of chromosomes during DNA replication. Recently, it was shown that TERT has additional roles in cell survival, mitochondrial function, DNA repair, and Wnt signaling, all of which are unrelated to telomeres. Here, we demonstrate that TERT is enriched in Purkinje neurons, but not in the granule cells of the adult mouse cerebellum. TERT immunoreactivity in Purkinje neurons is present in the nucleus, mitochondria, and cytoplasm. Furthermore, TERT co-localizes with mitochondrial markers, and immunoblot analysis of protein extracts from isolated mitochondria and synaptosomes confirmed TERT localization in mitochondria. TERT expression in Purkinje neurons increased significantly in response to two stressors: a sub-lethal dose of X-ray radiation and exposure to a high glutamate concentration. While X-ray radiation increased TERT levels in the nucleus, glutamate exposure elevated TERT levels in mitochondria. Our findings suggest that in mature Purkinje neurons, TERT is present both in the nucleus and in mitochondria, where it may participate in adaptive responses of the neurons to excitotoxic and radiation stress.

  15. Parametrization of the radiation induced leakage current increase of NMOS transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhaus, M.

    2017-01-01

    The increase of the leakage current of NMOS transistors during exposure to ionizing radiation is known and well studied. Radiation hardness by design techniques have been developed to mitigate this effect and have been successfully used. More recent developments in smaller feature size technologies do not make use of these techniques due to their drawbacks in terms of logic density and requirement of dedicated libraries. During operation the resulting increase of the supply current is a serious challenge and needs to be considered during the system design. A simple parametrization of the leakage current of NMOS transistors as a function of total ionizing dose is presented. The parametrization uses a transistor transfer characteristics of the parasitic transistor along the shallow trench isolation to describe the leakage current of the nominal transistor. Together with a parametrization of the number of positive charges trapped in the silicon dioxide and number of activated interface traps in the silicon to silicon dioxide interface the leakage current results as a function of the exposure time to ionizing radiation. This function is fitted to data of the leakage current of single transistors as well as to data of the supply current of full ASICs.

  16. Study of bulk damage in high resistivity silicon detectors irradiated by high dose of {sup 60}Co {gamma}-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z.; Li, C.J.

    1996-04-01

    High dose (> 200 Mrad) {gamma}-radiation induced displacement damage (or bulk damage) in high resistivity (6--10 k{Omega}-cm) silicon detectors has been studied. It has been found that detector bulk leakage current increases with {gamma} dose at a rate of 3.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} A/cm{sup 3}/Mrad. This introduction rate of bulk leakage current makes the introduction of generation centers by 210 Mrad of {gamma}-radiation comparable to that by 1 {times} 10{sup 12} n/cm{sup 2} of neutron radiation. Significant carrier removal (or donor removal), about 100%, was found in detectors irradiated to 215 Mrad. Space charge sign inversion (SCSI) (or type inversion) was observed in detectors irradiated to {ge} 215 Mrad using transient current technique (TCT). As many as seven deep levels have been observed by current deep level transient spectroscopy (I-DLTS). There was little or no annealing (or reverse annealing) for detectors irradiated to 215 Mrad. Some annealing for detectors irradiated to 500 Mrad have been observed.

  17. Study of surface properties of ATLAS12 strip sensors and their radiation resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikestikova, M.; Allport, P. P.; Baca, M.; Broughton, J.; Chisholm, A.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Pyatt, S.; Thomas, J. P.; Wilson, J. A.; Kierstead, J.; Kuczewski, P.; Lynn, D.; Hommels, L. B. A.; Ullan, M.; Bloch, I.; Gregor, I. M.; Tackmann, K.; Hauser, M.; Jakobs, K.; Kuehn, S.; Mahboubi, K.; Mori, R.; Parzefall, U.; Clark, A.; Ferrere, D.; Sevilla, S. Gonzalez; Ashby, J.; Blue, A.; Bates, R.; Buttar, C.; Doherty, F.; McMullen, T.; McEwan, F.; O'Shea, V.; Kamada, S.; Yamamura, K.; Ikegami, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Takubo, Y.; Unno, Y.; Takashima, R.; Chilingarov, A.; Fox, H.; Affolder, A. A.; Casse, G.; Dervan, P.; Forshaw, D.; Greenall, A.; Wonsak, S.; Wormald, M.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Gorelov, I.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Palni, P.; Seidel, S.; Taylor, A.; Toms, K.; Wang, R.; Hessey, N. P.; Valencic, N.; Hanagaki, K.; Dolezal, Z.; Kodys, P.; Bohm, J.; Stastny, J.; Bevan, A.; Beck, G.; Milke, C.; Domingo, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Galloway, Z.; Hibbard-Lubow, D.; Liang, Z.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; To, K.; French, R.; Hodgson, P.; Marin-Reyes, H.; Parker, K.; Jinnouchi, O.; Hara, K.; Sato, K.; Hagihara, M.; Iwabuchi, S.; Bernabeu, J.; Civera, J. V.; Garcia, C.; Lacasta, C.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Rodriguez, D.; Santoyo, D.; Solaz, C.; Soldevila, U.

    2016-09-01

    A radiation hard n+-in-p micro-strip sensor for the use in the Upgrade of the strip tracker of the ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) has been developed by the "ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration" and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. Surface properties of different types of end-cap and barrel miniature sensors of the latest sensor design ATLAS12 have been studied before and after irradiation. The tested barrel sensors vary in "punch-through protection" (PTP) structure, and the end-cap sensors, whose stereo-strips differ in fan geometry, in strip pitch and in edge strip ganging options. Sensors have been irradiated with proton fluences of up to 1×1016 neq/cm2, by reactor neutron fluence of 1×1015 neq/cm2 and by gamma rays from 60Co up to dose of 1 MGy. The main goal of the present study is to characterize the leakage current for micro-discharge breakdown voltage estimation, the inter-strip resistance and capacitance, the bias resistance and the effectiveness of PTP structures as a function of bias voltage and fluence. It has been verified that the ATLAS12 sensors have high breakdown voltage well above the operational voltage which implies that different geometries of sensors do not influence their stability. The inter-strip isolation is a strong function of irradiation fluence, however the sensor performance is acceptable in the expected range for HL-LHC. New gated PTP structure exhibits low PTP onset voltage and sharp cut-off of effective resistance even at the highest tested radiation fluence. The inter-strip capacitance complies with the technical specification required before irradiation and no radiation-induced degradation was observed. A summary of ATLAS12 sensors tests is presented including a comparison of results from different irradiation sites. The measured characteristics are compared with the previous prototype of the sensor design, ATLAS07.

  18. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  19. Modest increased sensitivity to radiation oncogenesis in ATM heterozygous versus wild-type mammalian cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smilenov, L. B.; Brenner, D. J.; Hall, E. J.

    2001-01-01

    Subpopulations that are genetically predisposed to radiation-induced cancer could have significant public health consequences. Individuals homozygous for null mutations at the ataxia telangiectasia gene are indeed highly radiosensitive, but their numbers are very small. Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes (1-2% of the population) have been associated with somewhat increased radiosensitivity for some end points, but none directly related to carcinogenesis. Here, intralitter comparisons between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts and mouse embryo fibroblasts carrying ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) null mutation indicate that the heterozygous cells are more sensitive to radiation oncogenesis than their normal, litter-matched, counterparts. From these data we suggest that Ataxia Telangiectasia heterozygotes could indeed represent a societally-significant radiosensitive human subpopulation.

  20. Increased water activity reduces the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90 °C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil.

  1. Importance of sigma factor mutations in increased triclosan resistance in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Gantzhorn, Mette Rørbæk; Olsen, John Elmerdahl; Thomsen, Line Elnif

    2015-05-19

    Salmonella enterica is the second most common foodborne pathogen. The use of biocides is crucial to prevent spread of foodborne pathogens, and it would be devastating for food safety if Salmonella would become resistant to the disinfectants used. Another concern is that exposure to disinfectants might lead to decreased susceptibility to antibiotics. The current study aimed to identify genetic changes causing high level triclosan resistance in S. enterica serovar Typhimurium and evaluate how these affected antibiotic resistance and efflux pump activity. Wild type strains S. Typhimurium 4/74 and DTU3 were adapted to increasing concentrations of the biocide triclosan by serial passage. High level triclosan resistant isolates (MIC > 1000 μg/ml) were obtained. Strains were genome sequenced, and SNPs in fabI, rpoS and rpoD were found to be associated with high level resistance. However, work with defined mutants revealed that a SNP in fabI was not sufficient to obtain high level resistance. This required additional mutations in the sigma factors rpoS or rpoD. The adapted strains showed triclosan-dependent increased efflux, increased fabI expression and reduced susceptibility towards the antibiotics enrofloxacin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim. Medium level triclosan resistance could be obtained by fabI mutations in S. Typhimurium, however, high level resistance was found to require sigma factor mutations in addition to a fabI mutation. Reduced antibiotic sensitivity was observed for the adapted strains, which could be associated with increased efflux.

  2. Increased Water Activity Reduces the Thermal Resistance of Salmonella enterica in Peanut Butter

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K.; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90°C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126°C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil. PMID:23728806

  3. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-01-01

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation. PMID:26415228

  4. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces mitochondrial fusion and increases expression of mitochondrial complexes I and III in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chien, Ling; Chen, Wun-Ke; Liu, Szu-Ting; Chang, Chuang-Rung; Kao, Mou-Chieh; Chen, Kuan-Wei; Chiu, Shih-Che; Hsu, Ming-Ling; Hsiang, I-Chou; Chen, Yu-Jen; Chen, Linyi

    2015-10-13

    High energy ionizing radiation can cause DNA damage and cell death. During clinical radiation therapy, the radiation dose could range from 15 to 60 Gy depending on targets. While 2 Gy radiation has been shown to cause cancer cell death, studies also suggest a protective potential by low dose radiation. In this study, we examined the effect of 0.2-2 Gy radiation on hippocampal neurons. Low dose 0.2 Gy radiation treatment increased the levels of MTT. Since hippocampal neurons are post-mitotic, this result reveals a possibility that 0.2 Gy irradiation may increase mitochondrial activity to cope with stimuli. Maintaining neural plasticity is an energy-demanding process that requires high efficient mitochondrial function. We thus hypothesized that low dose radiation may regulate mitochondrial dynamics and function to ensure survival of neurons. Our results showed that five days after 0.2 Gy irradiation, no obvious changes on neuronal survival, neuronal synapses, membrane potential of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species levels, and mitochondrial DNA copy numbers. Interestingly, 0.2 Gy irradiation promoted the mitochondria fusion, resulting in part from the increased level of a mitochondrial fusion protein, Mfn2, and inhibition of Drp1 fission protein trafficking to the mitochondria. Accompanying with the increased mitochondrial fusion, the expressions of complexes I and III of the electron transport chain were also increased. These findings suggest that, hippocampal neurons undergo increased mitochondrial fusion to modulate cellular activity as an adaptive mechanism in response to low dose radiation.

  5. Psychological modeling and adaptations in cognitive representations with increased resistance during motor skill acquisition.

    PubMed

    Catina, Peter

    2009-03-01

    It was hypothesized that subjects receiving increased resistance in the squat exercise would demonstrate better technique and better understanding of how to perform the skill than subjects performing the exercise with no increase in resistance. Scores were recorded on the following analyses: the questionnaire analysis, which measured cognitive representation; the video analysis, which measured squat performance technique; and the 3-dimensional figure analysis, which measured the degree of similarity between the position of the model and the position of the subjects during the performance task. Ten undergraduate students were sampled, half of whom received increased resistance in the squat exercise. Admission requirements were that the subjects be men, be matched for age, body weight, and height, and have no experience in resistance training or formal instruction in proper squat technique. After measuring subjects' cognitive representation with the questionnaire, subsequent analyses were conducted to further clarify treatment effects. The second analysis involved measuring differences between the videotaped performance of the model and the videotaped performance of naive subjects. The third analysis consisted of subjects assembling a 3-dimensional wooden figure to duplicate the proper biomechanics of the expert model, which was then photographed and compared with the model's template assembly of the wooden figure. It was concluded that subjects performing the squat with increased resistance showed significant (p < 0.05) improvement in cognitive representation accuracy and performance technique compared with subjects who performed the squat with no increase in resistance. The directional hypothesis was supported. Namely, the scores of subjects receiving the treatment were predicted to be significantly greater than the scores of those who received no treatment. These data suggest that increasing the resistance in subsequent trials of the squat exercise may be a

  6. Increasing Use of Dose-Escalated External Beam Radiation Therapy for Men With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Mitra, Nandita; Woo, Kaitlin; Smaldone, Marc; Uzzo, Robert; Bekelman, Justin E.

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To examine recent practice patterns, using a large national cancer registry, to understand the extent to which dose-escalated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) has been incorporated into routine clinical practice for men with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study using the National Cancer Data Base, a nationwide oncology outcomes database in the United States. We identified 98,755 men diagnosed with nonmetastatic prostate cancer between 2006 and 2011 who received definitive EBRT and classified patients into National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) risk groups. We defined dose-escalated EBRT as total prescribed dose of ≥75.6 Gy. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the association of patient, clinical, and demographic characteristics with the use of dose-escalated EBRT. Results: Overall, 81.6% of men received dose-escalated EBRT during the study period. The use of dose-escalated EBRT did not vary substantially by NCCN risk group. Use of dose-escalated EBRT increased from 70.7% of patients receiving treatment in 2006 to 89.8% of patients receiving treatment in 2011. On multivariable analysis, year of diagnosis and use of intensity modulated radiation therapy were significantly associated with receipt of dose-escalated EBRT. Conclusions: Our study results indicate that dose-escalated EBRT has been widely adopted by radiation oncologists treating prostate cancer in the United States. The proportion of patients receiving dose-escalated EBRT increased nearly 20% between 2006 and 2011. We observed high utilization rates of dose-escalated EBRT within all disease risk groups. Adoption of intensity modulated radiation therapy was strongly associated with use of dose-escalated treatment.

  7. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2002-06-10

    The mixture of toxic chemicals, heavy metals, halogenated solvents and radionuclides in many DOE waste materials presents a challenging problem for separating the different species and disposing of individual contaminants. One approach for dealing with mixed wastes is to genetically engineer the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans to survive in and detoxify DOE's mixed waste streams, and to develop process parameters for treating mixed wastes with such constructed strains. The goal for this project is to develop a suite of genetic tools for Deinococcus radiodurans and to use these tools to construct and test stable strains for detoxification of haloorganics in mixed wastes.

  8. Genetic Engineering of a Radiation-Resistant Bacterium for Biodegradation of Mixed Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2001-06-11

    The mixture of toxic chemicals, heavy metals, halogenated solvents and radionuclides in many DOE waste materials presents a challenging problem for separating the different species and disposing of individual contaminants. One approach for dealing with mixed wastes is to genetically engineer the radiation-resistant bacterium, Deinococcus radiodurans to survive in and detoxify DOE's mixed waste streams, and to develop process parameters for treating mixed wastes with such constructed strains. The goal for this project is to develop a suite of genetic tools for Deinococcus radiodurans and to use these tools to construct and test stable strains for detoxification of haloorganics in mixed wastes.

  9. Radiation-induced resistance oscillations in a 2D hole gas: a demonstration of a universal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iñarrea, Jesús; Platero, Gloria

    2015-09-01

    We report on a theoretical study about the microwave-induced