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Sample records for increased striatal dopamine

  1. Impaired Striatal Akt Signaling Disrupts Dopamine Homeostasis and Increases Feeding

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Adeola R.; Owens, W. Anthony; Matthies, Heinrich J. G.; Saadat, Sanaz; Kennedy, Jack P.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Russo, Scott J.; Daws, Lynette C.; Niswender1, Kevin D.; Galli, Aurelio

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of obesity has increased dramatically worldwide. The obesity epidemic begs for novel concepts and therapeutic targets that cohesively address “food-abuse” disorders. We demonstrate a molecular link between impairment of a central kinase (Akt) involved in insulin signaling induced by exposure to a high-fat (HF) diet and dysregulation of higher order circuitry involved in feeding. Dopamine (DA) rich brain structures, such as striatum, provide motivation stimuli for feeding. In these central circuitries, DA dysfunction is posited to contribute to obesity pathogenesis. We identified a mechanistic link between metabolic dysregulation and the maladaptive behaviors that potentiate weight gain. Insulin, a hormone in the periphery, also acts centrally to regulate both homeostatic and reward-based HF feeding. It regulates DA homeostasis, in part, by controlling a key element in DA clearance, the DA transporter (DAT). Upon HF feeding, nigro-striatal neurons rapidly develop insulin signaling deficiencies, causing increased HF calorie intake. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that consumption of fat-rich food impairs striatal activation of the insulin-activated signaling kinase, Akt. HF-induced Akt impairment, in turn, reduces DAT cell surface expression and function, thereby decreasing DA homeostasis and amphetamine (AMPH)-induced DA efflux. In addition, HF-mediated dysregulation of Akt signaling impairs DA-related behaviors such as (AMPH)-induced locomotion and increased caloric intake. We restored nigro-striatal Akt phosphorylation using recombinant viral vector expression technology. We observed a rescue of DAT expression in HF fed rats, which was associated with a return of locomotor responses to AMPH and normalization of HF diet-induced hyperphagia. Conclusions/Significance Acquired disruption of brain insulin action may confer risk for and/or underlie “food-abuse” disorders and the recalcitrance of obesity. This molecular model

  2. Propentophylline increases striatal dopamine release but dampens methamphetamine-induced dopamine dynamics: A microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Gough, B; Pereira, F C; Fontes Ribeiro, C A; Ali, S F; Binienda, Z K

    2014-10-01

    While there are currently no medications approved for methamphetamine (METH) addiction, it has been shown that propentofylline (PPF), an atypical methylxanthine, can suppress the rewarding effects of methamphetamine (METH) in mice. This experiment studied the interactions of PPF with METH in striatal dopaminergic transmission. Herein, the impact of PPF (10-40mM, intrastriatally perfused (80min) on the effect of METH (5mg/kg, i.p.) on striatal dopamine (DA) release was evaluated using brain microdialysis in Sprague-Dawley adult rats. METH was injected at the 60min time point of the 80min PPF perfusion. The extracellular levels of DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were determined using high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection (HPLC-ED). PPF induced a concentration-dependent increase in DA release beginning 30min after the onset of PPF perfusion. DA peak levels evoked by 40mM PPF were similar to those induced by 5mg/kg METH i.p. Only the highest concentration of PPF decreased the METH-induced DA peak (circa 70%). The significant decreases in extracellular levels of DOPAC and HVA evoked by METH were partially blocked by 10 and 20mM PPF. Although 40mM of PPF also partially blocked the METH-induced DOPAC decrease, it completely blocked HVA depletion after a transient increase in HVA levels in METH-treated rats. Data indicates for the first time that while PPF increases presynaptic striatal DA dynamics it attenuates METH-induced striatal DA release and metabolism. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Intrastriatal taurine increases striatal extracellular dopamine in a tetrodotoxin-sensitive manner in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Ahtee, L

    1996-07-19

    In vivo effects of locally administered taurine on striatal dopamine release and metabolism were studied by microdialysis in freely moving rats. Concentrations of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) in striatal dialysates were quantified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) using electrochemical detection. Infusion of 150 mM taurine into the striatum for 2 h induced a 2.5-fold increase in the extracellular dopamine concentration. Extracellular DOPAC concentration increased nearly 2-fold. Taurine infusion initially decreased HVA to 70% but afterwards increased it to 140% of the control. When taurine was infused simultaneously with 1 microM tetrodotoxin starting 60 min after tetrodotoxin, the output of dopamine did not differ from that in the presence of tetrodotoxin alone. Tetrodotoxin abolished the effects of taurine on dopamine metabolites as well. Tetrodotoxin-sensitivity of the effects of taurine on dopamine and its metabolites suggests that intrastriatal taurine elevates extracellular dopamine by releasing it from neuronal pool.

  4. Increased dopamine uptake in striatal synaptosomes after treatment of rats with amantadine.

    PubMed

    Page, G; Peeters, M; Maloteaux, J M; Hermans, E

    2000-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of short- and long-term treatments with amantadine on the activity of the neuronal dopamine transporter (DAT) in the rat striatum. For this purpose, the [3H]dopamine uptake was measured in striatal synaptosomes prepared from rats treated for 2, 7 and 14 days with amantadine (40 mg/kg; i.p.). After 7 days of treatment, amantadine increased the apparent V(max) by 30% without modification of the apparent K(m) of dopamine uptake whereas no change in these parameters was observed after 2 and 14 days treatment. Binding assays conducted with [3H]GBR-12935 on membranes prepared from animals treated with amantadine revealed no difference in the density and the affinity of striatal DAT binding sites as compared to control. This indicates that the increased dopamine uptake was not reflecting a modification at the level of the DAT expression. The activity of the DAT is regulated by phosphorylation and one may propose that ionotropic glutamate receptors present on presynaptic terminals directly modulate this phosphorylation. An indirect mechanism would involve presynaptic dopamine receptors that control the activity of the DAT in response to the increased dopamine concentration in the synaptic cleft.

  5. Increased Impulsivity Retards the Transition to Dorsolateral Striatal Dopamine Control of Cocaine Seeking

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Jennifer E.; Dilleen, Ruth; Pelloux, Yann; Economidou, Daina; Dalley, Jeffrey W.; Belin, David; Everitt, Barry J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Development of maladaptive drug-seeking habits occurs in conjunction with a ventral-to-dorsal striatal shift in dopaminergic control over behavior. Although these habits readily develop as drug use continues, high impulsivity predicts loss of control over drug seeking and taking. However, whether impulsivity facilitates the transition to dorsolateral striatum (DLS) dopamine-dependent cocaine-seeking habits or whether impulsivity and cocaine-induced intrastriatal shifts are additive processes is unknown. Methods High- and low-impulsive rats identified in the five-choice serial reaction-time task were trained to self-administer cocaine (.25 mg/infusion) with infusions occurring in the presence of a cue-light conditioned stimulus. Dopamine transmission was blocked in the DLS after three stages of training: early, transition, and late-stage, by bilateral intracranial infusions of α-flupenthixol (0, 5, 10, or 15 μg/side) during 15-min cocaine-seeking test sessions in which each response was reinforced by a cocaine-associated conditioned stimulus presentation. Results In early-stage tests, neither group was affected by DLS dopamine receptor blockade. In transition-stage tests, low-impulsive rats showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in cocaine seeking, whereas high-impulsive rats were still unaffected by α-flupenthixol infusions. In the final, late-stage seeking test, both groups showed dose-dependent sensitivity to dopamine receptor blockade. Conclusions The results demonstrate that high impulsivity is associated with a delayed transition to DLS-dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking. This suggests that, if impulsivity confers an increased propensity to addiction, it is not simply through a more rapid development of habits but instead through interacting corticostriatal and striato-striatal processes that result ultimately in maladaptive drug-seeking habits. PMID:24157338

  6. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability increases after long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss.

    PubMed

    van der Zwaal, Esther M; de Weijer, Barbara A; van de Giessen, Elsmarieke M; Janssen, Ignace; Berends, Frits J; van de Laar, Arnold; Ackermans, Mariette T; Fliers, Eric; la Fleur, Susanne E; Booij, Jan; Serlie, Mireille J

    2016-07-01

    In several studies reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability was reported in obese subjects compared to lean controls. Whether this is a reversible phenomenon remained uncertain. We previously determined the short-term effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) on striatal D2/3R availability (using [(123)I]IBZM SPECT) in 20 morbidly obese women. Striatal D2/3R availability was lower compared to controls at baseline, and remained unaltered after 6 weeks, despite significant weight loss. To determine whether long-term bariatric surgery-induced weight loss normalizes striatal D2/3R binding, we repeated striatal D2/3R binding measurements at least 2 years after RYGB in 14 subjects of the original cohort. In addition, we assessed long-term changes in body composition, eating behavior and fasting plasma levels of leptin, ghrelin, insulin and glucose. Mean body mass index declined from 46±7kg/m(2) to 32±6kg/m(2), which was accompanied by a significant increase in striatal D2/3R availability (p=0.031). Striatal D2/3R availability remained significantly reduced compared to the age-matched controls (BMI 22±2kg/m(2); p=0.01). Changes in striatal D2/3R availability did not correlate with changes in body weight/fat, insulin sensitivity, ghrelin or leptin levels. Scores on eating behavior questionnaires improved and changes in the General Food Craving Questionnaire-State showed a borderline significant correlation with changes in striatal D2/3R availability. These findings show that striatal D2/3R availability increases after long-term bariatric-surgery induced weight loss, suggesting that reduced D2/3R availability in obesity is a reversible phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  7. Leptin Increases Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in Leptin-Deficient Obese (ob/ob) Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Pfaffly, J.; Michaelides, M.; Wang, G-J.; Pessin, J.E.; Volkow, N.D.; Thanos, P.K.

    2010-06-01

    Peripheral and central leptin administration have been shown to mediate central dopamine (DA) signaling. Leptin-receptor deficient rodents show decreased DA D2 receptor (D2R) binding in striatum and unique DA profiles compared to controls. Leptin-deficient mice show increased DA activity in reward-related brain regions. The objective of this study was to examine whether basal D2R-binding differences contribute to the phenotypic behaviors of leptin-deficient ob/ob mice, and whether D2R binding is altered in response to peripheral leptin treatment in these mice. Leptin decreased body weight, food intake, and plasma insulin concentration in ob/ob mice but not in wild-type mice. Basal striatal D2R binding (measured with autoradiography [{sup 3}H] spiperone) did not differ between ob/ob and wild-type mice but the response to leptin did. In wild-type mice, leptin decreased striatal D2R binding, whereas, in ob/ob mice, leptin increased D2R binding. Our findings provide further evidence that leptin modulates D2R expression in striatum and that these effects are genotype/phenotype dependent.

  8. Prefrontal and Striatal Glutamate Differently Relate to Striatal Dopamine: Potential Regulatory Mechanisms of Striatal Presynaptic Dopamine Function?

    PubMed

    Gleich, Tobias; Deserno, Lorenz; Lorenz, Robert Christian; Boehme, Rebecca; Pankow, Anne; Buchert, Ralph; Kühn, Simone; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    Theoretical and animal work has proposed that prefrontal cortex (PFC) glutamate inhibits dopaminergic inputs to the ventral striatum (VS) indirectly, whereas direct VS glutamatergic afferents have been suggested to enhance dopaminergic inputs to the VS. In the present study, we aimed to investigate relationships of glutamate and dopamine measures in prefrontostriatal circuitries of healthy humans. We hypothesized that PFC and VS glutamate, as well as their balance, are differently associated with VS dopamine. Glutamate concentrations in the left lateral PFC and left striatum were assessed using 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Striatal presynaptic dopamine synthesis capacity was measured by fluorine-18-l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (F-18-FDOPA) positron emission tomography. First, a negative relationship was observed between glutamate concentrations in lateral PFC and VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 28). Second, a positive relationship was revealed between striatal glutamate and VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 26). Additionally, the intraindividual difference between PFC and striatal glutamate concentrations correlated negatively with VS dopamine synthesis capacity (n = 24). The present results indicate an involvement of a balance in PFC and striatal glutamate in the regulation of VS dopamine synthesis capacity. This notion points toward a potential mechanism how VS presynaptic dopamine levels are kept in a fine-tuned range. A disruption of this mechanism may account for alterations in striatal dopamine turnover as observed in mental diseases (e.g., in schizophrenia). The present work demonstrates complementary relationships between prefrontal and striatal glutamate and ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine using human imaging measures: a negative correlation between prefrontal glutamate and presynaptic dopamine and a positive relationship between striatal glutamate and presynaptic dopamine are revealed. The results may reflect a regulatory role

  9. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [(11)C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  10. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Volkow, N D; Wang, G-J; Logan, J; Alexoff, D; Fowler, J S; Thanos, P K; Wong, C; Casado, V; Ferre, S; Tomasi, D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300 mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). The association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors. PMID:25871974

  11. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    DOE PAGES

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; ...

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release inmore » striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.« less

  12. CB1 receptor knockout mice display reduced ethanol-induced conditioned place preference and increased striatal dopamine D2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Houchi, Hakim; Babovic, Daniela; Pierrefiche, Olivier; Ledent, Catherine; Daoust, Martine; Naassila, Mickaël

    2005-02-01

    Cannabinoids and ethanol activate the same reward pathways, and recent advances in the understanding of the neurobiological basis of alcoholism suggest that the CB1 receptor system may play a key role in the reinforcing effects of ethanol and in modulating ethanol intake. In the present study, male CB1 receptors knockout mice generated on a CD1 background displayed decreased ethanol-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) compared to wild-type (CB1(+/+)) mice. Ethanol (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 g/kg) induced significant CPP in CB1(+/+) mice at all doses tested, whereas it induced significant CPP only at the highest dose of ethanol (2.0 g/kg) in CB1(-/-) mice. However, there was no genotypic difference in cocaine (20 mg/kg)-induced CPP. There was also no genotypic difference, neither in cocaine (10-50 mg/kg) nor in D-amphetamine (1.2-5 mg/kg)-induced locomotor effects. In addition, mutant and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to the anxiolytic effects of ethanol (1.5 g/kg) when tested using the elevated plus maze. Interestingly, this decrease in ethanol efficacy to induce CPP in CB1(-/-) mice was correlated with an increase in D2/D3 receptors, as determined by [3H]raclopride binding, whereas there was no difference in D1-like receptors, as determined by [3H]SCH23390 binding, measured in the striatum from drug-naive mice. This increase in D2/D3 binding sites observed in CB1 knockout mice was associated with an altered locomotor response to the D2/D3 agonist quinpirole (low doses 0.02-0.1 mg/kg) but not to an alteration of quinpirole (0.1-1.0 mg/kg)-induced CPP compared to wild-type mice. Altogether, the present results indicate that lifelong deletion of CB1 receptors reduced ethanol-induced CPP and that these reduced rewarding effects of ethanol are correlated to an overexpression of striatal dopamine D2 receptors.

  13. Cortical Control of Striatal Dopamine Transmission via Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Kosillo, Polina; Zhang, Yan-Feng; Threlfell, Sarah; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal regulation of striatal dopamine (DA) transmission has long been postulated, but ionotropic glutamate receptors have not been localized directly to DA axons. Striatal cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) are emerging as major players in striatal function, and can govern DA transmission by activating nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) on DA axons. Cortical inputs to ChIs have historically been perceived as sparse, but recent evidence indicates that they strongly activate ChIs. We explored whether activation of M1/M2 corticostriatal inputs can consequently gate DA transmission, via ChIs. We reveal that optogenetic activation of channelrhodopsin-expressing corticostriatal axons can drive striatal DA release detected with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry and requires activation of nAChRs on DA axons and AMPA receptors on ChIs that promote short-latency action potentials. By contrast, DA release driven by optogenetic activation of intralaminar thalamostriatal inputs involves additional activation of NMDA receptors on ChIs and action potential generation over longer timescales. Therefore, cortical and thalamic glutamate inputs can modulate DA transmission by regulating ChIs as gatekeepers, through ionotropic glutamate receptors. The different use of AMPA and NMDA receptors by cortical versus thalamic inputs might lead to distinct input integration strategies by ChIs and distinct modulation of the function of DA and striatum. PMID:27566978

  14. Modulation of striatal projection systems by dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Gerfen, Charles R.; Surmeier, D. James

    2012-01-01

    The basal ganglia are a chain of subcortical nuclei that facilitate action selection. Striatal direct and indirect pathways form the functional backbone of the basal ganglia circuit. Twenty years ago it was proposed that the ability of the striatum to use the rise and fall of dopamine (DA) to control action selection was due to the segregation of D1 and D2 DA receptors in direct and indirect pathway spiny projection neurons. Although this sparked a debate, the evidence accumulated since clearly supports this model. In particular, recent advances in the means of marking neural circuits with optical or molecular reporters has revealed a clear-cut dichotomy between these two cell types at the molecular, anatomical and physiological levels. The contrast provided by these studies has provided new insights into how the striatum responds to fluctuations in DA signaling and how diseases that alter this signaling change striatal function. PMID:21469956

  15. Regulation of bat echolocation pulse acoustics by striatal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Tressler, Jedediah; Schwartz, Christine; Wellman, Paul; Hughes, Samuel; Smotherman, Michael

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The ability to control the bandwidth, amplitude and duration of echolocation pulses is a crucial aspect of echolocation performance but few details are known about the neural mechanisms underlying the control of these voice parameters in any mammal. The basal ganglia (BG) are a suite of forebrain nuclei centrally involved in sensory-motor control and are characterized by their dependence on dopamine. We hypothesized that pharmacological manipulation of brain dopamine levels could reveal how BG circuits might influence the acoustic structure of bat echolocation pulses. A single intraperitoneal injection of a low dose (5 mg kg–1) of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPTP), which selectively targets dopamine-producing cells of the substantia nigra, produced a rapid degradation in pulse acoustic structure and eliminated the bat's ability to make compensatory changes in pulse amplitude in response to background noise, i.e. the Lombard response. However, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements of striatal dopamine concentrations revealed that the main effect of MPTP was a fourfold increase rather than the predicted decrease in striatal dopamine levels. After first using autoradiographic methods to confirm the presence and location of D1- and D2-type dopamine receptors in the bat striatum, systemic injections of receptor subtype-specific agonists showed that MPTP's effects on pulse acoustics were mimicked by a D2-type dopamine receptor agonist (Quinpirole) but not by a D1-type dopamine receptor agonist (SKF82958). The results suggest that BG circuits have the capacity to influence echolocation pulse acoustics, particularly via D2-type dopamine receptor-mediated pathways, and may therefore represent an important mechanism for vocal control in bats. PMID:21900471

  16. Where attention falls: Increased risk of falls from the converging impact of cortical cholinergic and midbrain dopamine loss on striatal function.

    PubMed

    Sarter, Martin; Albin, Roger L; Kucinski, Aaron; Lustig, Cindy

    2014-07-01

    Falls are a major source of hospitalization, long-term institutionalization, and death in older adults and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Limited attentional resources are a major risk factor for falls. In this review, we specify cognitive-behavioral mechanisms that produce falls and map these mechanisms onto a model of multi-system degeneration. Results from PET studies in PD fallers and findings from a recently developed animal model support the hypothesis that falls result from interactions between loss of basal forebrain cholinergic projections to the cortex and striatal dopamine loss. Striatal dopamine loss produces inefficient, low-vigor gait, posture control, and movement. Cortical cholinergic deafferentation impairs a wide range of attentional processes, including monitoring of gait, posture and complex movements. Cholinergic cell loss reveals the full impact of striatal dopamine loss on motor performance, reflecting loss of compensatory attentional supervision of movement. Dysregulation of dorsomedial striatal circuitry is an essential, albeit not exclusive, mediator of falls in this dual-system model. Because cholinergic neuromodulatory activity influences cortical circuitry primarily via stimulation of α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, and because agonists at these receptors are known to benefit attentional processes in animals and humans, treating PD fallers with such agonists, as an adjunct to dopaminergic treatment, is predicted to reduce falls. Falls are an informative behavioral endpoint to study attentional-motor integration by striatal circuitry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Striatal Serotonin 2C receptors decrease nigrostriatal dopamine release by increasing GABA-A receptor tone in the substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Burke, M.V.; Nocjar, C.; Sonneborn, A.J.; McCreary, A.C.

    2017-01-01

    Drugs acting at the serotonin-2C (5-HT2C) receptor subtype have shown promise as therapeutics in multiple syndromes including obesity, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. While it is established that 5-HT2C receptor stimulation inhibits DA release, the neural circuits and the localization of the relevant 5-HT2C receptors remain unknown. The present study used dual-probe in vivo microdialysis to investigate the relative contributions of 5-HT2C receptors localized in the rat substantia nigra (SN) and caudate-putamen (CP) in the control of nigrostriatal DA release. Systemic administration (3.0 mg/kg) of the 5-HT2C receptor selective agonist Ro 60-0175 [(α S )-6-Chloro-5-fluoro-α-methyl-1 H-indole-1-ethanamine fumarate] decreased, whereas intrastriatal infusions of the selective 5-HT2C antagonist SB 242084 [6-Chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1 H-indole-1-carboxyamide; 1.0 µM] increased, basal DA in the CP. Depending on the site within the SN pars reticulata (SNpr), infusions of SB 242084 had more modest but significant effects. Moreover, infusions of the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol (10 µM) into the SNpr completely reversed the increases in striatal DA release produced by intrastriatal infusions of SB 242084. These findings suggest a role for 5-HT2C receptors regulating striatal DA release that is highly localized. 5-HT2C receptors localized in the striatum may represent a primary site of action that is mediated by actions on GABAergic activity in the SN. PMID:25073477

  18. Striatal cholinergic interneurons Drive GABA release from dopamine terminals.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Alexandra B; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F; Shah, Nirao M; Seal, Rebecca P; Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2014-04-02

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Striatal cholinergic interneurons drive GABA release from dopamine terminals

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically-driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons, but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. PMID:24613418

  20. Caffeine increases striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Volkow, N. D.; Wang, G. -J.; Logan, J.; Alexoff, D.; Fowler, J. S.; Thanos, P. K.; Wong, C.; Casado, V.; Ferre, S.; Tomasi, D.

    2015-04-14

    Caffeine, the most widely consumed psychoactive substance in the world, is used to promote wakefulness and enhance alertness. Like other wake-promoting drugs (stimulants and modafinil), caffeine enhances dopamine (DA) signaling in the brain, which it does predominantly by antagonizing adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR). However, it is unclear if caffeine, at the doses consumed by humans, increases DA release or whether it modulates the functions of postsynaptic DA receptors through its interaction with adenosine receptors, which modulate them. We used positron emission tomography and [11C]raclopride (DA D2/D3 receptor radioligand sensitive to endogenous DA) to assess if caffeine increased DA release in striatum in 20 healthy controls. Caffeine (300mg p.o.) significantly increased the availability of D2/D3 receptors in putamen and ventral striatum, but not in caudate, when compared with placebo. In addition, caffeine-induced increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum were associated with caffeine-induced increases in alertness. Our findings indicate that in the human brain, caffeine, at doses typically consumed, increases the availability of DA D2/D3 receptors, which indicates that caffeine does not increase DA in the striatum for this would have decreased D2/D3 receptor availability. Instead, we interpret our findings to reflect an increase in D2/D3 receptor levels in striatum with caffeine (or changes in affinity). Furthermore, the association between increases in D2/D3 receptor availability in ventral striatum and alertness suggests that caffeine might enhance arousal, in part, by upregulating D2/D3 receptors.

  1. Striatal Dopamine Links Gastrointestinal Rerouting to Altered Sweet Appetite.

    PubMed

    Han, Wenfei; Tellez, Luis A; Niu, Jingjing; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Tatiana L; Zhang, Xiaobing; Su, Jiansheng; Tong, Jenny; Schwartz, Gary J; van den Pol, Anthony; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2016-01-12

    Reductions in calorie intake contribute significantly to the positive outcome of bariatric surgeries. However, the physiological mechanisms linking the rerouting of the gastrointestinal tract to reductions in sugar cravings remain uncertain. We show that a duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) intervention inhibits maladaptive sweet appetite by acting on dopamine-responsive striatal circuitries. DJB disrupted the ability of recurrent sugar exposure to promote sweet appetite in sated animals, thereby revealing a link between recurrent duodenal sugar influx and maladaptive sweet intake. Unlike ingestion of a low-calorie sweetener, ingestion of sugar was associated with significant dopamine effluxes in the dorsal striatum, with glucose infusions into the duodenum inducing greater striatal dopamine release than equivalent jejunal infusions. Consistently, optogenetic activation of dopamine-excitable cells of the dorsal striatum was sufficient to restore maladaptive sweet appetite in sated DJB mice. Our findings point to a causal link between striatal dopamine signaling and the outcomes of bariatric interventions.

  2. Striatal Dopamine Links Gastrointestinal Rerouting to Altered Sweet Appetite

    PubMed Central

    Han, Wenfei; Tellez, Luis A; Niu, Jingjing; Medina, Sara; Ferreira, Tatiana L; Zhang, Xiaobing; Su, Jiansheng; Tong, Jenny; Schwartz, Gary J; van den Pol, Anthony; de Araujo, Ivan E

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in calorie intake contribute significantly to the positive outcome of bariatric surgeries. However, the physiological mechanisms linking the rerouting of the gastrointestinal tract to reductions in sugar cravings remain uncertain. We show that a duodenal-jejunal bypass (DJB) intervention inhibits maladaptive sweet appetite by acting on dopamine-responsive striatal circuitries. DJB disrupted the ability of recurrent sugar exposure to promote sweet appetite in sated animals, thereby revealing a link between recurrent duodenal sugar influx and maladaptive sweet intake. Unlike ingestion of a low-calorie sweetener, ingestion of sugar was associated with significant dopamine effluxes in dorsal striatum, with glucose infusions into the duodenum inducing greater striatal dopamine release than equivalent jejunal infusions. Consistently, optogenetic activation of dopamine-excitable cells of dorsal striatum was sufficient to restore maladaptive sweet appetite in sated DJB mice. Our findings point to a causal link between striatal dopamine signaling and the outcomes of bariatric interventions. PMID:26698915

  3. Cortical regulation of dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Neely, M D; Schmidt, D E; Deutch, A Y

    2007-10-26

    The proximate cause of Parkinson's disease is striatal dopamine depletion. Although no overt toxicity to striatal neurons has been reported in Parkinson's disease, one of the consequences of striatal dopamine loss is a decrease in the number of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Dendrites of these neurons receive cortical glutamatergic inputs onto the dendritic spine head and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra onto the spine neck. This synaptic arrangement suggests that dopamine gates corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto spines. Using triple organotypic slice cultures composed of ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and cortex of the neonatal rat, we examined the role of the cortex in dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in MSNs. The striatal dopamine innervation was lesioned by treatment of the cultures with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or by removing the mesencephalon. Both MPP+ and mesencephalic ablation decreased MSN dendritic spine density. Analysis of spine morphology revealed that thin spines were preferentially lost after dopamine depletion. Removal of the cortex completely prevented dopamine depletion-induced spine loss. These data indicate that the dendritic remodeling of MSNs seen in parkinsonism occurs secondary to increases in corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, and suggest that modulation of cortical activity may be a useful therapeutic strategy in Parkinson's disease.

  4. Cortical Regulation of Dopamine Depletion-Induced Dendritic Spine Loss in Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Neely, M. Diana; Schmidt, Dennis E.; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2007-01-01

    The proximate cause of Parkinson’s Disease is striatal dopamine depletion. Although no overt toxicity to striatal neurons has been reported in Parkinson’s Disease, one of the consequences of striatal dopamine loss is a decrease in the number of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Dendrites of these neurons receive cortical glutamatergic inputs onto the dendritic spine head and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra onto the spine neck. This synaptic arrangement suggests that dopamine gates corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto spines. Using triple organotypic slice cultures comprised of ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and cortex, we examined the role of the cortex in dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in MSNs. The striatal dopamine innervation was lesioned by treatment of the cultures with the dopaminergic neurotoxin MPP+ or by removing the mesencephalon. Both MPP+ and mesencephalic ablation decreased MSN dendritic spine density. Analysis of spine morphology revealed that thin spines were preferentially lost after dopamine depletion. Removal of the cortex completely prevented dopamine depletion-induced spine loss. These data indicate that the dendritic remodeling of MSNs seen in parkinsonism occurs secondary to increases in corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, and suggest that modulation of cortical activity may be a useful therapeutic strategy in Parkinson’s Disease. PMID:17888581

  5. Does human presynaptic striatal dopamine function predict social conformity?

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Benecke, Aaf; Puraite, Julita; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Shotbolt, Paul; Reeves, Suzanne J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver; Egerton, Alice

    2014-03-01

    Socially desirable responding (SDR) is a personality trait which reflects either a tendency to present oneself in an overly positive manner to others, consistent with social conformity (impression management (IM)), or the tendency to view one's own behaviour in an overly positive light (self-deceptive enhancement (SDE)). Neurochemical imaging studies report an inverse relationship between SDR and dorsal striatal dopamine D₂/₃ receptor availability. This may reflect an association between SDR and D₂/₃ receptor expression, synaptic dopamine levels or a combination of the two. In this study, we used a [¹⁸F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET) image database to investigate whether SDR is associated with presynaptic dopamine function. Striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA uptake, (k(i)(cer), min⁻¹), was determined in two independent healthy participant cohorts (n=27 and 19), by Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. SDR was assessed using the revised Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ-R) Lie scale, and IM and SDE were measured using the Paulhus Deception Scales. No significant associations were detected between Lie, SDE or IM scores and striatal [¹⁸F]-DOPA k(i)(cer). These results indicate that presynaptic striatal dopamine function is not associated with social conformity and suggests that social conformity may be associated with striatal D₂/₃ receptor expression rather than with synaptic dopamine levels.

  6. Adversity in childhood linked to elevated striatal dopamine function in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Alice; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Howes, Oliver D; Day, Fern; Chaddock, Christopher A; Allen, Paul; Winton-Brown, Toby T; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Chilcott, Jack; Lappin, Julia M; Murray, Robin M; McGuire, Philip

    2016-10-01

    Childhood adversity increases the risk of psychosis in adulthood. Theoretical and animal models suggest that this effect may be mediated by increased striatal dopamine neurotransmission. The primary objective of this study was to examine the relationship between adversity in childhood and striatal dopamine function in early adulthood. Secondary objectives were to compare exposure to childhood adversity and striatal dopamine function in young people at ultra high risk (UHR) of psychosis and healthy volunteers. Sixty-seven young adults, comprising 47 individuals at UHR for psychosis and 20 healthy volunteers were recruited from the same geographic area and were matched for age, gender and substance use. Presynaptic dopamine function in the associative striatum was assessed using 18F-DOPA positron emission tomography. Childhood adversity was assessed using the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse questionnaire. Within the sample as a whole, both severe physical or sexual abuse (T63=2.92; P=0.005), and unstable family arrangements (T57=2.80; P=0.007) in childhood were associated with elevated dopamine function in the associative striatum in adulthood. Comparison of the UHR and volunteer subgroups revealed similar incidence of childhood adverse experiences, and there was no significant group difference in dopamine function. This study provides evidence that childhood adversity is linked to elevated striatal dopamine function in adulthood.

  7. Dopamine depletion alters phosphorylation of striatal proteins in a model of Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Brown, Abigail M; Deutch, Ariel Y; Colbran, Roger J

    2005-07-01

    Nigrostriatal dopamine depletion disrupts striatal medium spiny neuron morphology in Parkinson's disease and modulates striatal synaptic plasticity in animal models of parkinsonism. We demonstrate that long-term nigrostriatal dopamine depletion in the rat induces evolving changes in the phosphorylation of striatal proteins critical for synaptic plasticity. Dopamine depletion increased the phosphorylation of the alpha isoform of calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKIIalpha) at Thr286, a site associated with enhanced autonomous kinase activity, but did not alter total levels of CaMKIIalpha or other synaptic proteins. Dopamine depletion decreased CaMKIIalpha levels in postsynaptic density-enriched fractions without significant changes in other proteins. The activity of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), a postsynaptic phosphatase that dephosphorylates CaMKII, is regulated by DARPP-32 (dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa). Dopamine depletion had no effect on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr34, but increased DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr75. Levodopa administration reversed the increased phosphorylation of both CaMKIIalpha and DARPP-32. Normal ageing increased the levels of PP1(gamma1 isoform) but decreased levels of the PP1gamma1-targeting proteins spinophilin and neurabin. Elevated phosphorylations of CaMKIIalpha and DARPP-32 were maintained for up to 20 months after dopamine depletion. However, phosphorylation of the CaMKII-PP1 substrate, Ser831 in the glutamate receptor GluR1 subunit, was increased only after sustained (9-20 months) dopamine depletion. Interaction of ageing-related changes in PP1 with the dopamine depletion-induced changes in CaMKIIalpha may account for enhanced GluR1 phosphorylation only after long-term dopamine depletion. These evolving changes may impact striatal synaptic plasticity, Parkinson's disease progression and the changing efficacy and side-effects associated with dopamine replacement therapy.

  8. Relationship of striatal dopamine synthesis capacity to age and cognition.

    PubMed

    Braskie, Meredith N; Wilcox, Claire E; Landau, Susan M; O'Neil, James P; Baker, Suzanne L; Madison, Cindee M; Kluth, Jennifer T; Jagust, William J

    2008-12-24

    Past research has demonstrated that performance on frontal lobe-dependent tasks is associated with dopamine system integrity and that various dopamine system deficits occur with aging. The positron emission tomography (PET) radiotracer 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FMT) is a substrate of the dopamine-synthesizing enzyme, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). Studies using 6-[(18)F]fluorodopa (FDOPA) (another AADC substrate) to measure how striatal PET signal and age relate have had inconsistent outcomes. The varying results occur in part from tracer processing that renders FDOPA signal subject to aspects of postrelease metabolism, which may themselves change with aging. In contrast, FMT remains a purer measure of AADC function. We used partial volume-corrected FMT PET scans to measure age-related striatal dopamine synthesis capacity in 21 older (mean, 66.9) and 16 younger (mean, 22.8) healthy adults. We also investigated how striatal FMT signal related to a cognitive measure of frontal lobe function. Older adults showed significantly greater striatal FMT signal than younger adults. Within the older group, FMT signal in dorsal caudate (DCA) and dorsal putamen was greater with age, suggesting compensation for deficits elsewhere in the dopamine system. In younger adults, FMT signal in DCA was lower with age, likely related to ongoing developmental processes. Younger adults who performed worse on tests of frontal lobe function showed greater FMT signal in right DCA, independent of age effects. Our data suggest that higher striatal FMT signal represents nonoptimal dopamine processing. They further support a relationship between striatal dopamine processing and frontal lobe cognitive function.

  9. SCH 23390 may alter dopamine-mediated motor behaviour via striatal D-1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Boyce, S; Kelly, E; Davis, A; Fleminger, S; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1985-05-15

    SCH 23390 potently displaced the specific binding of 3H-piflutixol to D-1 sites in striatal membranes but haloperidol was only weakly effective. SCH 23390 weakly displaced specific 3H-spiperone binding to D-2 sites, but haloperidol was potent. SCH 23390 was more effective than haloperidol in inhibiting dopamine stimulated striatal adenylate cyclase activity. These results confirm the D-1 selectivity of SCH 23390. However, SCH 23390 inhibited apomorphine-induced stereotypy and climbing behaviour in rats with equal potency to haloperidol. Haloperidol dose-dependently increased striatal HVA and DOPAC concentrations without altering dopamine content. Low doses of SCH 23390 elevated striatal DOPAC concentrations but higher doses were without effect; striatal dopamine and HVA overall was unaffected by administration of SCH 23390. Haloperidol did not affect basal 3H-acetylcholine release from striatal slices but reversed the apomorphine-induced inhibition of 3H-acetylcholine release. SCH 23390 did not affect basal 3H-acetylcholine release nor did it reverse the apomorphine-induced inhibition of 3H-acetylcholine release. The ability of SCH 23390 to inhibit motor behaviour in the rat may be due to its action on D-1 receptors since the drug does not cause typical changes in parameters of striatal D-2 receptor function.

  10. The effect of striatal dopamine depletion on striatal and cortical glutamate: A mini-review

    PubMed Central

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Gerretsen, Philip; Chung, Jun Ku; Iwata, Yusuke; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the interplay between the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the striatum has become the highlight of several theories of neuropsychiatric illnesses, such as schizophrenia. Using in vivo brain imaging in humans, alterations in dopamine and glutamate concentrations have been observed in several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, it is unclear a priori how alterations in striatal dopamine should modulate glutamate concentrations in the basal ganglia. In this selective mini-review, we examine the consequence of reducing striatal dopamine functioning on glutamate concentrations in the striatum and cortex; regions of interest heavily examined in the human brain imaging studies. We examine the predictions of the classical model of the basal ganglia, and contrast it with findings in humans and animals. The review concludes that chronic dopamine depletion (>4 months) produces decreases in striatal glutamate levels which are consistent with the classical model of the basal ganglia. However, acute alterations in striatal dopamine functioning, specifically at the D2 receptors, may produce opposite affects. This has important implications for models of the basal ganglia and theorizing about neurochemical alterations in neuropsychiatric diseases. Moreover, these findings may help guide a priori hypotheses for 1H-MRS studies measuring glutamate changes given alterations in dopaminergic functioning in humans. PMID:26334687

  11. The tumor suppressor PTEN regulates motor responses to striatal dopamine in normal and Parkinsonian animals.

    PubMed

    Stavarache, Mihaela A; Musatov, Sergei; McGill, Marlon; Vernov, Mary; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Phosphatase and Tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a dual lipid-protein phosphatase known primarily as a growth preventing tumor suppressor. PTEN is also expressed in neurons, and pathways modulated by PTEN can influence neuronal function. Here we report a novel function of PTEN as a regulator of striatal dopamine signaling in a model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Blocking PTEN expression with an adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector expressing a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) resulted in reduced responses of cultured striatal neurons to dopamine, which appeared to be largely due to reduction in D2 receptor activation. Co-expression of shRNA-resistant wild-type and mutant forms of PTEN indicated that the lipid-phosphatase activity was essential for this effect. In both normal and Parkinsonian rats, inhibition of striatal PTEN in vivo resulted in motor dysfunction and impaired responses to dopamine, particularly D2 receptor agonists. Expression of PTEN mutants confirmed the lipid-phosphatase activity as critical, while co-expression of a dominant-negative form of Akt overcame the PTEN shRNA effect. These results identify PTEN as a key mediator of striatal responses to dopamine, and suggest that drugs designed to potentiate PTEN expression or activity, such as cancer chemotherapeutics, may also be useful for improving striatal responses to dopamine in conditions of dopamine depletion such as PD. This also suggests that strategies which increase Akt or decrease PTEN expression or function, such as growth factors to prevent neuronal death, may have a paradoxical effect on neurological functioning by inhibiting striatal responses to dopamine.

  12. Plasmalogen Augmentation Reverses Striatal Dopamine Loss in MPTP Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miville-Godbout, Edith; Bourque, Mélanie; Morissette, Marc; Al-Sweidi, Sara; Smith, Tara; Mochizuki, Asuka; Senanayake, Vijitha; Jayasinghe, Dushmanthi; Wang, Li; Goodenowe, Dayan; Di Paolo, Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Plasmalogens are a class of glycerophospholipids shown to play critical roles in membrane structure and function. Decreased plasmalogens are reported in the brain and blood of Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients. The present study investigated the hypothesis that augmenting plasmalogens could protect striatal dopamine neurons that degenerate in response to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) treatment in mice, a PD model. First, in a pre-treatment experiment male mice were treated for 10 days with the docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-plasmalogen precursor PPI-1011 (10, 50 and 200 mg/kg). On day 5 mice received MPTP and were killed on day 11. Next, in a post-treatment study, male mice were treated with MPTP and then received daily for 5 days PPI-1011 (5, 10 and 50 mg/kg). MPTP treatment reduced serum plasmalogen levels, striatal contents of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, serotonin, DA transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2). Pre-treatment with PPI-1011 (10 and 50 mg/kg) prevented all MPTP-induced effects. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding. Post-treatment with PPI-1011 prevented all MPTP-induced effects at 50 mg/kg but not at lower doses. Positive correlations were measured between striatal DA contents and serum plasmalogen levels as well as striatal DAT and VMAT2 specific binding in the post-treatment experiment. PPI-1011 treatment (10 days at 5, 10 and 50 mg/kg) of intact mice left unchanged striatal biogenic amine contents. These data demonstrate that treatment with a plasmalogen precursor is capable of protecting striatal dopamine markers in an animal model of PD. PMID:26959819

  13. Dopamine-Dependent Tuning of Striatal Inhibitory Synaptogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Goffin, Darren; Ali, Afia B.; Rampersaud, Nazir; Harkavyi, Alexander; Fuchs, Celine; Whitton, Peter S.; Nairn, Angus C.

    2010-01-01

    Dopaminergic projections to the striatum, crucial for the correct functioning of this brain region in adulthood, are known to be established early in development, but their role is currently uncharacterized. We demonstrate here that dopamine, by activating D1- and/or D2-dopamine receptors, decreases the number of functional GABAergic synapses formed between the embryonic precursors of the medium spiny neurons, the principal output neurons of the striatum, with associated changes in spontaneous synaptic activity. Activation of these receptors reduces the size of postsynaptic GABAA receptor clusters and their overall cell-surface expression, without affecting the total number of clusters or the size or number of GABAergic nerve terminals. These changes result from an increased internalization of GABAA receptors, and are mediated by distinct signaling pathways converging at the level of GABAA receptors to cause a transient PP2A/PP1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, tonic D1- and D2-receptor activity limits the extent of collateral inhibitory synaptogenesis between medium spiny neurons, revealing a novel role of dopamine in controlling the development of intrinsic striatal microcircuits. PMID:20181591

  14. Striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate methamphetamine-induced cortical Fos expression

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Noah B.; Marshall, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that increases extracellular levels of monoamines throughout the brain. It has previously been observed that a single injection of mAMPH increases immediate early gene (IEG) expression in both the striatum and cerebral cortex. Moreover, this effect is modulated by dopamine and glutamate receptors since systemic administration of dopamine or glutamate antagonists has been found to alter mAMPH-induced striatal and cortical IEG expression. However, because dopamine and glutamate receptors are found in extra-striatal as well as striatal brain regions, studies employing systemic injection of dopamine or glutamate antagonists fail to localize the effects of mAMPH-induced activation. In the present experiments, the roles of striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors in mAMPH-induced gene expression in the striatum and cerebral cortex were examined. The nuclear expression of Fos, the protein product of the IEG c-fos, was quantified in both the striatum and the cortex of animals receiving intrastriatal dopamine or glutamate antagonist administration. Intrastriatal infusion of dopamine (D1 or D2) or glutamate [N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)] antagonists affected not only mAMPH-induced striatal, but also cortical, Fos expression. Overall, the effects of the antagonists occurred dose-dependently, in both the infused and non-infused hemispheres, with greater influences occurring in the infused hemisphere. Finally, unilateral intrastriatal infusion of dopamine or glutamate antagonists changed the behavior of the rats from characteristic mAMPH-induced stereotypy to rotation ipsilateral to the infusion. These results demonstrate that mAMPH’s actions on striatal dopamine and glutamate receptors modulate the widespread cortical activation induced by mAMPH. It is hypothesized that dopamine release from nigrostriatal terminals modulates activity within striatal

  15. Release of taurine, GABA and dopamine from rat striatal slices: mutual interactions and developmental aspects.

    PubMed

    Kontro, P; Oja, S S

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous and potassium-stimulated release of preloaded taurine and GABA from striatal slices of adult and 7-day-old rats were studied using a superfusion system. Particular attention was paid to mutual interactions of taurine and GABA with dopamine in the release processes. Potassium stimulation (50 mM) enhanced taurine release more in the immature than in the adult striatum, whereas the response was the opposite with GABA release. Spontaneous taurine efflux was increased by dopamine and apomorphine, whereas stimulated release was suppressed by these agents in both age groups. This dopamine effect was partially antagonized by haloperidol, suggesting that dopaminergic systems were able to modify taurine release, possibly via dopaminergic receptors. Dopamine and apomorphine had similar but more inconsistent effects on striatal GABA release, which were not, however, mediated through conventional dopamine receptors. Stimulation with 25 mM K+ caused an 11-fold increase in striatal dopamine release: this effect was potentiated by taurine, while the actions of GABA on dopamine release were variable.

  16. Evidence that somatostatin sst2 receptors mediate striatal dopamine release

    PubMed Central

    Hathway, G J; Humphrey, P P A; Kendrick, K M

    1999-01-01

    Somatostatin (SRIF) is a cyclic tetradecapeptide present in medium-sized aspiny interneurones in the rat striatum. We have previously shown that exogenous SRIF potently stimulates striatal dopamine (DA) release via a glutamate-dependent mechanism. We now report the ability of the selective sst2 receptor agonist, BIM-23027, to mimic this effect of SRIF.In vivo microdialysis studies were performed in anaesthetized male Wistar rats. In most experiments, compounds were administered by retrodialysis into the striatum for 15 min periods, 90 min and 225 min after sampling commenced, with levels of neurotransmitters being measured by HPLC with electrochemical and fluorescence detection.BIM-23027 (50 and 100 nM) stimulated DA release with extracellular levels increasing by up to 18 fold.Prior retrodialysis of BIM-23027 (50 nM) abolished the effects of subsequent administration of SRIF (100 nM).The agonist effects of both BIM-23027 and SRIF were abolished by the selective sst2 receptor antagonist, L-Tyr8-CYN-154806 (100 nM).The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist, DNQX (100 μM), abolished the agonist effects of BIM-23027 as previously shown for SRIF.This study provides evidence that the sst2 receptor mediates the potent dopamine-releasing actions observed with SRIF in the rat striatum. Dopamine release evoked by both peptides appears to be mediated indirectly via a glutamatergic pathway. Other subtype-specific somatostatin receptor ligands were unable to elicit any effects and therefore we conclude that no other somatostatin receptor types are involved in mediating the dopamine-releasing actions of SRIF in the striatum. PMID:10578151

  17. Striatal dopamine, reward, and decision making in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Elevated striatal dopamine function is one of the best-established findings in schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss causes and consequences of this striata! dopamine alteration. We first summarize earlier findings regarding striatal reward processing and anticipation using functional neuroimaging. Secondly, we present a series of recent studies that are exemplary for a particular research approach: a combination of theory-driven reinforcement learning and decision-making tasks in combination with computational modeling and functional neuroimaging. We discuss why this approach represents a promising tool to understand underlying mechanisms of symptom dimensions by dissecting the contribution of multiple behavioral control systems working in parallel. We also discuss how it can advance our understanding of the neurobiological implementation of such functions. Thirdly, we review evidence regarding the topography of dopamine dysfunction within the striatum. Finally, we present conclusions and outline important aspects to be considered in future studies. PMID:27069382

  18. Striatal dopamine, reward, and decision making in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Lorenz; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Heinz, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Elevated striatal dopamine function is one of the best-established findings in schizophrenia. In this review, we discuss causes and consequences of this striata! dopamine alteration. We first summarize earlier findings regarding striatal reward processing and anticipation using functional neuroimaging. Secondly, we present a series of recent studies that are exemplary for a particular research approach: a combination of theory-driven reinforcement learning and decision-making tasks in combination with computational modeling and functional neuroimaging. We discuss why this approach represents a promising tool to understand underlying mechanisms of symptom dimensions by dissecting the contribution of multiple behavioral control systems working in parallel. We also discuss how it can advance our understanding of the neurobiological implementation of such functions. Thirdly, we review evidence regarding the topography of dopamine dysfunction within the striatum. Finally, we present conclusions and outline important aspects to be considered in future studies.

  19. Dorsal striatal dopamine, food preference and health perception in humans.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Deanna L; Aarts, Esther; Dang, Linh C; Greer, Stephanie M; Jagust, William J; D'Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [(18)F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related decision-making, as well as body mass index (BMI) in 16 healthy-weight to moderately obese individuals. We find that lower PET FMT dopamine synthesis binding potential correlates with higher BMI, greater preference for perceived "healthy" foods, but also greater healthiness ratings for food items. These findings further substantiate the role of dorsal striatal dopamine in food-related behaviors and shed light on the complexity of individual differences in food preference.

  20. Dorsal Striatal Dopamine, Food Preference and Health Perception in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Deanna L.; Aarts, Esther; Dang, Linh C.; Greer, Stephanie M.; Jagust, William J.; D′Esposito, Mark

    2014-01-01

    To date, few studies have explored the neurochemical mechanisms supporting individual differences in food preference in humans. Here we investigate how dorsal striatal dopamine, as measured by the positron emission tomography (PET) tracer [18F]fluorometatyrosine (FMT), correlates with food-related decision-making, as well as body mass index (BMI) in 16 healthy-weight to moderately obese individuals. We find that lower PET FMT dopamine synthesis binding potential correlates with higher BMI, greater preference for perceived “healthy” foods, but also greater healthiness ratings for food items. These findings further substantiate the role of dorsal striatal dopamine in food-related behaviors and shed light on the complexity of individual differences in food preference. PMID:24806534

  1. Establishing the dopamine dependency of human striatal signals during reward and punishment reversal learning.

    PubMed

    van der Schaaf, Marieke E; van Schouwenburg, Martine R; Geurts, Dirk E M; Schellekens, Arnt F A; Buitelaar, Jan K; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2014-03-01

    Drugs that alter dopamine transmission have opposite effects on reward and punishment learning. These opposite effects have been suggested to depend on dopamine in the striatum. Here, we establish for the first time the neurochemical specificity of such drug effects, during reward and punishment learning in humans, by adopting a coadministration design. Participants (N = 22) were scanned on 4 occasions using functional magnetic resonance imaging, following intake of placebo, bromocriptine (dopamine-receptor agonist), sulpiride (dopamine-receptor antagonist), or a combination of both drugs. A reversal-learning task was employed, in which both unexpected rewards and punishments signaled reversals. Drug effects were stratified with baseline working memory to take into account individual variations in drug response. Sulpiride induced parallel span-dependent changes on striatal blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal during unexpected rewards and punishments. These drug effects were found to be partially dopamine-dependent, as they were blocked by coadministration with bromocriptine. In contrast, sulpiride elicited opposite effects on behavioral measures of reward and punishment learning. Moreover, sulpiride-induced increases in striatal BOLD signal during both outcomes were associated with behavioral improvement in reward versus punishment learning. These results provide a strong support for current theories, suggesting that drug effects on reward and punishment learning are mediated via striatal dopamine.

  2. Striatal Dopamine and the Interface between Motivation and Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Aarts, Esther; van Holstein, Mieke; Cools, Roshan

    2011-01-01

    Brain dopamine has long been known to be implicated in the domains of appetitive motivation and cognition. Recent work indicates that dopamine also plays a role in the interaction between appetitive motivation and cognition. Here we review this work. Animal work has revealed an arrangement of spiraling connections between the midbrain and the striatum that subserves a mechanism by which dopamine can direct information flow from ventromedial to more dorsal regions in the striatum. In line with current knowledge about dopamine's effects on cognition, we hypothesize that these striato-nigro-striatal connections provide the basis for functionally specific effects of appetitive motivation on cognition. One implication of this hypothesis is that appetitive motivation can induce cognitive improvement or impairment depending on task demands. PMID:21808629

  3. Distinctive striatal dopamine signaling after dieting and gastric bypass.

    PubMed

    Hankir, Mohammed K; Ashrafian, Hutan; Hesse, Swen; Horstmann, Annette; Fenske, Wiebke K

    2015-05-01

    Highly palatable and/or calorically dense foods, such as those rich in fat, engage the striatum to govern and set complex behaviors. Striatal dopamine signaling has been implicated in hedonic feeding and the development of obesity. Dieting and bariatric surgery have markedly different outcomes on weight loss, yet how these interventions affect central homeostatic and food reward processing remains poorly understood. Here, we propose that dieting and gastric bypass produce distinct changes in peripheral factors with known roles in regulating energy homeostasis, resulting in differential modulation of nigrostriatal and mesolimbic dopaminergic reward circuits. Enhancement of intestinal fat metabolism after gastric bypass may also modify striatal dopamine signaling contributing to its unique long-term effects on feeding behavior and body weight in obese individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ventral striatal dopamine modulation of different forms of behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Haluk, Desirae M; Floresco, Stan B

    2009-07-01

    Different forms of behavioral flexibility are facilitated by interactions between separate regions of the prefrontal cortex and their striatal outputs. However, the contribution of ventral striatal dopamine (DA) to these functions is unclear. The present study assessed the involvement of DA receptors in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core on either between- or within-strategy shifts using operant chamber-based tasks. Strategy set-shifting required rats initially to learn a visual-cue discrimination and, on the following day, shift to using an egocentric spatial response strategy to obtain reward. For reversal learning, rats were initially trained on a response discrimination and then required to select the opposite lever to receive food reward. Intra-NAc microinfusions of D(1) (SCH23390) but not D(2) (eticlopride) receptor antagonists impaired set-shifting, disrupting the maintenance of a new strategy. Conversely, supranormal activation of D(2) (quinpirole) but not D(1) (SKF81297) receptors also impaired set-shifting, inducing perseverative deficits. However, only infusions of the D(2) agonist impaired reversal learning, but did so without disrupting initial response learning. Thus, mesoaccumbens DA, acting on D(1) receptors, selectively facilitates complex forms of flexibility requiring shifts between different strategies, but does not appear to contribute to simpler forms of flexibility entailing shifts of specific stimulus-reward associations. In contrast, abnormal increases in D(2) receptor activity cause a more general impairment in behavioral flexibility. These findings suggest that deficits in these forms of executive functioning observed in disorders linked to dysfunction of the DA system may be attributable in part to aberrant increases or decreases in mesoaccumbens DA activity.

  5. Chronic nicotine administration in the drinking water affects the striatal dopamine in mice.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, K; Ahtee, L

    2000-05-01

    Although tobacco contains a large variety of substances, its addictive properties are most probably due to the reinforcing actions of nicotine that motivates continued tobacco use. Animals and humans self-administer nicotine, a response that appears to involve the mesolimbic dopamine system and to be common to other abused drugs. The present article reviews animal models to administer nicotine chronically. We also describe a new animal model in which nicotine is given to mice in drinking water as their sole source of fluid. This treatment produced nicotine plasma concentrations comparable to or above those found in smokers. We found that mice withdrawn from nicotine were tolerant to the effects of nicotine challenge on striatal dopamine metabolism as well as on body temperature and locomotor activity. Furthermore, 3H-nicotine binding in the cortex and midbrain was significantly increased in mice withdrawn from nicotine. The last part of the article will focus on the effects of this chronic nicotine treatment on striatal dopamine. Dopamine and its metabolites and locomotor activity were increased in the forenoon in mice still drinking nicotine solutions. We also report recent data in which chronic nicotine administration in the drinking water enhanced the effect of dopamine receptor agonist, quinpirole, on striatal metabolism. The animal model described appears to be a relevant method for studying the mechanisms that are thought to be involved in nicotine dependence.

  6. Striatal dopamine type 2 receptor availability in anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Broft, Allegra; Slifstein, Mark; Osborne, Joseph; Kothari, Paresh; Morim, Simon; Shingleton, Rebecca; Kenney, Lindsay; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Attia, Evelyn; Martinez, Diana; Walsh, B. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The neurobiology of anorexia nervosa remains incompletely understood. Here we utilized PET imaging with the radiotracer [11C]raclopride to measure striatal dopamine type 2 (D2) receptor availability in patients with anorexia nervosa. 25 women with anorexia nervosa who were receiving treatment in an inpatient program participated, as well as 25 control subjects. Patients were scanned up to two times with the PET tracer [11C]raclopride: once while underweight, and once upon weight restoration. Control subjects underwent one PET scan. In the primary analyses, there were no significant differences between underweight patients (n=21) and control subjects (n=25) in striatal D2 receptor binding potential. Analysis of subregions (sensorimotor striatum, associative striatum, limbic striatum) did not reveal differences between groups. In patients completing both scans (n=15), there were no detectable changes in striatal D2 receptor binding potential after weight restoration. In this sample, there were no differences in striatal D2 receptor binding potential between patients with anorexia nervosa and control subjects. Weight restoration was not associated with a change in striatal D2 receptor binding. These findings suggest that disturbances in reward processing in this disorder are not attributable to abnormal D2 receptor characteristics, and that other reward-related neural targets may be of greater relevance. PMID:26272038

  7. Striatal dopamine type 2 receptor availability in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Broft, Allegra; Slifstein, Mark; Osborne, Joseph; Kothari, Paresh; Morim, Simon; Shingleton, Rebecca; Kenney, Lindsay; Vallabhajosula, Shankar; Attia, Evelyn; Martinez, Diana; Timothy Walsh, B

    2015-09-30

    The neurobiology of anorexia nervosa remains incompletely understood. Here we utilized PET imaging with the radiotracer [(11)C]raclopride to measure striatal dopamine type 2 (D2) receptor availability in patients with anorexia nervosa. 25 women with anorexia nervosa who were receiving treatment in an inpatient program participated, as well as 25 control subjects. Patients were scanned up to two times with the PET tracer [(11)C]raclopride: once while underweight, and once upon weight restoration. Control subjects underwent one PET scan. In the primary analyses, there were no significant differences between underweight patients (n=21) and control subjects (n=25) in striatal D2 receptor binding potential. Analysis of subregions (sensorimotor striatum, associative striatum, limbic striatum) did not reveal differences between groups. In patients completing both scans (n=15), there were no detectable changes in striatal D2 receptor binding potential after weight restoration. In this sample, there were no differences in striatal D2 receptor binding potential between patients with anorexia nervosa and control subjects. Weight restoration was not associated with a change in striatal D2 receptor binding. These findings suggest that disturbances in reward processing in this disorder are not attributable to abnormal D2 receptor characteristics, and that other reward-related neural targets may be of greater relevance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Dopamine Promotes Striatal Neuronal Apoptotic Death via ERK Signaling Cascades

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jun; Rusnak, Milan; Lombroso, Paul J.; Sidhu, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Although the mechanisms underlying striatal neurodegeneration are poorly understood, we have shown that striatal pathogenesis may be initiated by high synaptic levels of extracellular dopamine (DA). Here we investigated in rat striatal primary neurons the mobilization of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways after treatment with DA. Instead of observing an elevation of the archetypical pro-cytotoxic MAPKs, p-JNK and p-p38 MAPK, we found that DA, acting through D1 DA receptors, induced a sustained stimulation of the phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) via a cAMP/PKA/Rap1/B-Raf/MEK pathway. Blockade of D2 DA receptors, β-adrenergic receptors or NMDA receptors with receptor-specific antagonists had no significant effect on this process. Activation of D1 DA receptors and PKA by DA caused phosphorylation and inactivation of the striatal–enriched tyrosine phosphatase (STEP), an important phosphatase for the dephosphorylation and subsequent inactivation of p-ERK in striatum. Interestingly p-ERK was primarily retained in the cytoplasm, with only low amounts translocated to the nucleus. The scaffold protein β-arrestin2 interacted with both p-ERK and D1 DA receptor, triggering the cytosolic retention of p-ERK and inducing striatal neuronal apoptotic death. These data provide unique insight into a novel role of p-ERK in striatal neurodegeneration. PMID:19200235

  9. New Repeat Polymorphism in the AKT1 Gene Predicts Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability and Stimulant-Induced Dopamine Release in the Healthy Human Brain.

    PubMed

    Shumay, Elena; Wiers, Corinde E; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Kim, Sung Won; Hodgkinson, Colin A; Sun, Hui; Tomasi, Dardo; Wong, Christopher T; Weinberger, Daniel R; Wang, Gene-Jack; Fowler, Joanna S; Volkow, Nora D

    2017-05-10

    The role of the protein kinase Akt1 in dopamine neurotransmission is well recognized and has been implicated in schizophrenia and psychosis. However, the extent to which variants in the AKT1 gene influence dopamine neurotransmission is not well understood. Here we investigated the effect of a newly characterized variant number tandem repeat (VNTR) polymorphism in AKT1 [major alleles: L- (eight repeats) and H- (nine repeats)] on striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (DRD2) availability and on dopamine release in healthy volunteers. We used PET and [(11)C]raclopride to assess baseline DRD2 availability in 91 participants. In 54 of these participants, we also measured intravenous methylphenidate-induced dopamine release to measure dopamine release. Dopamine release was quantified as the difference in specific binding of [(11)C]raclopride (nondisplaceable binding potential) between baseline values and values following methylphenidate injection. There was an effect of AKT1 genotype on DRD2 availability at baseline for the caudate (F(2,90) = 8.2, p = 0.001) and putamen (F(2,90) = 6.6, p = 0.002), but not the ventral striatum (p = 0.3). For the caudate and putamen, LL showed higher DRD2 availability than HH; HL were in between. There was also a significant effect of AKT1 genotype on dopamine increases in the ventral striatum (F(2,53) = 5.3, p = 0.009), with increases being stronger in HH > HL > LL. However, no dopamine increases were observed in the caudate (p = 0.1) or putamen (p = 0.8) following methylphenidate injection. Our results provide evidence that the AKT1 gene modulates both striatal DRD2 availability and dopamine release in the human brain, which could account for its association with schizophrenia and psychosis. The clinical relevance of the newly characterized AKT1 VNTR merits investigation.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The AKT1 gene has been implicated in schizophrenia and psychosis. This association is likely to reflect modulation of dopamine signaling by Akt1 kinase

  10. Dopamine receptor agonists mediate neuroprotection in malonate-induced striatal lesion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Armentero, Marie-Thérèse; Fancellu, Roberto; Nappi, Giuseppe; Blandini, Fabio

    2002-12-01

    Mitochondrial bioenergetic defects are involved in neurological disorders associated with neuronal damage in the striatum, such as Huntington's disease and cerebral ischemia. The striatal release of neurotransmitters, in particular dopamine, may contribute to the development of the neuronal damage. Recent studies have shown that dopamine agonists may exert neuroprotective effects via multiple mechanisms, including modulation of dopamine release from nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals. In rats, intrastriatal injection of malonate, a reversible inhibitor of the mitochondrial enzyme succinate dehydrogenase, induces a lesion similar to that observed following focal ischemia or in Huntington's disease. In this study, we used the malonate model to explore the neuroprotective potential of dopamine agonists. Sprague-Dawley rats were injected systemically with increasing concentrations of D(1), D(2), or mixed D(1)/D(2) dopamine agonists prior to malonate intrastriatal insult. Administration of increasing doses of the D(2)-specific agonist quinpirole resulted in increased protection against malonate toxicity. Conversely, the D(1)-specific agonist SKF-38393, as well as the mixed D(1)/D(2) agonist apomorphine, conferred higher neuroprotection at lower than at higher concentrations. Our data suggest that malonate-induced striatal toxicity can be attenuated by systemic administration of dopamine agonists, with D(1) and D(2) agonists showing different profiles of efficacy.

  11. Phasic-like stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle augments striatal gene expression despite methamphetamine-induced partial dopamine denervation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Christopher D; Pastuzyn, Elissa D; Barker-Haliski, Melissa L; Garris, Paul A; Keefe, Kristen A

    2013-05-01

    Methamphetamine-induced partial dopamine depletions are associated with impaired basal ganglia function, including decreased preprotachykinin mRNA expression and impaired transcriptional activation of activity-regulated, cytoskeleton-associated (Arc) gene in striatum. Recent work implicates deficits in phasic dopamine signaling as a potential mechanism linking methamphetamine-induced dopamine loss to impaired basal ganglia function. This study thus sought to establish a causal link between phasic dopamine transmission and altered basal ganglia function by determining whether the deficits in striatal neuron gene expression could be restored by increasing phasic dopamine release. Three weeks after pretreatment with saline or a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine, rats underwent phasic- or tonic-like stimulation of ascending dopamine neurons. Striatal gene expression was examined using in situ hybridization histochemistry. Phasic-like, but not tonic-like, stimulation induced immediate-early genes Arc and zif268 in both groups, despite the partial striatal dopamine denervation in methamphetamine-pretreated rats, with the Arc expression occurring in presumed striatonigral efferent neurons. Phasic-like stimulation also restored preprotachykinin mRNA expression. These results suggest that disruption of phasic dopamine signaling likely underlies methamphetamine-induced impairments in basal ganglia function, and that restoring phasic dopamine signaling may be a viable approach to manage long-term consequences of methamphetamine-induced dopamine loss on basal ganglia functions. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Beer Flavor Provokes Striatal Dopamine Release in Male Drinkers: Mediation by Family History of Alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Dzemidzic, Mario; Tran, Stella M; Soeurt, Christina M; Albrecht, Daniel S; Yoder, Karmen K; Kareken, David A

    2013-01-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) is increased by virtually all drugs of abuse, including alcohol. However, drug-associated cues are also known to provoke striatal DA transmission- a phenomenon linked to the motivated behaviors associated with addiction. To our knowledge, no one has tested if alcohol's classically conditioned flavor cues, in the absence of a significant pharmacologic effect, are capable of eliciting striatal DA release in humans. Employing positron emission tomography (PET), we hypothesized that beer's flavor alone can reduce the binding potential (BP) of [11C]raclopride (RAC; a reflection of striatal DA release) in the ventral striatum, relative to an appetitive flavor control. Forty-nine men, ranging from social to heavy drinking, mean age 25, with a varied family history of alcoholism underwent two [11C]RAC PET scans: one while tasting beer, and one while tasting Gatorade. Relative to the control flavor of Gatorade, beer flavor significantly increased self-reported desire to drink, and reduced [11C]RAC BP, indicating that the alcohol-associated flavor cues induced DA release. BP reductions were strongest in subjects with first-degree alcoholic relatives. These results demonstrate that alcohol-conditioned flavor cues can provoke ventral striatal DA release, absent significant pharmacologic effects, and that the response is strongest in subjects with a greater genetic risk for alcoholism. Striatal DA responses to salient alcohol cues may thus be an inherited risk factor for alcoholism. PMID:23588036

  13. Beer flavor provokes striatal dopamine release in male drinkers: mediation by family history of alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Brandon G; Dzemidzic, Mario; Tran, Stella M; Soeurt, Christina M; Albrecht, Daniel S; Yoder, Karmen K; Kareken, David A

    2013-08-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) is increased by virtually all drugs of abuse, including alcohol. However, drug-associated cues are also known to provoke striatal DA transmission- a phenomenon linked to the motivated behaviors associated with addiction. To our knowledge, no one has tested if alcohol's classically conditioned flavor cues, in the absence of a significant pharmacologic effect, are capable of eliciting striatal DA release in humans. Employing positron emission tomography (PET), we hypothesized that beer's flavor alone can reduce the binding potential (BP) of [(11)C]raclopride (RAC; a reflection of striatal DA release) in the ventral striatum, relative to an appetitive flavor control. Forty-nine men, ranging from social to heavy drinking, mean age 25, with a varied family history of alcoholism underwent two [(11)C]RAC PET scans: one while tasting beer, and one while tasting Gatorade. Relative to the control flavor of Gatorade, beer flavor significantly increased self-reported desire to drink, and reduced [(11)C]RAC BP, indicating that the alcohol-associated flavor cues induced DA release. BP reductions were strongest in subjects with first-degree alcoholic relatives. These results demonstrate that alcohol-conditioned flavor cues can provoke ventral striatal DA release, absent significant pharmacologic effects, and that the response is strongest in subjects with a greater genetic risk for alcoholism. Striatal DA responses to salient alcohol cues may thus be an inherited risk factor for alcoholism.

  14. Endocannabinoid–Dopamine Interactions in Striatal Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Brian N.; Lovinger, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system is implicated in action control and learning. A large body of work has focused on the contribution of this system to modulation of the corticostriatal synapse, the predominant synapse type in the striatum. Signaling through the D2 dopamine receptor is necessary for endocannabinoid-mediated depression of corticostriatal glutamate release. Here we review the known details of this mechanism and discuss newly discovered signaling pathways interacting with this system that ultimately exert dynamic control of cortical input to the striatum and striatal output. This topic is timely with respect to Parkinson’s disease given recent data indicating changes in the striatal endocannabinoid system in patients with this disorder. PMID:22529814

  15. Dopamine and fronto-striatal networks in cognitive aging

    PubMed Central

    Klostermann, Ellen C.; Braskie, Meredith N.; Landau, Susan M.; O’Neil, James P.; Jagust, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have linked dopamine to differences in behavior and brain activity in normal individuals. We explored these relationships in older and younger adults by investigating how functional connectivity between the striatum and prefrontal cortex is related to caudate dopamine and verbal working memory task performance. We studied 12 young and 18 older participants with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during this task, and used positron emission tomography with the tracer 6-[18F]-fluoro-L-m-tyrosine (FMT) to assess dopamine synthesis capacity. Younger adults had a greater extent of frontal-caudate functional connectivity during the load-dependent delay period of the working memory task than the older participants. Across all subjects, the extent of this functional connectivity was negatively correlated with dopamine synthesis capacity, such that participants with the greatest connectivity had the lowest caudate FMT signal. Additionally, the extent of functional connectivity was positively correlated with working memory performance. Overall these data suggest interdependencies exist between fronto-striatal functional connectivity, dopamine, and working memory performance and that this system is functioning suboptimally in normal aging. PMID:21511369

  16. Effects of taurine, homotaurine and GABA on hypothalamic and striatal dopamine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Panula-Lehto, E; Mäkinen, M; Ahtee, L

    1992-07-01

    To elucidate the effects of taurine on hypothalamic and striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission we compared its effects to those of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and homotaurine (a GABAA-receptor agonist) on hypothalamic and striatal concentrations of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and, in the case of striatum, 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) in rats. In addition, hypothalamic and striatal 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) und 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, hypothalamic noradrenaline (NA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol sulfate, and pituitary DA concentrations were also measured. The amino acids were injected into the lateral brain ventricles of conscious male rats in doses of 10 and 36 mumol/rat, and rat were sacrificed 15 and 60 min later, respectively. Homotaurine (by 11%) but not the other two amino acids elevated striatal DA, whereas hypothalamic DA was increased by both taurine (36%) and homotaurine (31%). All three amino acids at 36 mumol elevated striatal DOPAC, homotaurine (51%) more than taurine (31%) or GABA (30%), and hypothalamic DOPAC, both taurine (102%) and homotaurine (82%) clearly more than GABA (34%). Neither striatal nor hypothalamic HVA was altered by any of the amino acids. At 10 mumol the amino acids decreased striatal 3-MT by about 40%. At 36 mumol taurine and homotaurine reduced 3-MT by about 70%, whereas increasing the dose of GABA did not further reduce 3-MT. Both taurine and homotaurine at 36 mumol decreased hypothalamic NA content. Neither hypothalamic nor striatal 5-HT metabolism was altered. In the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary gland taurine at 10 mumol but not at 36 mumol slightly (20%) increased DA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Orthostatic hypotension, non-dipping and striatal dopamine in Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yoon-Sang; Kim, Joong-Seok; Chung, Yong-An; You, Ie Ryung; Yang, Dong-Won; Chung, Sung-Woo; Park, Jeong-Wook; Kim, Yeong-In; Lee, Kwang-Soo

    2013-04-01

    Orthostatic hypotension and non-dipping are relatively common autonomic dysfunctions in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). These abnormalities have been thought to occur independently of striatal dopaminergic depletion; however, only little preliminary information is available. In this study, we investigated the association of neurocirculatory changes with striatal dopamine transporter status in 69 patients with early PD. Seventeen patients had orthostatic hypotension and 55 patients were non-dippers. A comparison between cases with and without orthostatic hypotension was insignificant for striatal dopamine transporter uptake. These insignificances continued in a comparison of dippers and non-dippers. These results suggest that sympathetic noradrenergic dysfunctions in PD are independent of striatal dopamine transporter depletion.

  18. Role of 6-monoacetylmorphine in the acute release of striatal dopamine induced by intravenous heroin.

    PubMed

    Gottås, A; Boix, F; Øiestad, E L; Vindenes, V; Mørland, J

    2014-09-01

    After injection, heroin is rapidly metabolized to 6-monoacetylmorphine (6-MAM) and further to morphine. As morphine has been shown to increase striatal dopamine, whereas 6-MAM has not been studied in this respect, we gave i.v. injections of 3 μmol 6-MAM, morphine or heroin to rats. Opioids were measured in blood, and dopamine and opioids in microdialysate from brain striatal extracellular fluid (ECF), by UPLC-MS/MS. After 6-MAM injection, 6-MAM ECF concentrations increased rapidly, and reached Cmax of 4.4 μM after 8 min. After heroin injection, 6-MAM increased rapidly in blood and reached Cmax of 6.4 μM in ECF after 8 min, while ECF Cmax for heroin was 1.2 μM after 2 min. T max for morphine in ECF was 29 and 24 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively, with corresponding Cmax levels of 1 and 2 μM. Dopamine levels peaked after 8 and 14 min following 6-MAM and heroin administration, respectively. The dopamine responses were equal, indicating no dopamine release by heroin per se. Furthermore, 6-MAM, and not morphine, appeared to mediate the early dopamine response, whereas morphine administration, giving rise to morphine ECF concentrations similar to those observed shortly after 6-MAM injection, did not increase ECF dopamine. 6-MAM appeared accordingly to be the substance responsible for the early increase in dopamine observed after heroin injection. As 6-MAM was formed rapidly from heroin in blood, and was the major substance reaching the brain after heroin administration, this also indicates that factors influencing blood 6-MAM concentrations might change the behavioural effects of heroin.

  19. Locally infused taurine, GABA and homotaurine alter differently the striatal extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Majasaari, M; Salimäki, J; Ahtee, L

    1998-01-01

    We studied in vivo the effects of locally infused taurine (50, 150, and 450 mM) on the striatal dopamine and its metabolites in comparison with those of GABA and homotaurine, a GABAA receptor agonist, in freely moving rats. The extracellular dopamine concentration was elevated maximally 2.5-, 2- and 4-fold by taurine, GABA and homotaurine, respectively. At 150 mM concentration, at which the maximum effects occurred, homotaurine increased the extracellular dopamine more than taurine or GABA. When taurine and GABA were infused simultaneously with tetrodotoxin the output of dopamine did not differ from that in the presence of tetrodotoxin alone. In comparison, tetrodotoxin did not inhibit the increase in extracellular dopamine caused by homotaurine. Furthermore, omission of calcium from the perfusion fluid inhibited the increase of extracellular dopamine caused by GABA. However, it did not block the increase of dopamine caused by taurine or homotaurine. The present study suggests that the effects of intrastriatal taurine, GABA and homotaurine on the striatal extracellular dopamine differ. Thus, these amino acids seem to affect the striatal dopaminergic neurons via more than one mechanism.

  20. Deficits in striatal dopamine release in cannabis dependence

    PubMed Central

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; Weinstein, Jodi J.; Cassidy, Clifford M.; Haney, Margaret; Dong, Zhengchao; Ghazzaoui, Rassil; Ojeil, Najate; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Vadhan, Nehal P.; Volkow, Nora D.; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2016-01-01

    Most drugs of abuse lead to a general blunting of dopamine release in the chronic phase of dependence, which contributes to poor outcome. To test whether cannabis dependence is associated with a similar dopaminergic deficit, we examined striatal and extrastriatal dopamine release in severely cannabis dependent participants (CD), free of any comorbid conditions, including nicotine use. Eleven CD and twelve healthy controls (HC) completed two positron emission tomography scans with [11C]-(+)-PHNO, before and after oral administration of d-amphetamine. CD stayed inpatient for 5–7 days prior to the scans to standardize abstinence. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRS) measures of glutamate in the striatum and hippocampus were obtained in the same subjects. Percent change in [11C]-(+)-PHNO binding potential (ΔBPND) was compared between groups and correlations with MRS glutamate, subclinical psychopathological and neurocognitive parameters were examined. CD had significantly lower ΔBPND in the striatum (p=0.002, effect size (ES)=1.48), including the associative striatum (p=0.003, ES=1.39), sensorimotor striatum (p=0.003, ES=1.41), and the pallidus (p=0.012, ES=1.16). Lower dopamine release in the associative striatum correlated with inattention and negative symptoms in CD, and with poorer working memory and probabilistic category learning performance in both CD and HC. No relationships to MRS glutamate and amphetamine-induced subclinical positive symptoms were detected. In conclusion, this study provides evidence that severe cannabis dependence -without the confounds of any comorbidity- is associated with a deficit in striatal dopamine release. This deficit extends to other extrastriatal areas and predicts subclinical psychopathology. PMID:27001613

  1. Detection of phasic dopamine by D1 and D2 striatal medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Yapo, Cedric; Nair, Anu G; Clement, Lorna; Castro, Liliana R; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette; Vincent, Pierre

    2017-08-07

    Brief dopamine events are critical actors of reward-mediated learning in the striatum; the intracellular cAMP-protein kinase A (PKA) response of striatal medium spiny neurons to such events was studied dynamically using a combination of biosensor imaging in mouse brain slices and in silico simulations. Both D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons can sense brief dopamine transients in the sub-micromolar range. While dopamine transients profoundly change cAMP levels in both types of medium spiny neurons, the PKA-dependent phosphorylation level remains unaffected in D2 neurons. At the level of PKA-dependent phosphorylation, D2 unresponsiveness depends on protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) inhibition by DARPP-32. Simulations suggest that D2 medium spiny neurons could detect transient dips in dopamine level. The phasic release of dopamine in the striatum determines various aspects of reward and action selection, but the dynamics of the dopamine effect on intracellular signalling remains poorly understood. We used genetically encoded FRET biosensors in striatal brain slices to quantify the effect of transient dopamine on cAMP or PKA-dependent phosphorylation levels, and computational modelling to further explore the dynamics of this signalling pathway. Medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs), which express either D1 or D2 dopamine receptors, responded to dopamine by an increase or a decrease in cAMP, respectively. Transient dopamine showed similar sub-micromolar efficacies on cAMP in both D1 and D2 MSNs, thus challenging the commonly accepted notion that dopamine efficacy is much higher on D2 than on D1 receptors. However, in D2 MSNs, the large decrease in cAMP level triggered by transient dopamine did not translate to a decrease in PKA-dependent phosphorylation level, owing to the efficient inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 by DARPP-32. Simulations further suggested that D2 MSNs can also operate in a 'tone-sensing' mode, allowing them to detect transient dips in basal dopamine. Overall

  2. Effect of in vitro inorganic lead on dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Minnema, D J; Greenland, R D; Michaelson, I A

    1986-06-30

    The effect of inorganic lead in vitro in several aspects of [3H]dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes was examined. Under conditions of spontaneous release, lead (1-30 microM) induced dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The onset of the lead-induced release was delayed by approximately 15-30 sec. The magnitude of dopamine release induced by lead was increased when calcium was removed from the superfusing buffer. Lead-induced release was unaffected in the presence of putative calcium, sodium, and/or potassium channel blockers (nickel, tetrodotoxin, tetraethylammonium, respectively). Depolarization-evoked dopamine release, produced by a 1-sec exposure to 61 mM potassium, was diminished at calcium concentrations below 0.254 mM. The onset of depolarization-evoked release was essentially immediate following exposure of the synaptosomes to high potassium. The combination of lead (3 or 10 microM) with high potassium reduced the magnitude of depolarization-evoked dopamine release. This depression of depolarization-evoked release by lead was greater in the presence of 0.25 mM than 2.54 mM calcium in the superfusing buffer. These findings demonstrate multiple actions of lead on synaptosomal dopamine release. Lead can induce dopamine release by yet unidentified neuronal mechanisms independent of external calcium. Lead can also reduce depolarization-evoked dopamine release by apparent competition with calcium influx at the neuronal membrane calcium channel.

  3. Effect of in vitro inorganic lead on dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Minnema, D.J.; Greenland, R.D.; Michaelson, I.A.

    1986-06-30

    The effect of inorganic lead in vitro in several aspects of (/sup 3/H)dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes was examined. Under conditions of spontaneous release, lead (1-30 microM) induced dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The onset of the lead-induced release was delayed by approximately 15-30 sec. The magnitude of dopamine release induced by lead was increased when calcium was removed from the superfusing buffer. Lead-induced release was unaffected in the presence of putative calcium, sodium, and/or potassium channel blockers (nickel, tetrodotoxin, tetraethylammonium, respectively). Depolarization-evoked dopamine release, produced by a 1-sec exposure to 61 mM potassium, was diminished at calcium concentrations below 0.254 mM. The onset of depolarization-evoked release was essentially immediate following exposure of the synaptosomes to high potassium. The combination of lead (3 or 10 microM) with high potassium reduced the magnitude of depolarization-evoked dopamine release. This depression of depolarization-evoked release by lead was greater in the presence of 0.25 mM than 2.54 mM calcium in the superfusing buffer. These findings demonstrate multiple actions of lead on synaptosomal dopamine release. Lead can induce dopamine release by yet unidentified neuronal mechanisms independent of external calcium. Lead can also reduce depolarization-evoked dopamine release by apparent competition with calcium influx at the neuronal membrane calcium channel.

  4. Dysregulation of Striatal Dopamine Receptor Binding in Suicide.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Megan L; Kassir, Suham A; Underwood, Mark D; Bakalian, Mihran J; Mann, J John; Arango, Victoria

    2017-03-01

    Inconsistent evidence implicates disruptions of striatal dopaminergic indices in suicide and major depression. To determine whether there are alterations in the striatal dopamine system in suicide, we conducted a quantitative autoradiographic survey of dopamine transporter (DAT; [(3)H]mazindol), D1 receptor ([(3)H]SCH23390), and D2 receptor ([(3)H]sulpiride) binding in the dorsal striatum postmortem from matched suicides and controls. Axis I and axis II psychiatric diagnosis, recent treatment history, and early life adversity (ELA) were determined by psychological autopsy. Mean DAT, D2, and D1 receptor binding did not differ in suicide. However, there was a positive correlation between D1 and D2 receptor binding in the dorsal striatum of control subjects (R(2)=0.31, p<0.05) that was not present in suicides (R(2)=0.00, p=0.97). In suicides and controls with reported ELA, there was no correlation between striatal DAT and D1 receptor binding (R(2)=0.07, p=0.33), although DAT and D1 receptor binding was positively correlated in subjects with no report of ELA (R(2)=0.32, p<0.05). After controlling for age, there were no significant ELA-related mean differences. Binding of D1 receptors and DAT throughout the striatum correlated negatively with age (D1 receptor: R(2)=0.12, p<0.05; DAT: R(2)=0.36, p<0.001). There appears to be an imbalance in dopaminergic receptor and transporter expression related to suicide that differs from that associated with ELA or age.

  5. Dopamine mediates striatal malonate toxicity via dopamine transporter-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species and D2 but not D1 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Xia, X G; Schmidt, N; Teismann, P; Ferger, B; Schulz, J B

    2001-10-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate results in both chemically induced hypoxia and striatal lesions that are similar to those seen in Huntington's disease and cerebral ischaemia. The mechanisms leading to neuronal death involve secondary excitotoxicity, the release of dopamine from nigrostriatal fibres and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) including nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl radicals. Here, we further investigated the contribution and mechanism of dopamine on malonate-induced striatal lesions. Prior lesions of the nigrostriatal pathway with 6-OHDA or the depletion of striatal dopamine stores by pretreatment with reserpine, an inhibitor or the vesicular monoamine transporter type-2 (VMAT2), in combination with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine resulted in a significant reduction of malonate-induced striatal lesion volumes. This was paralleled by block or reduction of the malonate-induced generation of ROS, as measured by the conversions of salicylate to 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) using microdialysis. Systemic or intrastriatal application of L-DOPA or dopamine, respectively, reconstituted malonate toxicity and the generation of ROS in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR12909 did not result in a reduction of malonate-induced dopamine release, but significantly reduced the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The D2 receptor agonist lisuride and the mixed D1 and D2 receptor agonist apomorphine, but not the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393, partially restored malonate toxicity in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats without increasing the generation of ROS. In line with these results sulpiride, an inhibitor of D2 receptors, reduced the malonate-induced lesion volume, whereas SCH23390, an inhbitor of D1 receptors, was ineffective. Our data suggest that malonate-induced dopamine toxicity to energetically impaired neurons is mediated by two independent pathways: (i) dopamine transporter uptake

  6. Somatostatin regulates dopamine release in rat striatal slices and cat caudate nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Chesselet, M.F.; Reisine, T.D.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of somatostatin on the release of tritiated dopamine (DA) formed continuously from tritiated tyrosine were studied in vitro in superfused striatal slices and in vivo in both caudate nuclei and both substantiae nigrae of halothane-anesthetized cats using a push-pull cannula technique. Somatostatin (3 X 10(-10) to 3 X 10(-7) M) increased the spontaneous tritiated dopamine release from rat striatal slices. This effect was dose dependent and was completely prevented by tetrodotoxin (5 X 10(-7) M). When applied for 30 min in one cat caudate nucleus, somatostatin (10(-7) M) immediately increased the local release of tritiated DA, while a gradual inhibition of the tritiated amine's efflux was observed in the contralateral caudate nucleus. No changes in tritiated dopamine were seen in either substantia nigra during or after the peptide's application in the caudate nucleus. These results suggest that somatostatin in the striatum may play a role in the local and the distal control of dopamine release from the terminals of dopaminergic nigrostriatal neurons.

  7. Mechanism of action of methylmercury on in vivo striatal dopamine release. Possible involvement of dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Faro, L R F; do Nascimento, J L M; Alfonso, M; Durán, R

    2002-04-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) produces significant increases in the spontaneous output of dopamine (DA) from rat striatal tissue. The mechanism through MeHg produces such increase in the extracellular DA levels could be due to increased DA release or decreased DA uptake into DA terminals. One of the aims of this study was to investigate the role of DA transporter (DAT) in the MeHg-induced DA release. Coinfusion of 400 microM MeHg and nomifensine (50 microM) or amphetamine (50 microM) produced increases in the release of DA similar to those produced by nomifensine and amphetamine alone. In the same way, MeHg-induced DA release was not attenuated under Ca(2+)-free conditions or after pretreatment with reserpine (10 mg/kg i.p.) or tetrodotoxin (TTX), suggesting that the DA release was independent of calcium and vesicular stores, as well as it was not affected by the blockade of voltage sensitive sodium channels. Thus, to investigate whether depolarization of dopaminergic terminal was able to affect MeHg-induced DA release, we infused 75 mM KCl through the dialysis membrane. Our results clearly showed a decrease induced by MeHg in the KCl-evoked DA release. Taken together, these results suggest that MeHg induces release of DA via transporter-dependent, calcium- and vesicular-independent mechanism and it decreases the KCl-evoked DA release.

  8. Interaction of structural analogs of dopamine, chlorpromazine and sulpiride with striatal dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of these studies were to determine if the nitrogen atom of dopaminergic agonists and antagonists drugs is required for interaction with the D-1 and D-2 dopamine receptors and whether the positively charged or uncharged molecular species interacts with these receptors. To address these issues, permanently charged analogs of dopamine, chlorpromazine and sulpiride were synthesized in which a dimethylsulfonium, dimethylselenonium or quaternary ammonium group replaced the amine group. Permanently uncharged analogs which contained a methylsulfide, methylselenide and sulfoxide group instead of an amine group were also synthesized. The interactions of these compounds with striatal dopamine receptors were studied. We found that the permanently charged dopamine analogs bound to the D-2 receptor of striatal membranes like conventional dopaminergic agonists and displayed agonist activity at the D-2 receptor regulating potassium-evoked (/sup 3/H) acetylcholine release. In contrast, the permanently uncharged analogs bound only to the high affinity state of the D-2 receptor and had neither agonist or antagonist activity.

  9. A neurocomputational model of dopamine and prefrontal-striatal interactions during multicue category learning by Parkinson patients.

    PubMed

    Moustafa, Ahmed A; Gluck, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Most existing models of dopamine and learning in Parkinson disease (PD) focus on simulating the role of basal ganglia dopamine in reinforcement learning. Much data argue, however, for a critical role for prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine in stimulus selection in attentional learning. Here, we present a new computational model that simulates performance in multicue category learning, such as the "weather prediction" task. The model addresses how PD and dopamine medications affect stimulus selection processes, which mediate reinforcement learning. In this model, PFC dopamine is key for attentional learning, whereas basal ganglia dopamine, consistent with other models, is key for reinforcement and motor learning. The model assumes that competitive dynamics among PFC neurons is the neural mechanism underlying stimulus selection with limited attentional resources, whereas competitive dynamics among striatal neurons is the neural mechanism underlying action selection. According to our model, PD is associated with decreased phasic and tonic dopamine levels in both PFC and basal ganglia. We assume that dopamine medications increase dopamine levels in both the basal ganglia and PFC, which, in turn, increase tonic dopamine levels but decrease the magnitude of phasic dopamine signaling in these brain structures. Increase of tonic dopamine levels in the simulated PFC enhances attentional shifting performance. The model provides a mechanistic account for several phenomena, including (a) medicated PD patients are more impaired at multicue probabilistic category learning than unmedicated patients and (b) medicated PD patients opt out of reversal when there are alternative and redundant cue dimensions.

  10. Effects of mercuric chloride on (/sup 3/H)dopamine release from rat brain striatal synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hare, M.F.; Minnema, D.J.; Cooper, G.P.; Michaelson, I.A.

    1989-06-15

    Electrophysiological studies employing amphibian neuromuscular preparations have shown that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) in vitro increases both spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release. The present study examines the effect of HgCl2 on the release of (/sup 3/H)dopamine from synaptosomes prepared from mammalian brain tissue. Mercuric chloride (3-10 microM) produces a concentration-dependent increase in spontaneous (/sup 3/H)dopamine release from ''purified'' rat striatal synaptosomes, in both the presence and absence of extra-synaptosomal calcium. The effects of HgCl2 on transmitter release from amphibian neuromuscular junction preparations resemble those produced by the Na+, K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain. Experiments were performed to determine whether the HgCl2 effects on mammalian synaptosomal dopamine release are a consequence of Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition. Na+, K+-ATPase activity in lysed synaptosomal membranes is inhibited by HgCl2 (IC50 = 160 nM). However, mercuric chloride in the presence of 1 mM ouabain still increased (3H)dopamine release. The specific inhibitor of Na+-dependent, high-affinity dopamine transport, RMI81,182 inhibited ouabain-induced (3H)dopamine release whereas it had no effect on HgCl2-induced (/sup 3/H)dopamine release. These data suggest that augmentation of spontaneous (/sup 3/H)dopamine release by HgCl2 probably is not mediated by an inhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase and HgCl2 does not act directly on the dopamine transporter.

  11. Striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors: widespread influences on methamphetamine-induced dopamine and serotonin neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gross, Noah B; Duncker, Patrick C; Marshall, John F

    2011-11-01

    Methamphetamine (mAMPH) is an addictive psychostimulant drug that releases monoamines through nonexocytotic mechanisms. In animals, binge mAMPH dosing regimens deplete markers for monoamine nerve terminals, for example, dopamine and serotonin transporters (DAT and SERT), in striatum and cerebral cortex. Although the precise mechanism of mAMPH-induced damage to monoaminergic nerve terminals is uncertain, both dopamine D1 and D2 receptors are known to be important. Systemic administration of dopamine D1 or D2 receptor antagonists to rodents prevents mAMPH-induced damage to striatal dopamine nerve terminals. Because these studies employed systemic antagonist administration, the specific brain regions involved remain to be elucidated. The present study examined the contribution of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in striatum to mAMPH-induced DAT and SERT neurotoxicities. In this experiment, either the dopamine D1 antagonist, SCH23390, or the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist, sulpiride, was intrastriatally infused during a binge mAMPH regimen. Striatal DAT and cortical, hippocampal, and amygdalar SERT were assessed as markers of mAMPH-induced neurotoxicity 1 week following binge mAMPH administration. Blockade of striatal dopamine D1 or D2 receptors during an otherwise neurotoxic binge mAMPH regimen produced widespread protection against mAMPH-induced striatal DAT loss and cortical, hippocampal, and amygdalar SERT loss. This study demonstrates that (1) dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in striatum, like nigral D1 receptors, are needed for mAMPH-induced striatal DAT reductions, (2) these same receptors are needed for mAMPH-induced SERT loss, and (3) these widespread influences of striatal dopamine receptor antagonists are likely attributable to circuits connecting basal ganglia to thalamus and cortex. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. A variable number of tandem repeats in the 3'-untranslated region of the dopamine transporter modulates striatal function during working memory updating across the adult age span.

    PubMed

    Sambataro, Fabio; Podell, Jamie E; Murty, Vishnu P; Das, Saumitra; Kolachana, Bhaskar; Goldberg, Terry E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Mattay, Venkata S

    2015-08-01

    Dopamine modulation of striatal function is critical for executive functions such as working memory (WM) updating. The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates striatal dopamine signaling via synaptic reuptake. A variable number of tandem repeats in the 3'-untranslated region of SLC6A3 (DAT1-3'-UTR-VNTR) is associated with DAT expression, such that 9-repeat allele carriers tend to express lower levels (associated with higher extracellular dopamine concentrations) than 10-repeat homozygotes. Aging is also associated with decline of the dopamine system. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effects of aging and DAT1-3'-UTR-VNTR on the neural activity and functional connectivity of the striatum during WM updating. Our results showed both an age-related decrease in striatal activity and an effect of DAT1-3'-UTR-VNTR. Ten-repeat homozygotes showed reduced striatal activity and increased striatal-hippocampal connectivity during WM updating relative to the 9-repeat carriers. There was no age by DAT1-3'-UTR-VNTR interaction. These results suggest that, whereas striatal function during WM updating is modulated by both age and genetically determined DAT levels, the rate of the age-related decline in striatal function is similar across both DAT1-3'-UTR-VNTR genotype groups. They further suggest that, because of the baseline difference in striatal function based on DAT1-3'-UTR-VNTR polymorphism, 10-repeat homozygotes, who have lower levels of striatal function throughout the adult life span, may reach a threshold of decreased striatal function and manifest impairments in cognitive processes mediated by the striatum earlier in life than the 9-repeat carriers. Our data suggest that age and DAT1-3'-UTR-VNTR polymorphism independently modulate striatal function.

  13. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Conveys Familial Risk of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder through Striatal Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Fossella, John A.; Mulder, Martijn J.; Casey B. J.; Ziermans, Tim B.; Vessaz, M. Nathalie; Van Engeland, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effect of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The results confirm that DAT1 translates the genetic risk of ADHD through striatal activation.

  14. Dopamine Transporter Genotype Conveys Familial Risk of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder through Striatal Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durston, Sarah; Fossella, John A.; Mulder, Martijn J.; Casey B. J.; Ziermans, Tim B.; Vessaz, M. Nathalie; Van Engeland, Herman

    2008-01-01

    The study examines the effect of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) genotype in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The results confirm that DAT1 translates the genetic risk of ADHD through striatal activation.

  15. Initiation of calorie restriction in middle-aged male rats attenuates aging-related motoric decline and bradykinesia without increased striatal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Michael F.; Terrebonne, Jennifer; Fields, Victoria; Nodurft, Danielle; Runfalo, Cori; Latimer, Brian; Ingram, Donald K.

    2015-01-01

    Aging-related bradykinesia affects ~15% of those reaching age 65 and 50% of those reaching their 80s. Given this high risk and lack of pharmacological therapeutics, non-invasive lifestyle strategies should be identified to diminish its risk and identify the neurobiological targets to reduce aging-related bradykinesia. Early-life, long-term calorie restriction (CR) attenuates aging-related bradykinesia in rodents. Here, we addressed whether CR initiation at middle age could attenuate aging-related bradykinesia and motoric decline measured as rotarod performance. A 30% CR regimen was implemented for 6 months duration in 12-month old male Brown-Norway Fischer 344 F1 hybrid rats after establishing individual baseline locomotor activities. Locomotor capacity was assessed every 6 weeks thereafter. The ad libitum (AL) group exhibited predictably decreased locomotor activity, except movement speed, out to 18 months of age. In contrast, in the CR group, movement number and horizontal activity did not decrease during the 6-month trial and aging-related decline in rotarod performance was attenuated. The response to CR was influenced by baseline locomotor activity. The lower the locomotor activity level at baseline, the greater the response to CR. Rats in the lower 50th percentile surpassed their baseline level of activity, whereas rats in the top 50th percentile decreased at 6 weeks and then returned to baseline by 12 weeks of CR. We hypothesized that nigrostriatal dopamine tissue content would be greater in the CR group and observed a modest increase only in substantia nigra with no group differences in striatum, nucleus accumbens, or ventral tegmental area. These results indicate initiation of CR at middle age may reduce aging-related bradykinesia and, furthermore, subjects with below average locomotor activity may increase baseline activity. Sustaining nigral DA neurotransmission may be one component of preserving locomotor capabilities during aging. PMID:26610387

  16. Decreased striatal dopamine transporter uptake in the non-fluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia.

    PubMed

    Gil-Navarro, S; Lomeña, F; Cot, A; Lladó, A; Montagut, N; Castellví, M; Bosch, B; Rami, L; Antonell, A; Balasa, M; Pavia, J; Iranzo, A; Molinuevo, J L; Sánchez-Valle, R

    2013-11-01

    Patients with the non-fluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) may develop atypical parkinsonian syndromes. However, there is no current biomarker to assess which patients are at high risk of developing parkinsonism. 123I-2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl)-nortropane (123I-FP-CIT)-SPECT detects striatal dopamine dysfunction in vivo. The objective of the present study was to study whether non-fluent/agrammatic patients without parkinsonism at baseline present decreased striatal 123I-FP-CIT uptake. Visual and semi-quantitative assessments of the striatal 123I-FP-CIT uptake ratio were carried out in 15 patients with nfvPPA, eight patients with the logopenic variant of PPA (lvPPA) and 18 controls. To rule out progranulin mutations or underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD), serum progranulin levels and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD (Aβ42 , total-tau, phosphorylated-tau181 ) were determined. A second 123I-FP-CIT-SPECT analysis in the biomarker-enriched groups was also carried out. Patients with nfvPPA presented reduced striatal 123I-FP-CIT binding, especially in the left hemisphere (P = 0.002), compared with controls. All lvPPA patients had normal striatal 123I-FP-CIT uptake. 123I-FP-CIT striatal binding in nfvPPA patients with normal progranulin and CSF biomarker levels (nfvPPA/bio-) was also significantly reduced (P < 0.05) compared with lvPPA patients with positive AD biomarkers. Sixty-four per cent (9/14) of nfvPPA patients and 80% of nfvPPA/bio- patients (8/10) showed a diminished individual left striatal 123I-FP-CIT uptake ratio. On follow-up, seven nfvPPA/bio- patients developed parkinsonism (median 1.9 years; range 1.2-2.9), six of them with baseline reduced 123I-FP-CIT uptake. Reduced striatal tracer uptake in nfvPPA patients prior to clinical parkinsonism can be detected by 123I-FP-CIT-SPECT, especially in those with nfvPPA/bio-, suggesting subclinical nigrostriatal degeneration. Decreased striatal 123I

  17. Ketamine does not decrease striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding in man.

    PubMed

    Aalto, Sargo; Hirvonen, Jussi; Kajander, Jaana; Scheinin, Harry; Någren, Kjell; Vilkman, Harry; Gustafsson, Lars; Syvälahti, Erkka; Hietala, Jarmo

    2002-12-01

    A glutamate-dopamine interaction has been implicated in the psychosis-like effects of glutamate N-methyl- D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, such as phencyclidine and ketamine. However, recent imaging studies addressing striatal glutamate-dopamine interaction directly in vivo in man have been controversial. To examine whether the NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine in high subanesthetic concentrations decreases striatal [(11)C]raclopride binding potential in man. To further evaluate whether changes in striatal [(11)C]raclopride binding are associated with ketamine-induced behavioral effects. The effect of computer-driven subanesthetic ketamine infusion on striatal dopamine release was studied in healthy male subjects using a controlled study design. Dopamine release was studied using positron emission tomography and the [(11)C]raclopride displacement paradigm. A conventional region of interest-based analysis and voxel-based analysis were applied to the positron emission tomography data. The average plasma ketamine concentration was 293+/-29 ng/ml. Ketamine did not alter striatal [(11)C]raclopride binding. Ketamine induced typical behavioral effects, such as hallucinations but there was no correlation between these effects and displacement of [(11)C]raclopride binding. This controlled study indicates that ketamine does not decrease striatal [(11)C]raclopride binding. Striatal dopamine release is of minor importance in the psychosis-like effects of ketamine.

  18. The effects of systemically administered taurine and N-pivaloyltaurine on striatal extracellular dopamine and taurine in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Salimäki, J; Scriba, G; Piepponen, T P; Rautolahti, N; Ahtee, L

    2003-08-01

    The second most abundant cerebral amino acid, taurine, is widely consumed in the so-called "energy drinks". Therefore, its possible actions on the brain are of great interest. In the present experiments taurine was given intraperitoneally to rats in order to study if it can be administered systemically in large enough amounts to alter cerebral dopaminergic transmission or to induce hypothermia. In addition, the effects of subcutaneously administered lipophilic taurine analogue, N-pivaloyltaurine, were studied. The extracellular striatal taurine and dopamine concentrations were estimated using in vivo microdialysis in awake and freely moving rats, and the rectal temperatures were measured. Taurine at the total dose of 45 mmol/kg i.p. led to a maximally 8-fold increased striatal extracellular taurine concentration, induced a long-lasting hypothermia, and significantly reduced the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration. The latter effect was strengthened by co-treatment with reuptake inhibitor nomifensine. N-pivaloyltaurine (15 mmol/kg in total, s.c.) only slightly elevated the striatal extracellular taurine concentration, failed to alter the rectal temperature, and in contrast to taurine somewhat elevated the striatal extracellular dopamine concentration suggesting a different mechanism or locus of action from that of taurine. Finally, our experiments using brain microdialysis confirmed the earlier findings that taurine is slowly eliminated from the brain. The results clearly indicate that systemically given taurine enters the brain in concentrations that induce pharmacological effects.

  19. Striatal dopamine release regulation by the cholinergic properties of the smokeless tobacco, gutkha.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Brian; Lauterstein, Dana; Patel, Jyoti C; Zelikoff, Judith T; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-06-17

    Tobacco products influence striatal dopamine (DA) release primarily through the actions of nicotine, an agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Gutkha is a smokeless tobacco product that contains not only nicotine, but also includes the habit-forming areca nut and other plant-based constituents that contribute muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) agonists and other cholinergic agents. Thus, the net influence of the cholinergic agents in gutkha on striatal DA release is difficult to predict. This study investigated the influence of gutkha extract on evoked DA release in mouse striatal slices using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. The potency of a given concentration of nicotine in the gutkha extract was found to be significantly lower than that of a comparable concentration of nicotine alone. Atropine, a mAChR antagonist, increased the potency of gutkha-associated nicotine; however, other experiments suggested that this was mediated in part by direct effects of atropine at nAChRs. Overall, these results suggest that the unique constituents of gutkha work together to oppose the influence of gutkha-associated nicotine on evoked striatal DA release.

  20. PET demonstrates different behaviour of striatal dopamine D-1 and D-2 receptors in early Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rinne, J.O.; Laihinen, A.; Nagren, K.B.; Bergman, J.; Solin, O.; Haaparanta, M.; Ruotsalainen, U.; Rinne, U.K. )

    1990-12-01

    Striatal dopamine D-1 receptor binding was investigated in vivo with positron emission tomography (PET) in five patients with early Parkinson's disease using {sup 11}C-SCH 23390. All patients had predominantly unilateral symptoms and showed a significant reduction in the accumulation of {sup 18}F-6-F-DOPA in the striatum contralateral to the symptoms. None of the patients had received any antiparkinsonian medication. The striatal and cerebellar radioactivity was measured and corresponding striatum/cerebellum ratios were counted. The mean striatum/cerebellum ratio of {sup 11}C-SCH 23390 binding was symmetric between the hemispheres. By contrast, the striatum/cerebellum ratio of ({sup 11}C)raclopride binding, labelling dopamine D-2 receptors, was increased significantly in the hemisphere contralateral to the symptoms as compared with the opposite hemisphere. Thus, the present results show that the behaviour of striatal D-1 and D-2 receptors is different in early Parkinson's disease.

  1. Taurine infused intrastriatally elevates, but intranigrally decreases striatal extracellular dopamine concentration in anaesthetised rats.

    PubMed

    Ruotsalainen, M; Heikkilä, M; Lillsunde, P; Seppälä, T; Ahtee, L

    1996-01-01

    In the present study we infused taurine (50, 150 or 450 mM, 2 microliters/min for 4h) into the dorsal striatum or into the substantia nigra via microdialysis probe and estimated the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the dorsal striatum of anaesthetised rats. Intrastriatal infusion of taurine elevated striatal dopamine at all concentrations studied. At the 450 mM concentration taurine elevated the extracellular dopamine 10-fold, but only in the first 30 min sample after starting the taurine infusion. At 50 and 150 mM taurine elevated dopamine throughout the 4h infusion maximally up to 3-4-fold the control level. Extracellular DOPAC was increased by 150 and 450 mM taurine (up to about 150-160% of the control level), whereas at all three concentrations taurine decreased HVA to about 85% of the control; however, the decrease caused by 450 mM taurine was short-lasting. At all three concentrations taurine infused into the substantia nigra decreased the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum to about 40-50% of the control, and increased extracellular DOPAC and HVA maximally to about 150% and 170% of the control, respectively. These results show that the effects of taurine on the concentrations of extracellular dopamine and its metabolites depend on its administration site on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. It elevates the extracellular dopamine when given into the striatum, but when given into the cell body region of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway it decreases the extracellular dopamine in the ipsilateral striatum.

  2. Methamphetamine-induced vascular changes lead to striatal hypoxia and dopamine reduction

    PubMed Central

    Kousik, Sharanya M.; Graves, Steven M.; Napier, T. Celeste; Zhao, Chaohui; Carvey, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a potent psychostimulant known to cause neurotoxicity. Clinical reports suggest meth abuse is a risk factor for Parkinson’s disease. We investigated changes in the blood brain barrier and cerebral vasculature as a mechanism underlying this risk in rats treated acutely and trained to self-administer meth. We observed blood brain barrier leakage in rats treated acutely with meth. Hypoperfusion in the striatum was detected with acute and chronic meth treatment and associated with hypoxia. This was correlated with reductions in striatal tyrosine hydroxylase in rats trained to self-administer meth. These findings suggest a new mechanism of meth-induced neurotoxicity involving striatal vasoconstriction resulting in hypoxia and dopamine reductions leading to an increased risk for Parkinson’s disease for meth abusers. PMID:21979424

  3. Dopamine Regulation of Lateral Inhibition between Striatal Neurons Gates the Stimulant Actions of Cocaine.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Lauren K; Kaplan, Alanna R; Lemos, Julia C; Matsui, Aya; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Alvarez, Veronica A

    2016-06-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) form inhibitory synapses on neighboring striatal neurons through axon collaterals. The functional relevance of this lateral inhibition and its regulation by dopamine remains elusive. We show that synchronized stimulation of collateral transmission from multiple indirect-pathway MSNs (iMSNs) potently inhibits action potentials in direct-pathway MSNs (dMSNs) in the nucleus accumbens. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) suppress lateral inhibition from iMSNs to disinhibit dMSNs, which are known to facilitate locomotion. Surprisingly, D2R inhibition of synaptic transmission was larger at axon collaterals from iMSNs than their projections to the ventral pallidum. Targeted deletion of D2Rs from iMSNs impaired cocaine's ability to suppress lateral inhibition and increase locomotion. These impairments were rescued by chemogenetic activation of Gi-signaling in iMSNs. These findings shed light on the functional significance of lateral inhibition between MSNs and offer a novel synaptic mechanism by which dopamine gates locomotion and cocaine exerts its canonical stimulant response. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  4. Inhibitory effect of taurine on 4-aminopyridine-stimulated release of labelled dopamine from striatal synaptosomes.

    PubMed

    Arzate, M E; Morán, J; Pasantes-Morales, H

    1986-07-01

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) stimulated the release of [3H]dopamine from striatal synaptosomes in the rat. At a concentration of 200 microM, 4-aminopyridine increased the spontaneous efflux of dopamine by 170%. The effect of 4-aminopyridine was calcium-dependent, being abolished when calcium was omitted from the incubation medium. Taurine, at a concentration of 25 mM, decreased the stimulatory effect of 4-aminopyridine from 170 to 49%, in the presence of 2.5 mM calcium. When the concentration of calcium in the superfusion medium was reduced to 0.1 mM, taurine had a complete inhibitory effect on the release of [3H]dopamine stimulated by 4-aminopyridine. The effect of taurine was dose-dependent. Glycine had no effect on the release of [3H]dopamine stimulated by 4-aminopyridine, either in the presence of absence of calcium, whereas gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) showed a slight inhibitory effect in both conditions. The results suggest that taurine antagonizes the release of [3H]dopamine induced by 4-aminopyridine through an effect mediated by calcium.

  5. Differential effects of continuous administration for 1 year of haloperidol or sulpiride on striatal dopamine function in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rupniak, N M; Mann, S; Hall, M D; Fleminger, S; Kilpatrick, G; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D

    1984-01-01

    Administration of haloperidol (1.4-1.6 mg/kg/day) for up to 12 months or sulpiride (102-109 mg/kg/day) for between 6 and 12 months increased the frequency of purposeless chewing jaw movements in rats. N,n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) (0.25-2.0 mg/kg SC) did not induce hypoactivity in haloperidol-treated rats at any time; sulpiride treatment for 9 and 12 months caused a reduction in the ability of NPA to induce hypoactivity. Haloperidol, but not sulpiride, treatment enduringly inhibited low dose apomorphine effects (0.125 mg/kg SC). After 12 months, stereotypy induced by high doses of apomorphine (0.5-1.0 mg/kg) was exaggerated in haloperidol-, but not sulpiride-treated rats. Bmax for specific striatal 3H-spiperone binding was increased by haloperidol, but not sulpiride, treatment throughout the study. Bmax for 3H-piflutixol binding was not altered by chronic haloperidol or sulpiride treatment. Striatal dopamine-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was inhibited for the 1st month of haloperidol treatment, thereafter returning to control levels; dopamine stimulation was increased after 12 months of sulpiride treatment. Striatal acetylcholine content was increased after 3 and 12 months of treatment with haloperidol, but was not affected by sulpiride. Chronic administration of sulpiride does not induce identical changes in striatal dopamine function to those caused by haloperidol.

  6. Systemic inflammation enhances stimulant-induced striatal dopamine elevation.

    PubMed

    Petrulli, J R; Kalish, B; Nabulsi, N B; Huang, Y; Hannestad, J; Morris, E D

    2017-03-28

    Changes in the mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system are implicated in a range of neuropsychiatric conditions including addiction, depression and schizophrenia. Dysfunction of the neuroimmune system is often comorbid with such conditions and affects similar areas of the brain. The goal of this study was to use positron emission tomography with the dopamine D2 antagonist tracer, (11)C-raclopride, to explore the effect of acute immune activation on striatal DA levels. DA transmission was modulated by an oral methylphenidate (MP) challenge in order to reliably elicit DA elevation. Elevation in DA concentration due to MP was estimated via change in (11)C-raclopride binding potential from the baseline scan. Prior to the post-MP scan, subjects were pre-treated with either the immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or placebo (PBO) in a cross-over design. Immune activation was confirmed by measuring tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 concentration in plasma. Eight healthy subjects were scanned four times each to determine the MP-induced DA elevation under both LPS and PBO pre-treatment conditions. MP-induced DA elevation in the striatum was significantly greater (P<0.01) after LPS pre-treatment compared to PBO pre-treatment. Seven of eight subjects responded similarly. This effect was observed in the caudate and putamen (P<0.02), but was not present in ventral striatum. DA elevation induced by MP was significantly greater when subjects were pre-treated with LPS compared to PBO. The amplification of stimulant-induced DA signaling in the presence of systemic inflammation may have important implications for our understanding of addiction and other diseases of DA dysfunction.

  7. Elevated Striatal Dopamine Function in Immigrants and Their Children: A Risk Mechanism for Psychosis.

    PubMed

    Egerton, Alice; Howes, Oliver D; Houle, Sylvain; McKenzie, Kwame; Valmaggia, Lucia R; Bagby, Michael R; Tseng, Huai-Hsuan; Bloomfield, Michael A P; Kenk, Miran; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Suridjan, Ivonne; Chaddock, Chistopher A; Winton-Brown, Toby T; Allen, Paul; Rusjan, Pablo; Remington, Gary; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McGuire, Philip K; Mizrahi, Romina

    2017-03-01

    Migration is a major risk factor for schizophrenia but the neurochemical processes involved are unknown. One candidate mechanism is through elevations in striatal dopamine synthesis and release. The objective of this research was to determine whether striatal dopamine function is elevated in immigrants compared to nonimmigrants and the relationship with psychosis. Two complementary case-control studies of in vivo dopamine function (stress-induced dopamine release and dopamine synthesis capacity) in immigrants compared to nonimmigrants were performed in Canada and the United Kingdom. The Canadian dopamine release study included 25 immigrant and 31 nonmigrant Canadians. These groups included 23 clinical high risk (CHR) subjects, 9 antipsychotic naïve patients with schizophrenia, and 24 healthy volunteers. The UK dopamine synthesis study included 32 immigrants and 44 nonimmigrant British. These groups included 50 CHR subjects and 26 healthy volunteers. Both striatal stress-induced dopamine release and dopamine synthesis capacity were significantly elevated in immigrants compared to nonimmigrants, independent of clinical status. These data provide the first evidence that the effect of migration on the risk of developing psychosis may be mediated by an elevation in brain dopamine function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  8. Elevated Striatal Dopamine Function in Immigrants and Their Children: A Risk Mechanism for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Egerton, Alice; Howes, Oliver D.; Houle, Sylvain; McKenzie, Kwame; Valmaggia, Lucia R.; Bagby, Michael R.; Tseng, Huai-Hsuan; Bloomfield, Michael A. P.; Kenk, Miran; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Suridjan, Ivonne; Chaddock, Chistopher A.; Winton-Brown, Toby T.; Allen, Paul; Rusjan, Pablo; Remington, Gary; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McGuire, Philip K.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Migration is a major risk factor for schizophrenia but the neurochemical processes involved are unknown. One candidate mechanism is through elevations in striatal dopamine synthesis and release. The objective of this research was to determine whether striatal dopamine function is elevated in immigrants compared to nonimmigrants and the relationship with psychosis. Two complementary case–control studies of in vivo dopamine function (stress-induced dopamine release and dopamine synthesis capacity) in immigrants compared to nonimmigrants were performed in Canada and the United Kingdom. The Canadian dopamine release study included 25 immigrant and 31 nonmigrant Canadians. These groups included 23 clinical high risk (CHR) subjects, 9 antipsychotic naïve patients with schizophrenia, and 24 healthy volunteers. The UK dopamine synthesis study included 32 immigrants and 44 nonimmigrant British. These groups included 50 CHR subjects and 26 healthy volunteers. Both striatal stress-induced dopamine release and dopamine synthesis capacity were significantly elevated in immigrants compared to nonimmigrants, independent of clinical status. These data provide the first evidence that the effect of migration on the risk of developing psychosis may be mediated by an elevation in brain dopamine function. PMID:28057720

  9. Dopamine regulates distinctively the activity patterns of striatal output neurons in advanced parkinsonian primates

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun; Liang, Li; Kaneoke, Yoshiki; Cao, Xuebing

    2014-01-01

    Nigrostriatal dopamine denervation plays a major role in basal ganglia circuitry disarray and motor abnormalities of Parkinson's disease (PD). Studies in rodent and primate models have revealed that striatal projection neurons, namely, medium spiny neurons (MSNs), increase the firing frequency. However, their activity pattern changes and the effects of dopaminergic stimulation in such conditions are unknown. Using single-cell recordings in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-treated primates with advanced parkinsonism, we studied MSN activity patterns in the transition to different motor states following levodopa administration. In the “off” state (baseline parkinsonian disability), a burst-firing pattern accompanied by prolonged silences (pauses) was found in 34% of MSNs, and 80% of these exhibited a levodopa response compatible with dopamine D1 receptor activation (direct pathway MSNs). This pattern was highly responsive to levodopa given that bursting/pausing almost disappeared in the “on” state (reversal of parkinsonism after levodopa injection), although this led to higher firing rates. Nonbursty MSNs fired irregularly with marked pausing that increased in the on state in the MSN subset with a levodopa response compatible with dopamine D2 receptor activation (indirect pathway MSNs), although the pause increase was not sustained in some units during the appearance of dyskinesias. Data indicate that the MSN firing pattern in the advanced parkinsonian monkey is altered by bursting and pausing changes and that dopamine differentially and inefficiently regulates these behaviorally correlated patterns in MSN subpopulations. These findings may contribute to understand the impact of striatal dysfunction in the basal ganglia network and its role in motor symptoms of PD. PMID:25505120

  10. Focal striatal dopamine may potentiate dyskinesias in parkinsonian monkeys.

    PubMed

    Bankiewicz, Krystof S; Daadi, Marcel; Pivirotto, Philip; Bringas, John; Sanftner, Laura; Cunningham, Janet; Forsayeth, John R; Eberling, Jamie L

    2006-02-01

    Striatal neurons convert L-dopa to dopamine (DA) following gene transfer of aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) via adeno-associated virus (AAV) in parkinsonian monkeys. We investigated whether AAV-AADC could reduce or eliminate L-dopa-induced dyskinesias (LIDs) and side effects in MPTP-treated monkeys. Five monkeys were made parkinsonian by bilateral MPTP lesions. The optimal therapeutic dose of L-dopa was determined using an acute dose response regimen. After 3 weeks of chronic L-dopa treatment, AAV-AADC or control vector was bilaterally injected into the striatum. Animals were assessed for 6 months with the same L-dopa dosing as presurgery as well as chronic oral L-dopa treatment. Presurgery LID was observed at doses greater than 5 mg/kg. The AAV-AADC-treated animals displayed an average 7.3-fold decrease in the therapeutic dose of L-dopa throughout the 6-month follow-up period. Only AAV-AADC-treated monkeys were susceptible to dyskinesias even at sub-clinical doses. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed well-delineated foci of AADC within the striatum. These results suggest that high levels of focal DA were generated in response to L-dopa administration and may be responsible for the exacerbation of dyskinesias. This may be similar to focal dopaminergic activity in PD patients that developed off-drug or "runaway" dyskinesias following fetal mesencephalic grafts.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide mitagates methamphetamine-induced striatal dopamine depletion via modulating local TNF-alpha and dopamine transporter expression.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yu-Ting; Tsai, Yen-Ping N; Cherng, Chianfang G; Ke, Jing-Jer; Ho, Ming-Che; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Yu, Lung

    2009-04-01

    Systemic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment may affect methamphetamine (MA)-induced nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) depletion. This study was undertaken to determine the critical time window for the protective effects of LPS treatment and the underlying mechanisms. An LPS injection (1 mg/kg) 72 h before or 2 h after MA treatment [three consecutive, subcutaneous injections of MA (10 mg/kg each) at 2-h intervals] diminished the MA-induced DA depletion in mouse striatum. Such an LPS-associated effect was independent of MA-produced hyperthermia. TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, IL-6 expressions were all elevated in striatal tissues following a systemic injection with LPS, indicating that peripheral LPS treatment affected striatal pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. Striatal TNF-alpha expression was dramatically increased at 72 and 96 h after the MA treatment, while such TNF-alpha elevation was abolished by the LPS pretreatment protocol. Moreover, MA-produced activation of nuclear NFkappaB, a transcription factor following TNF-alpha activation, in striatum was abolished by the LPS (1 mg/kg) pretreatment. Furthermore, thalidomide, a TNF-alpha antagonist, treatment abolished the LPS pretreatment-associated protective effects. Pretreatment with mouse recombinant TNF-alpha in striatum diminished the MA-produced DA depletion. Finally, single LPS treatment caused a rapid down-regulation of dopamine transporter (DAT) in striatum. Taken together, we conclude that peripheral LPS treatment protects nigrostriatal DA neurons against MA-induced toxicity, in part, by reversing elevated TNF-alpha expression and subsequent signaling cascade and causing a rapid DAT down-regulation in striatum.

  12. Nigral Tau pathology and striatal amyloid-β deposition does not correlate with striatal dopamine deficit in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Tabea H; Lochner, Maximilian; Kovacs, Gabor G

    2012-12-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms may appear in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, using morphometric immunohistochemistry in 34 cases with AD-related pathology, we evaluated whether nigral burden of tau pathology or striatal burden of amyloid-β deposition correlates with dopamine transporter (DAT) expression in the striatum. Our observations show a lack of correlation between these variables and support the notion that lower striatal DAT expression in AD patients suggests concomitant nigral α-synuclein pathology. Extrapyramidal symptoms may have a complex background in AD.

  13. Denicotinized versus average nicotine tobacco cigarette smoking differentially releases striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Domino, Edward F; Ni, Lisong; Domino, Joseph S; Yang, Wendy; Evans, Catherine; Guthrie, Sally; Wang, Heng; Koeppe, Robert A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2013-01-01

    Nicotine has long been recognized as a necessary but insufficient component of tobacco cigarettes to maintain a psychophysiological need to smoke. This study examined venous plasma concentrations effects of nicotine in cigarette smoking after overnight abstinence to release striatal dopamine (DA). Twenty-two male smokers smoked either denicotinized (denic) or average nicotine (nic) cigarettes under single blind conditions. Each was given [(11)C]raclopride and scanned in a positron emission tomography (PET) facility. Smoking either denic or nic cigarettes released striatal DA. Denic cigarette smoking released DA primarily in the right striatum, whereas nic cigarette smoking released DA in both striata, but especially in the left. Increases in venous plasma nicotine concentrations correlated positively with increased DA release in the left caudate nucleus. Smoking denic cigarettes reduced craving as much as smoking nic cigarettes. Craving reduction after nic tobacco smoking correlated with increases in plasma nicotine. Nonnicotine factors in tobacco smoking produce important right brain effects. Nicotine is a pharmacological factor during tobacco smoking that releases bilateral striatal DA, but more in the left brain.

  14. Denicotinized Versus Average Nicotine Tobacco Cigarette Smoking Differentially Releases Striatal Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wendy; Evans, Catherine; Guthrie, Sally; Wang, Heng; Koeppe, Robert A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nicotine has long been recognized as a necessary but insufficient component of tobacco cigarettes to maintain a psychophysiological need to smoke. This study examined venous plasma concentrations effects of nicotine in cigarette smoking after overnight abstinence to release striatal dopamine (DA). Methods: Twenty-two male smokers smoked either denicotinized (denic) or average nicotine (nic) cigarettes under single blind conditions. Each was given [11C]raclopride and scanned in a positron emission tomography (PET) facility. Results: Smoking either denic or nic cigarettes released striatal DA. Denic cigarette smoking released DA primarily in the right striatum, whereas nic cigarette smoking released DA in both striata, but especially in the left. Increases in venous plasma nicotine concentrations correlated positively with increased DA release in the left caudate nucleus. Smoking denic cigarettes reduced craving as much as smoking nic cigarettes. Craving reduction after nic tobacco smoking correlated with increases in plasma nicotine. Conclusions: Nonnicotine factors in tobacco smoking produce important right brain effects. Nicotine is a pharmacological factor during tobacco smoking that releases bilateral striatal DA, but more in the left brain. PMID:22491891

  15. mTORC2/Rictor Signaling Disrupts Dopamine-Dependent Behaviors via Defects in Striatal Dopamine Neurotransmission

    PubMed Central

    Dadalko, Olga I.; Siuta, Michael; Poe, Amanda; Erreger, Kevin; Matthies, Heinrich J.G.; Niswender, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    Disrupted neuronal protein kinase B (Akt) signaling has been associated with dopamine (DA)-related neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, a devastating mental illness. We hypothesize that proper DA neurotransmission is therefore dependent upon intact neuronal Akt function. Akt is activated by phosphorylation of two key residues: Thr308 and Ser473. Blunted Akt phosphorylation at Ser473 (pAkt-473) has been observed in lymphocytes and postmortem brains of schizophrenia patients, and psychosis-prone normal individuals. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2) is a multiprotein complex that is responsible for phosphorylation of Akt at Ser473 (pAkt-473). We demonstrate that mice with disrupted mTORC2 signaling in brain exhibit altered striatal DA-dependent behaviors, such as increased basal locomotion, stereotypic counts, and exaggerated response to the psychomotor effects of amphetamine (AMPH). Combining in vivo and ex vivo pharmacological, electrophysiological, and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that the changes in striatal DA neurotransmission and associated behaviors are caused, at least in part, by elevated D2 DA receptor (D2R) expression and upregulated ERK1/2 activation. Haloperidol, a typical antipsychotic and D2R blocker, reduced AMPH hypersensitivity and elevated pERK1/2 to the levels of control animals. By viral gene delivery, we downregulated mTORC2 solely in the dorsal striatum of adult wild-type mice, demonstrating that striatal mTORC2 regulates AMPH-stimulated behaviors. Our findings implicate mTORC2 signaling as a novel pathway regulating striatal DA tone and D2R signaling. PMID:26063917

  16. Tamoxifen counteracts estradiol induced effects on striatal and hypophyseal dopamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Ferretti, C.; Blengio, M.; Ghi, P.; Racca, S.; Genazzani, E.; Portaleone, P.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the ability of Tamoxifen (TAM), an antiestrogen drug, to counteract the modification induced by estrogens on dopamine (DA) receptors on striatum and on adenohypophysis of ovex female rats. Subacute treatment with 17..beta..-estradiol (E/sub 2/) at both low (0.1 ..mu..g/kg) and high (20 ..mu..g/kg) doses confirmed its ability to increase the number of striatal /sup 3/H-Spiperone (/sup 3/H-SPI) binding sites in a dose dependent manner. By contrast in the pituitary, only high doses of estrogen were effective in reducing the number of DA receptors. We treated ovex female rats for 15 days with TAM alone or associated with E/sub 2/, to see if these estrogenic effects could be suppressed by an antiestrogenic drug. TAM did not affect the number of striatal DA receptors, but significantly increased the adenohypophy-seal DA binding sites, without varying their affinity. No changes were observed in pituitary and striatal DA receptor density, even when TAM was injected in association with estradiol. In conclusions: TAM is able to counteract the effects estrogens have on DA receptors. However there is some evidence that it could influence the pituitary DA systems independently of it antiestrogenic activity.

  17. A D1 dopamine agonist stimulates acetylcholine release from dissociated striatal cholinergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Login, I S; Harrison, M B

    1996-07-15

    We tested the hypothesis that a D1 dopamine agonist could stimulate acetylcholine release directly from striatal cholinergic neurons. A suspension of viable dissociated striatal cells was made enzymatically and mechanically from normal adult male rats. The heterogeneous suspension was incubated in [3H]choline to allow synthesis of [3H]acetylcholine selectively by cholinergic neurons. Fractional [3H]acetylcholine release from the cholinergic cells in the suspension was recorded during continuous dynamic perifusion. The D1 agonist, 50 microM (+/-) SKF 38393, increased the basal rate of release from the cholinergic cells by 50% and the action was inhibited by the D1 antagonist, SKF 83566. Stimulation of [3H]acetylcholine secretion was recorded as low as 500 nM SKF 38393. The (S, -) SKF 38393 stereoisomer was significantly less effective than the (R, +) isomer in stimulating release. The D1-mediated stimulation of acetylcholine secretion was abolished in a low-calcium environment that also inhibited basal release. The data suggest that striatal cholinergic cells express D1 receptors functionally coupled to the regulation of acetylcholine release. These D1 actions in the absence of synaptic circuitry imply that such circuitry is not required in situ. In vivo however, indirectly mediated D1 actions and those of other transmitters may modify the manifestations of this direct cholinergic stimulation.

  18. Effect of electrical and chemical stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus on the release of striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Pazo, Jorge H; Höcht, Cristian; Barceló, Ana C; Fillipini, Bárbara; Lomastro, María J

    2010-12-01

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) alleviates the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease, but the mechanisms underlying these clinical results remain to be clarified. The HFS of STN is associated with the release of dopamine (DA) in the striatum. This study examines possible mechanisms by which HFS-STN release DA. The experiments were performed in rats anesthetized with urethane. The STN was stimulated by electrical HF and chemical microinjections of an antagonist and an agonist of GABA(A) receptors, the bicuculline, and the muscimol, respectively. The extracellular striatal DA-DOPAC (3-4-dihydroxyphenilacetic acid) content was collected by means of intracerebral microdialysis cannula and analyzed with HPLC with an electrochemical detector. The HFS of STN and microinjection of bicuculline intrasubthalamic produced a significant increase of extracellular striatal DA, whereas DOPAC levels were unchanged. The microinjection of muscimol depresses spontaneous release of DA, without changes in DOPAC. The kainic acid lesion of the globus pallidus (GP) and the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr), ipsilateral to dialyzed striatum, did not modify the release of DA-DOPAC. These data provide evidence that the STN has a tonic action on the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), and the release of striatal DA by HFS-STN may be due to activation of the STN acting directly on SNc neurons. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Expression and Activity of Nitric Oxide Synthase Isoforms in Methamphetamine-Induced Striatal Dopamine Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Son, Jong H.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide is implicated in methamphetamine (METH)-induced neurotoxicity; however, the source of the nitric oxide has not been identified. Previous work has also revealed that animals with partial dopamine loss induced by a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine fail to exhibit further decreases in striatal dopamine when re-exposed to methamphetamine 7–30 days later. The current study examined nitric oxide synthase expression and activity and protein nitration in striata of animals administered saline or neurotoxic regimens of methamphetamine at postnatal days 60 and/or 90, resulting in four treatment groups: Saline:Saline, METH:Saline, Saline:METH, and METH:METH. Acute administration of methamphetamine on postnatal day 90 (Saline:METH and METH:METH) increased nitric oxide production, as evidenced by increased protein nitration. Methamphetamine did not, however, change the expression of endothelial or inducible isoforms of nitric oxide synthase, nor did it change the number of cells positive for neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA expression or the amount of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mRNA per cell. However, nitric oxide synthase activity in striatal interneurons was increased in the Saline:METH and METH:METH animals. These data suggest that increased nitric oxide production after a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine results from increased nitric oxide synthase activity, rather than an induction of mRNA, and that constitutively expressed neuronal nitric oxide synthase is the most likely source of nitric oxide after methamphetamine administration. Of interest, animals rendered resistant to further methamphetamine-induced dopamine depletions still show equivalent degrees of methamphetamine-induced nitric oxide production, suggesting that nitric oxide production alone in response to methamphetamine is not sufficient to induce acute neurotoxic injury. PMID:23230214

  20. Serotonin and dopamine striatal innervation in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's chorea.

    PubMed

    Bédard, Catherine; Wallman, Marie-Josée; Pourcher, Emmanuelle; Gould, Peter V; Parent, André; Parent, Martin

    2011-09-01

    In contrast to our vast knowledge of the dopamine (DA) system, much less is known about the involvement of serotonin (5-HT) in neurodegenerative diseases affecting the basal ganglia. Therefore, we designed a study that aimed at characterizing the status of the striatal DA and 5-HT systems in patients who suffered from either Parkinson's (PD) or Huntington's disease (HD), compared to age-matched controls. Antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and 5-HT transporter (SERT) were used as markers of DA and 5-HT axonal profiles, respectively. The density and pattern of TH+ and SERT + innervation were determined by optical density measurements as well as by direct stereological estimates of labeled axon varicosities. The results reveal a significant decrease in TH immunoreactivity and TH + axon terminals throughout the striatum in both PD and HD, whereas the intensity of SERT immunostaining and the density of SERT + axon varicosities were found to be slightly increased in the striatum of PD and HD patients compared to controls. These findings reveal that the nigrostriatal DA system is significantly impaired in both PD and HD compared to the striatal 5-HT innervation, which is slightly increased in these two conditions. The striatal 5-HT augmentation observed in PD might be the result of a neural mechanism designed to compensate for DA denervation, whereas the marked atrophy of the striatum might explain the increase in the 5-HT innervation noted in HD. These findings underline the importance of the complex interplay between DA and 5-HT striatal afferents in the elaboration of appropriate motor behaviour.

  1. Correlation of individual differences in schizotypal personality traits with amphetamine-induced dopamine release in striatal and extrastriatal brain regions.

    PubMed

    Woodward, Neil D; Cowan, Ronald L; Park, Sohee; Ansari, M Sib; Baldwin, Ronald M; Li, Rui; Doop, Mikisha; Kessler, Robert M; Zald, David H

    2011-04-01

    Schizotypal personality traits are associated with schizophrenia spectrum disorders, and individuals with schizophrenia spectrum disorders demonstrate increased dopamine transmission in the striatum. The authors sought to determine whether individual differences in normal variation in schizotypal traits are correlated with dopamine transmission in the striatum and in extrastriatal brain regions. Sixty-three healthy volunteers with no history of psychiatric illness completed the Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire and underwent positron emission tomography imaging with [(18)F]fallypride at baseline and after administration of oral d-amphetamine (0.43 mg/kg). Dopamine release, quantified by subtracting each participant's d-amphetamine scan from his or her baseline scan, was correlated with Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire total and factor scores using region-of-interest and voxel-wise analyses. Dopamine release in the striatum was positively correlated with overall schizotypal traits. The association was especially robust in the associative subdivision of the striatum. Voxel-wise analyses identified additional correlations between dopamine release and schizotypal traits in the left middle frontal gyrus and left supramarginal gyrus. Exploratory analyses of Schizotypal Personality Questionnaire factor scores revealed correlations between dopamine release and disorganized schizotypal traits in the striatum, thalamus, medial prefrontal cortex, temporal lobe, insula, and inferior frontal cortex. The association between dopamine signaling and psychosis phenotypes extends to individual differences in normal variation in schizotypal traits and involves dopamine transmission in both striatal and extrastriatal brain regions. Amphetamine-induced dopamine release may be a useful endophenotype for investigating the genetic basis of schizophrenia spectrum disorders.

  2. Studies on striatal neurotoxicity caused by the 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine/ malonate combination: implications for serotonin/dopamine interactions.

    PubMed

    Goñi-Allo, Beatriz; Ramos, Mar'a; Herv'as, Isabel; Lasheras, Berta; Aguirre, Norberto

    2006-03-01

    The amphetamine derivative 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) produces long-term toxicity to serotonin (5-HT) neurones in rats, which is exacerbated when combined with the mitochondrial inhibitor malonate. Moreover, MDMA, which does not produce dopamine depletion in the rat, potentiates malonate-induced striatal dopamine toxicity. Because the malonate/MDMA combination acutely causes a synergistic increase of 5-HT and dopamine release, in this study we sought to determine whether pharmacological blockade of MDMA- and/or malonate-induced dopamine release prevents neurotoxicity. Fluoxetine, given 30 min prior to the malonate/MDMA combination, afforded complete protection against 5-HT depletion and reversed MDMA-induced exacerbation of dopamine toxicity found in the malonate/MDMA treated rats. Protection afforded by fluoxetine was not related to changes in MDMA-induced hyperthermia. Similarly, potentiation of malonate-induced dopamine toxicity caused by MDMA was not observed in p-chlorophenylalanine-5-HT depleted rats. Finally, the dopamine transporter inhibitor GBR 12909 completely prevented dopamine neurotoxicity caused by the malonate/MDMA combination and reversed the exacerbating toxic effects of malonate on MDMA-induced 5-HT depletion without significantly altering the hyperthermic response. Overall, these results suggest that the synergic release of dopamine caused by the malonate/MDMA combination plays an important role in the long-term toxic effects. A possible mechanism of neurotoxicity and protection is proposed.

  3. The dopamine transporter haplotype and reward-related striatal responses in adult ADHD.

    PubMed

    Hoogman, Martine; Onnink, Marten; Cools, Roshan; Aarts, Esther; Kan, Cornelis; Arias Vasquez, Alejandro; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara

    2013-06-01

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a highly heritable disorder and several genes increasing disease risk have been identified. The dopamine transporter gene, SLC6A3/DAT1, has been studied most extensively in ADHD research. Interestingly, a different haplotype of this gene (formed by genetic variants in the 3' untranslated region and intron 8) is associated with childhood ADHD (haplotype 10-6) and adult ADHD (haplotype 9-6). The expression of DAT1 is highest in striatal regions in the brain. This part of the brain is of interest to ADHD because of its role in reward processing is altered in ADHD patients; ADHD patients display decreased striatal activation during reward processing. To better understand how the DAT1 gene exerts effects on ADHD, we studied the effect of this gene on reward-related brain functioning in the area of its highest expression in the brain, the striatum, using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In doing so, we tried to resolve inconsistencies observed in previous studies of healthy individuals and ADHD-affected children. In a sample of 87 adult ADHD patients and 77 healthy comparison subjects, we confirmed the association of the 9-6 haplotype with adult ADHD. Striatal hypoactivation during the reward anticipation phase of a monetary incentive delay task in ADHD patients was again shown, but no significant effects of DAT1 on striatal activity were found. Although the importance of the DAT1 haplotype as a risk factor for adult ADHD was again demonstrated in this study, the mechanism by which this gene increases disease risk remains largely unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  4. Amphetamine and methamphetamine reduce striatal dopamine transporter function without concurrent dopamine transporter relocalization.

    PubMed

    German, Christopher L; Hanson, Glen R; Fleckenstein, Annette E

    2012-10-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) alter dopamine transporter (DAT) function. In vitro heterologous cell line and synaptosome studies demonstrate AMPH-induced DAT internalization, implicating relocalization in reduced DAT uptake following drug exposure. However, few studies have evaluated DAT localization following in vivo AMPH/METH administration. To determine DAT subcellular localization following drug administration, a centrifugation technique was developed to isolate striatal synaptosomal membrane and vesicle fractions. DAT was distributed between the synaptosomal membrane (60%) and endosomal vesicles (40%), and in vitro application of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate to striatal synaptosomes caused DAT internalization into the vesicle fractions. In contrast, neither single nor repeated in vivo AMPH and/or METH administrations altered DAT localization 5, 15, 30, or 60 min post-treatment, despite reduced DAT uptake. Importantly, repeated METH injections uniformly decreased total DAT immunoreactivity within all fractions 7 days post-treatment. These findings suggest that factors other than internalization can contribute to the observed acute and persistent DAT dysfunction and dopaminergic deficits following in vivo AMPH or METH administration. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  5. Amphetamine and Methamphetamine Reduce Striatal Dopamine Transporter Function Without Concurrent Dopamine Transporter Relocalization

    PubMed Central

    German, Christopher L.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2014-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) and methamphetamine (METH) alter dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) function. In vitro heterologous cell line and synaptosome studies demonstrate AMPH-induced DAT internalization, implicating relocalization in reduced DAT uptake following drug exposure. However, few studies have evaluated DAT localization following in vivo AMPH/METH administration. To determine DAT subcellular localization following drug administration, a centrifugation technique was developed to isolate striatal synaptosomal membrane and vesicle fractions. DAT was distributed between the synaptosomal membrane (60%) and endosomal vesicles (40%), and in vitro application of the protein kinase C activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) to striatal synaptosomes caused DAT internalization into the vesicle fractions. In contrast, neither single nor repeated in vivo AMPH and/or METH administrations altered DAT localization 5, 15, 30 or 60 min post-treatment, despite reduced DAT uptake. Importantly, repeated METH injections uniformly decreased total DAT immunoreactivity within all fractions 7 d post-treatment. These findings suggest factors other than internalization can contribute to the observed acute and persistent DAT dysfunction and dopaminergic deficits following in vivo AMPH or METH administration. PMID:22804716

  6. Regulation of dopamine D3 receptor in the striatal regions and substantia nigra in diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD)

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jianjun; Cairns, Nigel J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Mach, Robert H.; Xu, Jinbin

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of D3 receptor has not been well documented in diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD). In this study, a novel D3 preferring radioligand [3H]WC-10 and a D2-preferring radioligand [3H]raclopride were used and the absolute densities of the dopamine D3 and D2 receptors were determined in the striatal regions and substantia nigra (SN) from postmortem brains from 5 cases DLBD, which included dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB, n=4) and Parkinson disease dementia (PDD, n=1). The densities of the dopamine D1 receptor, vesicular monoamine transporter 2(VMAT2), and dopamine transporter (DAT) were also measured by quantitative autoradiography using [3H]SCH23390, [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine, and [3H]WIN35428, respectively. The densities of these dopaminergic markers were also measured in the same brain regions in 10 age-matched control cases. Dopamine D3 receptor density was significantly increased in the striatal regions including caudate, putamen and nucleus accumbens (NAc). There were no significant changes in the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor densities in any brain regions measured. VMAT2 and DAT densities were reduced in all the brain regions measured in DLB/PDD, however the significant reduction was found in putamen for DAT and in the NAc and SN for VMAT2. The decrease of dopamine pre-synaptic markers implies neuronal loss in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) in these DLB/PDD cases, while the increase of D3 receptors in striatal regions could be attributed to dopaminergic medication history and psychiatric state such as hallucinations. Whether it also reflects compensatory regulation upon dopaminergic denervation warrants further confirmations on larger populations. PMID:23732230

  7. Protective effects of glutathione and cysteine on the methylmercury-induced striatal dopamine release in vivo.

    PubMed

    Faro, L R F; do Nascimento, J L M; Campos, F; Vidal, L; Alfonso, M; Durán, R

    2005-06-10

    The possible protective effects of glutathione (GSH), cysteine (CYS) and methionine (MET) on the Methylmercury (MeHg)-induced dopamine (DA) release from rat striatum were investigated using in vivo microdialysis coupled to HPLC with electrochemical detection. Intrastriatal infusion of MeHg 400 microM increased extracellular DA levels to 1941 +/- 199% in terms of basal levels. Infusion of MeHg 400 microM in GSH 400 microM pretreated animals, only increased striatal DA levels to 465 +/- 104%, in terms of basal levels, this increase being 76% lower than induced by MeHg alone. Conversely, the infusion of MeHg 400 microM after infusion of GSH 400 microM increased DA levels to 1019 +/- 96% in terms of basal levels, this increase being 47.5% lower than that observed in MeHg non-pretreated animals. The infusion of MeHg 400 microM in CYS 400 microM -pretreated animals, increased striatal DA levels to 740 +/- 149%, in terms of basal levels, this increase being 62% lower than that induced by MeHg in non-pretreated animals. The infusion of MeHg 400 microM in MET 400 microM pretreated animals increased striatal DA levels to 2011 +/- 230% in terms of basal, an increase that was not significantly different from that produced by MeHg 400 muM alone. In summary, the administration of compounds containing free -SH groups prevented the MeHg-induced DA release from rat striatum, probably due to the binding of MeHg to -SH groups. This would result in a lower metal availability to interact with -SH membrane proteins groups, which would decrease MeHg ability to interact with DA transporter.

  8. Dopamine stimulates [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding in cultured striatal cells.

    PubMed

    McMillian, M K; He, X P; Hong, J S; Pennypacker, K R

    1992-04-01

    The effect of dopamine (DA) on the binding of [3H]phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate ([3H]PdBu) in cultured rat striatal cells was examined. DA maximally increased specific [3H]PdBu binding by 70 +/- 10%, an increase comparable to that observed with norepinephrine (NE). This finding suggests that DA activates protein kinase C in cultured striatal cells, because increases in [3H]PdBu binding reflect translocation of protein kinase C. Half-maximal stimulation was observed with 10(-6) M DA. The peak response was observed at 2-3 min after addition of 10(-4) M DA, but [3H]PdBu binding was still increased above basal at 30 min. DA was not acting via an adrenergic receptor. Prazosin (10(-6) M) blocked the response to NE, suggesting mediation by an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor, but had little effect on the response to DA. Conversely, the D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390 (10(-6) M) blocked the response to DA, but only partially inhibited the response to NE. Morphine (10(-6) M) inhibited the response to DA by 46 +/- 14%, but did not affect significantly the response to NE. The DA effect on [3H]PdBu binding is apparently independent of the increase in cyclic AMP seen on D1 receptor activation. Forskolin, apomorphine, and the D1 agonist SKF-38393 all increased cyclic AMP in striatal cells, but were less effective than DA in stimulating [3H]PdBu binding. The D2 agonist quinpirole was ineffective in stimulating either cyclic AMP or [3H]PdBu binding.

  9. Effect of cocaine on striatal dopamine clearance in a rat model of developmental stress and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    PubMed

    Womersley, Jacqueline S; Kellaway, Lauriston A; Stein, Dan J; Gerhardt, Greg A; Russell, Vivienne A

    2016-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and developmental stress are considered risk factors for the development of drug abuse. Though the physiological mechanisms underlying this risk are not yet clear, ADHD, developmental stress and drug abuse are known to share underlying disturbances in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Thus, we hypothesized that clearance of cocaine-induced elevations in striatal dopamine would be prolonged in a rat model of ADHD and that this would be further increased by exposure to developmental stress. In the current study, male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), a well-validated model of ADHD, and control Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were exposed to either standard rearing (nMS) or a maternal separation (MS) paradigm involving removal of the pups from the dam for 180 min/day over 13 days. This produced a 2 × 2 factorial design (SHR/WKY × nMS/MS) with 5-6 rats/group. Striatal clearance of exogenously applied dopamine was measured via in vivo chronoamperometry, and the difference in dopamine uptake parameters before and after cocaine administration was compared between experimental groups. Cocaine, a potent dopamine transporter inhibitor, reliably increased the clearance time of dopamine though no difference in this parameter was found between SHR and WKY strains. However, developmental stress elevated the cocaine-induced increase in time to clear 50% of exogenously applied dopamine (T50) in SHR but had no effect in WKY rats. These findings suggest that a strain × environment interaction prolongs elevated levels of dopamine thereby potentially increasing the rewarding properties of this drug in SHR.

  10. Speech-induced striatal dopamine release is left lateralized and coupled to functional striatal circuits in healthy humans: A combined PET, fMRI and DTI study

    PubMed Central

    Simonyan, Kristina; Herscovitch, Peter; Horwitz, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Considerable progress has been recently made in understanding the brain mechanisms underlying speech and language control. However, the neurochemical underpinnings of normal speech production remain largely unknown. We investigated the extent of striatal endogenous dopamine release and its influences on the organization of functional striatal speech networks during production of meaningful English sentences using a combination of positron emission tomography (PET) with the dopamine D2/D3 receptor radioligand [11C]raclopride and functional MRI (fMRI). In addition, we used diffusion tensor tractography (DTI) to examine the extent of dopaminergic modulatory influences on striatal structural network organization. We found that, during sentence production, endogenous dopamine was released in the ventromedial portion of the dorsal striatum, in its both associative and sensorimotor functional divisions. In the associative striatum, speech-induced dopamine release established a significant relationship with neural activity and influenced the left-hemispheric lateralization of striatal functional networks. In contrast, there were no significant effects of endogenous dopamine release on the lateralization of striatal structural networks. Our data provide the first evidence for endogenous dopamine release in the dorsal striatum during normal speaking and point to the possible mechanisms behind the modulatory influences of dopamine on the organization of functional brain circuits controlling normal human speech. PMID:23277111

  11. Phasic dopamine release drives rapid activation of striatal D2-receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marcott, Pamela F; Mamaligas, Aphroditi A; Ford, Christopher P

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal dopamine transmission underlies numerous goal-directed behaviors. Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are a major target of dopamine in the striatum. However, as dopamine does not directly evoke a synaptic event in MSNs, the time course of dopamine signaling in these cells remains unclear. To examine how dopamine release activates D2-receptors on MSNs, G-protein activated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK2; Kir 3.2) channels were virally overexpressed in the striatum and the resulting outward currents were used as a sensor of D2-receptor activation. Electrical and optogenetic stimulation of dopamine terminals evoked robust D2-receptor inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) in GIRK2-expressing MSNs that occurred in under a second. Evoked D2-IPSCs could be driven by repetitive stimulation and were not occluded by background dopamine tone. Together, the results indicate that D2-receptors on MSNs exhibit functional low affinity and suggest that striatal D2-receptors can encode both tonic and phasic dopamine signals. PMID:25242218

  12. Sex differences in methamphetamine-evoked striatal dopamine of mice are reversed by nomifensine.

    PubMed

    Kunnathur, Vidhya; Shemisa, Kamal; Liu, Bin; Salvaterra, Ty J; Dluzen, Dean E

    2006-01-01

    Male mice show more severe striatal dopamine depletions to the psychostimulant, methamphetamine (MA). To gain some understanding for this sex difference, we examined MA-evoked dopamine (DA) responses from superfused striatal tissue fragments of male and female mice under conditions of a dopamine transporter which was either unaltered (Experiment 1) or inhibited, with use of the drug, nomifensine (Experiment 2). In Experiment 1, MA-evoked DA was significantly greater in male versus female mice. In Experiment 2, diminished, albeit statistically significant, DA responses to MA infusion in the presence of nomifensine were obtained from striatal tissue of female, but not male, mice. In Experiment 3, potassium-evoked DA responses and sex differences were abolished in the presence of nomifensine. These data demonstrate a clear sex difference in DA responses to MA. Interestingly, under conditions where dopamine transporter function is inhibited, MA retains its ability to evoke DA. However, this capacity was only observed within striatal tissue fragments of female mice and not under conditions of potassium-evoked DA. These results indicate an additional component for the bases of sex differences in nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in health and in disease. In particular, the present findings have important implications in suggesting an alternative, non-traditional, mechanism for MA effects and indicate that such a function is limited to females.

  13. Decreased Spontaneous Eye Blink Rates in Chronic Cannabis Users: Evidence for Striatal Cannabinoid-Dopamine Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Mikael A.; Colzato, Lorenza S.; Hommel, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    Chronic cannabis use has been shown to block long-term depression of GABA-glutamate synapses in the striatum, which is likely to reduce the extent to which endogenous cannabinoids modulate GABA- and glutamate-related neuronal activity. The current study aimed at investigating the effect of this process on striatal dopamine levels by studying the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a clinical marker of dopamine level in the striatum. 25 adult regular cannabis users and 25 non-user controls matched for age, gender, race, and IQ were compared. Results show a significant reduction in EBR in chronic users as compared to non-users, suggesting an indirect detrimental effect of chronic cannabis use on striatal dopaminergic functioning. Additionally, EBR correlated negatively with years of cannabis exposure, monthly peak cannabis consumption, and lifetime cannabis consumption, pointing to a relationship between the degree of impairment of striatal dopaminergic transmission and cannabis consumption history. PMID:22125599

  14. Striatal dopamine innervation and receptor density: regional effects of the weaver mutation.

    PubMed

    Pullara, J M; Marshall, J F

    1989-02-20

    Mice homozygous for the autosomal recessive gene weaver (wv) exhibit a regionally specific depletion of forebrain dopamine (DA). DA is reduced approximately 70% in the dorsal striatum of homozygotes (wv/wv) relative to heterozygous (+/wv) controls while DA content in ventral striatum is relatively unchanged. The goal of the present study was to determine the regional effects of the weaver mutation on striatal DA receptors and DA uptake sites using quantitative autoradiography. Catecholamine histofluorescence was used to examine midbrain DA-containing cell bodies. Compared to behaviorally normal (+/-) littermates, the binding of [3H]spiroperidol to D2 sites was significantly increased in the dorsal but not ventral striatum of wv/wv mice. Binding of the D1 ligand, [3H]SCH23390, was significantly decreased throughout the striatum of wv/wv mice. The binding of [3H]mazindol to DA uptake sites was dramatically reduced in all wv/wv striatal regions except the ventrolateral portion. Compared to +/- littermates, wv/wv mice had far fewer fluorescent cell bodies in the substantia nigra and a less pronounced reduction of ventral tegmental area fluorescent somata. These findings support the hypothesis that heterogeneities exist in the genetic control of the mesotelencephalic DA system. The results underscore the usefulness of the weaver mouse in the study of mesostriatal sub-systems, receptor regulation, and potentially as a model of human neuropathologies that affect distinct populations of cells in the mesotelencephalic system.

  15. Effects of dopaminergic treatment on striatal dopamine turnover in de novo Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Storch, Alexander; Wolz, Martin; Beuthien-Baumann, Bettina; Löhle, Matthias; Herting, Birgit; Schwanebeck, Uta; Oehme, Liane; van den Hoff, Jörg; Perick, Maria; Grählert, Xina; Kotzerke, Jörg; Reichmann, Heinz

    2013-05-07

    To evaluate the effects of levodopa and the dopamine D2 agonist cabergoline on striatal dopamine turnover estimated as the inverse of the effective dopamine distribution volume ratio (EDVR) measured by (18)F-dopa PET in de novo Parkinson disease (PD). Single-center, parallel-group, randomized, observer-blinded study of cabergoline (3 mg/day) and levodopa (300 mg/day) over 12 weeks in patients with de novo PD. Primary efficacy measure was the change of the side-to-side averaged putaminal EDVR comparing baseline and end-of-maintenance period. Thirty-five out of 39 randomized patients were assigned to the primary efficacy analysis (cabergoline, n = 17; levodopa, n = 18). At the end of treatment period, mean EDVRs were significantly lower compared to baseline solely in the levodopa group (relative change -1.0 ± 13.0% in cabergoline [p = 0.525 when compared to baseline], -8.3 ± 11.8% in levodopa group [p = 0.006]) with a nonsignificant trend between groups (mean relative difference: 7.3% (95% confidence interval -1.2% to 15.8%; p = 0.091). There was significant clinical improvement in both groups at 12 weeks compared to baseline, but no significant differences between groups in clinical and PET secondary outcome measures. Both pharmacologic treatments and PET scanning were well-tolerated and safe. Putaminal dopamine turnover is increased by levodopa treatment in de novo PD. The nonsignificant trend toward a larger influence by levodopa compared to cabergoline is supported by ancillary statistical analyses. This augmentation of early compensatory events by levodopa might contribute not only to its symptomatic effects, but also to its induction of motor complications.

  16. Convergence of dopamine and glutamate signaling onto striatal ERK activation in response to drugs of abuse

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Emma; Salery, Marine; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2014-01-01

    Despite their distinct targets, all addictive drugs commonly abused by humans evoke increases in dopamine (DA) concentration within the striatum. The main DA Guanine nucleotide binding protein couple receptors (GPCRs) expressed by medium-sized spiny neurons of the striatum are the D1R and D2R, which are positively and negatively coupled to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling, respectively. These two DA GPCRs are largely segregated into distinct neuronal populations, where they are co-expressed with glutamate receptors in dendritic spines. Direct and indirect interactions between DA GPCRs and glutamate receptors are the molecular basis by which DA modulates glutamate transmission and controls striatal plasticity and behavior induced by drugs of abuse. A major downstream target of striatal D1R is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase pathway. ERK activation by drugs of abuse behaves as a key integrator of D1R and glutamate NMDAR signaling. Once activated, ERK can trigger chromatin remodeling and induce gene expression that permits long-term cellular alterations and drug-induced morphological and behavioral changes. Besides the classical cAMP/PKA pathway, downstream of D1R, recent evidence implicates a cAMP-independent crosstalk mechanism by which the D1R potentiates NMDAR-mediated calcium influx and ERK activation. The mounting evidence of reciprocal modulation of DA and glutamate receptors adds further intricacy to striatal synaptic signaling and is liable to prove relevant for addictive drug-induced signaling, plasticity, and behavior. Herein, we review the evidence that built our understanding of the consequences of this synergistic signaling for the actions of drugs of abuse. PMID:24409148

  17. Pergolide inhibition of calcium-induced /sup 3/H-dopamine release from striatal synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Weiner, N.

    1986-03-05

    Several investigators have reported that dopamine agonists or antagonists are unable to modulate the K/sup +/-evoked release of /sup 3/H-dopamine (/sup 3/H-DA) from striatal synaptosomes. To further assess the role of DA in regulating its release, they have examined the effects of pergolide on Ca/sup + +/ (1.25 mM)-evoked release of /sup 3/H-DA from partially K/sup +/-depolarized striatal synaptosomes. Synaptosomes (P2 pellet) were isolated from rat striatum and incubated for 5 min at 37/sup 0/C in a Ca/sup + +/-free Krebs-Ringer buffer containing 25 nM /sup 3/H-DA. After radiolabeling, the synaptosomes were superfused for 12 min with Ca/sup + +/-free 6 mM Krebs-Ringer buffer to determine basal release of /sup 3/H-DA. Synaptosomes were then exposed to test drugs for 8 min prior to Ca/sup + +/ challenge. Ca/sup + +/ addition resulted in a 3-fold increase in /sup 3/H-DA release within 2-4 min. Pergolide inhibited the release of /sup 3/H-DA in a concentration-dependent manner. Release was inhibited to 56% of control by 10 nM pergolide. This was largely reversed by 0.1 ..mu..M S-sulpiride. Ca/sup + +/-evoked release was inhibited over 70% by 1 ..mu..M tetrodotoxin (TTX), indicating that voltage-dependent Na/sup +/ channels may play a role in the release process. The combination of pergolide and TTX inhibited release to a degree similar to TTX alone. These results suggest that pergolide may inhibit /sup 3/H-DA release by a TTX-sensitive mechanism and that the dopaminergic autoreceptors may be linked to voltage-sensitive Na/sup +/ channels.

  18. The atypical dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 83959 induces striatal Fos expression in rats.

    PubMed

    Wirtshafter, David; Osborn, Catherine V

    2005-12-28

    The effects of dopamine D1 receptor agonists are often presumed to result from an activation of adenylyl cyclase, but dopamine D1 receptors may also be linked to other signal transduction cascades and the relative importance of these various pathways is currently unclear. SKF 83959 is an agonist at dopamine D1 receptors linked to phospholipase C, but has been reported to be an antagonist at receptors linked to adenylyl cyclase. The current report demonstrates that SKF 83959 induces pronounced, nonpatchy, expression of the immediate-early gene product Fos in the striatum of intact rats which can be converted to a patchy pattern by pretreatment with the dopamine D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole. In rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions SKF 83959 induces strong behavioral rotation and a greatly potentiated Fos response. All of the responses to SKF 83959, in both intact and dopamine-depleted animals, can be blocked by pretreatment with the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH-23390. In intact subjects, SKF 83959 induced Fos expression less potently than the standard dopamine D1 receptor agonist SKF 82958, but the two drugs were approximately equipotent in deinnervated animals. These results demonstrate for the first time that possession of full efficacy at dopamine D1 receptors linked to adenylyl cyclase is not a necessary requirement for the induction of striatal Fos expression in intact animals and suggest that alternative signal transduction pathways may play a role in dopamine agonist induced Fos expression, especially in dopamine-depleted subjects.

  19. Striatal dopamine transporters correlate with simple reaction time in elderly subjects

    PubMed Central

    van Dyck, Christopher H.; Avery, Robert A.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Marek, Kenneth L.; Quinlan, Donald M.; Baldwin, Ronald M.; Seibyl, John P.; Innis, Robert B.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.

    2011-01-01

    The decline in motor performance that accompanies advanced age has unclear neurobiological substrates but may relate, in part, to degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system. This research tested the hypothesis that striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in healthy elderly individuals was related to measures of motor performance. Thirty-six healthy volunteers (18 male, 18 female) who ranged in age from 68 to 88 (75.4±4.9 years) received a neuropsychological evaluation that included two primary motor measures (tested with dominant hand): 1) Simple Reaction Time (SRT); and 2) Finger Tapping (FT). Subjects underwent SPECT scanning with [123I]2ß-carbomethoxy-3ß-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ([123I]ß-CIT) for measurement of striatal DAT availability. A ratio of specific to nondisplaceable brain uptake (i.e., V3″=[striatal−occipital]/occipital), a measure proportional to the binding potential (Bmax/KD), was derived. SRT was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability with or without controlling for the contribution of age. However, contrary to hypothesis, FT was not correlated with striatal DAT availability. Comparison measures, including episodic memory and general intelligence, were also unrelated to striatal DAT availability. These results demonstrate that a loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic function likely contributes to slowing of reaction speed with advancing age. PMID:17363113

  20. Changes in Striatal Dopamine Release Associated with Human Motor-Skill Acquisition

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Shoji; Ueki, Yoshino; Kato, Takashi; Matsukawa, Noriyuki; Mima, Tatsuya; Hallett, Mark; Ito, Kengo; Ojika, Kosei

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition of new motor skills is essential throughout daily life and involves the processes of learning new motor sequence and encoding elementary aspects of new movement. Although previous animal studies have suggested a functional importance for striatal dopamine release in the learning of new motor sequence, its role in encoding elementary aspects of new movement has not yet been investigated. To elucidate this, we investigated changes in striatal dopamine levels during initial skill-training (Day 1) compared with acquired conditions (Day 2) using 11C-raclopride positron-emission tomography. Ten volunteers learned to perform brisk contractions using their non-dominant left thumbs with the aid of visual feedback. On Day 1, the mean acceleration of each session was improved through repeated training sessions until performance neared asymptotic levels, while improved motor performance was retained from the beginning on Day 2. The 11C-raclopride binding potential (BP) in the right putamen was reduced during initial skill-training compared with under acquired conditions. Moreover, voxel-wise analysis revealed that 11C-raclopride BP was particularly reduced in the right antero-dorsal to the lateral part of the putamen. Based on findings from previous fMRI studies that show a gradual shift of activation within the striatum during the initial processing of motor learning, striatal dopamine may play a role in the dynamic cortico-striatal activation during encoding of new motor memory in skill acquisition. PMID:22355391

  1. Dopamine depletion impairs gait automaticity by altering cortico-striatal and cerebellar processing in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gilat, Moran; Bell, Peter T; Ehgoetz Martens, Kaylena A; Georgiades, Matthew J; Hall, Julie M; Walton, Courtney C; Lewis, Simon J G; Shine, James M

    2017-03-03

    -scale network interactions during gait. A main effect of medication was found for functional connectivity within an attentional motor network and a significant condition by medication interaction for functional connectivity was found within the striatum. Furthermore, functional connectivity within the striatum correlated strongly with increasing step time variability during walk in the off state (r=0.616, p=0.002), but not in the on state (r=-0.233, p=0.284). Post-hoc analyses revealed that functional connectivity in the dopamine depleted state within an orbitofrontal-striatal limbic circuit was correlated with worse step time variability (r=0.653, p<0.001). Overall, this study demonstrates that dopamine ameliorates gait automaticity in Parkinson's disease by altering striatal, limbic and cerebellar processing, thereby informing future therapeutic avenues for gait and falls prevention.

  2. DOPAMINE RECEPTOR ACTIVATION REVEALS A NOVEL, KYNURENATE-SENSITIVE COMPONENT OF STRIATAL NMDA NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Poeggeler, Burkhard; Rassoulpour, Arash; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Guidetti, Paolo; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Schwarcz, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors plays an important role in brain physiology, but excessive receptor stimulation results in seizures and excitotoxic nerve cell death. NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal excitation and injury can be prevented by high, non-physiological concentrations of the neuroinhibitory tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA). Here we report that endogenous KYNA, which is formed in and released from astrocytes, controls NMDA receptors in vivo. This was revealed with the aid of the dopaminergic drugs d-amphetamine and apomorphine, which cause rapid, transient decreases in striatal KYNA levels in rats. Intrastriatal injections of the excitotoxins NMDA or quinolinate (but not the non-NMDA receptor agonist kainate) at the time of maximal KYNA reduction resulted in 2-3-fold increases in excitotoxic lesion size. Pre-treatment with kynurenine 3-hydroxylase inhibitors or dopamine receptor antagonists, two classes of pharmacological agents that prevented the reduction in brain KYNA caused by dopaminergic stimulation, abolished the potentiation of neurotoxicity. Thus, the present study identifies a previously unappreciated role of KYNA as a functional link between dopamine receptor stimulation and NMDA neurotoxicity in the striatum. PMID:17629627

  3. Striatal dopamine release and biphasic pattern of locomotor and motor activity under gas narcosis.

    PubMed

    Balon, Norbert; Risso, Jean-Jacques; Blanc, François; Rostain, Jean-Claude; Weiss, Michel

    2003-05-02

    Inert gas narcosis is a neurological syndrome appearing when humans or animals are exposed to hyperbaric inert gases (nitrogen, argon) composed by motor and cognitive impairments. Inert gas narcosis induces a decrease of the dopamine release at the striatum level, structure involved in the regulation of the extrapyramidal motricity. We have investigated, in freely moving rats exposed to different narcotic conditions, the relationship between the locomotor and motor activity and the striatal dopamine release, using respectively a computerized device that enables a quantitative analysis of this behavioural disturbance and voltammetry. The use of 3 MPa of nitrogen, 2 MPa of argon and 0.1 MPa of nitrous oxide, revealed after a transient phase of hyperactivity, a lower level of the locomotor and motor activity, in relation with the decrease of the striatal dopamine release. It is concluded that the striatal dopamine decrease could be related to the decrease of the locomotor and motor hyperactivity, but that other(s) neurotransmitter(s) could be primarily involved in the behavioural motor disturbances induced by narcotics. This biphasic effect could be of major importance for future pharmacological investigations, and motor categorization, on the basic mechanisms of inert gas at pressure.

  4. Ventral striatal prediction error signaling is associated with dopamine synthesis capacity and fluid intelligence.

    PubMed

    Schlagenhauf, Florian; Rapp, Michael A; Huys, Quentin J M; Beck, Anne; Wüstenberg, Torsten; Deserno, Lorenz; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Kalbitzer, Jan; Buchert, Ralph; Bauer, Michael; Kienast, Thorsten; Cumming, Paul; Plotkin, Michail; Kumakura, Yoshitaka; Grace, Anthony A; Dolan, Raymond J; Heinz, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Fluid intelligence represents the capacity for flexible problem solving and rapid behavioral adaptation. Rewards drive flexible behavioral adaptation, in part via a teaching signal expressed as reward prediction errors in the ventral striatum, which has been associated with phasic dopamine release in animal studies. We examined a sample of 28 healthy male adults using multimodal imaging and biological parametric mapping with (1) functional magnetic resonance imaging during a reversal learning task and (2) in a subsample of 17 subjects also with positron emission tomography using 6-[(18) F]fluoro-L-DOPA to assess dopamine synthesis capacity. Fluid intelligence was measured using a battery of nine standard neuropsychological tests. Ventral striatal BOLD correlates of reward prediction errors were positively correlated with fluid intelligence and, in the right ventral striatum, also inversely correlated with dopamine synthesis capacity (FDOPA K inapp). When exploring aspects of fluid intelligence, we observed that prediction error signaling correlates with complex attention and reasoning. These findings indicate that individual differences in the capacity for flexible problem solving relate to ventral striatal activation during reward-related learning, which in turn proved to be inversely associated with ventral striatal dopamine synthesis capacity.

  5. Reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Body Dysmorphic Disorder.

    PubMed

    Vulink, Nienke C; Planting, Robin S; Figee, Martijn; Booij, Jan; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    Though the dopaminergic system is implicated in Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders (OCRD), the dopaminergic system has never been investigated in-vivo in Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD). In line with consistent findings of reduced striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD), we hypothesized that the dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in the striatum will be lower in patients with BDD in comparison to healthy subjects. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor Binding Potential (BPND) was examined in 12 drug-free BDD patients and 12 control subjects pairwise matched by age, sex, and handedness using [(123)I]iodobenzamide Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT; bolus/constant infusion technique). Regions of interest were the caudate nucleus and the putamen. BPND was calculated as the ratio of specific striatal to binding in the occipital cortex (representing nonspecific binding). Compared to controls, dopamine D2/3 receptor BPND was significantly lower in BDD, both in the putamen (p=0.017) and caudate nucleus (p=0.022). This study provides the first evidence of a disturbed dopaminergic system in BDD patients. Although previously BDD was classified as a separate disorder (somatoform disorder), our findings give pathophysiological support for the recent reclassification of BDD to the OCRD in DSM-5. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Daigle, Tanya L.; Wetsel, William C.; Caron, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. While it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, an understanding of the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum is not well understood. Here we use knockout (KO) mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal ERK1/2 signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of cannabinoids. This cellular pathway has been implicated as a central mediator of drug reward and synaptic plasticity. In C57BL/6J mice, acute administration of cannabinoid agonists, HU-210 and Δ9-THC, promotes a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal striatum. Co-administration of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) antagonist AM251 with HU-210 prevents ERK1/2 inactivation, indicating a requirement for activation of this receptor. In dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) KO animals treated with HU-210, the magnitude of the HU-210-dependent decrease in striatal ERK1/2 signaling is greater than in wild-type controls. In contrast, the HU-210 administration to NMDA receptor knockdown mice (NR1-Kd) was ineffective at promoting striatal ERK1/2 inactivation. Genetic deletion of other potential ERK1/2 mediators, the dopamine D2 receptors (D2R)s or βarrestin-1 or -2, did not affect HU-210-induced modulation of ERK1/2 signaling in the striatum. These results support the hypothesis that dopamine D1 receptors and NMDA receptors act in an opposite manner to regulate striatal CB1R signal transduction. PMID:22034973

  7. Dopamine D2 Receptors Regulate Collateral Inhibition between Striatal Medium Spiny Neurons

    PubMed Central

    van der Goes, Marie-Sophie; Partridge, John G.; Vicini, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    The principle neurons of the striatum are GABAergic medium spiny neurons (MSNs), whose collateral synapses onto neighboring neurons play critical roles in striatal function. MSNs can be divided by dopamine receptor expression into D1-class and D2-class MSNs, and alterations in D2 MSNs are associated with various pathological states. Despite overwhelming evidence for D2 receptors (D2Rs) in maintaining proper striatal function, it remains unclear how MSN collaterals are specifically altered by D2R activation. Here, we report that chronic D2R stimulation regulates MSN collaterals in vitro by presynaptic and postsynaptic mechanisms. We used corticostriatal cultures from mice in which MSN subtypes were distinguished by fluorophore expression. Quinpirole, an agonist for D2/3 receptors, was used to chronically activate D2Rs. Quinpirole increased the rate and strength of collateral formation onto D2R-containing MSNs as measured by dual whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. Additionally, these neurons were more sensitive to low concentrations of GABA and exhibited an increase in gephyrin puncta density, suggesting increased postsynaptic GABAA receptors. Last, quinpirole treatment increased presynaptic GABA release sites, as shown by increased frequency of sIPSCs and mIPSCs, correlating with increased VGAT (vesicular GABA transporter) puncta. Combined with the observation that there were no detectable differences in sensitivity to specific GABAA receptor modulators, we provide evidence that D2R activation powerfully transforms MSN collaterals via coordinated presynaptic and postsynaptic alterations. As the D2 class of MSNs is highly implicated in Parkinson's disease and other neurological disorders, our findings may contribute to understanding and treating the changes that occur in these pathological states. PMID:23986243

  8. Probabilistic classification learning with corrective feedback is associated with in vivo striatal dopamine release in the ventral striatum, while learning without feedback is not

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Leonora; Tai, Yen Foung; Lin, Chia Shu; Lagnado, David Albert; Brooks, David James; Piccini, Paola; Jahanshahi, Marjan

    2014-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) mediate certain types of procedural learning, such as probabilistic classification learning on the ‘weather prediction task’ (WPT). Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), who have BG dysfunction, are impaired at WPT-learning, but it remains unclear what component of the WPT is important for learning to occur. We tested the hypothesis that learning through processing of corrective feedback is the essential component and is associated with release of striatal dopamine. We employed two WPT paradigms, either involving learning via processing of corrective feedback (FB) or in a paired associate manner (PA). To test the prediction that learning on the FB but not PA paradigm would be associated with dopamine release in the striatum, we used serial 11C-raclopride (RAC) positron emission tomography (PET), to investigate striatal dopamine release during FB and PA WPT-learning in healthy individuals. Two groups, FB, (n = 7) and PA (n = 8), underwent RAC PET twice, once while performing the WPT and once during a control task. Based on a region-of-interest approach, striatal RAC-binding potentials reduced by 13–17% in the right ventral striatum when performing the FB compared to control task, indicating release of synaptic dopamine. In contrast, right ventral striatal RAC binding non-significantly increased by 9% during the PA task. While differences between the FB and PA versions of the WPT in effort and decision-making is also relevant, we conclude striatal dopamine is released during FB-based WPT-learning, implicating the striatum and its dopamine connections in mediating learning with FB. PMID:24777947

  9. The neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors alpha 4* and alpha 6* differentially modulate dopamine release in mouse striatal slices.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Erin L; Yoshikami, Doju; McIntosh, J Michael

    2008-06-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) plays a major role in the regulation of motor coordination and in the processing of salient information. We used voltammetry to monitor DA-release evoked by electrical stimulation in striatal slices, where interneurons continuously release acetylcholine. Use of the alpha6-selective antagonist alpha-conotoxin MII[E11A] and alpha4 knockout mice enabled identification of two populations of DA-ergic fibers. The first population had a low action potential threshold, and action potential-evoked DA-release from these fibers was modulated by alpha6. The second population had a higher action potential threshold, and only alpha4(non-alpha6) modulated action potential-evoked DA-release. Striatal DA-ergic neurons fire in both tonic and phasic patterns. When stimuli were applied in a train to mimic phasic firing, more DA-release was observed in alpha4 knockout versus wild-type mice. Furthermore, block of alpha4(non-alpha6), but not of alpha6, increased DA release evoked by a train. These results indicate that there are different classes of striatal DA-ergic fibers that express different subtypes of nicotinic receptors.

  10. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward

    PubMed Central

    Stouffer, Melissa A.; Woods, Catherine A.; Patel, Jyoti C.; Lee, Christian R.; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P.; Jones, Kymry T.; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E. A.; Carr, Kenneth D.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate–putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices. PMID:26503322

  11. Insulin enhances striatal dopamine release by activating cholinergic interneurons and thereby signals reward.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Woods, Catherine A; Patel, Jyoti C; Lee, Christian R; Witkovsky, Paul; Bao, Li; Machold, Robert P; Jones, Kymry T; de Vaca, Soledad Cabeza; Reith, Maarten E A; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2015-10-27

    Insulin activates insulin receptors (InsRs) in the hypothalamus to signal satiety after a meal. However, the rising incidence of obesity, which results in chronically elevated insulin levels, implies that insulin may also act in brain centres that regulate motivation and reward. We report here that insulin can amplify action potential-dependent dopamine (DA) release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and caudate-putamen through an indirect mechanism that involves striatal cholinergic interneurons that express InsRs. Furthermore, two different chronic diet manipulations in rats, food restriction (FR) and an obesogenic (OB) diet, oppositely alter the sensitivity of striatal DA release to insulin, with enhanced responsiveness in FR, but loss of responsiveness in OB. Behavioural studies show that intact insulin levels in the NAc shell are necessary for acquisition of preference for the flavour of a paired glucose solution. Together, these data imply that striatal insulin signalling enhances DA release to influence food choices.

  12. Inhibition by apomorphine of the metoclopramide-induced catalepsy and increase in striatal homovanillic acid content.

    PubMed Central

    Ahtee, L

    1975-01-01

    1 The mechanism of the cataleptic effect of metoclopramide was analyzed by using drugs which alter the activity of dopaminergic or cholinergic neurones or the content of psi-aminobutyric acid in the central nervous system of rats. 2 The cataleptic effect of metoclopramide (20 mg/kg) was antagonized by apomorphine (10 mg/kg) and by atropine (50 mg/kg). Aminoxyacete acid (AOAA, 25-50 mg/kg) potentiated the catalepsy induced by metoclopramide (5 mg/kg). 3 Metoclopramide alone did not alter the rectal temperature of rats. It did not alter the AOAA-induced hypothermia, but it partially antagonized apomorphine-induced hypothermia. 4 Metoclopramide induced a six-fold increase in striatal homovanillic acid (HVA) concentration, but it did not change the dopamine or noradrenaline content in the brain of rats. Apomorphine decreased the striatal HVA concentration in control and in metoclopramide-treated rats. Atropine and AOAA did not alter the metoclopramide-induced increase in striatal HVA concentration. 5 The results suggest that metoclopramide produces catalepsy by blocking striatal dopamine receptors. PMID:1239323

  13. Role of aberrant striatal dopamine D1 receptor/cAMP/protein kinase A/DARPP32 signaling in the paradoxical calming effect of amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Francesco; Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Federici, Mauro; Carta, Manolo; Errico, Francesco; Magara, Salvatore; Martella, Giuseppina; Nisticò, Robert; Centonze, Diego; Pisani, Antonio; Gu, Howard H; Mercuri, Nicola B; Usiello, Alessandro

    2010-08-18

    Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is characterized by inattention, impulsivity, and motor hyperactivity. Several lines of research support a crucial role for the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in this psychiatric disease. Consistently, the most commonly prescribed medications in ADHD treatment are stimulant drugs, known to preferentially act on DAT. Recently, a knock-in mouse [DAT-cocaine insensitive (DAT-CI)] has been generated carrying a cocaine-insensitive DAT that is functional but with reduced dopamine uptake function. DAT-CI mutants display enhanced striatal extracellular dopamine levels and basal motor hyperactivity. Herein, we showed that DAT-CI animals present higher striatal dopamine turnover, altered basal phosphorylation state of dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 kDa (DARPP32) at Thr75 residue, but preserved D(2) receptor (D(2)R) function. However, although we demonstrated that striatal D(1) receptor (D(1)R) is physiologically responsive under basal conditions, its stimulus-induced activation strikingly resulted in paradoxical electrophysiological, behavioral, and biochemical responses. Indeed, in DAT-CI animals, (1) striatal LTP was completely disrupted, (2) R-(+)-6-chloro-7,8-dihydroxy-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (SKF 81297) treatment induced paradoxical motor calming effects, and (3) SKF 81297 administration failed to increase cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)/DARPP32 signaling. Such biochemical alteration selectively affected dopamine D(1)Rs since haloperidol, by blocking the tonic inhibition of D(2)R, unmasked a normal activation of striatal adenosine A(2A) receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA/DARPP32 cascade in mutants. Most importantly, our studies highlighted that amphetamine, nomifensine, and bupropion, through increased striatal dopaminergic transmission, are able to revert motor hyperactivity of DAT-CI animals. Overall, our results suggest that the paradoxical motor calming effect induced by these

  14. Striatal neurones have a specific ability to respond to phasic dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Castro, Liliana R V; Brito, Marina; Guiot, Elvire; Polito, Marina; Korn, Christoph W; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Paupardin-Tritsch, Danièle; Vincent, Pierre

    2013-07-01

      The cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signalling cascade is ubiquitous, and each step in this cascade involves enzymes that are expressed in multiple isoforms. We investigated the effects of this diversity on the integration of the pathway in the target cell by comparing prefrontal cortical neurones with striatal neurones which express a very specific set of signalling proteins. The prefrontal cortex and striatum both receive dopaminergic inputs and we analysed the dynamics of the cAMP/PKA signal triggered by dopamine D1 receptors in these two brain structures. Biosensor imaging in mouse brain slice preparations showed profound differences in the D1 response between pyramidal cortical neurones and striatal medium spiny neurones: the cAMP/PKA response was much stronger, faster and longer lasting in striatal neurones than in pyramidal cortical neurones. We identified three molecular determinants underlying these differences: different activities of phosphodiesterases, particularly those of type 4, which strongly damp the cAMP signal in the cortex but not in the striatum; stronger adenylyl cyclase activity in the striatum, generating responses with a faster onset than in the cortex; and DARPP-32, a phosphatase inhibitor which prolongs PKA action in the striatum. Striatal neurones were also highly responsive in terms of gene expression since a single sub-second dopamine stimulation is sufficient to trigger c-Fos expression in the striatum, but not in the cortex. Our data show how specific molecular elements of the cAMP/PKA signalling cascade selectively enable the principal striatal neurones to respond to brief dopamine stimuli, a critical process in incentive learning.

  15. Effect of ionizing radiation on in vivo striatal release of dopamine in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Han-Tong Chen; Kandasamy, S.B.

    1996-07-01

    The time-course effect of ionizing radiation on the levels of basal and KCl-stimulated striatal release of dopamine (DA) was examined in vivo using microdialysis techniques. The basal level of extracellular DA in sham-irradiated controls was 0.172 {plus_minus} 0.042 pmol/sample (n = 9), and it increased 7.1-fold after the stimulation by 30 mM KCl (20 {mu}l). However, the release of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), two metabolites of DA, was reduced significantly by 30 mM KCl(P {le} 0.05). In the presence of 10 {mu}M forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, a second stimulation by 30 mM KCl increased the release of DA 6.9-fold. Radiation exposure, at a dose of 10 Gyt at 10 Gy/min, had no significant effect on the levels of either basal or KCl-stimulated release of DA or on the release of DOPAC and HVA. Striatal DA releases increased in response to two consecutive challenges of KCl. However, the release of DA in response to the second challenge of KCl was significantly smaller than that after the first challenge (543 {plus_minus} 110% compared to 794 {plus_minus} 164%, P {le} 0.05; Student`s paired t test). Pretreatment with 10 {mu}M forskolin, which by itself had no significant effect on the level of basal release of DA, prevented the decreased response of DA to the second challenge of KCl. Our results suggest that radiation exposure at the dose we used has no significant effect on the level of the basal release of DA or the release of DA stimulated by 30 mM KCl in the rat striatum, and that a reduced release of DA in response to repeated KCl stimulation might involve the cAMP effector system. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Altered striatal function in a mutant mouse lacking D1A dopamine receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Drago, J; Gerfen, C R; Lachowicz, J E; Steiner, H; Hollon, T R; Love, P E; Ooi, G T; Grinberg, A; Lee, E J; Huang, S P

    1994-01-01

    Of the five known dopamine receptors, D1A and D2 represent the major subtypes expressed in the striatum of the adult brain. Within the striatum, these two subtypes are differentially distributed in the two main neuronal populations that provide direct and indirect pathways between the striatum and the output nuclei of the basal ganglia. Movement disorders, including Parkinson disease and various dystonias, are thought to result from imbalanced activity in these pathways. Dopamine regulates movement through its differential effects on D1A receptors expressed by direct output neurons and D2 receptors expressed by indirect output neurons. To further examine the interaction of D1A and D2 neuronal pathways in the striatum, we used homologous recombination to generate mutant mice lacking functional D1A receptors (D1A-/-). D1A-/- mutants are growth retarded and die shortly after weaning age unless their diet is supplemented with hydrated food. With such treatment the mice gain weight and survive to adulthood. Neurologically, D1A-/- mice exhibit normal coordination and locomotion, although they display a significant decrease in rearing behavior. Examination of the striatum revealed changes associated with the altered phenotype of these mutants. D1A receptor binding was absent in striatal sections from D1A-/- mice. Striatal neurons normally expressing functional D1A receptors are formed and persist in adult homozygous mutants. Moreover, substance P mRNA, which is colocalized specifically in striatal neurons with D1A receptors, is expressed at a reduced level. In contrast, levels of enkephalin mRNA, which is expressed in striatal neurons with D2 receptors, are unaffected. These findings show that D1A-/- mice exhibit selective functional alterations in the striatal neurons giving rise to the direct striatal output pathway. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7809078

  17. Regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in striatal and prefrontal cortical brain slices

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Brain slices were used to investigate the role of nerve terminal autoreceptors in modulating dopamine (DA) synthesis and release in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) was used as an index of tyrosine hydroxylation in vitro. Nomifensine, a DA uptake blocker, inhibited DOPA synthesis in striatal but not prefrontal slices. This effect was reversed by the DA antagonist sulpiride, suggesting it involved activation of DA receptors by elevated synaptic levels of DA. The autoreceptor-selective agonist EMD-23-448 also inhibited striatal but not prefrontal DOPA synthesis. DOPA synthesis was stimulated in both brain regions by elevated K/sup +/, however only striatal synthesis could be further enhanced by sulpiride. DA release was measured by following the efflux of radioactivity from brain slices prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)-DA. EMD-23-448 and apomorphine inhibited, while sulpiride enhanced, the K/sup +/-evoked overflow of radioactivity from both striatal and prefrontal cortical slices. These findings suggest that striatal DA nerve terminals possess autoreceptors which modulate tyrosine hydroxylation as well as autoreceptors which modulate release. Alternatively, one site may be coupled to both functions through distinct transduction mechanisms. In contrast, autoreceptors on prefrontal cortical terminals appear to regulate DA release but not DA synthesis.

  18. Genetic variation in components of dopamine neurotransmission impacts ventral striatal reactivity associated with impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, EE; Brown, SM; Kimak, M; Ferrell, RE; Manuck, SB; Hariri, AR

    2009-01-01

    Individual differences in traits such as impulsivity involve high reward sensitivity and are associated with risk for substance use disorders. The ventral striatum (VS) has been widely implicated in reward processing, and individual differences in its function are linked to these disorders. Dopamine (DA) plays a critical role in reward processing and is a potent neuromodulator of VS reactivity. Moreover, altered DA signaling has been associated with normal and pathological reward-related behaviors. Functional polymorphisms in DA-related genes represent an important source of variability in DA function that may subsequently impact VS reactivity and associated reward-related behaviors. Using an imaging genetics approach, we examined the modulatory effects of common, putatively functional DA-related polymorphisms on reward-related VS reactivity associated with self-reported impulsivity. Genetic variants associated with relatively increased striatal DA release (DRD2 – 141C deletion) and availability (DAT1 9-repeat), as well as diminished inhibitory postsynaptic DA effects (DRD2 – 141C deletion and DRD4 7-repeat), predicted 9–12% of the interindividual variability in reward-related VS reactivity. In contrast, genetic variation directly affecting DA signaling only in the prefrontal cortex (COMT Val158Met) was not associated with variability in VS reactivity. Our results highlight an important role for genetic polymorphisms affecting striatal DA neurotransmission in mediating interindividual differences in reward-related VS reactivity. They further suggest that altered VS reactivity may represent a key neurobiological pathway through which these polymorphisms contribute to variability in behavioral impulsivity and related risk for substance use disorders. PMID:17893706

  19. Restorative effects of GDNF on striatal dopamine release in rats treated with neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Cass, W A; Manning, M W; Bailey, S L

    2000-09-01

    Repeated methamphetamine (METH) administration to animals can result in long-lasting decreases in striatal dopamine (DA) release and content. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has pronounced effects on dopaminergic systems in vivo, including neuroprotective effects against METH. The present experiments were designed to examine the ability of GDNF to reverse, or accelerate recovery from, METH-induced alterations in striatal DA release. Male Fischer-344 rats were administered METH (5 mg/kg, s.c.) or saline 4 times in one day at 2-hour intervals. Seven days later the animals were anesthetized and given a single injection of 10 microg GDNF, or vehicle, into the right striatum. Three weeks later microdialysis experiments were carried out in both the right and left striata to examine basal and evoked levels of DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA). In animals treated with METH followed by vehicle 7 days later, there were significant reductions in potassium- and amphetamine-evoked overflow of DA, and in basal levels of DOPAC and HVA, compared to control animals. In rats treated with METH followed 7 days later with GDNF, there were significant increases in potassium- and amphetamine-evoked overflow of DA on the right, GDNF-treated, side of the brain compared to the left side. Basal levels of DOPAC and HVA were also elevated on the GDNF-treated side of the brain. These results suggest that GDNF can accelerate recovery of dopaminergic release processes in the striatum of rats treated with neurotoxic doses of METH.

  20. Striatal Dopamine Depletion Patterns and Early Non-Motor Burden in Parkinsons Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Jung; Ham, Jee Hyun; Ye, Byoung Seok; Lee, Phil Hyu; Sohn, Young H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The mechanism underlying non-motor symptoms in Parkinson’s disease has not yet been elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that Parkinson patients with more non-motor symptoms have a different pattern of striatal dopamine depletion, particularly in areas other than the sensorimotor striatum, compared to those with fewer non-motor symptoms. Methods We conducted a prospective survey of the degree of non-motor symptoms (using the Korean version of the Non-Motor Symptoms Scale; K-NMSS) in 151 patients with early-stage Parkinson’s disease who had undergone a dopamine transporter PET scan as an initial diagnostic procedure. We classified the patients into two groups; high non-motor patients (HNM-PD; K-NMSS score ≥ 41) and low non-motor patients (LNM-PD). Results Patients in the HNM-PD group (n = 71) were older, had longer symptom duration, exhibited more severe motor deficits, and had been prescribed higher levodopa-equivalent doses at follow-up than those in the LNM-PD group. However, dopamine transporter binding to the striatal sub-regions and inter-sub-regional binding ratios were comparable between the two groups. A general linear model showed that the HNM-PD group had significantly more severe motor deficits than the LNM-PD group after controlling for age, gender, symptom duration, and dopamine transporter binding to the sensorimotor striatum. Conclusions This study demonstrated that the pattern of striatal dopamine depletion does not contribute to early non-motor burden in Parkinson’s disease. Our results suggest that LNM-PD patients may have a more benign course of motor symptom progression than HNM-PD patients. PMID:27529171

  1. Incentive motivation is associated with striatal dopamine asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Rachel; Goldstein, Rita Z; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wong, Christopher; Volkow, Nora D

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in modulating incentive motivation, expressed behaviorally as approach behavior. EEG studies report association between approach behavior and asymmetric pattern of activation in anterior cortical regions (as measured by the inverse of EEG alpha power). Therefore, individual differences in incentive motivation may reflect asymmetries in dopaminergic systems. We examined this hypothesis by studying the relationship between self-reported degree of incentive motivation, and asymmetry of D2 receptor availability in healthy volunteers. Nineteen healthy participants were studied with positron emission tomography (PET) and [11C]raclopride to assess the availability of dopamine D2 receptors in left and right striatum. Incentive motivation was assessed by the Achievement scale of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire. The Achievement score was negatively correlated with the Asymmetry Index ([R-L]/[R+L]) of D2 receptor availability (r=-.721, p=.001), suggesting that greater positive incentive motivation is associated with higher receptor availability in the left relative to the right hemisphere.

  2. Nature or nurture? Determining the heritability of human striatal dopamine function: an [18F]-DOPA PET study.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Shotbolt, Paul; Mehta, Mitul A; Turkheimer, Eric; Benecke, Aaf; Copeland, Caroline; Turkheimer, Federico E; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver D

    2013-02-01

    Striatal dopamine function is important for normal personality, cognitive processes and behavior, and abnormalities are linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, no studies have examined the relative influence of genetic inheritance and environmental factors in determining striatal dopamine function. Using [18F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET), we sought to determine the heritability of presynaptic striatal dopamine function by comparing variability in uptake values in same sex monozygotic (MZ) twins to dizygotic (DZ) twins. Nine MZ and 10 DZ twin pairs underwent high-resolution [18F]-DOPA PET to assess presynaptic striatal dopamine function. Uptake values for the overall striatum and functional striatal subdivisions were determined by a Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. Heritability, shared environmental effects and non-shared individual-specific effects were estimated using a region of interest (ROI) analysis and a confirmatory parametric analysis. Overall striatal heritability estimates from the ROI and parametric analyses were 0.44 and 0.33, respectively. We found a distinction between striatal heritability in the functional subdivisions, with the greatest heritability estimates occurring in the sensorimotor striatum and the greatest effect of individual-specific environmental factors in the limbic striatum. Our results indicate that variation in overall presynaptic striatal dopamine function is determined by a combination of genetic factors and individual-specific environmental factors, with familial environmental effects having no effect. These findings underline the importance of individual-specific environmental factors for striatal dopaminergic function, particularly in the limbic striatum, with implications for understanding neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and addictions.

  3. Nature or Nurture? Determining the Heritability of Human Striatal Dopamine Function: an [18F]-DOPA PET Study

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Paul R A; Shotbolt, Paul; Mehta, Mitul A; Turkheimer, Eric; Benecke, Aaf; Copeland, Caroline; Turkheimer, Federico E; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Howes, Oliver D

    2013-01-01

    Striatal dopamine function is important for normal personality, cognitive processes and behavior, and abnormalities are linked to a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, no studies have examined the relative influence of genetic inheritance and environmental factors in determining striatal dopamine function. Using [18F]-DOPA positron emission tomography (PET), we sought to determine the heritability of presynaptic striatal dopamine function by comparing variability in uptake values in same sex monozygotic (MZ) twins to dizygotic (DZ) twins. Nine MZ and 10 DZ twin pairs underwent high-resolution [18F]-DOPA PET to assess presynaptic striatal dopamine function. Uptake values for the overall striatum and functional striatal subdivisions were determined by a Patlak analysis using a cerebellar reference region. Heritability, shared environmental effects and non-shared individual-specific effects were estimated using a region of interest (ROI) analysis and a confirmatory parametric analysis. Overall striatal heritability estimates from the ROI and parametric analyses were 0.44 and 0.33, respectively. We found a distinction between striatal heritability in the functional subdivisions, with the greatest heritability estimates occurring in the sensorimotor striatum and the greatest effect of individual-specific environmental factors in the limbic striatum. Our results indicate that variation in overall presynaptic striatal dopamine function is determined by a combination of genetic factors and individual-specific environmental factors, with familial environmental effects having no effect. These findings underline the importance of individual-specific environmental factors for striatal dopaminergic function, particularly in the limbic striatum, with implications for understanding neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and addictions. PMID:23093224

  4. Voltammetric study of the control of striatal dopamine release by glutamate.

    PubMed

    Borland, Laura M; Michael, Adrian C

    2004-10-01

    The central dopamine systems are involved in several aspects of normal brain function and are implicated in a number of human disorders. Hence, it is important to understand the mechanisms that control dopamine release in the brain. The striatum of the rat receives both dopaminergic and glutamatergic projections that synaptically target striatal neurons but not each other. Nevertheless, these afferents do form frequent appositional contacts, which has engendered interest in the question of whether they communicate with each other despite the absence of a direct synaptic connection. In this study, we used voltammetry in conjunction with carbon fiber microelectrodes in anesthetized rats to further examine the effect of the ionotropic glutamate antagonist, kynurenate, on extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum. Intrastriatal infusions of kynurenate decreased extracellular dopamine levels, suggesting that glutamate acts locally within the striatum via ionotropic receptors to regulate the basal extracellular dopamine concentration. Infusion of tetrodotoxin into the medial forebrain bundle or the striatum did not alter the voltammetric response to the intrastriatal kynurenate infusions, suggesting that glutamate receptors control a non-vesicular release process that contributes to the basal extracellular dopamine level. However, systemic administration of the dopamine uptake inhibitor, nomifensine (20 mg/kg i.p.), markedly decreased the amplitude of the response to kynurenate infusions, suggesting that the dopamine transporter mediates non-vesicular dopamine release. Collectively, these findings are consistent with the idea that endogenous glutamate acts locally within the striatum via ionotropic receptors to control a tonic, impulse-independent, transporter-mediated mode of dopamine release. Although numerous prior in vitro studies had suggested that such a process might exist, it has not previously been clearly demonstrated in an in vivo experiment.

  5. Role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and K(+)-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices.

    PubMed Central

    Zazpe, A; Artaiz, I; Del Río, J

    1994-01-01

    1. The present study was aimed at examining the role of 5-HT3 receptors in basal and depolarization-evoked dopamine release from rat olfactory tubercle and striatal slices. [3H]-dopamine ([3H]-DA) release was measured in both brain regions and endogenous dopamine release from striatal slices was also studied. 2. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist 2-methyl-5-HT (0.5-10 microM) produced a concentration-dependent increase in [3H]-DA efflux evoked by K+ (20 mM) from slices of rat olfactory tubercle. 1-Phenylbiguanide (PBG) and 5-HT also increased K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux. 3. 5-HT (1-100 microM) increased in a concentration-dependent manner basal [3H]-DA release from olfactory tubercle and striatal slices as well as endogenous DA release from striatal slices. The selective 5-HT3 receptor agonists 2-methyl-5-HT and 1-phenylbiguanide were weaker releasing agents. In all cases, the release was Ca2+ independent and tetrodotoxin insensitive. 4. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists such as ondansetron, granisetron and tropisetron (0.2 microM) significantly blocked the enhanced K(+)-evoked [3H]-DA efflux from rat olfactory tubercle slices induced by 2-methyl-5HT. A ten fold higher concentration of the 5-HT2 receptor antagonist ketanserin was ineffective. 5. Much higher concentrations, up to 50 microM, of the same 5-HT3 receptor antagonists did not block the increase in basal [3H]-DA release from striatal or olfactory tubercle slices induced by 5-HT or the release of endogenous DA induced by 5-HT from striatal slices.2+ off PMID:7858893

  6. Maternal cannabis use alters ventral striatal dopamine D2 gene regulation in the offspring

    PubMed Central

    DiNieri, Jennifer A; Wang, Xinyu; Szutorisz, Henrietta; Spano, Sabrina M; Kaur, Jasbir; Casaccia, Patrizia; Dow-Edwards, Diana; Hurd, Yasmin L

    2011-01-01

    Background Prenatal cannabis exposure has been linked to addiction vulnerability, but the neurobiology underlying this risk is unknown. Methods Striatal dopamine and opioid-related genes were studied in human fetal subjects exposed to cannabis (as well as cigarettes and alcohol). Cannabis-related gene disturbances observed in the human fetus were subsequently characterized using an animal model of prenatal delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC; 0.15 mg/kg) exposure. Results Prenatal cannabis exposure decreased dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) mRNA expression in the human ventral striatum (nucleus accumbens; NAc), a key brain reward region. No significant alterations were observed for the other genes in cannabis-exposed subjects. Maternal cigarette use was associated with reduced NAc prodynorphin mRNA expression and alcohol exposure induced broad alterations primarily in the dorsal striatum of most genes. To explore the mechanisms underlying the cannabis-associated disturbances, we exposed pregnant rats to THC and examined the epigenetic regulation of the NAc Drd2 gene in their offspring at postnatal day 2, comparable to the human fetal period studied, and in adulthood. Chromatin immunoprecipitation of the adult NAc revealed increased 2meH3K9 repressive mark and decreased 3meH3K4 and RNA polymerase II at the Drd2 gene locus in the THC-exposed offspring. Decreased Drd2 expression was accompanied by reduced D2R binding sites and increased sensitivity to opiate reward in adulthood. Conclusions These data suggest that maternal cannabis use alters developmental regulation of mesolimbic D2R in offspring through epigenetic mechanisms that regulate histone lysine methylation, and the ensuing reduction of D2R may contribute to addiction vulnerability later in life. PMID:21820648

  7. Dopamine-transporter levels drive striatal responses to apomorphine in Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Passamonti, Luca; Salsone, Maria; Toschi, Nicola; Cerasa, Antonio; Giannelli, Marco; Chiriaco, Carmelina; Cascini, Giuseppe Lucio; Fera, Francesco; Quattrone, Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD) can improve some cognitive functions while worsening others. These opposite effects might reflect different levels of residual dopamine in distinct parts of the striatum, although the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to address how apomorphine, a potent dopamine agonist, influences brain activity associated with working memory in PD patients with variable levels of nigrostriatal degeneration, as assessed via dopamine-transporter (DAT) scan. Twelve PD patients underwent two fMRI sessions (Off-, On-apomorphine) and one DAT-scan session. Twelve sex-, age-, and education-matched healthy controls underwent one fMRI session. The core fMRI analyses explored: (1) the main effect of group; (2) the main effect of treatment; and (3) linear and nonlinear interactions between treatment and DAT levels. Relative to controls, PD-Off patients showed greater activations within posterior attentional regions (e.g., precuneus). PD-On versus PD-Off patients displayed reduced left superior frontal gyrus activation and enhanced striatal activation during working-memory task. The relation between DAT levels and striatal responses to apomorphine followed an inverted-U-shaped model (i.e., the apomorphine effect on striatal activity in PD patients with intermediate DAT levels was opposite to that observed in PD patients with higher and lower DAT levels). Previous research in PD demonstrated that the nigrostriatal degeneration (tracked via DAT scan) is associated with inverted-U-shaped rearrangements of postsynaptic D2-receptors sensitivity. Hence, it can be hypothesized that individual differences in DAT levels drove striatal responses to apomorphine via D2-receptor-mediated mechanisms. PMID:23785657

  8. Interactions between Histamine H3 and Dopamine D2 Receptors and the Implications for Striatal Function

    PubMed Central

    Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent; Cortés, Antonio; Justinova, Zuzana; Barnes, Chanel; Canela, Enric I.; Goldberg, Steven R.; Leurs, Rob; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The striatum contains a high density of histamine H3 receptors, but their role in striatal function is poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated antagonistic interactions between striatal H3 and dopamine D1 receptors at the biochemical level, while contradictory results have been reported about interactions between striatal H3 and dopamine D2 receptors. In the present study, by using reserpinized mice, we demonstrate the existence of behaviorally significant antagonistic postsynaptic interactions between H3 and D1 and also between H3 and dopamine D2 receptors. The selective H3 receptor agonist imetit inhibited, while the H3 receptor antagonist thioperamide potentiated locomotor activation induced by either the D1 receptor agonist SKF 38393 or the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. High scores of locomotor activity were obtained with H3 receptor blockade plus D1 and D2 receptor co-activation, i.e., when thioperamide was co-administered with both SKF 38393 and quinpirole. Radioligand binding experiments in striatal membrane preparations showed the existence of a strong and selective H3-D2 receptor interaction at the membrane level. In agonist/antagonist competition experiments stimulation of H3 receptors with several H3 receptor agonists significantly decreased the affinity of D2 receptors for the agonist. This kind of intramembrane receptor-receptor interactions are a common biochemical property of receptor heteromers. In fact, by using Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer techniques in co-transfected HEK-293 cells, H3 (but not H4) receptors were found to form heteromers with D2 receptors. The present study demonstrates an important role of postsynaptic H3 receptors in the modulation of dopaminergic transmission by means of a negative modulation of D2 receptor function. PMID:18547596

  9. Incentive motivation is associated with striatal dopamine asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Tomer, Rachel; Goldstein, Rita Z; Wang, Gene-Jack; Wong, Christopher; Volkow, Nora D

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in modulating incentive motivation, expressed behaviorally as approach behavior. EEG studies report association between approach behavior and asymmetric pattern of activation in anterior cortical regions (as measured by the inverse of EEG alpha power). Therefore, individual differences in incentive motivation may reflect asymmetries in dopaminergic systems. We examined this hypothesis by studying the relationship between self-reported degree of incentive motivation, and asymmetry of D2 receptor availability in healthy volunteers. Nineteen healthy participants were studied with positron emission tomography (PET) and [11C]raclopride to assess the availability of dopamine D2 receptors in left and right striatum. Incentive motivation was assessed by the Achievement scale of the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire. The Achievement score was negatively correlated with the Asymmetry Index ([R−L]/[R+L]) of D2 receptor availability (r = −.721, p =.001), suggesting that greater positive incentive motivation is associated with higher receptor availability in the left relative to the right hemisphere. PMID:17868972

  10. Altered effect of dopamine transporter 3'UTR VNTR genotype on prefrontal and striatal function in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Prata, Diana P; Mechelli, Andrea; Picchioni, Marco M; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Bramon, Elvira; Walshe, Muriel; Murray, Robin M; Collier, David A; McGuire, Philip

    2009-11-01

    The dopamine transporter plays a key role in the regulation of central dopaminergic transmission, which modulates cognitive processing. Disrupted dopamine function and impaired executive processing are robust features of schizophrenia. To examine the effect of a polymorphism in the dopamine transporter gene (the variable number of tandem repeats in the 3' untranslated region) on brain function during executive processing in healthy volunteers and patients with schizophrenia. We hypothesized that this variation would have a different effect on prefrontal and striatal activation in schizophrenia, reflecting altered dopamine function. Case-control study. Psychiatric research center. Eighty-five subjects, comprising 44 healthy volunteers (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 26 who were 10-repeat homozygotes) and 41 patients with DSM-IV schizophrenia (18 who were 9-repeat carriers and 23 who were 10-repeat homozygotes). Regional brain activation during word generation relative to repetition in an overt verbal fluency task measured by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Main effects of genotype and diagnosis on activation and their interaction were estimated with analysis of variance in SPM5. Irrespective of diagnosis, the 10-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 9-repeat allele in the left anterior insula and right caudate nucleus. Trends for the same effect in the right insula and for greater deactivation in the rostral anterior cingulate cortex were also detected. There were diagnosis x genotype interactions in the left middle frontal gyrus and left nucleus accumbens, where the 9-repeat allele was associated with greater activation than the 10-repeat allele in patients but not controls. Insular, cingulate, and striatal function during an executive task is normally modulated by variation in the dopamine transporter gene. Its effect on activation in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and ventral striatum is altered in patients with schizophrenia

  11. Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibition Promotes Striatal Axon Sprouting via NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Candace; Mrejeru, Ana; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Klein, Zoe; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activity is involved in shaping synaptic connections throughout development and adulthood. We recently reported that brief activation of NMDA receptors on cultured ventral midbrain dopamine neurons enhanced their axon growth rate and induced axonal branching. To test whether this mechanism was relevant to axon regrowth in adult animals, we examined the reinnervation of dorsal striatum following nigral dopamine neuron loss induced by unilateral intrastriatal injections of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine. We used a pharmacological approach to enhance NMDA receptor-dependent signaling by treatment with an inhibitor of glycine transporter-1 that elevates levels of extracellular glycine, a coagonist required for NMDA receptor activation. All mice displayed sprouting of dopaminergic axons from spared fibers in the ventral striatum to the denervated dorsal striatum at 7 weeks post-lesion, but the reinnervation in mice treated for 4 weeks with glycine uptake inhibitor was approximately twice as dense as in untreated mice. The treated mice also displayed higher levels of striatal dopamine and a complete recovery from lateralization in a test of sensorimotor behavior. We confirmed that the actions of glycine uptake inhibition on reinnervation and behavioral recovery required NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons using targeted deletion of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit in dopamine neurons. Glycine transport inhibitors promote functionally relevant sprouting of surviving dopamine axons and could provide clinical treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24133278

  12. D1 dopamine receptor stimulation impairs striatal proteasome activity in Parkinsonism through 26S proteasome disassembly.

    PubMed

    Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Thiolat, Marie-Laure; Bido, Simone; Martinez, Audrey; Doudnikoff, Evelyne; Baufreton, Jérôme; Bourdenx, Mathieu; Bloch, Bertrand; Bezard, Erwan; Martin-Negrier, Marie-Laure

    2015-06-01

    Among the mechanisms underlying the development of L-dopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) in Parkinson's disease, complex alterations in dopamine signaling in D1 receptor (D1R)-expressing medium spiny striatal neurons have been unraveled such as, but not limited to, dysregulation of D1R expression, lateral diffusion, intraneuronal trafficking, subcellular localization and desensitization, leading to a pathological anchorage of D1R at the plasma membrane. Such anchorage is partly due to a decreased proteasomal activity that is specific of the L-dopa-exposed dopamine-depleted striatum, results from D1R activation and feeds-back the D1R exaggerated cell surface abundance. The precise mechanisms by which L-dopa affects striatal proteasome activity remained however unknown. We here show, in a series of in vitro ex vivo and in vivo models, that such rapid modulation of striatal proteasome activity intervenes through D1R-mediated disassembly of the 26S proteasome rather than change in transcription or translation of proteasome or proteasome subunits intraneuronal relocalization.

  13. Association of amphetamine-induced striatal dopamine release and cortisol responses to psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Wand, Gary S; Oswald, Lynn M; McCaul, Mary E; Wong, Dean F; Johnson, Elizabeth; Zhou, Yun; Kuwabara, Hiroto; Kumar, Anil

    2007-11-01

    Preclinical studies have shown that stress and glucocorticoids increase mesolimbic dopamine (DA) and thereby facilitate psychostimulant self-administration. The relationship between stress-induced cortisol and mesolimbic DA responses to psychostimulants has not been studied in humans. To test the hypotheses that glucocorticoid responses to psychological stress are correlated with DA and subjective responses to psychostimulants in humans, 25 healthy adults (18-29 years) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and two positron emission tomography (PET) scans with high-specific [11C]raclopride. The first scan was preceded by intravenous saline and the second by amphetamine (AMPH). Findings showed that stress-induced cortisol levels were positively associated with AMPH-induced DA release in the ventral striatum and other striatal regions. Subjects with higher cortisol responses to stress also reported more positive subjective drug effects with AMPH than subjects with lower responses. The results are consistent with preclinical findings showing an interrelationship between glucocorticoids and mesolimbic DA dynamics, which may influence psychostimulant self-administration in humans.

  14. Striatal dopamine dynamics in mice following acute and repeated toluene exposure.

    PubMed

    Apawu, Aaron K; Mathews, Tiffany A; Bowen, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    The abused inhalant toluene has potent behavioral effects, but only recently has progress been made in understanding the neurochemical actions that mediate the action of toluene in the brain. Available evidence suggests that toluene inhalation alters dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, but toluene's mechanism of action is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of acute and repeated toluene inhalation (0, 2,000, or 4,000 ppm) on locomotor activity as well as striatal DA release and uptake using slice fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Acutely, 2,000 and 4,000 ppm toluene increased locomotor activity, while neurochemically only 4,000 ppm toluene potentiated electrically evoked DA release across the caudate-putamen and the nucleus accumbens. Repeated administration of toluene resulted in sensitization to toluene's locomotor activity effects. Brain slices obtained from mice repeatedly exposed to toluene demonstrated no difference in stimulated DA release in the caudate-putamen as compared to control animals. Repeated exposure to 2,000 and 4,000 ppm toluene caused a concentration-dependent decrease of 25-50 % in evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens core and shell relative to air-exposed mice. These voltammetric neurochemical findings following repeated toluene exposure suggest that there may be a compensatory downregulation of the DA system. Acute or repeated toluene exposure had no effect on the DA uptake kinetics. Taken together, these results demonstrate that acute toluene inhalation potentiates DA release, while repeated toluene exposure attenuates DA release in the nucleus accumbens only.

  15. Lowering ambient or core body temperature elevates striatal MPP+ levels and enhances toxicity to dopamine neurons in MPTP-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Moy, L Y; Albers, D S; Sonsalla, P K

    1998-04-20

    The neuroprotective effects of lowering body temperature have been well documented in various models of neuronal injury. The present study investigated the effects a lower ambient or core body temperature would have on damage to striatal dopamine (DA) neurons produced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Mice received systemic MPTP treatment at two different temperatures, 4 degrees C and 22 degrees C. MPTP-treated mice maintained at 4 degrees C demonstrated (1) a greater hypothermic response, (2) a significant reduction in striatal DA content and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity, and (3) significantly greater striatal 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) levels, as compared to mice dosed with MPTP at room temperature. Parallel studies with methamphetamine (METH) were conducted since temperature appears to play a pivotal role in the mediation of damage to DA neurons by this CNS stimulant in rodents. As previously reported, METH-induced hyperthermia and the subsequent loss of striatal DA content were attenuated in animals dosed at 4 degrees C. We also evaluated the effects a hypothermic state induced by pharmacological agents would have on striatal neurochemistry and MPP+ levels following MPTP treatment. Concurrent administration of MK-801 or 8-OHDPAT increased the striatal MPP+ levels following MPTP treatment. However, only 8-OHDPAT potentiated the MPTP-induced decrements of striatal DA content and TH activity; MK-801 did not affect MPTP decreases in these striatal markers of dopaminergic damage. Altogether, these findings indicate that temperature has a profound effect on striatal MPP+ levels and MPTP-induced damage to DA neurons in mice.

  16. Striatal dopamine neurotransmission: regulation of release and uptake

    PubMed Central

    Sulzer, David; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Rice, Margaret E.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) transmission is governed by processes that regulate release from axonal boutons in the forebrain and the somatodendritic compartment in midbrain, and by clearance by the DA transporter, diffusion, and extracellular metabolism. We review how axonal DA release is regulated by neuronal activity and by autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, and address how quantal release events are regulated in size and frequency. In brain regions densely innervated by DA axons, DA clearance is due predominantly to uptake by the DA transporter, whereas in cortex, midbrain, and other regions with relatively sparse DA inputs, the norepinephrine transporter and diffusion are involved. We discuss the role of DA uptake in restricting the sphere of influence of DA and in temporal accumulation of extracellular DA levels upon successive action potentials. The tonic discharge activity of DA neurons may be translated into a tonic extracellular DA level, whereas their bursting activity can generate discrete extracellular DA transients. PMID:27141430

  17. Repeated cocaine administration results in supersensitivity of striatal D-2 dopamine autoreceptors to pergolide

    SciTech Connect

    Dwoskin, L.P.; Peris, J.; Yasuda, R.P.; Philpott, K.; Zahniser, N.R.

    1988-01-01

    Groups of rats administered cocaine-HCl (10 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline either acutely or once daily for 8 or 14 days were killed 24 hrs after the last dose. In striatal slices prelabelled with (/sup 3/H)DA, modulation of (/sup 3/H)-overflow by pergolide was used to measure D-2 autoreceptor activity. Compared to the contemporaneous control group pergolide produced a greater inhibition only in striatal slices from rats treated repeatedly with cocaine. In radioligand binding studies using striatal membranes from control rats, pergolide had a 500-fold greater affinity for the D-2, as opposed to the D-1, dopamine (DA) receptor subtype. These results indicate that repeated treatment with cocaine produces supersensitive striatal D-2 release-modulating autoreceptors consistent with a compensatory change to diminish the effect of elevated synaptic concentrations of DA produced by cocaine. In contrast, supersensitivity of D-2 receptors was not detected in (/sup 3/H)spiperone binding assays. 31 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  18. History of cannabis use is not associated with alterations in striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Paul R A; Egerton, Alice; Watson, Ben; Reid, Alistair; Lappin, Julia; Howes, Oliver D; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis use in adolescence is emerging as a risk factor for the development of psychosis. In animal studies, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis, modulates striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. Alterations in human striatal dopaminergic function have also been reported both in psychosis and in stimulant use. We sought to examine whether striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor availability was altered in volunteers with a history of cannabis use using a database of previously acquired [(11)C]-raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) scans. Ten [(11)C]-raclopride scans from volunteers with a history of cannabis use were compared to ten control scans using a functional striatal subdivision region of interest (ROI) analysis. No significant differences in either overall striatal BP(ND) values or BP(ND) values in any functional striatal subdivision were found between the two groups. There was also no correlation between lifetime frequency of cannabis use and BP(ND) values. Limbic striatal BP(ND) values were ten percent lower in current nicotine cigarette smokers. These findings suggest that, unlike other drugs of abuse, a history of cannabis use is not associated with alterations in striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor availability.

  19. Distinct roles of D1 and D5 dopamine receptors in motor activity and striatal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Centonze, Diego; Grande, Cristina; Saulle, Emilia; Martin, Ana B; Gubellini, Paolo; Pavón, Nancy; Pisani, Antonio; Bernardi, Giorgio; Moratalla, Rosario; Calabresi, Paolo

    2003-09-17

    Stimulation of dopamine (DA) receptors in the striatum is essential for voluntary motor activity and for the generation of plasticity at corticostriatal synapses. In the present study, mice lacking DA D1 receptors have been used to investigate the involvement of the D1-like class (D1 and D5) of DA receptors in locomotion and corticostriatal long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP). Our results suggest that D1 and D5 receptors exert distinct actions on both activity-dependent synaptic plasticity and spontaneous motor activity. Accordingly, the ablation of D1 receptors disrupted corticostriatal LTP, whereas pharmacological blockade of D5 receptors prevented LTD. On the other side, genetic ablation of D1 receptors increased locomotor activity, whereas the D1/D5 receptor antagonist SCH 23390 decreased motor activity in both control mice and mice lacking D1 receptors. Endogenous DA stimulated D1 and D5 receptors in distinct subtypes of striatal neurons to induce, respectively, LTP and LTD. In control mice, in fact, LTP was blocked by inhibiting the D1-protein kinase A pathway in the recorded spiny neuron, whereas the striatal nitric oxide-producing interneuron was presumably the neuronal subtype stimulated by D5 receptors during the induction phase of LTD. Understanding the role of DA receptors in striatal function is essential to gain insights into the neural bases of critical brain functions and of dramatic pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug addiction.

  20. Resolving pathobiological mechanisms relating to Huntington disease: gait, balance, and involuntary movements in mice with targeted ablation of striatal D1 dopamine receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Ah; Jiang, Luning; Madsen, Heather; Parish, Clare L; Massalas, Jim; Smardencas, Arthur; O'Leary, Claire; Gantois, Ilse; O'Tuathaigh, Colm; Waddington, John L; Ehrlich, Michelle E; Lawrence, Andrew J; Drago, John

    2014-02-01

    Progressive cell loss is observed in the striatum, cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, subthalamic nucleus and hippocampus in Huntington disease. In the striatum, dopamine-responsive medium spiny neurons are preferentially lost. Clinical features include involuntary movements, gait and orofacial impairments in addition to cognitive deficits and psychosis, anxiety and mood disorders. We utilized the Cre-LoxP system to generate mutant mice with selective postnatal ablation of D1 dopamine receptor-expressing striatal neurons to determine which elements of the complex Huntington disease phenotype relate to loss of this neuronal subpopulation. Mutant mice had reduced body weight, locomotor slowing, reduced rearing, ataxia, a short stride length wide-based erratic gait, impairment in orofacial movements and displayed haloperidol-suppressible tic-like movements. The mutation was associated with an anxiolytic profile. Mutant mice had significant striatal-specific atrophy and astrogliosis. D1-expressing cell number was reduced throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the dorsal striatum consistent with partial destruction of the striatonigral pathway. Additional striatal changes included up-regulated D2 and enkephalin mRNA, and an increased density of D2 and preproenkephalin-expressing projection neurons, and striatal neuropeptide Y and cholinergic interneurons. These data suggest that striatal D1-cell-ablation alone may account for the involuntary movements and locomotor, balance and orofacial deficits seen not only in HD but also in HD phenocopy syndromes with striatal atrophy. Therapeutic strategies would therefore need to target striatal D1 cells to ameliorate deficits especially when the clinical presentation is dominated by a bradykinetic/ataxic phenotype with involuntary movements.

  1. Striatal Dopamine Mediates the Interface between Motivational and Cognitive Control in Humans: Evidence from Genetic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Aarts, Esther; Roelofs, Ardi; Franke, Barbara; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén; Helmich, Rick C; Cools, Roshan

    2010-01-01

    Dopamine has been hypothesized to provide the basis for the interaction between motivational and cognitive control. However, there is no evidence for this hypothesis in humans. We fill this gap by using fMRI, a novel behavioral paradigm and a common polymorphism in the DAT1 gene (SLC6A3). Carriers of the 9-repeat (9R) allele of a 40 base pair repeat polymorphism in the 3′ untranslated region of DAT1, associated with high striatal dopamine, showed greater activity in the ventromedial striatum during reward anticipation than homozygotes for the 10-repeat allele, replicating previous genetic imaging studies. The crucial novel finding is that 9R carriers also exhibited a greater influence of anticipated reward on switch costs, as well as greater activity in the dorsomedial striatum during task switching in anticipation of high reward relative to low reward. These data establish a crucial role for human striatal dopamine in the modulation of cognitive flexibility by reward anticipation, thus, elucidating the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between motivation and cognitive control. PMID:20463658

  2. Striatal dopamine mediates the interface between motivational and cognitive control in humans: evidence from genetic imaging.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Esther; Roelofs, Ardi; Franke, Barbara; Rijpkema, Mark; Fernández, Guillén; Helmich, Rick C; Cools, Roshan

    2010-08-01

    Dopamine has been hypothesized to provide the basis for the interaction between motivational and cognitive control. However, there is no evidence for this hypothesis in humans. We fill this gap by using fMRI, a novel behavioral paradigm and a common polymorphism in the DAT1 gene (SLC6A3). Carriers of the 9-repeat (9R) allele of a 40 base pair repeat polymorphism in the 3' untranslated region of DAT1, associated with high striatal dopamine, showed greater activity in the ventromedial striatum during reward anticipation than homozygotes for the 10-repeat allele, replicating previous genetic imaging studies. The crucial novel finding is that 9R carriers also exhibited a greater influence of anticipated reward on switch costs, as well as greater activity in the dorsomedial striatum during task switching in anticipation of high reward relative to low reward. These data establish a crucial role for human striatal dopamine in the modulation of cognitive flexibility by reward anticipation, thus, elucidating the neurochemical mechanism of the interaction between motivation and cognitive control.

  3. Reward and choice encoding in terminals of midbrain dopamine neurons depends on striatal target

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Nathan F.; Cameron, Courtney M.; Taliaferro, Joshua P.; Lee, Junuk; Choi, Jung Yoon; Davidson, Thomas J.; Daw, Nathaniel D.; Witten, Ilana B.

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the midbrain provide rich, topographic innervation of the striatum and are central to learning and to generating actions. Despite the importance of this DA innervation, it remains unclear if and how DA neurons are specialized based on the location of their striatal target. Thus, we sought to compare the function of subpopulations of DA neurons that target distinct striatal subregions in the context of an instrumental reversal learning task. We identified key differences in the encoding of reward and choice in dopamine terminals in dorsal versus ventral striatum: DA terminals in ventral striatum responded more strongly to reward consumption and reward-predicting cues, whereas DA terminals in dorsomedial striatum responded more strongly to contralateral choices. In both cases the terminals encoded a reward prediction error. Our results suggest that the DA modulation of the striatum is spatially organized to support the specialized function of the targeted subregion. PMID:27110917

  4. Influence of striatal dopamine transporter availability on the response to methylphenidate in adult patients with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Krause, Johanna; la Fougere, Christian; Krause, Klaus-Henning; Ackenheil, Manfred; Dresel, Stefan H

    2005-12-01

    In this study, we investigated whether availability of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) may have an influence on the response of adult patients with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on methylphenidate (MPH). In 18 non-smoking and non-medicated adult patients with ADHD, availability of DAT was measured with [(99m)Tc] TRODAT-1 SPECT. Then, the patients received methylphenidate (MPH), individually titrated up to 60 mg per day. Ten weeks later, clinical improvement was rated by Clinical Global Impressions scale. In all, 6 patients were classified as non-responders, and 12 responded to MPH. From the non-responders, 5 presented with a DAT availability below that of normal controls of the same age, whereas in the group of responders all patients had elevated DAT availability. There was a significant negative correlation between values for global clinical improvement and striatal DAT availability. In conclusion, ADHD patients with low DAT availability seem not to respond to therapy with MPH.

  5. Ventral striatal dopamine reflects behavioral and neural signatures of model-based control during sequential decision making.

    PubMed

    Deserno, Lorenz; Huys, Quentin J M; Boehme, Rebecca; Buchert, Ralph; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Grace, Anthony A; Dolan, Raymond J; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2015-02-03

    Dual system theories suggest that behavioral control is parsed between a deliberative "model-based" and a more reflexive "model-free" system. A balance of control exerted by these systems is thought to be related to dopamine neurotransmission. However, in the absence of direct measures of human dopamine, it remains unknown whether this reflects a quantitative relation with dopamine either in the striatum or other brain areas. Using a sequential decision task performed during functional magnetic resonance imaging, combined with striatal measures of dopamine using [(18)F]DOPA positron emission tomography, we show that higher presynaptic ventral striatal dopamine levels were associated with a behavioral bias toward more model-based control. Higher presynaptic dopamine in ventral striatum was associated with greater coding of model-based signatures in lateral prefrontal cortex and diminished coding of model-free prediction errors in ventral striatum. Thus, interindividual variability in ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine reflects a balance in the behavioral expression and the neural signatures of model-free and model-based control. Our data provide a novel perspective on how alterations in presynaptic dopamine levels might be accompanied by a disruption of behavioral control as observed in aging or neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and addiction.

  6. Ventral striatal dopamine reflects behavioral and neural signatures of model-based control during sequential decision making

    PubMed Central

    Deserno, Lorenz; Huys, Quentin J. M.; Boehme, Rebecca; Buchert, Ralph; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Grace, Anthony A.; Dolan, Raymond J.; Heinz, Andreas; Schlagenhauf, Florian

    2015-01-01

    Dual system theories suggest that behavioral control is parsed between a deliberative “model-based” and a more reflexive “model-free” system. A balance of control exerted by these systems is thought to be related to dopamine neurotransmission. However, in the absence of direct measures of human dopamine, it remains unknown whether this reflects a quantitative relation with dopamine either in the striatum or other brain areas. Using a sequential decision task performed during functional magnetic resonance imaging, combined with striatal measures of dopamine using [18F]DOPA positron emission tomography, we show that higher presynaptic ventral striatal dopamine levels were associated with a behavioral bias toward more model-based control. Higher presynaptic dopamine in ventral striatum was associated with greater coding of model-based signatures in lateral prefrontal cortex and diminished coding of model-free prediction errors in ventral striatum. Thus, interindividual variability in ventral striatal presynaptic dopamine reflects a balance in the behavioral expression and the neural signatures of model-free and model-based control. Our data provide a novel perspective on how alterations in presynaptic dopamine levels might be accompanied by a disruption of behavioral control as observed in aging or neuropsychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and addiction. PMID:25605941

  7. Dopamine-deprived striatal GABAergic interneurons burst and generate repetitive gigantic IPSCs in medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Dehorter, Nathalie; Guigoni, Celine; Lopez, Catherine; Hirsch, June; Eusebio, Alexandre; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Hammond, Constance

    2009-06-17

    Striatal GABAergic microcircuits modulate cortical responses and movement execution in part by controlling the activity of medium spiny neurons (MSNs). How this is altered by chronic dopamine depletion, such as in Parkinson's disease, is not presently understood. We now report that, in dopamine-depleted slices of the striatum, MSNs generate giant spontaneous postsynaptic GABAergic currents (single or in bursts at 60 Hz) interspersed with silent episodes, rather than the continuous, low-frequency GABAergic drive (5 Hz) observed in control MSNs. This shift was observed in one-half of the MSN population, including both "D(1)-negative" and "D(1)-positive" MSNs. Single GABA and NMDA channel recordings revealed that the resting membrane potential and reversal potential of GABA were similar in control and dopamine-depleted MSNs, and depolarizing, but not excitatory, actions of GABA were observed. Glutamatergic and cholinergic antagonists did not block the GABAergic oscillations, suggesting that they were generated by GABAergic neurons. In support of this, cell-attached recordings revealed that a subpopulation of intrastriatal GABAergic interneurons generated bursts of spikes in dopamine-deprived conditions. This subpopulation included low-threshold spike interneurons but not fast-spiking interneurons, cholinergic interneurons, or MSNs. Therefore, a population of local GABAergic interneurons shifts from tonic to oscillatory mode when dopamine deprived and gives rise to spontaneous repetitive giant GABAergic currents in one-half the MSNs. We suggest that this may in turn alter integration of cortical signals by MSNs.

  8. Association between striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors and brain activation during visual attention: effects of sleep deprivation.

    PubMed

    Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-05-31

    Sleep deprivation (SD) disrupts dopamine (DA) signaling and impairs attention. However, the interpretation of these concomitant effects requires a better understanding of dopamine's role in attention processing. Here we test the hypotheses that D2/D3 receptors (D2/D3R) in dorsal and ventral striatum would distinctly regulate the activation of attention regions and that, by decreasing D2/D3, SD would disrupt these associations. We measured striatal D2/D3R using positron emission tomography with [(11)C]raclopride and brain activation to a visual attention (VA) task using 4-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen healthy men were studied during rested wakefulness and also during SD. Increased D2/D3R in striatum (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) were linearly associated with higher thalamic activation. Subjects with higher D2/D3R in caudate relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in superior parietal cortex and ventral precuneus, and those with higher D2/D3R in putamen relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in anterior cingulate. SD impaired the association between striatal D2/D3R and VA-induced thalamic activation, which is essential for alertness. Findings suggest a robust DAergic modulation of cortical activation during the VA task, such that D2/D3R in dorsal striatum counterbalanced the stimulatory influence of D2/D3R in ventral striatum, which was not significantly disrupted by SD. In contrast, SD disrupted thalamic activation, which did not show counterbalanced DAergic modulation but a positive association with D2/D3R in both dorsal and ventral striatum. The counterbalanced dorsal versus ventral striatal DAergic modulation of VA activation mirrors similar findings during sensorimotor processing (Tomasi et al., 2015) suggesting a bidirectional influence in signaling between the dorsal caudate and putamen and the ventral striatum.

  9. Association between striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors and brain activation during visual attention: effects of sleep deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Tomasi, D; Wang, G-J; Volkow, N D

    2016-01-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) disrupts dopamine (DA) signaling and impairs attention. However, the interpretation of these concomitant effects requires a better understanding of dopamine's role in attention processing. Here we test the hypotheses that D2/D3 receptors (D2/D3R) in dorsal and ventral striatum would distinctly regulate the activation of attention regions and that, by decreasing D2/D3, SD would disrupt these associations. We measured striatal D2/D3R using positron emission tomography with [11C]raclopride and brain activation to a visual attention (VA) task using 4-Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging. Fourteen healthy men were studied during rested wakefulness and also during SD. Increased D2/D3R in striatum (caudate, putamen and ventral striatum) were linearly associated with higher thalamic activation. Subjects with higher D2/D3R in caudate relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in superior parietal cortex and ventral precuneus, and those with higher D2/D3R in putamen relative to ventral striatum had higher activation in anterior cingulate. SD impaired the association between striatal D2/D3R and VA-induced thalamic activation, which is essential for alertness. Findings suggest a robust DAergic modulation of cortical activation during the VA task, such that D2/D3R in dorsal striatum counterbalanced the stimulatory influence of D2/D3R in ventral striatum, which was not significantly disrupted by SD. In contrast, SD disrupted thalamic activation, which did not show counterbalanced DAergic modulation but a positive association with D2/D3R in both dorsal and ventral striatum. The counterbalanced dorsal versus ventral striatal DAergic modulation of VA activation mirrors similar findings during sensorimotor processing (Tomasi et al., 2015) suggesting a bidirectional influence in signaling between the dorsal caudate and putamen and the ventral striatum. PMID:27219347

  10. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: decreased striatal dopamine transporter levels.

    PubMed

    Voon, Valerie; Rizos, Alexandra; Chakravartty, Riddhika; Mulholland, Nicola; Robinson, Stephanie; Howell, Nicholas A; Harrison, Neil; Vivian, Gill; Ray Chaudhuri, K

    2014-02-01

    Impulse control disorders are commonly associated with dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients with impulse control disorders demonstrate enhanced dopamine release to conditioned cues and a gambling task on [(11)C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and enhanced ventral striatal activity to reward on functional MRI. We compared PD patients with impulse control disorders and age-matched and gender-matched controls without impulse control disorders using [(123)I]FP-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), to assess striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density. The [(123)I]FP-CIT binding data in the striatum were compared between 15 PD patients with and 15 without impulse control disorders using independent t tests. Those with impulse control disorders showed significantly lower DAT binding in the right striatum with a trend in the left (right: F(1,24)=5.93, p=0.02; left: F(1,24)=3.75, p=0.07) compared to controls. Our findings suggest that greater dopaminergic striatal activity in PD patients with impulse control disorders may be partly related to decreased uptake and clearance of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. Whether these findings are related to state or trait effects is not known. These findings dovetail with reports of lower DAT levels secondary to the effects of methamphetamine and alcohol. Although any regulation of DAT by antiparkinsonian medication appears to be modest, PD patients with impulse control disorders may be differentially sensitive to regulatory mechanisms of DAT expression by dopaminergic medications.

  11. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: decreased striatal dopamine transporter levels

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Valerie; Rizos, Alexandra; Chakravartty, Riddhika; Mulholland, Nicola; Robinson, Stephanie; Howell, Nicholas A; Harrison, Neil; Vivian, Gill; Ray Chaudhuri, K

    2014-01-01

    Objective Impulse control disorders are commonly associated with dopaminergic therapy in Parkinson's disease (PD). PD patients with impulse control disorders demonstrate enhanced dopamine release to conditioned cues and a gambling task on [11C]raclopride positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and enhanced ventral striatal activity to reward on functional MRI. We compared PD patients with impulse control disorders and age-matched and gender-matched controls without impulse control disorders using [123I]FP-CIT (2β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)tropane) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), to assess striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) density. Methods The [123I]FP-CIT binding data in the striatum were compared between 15 PD patients with and 15 without impulse control disorders using independent t tests. Results Those with impulse control disorders showed significantly lower DAT binding in the right striatum with a trend in the left (right: F(1,24)=5.93, p=0.02; left: F(1,24)=3.75, p=0.07) compared to controls. Conclusions Our findings suggest that greater dopaminergic striatal activity in PD patients with impulse control disorders may be partly related to decreased uptake and clearance of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. Whether these findings are related to state or trait effects is not known. These findings dovetail with reports of lower DAT levels secondary to the effects of methamphetamine and alcohol. Although any regulation of DAT by antiparkinsonian medication appears to be modest, PD patients with impulse control disorders may be differentially sensitive to regulatory mechanisms of DAT expression by dopaminergic medications. PMID:23899625

  12. Enhanced striatal dopamine release during food stimulation in binge eating disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Geliebter, Allan; Volkow, Nora D; Telang, Frank W; Logan, Jean; Jayne, Millard C; Galanti, Kochavi; Selig, Peter A; Han, Hao; Zhu, Wei; Wong, Christopher T; Fowler, Joanna S

    2011-08-01

    Subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) regularly consume large amounts of food in short time periods. The neurobiology of BED is poorly understood. Brain dopamine, which regulates motivation for food intake, is likely to be involved. We assessed the involvement of brain dopamine in the motivation for food consumption in binge eaters. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans with [(11)C]raclopride were done in 10 obese BED and 8 obese subjects without BED. Changes in extracellular dopamine in the striatum in response to food stimulation in food-deprived subjects were evaluated after placebo and after oral methylphenidate (MPH), a drug that blocks the dopamine reuptake transporter and thus amplifies dopamine signals. Neither the neutral stimuli (with or without MPH) nor the food stimuli when given with placebo increased extracellular dopamine. The food stimuli when given with MPH significantly increased dopamine in the caudate and putamen in the binge eaters but not in the nonbinge eaters. Dopamine increases in the caudate were significantly correlated with the binge eating scores but not with BMI. These results identify dopamine neurotransmission in the caudate as being of relevance to the neurobiology of BED. The lack of correlation between BMI and dopamine changes suggests that dopamine release per se does not predict BMI within a group of obese individuals but that it predicts binge eating.

  13. Enhanced Striatal Dopamine Release During Food Stimulation in Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Gene-Jack; Geliebter, Allan; Volkow, Nora D.; Telang, Frank W.; Logan, Jean; Jayne, Millard C.; Galanti, Kochavi; Selig, Peter A.; Han, Hao; Zhu, Wei; Wong, Christopher T.; Fowler, Joanna S.

    2011-01-01

    Subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) regularly consume large amounts of food in short time periods. The neurobiology of BED is poorly understood. Brain dopamine, which regulates motivation for food intake, is likely to be involved. We assessed the involvement of brain dopamine in the motivation for food consumption in binge eaters. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans with [11C]raclopride were done in 10 obese BED and 8 obese subjects without BED. Changes in extracellular dopamine in the striatum in response to food stimulation in food-deprived subjects were evaluated after placebo and after oral methylphenidate (MPH), a drug that blocks the dopamine reuptake transporter and thus amplifies dopamine signals. Neither the neutral stimuli (with or without MPH) nor the food stimuli when given with placebo increased extracellular dopamine. The food stimuli when given with MPH significantly increased dopamine in the caudate and putamen in the binge eaters but not in the nonbinge eaters. Dopamine increases in the caudate were significantly correlated with the binge eating scores but not with BMI. These results identify dopamine neurotransmission in the caudate as being of relevance to the neurobiology of BED. The lack of correlation between BMI and dopamine changes suggests that dopamine release per se does not predict BMI within a group of obese individuals but that it predicts binge eating. PMID:21350434

  14. Enhanced striatal dopamine release during food stimulation in binge eating disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, g.j.; Wang, G.-J.; Geliebter, A.; Volkow, N.D.; Telang, F.W.; Logan, Jaynbe, M.C.; Galanti, K.; Selig, P.A.; Han, H.; Zhu, W.; Wong, C.T.; Fowler, J.S.

    2011-01-13

    Subjects with binge eating disorder (BED) regularly consume large amounts of food in short time periods. The neurobiology of BED is poorly understood. Brain dopamine, which regulates motivation for food intake, is likely to be involved. We assessed the involvement of brain dopamine in the motivation for food consumption in binge eaters. Positron emission tomography (PET) scans with [{sup 11}C]raclopride were done in 10 obese BED and 8 obese subjects without BED. Changes in extracellular dopamine in the striatum in response to food stimulation in food-deprived subjects were evaluated after placebo and after oral methylphenidate (MPH), a drug that blocks the dopamine reuptake transporter and thus amplifies dopamine signals. Neither the neutral stimuli (with or without MPH) nor the food stimuli when given with placebo increased extracellular dopamine. The food stimuli when given with MPH significantly increased dopamine in the caudate and putamen in the binge eaters but not in the nonbinge eaters. Dopamine increases in the caudate were significantly correlated with the binge eating scores but not with BMI. These results identify dopamine neurotransmission in the caudate as being of relevance to the neurobiology of BED. The lack of correlation between BMI and dopamine changes suggests that dopamine release per se does not predict BMI within a group of obese individuals but that it predicts binge eating.

  15. Changes in the striatal extracellular levels of dopamine and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid evoked by ammonia and N-methyl-D-aspartate: modulation by taurine.

    PubMed

    Anderzhanova, Elmira; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo; Albrecht, Jan

    2003-07-11

    Acute hyperammonemia is associated with motor disturbances that are thought to involve striatal dopaminergic dysfunction. Discharge of striatal dopaminergic neurons is controlled by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, the excessive activation of which contributes to ammonia neurotoxicity. Here we show that ammonium chloride ("ammonia", extracellular concentration 5 mM) or NMDA (1 mM), when directly administered to the rat striatum via a microdialysis probe, evoke a prompt accumulation of dopamine (DA) in the microdialysates. However, while ammonia increases, NMDA decreases, the extracellular dihydroxyphenylacetate (DOPAC) level. The results point to the NMDA receptor-mediated enhancement of DA release and increased DA metabolism as two independent ways by which ammonia affects the striatal dopaminergic system. Taurine (extracellular concentration 10 mM) attenuated the NMDA- and ammonia-evoked DA release and ammonia-induced accumulation of DOPAC, reflecting two different neuroprotective mechanisms of this amino acid.

  16. Role of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide in the effects of flutriafol, a triazole fungicide, on the in vivo striatal dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Faro, Lilian R Ferreira; Alfonso, Miguel; Maués, Luis A L; Durán, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Flutriafol is a triazole fungicide that induces spontaneous and depolarization-stimulated release of dopamine from rat striatum, although the neurochemical mechanism by which this fungicide induces this effect is unknown. The purpose of the present work was to assess the implication of ionotropic glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide (NO) production in the flutriafol-induced dopamine release from rat striatum. To this, we have used non-competitive antagonists of NMDA (dizocilpine, MK-801), and (AMPA)/kainate (6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione, CNQX) receptors, or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors (Nomega-nitro-L-arginine -L-NARG - and 7-nitro-indazol - 7-NI), to study the striatal dopamine release induced by flutriafol. Intrastriatal infusion of 6 mM flutriafol increased the dopamine levels to 984 ± 141%, with respect to basal levels. Infusion of flutriafol (6 mM) in MK-801 (500 μM) or CNQX (500 μM) pretreated animals, increased striatal dopamine levels to 489 ± 74% and 477 ± 78%, with respect to basal levels, respectively, these increases being 50.3% and 51.5% smaller than those induced by flutriafol in non-pretreated animals. Infusion of flutriafol (6 mM) in L-NARG (1 mM) or 7-NI (100 μM) pretreated animals, increased the extracellular dopamine levels to 400 ± 88.5 and 479 ± 69.4%, with respect to basal levels, respectively, these increases being 59.3 and 51% smaller than those induced by flutriafol in non-pretreated animals. In summary, flutriafol appears to act, at least in part, through an overstimulation of NMDA receptors with possible NO production to induce dopamine release, and the administration of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors protects against flutriafol-induced dopamine release from rat striatum.

  17. Effects of cocaine self-administration history under limited and extended access conditions on in vivo striatal dopamine neurochemistry and acoustic startle in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Porche’ Kirkland; Davis, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Rationale The transition from infrequent and controlled cocaine use to dependence may involve enduring changes in neurobiology as a consequence of persistent drug use. Objective The present study utilized an intravenous drug self-administration protocol of increasing cocaine access to evaluate potential changes in dopamine function in vivo, including changes in sensitivity to psychostimulants. Materials and methods Drug-naïve rhesus monkeys were provided limited access (1 h) to cocaine self-administration for 60 days followed by 60 days under an extended access condition (4 h). Basal levels of striatal extracellular dopamine and its metabolites, as well as the effectiveness of cocaine and amphetamine to elevate dopamine, were determined with in vivo microdialysis before the initiation of cocaine self-administration and during limited and extended access. The effect of cocaine and amphetamine on the acoustic startle response was also examined to assess complementary behavioral changes as a function of drug history. Results Extended access to cocaine self-administration lead to increased daily intake compared to limited access conditions but did not result in escalated intake over time. However, cocaine- and amphetamine-induced increases in striatal dopamine were diminished as a function of cocaine self-administration history. Surprisingly, there was no effect of drug-taking history on sensitivity to psychostimulant-induced enhancement of startle amplitude. Conclusions The present experiments provide evidence of a hypofunctional dopamine system that is not associated with an escalation in drug intake or reflected in measures of acoustic startle. PMID:19365621

  18. Selective Effects of Dopamine Depletion and L-DOPA Therapy on Learning-Related Firing Dynamics of Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ledia F.; Kubota, Yasuo; Hu, Dan; Howe, Mark W.; Lemaire, Nune; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Despite evidence that dopamine neurotransmission in the striatum is critical for learning as well as for movement control, little is yet known about how the learning-related dynamics of striatal activity are affected by dopamine depletion, a condition faced in Parkinson’s disease. We made localized intrastriatal 6-hydroxydopamine lesions in rats and recorded within the dopamine-depleted sensorimotor striatal zone and its contralateral correspondent as the animals learned a conditional maze task. Rather than producing global, non-specific elevations in firing rate across the task, the dopamine depletion altered striatal projection neuron activity and fast-spiking interneuron activity selectively, with sharply task-specific and cell-type specific effects, and often, with learning-stage selective effects as well. Striatal projection neurons with strong responses during the maze runs had especially elevated responsiveness during the maze runs. Projection neurons that, instead, fired most strongly prior to maze running showed elevated pre-start firing rates, but not during maze running, as learning progressed. The intrastriatal dopamine depletion severely affected the learning-related patterning of fast-spiking interneuron ensembles, especially during maze running and after extended training. Remarkably, L-DOPA treatment almost entirely reversed the depletion-induced elevations in pre-run firing of the projection neurons, and elevated their responses around start and end of maze runs. By contrast, L-DOPA failed to normalize fast-spiking interneuron activity. Thus the effects of striatal dopamine depletion and restoration on striatal activity are highly dependent not only on cell type, as previously shown, but also on the behavioral activity called for and the state of behavioral learning achieved. PMID:23486949

  19. Graft-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease: High striatal serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio.

    PubMed

    Politis, Marios; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Wu, Kit; Quinn, Niall P; Pogarell, Oliver; Brooks, David J; Bjorklund, Anders; Lindvall, Olle; Piccini, Paola

    2011-09-01

    Graft-induced dyskinesias are a serious complication after neural transplantation in Parkinson's disease. One patient with Parkinson's disease, treated with fetal grafts 14 years ago and deep brain stimulation 6 years ago, showed marked improvement of motor symptoms but continued to suffer from OFF-medication graft-induced dyskinesias. The patient received a series of clinical and imaging assessments. Positron emission tomography and single-photon emission computed tomography 14 years posttransplantation revealed an elevated serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio in the grafted striatum compatible with serotonergic hyperinnervation. Inhibition of serotonin neuron activity by systemic administration of a 5-HT(1A) agonist suppressed graft-induced dyskinesias. Our data provide further evidence that serotonergic neurons mediate graft-induced dyskinesias in Parkinson's disease. Achieving a normal striatal serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio following transplantation of fetal tissue or stem cells should be necessary to avoid the development of graft-induced dyskinesias.

  20. Intranasal Dopamine Reduces In Vivo [123I]FP-CIT Binding to Striatal Dopamine Transporter: Correlation with Behavioral Changes and Evidence for Pavlovian Conditioned Dopamine Response

    PubMed Central

    de Souza Silva, Maria A.; Mattern, Claudia; Decheva, Cvetana; Huston, Joseph P.; Sadile, Adolfo G.; Beu, Markus; Müller, H.-W.; Nikolaus, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Dopamine (DA), which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, has central and behavioral effects when administered via the nasal route. Neither the mechanisms of central action of intranasal dopamine (IN-DA), nor its mechanisms of diffusion and transport into the brain are well understood. We here examined whether IN-DA application influences dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in the dorsal striatum and assessed the extent of binding in relation to motor and exploratory behaviors. We hypothesized that, based on the finding of increased extracellular DA in the striatum induced by application of IN-DA, binding of [123I]FP-CIT to the DAT should be decreased due to competition at the receptor. Methods: Rats were administered 3 mg/kg IN-DA and vehicle (VEH), with IN-DA injection either preceding or following VEH. Then motor and exploratory behaviors (traveled distance, velocity, center time, sitting, rearing, head-shoulder motility, grooming) were assessed for 30 min in an open field prior to administration of [123I]FP-CIT. DAT binding after IN-DA and VEH was measured with small animal SPECT 2 h following administration of the radioligand. Results: (1) After IN-DA application, striatal DAT binding was significantly lower as compared to VEH, indicating that the nasally delivered DA had central action and increased DA levels comparable to that found previously with L-DOPA administration; and (2) DAT binding in response to intranasal VEH was lower when IN-DA application preceded VEH treatment. This finding is suggestive of Pavlovian conditioning of DA at the level of the DAT, since the DA treatment modified (decreased) the binding in response to the subsequent VEH treatment. VEH treatment also reduced motor and exploratory behaviors more when applied before, as compared to when it followed IN-DA application, also indicative of behavioral Pavlovian conditioning akin to that found upon application of various psychostimulant drugs. Conclusions: The results: (a

  1. Striatal muscarinic receptors promote activity-dependence of dopamine transmission via distinct receptor subtypes on cholinergic interneurons in ventral versus dorsal striatum

    PubMed Central

    Threlfell, Sarah; Clements, Michael A.; Khodai, Tansi; Pienaar, Ilse S.; Exley, Richard; Wess, Jürgen; Cragg, Stephanie J.

    2010-01-01

    Striatal dopamine (DA) and acetylcholine (ACh) regulate motivated behaviors and striatal plasticity. Interactions between these neurotransmitters may be important, through synchronous changes in parent neuron activities and reciprocal presynaptic regulation of release. How DA signalling is regulated by striatal muscarinic receptors (mAChRs) is unresolved; contradictory reports indicate suppression or facilitation, implicating several mAChR-subtypes on various neurons. We investigated whether mAChR regulation of DA signaling varies with presynaptic activity, and identified the mAChRs responsible in sensorimotor- versus limbic-associated striatum. We detected DA in real-time at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in mouse striatal slices. Broad-spectrum mAChR agonists (oxotremorine-M, APET) decreased DA release evoked by low-frequency stimuli (1–10 Hz, 4 pulses) but increased the sensitivity of DA release to presynaptic activity, even enhancing release by high frequencies (e.g. >25 Hz for 4 pulses). These bidirectional effects depended upon ACh input to striatal nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) on DA axons but not GABA- or glutamate-input. In caudate-putamen (CPu), knockout of M2- or M4-mAChRs (not M5) prevented mAChR control of DA indicating that M2- and M4-mAChRs are required. In nucleus accumbens (NAc) core or shell, mAChR function was prevented in M4-knockouts, but not M2- or M5-knockouts. These data indicate that striatal mAChRs, by inhibiting ACh release from cholinergic interneurons and thus modifying nAChR activity, offer variable control of DA release probability that promotes how DA release reflects activation of dopaminergic axons. Furthermore, different coupling of striatal M2-/M4-mAChRs to the control of DA release in CPu versus NAc suggests targets to influence DA/ACh function differentially between striatal domains. PMID:20203199

  2. The effects of administration of monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors on rat striatal neurone responses to dopamine.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, M D; Scarr, E; Zhu, M Y; Paterson, I A; Juorio, A V

    1994-01-01

    1. (-)-Deprenyl has been shown to potentiate rat striatal neurone responses to dopamine agonists at doses not altering dopamine metabolism. Since there are a number of effects of (-)-deprenyl which could result in this phenomenon, we have investigated the effects of MDL 72,145 and Ro 19-6327, whose only common effect with (-)-deprenyl is an inhibition of monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), on rat striatal neurone responses to dopamine and on striatal dopamine metabolism. 2. Using in vivo electrophysiology, i.p. injection of either MDL 72,145 or Ro 19-6327 was found to produce a dose-dependent potentiation of striatal neurone responses to dopamine but not gamma-aminobutyric acid. 3. Neurochemical investigations revealed that this occurred at doses (0.25-1 mg kg-1) which, while not affecting levels of dopamine or its metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid or homovanillic acid, did cause a significant, dose-dependent, elevation in striatal levels of the putative neuromodulator, 2-phenylethylamine (PE). 4. Inhibition of PE synthesis by i.p. injection of the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor, NSD 1015, produced a reversal of the effects of MDL 72,145 and Ro 19-6327. 5. Neurochemical analysis revealed this to occur at a dose of NSD 1015 (10 mg kg-1) selective for reduction of elevated PE levels. 6. These results suggest that PE can act as a neuromodulator of dopaminergic responses and that MAO-B inhibitors may potentiate neuronal responses to dopamine via the indirect mechanism of elevation of PE following MAO-B inhibition. PMID:7889269

  3. Hypothyroidism leads to increased dopamine receptor sensitivity and concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Crocker, A.D.; Overstreet, D.H.; Crocker, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Rats treated with iodine-131 were confirmed to be hypothyroid by their reduced baseline core body temperatures, reduced serum thyroxine concentrations and elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone concentrations. When hypothyroid rats were compared to euthyroid controls they were more sensitive to the effects of apomorphine (1.0 mumol/kg) on stereotypy, operant responding and body temperature and showed a smaller reduction in locomotor activity after injection of haloperidol (0.25 mumol/kg). Receptor binding studies on striatal homogenates indicated that hypothyroid rats had increased concentrations of D2 dopamine receptors but there was no change in the affinity. It is concluded that hypothyroidism increases dopamine receptor sensitivity by increasing receptor concentration.

  4. Ventral striatal dopamine synthesis capacity is associated with individual differences in behavioral disinhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Andrew D.; Brooks, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Pathological gambling, alongside addictive and antisocial disorders, forms part of a broad psychopathological spectrum of externalizing disorders, which share an underlying genetic vulnerability. The shared externalizing propensity is a highly heritable, continuously varying trait. Disinhibitory personality traits such as impulsivity and novelty seeking (NS) function as indicators of this broad shared externalizing tendency, which may reflect, at the neurobiological level, variation in the reactivity of dopaminergic (DAergic) brain reward systems centered on the ventral striatum (VS). Here, we examined whether individual differences in ventral striatal dopamine (DA) synthesis capacity were associated with individual variation in disinhibitory personality traits. Twelve healthy male volunteers underwent 6-[18F]Fluoro-L-DOPA (FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to measure striatal DA synthesis capacity, and completed a measure of disinhibited personality (NS). We found that levels of ventral, but not dorsal, striatal DA synthesis capacity were significantly correlated with inter-individual variation in disinhibitory personality traits, particularly a propensity for financial extravagance and irresponsibility. Our results are consistent with preclinical models of behavioral disinhibition and addiction proneness, and provide novel insights into the neurobiology of personality based vulnerability to pathological gambling and other externalizing disorders. PMID:24672449

  5. Effects of an acute therapeutic or rewarding dose of amphetamine on acquisition of Pavlovian autoshaping and ventral striatal dopamine signaling.

    PubMed

    Schuweiler, D R; Athens, J M; Thompson, J M; Vazhayil, S T; Garris, P A

    2017-09-04

    Rewarding doses of amphetamine increase the amplitude, duration, and frequency of dopamine transients in the ventral striatum. Debate continues at the behavioral level about which component of reward, learning or incentive salience, is signaled by these dopamine transients and thus altered in addiction. The learning hypothesis proposes that rewarding drugs result in pathological overlearning of drug-predictive cues, while the incentive sensitization hypothesis suggests that rewarding drugs result in sensitized attribution of incentive salience to drug-predictive cues. Therapeutic doses of amphetamine, such as those used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, are hypothesized to enhance the ventral striatal dopamine transients that are critical for reward-related learning and to enhance Pavlovian learning. However, the effects of therapeutic doses of amphetamine on Pavlovian learning are poorly understood, and the effects on dopamine transients are completely unknown. We determined the effects of an acute pre-training therapeutic or rewarding amphetamine injection on the acquisition of Pavlovian autoshaping in the intact rat. We also determined the effects of these doses on electrically evoked transient-like dopamine signals using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in the anesthetized rat. The rewarding dose enhanced the amplitude and duration of DA signals, caused acute task disengagement, impaired learning for several days, and triggered incentive sensitization. The therapeutic dose produced smaller enhancements in DA signals but did not have similar behavioral effects. These results underscore the necessity of more studies using therapeutic doses, and suggest a hybrid learning/incentive sensitization model may be required to explain the development of addiction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Cortical regulation of striatal medium spiny neuron dendritic remodeling in parkinsonism: modulation of glutamate release reverses dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bonnie G; Neely, M Diana; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2010-10-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if decortication reverses or prevents dopamine depletion-induced spine loss by placing motor cortex lesions 4 weeks after, or at the time of, 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the SN. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after cortical lesions. Motor cortex lesions significantly reversed the loss of MSN spines elicited by dopamine denervation; a similar effect was observed in the prevention experiment. We then determined if modulating glutamate release in organotypic cocultures prevented spine loss. Treatment of the cultures with the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to suppress corticostriatal glutamate release completely blocked spine loss in dopamine-denervated cultures. These studies provide the first evidence to show that MSN spine loss associated with parkinsonism can be reversed and point to suppression of corticostriatal glutamate release as a means of slowing progression in Parkinson's disease.

  7. Effects of isomers of apomorphines on dopamine receptors in striatal and limbic tissue of rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Kula, N.S.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Bromley, S.; Neumeyer, J.L.

    1985-09-16

    The optical isomers of apomorphine (APO) and N-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) were interacted with three biochemical indices of dopamine (Da) receptors in extrapyramidal and limbic preparations of rat brain tissues. There were consistent isomeric preferences for the R(-) configuration of both DA analogs in stimulation adenylate cyclase (D-1 sites) and in competing for high affinity binding of /sup 3/H-spiroperidol (D-2 sites) and of /sup 3/H-ADTN (DA agonist binding sites) in striatal tissue, with lesser isomeric differences in the limbic tissue. The S(+) apomorphines did not inhibit stimulation of adenylate cyclase by DA. The tendency for greater activity of higher apparent affinity of R(-) apomorphines in striatum may reflect the evidently greater abundance of receptor sites in that region. There were only small regional differences in interactions of the apomorphine isomers with all three receptor sites, except for a strong preference of (-)NPA for striatal D-2 sites. These results do not parallel our recent observations indicating potent and selective antidopaminergic actions of S(+) apomorphines in the rat limbic system. They suggest caution in assuming close parallels between current biochemical functional, especially behavioral, methods of evaluating dopamine receptors of mammalian brain.

  8. Dopaminergic mechanisms of target detection - P300 event related potential and striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Pogarell, Oliver; Padberg, Frank; Karch, Susanne; Segmiller, Felix; Juckel, Georg; Mulert, Christoph; Hegerl, Ulrich; Tatsch, Klaus; Koch, Walter

    2011-12-30

    The P300 is a cortically generated event related potential (ERP) widely used in neurophysiological research since it is related to cognitive functions and central information processing. Intracerebral recordings and functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that this potential is generated by various brain regions including frontal, temporal and parietal cortices. Regarding the neurochemical background, clinical and genetic investigations suggest that dopaminergic neurons could be involved in the generation of the P300. However, there is no direct evidence in vivo that P300 amplitudes and latencies are related to dopaminergic parameters. The aim of this study was to further elucidate dopaminergic aspects of the P300 ERP by combining neurophysiological and nuclear medicine assessments in vivo. Patients with a major depressive episode underwent both P300 recordings and dynamic [¹²³I] IBZM SPECT for the evaluation of striatal dopamine D₂/D₃-receptor availability. There were statistically significant positive correlations of the striatal dopamine D₂/D₃-receptor status with P300 amplitudes and significant negative correlations with P300 latencies. Using this combined approach, the study presents direct evidence in vivo that the central dopaminergic system might play an important role in the generation of the P300 and that central dopaminergic activity could be involved in the modulation of P300 parameters. This association might be of relevance for the interpretation of P300 studies in psychiatric disorders. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The impact of a parkinsonian lesion on dynamic striatal dopamine transmission depends on nicotinic receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Katie A; Platt, Nicola J; Cragg, Stephanie J

    2015-10-01

    Dopamine function is disturbed in Parkinson's disease (PD), but whether and how release of dopamine from surviving neurons is altered has long been debated. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) on dopamine axons powerfully govern dopamine release and could be critical contributing factors. We revisited whether fundamental properties of dopamine transmission are changed in a parkinsonian brain and tested the potentially profound masking effects of nAChRs. Using real-time detection of dopamine in mouse striatum after a partial 6-hydroxydopamine lesion and under nAChR inhibition, we reveal that dopamine signals show diminished sensitivity to presynaptic activity. This effect manifested as diminished contrast between DA release evoked by the lowest versus highest frequencies. This reduced activity-dependence was underpinned by loss of short-term facilitation of dopamine release, consistent with an increase in release probability (Pr). With nAChRs active, the reduced activity-dependence of dopamine release after a parkinsonian lesion was masked. Consequently, moment-by-moment variation in activity of nAChRs may lead to dynamic co-variation in dopamine signal impairments in PD.

  10. Pre-Existing Differences and Diet-Induced Alterations in Striatal Dopamine Systems of Obesity-Prone Rats

    PubMed Central

    Vollbrecht, Peter J.; Mabrouk, Omar S.; Nelson, Andrew D.; Kennedy, Robert T.; Ferrario, Carrie R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Interactions between pre-existing differences in mesolimbic function and neuroadaptations induced by consumption of fatty, sugary foods are thought to contribute to human obesity. This study examined basal and cocaine-induced changes in striatal neurotransmitter levels without diet manipulation and D2/D3 dopamine receptor-mediated transmission prior to and after consumption of “junk-foods” in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Methods Microdialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to determine basal and cocaine-induced changes in neurotransmitter levels in real time with cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Sensitivity to the D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was examined before and after restricted junk-food exposure. Selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats were used. Results Cocaine-induced locomotion was greater in obesity-prone rats versus obesity-resistant rats prior to diet manipulation. Basal and cocaine-induced increases in dopamine and serotonin levels did not differ. Obesity-prone rats were more sensitive to the D2 receptor-mediated effects of quinpirole, and junk-food produced modest alterations in quinpirole sensitivity in obesity-resistant rats. Conclusions These data show that mesolimbic systems differ prior to diet manipulation in susceptible versus resistant rats, and that consumption of fatty, sugary foods produce different neuroadaptations in these populations. These differences may contribute to enhanced food craving and an inability to limit food intake in susceptible individuals. PMID:26847484

  11. Pre-existing differences and diet-induced alterations in striatal dopamine systems of obesity-prone rats.

    PubMed

    Vollbrecht, Peter J; Mabrouk, Omar S; Nelson, Andrew D; Kennedy, Robert T; Ferrario, Carrie R

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between pre-existing differences in mesolimbic function and neuroadaptations induced by consumption of fatty, sugary foods are thought to contribute to human obesity. This study examined basal and cocaine-induced changes in striatal neurotransmitter levels without diet manipulation and D2 /D3 dopamine receptor-mediated transmission prior to and after consumption of "junk-foods" in obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats. Microdialysis and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to determine basal and cocaine-induced changes in neurotransmitter levels in real time with cocaine-induced locomotor activity. Sensitivity to the D2 /D3 dopamine receptor agonist quinpirole was examined before and after restricted junk-food exposure. Selectively bred obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats were used. Cocaine-induced locomotion was greater in obesity-prone rats versus obesity-resistant rats prior to diet manipulation. Basal and cocaine-induced increases in dopamine and serotonin levels did not differ. Obesity-prone rats were more sensitive to the D2 receptor-mediated effects of quinpirole, and junk-food produced modest alterations in quinpirole sensitivity in obesity-resistant rats. These data show that mesolimbic systems differ prior to diet manipulation in susceptible versus resistant rats, and that consumption of fatty, sugary foods produce different neuroadaptations in these populations. These differences may contribute to enhanced food craving and an inability to limit food intake in susceptible individuals. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  12. Dopamine D1 receptor blockade impairs alcohol seeking without reducing dorsal striatal activation to cues of alcohol availability

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Rebecca R; Robinson, Donita L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Alcohol-associated cues activate both ventral and dorsal striatum in functional brain imaging studies of heavy drinkers. In rodents, alcohol-associated cues induce changes in neuronal firing frequencies and increase dopamine release in ventral striatum, but the impact of alcohol-associated cues on neuronal activity in dorsal striatum is unclear. We previously reported phasic changes in action potential frequency in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum after cues that signaled alcohol availability, prompting approach behavior. Methods We investigated the hypothesis that dopamine transmission modulates these phasic firing changes. Rats were trained to self-administer alcohol, and neuronal activity was monitored with extracellular electrophysiology during “anticipatory” cues that signaled the start of the operant session. Sessions were preceded by systemic administration of the D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0, 10, and 20 μg/kg). Results SCH23390 significantly decreased firing rates during the 60 s prior to cue onset without reducing phasic excitations immediately following the cues. While neuronal activation to cues might be expected to initiate behavioral responses, in this study alcohol seeking was reduced despite the presence of dorsal striatal excitations to alcohol cues. Conclusions These data suggest that D1 receptor antagonism reduces basal firing rates in the dorsal striatum and modulates the ability of neuronal activation to “anticipatory” cues to initiate alcohol seeking in rats with an extensive history of alcohol self-administration. PMID:25642390

  13. Dopamine D1 receptor blockade impairs alcohol seeking without reducing dorsal striatal activation to cues of alcohol availability.

    PubMed

    Fanelli, Rebecca R; Robinson, Donita L

    2015-02-01

    Alcohol-associated cues activate both ventral and dorsal striatum in functional brain imaging studies of heavy drinkers. In rodents, alcohol-associated cues induce changes in neuronal firing frequencies and increase dopamine release in ventral striatum, but the impact of alcohol-associated cues on neuronal activity in dorsal striatum is unclear. We previously reported phasic changes in action potential frequency in the dorsomedial and dorsolateral striatum after cues that signaled alcohol availability, prompting approach behavior. We investigated the hypothesis that dopamine transmission modulates these phasic firing changes. Rats were trained to self-administer alcohol, and neuronal activity was monitored with extracellular electrophysiology during "anticipatory" cues that signaled the start of the operant session. Sessions were preceded by systemic administration of the D1-type dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390 (0, 10, and 20 μg/kg). SCH23390 significantly decreased firing rates during the 60 s prior to cue onset without reducing phasic excitations immediately following the cues. While neuronal activation to cues might be expected to initiate behavioral responses, in this study alcohol seeking was reduced despite the presence of dorsal striatal excitations to alcohol cues. These data suggest that D1 receptor antagonism reduces basal firing rates in the dorsal striatum and modulates the ability of neuronal activation to "anticipatory" cues to initiate alcohol seeking in rats with an extensive history of alcohol self-administration.

  14. Striatal dopamine D1 receptor suppression impairs reward-associative learning.

    PubMed

    Higa, Kerin K; Young, Jared W; Ji, Baohu; Nichols, David E; Geyer, Mark A; Zhou, Xianjin

    2017-04-14

    Dopamine (DA) is required for reinforcement learning. Hence, disruptions in DA signaling may contribute to the learning deficits associated with psychiatric disorders. The DA D1 receptor (D1R) has been linked to learning and is a target for cognitive/motivational enhancement in patients with schizophrenia. Separating the striatal D1R contribution to learning vs. motivation, however, has been challenging. We suppressed striatal D1R expression in mice using a D1R-targeting short hairpin RNA (shRNA), delivered locally to the striatum via an adeno-associated virus (AAV). We then assessed reward- and punishment-associative learning using a probabilistic learning task and motivation using a progressive-ratio breakpoint procedure. We confirmed suppression of striatal D1Rs immunohistochemically and by testing locomotor activity after the administration of (+)-doxanthrine, a full D1R agonist, in control mice and those treated with the D1RshRNA. D1RshRNA-treated mice exhibited impaired reward-associative learning, while punishment-associative learning was spared. This deficit was unrelated to general learning impairments or amotivation, because the D1shRNA-treated mice exhibited normal Barnes maze learning and normal motivation in the progressive-ratio breakpoint procedure. Suppression of striatal D1Rs selectively impaired reward-associative learning whereas punishment-associative learning, aversion-motivated learning, and appetitive motivation were spared. Because patients with schizophrenia exhibit similar reward-associative learning deficits, D1R-targeted treatments should be investigated to improve reward learning in these patients.

  15. Greater striatal dopamine transporter density may be associated with major depressive episode.

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Jay D; Newberg, Andrew B; Soeller, Irene; Shults, Justine

    2012-12-10

    We examined striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) distribution volume ratio (DVR) values in subjects with unipolar or bipolar major depressive episode (versus non-depressed healthy volunteers) using the selective DAT radioligand [(99m)Tc]TRODAT-1 and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). We hypothesized that striatal DVR values would be greater in depressed versus non-depressed subjects, and that greater DVR values may represent a possible clinical biomarker of depression. [(99m)Tc]TRODAT-1 spect images were acquired from 39 depressed and 103 non-depressed drug-free subjects. The primary outcome measure was the DVR value of [(99m)Tc]TRODAT-1 binding for the putamen region and the combined putamen plus caudate region. DVR values were significantly correlated across all striatal regions within both subject groups (p<0.005). Depressed subjects had significantly greater DVR values (versus non-depressed subjects) in the putamen (p<0.0005) and the combined putamen plus caudate (p<0.0005) regions. There was no difference in DVR values between unipolar (n=24) and bipolar (n=15) depressed subjects, and no difference in DVR values for depressed subjects with or without prior antidepressant exposure. The predictive probability of the putamen or combined putamen plus caudate DVR value to distinguish depressed from non-depressed subjects was significant (p<0.0005). DAT values could potentially be influenced by age, gender, diagnosis, prior psychotropic dug exposure, illness length, or symptom severity. Results confirm prior observations of greater striatal DAT density in depressed versus non-depressed subjects, and suggest that greater DVR values may possibly represent a potential diagnostic biomarker for distinguish depressed from non-depressed individuals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Striatal dysfunction increases basal ganglia output during motor cortex activation in parkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Belluscio, Mariano A; Riquelme, Luis A; Murer, M Gustavo

    2007-05-01

    During movement, inhibitory neurons in the basal ganglia output nuclei show complex modulations of firing, which are presumptively driven by corticostriatal and corticosubthalamic input. Reductions in discharge should facilitate movement by disinhibiting thalamic and brain stem nuclei while increases would do the opposite. A proposal that nigrostriatal dopamine pathway degeneration disrupts trans-striatal pathways' balance resulting in sustained overactivity of basal ganglia output nuclei neurons and Parkinson's disease clinical signs is not fully supported by experimental evidence, which instead shows abnormal synchronous oscillatory activity in animal models and patients. Yet, the possibility that variation in motor cortex activity drives transient overactivity in output nuclei neurons in parkinsonism has not been explored. In Sprague-Dawley rats with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced nigrostriatal lesions, approximately 50% substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr) units show abnormal cortically driven slow oscillations of discharge. Moreover, these units selectively show abnormal responses to motor cortex stimulation consisting in augmented excitations of an odd latency, which overlapped that of inhibitory responses presumptively mediated by the trans-striatal direct pathway in control rats. Delivering D1 or D2 dopamine agonists into the striatum of parkinsonian rats by reverse microdialysis reduced these abnormal excitations but had no effect on pathological oscillations. The present study establishes that dopamine-deficiency related changes of striatal function contribute to producing abnormally augmented excitatory responses to motor cortex stimulation in the SNpr. If a similar transient overactivity of basal ganglia output were driven by motor cortex input during movement, it could contribute to impeding movement initiation or execution in Parkinson's disease.

  17. Striatal glucose metabolism and dopamine D2 receptor binding in asymptomatic gene carriers and patients with Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Antonini, A; Leenders, K L; Spiegel, R; Meier, D; Vontobel, P; Weigell-Weber, M; Sanchez-Pernaute, R; de Yébenez, J G; Boesiger, P; Weindl, A; Maguire, R P

    1996-12-01

    We used PET scans with the tracers [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [11C]raclopride (RACLO) to study glucose metabolism and dopamine D2 receptor binding in the caudate nucleus and putamen of 18 carriers of the Huntington's disease gene mutation (10 asymptomatic subjects and eight untreated symptomatic Huntington's disease patients in an early disease stage). We also performed MRI scans and measured the bicaudate ratio (BCR) in the same subjects. Data were compared with those from nine mutation-negative members of Huntington's disease families and separate groups of age matched controls. The PET scans were repeated 1.5-3 years later in six of the asymptomatic gene carriers. Symptomatic Huntington's disease patients showed a marked reduction of FDG and RACLO uptake in the caudate nucleus and putamen and a significant increase of BCR. Asymptomatic mutation carriers revealed significant hypometabolism in the caudate nucleus and putamen. The RACLO binding was significantly decreased in the putamen. Decrements of caudate nucleus tracer uptake, particularly RACLO, correlated significantly with BCR increases in both symptomatic and asymptomatic gene carriers. In asymptomatic carriers, metabolic and receptor binding decreases were also significantly associated with the CAG repeat number but not with the individual's age. Discriminant function analysis correctly classified clinical and genetic status in 24 of 27 subjects on the basis of their striatal PET values (83% sensitivity and 100% specificity). Three asymptomatic mutation carriers were classified/grouped together with mutation-negative subjects, indicating that these individuals had normal striatal RACLO and FDG uptake. Follow-up PET data from gene-positive subjects showed a significant reduction in the mean striatal RACLO binding of 6.3% per year. Striatal glucose metabolism revealed an overall non significant 2.3% decrease per year. These data indicate that asymptomatic Huntington's disease mutation carriers may

  18. Modafinil evokes striatal [(3)H]dopamine release and alters the subjective properties of stimulants.

    PubMed

    Dopheide, Marsha M; Morgan, Russell E; Rodvelt, Kelli R; Schachtman, Todd R; Miller, Dennis K

    2007-07-30

    Modafinil is a mild psychostimulant used for the treatment of sleep and arousal-related disorders, and has been considered a pharmacotherapy for cocaine and amphetamine dependence; however, modafinil's mechanism of action is largely unclear. The present study investigated modafinil using drug discrimination and slice superfusion techniques. Rats were trained to discriminate cocaine (1.6 or 5 mg/kg) or amphetamine (0.3 mg/kg) from saline injection for food reinforcement. Modafinil (64-128 mg/kg) substituted partially for both cocaine doses and amphetamine. Pretreatment with a lower modafinil dose (32 mg/kg) augmented the discriminative stimulus properties of cocaine (1.6 mg/kg dose group) and amphetamine. In neurochemical experiments, modafinil (100-300 microM) evoked [(3)H]overflow from rat striatal slices preloaded with [(3)H]dopamine in a concentration-dependent manner; however, modafinil was less potent and efficacious than amphetamine and nicotine. The dopamine transporter inhibitor nomifensine (10 microM) blocked modafinil-evoked [(3)H]overflow, and concentrations of modafinil (<100 microM) that did not have intrinsic activity attenuated amphetamine (1 and 3 microM)-evoked [(3)H]overflow. Modafinil-evoked [(3)H]overflow was not altered by the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist mecamylamine, and modafinil did not alter nicotine-evoked [(3)H]overflow, indicating that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors likely are not important for modafinil's mechanism of action. The present results indicate that modafinil evokes dopamine release from striatal neurons and is a psychostimulant that is pharmacologically similar to, but much less potent and efficacious than, amphetamine.

  19. Exercise-induced rescue of tongue function without striatal dopamine sparing in a rat neurotoxin model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ciucci, Michelle R; Schaser, Allison J; Russell, John A

    2013-09-01

    Unilateral lesions to the medial forebrain bundle with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) lead to force and timing deficits during a complex licking task. We hypothesized that training targeting tongue force generation during licking would improve timing and force measures and also lead to striatal dopamine sparing. Nine month-old male Fisher344/Brown Norway rats were used in this experiment. Sixteen rats were in the control condition and received tongue exercise (n=8) or no exercise (n=8). Fourteen rats were in the 6-OHDA lesion condition and underwent tongue exercise (n=7) and or no exercise (n=7). Following 4 weeks of training and post-training measures, all animals underwent bilateral stimulation of the hypoglossal nerves to measure muscle contractile properties and were then transcardially perfused and brain tissues collected for immunohistochemistry to examine striatal dopamine content. Results demonstrated that exercise animals performed better for maximal force, average force, and press rate than their no-exercise counterparts, and the 6-OHDA animals that underwent exercise performed as well as the Control No Exercise group. Interestingly, there were no group differences for tetanic muscle force, despite behavioral recovery of forces. Additionally, behavioral and neurochemical analyses indicate that there were no differences in striatal dopamine. Thus, targeted exercise can improve tongue force and timing deficits related to 6-OHDA lesions and this exercise likely has a central, versus peripheral (muscle strength) mechanism. However, this mechanism is not related to sparing of striatal dopamine content.

  20. An evaluation of the interactions of antiestrogens with pituitary and striatal dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Toney, T W; Katzenellenbogen, B S

    1987-01-01

    We have examined the ability of various antiestrogens (AE's) to compete with 3H-spiroperidol for binding to membrane preparations from striatal tissue and anterior pituitary glands of immature female rats in order to determine the affinity of binding of AE's to D-2 dopamine receptors. Scatchard analyses revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptor sites in both the striatum and pituitary with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.33 nM and 0.40 nM, respectively, for the dopamine antagonist spiroperidol. The AE's tamoxifen, 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen (TAM-OH), CI-628, LY 117018, and a structurally related compound t-butyl-phenoxyethyl diethylamine (BPEA) were all able to compete with spiroperidol for binding to D-2 receptors and demonstrated relative binding affinities of 0.4-0.06%, with spiroperidol set at 100%. Dopamine displayed a lower affinity, 0.01%. Estradiol failed to compete with spiroperidol for D-2 receptor binding while the non-steroidal estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) showed very weak competition. For the lipophilic AE's, alteration of the level of their non-specific binding greatly affected their relative affinities in these competitive binding assays. The amine side chain on an aromatic ring appears to be a critical structural requirement in allowing the AE's to bind to the dopamine receptor. The relatively low affinity of AE's for the dopamine receptor and the high degree of interaction of AE's with other proteins suggest that only limited occupancy of D-2 receptors by AE's is likely in vivo.

  1. /sup 3/H-imipramine uptake into rat striatal slices and imipramine-induced /sup 3/H-dopamine efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, R.; Kawasaki, K.; Ono, N.; Kamiya, H.

    1983-04-01

    The effect of imipramine on spontaneous efflux of radiolabelled dopamine (DA) from slices of rat striatum was examined by a superfusion method. Imipramine at concentrations of 10 - 100 microM enhanced the efflux of DA accumulated in a high-affinity uptake system in a concentration-dependent manner. This efflux of /sup 3/H-DA was not affected by conditions (Ca/sup 2 +/-free medium, 100 microM bretylium and 30 microM tetrodotoxin) which inhibited the release of /sup 3/H-DA by electrical stimulation. Furthermore, this imipramine-induced /sup 3/H-DA efflux was temperature-dependent. The uptake of /sup 3/H-imipramine into striatal slices was determined. This uptake was concentration- and temperature-dependent and increased linearly. These results are discussed in relation to the hypothesis that /sup 3/H-DA efflux by imipramine is connected with uptake of imipramine.

  2. Effect of ethanol on (/sup 3/H)dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens and striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, V.A.; Lamm, M.C.; Taljaard, J.J.

    1988-05-01

    Ethanol (10-200 mM) transiently increased tritium overflow from superfused rat nucleus accumbens slices previously incubated with (/sup 3/H)dopamine (DA) and (/sup 14/C)choline. The effect was greater in striatal tissue and did not appear to be a non-specific membrane effect since (/sup 14/C)acetylcholine (ACh) release was not affected. Lack of antagonism by picrotoxin suggested that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors were not involved. Calcium was not a requirement and the DA uptake blocker, nomifensine, was without effect. Ethanol appeared to be causing (/sup 3/H)DA release into the cytoplasm. K+ -stimulated release of (/sup 3/H)DA and (/sup 14/C)ACh from nucleus accumbens and striatal slices was not affected. Clonidine-mediated inhibition of the K+-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)DA remained unaltered. Ethanol attenuated the isoproterenol-induced enhancement of (/sup 3/H)DA release. Ethanol therefore appeared to interact with components of the DA terminal causing a transient increase in the release of neurotransmitter without impairing K+-evoked release but apparently interfering with the isoproterenol-induced effect.

  3. Is there a relation between novelty seeking, striatal dopamine release and frontal cortical thickness?

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Sylvia M.; Casey, Kevin F.; Boileau, Isabelle; Cherkasova, Mariya; Larcher, Kevin; Dagher, Alain; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Background Novelty-seeking (NS) and impulsive personality traits have been proposed to reflect an interplay between fronto-cortical and limbic systems, including the limbic striatum (LS). Although neuroimaging studies have provided some evidence for this, most are comprised of small samples and many report surprisingly large effects given the challenges of trying to relate a snapshot of brain function or structure to an entity as complex as personality. The current work tested a priori hypotheses about associations between striatal dopamine (DA) release, cortical thickness (CT), and NS in a large sample of healthy adults. Methods Fifty-two healthy adults (45M/7F; age: 23.8±4.93) underwent two positron emission tomography scans with [11C]raclopride (specific for striatal DA D2/3 receptors) with or without amphetamine (0.3 mg/kg, p.o.). Structural magnetic resonance image scans were acquired, as were Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire data. Amphetamine-induced changes in [11C]raclopride binding potential values (ΔBPND) were examined in the limbic, sensorimotor (SMS) and associative (AST) striatum. CT measures, adjusted for whole brain volume, were extracted from the dorsolateral sensorimotor and ventromedial/limbic cortices. Results BPND values were lower in the amphetamine vs. no-drug sessions, with the largest effect in the LS. When comparing low vs. high LS ΔBPND groups (median split), higher NS2 (impulsiveness) scores were found in the high ΔBPND group. Partial correlations (age and gender as covariates) yielded a negative relation between ASTS ΔBPND and sensorimotor CT; trends for inverse associations existed between ΔBPND values in other striatal regions and frontal CT. In other words, the greater the amphetamine-induced striatal DA response, the thinner the frontal cortex. Conclusions These data expand upon previously reported associations between striatal DA release in the LS and both NS related impulsiveness and CT in the largest sample reported

  4. Putamen-midbrain functional connectivity is related to striatal dopamine transporter availability in patients with Lewy body diseases.

    PubMed

    Rieckmann, A; Gomperts, S N; Johnson, K A; Growdon, J H; Van Dijk, K R A

    2015-01-01

    Prior work has shown that functional connectivity between the midbrain and putamen is altered in patients with impairments in the dopamine system. This study examines whether individual differences in midbrain-striatal connectivity are proportional to the integrity of the dopamine system in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss (Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies). We assessed functional connectivity of the putamen during resting state fMRI and dopamine transporter (DAT) availability in the striatum using 11C-Altropane PET in twenty patients. In line with the hypothesis that functional connectivity between the midbrain and the putamen reflects the integrity of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system, putamen-midbrain functional connectivity was significantly correlated with striatal DAT availability even after stringent control for effects of head motion. DAT availability did not relate to functional connectivity between the caudate and thalamus/prefrontal areas. As such, resting state functional connectivity in the midbrain-striatal pathway may provide a useful indicator of underlying pathology in patients with nigrostriatal dopamine loss.

  5. Role of DARPP-32 and ARPP-21 in the Emergence of Temporal Constraints on Striatal Calcium and Dopamine Integration

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Upinder S.; Hellgren Kotaleski, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    In reward learning, the integration of NMDA-dependent calcium and dopamine by striatal projection neurons leads to potentiation of corticostriatal synapses through CaMKII/PP1 signaling. In order to elicit the CaMKII/PP1-dependent response, the calcium and dopamine inputs should arrive in temporal proximity and must follow a specific (dopamine after calcium) order. However, little is known about the cellular mechanism which enforces these temporal constraints on the signal integration. In this computational study, we propose that these temporal requirements emerge as a result of the coordinated signaling via two striatal phosphoproteins, DARPP-32 and ARPP-21. Specifically, DARPP-32-mediated signaling could implement an input-interval dependent gating function, via transient PP1 inhibition, thus enforcing the requirement for temporal proximity. Furthermore, ARPP-21 signaling could impose the additional input-order requirement of calcium and dopamine, due to its Ca2+/calmodulin sequestering property when dopamine arrives first. This highlights the possible role of phosphoproteins in the temporal aspects of striatal signal transduction. PMID:27584878

  6. Effect of chronic treatment with angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonists on striatal dopamine levels in normal rats and in a rat model of Parkinson's disease treated with L-DOPA.

    PubMed

    Dominguez-Meijide, Antonio; Villar-Cheda, Begoña; Garrido-Gil, Pablo; Sierrra-Paredes, German; Guerra, Maria J; Labandeira-Garcia, Jose L

    2014-01-01

    Beneficial effects of angiotensin type-1 receptor (AT1) inhibition have been observed in a number of brain processes mediated by oxidative stress and neuroinflammation, including Parkinson's disease. However, important counterregulatory interactions between dopamine and angiotensin systems have recently been demonstrated in several peripheral tissues, and it is possible that a decrease in dopamine levels due to AT1 inhibition may interfere with neuroprotective strategies. The present experiments involving rats with normal dopaminergic innervation indicate that chronic treatment with the AT1 antagonist candesartan does not significantly affect striatal levels of dopamine, serotonin or metabolites, as does not significantly affect motor behavior, as evaluated by the rotarod test. Interestingly, chronic administration of candesartan to normal rats induced a marked increase in dopamine D1 and a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor expression. In a rat model of Parkinson's disease treated with L-DOPA, no differences in striatal dopamine and serotonin levels were observed between candesartan-treated rats and untreated, which suggests that chronic treatment with candesartan does not significantly affect the process of L-DOPA decarboxylation and dopamine release in Parkinson's disease patients. Candesartan did not induce any differences in the striatal expression of dopamine D1 and D2 and serotonin 5-HT1B receptors in 6ydroxydopamine-lesioned rats treated with L-DOPA. The results suggest that chronic treatment with AT1 antagonists as a neuroprotective strategy does not significantly affect striatal dopamine release or motor behavior. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'.

  7. Striatal and extrastriatal dopamine release in the common marmoset brain measured by positron emission tomography and [(18)F]fallypride.

    PubMed

    Ota, Miho; Ogawa, Shintaro; Kato, Koichi; Masuda, Chiaki; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that patients with schizophrenia show greater sensitivity to psychostimulants than healthy subjects. Sensitization to psychostimulants and resultant alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmission in rodents has been suggested as a useful model of schizophrenia. This study sought to examine the use of methylphenidate as a psychostimulant to induce dopamine release and that of [(18)F]fallypride as a radioligand to quantify the release in a primate model of schizophrenia. Four common marmosets were scanned by positron emission tomography twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate dopamine release. Four other marmosets were sensitized by repeated methamphetamine (MAP) administration. Then, they were scanned twice, before and after methylphenidate challenge, to evaluate whether MAP-sensitization induced greater sensitivity to methylphenidate. We revealed a main effect of the methylphenidate challenge but not the MAP pretreatment on the striatal binding potential. These results suggest that methylphenidate-induced striatal dopamine release in the common marmoset could be evaluated by [(18)F]fallypride.

  8. Estradiol and striatal dopamine receptor antagonism influence memory system bias in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, Matthew G; Almey, Anne; Caissie, Meghen; LaChappelle, Ivonne; Radiotis, George; Brake, Wayne G

    2013-11-01

    Estradiol (E2) has been shown to influence learning and memory systems used by female rats to find a reward. Rats with high levels of E2 tend to use allocentric, or place, memory while rats with low levels of E2 use egocentric, or response, memory. It has been shown that systemic dopamine receptor antagonism interacts with E2 to affect which memory system is used. Here, dopamine antagonists were administered directly into either the dorsal striatum or nucleus accumbens to determine where in the brain this interaction takes place. Seventy-four young adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in a modified plus-maze. All rats were ovariectomized, received a subcutaneous low E2 implant, and were implanted with bilateral cannulae into either the dorsal striatum or the nucleus accumbens. Additionally, high E2 rats received daily injections of E2 in a sesame oil solution while low E2 rats received daily injections of vehicle. After reaching criterion levels of performance in a plus-maze task, rats were administered microinjections of either a dopamine D1 receptor (SCH 23390; 0.1 μg/ml and 0.01 μg/ml) or D2 receptor (raclopride; 2 μg/ml and 0.5 μg/ml) antagonist or a vehicle control (saline) in a counterbalanced manner. High E2 rats exhibited a trend towards a place memory bias while low E2 rats showed a response memory bias. Dorsal striatal administration of a D1, but not D2, dopamine receptor antagonist caused a switch in the memory system used by both high and low E rats. There was no significant effect of dopamine receptor antagonism in the nucleus accumbens group. Thus, E2 determined which memory system controlled behavior in a plus-maze task. Moreover, this effect was modulated by dopamine D1R antagonism in the dorsal but not ventral striatum suggesting that memory systems are, in part, mediated by E2 and dopamine in this region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. β-asarone and levodopa co-administration increase striatal dopamine level in 6-hydroxydopamine induced rats by modulating P-glycoprotein and tight junction proteins at the blood-brain barrier and promoting levodopa into the brain.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Deng, Minzhen; He, Yuping; Lu, Shiyao; Ma, Ruanxin; Fang, Yongqi

    2016-06-01

    Levodopa (L-dopa) is widely considered as one of the most effective drug constituents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability of L-dopa is <5%, which causes low efficacy. Neuroprotective effects of β-asarone on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced PD rats were demonstrated by our previous studies. Co-administration of β-asarone and L-dopa has not been explored until being investigated on PD rats in this study. PD rats were divided into four groups: untreated, L-dopa-treated, β-asarone-treated and co-administered-treated groups. All of the treatments were administered to the rats twice per day for 30 days. The L-dopa, dopamine (DA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), S100β and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels were subsequently determined. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp), zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1), claudin-5, occludin and actin expression was also assessed in cortex. Changes in BBB ultrastructure were observed using transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the co-administered treatment increased levels of L-dopa, DA, DOPAC and HVA in striatum, and S100β in plasma, but down-regulated NSE, P-gp, ZO-1, occludin, actin and claudin-5 in cortex. Crevices were observed between capillary endothelial cells at intercellular tight junction of the striatum in co-administered-treated group, while the endothelial cells in untreated group were tightly jointing each other. In addition, the correlations of L-dopa or DA and P-gp or tight junction proteins respectively were significantly negative in co-administered- and β-asarone-treated groups. These findings suggest that co-administered treatment may enhance the L-dopa BBB permeability and attenuate brain injury, which may be beneficial to PD treatment.

  10. Taurine fails to protect against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine-induced striatal dopamine depletion in mice.

    PubMed

    Navneet, A K; Appukuttan, T A; Pandey, M; Mohanakumar, K P

    2008-08-01

    Taurine, a known antioxidant and neuroprotector has been investigated for its free radical scavenging action in vitro in isolated mitochondria, and tested whether it protects against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice. Taurine (0.1-10 mM) did not affect 1-methyl-4-phenyl pyridinium-induced hydroxyl radical production in isolated mitochondria. Systemic administration of taurine (250 mg/kg, i.p.) caused a small, but significant loss of dopamine levels in the striatum of mice. Taurine failed to reverse MPTP-induced striatal dopamine depletion, but caused significant increase in dopamine turnover in these animals. In the light of the present study it may be suggested that consumption of taurine may neither help in scavenging of neurotoxic hydroxyl radicals in the brain mitochondria, nor would it help in blocking the process of neurodegeneration.

  11. Lower levels of uric acid and striatal dopamine in non-tremor dominant Parkinson's disease subtype

    PubMed Central

    Huertas, Ismael; Jesús, Silvia; Lojo, José Antonio; García-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Oropesa-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Carrillo, Fátima; Vargas-Gonzalez, Laura; Martín Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; García-Solís, David; Mir, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients who present with tremor and maintain a predominance of tremor have a better prognosis. Similarly, PD patients with high levels of uric acid (UA), a natural neuroprotectant, have also a better disease course. Our aim was to investigate whether PD motor subtypes differ in their levels of UA, and if these differences correlate with the degree of dopamine transporter (DAT) availability. We included 75 PD patients from whom we collected information about their motor symptoms, DAT imaging and UA concentration levels. Based on the predominance of their motor symptoms, patients were classified into postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD, n = 36), intermediate (I, n = 22), and tremor-dominant (TD, n = 17) subtypes. The levels of UA and striatal DAT were compared across subtypes and the correlation between these two measures was also explored. We found that PIGD patients had lower levels of UA (3.7 vs 4.5 vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<0.001) and striatal DAT than patients with an intermediate or TD phenotype. Furthermore, UA levels significantly correlated with the levels of striatal DAT. We also observed that some PIGD (25%) and I (45%) patients had a predominance of tremor at disease onset. We speculate that UA might be involved in the maintenance of the less damaging TD phenotype and thus also in the conversion from TD to PIGD. Low levels of this natural antioxidant could lead to a major neuronal damage and therefore influence the conversion to a more severe motor phenotype. PMID:28358829

  12. Lower levels of uric acid and striatal dopamine in non-tremor dominant Parkinson's disease subtype.

    PubMed

    Huertas, Ismael; Jesús, Silvia; Lojo, José Antonio; García-Gómez, Francisco Javier; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Oropesa-Ruiz, Juan Manuel; Carrillo, Fátima; Vargas-Gonzalez, Laura; Martín Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; García-Solís, David; Mir, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) patients who present with tremor and maintain a predominance of tremor have a better prognosis. Similarly, PD patients with high levels of uric acid (UA), a natural neuroprotectant, have also a better disease course. Our aim was to investigate whether PD motor subtypes differ in their levels of UA, and if these differences correlate with the degree of dopamine transporter (DAT) availability. We included 75 PD patients from whom we collected information about their motor symptoms, DAT imaging and UA concentration levels. Based on the predominance of their motor symptoms, patients were classified into postural instability and gait disorder (PIGD, n = 36), intermediate (I, n = 22), and tremor-dominant (TD, n = 17) subtypes. The levels of UA and striatal DAT were compared across subtypes and the correlation between these two measures was also explored. We found that PIGD patients had lower levels of UA (3.7 vs 4.5 vs 5.3 mg/dL; P<0.001) and striatal DAT than patients with an intermediate or TD phenotype. Furthermore, UA levels significantly correlated with the levels of striatal DAT. We also observed that some PIGD (25%) and I (45%) patients had a predominance of tremor at disease onset. We speculate that UA might be involved in the maintenance of the less damaging TD phenotype and thus also in the conversion from TD to PIGD. Low levels of this natural antioxidant could lead to a major neuronal damage and therefore influence the conversion to a more severe motor phenotype.

  13. Failure of MK-801 to suppress D1 receptor-mediated induction of locomotor activity and striatal preprotachykinin mRNA expression in the dopamine-depleted rat.

    PubMed

    Campbell, B M; Kreipke, C W; Walker, P D

    2006-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonism exerts suppressive influences over dopamine D1 receptor-mediated striatal gene expression and locomotor behavior in the intact rat. The present study examined the effects of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 on locomotor activity and striatal preprotachykinin mRNA expression stimulated by the D1 agonist (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide in rats with bilateral dopamine lesions. Two months after neonatal dopamine lesions with 6-hydroxydopamine, rats were challenged with (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (1.0 mg/kg) 15 min after administration of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg). In the intact rat, MK-801 prevented the induction of striatal preprotachykinin mRNA by D1 agonism. Similarly, direct infusion of (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (3.0 microg) into the intact striatum produced an increase in locomotor activity that was suppressed by MK-801 (1.0 microg) co-infusion. In the dopamine-depleted rat, MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg) administered prior to (+/-)6-chloro-7, 8-dihydroxy-3-allyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrobromide (1.0 mg/kg) increased, rather than suppressed, striatal preprotachykinin mRNA levels. Intrastriatal infusion of MK-801 (1.0 microg) failed to inhibit D1-mediated induction of motor activity in dopamine-depleted animals. Together, these data provide further support that N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists lose their ability to block D1-mediated behavioral activation following dopamine depletion. The activation, rather than suppression, of tachykinin neurons of the direct striatonigral pathway may play a facilitatory role in this mechanism.

  14. Comparison of striatal dopamine transporter levels in chronic heroin-dependent and methamphetamine-dependent subjects.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Jie; Liu, Xing Dang; Han, Mei; Lv, Rong Bin; Wang, Yuan Kai; Zhang, Guang Ming; Li, Yu

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of heroin and methamphetamine (METH) addiction on dopamine transporters (DATs) in the same dose and duration, we assessed DAT levels in the striatum by (99m) Tc-TRODAT-1 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain images in people with heroin and METH dependence. We recruited 21 healthy human controls, 23 heroin-dependent subjects and 25 METH abusers. The heroin- and METH-dependent subjects exhibited negative urine toxicology after undergoing physiological detoxification. All subjects underwent SPECT brain imaging, and specific tracer uptake ratios (SURs) were assessed bilaterally in the regions of interest. A significant SUR reduction in heroin-dependent subjects and METH-dependent subjects compared with healthy controls was found in the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. There were no significant differences in the heroin group and METH group for the left striatum, right striatum, left caudate nucleus, right caudate nucleus, left putamen and right putamen. The scores of craving, HAMA (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale), in heroin abusers were lower than in the METH abusers. Our results show that people with heroin and METH dependence who are currently abstinent had lower DAT levels in the striatum than healthy controls. There were no differences in striatal DAT in heroin and METH users. These results suggest that chronic heroin and METH abuse appears to produce similar effects in striatal DAT in humans. METH users may have more serious craving and anxiety symptoms than heroin users with prolonged abstinence.

  15. Sex-Dependent Changes in Striatal Dopamine Transport in Preadolescent Rats Exposed Prenatally and/or Postnatally to Methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Sirova, Jana; Kristofikova, Zdenka; Vrajova, Monika; Fujakova-Lipski, Michaela; Ripova, Daniela; Klaschka, Jan; Slamberova, Romana

    2016-08-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is the most commonly used psychostimulant drug, the chronic abuse of which leads to neurodegenerative changes in the brain. The global use of MA is increasing, including in pregnant women. Since MA can cross both placental and haematoencephalic barriers and is also present in maternal milk, children of chronically abused mothers are exposed prenatally as well as postnatally. Women seem to be more vulnerable to some aspects of MA abuse than men. MA is thought to exert its effects among others via direct interactions with dopamine transporters (DATs) in the brain tissue. Sexual dimorphism of the DAT system could be a base of sex-dependent actions of MA observed in behavioural and neurochemical studies. Possible sex differences in the DATs of preadolescent offspring exposed to MA prenatally and/or postnatally have not yet been evaluated. We examined the striatal synaptosomal DATs (the activity and density of surface expressed DATs and total DAT expression) in preadolescent male and female Wistar rats (31-35-day old animals) exposed prenatally and/or postnatally to MA (daily 5 mg/kg, s.c. to mothers during pregnancy and lactation). To distinguish between specific and nonspecific effects of MA on DATs, we also evaluated the in vitro effects of lipophilic MA on the fluidity of striatal membranes isolated from preadolescent and young adult rats of both sexes. We observed similar changes in the DATs of preadolescent rats exposed prenatally or postnatally (MA-mediated drop in the reserve pool but no alterations in surface-expressed DATs). However, prenatal exposure evoked significant changes in males and postnatal exposure in females. A significant decrease in the activity of surface-expressed DATs was found only in postnatally exposed females sensitized to MA via prenatal exposure. MA applied in vitro increased the fluidity of striatal membranes of preadolescent female but not male rats. In summary, DATs of preadolescent males are more sensitive to

  16. The effects in rats of lisdexamfetamine in combination with olanzapine on mesocorticolimbic dopamine efflux, striatal dopamine D2 receptor occupancy and stimulus generalization to a D-amphetamine cue.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Peter H; Rowley, Helen L; Gosden, James; Kulkarni, Rajiv S; Slater, Nigel; Love, Patrick L; Wang, Yiyun; Heal, David

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of schizophrenia is poorly understood and two principle hypotheses have dominated the field. Firstly, that subcortical dopamine function is enhanced while cortical dopamine function is reduced and secondly, that cortical glutamate systems are dysfunctional. It is also widely accepted that currently used antipsychotics have essentially no impact on cognitive deficits and persistent negative symptoms in schizophrenia. Reduced dopamine transmission via dopamine D1 receptors in the prefrontal cortex has been hypothesized to be involved in the aetiology of these symptom domains and enhancing cortical dopamine transmission within an optimal window has been suggested to be potentially beneficial. In these pre-clinical studies we have determined that combined administration of the d-amphetamine pro-drug, lisdexamfetamine and the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine increased dopamine efflux in the rat prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens to an extent greater than either drug given separately without affecting olanzapine's ability to block striatal dopamine D2 receptors which is important for its antipsychotic activity. Furthermore, in an established rodent model used to compare the subjective effects of novel compounds the ability of lisdexamfetamine to generalize to a d-amphetamine cue was dose-dependently attenuated when co-administered with olanzapine suggesting that lisdexamfetamine may produce less marked subjective effects when administered adjunctively with olanzapine.

  17. G-protein coupled receptor 6 deficiency alters striatal dopamine and cAMP concentrations and reduces dyskinesia in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Oeckl, Patrick; Hengerer, Bastian; Ferger, Boris

    2014-07-01

    The orphan G-protein coupled receptor 6 (GPR6) is a constitutively active receptor which is positively coupled to the formation of cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP). GPR6 is predominantly expressed in striatopallidal neurons. Here, we investigated neurochemical and behavioural effects of Gpr6 deficiency in mice. Gpr6 depletion decreased in vivo cAMP tissue concentrations (20%) in the striatum. An increase of striatal tissue dopamine concentrations (10%) was found in Gpr6(-/-) mice, whereas basal extracellular dopamine levels were not changed compared with Gpr6(+/+) mice, as shown by in vivo microdialysis. Western blot analyses revealed no alteration in the expression and subcellular localisation of the dopamine D2 receptor in the striatum of Gpr6(-/-) mice, and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons in the substantia nigra was unchanged. DARPP-32 (dopamine and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein of 32kDa) expression in the striatum of Gpr6(-/-) mice was not altered, however, a twofold increase in the phosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Thr34 was detected in Gpr6(-/-) compared with Gpr6(+/+) mice. Gpr6(-/-) mice showed higher locomotor activity in the open field, which persisted after treatment with the dopamine D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol. They also displayed reduced abnormal involuntary movements after apomorphine and quinpirole treatment in the mouse dyskinesia model of Parkinson's disease. In conclusion, the depletion of Gpr6 reduces cAMP concentrations in the striatum and alters the striatal dopaminergic system. Gpr6 deficiency causes an interesting behavioural phenotype in the form of enhanced motor activity combined with reduced abnormal involuntary movements. These findings could offer an opportunity for the treatment of Parkinson's disease beyond dopamine replacement.

  18. Phorbol esters potentiate rapid dopamine release from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, C.; Selmanoff, M.

    1988-06-01

    In the present study, we investigated the ability of phorbol esters to potentiate Ca2+-dependent depolarization-induced release of tritium-labeled dopamine ((3H)DA) from median eminence and striatal synaptosomes. Phorbol esters potentiated (3H)DA release in a concentration-dependent manner in both kinds of dopaminergic nerve terminals and with a potency series similar to that reported for stimulation of protein kinase-C (PKC) activity in other cell systems. Evoked (3H)DA release was increased by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-7) M) after 1, 3, 5, and 10 sec of depolarization. The effect of TPA was suppressed by sphingosine, a PKC inhibitor. TPA enhanced (3H)DA release evoked by high K+, veratridine or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187. Phorbol ester potentiation was found to be depolarization dependent, as it was present from 30-75 mM, but not at 5-20 mM external K+. Potentiation was seen at all external Ca2+ concentrations studied between 0.01-3 mM. However, in the absence of external free Ca2+ (i.e. with 0.1 mM EGTA), the phorbol effect was not present. These data indicate that an increase in intrasynaptosomal Ca2+ concentration is necessary for the enhancement of (3H)DA release by phorbol esters to occur. The combination of TPA and the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 does not show the marked synergism observed in some other systems, that is maximal release was not reinstated. This suggests that in dopaminergic nerve terminals, activation of PKC has a modulatory, rather than a mediating, effect on release. Recently, we have shown that hyperprolactinemia stimulated (3H)DA release from median eminence synaptosomes by an external Ca2+-independent mechanism which might involve the PKC pathway. However, in the present work we found that the TPA and PRL effects on evoked (3H)DA release were additive, suggesting that two independent mechanisms are involved.

  19. LRRK2 overexpression alters glutamatergic presynaptic plasticity, striatal dopamine tone, postsynaptic signal transduction, motor activity and memory.

    PubMed

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N; Paschall, Sarah A; Tatarnikov, Igor; Co, Kimberley; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Bergeron, Sabrina; Mitchell, Emma; Han, Heather; Melrose, Heather L; Tapia, Lucia; Raymond, Lynn A; Farrer, Matthew J; Milnerwood, Austen J

    2015-03-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (Lrrk2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), a neurodegenerative disorder affecting 1-2% of those >65 years old. The neurophysiology of LRRK2 remains largely elusive, although protein loss suggests a role in glutamatergic synapse transmission and overexpression studies show altered dopamine release in aged mice. We show that glutamate transmission is unaltered onto striatal projection neurons (SPNs) of adult LRRK2 knockout mice and that adult animals exhibit no detectable cognitive or motor deficits. Basal synaptic transmission is also unaltered in SPNs of LRRK2 overexpressing mice, but they do exhibit clear alterations to D2-receptor-mediated short-term synaptic plasticity, behavioral hypoactivity and impaired recognition memory. These phenomena are associated with decreased striatal dopamine tone and abnormal dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein 32 kDa signal integration. The data suggest that LRRK2 acts at the nexus of dopamine and glutamate signaling in the adult striatum, where it regulates dopamine levels, presynaptic glutamate release via D2-dependent synaptic plasticity and dopamine-receptor signal transduction.

  20. Revisiting the 'self-medication' hypothesis in light of the new data linking low striatal dopamine to comorbid addictive behavior.

    PubMed

    Awad, A George; Voruganti, Lakshmi L N P

    2015-06-01

    Persons with schizophrenia are at a high risk, almost 4.6 times more likely, of having drug abuse problems than persons without psychiatric illness. Among the influential proposals to explain such a high comorbidity rate, the 'self-medication hypothesis' proposed that persons with schizophrenia take to drugs in an effort to cope with the illness and medication side effects. In support of the self-medication hypothesis, data from our earlier clinical study confirmed the strong association between neuroleptic dysphoria and negative subjective responses and comorbid drug abuse. Though dopamine has been consistently suspected as one of the major culprits for the development of neuroleptic dysphoria, it is only recently our neuroimaging studies correlated the emergence of neuroleptic dysphoria to the low level of striatal dopamine functioning. Similarly, more evidence has recently emerged linking low striatal dopamine with the development of vulnerability for drug addictive states in schizophrenia. The convergence of evidence from both the dysphoria and comorbidity research, implicating the role of low striatal dopamine in both conditions, has led us to propose that the person with schizophrenia who develops dysphoria and comorbid addictive disorder is likely to be one and the same.

  1. Chronic escalating cocaine exposure, abstinence/withdrawal, and chronic re-exposure: Effects on striatal dopamine and opioid systems in C57BL/6J mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Schlussman, Stefan D.; Rabkin, Jacqui; Butelman, Eduardo R.; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine addiction is a chronic relapsing disease with periods of chronic escalating self-exposure, separated by periods of abstinence/withdrawal of varying duration. Few studies compare such cycles in preclinical models. This study models an “addiction-like cycle” in mice to determine neurochemical/molecular alterations that underlie the chronic, relapsing nature of this disease. Groups of male C57BL/6J mice received acute cocaine exposure (14-day saline/14-day withdrawal /13-day saline + 1-day cocaine), chronic cocaine exposure (14 day cocaine) or chronic re-exposure (14-day cocaine/14-day withdrawal /14-day cocaine). Escalating-dose binge cocaine (15-30 mg/kg/injection x 3/day, i.p. at hourly intervals) or saline (14-day saline) was administered, modeling initial exposure. In “re-exposure” groups, after a 14-day injection-free period (modeling abstinence/withdrawal), mice that had received cocaine were re-injected with 14-day escalating-dose binge cocaine, whereas controls received saline. Microdialysis was conducted on the 14th day of exposure or re-exposure to determine striatal dopamine content. Messenger RNA levels of preprodynorphin (Pdyn), dopamine D1 (Drd1) and D2 (Drd2) in the caudate putamen were determined by real-time PCR. Basal striatal dopamine levels were lower in mice after 14-day escalating exposure or re-exposure than in those in the acute cocaine group and controls. Pdyn mRNA levels were higher in the cocaine groups than in controls. Long-term adaptation was observed across the stages of this addiction-like cycle, in that the effects of cocaine on dopamine levels were increased after re-exposure compared to exposure. Changes in striatal dopaminergic responses across chronic escalating cocaine exposure and re-exposure are a central feature of the neurobiology of relapsing addictive states. PMID:23164614

  2. Contributions of Striatal Dopamine Signaling to the Modulation of Cognitive Flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Darvas, Martin; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although cognitive flexibility is mediated by different areas of the prefrontal cortex, evidence from patients with Parkinson’s disease suggests an additional involvement of striatal dopamine (DA) signaling. Because both dorsal and ventral striatum receive prefrontal cortex projections, it is unclear whether DA signaling to either one or both of these regions is required for cognitive flexibility. Methods Cognitive flexibility was examined with a water U-maze paradigm in which mice had to shift from an initially acquired escape strategy to a new strategy or to reverse the initially learned strategy. We tested mice with conditionally inactive tyrosine hydroxylase genes that can be activated by Cre recombinase. With region-specific viral gene therapy we selectively restricted DA signaling to either dorsal or ventral striatum. Results Restricting DA signaling to the ventral striatum did not impair learning of the initial strategy or reversal-learning but strongly disrupted strategy-shifting. In contrast, mice with DA signaling restricted to the dorsal striatum had intact learning of the initial strategy, reversal-learning, and strategy-shifting. Conclusions Dopamine signaling in both dorsal and ventral striatum is sufficient for reversal-learning, whereas only DA signaling in the dorsal striatum is sufficient for the more demanding strategy-shifting task. PMID:21074144

  3. Relationship between impulsivity, prefrontal anticipatory activation, and striatal dopamine release during rewarded task performance

    PubMed Central

    Weiland, Barbara J.; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Zald, David; Cummiford, Chelsea; Love, Tiffany; Zucker, Robert A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity, and in particular the negative urgency aspect of this trait, is associated with poor inhibitory control when experiencing negative emotion. Individual differences in aspects of impulsivity have been correlated with striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability and function. This multi-modal pilot study used both positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate dopaminergic and neural activity, respectively, using modified versions of the monetary incentive delay task. Twelve healthy female subjects underwent both scans and completed the NEO Personality Inventory Revised to assess Impulsiveness (IMP). We examined the relationship between nucleus accumbens (NAcc) dopaminergic incentive/reward release, measured as a change in D2/D3 binding potential between neutral and incentive/reward conditions with [11C]raclopride PET, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation elicited during the anticipation of rewards, measured with fMRI. Left NAcc incentive/reward dopaminergic release correlated with anticipatory reward activation within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), left angular gyrus, mammillary bodies, and left superior frontal cortex. Activation in the mPFC negatively correlated with IMP and mediated the relationship between IMP and incentive/reward dopaminergic release in left NAcc. The mPFC, with a regulatory role in learning and valuation, may influence dopamine incentive/reward release. PMID:24969539

  4. Age-related decline in motor behavior and striatal dopamine transporter in cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Yue, Feng; Zeng, Sien; Wu, Di; Yi, Deqiao; Alex Zhang, Y; Chan, Piu

    2012-08-01

    Advanced human aging is associated with progressive declines of motor function and a risk factor for Parkinson's disease, which mainly involves central nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. The present study investigated age-related changes in motor behaviors and alterations of the number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic terminals in non-human primates. A total of 30 cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) of age 3.5-15.5 years were studied. Motor behaviors including upper limb movement time and the amount of overall home cage activity were quantitatively assessed using a modified movement assessment panel and a newly developed webcam-based monitoring system. The function of the dopaminergic system was semi-quantitatively measured by (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 uptake rates, a dopamine transporter (DAT) specific radiopharmaceutical with SPECT imaging. The results showed a significant decline in motor behaviors associated with aging which were significantly correlated with age-related decreases of (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 uptake. A further partial correlation analysis independent of age indicated that age contributed to the relationship between striatal DAT levels and motor behaviors. Our results indicate that normal aging-related dopamine physiology influences certain aspects of motor behaviors and suggest that aging-associated dysfunction in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system may be an important factor contributing to the decline of motor behaviors in aging cynomolgus monkeys.

  5. Relationship between impulsivity, prefrontal anticipatory activation, and striatal dopamine release during rewarded task performance.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Barbara J; Heitzeg, Mary M; Zald, David; Cummiford, Chelsea; Love, Tiffany; Zucker, Robert A; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2014-09-30

    Impulsivity, and in particular the negative urgency aspect of this trait, is associated with poor inhibitory control when experiencing negative emotion. Individual differences in aspects of impulsivity have been correlated with striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability and function. This multi-modal pilot study used both positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate dopaminergic and neural activity, respectively, using modified versions of the monetary incentive delay task. Twelve healthy female subjects underwent both scans and completed the NEO Personality Inventory Revised to assess Impulsiveness (IMP). We examined the relationship between nucleus accumbens (NAcc) dopaminergic incentive/reward release, measured as a change in D2/D3 binding potential between neutral and incentive/reward conditions with [(11)C]raclopride PET, and blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) activation elicited during the anticipation of rewards, measured with fMRI. Left NAcc incentive/reward dopaminergic release correlated with anticipatory reward activation within the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), left angular gyrus, mammillary bodies, and left superior frontal cortex. Activation in the mPFC negatively correlated with IMP and mediated the relationship between IMP and incentive/reward dopaminergic release in left NAcc. The mPFC, with a regulatory role in learning and valuation, may influence dopamine incentive/reward release. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Association between striatal and extrastriatal dopamine D2-receptor binding and social desirability.

    PubMed

    Cervenka, Simon; Gustavsson, J Petter; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Research on the biological underpinnings of personality can provide leads to the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders. In particular, interpersonal aspects of behavior are a common problem during the course of psychiatric illness. Animal research has demonstrated a role for the dopamine system in social behaviour, and recent molecular imaging studies have shown a negative correlation between dopamine D2-receptor binding in the striatum and social desirability. The emotional and cognitive aspects of social behavior suggest involvement of brain regions outside of the striatum, such as limbic structures. The aim of the present study was to explore associations between the personality trait social desirability and dopamine D2-receptor binding in both striatal and extrastriatal brain regions. We examined 16 control subjects with Positron Emission Tomography and the radioligands [(11)C]raclopride and [(11)C]FLB 457, in relation to social desirability in the inventory Swedish universities Scales of Personality. [(11)C]raclopride D2-receptor binding in the striatum showed negative correlations to social desirability scores, corroborating previous findings. Furthermore, a correlation of a higher statistical significance was demonstrated for [(11)C]FLB 457 binding in the hippocampal-amygdala complex. A separate analysis of social desirability items in relation to a model of interpersonal behaviour revealed that the associations were driven by items reflecting high submissiveness and high affiliation. Taken together with previous evidence on D2-receptor binding and social behaviour, a role for dopaminergic neurotransmission in regulating displays of dominance vs. submissive behaviour is proposed. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High fat/carbohydrate ratio but not total energy intake induces lower striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    van de Giessen, E; la Fleur, S E; Eggels, L; de Bruin, K; van den Brink, W; Booij, J

    2013-05-01

    High-energy diets that induce obesity decrease striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor (DRD2/3) availability. It is however poorly understood which components of these diets are underlying this decrease. This study assessed the role of saturated fat intake on striatal DRD2/3 availability. Forty rats were randomized to a free-choice high-fat high-sugar diet (HFHS) or a standard chow diet for 28 days. Striatal DRD2/3 availability was measured using (123)I-IBZM storage phosphor imaging at day 29. The HFHS group was split in a HFHS-high-fat (HFHS-hf) and HFHS-low-fat (HFHS-lf) group based on the percentage energy intake from fat. Rats of both HFHS subgroups had increased energy intake, abdominal fat stores and plasma leptin levels compared with controls. DRD2/3 availability in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) was significantly lower in HFHS-hf than in HFHS-lf rats, whereas it was similar for HFHS-lf and control rats. Furthermore, DRD2/3 availability in the NAcc was positively correlated with the percentage energy intake from sugar. Total energy intake was lower for HFHS-hf than for HFHS-lf rats. Together these results suggest that a diet with a high fat/carbohydrate ratio, but not total energy intake or the level of adiposity, is the best explanation for the decrease in striatal DRD2/3 availability observed in diet-induced obesity.

  8. Effect of the inhibition of dopamine uptake on the dopamine- and dimethyldopamine-induced-inhibition of the potassium-evoked release of [3H]acetylcholine from striatal slices.

    PubMed

    Farooqui, T; Wallace, R A; Miller, D D; Uretsky, N J

    1989-01-01

    1. Dimethyldopamine was eight times more potent than dopamine in activating the D2 receptor that inhibits the potassium-evoked release of [3H]acetylcholine from striatal slices. 2. Cocaine and mazindol produced an eight-fold shift in the concentration-response curve for dopamine, but not for dimethyldopamine. 3. The IC50 of dimethyldopamine for the inhibition of [3H]dopamine uptake was thirty times greater than that for dopamine. 4. Dopamine may be less potent than dimethyldopamine at the D2 receptor because dopamine has a higher affinity for the dopamine uptake system, resulting in its rapid removal from the vicinity of the receptor.

  9. Opponent actor learning (OpAL): modeling interactive effects of striatal dopamine on reinforcement learning and choice incentive.

    PubMed

    Collins, Anne G E; Frank, Michael J

    2014-07-01

    The striatal dopaminergic system has been implicated in reinforcement learning (RL), motor performance, and incentive motivation. Various computational models have been proposed to account for each of these effects individually, but a formal analysis of their interactions is lacking. Here we present a novel algorithmic model expanding the classical actor-critic architecture to include fundamental interactive properties of neural circuit models, incorporating both incentive and learning effects into a single theoretical framework. The standard actor is replaced by a dual opponent actor system representing distinct striatal populations, which come to differentially specialize in discriminating positive and negative action values. Dopamine modulates the degree to which each actor component contributes to both learning and choice discriminations. In contrast to standard frameworks, this model simultaneously captures documented effects of dopamine on both learning and choice incentive-and their interactions-across a variety of studies, including probabilistic RL, effort-based choice, and motor skill learning. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters.

    PubMed

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S S; Wainer, Irving W; Cheer, Joseph F; Frost, Douglas O; Huang, Xi-Ping; Gould, Todd D

    2016-10-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine's antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine's side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1-D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine's enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. U.S. Government

  11. Effects of Ketamine and Ketamine Metabolites on Evoked Striatal Dopamine Release, Dopamine Receptors, and Monoamine Transporters

    PubMed Central

    Can, Adem; Zanos, Panos; Moaddel, Ruin; Kang, Hye Jin; Dossou, Katinia S. S.; Wainer, Irving W.; Cheer, Joseph F.; Frost, Douglas O.; Huang, Xi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Following administration at subanesthetic doses, (R,S)-ketamine (ketamine) induces rapid and robust relief from symptoms of depression in treatment-refractory depressed patients. Previous studies suggest that ketamine’s antidepressant properties involve enhancement of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission. Ketamine is rapidly metabolized to (2S,6S)- and (2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK), which have antidepressant actions independent of N-methyl-d-aspartate glutamate receptor inhibition. These antidepressant actions of (2S,6S;2R,6R)-HNK, or other metabolites, as well as ketamine’s side effects, including abuse potential, may be related to direct effects on components of the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. Here, brain and blood distribution/clearance and pharmacodynamic analyses at DA receptors (D1–D5) and the DA, norepinephrine, and serotonin transporters were assessed for ketamine and its major metabolites (norketamine, dehydronorketamine, and HNKs). Additionally, we measured electrically evoked mesolimbic DA release and decay using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry following acute administration of subanesthetic doses of ketamine (2, 10, and 50 mg/kg, i.p.). Following ketamine injection, ketamine, norketamine, and multiple hydroxynorketamines were detected in the plasma and brain of mice. Dehydronorketamine was detectable in plasma, but concentrations were below detectable limits in the brain. Ketamine did not alter the magnitude or kinetics of evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens in anesthetized mice. Neither ketamine’s enantiomers nor its metabolites had affinity for DA receptors or the DA, noradrenaline, and serotonin transporters (up to 10 μM). These results suggest that neither the side effects nor antidepressant actions of ketamine or ketamine metabolites are associated with direct effects on mesolimbic DAergic neurotransmission. Previously observed in vivo changes in DAergic neurotransmission following ketamine administration are likely indirect. PMID

  12. Midbrain functional connectivity and ventral striatal dopamine D2-type receptors: Link to impulsivity in methamphetamine users

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Milky; Okita, Kyoji; Morales, Angelica M.; Robertson, Chelsea; Dean, Andy C.; Ghahremani, Dara G.; Sabb, Fred; Mandelkern, Mark A.; Bilder, Robert M.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Stimulant use disorders are associated with deficits in striatal dopamine receptor availability, abnormalities in mesocorticolimbic resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC), and impulsivity. In methamphetamine-dependent research participants, impulsivity is correlated negatively with striatal D2-type receptor availability, and mesocorticolimbic RSFC is stronger than in controls. The extent to which these features of methamphetamine dependence are interrelated, however, is unknown. This question was addressed in two studies. In Study 1, 19 methamphetamine-dependent and 26 healthy control subjects underwent [18F]fallypride positron emission tomography to measure ventral striatal dopamine D2-type receptor availability, indexed by binding potential (BPND), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess mesocorticolimbic RSFC, using a midbrain seed. In Study 2, an independent sample of 20 methamphetamine-dependent and 18 control subjects completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale in addition to fMRI. Study 1 showed a significant group by ventral striatal BPND interaction effect on RSFC, reflecting a negative relationship between ventral striatal BPND and RSFC between midbrain and striatum, orbitofrontal cortex, and insula in methamphetamine-dependent participants but a positive relationship in the control group. In Study 2, an interaction of group with RSFC on impulsivity was observed. Methamphetamine-dependent participants users exhibited a positive relationship of midbrain RSFC to the left ventral striatum with cognitive impulsivity, whereas a negative relationship was observed in healthy controls. The results indicate that ventral striatal D2-type receptor signaling may affect system-level activity within the mesocorticolimbic system, providing a functional link that may help explain high impulsivity in methamphetamine-dependent individuals. PMID:26830141

  13. Alterations in the Striatal Dopamine System During Intravenous Methamphetamine Exposure: Effects of Contingent and Noncontingent Administration

    PubMed Central

    Laćan, Goran; Hadamitzky, Martin; Kuczenski, Ronald; Melega, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The continuing spread of methamphetamine (METH) abuse has stimulated research aimed at understanding consequences of its prolonged exposure. Alterations in nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system parameters have been characterized in experimental studies after discontinuation of long term METH but fewer studies have included similar assessments during METH exposure. Here, we report METH plasma pharmacokinetics and striatal DA system alterations in rat after noncontingent and contingent METH administration for 7.5 weeks. Escalating METH exposure was delivered by dynamic infusion (DI) that incorporated a ‘humanized’ plasma METH half life, or by intravenous self-administration (IVSA) that included binge intakes. Kinetic modeling of DI and IVSA for 24 h periods during the final week of METH exposure showed that plasma METH levels remained between 0.7–1.5 μM. Animals were sacrificed during their last METH administration for autoradiography assessment using [3H]ligands and D2 agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding. DA transporter binding was decreased (DI, 34%; IVSA, 15%) while vesicular monoamine transporter binding and substantia nigra DA cell numbers were unchanged. Decreases were measured for D2 receptor (DI and IVSA, 15–20%) and [35S]GTPγS binding (DI, 35%; IVSA, 18%). These similar patterns of DI and IVSA associated decreases in striatal DA markers reflect consequences of cumulative METH exposure and not the drug delivery method. For METH IVSA, individual differences were observed, yet each animal’s total intake was similar within and across three 24 h binges. IVSA rodent models may be useful for identifying molecular mechanisms that are associated with METH binges in humans. PMID:23417852

  14. Alterations in the striatal dopamine system during intravenous methamphetamine exposure: effects of contingent and noncontingent administration.

    PubMed

    Laćan, Goran; Hadamitzky, Martin; Kuczenski, Ronald; Melega, William P

    2013-08-01

    The continuing spread of methamphetamine (METH) abuse has stimulated research aimed at understanding consequences of its prolonged exposure. Alterations in nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system parameters have been characterized in experimental studies after discontinuation of long-term METH but fewer studies have included similar assessments during METH exposure. Here, we report METH plasma pharmacokinetics and striatal DA system alterations in rat after noncontingent and contingent METH administration for 7.5 weeks. Escalating METH exposure was delivered by dynamic infusion (DI) that incorporated a "humanized" plasma METH half life or by intravenous self-administration (IVSA) that included binge intakes. Kinetic modeling of DI and IVSA for 24 h periods during the final week of METH exposure showed that plasma METH levels remained between 0.7 and 1.5 µM. Animals were sacrificed during their last METH administration for autoradiography assessment using [³H]ligands and D2 agonist-induced [³⁵S]GTPγS binding. DA transporter binding was decreased (DI, 34%; IVSA, 15%) while vesicular monoamine transporter binding and substantia nigra DA cell numbers were unchanged. Decreases were measured for D2 receptor (DI and IVSA, 15-20%) and [³⁵S]GTPγS binding (DI, 35%; IVSA, 18%). These similar patterns of DI and IVSA associated decreases in striatal DA markers reflect consequences of cumulative METH exposure and not the drug delivery method. For METH IVSA, individual differences were observed, yet each animal's total intake was similar within and across three 24-h binges. IVSA rodent models may be useful for identifying molecular mechanisms that are associated with METH binges in humans. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Dopamine D2 receptors in striatal output neurons enable the psychomotor effects of cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Kharkwal, Geetika; Radl, Daniela; Lewis, Robert; Borrelli, Emiliana

    2016-01-01

    The psychomotor effects of cocaine are mediated by dopamine (DA) through stimulation of striatal circuits. Gabaergic striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are the only output of this pivotal structure in the control of movements. The majority of MSNs express either the DA D1 or D2 receptors (D1R, D2R). Studies have shown that the motor effect of cocaine depends on the DA-mediated stimulation of D1R-expressing MSNs (dMSNs), which is mirrored at the cellular level by stimulation of signaling pathways leading to phosphorylation of ERKs and induction of c-fos. Nevertheless, activation of dMSNs by cocaine is necessary but not sufficient, and D2R signaling is required for the behavioral and cellular effects of cocaine. Indeed, cocaine motor effects and activation of signaling in dMSNs are blunted in mice with the constitutive knockout of D2R (D2RKO). Using mouse lines with a cell-specific knockout of D2R either in MSNs (MSN-D2RKO) or in dopaminergic neurons (DA-D2RKO), we show that D2R signaling in MSNs is required and permissive for the motor stimulant effects of cocaine and the activation of signaling in dMSNs. MSN-D2RKO mice show the same phenotype as constitutive D2RKO mice both at the behavioral and cellular levels. Importantly, activation of signaling in dMSNs by cocaine is rescued by intrastriatal injection of the GABA antagonist, bicuculline. These results are in support of intrastriatal connections of D2R+-MSNs (iMSNs) with dMSNs and indicate that D2R signaling in MSNs is critical for the function of intrastriatal circuits. PMID:27671625

  16. Reduced striatal dopamine DA D2 receptor function in dominant-negative GSK-3 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Sintes, Raquel; Bortolozzi, Analia; Artigas, Francesc; Lucas, José J

    2014-09-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is a serine/threonine kinase with constitutive activity involved in cellular architecture, gene expression, cell proliferation, fate decision and apoptosis, among others. GSK-3 expression is particularly high in brain where it may be involved in neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer׳s disease, bipolar disorder and major depression. A link with schizophrenia is suggested by the antipsychotic drug-induced GSK-3 regulation and by the involvement of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Taking advantage of the previous development of dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice (Tg) showing a selective reduction of GSK-3 activity in forebrain neurons but not in dopaminergic neurons, we explored the relationship between GSK-3 and dopaminergic neurotransmission in vivo. In microdialysis experiments, local quinpirole (DA D2-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced dopamine (DA) release significantly less in Tg mice than in wild-type (WT) mice. However, local SKF-81297 (selective DA D1-R agonist) in dorsal striatum reduced DA release equally in both control and Tg mice indicating a comparable function of DA D1-R in the direct striato-nigral pathway. Likewise, systemic quinpirole administration - acting preferentially on presynaptic DA D2- autoreceptors to modulate DA release-reduced striatal DA release similarly in both control and Tg mice. Quinpirole reduced locomotor activity and induced c-fos expression in globus pallidus (both striatal DA D2-R-mediated effects) significantly more in WT than in Tg mice. Taking together, the present results show that dominant negative GSK-3 transgenic mice show reduced DA D2-R-mediated function in striatum and further support a link between dopaminergic neurotransmission and GSK-3 activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased brain dopamine and dopamine receptors in schizophrenia

    SciTech Connect

    Mackay, A.V.; Iversen, L.L.; Rossor, M.; Spokes, E.; Bird, E.; Arregui, A.; Creese, I.; Synder, S.H.

    1982-09-01

    In postmortem samples of caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens from 48 schizophrenic patients, there were significant increases in both the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) and the apparent dissociation constant (KD) for tritiated spiperone. The increase in apparent KD probably reflects the presence of residual neuroleptic drugs, but changes in Bmax for tritiated spiperone reflect genuine changes in receptor numbers. The increases in receptors were seen only in patients in whom neuroleptic medication had been maintained until the time of death, indicating that they may be entirely iatrogenic. Dopamine measurements for a larger series of schizophrenic and control cases (n greater than 60) show significantly increased concentrations in both the nucleus accumbens and caudate nucleus. The changes in dopamine were not obviously related to neuroleptic medication and, unlike the receptor changes, were most severe in younger patients.

  18. Methamphetamine-induced dopamine-independent alterations in striatal gene expression in the 6-hydroxydopamine hemiparkinsonian rats.

    PubMed

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Brannock, Christie; Krasnova, Irina N; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T; Chou, Jenny; Lehrmann, Elin; Wood, William H; Becker, Kevin G; Wang, Yun

    2010-12-13

    Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinson's disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA)-denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH) (2.5 mg/kg) known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (±1.7-fold, p<0.025) in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection also caused

  19. Methamphetamine-Induced Dopamine-Independent Alterations in Striatal Gene Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine Hemiparkinsonian Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cadet, Jean Lud; Brannock, Christie; Krasnova, Irina N.; Ladenheim, Bruce; McCoy, Michael T.; Chou, Jenny; Lehrmann, Elin; Wood, William H.; Becker, Kevin G.; Wang, Yun

    2010-01-01

    Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle are used extensively as a model of Parkinson's disease. The present experiments sought to identify genes that were affected in the dopamine (DA)–denervated striatum after 6-hydroxydopamine-induced destruction of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway in the rat. We also examined whether a single injection of methamphetamine (METH) (2.5 mg/kg) known to cause changes in gene expression in the normally DA-innervated striatum could still influence striatal gene expression in the absence of DA. Unilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine into the medial forebrain bundle resulted in METH-induced rotational behaviors ipsilateral to the lesioned side and total striatal DA depletion on the lesioned side. This injection also caused decrease in striatal serotonin (5-HT) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) levels. DA depletion was associated with increases in 5-HIAA/5-HT ratios that were potentiated by the METH injection. Microarray analyses revealed changes (± 1.7-fold, p<0.025) in the expression of 67 genes on the lesioned side in comparison to the intact side of the saline-treated hemiparkinsonian animals. These include follistatin, neuromedin U, and tachykinin 2 which were up-regulated. METH administration caused increases in the expression of c-fos, Egr1, and Nor-1 on the intact side. On the DA-depleted side, METH administration also increased the expression of 61 genes including Pdgf-d and Cox-2. There were METH-induced changes in 16 genes that were common in the DA-innervated and DA-depleted sides. These include c-fos and Nor-1 which show greater changes on the normal DA side. Thus, the present study documents, for the first time, that METH mediated DA-independent changes in the levels of transcripts of several genes in the DA-denervated striatum. Our results also implicate 5-HT as a potential player in these METH-induced alterations in gene expression because the METH injection also

  20. Interactions of MK-801 with glutamate-, glutamine- and methamphetamine-evoked release of ( sup 3 H)dopamine from striatal slices

    SciTech Connect

    Bowyer, J.F.; Scallet, A.C.; Holson, R.R.; Lipe, G.W.; Slikker, W. Jr.; Ali, S.F. )

    1991-04-01

    The interactions of MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d) cyclohepten-5,10-imine), glutamate and glutamine with methamphetamine (METH)-evoked release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine were assessed in vitro to determine whether MK-801 inhibition of METH neurotoxicity might be mediated presynaptically, and to evaluate the effects of glutamatergic stimulation on METH-evoked dopamine release. MK-801 inhibition of glutamate- or METH-evoked dopamine release might reduce synaptic dopamine levels during METH exposure and decrease the formation of 6-hydroxydopamine or other related neurotoxins. Without Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 40 microM and 1 mM glutamate evoked a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated ({sup 3}H)dopamine and ({sup 3}H)metabolite (tritium) release of 3 to 6 and 12 to 16% of total tritium stores, respectively, from striatal slices. With 1.50 mM Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 10 mM glutamate alone or in combination with the dopamine uptake blocker nomifensine released only 2.1 or 4.2%, respectively, of total tritium stores, and release was only partially dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors. With or without 1.50 mM Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 0.5 or 5 microM METH evoked a substantial release of tritium (5-8 or 12-21% of total stores, respectively). METH-evoked dopamine release was not affected by 5 microM MK-801 but METH-evoked release was additive with glutamate-evoked release. Without Mg{sup 2}{sup +} present, 1 mM glutamine increased glutamate release and induced the release of ({sup 3}H)dopamine and metabolites. Both 0.5 and 5 microM METH also increased tritium release with 1 mM glutamine present. When striatal slices were exposed to 5 microM METH this glutamine-evoked release of glutamate was increased more than 50%.

  1. Cholinergic Modulation of Locomotion and Striatal Dopamine Release is Mediated by α6α4* Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Drenan, Ryan M.; Grady, Sharon R.; Steele, Andrew D.; McKinney, Sheri; Patzlaff, Natalie E.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Marks, Michael J.; Miwa, Julie M.; Lester, Henry A.

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) release in striatum is governed by firing rates of midbrain DA neurons, striatal cholinergic tone, and nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs) on DA presynaptic terminals. DA neurons selectively express α6* nAChRs, which show high ACh and nicotine sensitivity. To help identify nAChR subtypes that control DA transmission, we studied transgenic mice expressing hypersensitive α6L9′S* receptors. α6L9′S mice are hyperactive, travel greater distance, exhibit increased ambulatory behaviors such as walking, turning, and rearing, and show decreased pausing, hanging, drinking, and grooming. These effects were mediated by α6α4* pentamers, as α6L9′S mice lacking α4 subunits displayed essentially normal behavior. In α6L9′S mice, receptor numbers are normal, but loss of α4 subunits leads to fewer and less sensitive α6* receptors. Gain-of-function nicotine-stimulated DA release from striatal synaptosomes requires α4 subunits, implicating α6α4β2* nAChRs in α6L9′S mouse behaviors. In brain slices, we applied electrochemical measurements to study control of DA release by α6L9′S nAChRs. Burst stimulation of DA fibers elicited increased DA release relative to single action potentials selectively in α6L9′S, but not WT or α4KO/α6L9′S, mice. Thus, increased nAChR activity, like decreased activity, leads to enhanced extracellular DA release during phasic firing. Bursts may directly enhance DA release from α6L9′S presynaptic terminals, as there was no difference in striatal DA receptor numbers or DA transporter levels or function in vitro. These results implicate α6α4β2* nAChRs in cholinergic control of DA transmission, and strongly suggest that these receptors are candidate drug targets for disorders involving the DA system. PMID:20660270

  2. Reward modulation of cognitive function in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study on the role of striatal dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Aarts, Esther; Hoogman, Martine; Onnink, Marten; Kan, Cornelis; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is accompanied by impairments in cognitive control, such as task-switching deficits. We investigated whether such problems, and their remediation by medication, reflect abnormal reward motivation and associated striatal dopamine transmission in ADHD. We used functional genetic neuroimaging to assess the effects of dopaminergic medication and reward motivation on task-switching and striatal BOLD signal in 23 adults with ADHD, ON and OFF methylphenidate, and 26 healthy controls. Critically, we took into account interindividual variability in striatal dopamine by exploiting a common genetic polymorphism (3′-UTR VNTR) in the DAT1 gene coding for the dopamine transporter. The results showed a highly significant group by genotype interaction in the striatum. This was because a subgroup of patients with ADHD showed markedly exaggerated effects of reward on the striatal BOLD signal during task-switching when they were OFF their dopaminergic medication. Specifically, patients carrying the 9R allele showed a greater striatal signal than healthy controls carrying this allele, whereas no effect of diagnosis was observed in 10R homozygotes. Aberrant striatal responses were normalized when 9R-carrying patients with ADHD were ON medication. These pilot data indicate an important role for aberrant reward motivation, striatal dopamine and interindividual genetic differences in cognitive processes in adult ADHD. PMID:25485641

  3. Reward modulation of cognitive function in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a pilot study on the role of striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Esther; van Holstein, Mieke; Hoogman, Martine; Onnink, Marten; Kan, Cornelis; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan; Cools, Roshan

    2015-02-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is accompanied by impairments in cognitive control, such as task-switching deficits. We investigated whether such problems, and their remediation by medication, reflect abnormal reward motivation and associated striatal dopamine transmission in ADHD. We used functional genetic neuroimaging to assess the effects of dopaminergic medication and reward motivation on task-switching and striatal BOLD signal in 23 adults with ADHD, ON and OFF methylphenidate, and 26 healthy controls. Critically, we took into account interindividual variability in striatal dopamine by exploiting a common genetic polymorphism (3'-UTR VNTR) in the DAT1 gene coding for the dopamine transporter. The results showed a highly significant group by genotype interaction in the striatum. This was because a subgroup of patients with ADHD showed markedly exaggerated effects of reward on the striatal BOLD signal during task-switching when they were OFF their dopaminergic medication. Specifically, patients carrying the 9R allele showed a greater striatal signal than healthy controls carrying this allele, whereas no effect of diagnosis was observed in 10R homozygotes. Aberrant striatal responses were normalized when 9R-carrying patients with ADHD were ON medication. These pilot data indicate an important role for aberrant reward motivation, striatal dopamine and interindividual genetic differences in cognitive processes in adult ADHD.

  4. Triple monoamine inhibitor tesofensine decreases food intake, body weight, and striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in diet-induced obese rats.

    PubMed

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; de Bruin, Kora; la Fleur, Susanne E; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The novel triple monoamine inhibitor tesofensine blocks dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake and is a promising candidate for the treatment of obesity. Obesity is associated with lower striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability, which may be related to disturbed regulation of food intake. This study assesses the effects of chronic tesofensine treatment on food intake and body weight in association with changes in striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2/3R) availability of diet-induced obese (DIO) rats. Four groups of 15 DIO rats were randomized to one of the following treatments for 28 days: 1. tesofensine (2.0 mg/kg), 2. vehicle, 3. vehicle+restricted diet isocaloric to caloric intake of group 1, and 4. tesofensine (2.0 mg/kg)+ a treatment-free period of 28 days. Caloric intake and weight gain decreased significantly more in the tesofensine-treated rats compared to vehicle-treated rats, which confirms previous findings. After treatment discontinuation, caloric intake and body weight gain gradually increased again. Tesofensine-treated rats showed significantly lower D2/3R availability in nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum than both vehicle-treated rats and vehicle-treated rats on restricted isocaloric diet. No correlations were observed between food intake or body weight and D2/3R availability. Thus, chronic tesofensine treatment leads to decreased food intake and weight gain. However, this appears not to be directly related to the decreased striatal D2/3R availability, which is mainly a pharmacological effect.

  5. Effects of COMT inhibitors on striatal dopamine metabolism: A microdialysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaakkola, S.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    In vivo microdialysis was used to examine the effect of two new catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors, Ro 40-7592 and OR-611, on extracellular levels of dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in rat striatum. The interactions of the COMT inhibitors with nomifensine, clorgyline, and deprenyl were also studied. Ro 40-7592 (3-30 mg/kg. i.p.) decreased dose-dependently the efflux of HVA, increased that of DOPAC, and tended to increase that of dopamine. Higher doses of OR-611 (30-100 mg/kg, i.p.) also decreased the dialysate level of HVA, increased that of DOPAC, and tended to increase that of dopamine. Ro 40-7592 was about ten-fold as potent as OR-611. Neither of the COMT inhibitors changed dialysate levels of 6-HIAA. An OR-611 dose of 10 mg/kg i.p. had no significant effect, in contrast to Ro 40-7592, on any of the parameters studied; this dose was thus used to differentiate between the effects of central and peripheral COMT inhibition. Both nomifensine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) and clorgyline (4 mg/kg, i.p.) alone elevated extracellular dopamine levels, and lowered those of DOPAC and HVA, though there were quantitative and temporal differences between the drugs. L-deprenyl (1 mg/kg, i.p.) alone had no significant effect on any of the compounds measured. Ro 40-7592 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effect of nomifensine on dopamine efflux, and it tended to increase clorgyline-induced dopamine efflux. DOPAC levels in dialysates were significantly increased by combinations of Ro 40-7592 and nomifensine or clorgyline, whereas HVA remained about as low as they were after Ro 40-7592 alone. Ro 40-7592 had no significant interactions with L-deprenyl. OR-611 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not modify the effects on dopamine metabolism of nomifensine, clorgyline, or L-deprenyl. These data show that Ro 40-7592 is a potent centrally active COMT inhibitor, whereas OR-611 is principally a peripherally active inhibitor

  6. Effects of COMT inhibitors on striatal dopamine metabolism: A microdialysis study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaakkola, S.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    In vivo microdialysis was used to examine the effect of two new catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) inhibitors, Ro 40-7592 and OR-611, on extracellular levels of dopamine, dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in rat striatum. The interactions of the COMT inhibitors with nomifensine, clorgyline, and deprenyl were also studied. Ro 40-7592 (3-30 mg/kg. i.p.) decreased dose-dependently the efflux of HVA, increased that of DOPAC, and tended to increase that of dopamine. Higher doses of OR-611 (30-100 mg/kg, i.p.) also decreased the dialysate level of HVA, increased that of DOPAC, and tended to increase that of dopamine. Ro 40-7592 was about ten-fold as potent as OR-611. Neither of the COMT inhibitors changed dialysate levels of 6-HIAA. An OR-611 dose of 10 mg/kg i.p. had no significant effect, in contrast to Ro 40-7592, on any of the parameters studied; this dose was thus used to differentiate between the effects of central and peripheral COMT inhibition. Both nomifensine (15 mg/kg, i.p.) and clorgyline (4 mg/kg, i.p.) alone elevated extracellular dopamine levels, and lowered those of DOPAC and HVA, though there were quantitative and temporal differences between the drugs. L-deprenyl (1 mg/kg, i.p.) alone had no significant effect on any of the compounds measured. Ro 40-7592 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the effect of nomifensine on dopamine efflux, and it tended to increase clorgyline-induced dopamine efflux. DOPAC levels in dialysates were significantly increased by combinations of Ro 40-7592 and nomifensine or clorgyline, whereas HVA remained about as low as they were after Ro 40-7592 alone. Ro 40-7592 had no significant interactions with L-deprenyl. OR-611 (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not modify the effects on dopamine metabolism of nomifensine, clorgyline, or L-deprenyl. These data show that Ro 40-7592 is a potent centrally active COMT inhibitor, whereas OR-611 is principally a peripherally active inhibitor

  7. Enhanced striatal dopamine transmission and motor performance with LRRK2 overexpression in mice is eliminated by familial Parkinson's disease mutation G2019S.

    PubMed

    Li, Xianting; Patel, Jyoti C; Wang, Jing; Avshalumov, Marat V; Nicholson, Charles; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Elder, Gregory A; Rice, Margaret E; Yue, Zhenyu

    2010-02-03

    PARK8/LRRK2 (leucine-rich repeat kinase 2) was recently identified as a causative gene for autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD), with LRRK2 mutation G2019S linked to the most frequent familial form of PD. Emerging in vitro evidence indicates that aberrant enzymatic activity of LRRK2 protein carrying this mutation can cause neurotoxicity. However, the physiological and pathophysiological functions of LRRK2 in vivo remain elusive. Here we characterize two bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic mouse strains overexpressing LRRK2 wild-type (Wt) or mutant G2019S. Transgenic LRRK2-Wt mice had elevated striatal dopamine (DA) release with unaltered DA uptake or tissue content. Consistent with this result, LRRK2-Wt mice were hyperactive and showed enhanced performance in motor function tests. These results suggest a role for LRRK2 in striatal DA transmission and the consequent motor function. In contrast, LRRK2-G2019S mice showed an age-dependent decrease in striatal DA content, as well as decreased striatal DA release and uptake. Despite increased brain kinase activity, LRRK2-G2019S overexpression was not associated with loss of DAergic neurons in substantia nigra or degeneration of nigrostriatal terminals at 12 months. Our results thus reveal a pivotal role for LRRK2 in regulating striatal DA transmission and consequent control of motor function. The PD-associated mutation G2019S may exert pathogenic effects by impairing these functions of LRRK2. Our LRRK2 BAC transgenic mice, therefore, could provide a useful model for understanding early PD pathological events.

  8. Dysfunction of ventrolateral striatal dopamine receptor type 2-expressing medium spiny neurons impairs instrumental motivation

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Takiue, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Keitaro; Xu, Ming; Yano, Ryutaro; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Hiroshi; Bouchekioua, Youcef; Okano, Hideyuki; Uchigashima, Motokazu; Watanabe, Masahiko; Takata, Norio; Drew, Michael R.; Sano, Hiromi; Mimura, Masaru; Tanaka, Kenji F.

    2017-01-01

    Impaired motivation is present in a variety of neurological disorders, suggesting that decreased motivation is caused by broad dysfunction of the nervous system across a variety of circuits. Based on evidence that impaired motivation is a major symptom in the early stages of Huntington's disease, when dopamine receptor type 2-expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (D2-MSNs) are particularly affected, we hypothesize that degeneration of these neurons would be a key node regulating motivational status. Using a progressive, time-controllable, diphtheria toxin-mediated cell ablation/dysfunction technique, we find that loss-of-function of D2-MSNs within ventrolateral striatum (VLS) is sufficient to reduce goal-directed behaviours without impairing reward preference or spontaneous behaviour. Moreover, optogenetic inhibition and ablation of VLS D2-MSNs causes, respectively, transient and chronic reductions of goal-directed behaviours. Our data demonstrate that the circuitry containing VLS D2-MSNs control motivated behaviours and that VLS D2-MSN loss-of-function is a possible cause of motivation deficits in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28145402

  9. Extracellular dopamine levels in striatal subregions track shifts in motivation and response cost during instrumental conditioning.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Sean B; Wassum, Kate M; Murphy, Niall P; Balleine, Bernard W; Maidment, Nigel T

    2011-01-05

    Tonic dopamine (DA) signaling is widely regarded as playing a central role in effort-based decision making and in the motivational control of instrumental performance. The current study used microdialysis to monitor changes in extracellular DA levels across subregions of the nucleus accumbens and dorsal striatum of rats as they lever pressed for food reward on a probabilistic schedule of reinforcement, a procedure that ensured they would experience variation in the amount of effort needed to earn rewards across tests. Each rat was given three tests. Rats were hungry for the first and last test, but were sated on food before the middle test, allowing us to assess the effects of a downshift in motivational state on task performance and conditioning-induced DA efflux. During hungry tests, DA levels rose in both the shell and core of the accumbens and, to a lesser degree, in both the medial and lateral divisions of the dorsal striatum. Interestingly, changes in DA efflux across hungry tests in the accumbens core were negatively correlated with changes in the effort required to obtain rewards. We also found that--across regions--the DA response to instrumental conditioning was attenuated when rats were sated before testing. Furthermore, the effect of satiety on DA efflux in the accumbens shell was positively correlated with its effect on task performance. Together, the results indicate that tonic DA contributes to the control of instrumental performance by conveying information about the costs and benefits of responding to different striatal subregions.

  10. Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability is Reduced in Methamphetamine Dependence and is Linked to Impulsivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Buyean; London, Edythe D.; Poldrack, Russell A.; Farahi, Judah; Nacca, Angelo; Monterosso, John R.; Mumford, Jeanette A.; Bokarius, Andrew V.; Dahlbom, Magnus; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Bilder, Robert M.; Brody, Arthur L.; Mandelkern, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    While methamphetamine addiction has been associated with both impulsivity and striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor deficits, human studies have not directly linked the latter two entities. We therefore compared methamphetamine-dependent and healthy control subjects using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (version 11, BIS-11) and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride to measure striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability. The methamphetamine-dependent subjects reported recent use of the drug 3.3 g per week, and a history of using methamphetamine, on average, for 12.5 years. They had higher scores than healthy control subjects on all BIS-11 impulsiveness subscales (p < 0.001). Volume-of-interest analysis found lower striatal D2/D3 receptor availability in methamphetamine-dependent than in healthy control subjects (p < 0.01) and a negative relationship between impulsiveness and striatal D2/D3 receptor availability in the caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens that reached statistical significance in methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Combining data from both groups, voxelwise analysis indicated that impulsiveness was related to D2/D3 receptor availability in left caudate nucleus and right lateral putamen/claustrum (p < 0.05, determined by threshold-free cluster enhancement). In separate group analyses, correlations involving the head and body of the caudate and the putamen of methamphetamine-dependent subjects, and the lateral putamen/claustrum of control subjects were observed at a weaker threshold (p < 0.12 corrected). The findings suggest that low striatal D2/D3 receptor availability may mediate impulsive temperament and thereby influence addiction. PMID:19940168

  11. Striatal dopamine d2/d3 receptor availability is reduced in methamphetamine dependence and is linked to impulsivity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Buyean; London, Edythe D; Poldrack, Russell A; Farahi, Judah; Nacca, Angelo; Monterosso, John R; Mumford, Jeanette A; Bokarius, Andrew V; Dahlbom, Magnus; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Bilder, Robert M; Brody, Arthur L; Mandelkern, Mark A

    2009-11-25

    While methamphetamine addiction has been associated with both impulsivity and striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor deficits, human studies have not directly linked the latter two entities. We therefore compared methamphetamine-dependent and healthy control subjects using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (version 11, BIS-11) and positron emission tomography with [(18)F]fallypride to measure striatal dopamine D(2)/D(3) receptor availability. The methamphetamine-dependent subjects reported recent use of the drug 3.3 g per week, and a history of using methamphetamine, on average, for 12.5 years. They had higher scores than healthy control subjects on all BIS-11 impulsiveness subscales (p < 0.001). Volume-of-interest analysis found lower striatal D(2)/D(3) receptor availability in methamphetamine-dependent than in healthy control subjects (p < 0.01) and a negative relationship between impulsiveness and striatal D(2)/D(3) receptor availability in the caudate nucleus and nucleus accumbens that reached statistical significance in methamphetamine-dependent subjects. Combining data from both groups, voxelwise analysis indicated that impulsiveness was related to D(2)/D(3) receptor availability in left caudate nucleus and right lateral putamen/claustrum (p < 0.05, determined by threshold-free cluster enhancement). In separate group analyses, correlations involving the head and body of the caudate and the putamen of methamphetamine-dependent subjects and the lateral putamen/claustrum of control subjects were observed at a weaker threshold (p < 0.12 corrected). The findings suggest that low striatal D(2)/D(3) receptor availability may mediate impulsive temperament and thereby influence addiction.

  12. Prolonged treatment with pramipexole promotes physical interaction of striatal dopamine D3 autoreceptors with dopamine transporters to reduce dopamine uptake.

    PubMed

    Castro-Hernández, Javier; Afonso-Oramas, Domingo; Cruz-Muros, Ignacio; Salas-Hernández, Josmar; Barroso-Chinea, Pedro; Moratalla, Rosario; Millan, Mark J; González-Hernández, Tomás

    2015-02-01

    The dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT), a membrane glycoprotein expressed in dopaminergic neurons, clears DA from extracellular space and is regulated by diverse presynaptic proteins like protein kinases, α-synuclein, D2 and D3 autoreceptors. DAT dysfunction is implicated in Parkinson's disease and depression, which are therapeutically treated by dopaminergic D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) agonists. It is, then, important to improve our understanding of interactions between D3R and DAT. We show that prolonged administration of pramipexole (0.1mg/kg/day, 6 to 21 days), a preferential D3R agonist, leads to a decrease in DA uptake in mouse striatum that reflects a reduction in DAT affinity for DA in the absence of any change in DAT density or subcellular distribution. The effect of pramipexole was absent in mice with genetically-deleted D3R (D3R(-/-)), yet unaffected in mice genetically deprived of D2R (D2R(-/-)). Pramipexole treatment induced a physical interaction between D3R and DAT, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and in situ proximity ligation assay. Furthermore, it promoted the formation of DAT dimers and DAT association with both D2R and α-synuclein, effects that were abolished in D3R(-/-) mice, yet unaffected in D2R(-/-) mice, indicating dependence upon D3R. Collectively, these data suggest that prolonged treatment with dopaminergic D3 agonists provokes a reduction in DA reuptake by dopaminergic neurons related to a hitherto-unsuspected modification of the DAT interactome. These observations provide novel insights into the long-term antiparkinson, antidepressant and additional clinical actions of pramipexole and other D3R agonists. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of intranigral injection of taurine and GABA on striatal dopamine release monitored voltammetrically in the unanaesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, R D

    1986-09-10

    Linear sweep voltammetry with carbon-paste electrodes was used to detect changes in the extracellular concentration of homovanillic acid (HVA) in the striatum of unanaesthetized rats; under the present experimental conditions, changes in the HVA signal were used as an index of striatal dopamine release. The effects of unilateral intranigral infusion of saline, sucrose, taurine, GABA and the putative taurine-receptor antagonist, 6-aminomethyl-3-methyl-4H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-1,1-dioxide (TAG), on the HVA signal were monitored in the striatum on the two sides of the brain. Both taurine and GABA caused an increase in the extracellular concentration of HVA which was significantly greater in the striatum on the side of the injection compared with the contralateral side. The effect of TAG varied between animals. The results are discussed in terms of the role of taurine as a possible neuromodulator in the substantia nigra and in the light of the suggestion that different pathways are involved in taurine- and GABA-induced contraversive circling.

  14. Socioeconomic status is associated with striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors in healthy volunteers but not in cocaine abusers

    PubMed Central

    Wiers, Corinde E.; Shokri-Kojori, Ehsan; Cabrera, Elizabeth; Cunningham, Samantha; Wong, Christopher; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Volkow, Nora D.

    2016-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) studies in animals and humans have shown that social status is associated with striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptor (D2/D3R) availability. That is, higher social hierarchy and higher scores on questionnaires assessing social status correlated positively with striatal D2/D3R availability in animals and humans respectively. Furthermore, subordinate monkeys were vulnerable to cocaine self-administration, suggesting that alternations in social hierarchy can change D2/D3R availability and vulnerability to cocaine use. Here, we investigated whether socioeconomic status (SES) measured with the Hollingshead scale is associated with striatal D2D/3R availability using [11C]raclopride PET in 38 cocaine abusers and 42 healthy controls matched for age and education. Compared to controls, cocaine abusers showed lower D2/D3R availability in the caudate, putamen and ventral striatum (all p≤.001). Despite matching groups for education, SES scores were lower in cocaine abusers than controls (p<.001). In the control group only, SES scores significantly correlated with D2/D3R in caudate (r=.35, p=.024) and putamen (r=.39, p=.011) but not in ventral striatum (p=.61); all corrected for age. The study confirms that SES is associated with striatal D2/D3R availability in healthy human volunteers. However, reductions in D2/D3R availability in cocaine abusers may be driven by factors other than SES such as chronic cocaine exposure. PMID:26828302

  15. Opposite function of dopamine D1 and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors in striatal cannabinoid-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Tanya L; Wetsel, William C; Caron, Marc G

    2011-11-01

    It is well established that the cannabinoid and dopamine systems interact at various levels to regulate basal ganglia function. Although it is well known that acute administration of cannabinoids to mice can modify dopamine-dependent behaviors, the intraneuronal signaling pathways employed by these agents in the striatum are not well understood. Here we used knockout mouse models to examine the regulation of striatal extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) signaling by behaviorally relevant doses of cannabinoids. This cellular pathway has been implicated as a central mediator of drug reward and synaptic plasticity. In C57BL/6J mice, acute administration of the cannabinoid agonists, (-)-11-hydroxydimethylheptyl-Δ8-tetrahydrocannabinol (HU-210) and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9) -THC), promoted a dose- and time-dependent decrease in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in dorsal striatum. Co-administration of the CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist N-(Piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide(AM251) with HU-210 prevented ERK1/2 inactivation, indicating a requirement for activation of this receptor. In dopamine D1 receptor knockout animals treated with HU-210, the magnitude of the HU-210-dependent decrease in striatal ERK1/2 signaling was greater than in wild-type controls. In contrast, HU-210 administration to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor knockdown mice was ineffective at promoting striatal ERK1/2 inactivation. Genetic deletion of other potential ERK1/2 mediators, the dopamine D2 receptors or β-arrestin-1 or -2, did not affect the HU-210-induced modulation of ERK1/2 signaling in the striatum. These results support the hypothesis that dopamine D1 receptors and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors act in an opposite manner to regulate striatal CB1 cannabinoid receptor signal transduction. Published 2011. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  16. Chronic treatment with novel small molecule Hsp90 inhibitors rescues striatal dopamine levels but not α-synuclein-induced neuronal cell loss.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Nikolaus R; Dimant, Hemi; Kibuuka, Laura; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Desjardins, Cody A; Danzer, Karin M; Danzer, Michael; Fan, Zhanyun; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Hirst, Warren; McLean, Pamela J

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 inhibitors such as geldanamycin potently induce Hsp70 and reduce cytotoxicity due to α-synuclein expression, although their use has been limited due to toxicity, brain permeability, and drug design. We recently described the effects of a novel class of potent, small molecule Hsp90 inhibitors in cells overexpressing α-synuclein. Screening yielded several candidate compounds that significantly reduced α-synuclein oligomer formation and cytotoxicity associated with Hsp70 induction. In this study we examined whether chronic treatment with candidate Hsp90 inhibitors could protect against α-synuclein toxicity in a rat model of parkinsonism. Rats were injected unilaterally in the substantia nigra with AAV8 expressing human α-synuclein and then treated with drug for approximately 8 weeks by oral gavage. Chronic treatment with SNX-0723 or the more potent, SNX-9114 failed to reduce dopaminergic toxicity in the substantia nigra compared to vehicle. However, SNX-9114 significantly increased striatal dopamine content suggesting a positive neuromodulatory effect on striatal terminals. Treatment was generally well tolerated, but higher dose SNX-0723 (6-10 mg/kg) resulted in systemic toxicity, weight loss, and early death. Although still limited by potential toxicity, Hsp90 inhibitors tested herein demonstrate oral efficacy and possible beneficial effects on dopamine production in a vertebrate model of parkinsonism that warrant further study.

  17. Chronic Treatment with Novel Small Molecule Hsp90 Inhibitors Rescues Striatal Dopamine Levels but Not α-Synuclein-Induced Neuronal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Kibuuka, Laura; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Desjardins, Cody A.; Danzer, Karin M.; Danzer, Michael; Fan, Zhanyun; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Hirst, Warren; McLean, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    Hsp90 inhibitors such as geldanamycin potently induce Hsp70 and reduce cytotoxicity due to α-synuclein expression, although their use has been limited due to toxicity, brain permeability, and drug design. We recently described the effects of a novel class of potent, small molecule Hsp90 inhibitors in cells overexpressing α-synuclein. Screening yielded several candidate compounds that significantly reduced α-synuclein oligomer formation and cytotoxicity associated with Hsp70 induction. In this study we examined whether chronic treatment with candidate Hsp90 inhibitors could protect against α-synuclein toxicity in a rat model of parkinsonism. Rats were injected unilaterally in the substantia nigra with AAV8 expressing human α-synuclein and then treated with drug for approximately 8 weeks by oral gavage. Chronic treatment with SNX-0723 or the more potent, SNX-9114 failed to reduce dopaminergic toxicity in the substantia nigra compared to vehicle. However, SNX-9114 significantly increased striatal dopamine content suggesting a positive neuromodulatory effect on striatal terminals. Treatment was generally well tolerated, but higher dose SNX-0723 (6–10 mg/kg) resulted in systemic toxicity, weight loss, and early death. Although still limited by potential toxicity, Hsp90 inhibitors tested herein demonstrate oral efficacy and possible beneficial effects on dopamine production in a vertebrate model of parkinsonism that warrant further study. PMID:24465863

  18. Alteration of dopamine uptake into rat striatal vesicles and synaptosomes caused by an in vitro exposure to atrazine and some of its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Muhammad M; Filipov, Nikolay M

    2008-06-03

    Studies have shown that both in vivo and in vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) results in dopaminergic neurotoxicity manifested by decreased striatal dopamine (DA) levels. However, the mechanism behind this reduction is largely unknown. A decrease in striatal DA could be due to ATR exposure affecting vesicular and/or synaptosomal uptake resulting in disrupted vesicular storage and/or cellular uptake of DA. Hence, we investigated the effects of in vitro ATR exposure on DA uptake into isolated rat striatal synaptosomes and synaptic vesicles. In addition to ATR, effects of its major mammalian metabolites, didealkyl atrazine (DACT), desethyl atrazine (DE) and desiopropyl atrazine (DIP) were investigated. ATR (1-250 microM) inhibited DA uptake into synaptic vesicles in a dose-dependent manner. Of the three ATR metabolites tested, DACT did not affect vesicular DA uptake. DE and DIP, on the other hand, significantly decreased vesicular DA uptake with the effect of 100 microM DE/DIP being similar to the effect of the same concentration of ATR. Kinetic analysis of vesicular DA uptake indicated that ATR significantly decreased the V(max) while the K(m) value was not affected. Contrary to the inhibitory effects on vesicular DA uptake, synaptosomal DA uptake was marginally (6-13%) increased by ATR and DE, but not by DACT and DIP, at concentrations of increased the synaptosomal/vesicular (DAT/VMAT-2) uptake ratio. Collectively, results from this study suggest that ATR and two of its metabolites, DIP and DE, but not its major mammalian metabolite, DACT, decrease striatal DA levels, at least in part, by increasing cytosolic DA, which is prone to oxidative breakdown.

  19. Alteration of dopamine uptake into rat striatal vesicles and synaptosomes caused by an in vitro exposure to atrazine and some of its metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Muhammad M.; Filipov, Nikolay M.

    2008-01-01

    Studies have shown that both in vivo and in vitro exposure to the herbicide atrazine (ATR) results in dopaminergic neurotoxicity manifested by decreased striatal dopamine (DA) levels. However, the mechanism behind this reduction is largely unknown. A decrease in striatal DA could be due to ATR exposure affecting vesicular and/or synaptosomal uptake resulting in disrupted vesicular storage and/or cellular uptake of DA. Hence, we investigated the effects of in vitro ATR exposure on DA uptake into isolated rat striatal synaptosomes and synaptic vesicles. In addition to ATR, effects of its major mammalian metabolites, didealkyl atrazine (DACT), desethyl atrazine (DE) and desiopropyl atrazine (DIP) were investigated. ATR (1–250 μM) inhibited DA uptake into synaptic vesicles in a dose dependent manner. Of the three ATR metabolites tested, DACT did not affect vesicular DA uptake. DE and DIP, on the other hand, significantly decreased vesicular DA uptake with the effect of 100 μM DE/DIP being similar to the effect of the same concentration of ATR. Kinetic analysis of vesicular DA uptake indicated that ATR significantly decreased the Vmax while the Km value was not affected. Contrary to the inhibitory effects on vesicular DA uptake, synaptosomal DA uptake was marginally (6–13%) increased by ATR and DE, but not by DACT and DIP, at concentrations of ≤100 μM. As a result, ATR, DIP and DE increased the synaptosomal/vesicular (DAT/VMAT-2) uptake ratio. Collectively, results from this study suggest that ATR and two of its metabolites, DIP and DE, but not its major mammalian metabolite, DACT, decrease striatal DA levels, at least in part, by increasing cytosolic DA, which is prone to oxidative breakdown. PMID:18423833

  20. A C-terminal PDZ domain binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rickhag, Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar; Strandfelt, Kristine Nørgaard; Andresen, Bjørn; Gotfryd, Kamil; Madsen, Kenneth L.; Vestergaard-Klewe, Ib; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Eriksen, Jacob; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gomeza, Jesus; Woldbye, David P.D.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling DAT levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. DAT contains a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain binding sequence believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different DAT knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (DAT-AAA and DAT+Ala) are characterized by dramatic loss of DAT expression in the striatum, causing hyperlocomotion and attenuated response to amphetamine. In cultured dopaminergic neurons and striatal slices from DAT-AAA mice, we find markedly reduced DAT surface levels and evidence for enhanced constitutive internalization. In DAT-AAA neurons, but not in wild type neurons, surface levels are rescued in part by expression of a dominant-negative dynamin mutation (K44A). Our findings suggest that PDZ domain interactions are critical for synaptic distribution of DAT in vivo and thereby for proper maintenance of dopamine homeostasis. PMID:23481388

  1. Coexpression of striatal dopamine receptor subtypes and excitatory amino acid subunits.

    PubMed

    Ariano, M A; Larson, E R; Noblett, K L; Sibley, D R; Levine, M S

    1997-08-01

    The striatal cellular coexpression patterns for the D(1A) and D2 dopamine (DA) receptor subtypes and the ionotropic excitatory amino acid (EAA) subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-R1) and the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) (GluR1 and GluR2/3) receptor subunits were examined morphologically. Their coincidence was assessed by visualization of mRNA transcripts, localization of encoded receptor proteins, and binding analysis using concurrently paired methods of fluorescence detection. The findings indicated that 1) mRNA transcripts for both receptor systems were detected in the medium-sized neuron population, and the distribution of receptor message closely reflected protein and binding patterns, with the exception of the GluR1 subunit; 2) both DA receptor mRNA transcripts were coexpressed with each ionotropic EAA receptor subunit examined and with each other, and NMDA and AMPA receptor subunits also showed coincident expression; 3) D(1A) DA receptor protein was detected in neurons which coexpressed EAA subunit proteins; and 4) GluR2/3 and NMDA-R1 subunit proteins were coexpressed in medium-sized neurons which also demonstrated D2 DA receptor binding sites. These findings suggest morphological receptor "promiscuity" since the coexpression patterns between DA and EAA receptors were found in all permutations. The results provide a spatial framework for physiological findings describing functional interactions between the two DA receptor types and between specific DA and EAA receptors in the striatum.

  2. Monetary discounting and ventral striatal dopamine receptor availability in nontreatment-seeking alcoholics and social drinkers

    PubMed Central

    Oberlin, Brandon G.; Albrecht, Daniel S.; Herring, Christine M.; Walters, James W.; Hile, Karen L.; Kareken, David A.; Yoder, Karmen K.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Dopamine (DA) in the ventral striatum (VST) has long been implicated in addiction pathologies, yet its role in temporal decision-making is not well-understood. Objectives To determine if VST DA D2 receptor availability corresponds with greater impulsive choice in both non treatment-seeking alcoholics (NTS) and social drinkers (SD). Methods NTS subjects (n=10) and SD (n=13) received PET scans at baseline with the D2/D3 radioligand [11C]raclopride (RAC). Outside the scanner, subjects performed a delay discounting procedure with monetary rewards. RAC binding potential (BPND) was estimated voxelwise, and correlations were performed to test for relationships between VST BPND and delay discounting performance. Self-reported impulsivity was also tested for correlations with BPND. Results Across all subjects, greater impulsive choice for $20 correlated with lower BPND in the right VST. NTS showed greater impulsive choice than SD, and were more impulsive by self-report. Across all subjects, the capacity of larger rewards to reduce impulsive choice (the magnitude effect) correlated negatively (p= 0.028) with problematic alcohol use (AUDIT) scores. Self-reported impulsivity did not correlate with BPND in VST. Conclusions Preference for immediate reinforcement may reflect greater endogenous striatal DA or lower D2 number, or both. Alcoholic status did not mediate significant effects on VST BPND, suggesting minimal effects from alcohol exposure. The apparent lack of BPND correlation with self-reported impulsivity highlights the need for objective behavioral assays in the study of the neurochemical substrates of behavior. Finally, our results suggest that the magnitude effect may be more sensitive to alcohol-induced problems than single discounting measures. PMID:25563235

  3. Receptor subtypes involved in the presynaptic and postsynaptic actions of dopamine on striatal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Centonze, Diego; Grande, Cristina; Usiello, Alessandro; Gubellini, Paolo; Erbs, Eric; Martin, Ana B; Pisani, Antonio; Tognazzi, Nadia; Bernardi, Giorgio; Moratalla, Rosario; Borrelli, Emiliana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2003-07-16

    By stimulating distinct receptor subtypes, dopamine (DA) exerts presynaptic and postsynaptic actions on both large aspiny (LA) cholinergic and fast-spiking (FS) parvalbumin-positive interneurons of the striatum. Lack of receptor- and isoform-specific pharmacological agents, however, has hampered the progress toward a detailed identification of the specific DA receptors involved in these actions. To overcome this issue, in the present study we used four different mutant mice in which the expression of specific DA receptors was ablated. In D1 receptor null mice, D1R-/-, DA dose-dependently depolarized both LA and FS interneurons. Interestingly, SCH 233390 (10 microm), a D1-like (D1 and D5) receptor antagonist, but not l-sulpiride (3-10 microm), a D2-like (D2, D3, D4) receptor blocker, prevented this effect, implying D5 receptors in this action. Accordingly, immunohistochemical analyses in both wild-type and D1R-/- mice confirmed the expression of D5 receptors in both cholinergic and parvalbumin-positive interneurons of the striatum. In mice lacking D2 receptors, D2R-/-, the DA-dependent inhibition of GABA transmission was lost in both interneuron populations. Both isoforms of D2 receptor, D2L and D2S, were very likely involved in this inhibitory action, as revealed by the electrophysiological analysis of the effect of the DA D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole in two distinct mutants lacking D2L receptors and expressing variable contents of D2S receptors. The identification of the receptor subtypes involved in the actions of DA on different populations of striatal cells is essential to understand the circuitry of the basal ganglia and to develop pharmacological strategies able to interfere selectively with specific neuronal functions.

  4. [Halothane anesthesia decreases the level of interstitial striatal dopamine of awake freely moving rats in an in vivo microdialysis study].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Y; Uchihashi, Y; Watanabe, K; Satoh, T

    2000-02-01

    We investigated the effect of halothane on the level of interstitial dopamine of in vivo awake, free moving rats brain striatum using microdialysis techniques. Rats were implanted a microdialysis probe to right striatum of the brain and administered 1.5% of halothane (approximately 1.2 MAC) for 1 or 2 hours, and dialysates from the probe were determined every 20 minutes. Halothane anesthesia reduced the amount of dopamine derived from dialysate, and after discontinuation of halothane and at emergence from anesthesia, the level of dopamine was increased. The levels of metabolites of dopamine during anesthesia were increased lineally in a time dependent manner. We hypothesized that halothane might increase the rate of re-uptake of dopamine at nerve endings and decreased level of interstitial dopamine is compensated by dopamine releases during anesthesia.

  5. Dopamine transporter SLC6A3 genotype affects cortico-striatal activity of set-shifts in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Habak, Claudine; Noreau, Anne; Nagano-Saito, Atsuko; Mejía-Constaín, Beatriz; Degroot, Clotilde; Strafella, Antonio P; Chouinard, Sylvain; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Rouleau, Guy A; Monchi, Oury

    2014-11-01

    Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative condition that affects motor function along with a wide range of cognitive domains, including executive function. The hallmark of the pathology is its significant loss of nigrostriatal dopamine, which is necessary for the cortico-striatal interactions that underlie executive control. Striatal dopamine reuptake is mediated by the SLC6A3 gene (formerly named DAT1) and its polymorphisms, which have been largely overlooked in Parkinson's disease. Thirty patients (ages 53-68 years; 19 males, 11 females) at early stages of Parkinson's disease, were genotyped according to a 9-repeat (9R) or 10-repeat (10R) allele on the SLC6A3/DAT1 gene. They underwent neuropsychological assessment and functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a set-shifting task (a computerized Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) that relies on fronto-striatal interactions. Patients homozygous on the 10R allele performed significantly better on working memory tasks than 9R-carrier patients. Most importantly, patients carrying a 9R allele exhibited less activation than their 10R homozygous counterparts in the prefrontal cortex, premotor cortex and caudate nucleus, when planning and executing a set-shift. This pattern was exacerbated for conditions that usually recruit the striatum compared to those that do not. This is the first study indicating that the SLC6A3/DAT1 genotype has a significant effect on fronto-striatal activation and performance in Parkinson's disease. This effect is stronger for conditions that engage the striatum. Longitudinal studies are warranted to assess this polymorphism's effect on the clinical evolution of patients with Parkinson's disease, especially with cognitive decline.

  6. Striatal dopamine release in the rat during a cued lever-press task for food reward and the development of changes over time measured using high-speed voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Taizo

    2005-09-01

    Substantia nigra dopamine neuronal activity in the primate is thought to be related to the error in predicting reward delivery. Dopamine release in rat nucleus accumbens has been shown to increase in relation to drug/food-seeking behaviour. It is not known how the release of dopamine in the striatum corresponds to the many distinct steps of a rewarded, cued task (e.g. recognizing the cue, executing the behaviour, anticipating the reward, receiving the reward) and how dopamine release then changes over time as task performance improves. To investigate dopamine release during a rewarded, cued task and the development of changes in dopamine release over time, changes in extracellular striatal dopamine concentration during a rewarded, cued lever-press task were measured a few days every week for 5 months using high-speed in vivo voltammetry. Rats were trained to press a lever after a tone to obtain a food reward. The reaction time for the lever press decreased gradually as training continued. Changes in dopamine concentration were measured in the anterior striatum (ventral portion) during the task performance after an initial 6-day familiarization period, in which the animals learned that a lever press yielded food, and a 5-week period for surgery, recovery, and electrode preparation. During the task performance, dopamine concentration started to increase just after the cue, peaked near the time of the lever press, and returned to basal levels 1-2 s after the lever press. This pattern of changes in dopamine concentration was observed over the 5 months of testing, the peak dopamine concentration increasing steadily until peaking at week 7, at which time the task performance had not yet improved significantly from week 2. By week 13, task performance had significantly improved and peak dopamine concentration had begun to subside. Thus, the increase in dopamine concentration after the cue was highest while the task was not yet perfected and subsided toward the end of the

  7. Kinetic Diversity of Striatal Dopamine: Evidence from a Novel Protocol for Voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Walters, Seth H; Robbins, Elaine M; Michael, Adrian C

    2016-05-18

    In vivo voltammetry reveals substantial diversity of dopamine kinetics in the rat striatum. To substantiate this kinetic diversity, we evaluate the temporal distortion of dopamine measurements arising from the diffusion-limited adsorption of dopamine to voltammetric microelectrodes. We validate two mathematical procedures for correcting adsorptive distortion, both of which substantiate that dopamine's apparent kinetic diversity is not an adsorption artifact.

  8. Levodopa increases memory encoding and dopamine release in the striatum in the elderly

    PubMed Central

    Floel, A.; Garraux, G.; Xu, B.; Breitenstein, C.; Knecht, S.; Herscovitch, P.; Cohen, L.G.

    2008-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with a decrease in dopaminergic function and a reduced ability to form new motor memories with training. This study examined the link between both phenomena. We hypothesized that levodopa would (a) ameliorate aging-dependent deficits in motor memory formation, and (b) increase dopamine availability at the dopamine type 2-like (D2) receptor during training in task-relevant brain structures. The effects of training plus levodopa (100mg, plus 25 mg carbidopa) on motor memory formation and striatal dopamine availability were measured with [11C] raclopride (RAC) positron emission tomography (PET). We found that levodopa did not alter RAC-binding potential at rest but it enhanced training effects on motor memory formation as well as dopamine release in the dorsal caudate nucleus. Motor memory formation during training correlated with the increase of dopamine release in the caudate nucleus. These results demonstrate that levodopa may ameliorate dopamine deficiencies in the elderly by replenishing dopaminergic presynaptic stores, actively engaged in phasic dopamine release during motor training. PMID:17098331

  9. Electrically-evoked dopamine and acetylcholine release from rat striatal slices perfused without magnesium: regulation by glutamate acting on NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Shaoyu; Fredholm, Bertil B

    1997-01-01

    Rat striatal slices, preincubated with [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-choline, were continuously superfused and electrically stimulated. Electrically evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-acetylcholine (ACh) was not significantly changed by elimination of Mg2+ from superfusion buffer, but the basal release of [3H]-dopamine was doubled. Kynurenic acid (100–800  μM) caused, in the absence but not presence of Mg2+, a concentration-dependent decrease in the evoked release of these two transmitters. The addition of glycine reversed the inhibition of the evoked release of both transmitters caused by kynurenic acid (400  μM) in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, glycine increased the evoked release of [3H]-dopamine via a site inhibitable by strychnine (1  μM). Another two antagonists at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid and dizocilpine, also decreased significantly the evoked release of the two transmitters in a concentration-dependent manner in the absence, but not presence of Mg2+. By contrast, an antagonist of non-NMDA receptors, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (10  μM) significantly decreased the evoked release of the two transmitters in the presence, but not in the absence of Mg2+. Electrical field stimulation evoked release of endogenous adenosine, and this release tended to be higher in the absence of Mg2+. However, the addition of a selective adenosine A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (200 nM) did not influence the evoked release of the two transmitters, showing that the released adenosine is of little importance in controlling ACh and dopamine release from striatal slices. Non-NMDA receptors may play a similar role when Mg2+ ions are present. The results indicate that NMDA receptors activated in the absence of Mg2+ participate in the electrically-evoked release of [3H]-dopamine and [14C]-ACh from the striatum. PMID:9257903

  10. Alterations in striatal dopamine catabolism precede loss of substantia nigra neurons in a mouse model of Juvenile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis

    PubMed Central

    Weimer, Jill M.; Benedict, Jared W.; Elshatory, Yasser M.; Short, Douglas W.; Ramirez-Montealegre, Denia; Ryan, Deborah A.; Alexander, Noreen A.; Federoff, Howard J.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Pearce, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Batten disease, or juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (JNCL), results from mutations in the CLN3 gene. This disorder presents clinically around the age of five years with visual deficits progressing to include seizures, cognitive impairment, motor deterioration, hallucinations, and premature death by the third to forth decade of life. The motor deficits include coordination and gait abnormalities, myoclonic jerks, inability to initiate movements, and spasticity. Previous work from our laboratory has identified an early reduction in catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), an enzyme responsible for the efficient degradation of dopamine. Alterations in the kinetics of dopamine metabolism could cause the accumulation of undegraded or unsequestered dopamine leading to the formation of toxic dopamine intermediates. We report an imbalance in the catabolism of dopamine in three month Cln3-/- mice persisting through nine months of age that may be causal to oxidative damage within the striatum at nine months of age. Combined with the previously reported inflammatory changes and loss of post-synaptic D1α receptors, this could facilitate cell loss in striatal projection regions and underlie a general locomotion deficit that becomes apparent at twelve months of age in Cln3-/- mice. This study provides evidence for early changes in the kinetics of COMT in the Cln3-/- mouse striatum, affecting the turnover of dopamine, likely leading to neuron loss and motor deficits. These data provide novel insights into the basis of motor deficits in JNCL and how alterations in dopamine catabolism may result in oxidative damage and localized neuronal loss in this disorder. PMID:17617387

  11. Dopamine and conditioned reinforcement. I. Differential effects of amphetamine microinjections into striatal subregions.

    PubMed

    Kelley, A E; Delfs, J M

    1991-01-01

    In the conditioned reinforcement paradigm, animals learn a new instrumental response reinforced solely by conditioned reward (a stimulus that has previously been associated with primary reward). It has been shown that psychostimulants potentiate responding for conditioned reward and there is evidence that the nucleus accumbens is involved in this effect. The present experiments extend this work and examine the roles of various striatal subregions in the enhancement of responding for conditioned reward. In the conditioning phase, hungry rats were trained to associate a light/click stimulus with food delivery, with no levers present in the operant chamber. In the test phase, two levers were present and responding on one provided conditioned reward (presentation of the compound stimulus but no food). During this phase, microinjections of d-amphetamine (0, 0.2, 2.0, 20.0 micrograms/0.5 microliters) were made into seven striatal subregions in separate groups of rats. Injection of amphetamine into the nucleus accumbens elicited a dose-dependent, selective increase in responding for CR. Injections into posterior regions of the striatum had no effect. Significant and selective increases in CR responding were noted after injections into two regions neighboring the nucleus accumbens, the anterior dorsal and the ventromedial striatum, although the magnitude of these effects was considerably less than that following accumbens injections. Injections into ventrolateral regions increased responding in some rats, but this effect was very variable and not selective for the CR lever. These results are interpreted as evidence for functional heterogeneity of the striatum with regard to enhancement of conditioned reinforcement. The findings are discussed in relation to the theory that increased dopaminergic activity in the nucleus accumbens results in amplification of the response to a previously learned reward-related signal.

  12. Expression of striatal D sub 1 dopamine receptors coupled to inositol phosphate production and Ca sup 2+ mobilization in Xenopus oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, L.C.; Monsma, F.J. Jr.; Sibley, D.R. ); Burch, R.M. )

    1990-03-01

    Expression of central nervous system receptors for dopamine was examined by injection of poly(A){sup +} RNA (mRNA) from rat striatum into oocytes from Xenopus laevis. Electrophysiological measurements in mRNA-injected oocytes indicated that addition of 100 {mu}M dopamine induced an inward current that was consistent with the activation of endogenous Ca{sup 2+}-dependent Cl{sup {minus}} channels. This current was also elicited by addition of the selective D{sub 1} agonist SKF 38393 but not by the selective D{sub 2} agonist quinpirole. Using {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux assays, addition of 100 {mu}M dopamine to injected oocytes stimulated efflux 2- to 3-fold. This increase was mimicked by SKF 38393 and was blocked by the D{sub 1}-selective antagonist (+)SCH 23390 but not by the D{sub 2}-selective antagonist domperidone. No increase in {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux was seen with 100 {mu}M quinpirole. Size fractionation of striatal mRNA yielded a single peak (2.5-3.0 kilobases) of D{sub 1} receptor-mediated {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} efflux activity in injected oocytes. Thus, in addition to D{sub 1} receptors that stimulate adenylyl cyclase, rat striatum contains D{sub 1} receptors that can couple to InsP{sub 3} formation and mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+}.

  13. GBR12909 attenuates amphetamine-induced striatal dopamine release as measured by [(11)C]raclopride continuous infusion PET scans.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, V L; Wong, D F; Yokoi, F; Stephane, M; Rice, K C; Matecka, D; Clough, D J; Dannals, R F; Rothman, R B

    1999-09-15

    Major neurochemical effects of methamphetamine include release of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT), and norepinephrine (NE) via a carrier-mediated exchange mechanism. Preclinical research supports the hypothesis that elevations of mesolimbic DA mediate the addictive and reinforcing effects of methamphetamine and amphetamine. This hypothesis has not been adequately tested in humans. Previous in vivo rodent microdialysis demonstrated that the high affinity DA uptake inhibitor, GBR12909, attenuates cocaine- and amphetamine-induced increases in mesolimbic DA. The present study determined the ability of GBR12909 to attenuate amphetamine-induced increases in striatal DA as measured by [(11)C]raclopride continuous infusion positron emission tomography (PET) scans in two Papio anubis baboons. [(11)C]Raclopride was given in a continuous infusion paradigm resulting in a flat volume of distribution vs. time for up to 45 min postinjection. At that time, a 1.5 mg/kg amphetamine i.v. bolus was administered which caused a significant (30.3%) reduction in the volume of distribution (V(3)"). The percent reduction in the volume of distribution and, hence, a measure of the intrasynaptic DA release ranged between 22-41%. GBR12909 (1 mg/kg, slow i.v. infusion) was administered 90 min before the administration of the radiotracer. The comparison of the volume of distribution before and after administration of GBR12909 showed that GBR12909 inhibited amphetamine-induced DA release by 74%. These experiments suggest that GBR12909 is an important prototypical medication to test the hypothesis that stimulant-induced euphoria is mediated by DA and, if the DA hypothesis is correct, a potential treatment agent for cocaine and methamphetamine abuse. Furthermore, this quantitative approach demonstrates a way of testing various treatment medications, including other forms of GBR12909 such as a decanoate derivative.

  14. Exploring personality traits related to dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in striatal subregions of humans.

    PubMed

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Chung, Jun Ku; Gerretsen, Philip; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Iwata, Yusuke; Wilson, Alan; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-04-01

    While several studies have examined how particular personality traits are related to dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability in the striatum of humans, few studies have reported how multiple traits measured in the same persons are differentially related to D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. We examined how personality traits measured with the Karolinska Scales of Personality are related to striatal D2/3R availability measured with [(11)C]-raclopride in 30 healthy humans. Based on previous the literature, five personality traits were hypothesized to be most likely related to D2/3R availability: impulsiveness, monotony avoidance, detachment, social desirability, and socialization. We found self-reported impulsiveness was negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. After controlling for age and gender, monotony avoidance was also negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. Socialization was positively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and putamen. After controlling for age and gender, the relationship between socialization and D2/3R availability in these regions survived correction for multiple comparisons (p-threshold=.003). Thus, within the same persons, different personality traits are differentially related to in vivo D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  15. Exploring peronality traits related to dopamine D2/3 receptor availability in striatal subregions of humans

    PubMed Central

    Caravaggio, Fernando; Fervaha, Gagan; Chung, Jun Ku; Gerretsen, Philip; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Plitman, Eric; Iwata, Yusuke; Wilson, Alan; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    While several studies have examined how particular personality traits are related to dopamine D2/3 receptor (D2/3R) availability in the striatum of humans, few studies have reported how multiple traits measured in the same persons are differentially related to D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. We examined how personality traits measured with the Karolinska Scales of Personality are related to striatal D2/3R availability measured with [11C]-raclopride in 30 healthy humans. Based on previous literature, five personality traits were hypothesized to be most likely related to D2/3R availability: impulsiveness, monotony avoidance, detachment, social desirability, and socialization. We found self-reported impulsiveness was negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. After controlling for age and gender, monotony avoidance was also negatively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and globus pallidus. Socialization was positively correlated with D2/3R availability in the ventral striatum and putamen. After controlling for age and gender, the relationship between socialization and D2/3R availability in these regions survived correction for multiple comparisons (p-threshold=.003). Thus, within the same persons, different personality traits are differentially related to in vivo D2/3R availability in different striatal sub-regions. PMID:26944295

  16. Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa J; Rawson, Richard A; Dolezal, Brett A; Cooper, Christopher B; Brown, Amira K; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is associated with striatal dopaminergic deficits that have been linked to poor treatment outcomes, identifying these deficits as an important therapeutic target. Exercise attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurochemical damage in the rat brain, and a preliminary observation suggests that exercise increases striatal D2/D3 receptor availability (measured as nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND)) in patients with Parkinson's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether adding an exercise training program to an inpatient behavioral intervention for methamphetamine use disorder reverses deficits in striatal D2/D3 receptors. Participants were adult men and women who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence and were enrolled in a residential facility, where they maintained abstinence from illicit drugs of abuse and received behavioral therapy for their addiction. They were randomized to a group that received 1 h supervised exercise training (n=10) or one that received equal-time health education training (n=9), 3 days/week for 8 weeks. They came to an academic research center for positron emission tomography (PET) using [(18)F]fallypride to determine the effects of the 8-week interventions on striatal D2/D3 receptor BPND. At baseline, striatal D2/D3 BPND did not differ between groups. However, after 8 weeks, participants in the exercise group displayed a significant increase in striatal D2/D3 BPND, whereas those in the education group did not. There were no changes in D2/D3 BPND in extrastriatal regions in either group. These findings suggest that structured exercise training can ameliorate striatal D2/D3 receptor deficits in methamphetamine users, and warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment for stimulant dependence.

  17. Dopamine receptor-mediated mechanisms involved in the expression of learned activity of primate striatal neurons.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, K; Kimura, M

    1998-05-01

    To understand the mechanisms by which basal ganglia neurons express acquired activities during and after behavioral learning, selective dopamine (DA) receptor antagonists were applied while recording the activity of striatal neurons in monkeys performing behavioral tasks. In experiment 1, a monkey was trained to associate a click sound with a drop of reward water. DA receptor antagonists were administered by micropressure using a stainless steel injection cannula (300 microm ID) through which a Teflon-coated tungsten wire for recording neuronal activity had been threaded. Responses to sound by tonically active neurons (TANs), a class of neurons in the primate striatum, were recorded through a tungsten wire electrode during the application of either D1- or D2-class DA receptor antagonists (total volume <1 microl, at a rate of 1 microl/5-10 min). Application of the D2-class antagonist, (-)-sulpiride (20 micrograms/microl, 58 mM, pH 6.8), abolished the responses of four of five TANs examined. In another five TANs, neither the D2-class antagonist nor the D1-class antagonists, SCH23390 (10 micrograms/microl, 31 mM, pH 5.7) or cis-flupenthixol (30 micrograms/microl, 59 mM, pH 6.6) significantly suppressed responses. In experiment 2, four- or five-barreled glass microelectrodes were inserted into the striatum. The central barrel was used for extracellular recording of activity of TANs. Each DA receptor antagonist was iontophoretically applied through one of the surrounding barrels. SCH23390 (10 mM, pH 4.5) and (-)-sulpiride (10 mM, pH 4.5) were used. The effects of iontophoresis of both D1- and D2-class antagonists were examined in 40 TANs. Of 40 TANs from which recordings were made, responses were suppressed exclusively by the D2-class antagonist in 19 TANs, exclusively by the D1-class antagonist in 3 TANs, and by both D1- and D2-class antagonists in 7 TANs. When 0.9% NaCl, saline, was applied by pressure (<1 microl) or by iontophoresis (<30 nA) as a control, neither the

  18. Striatal dopamine ramping may indicate flexible reinforcement learning with forgetting in the cortico-basal ganglia circuits.

    PubMed

    Morita, Kenji; Kato, Ayaka

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that the midbrain dopamine (DA) neurons, receiving inputs from the cortico-basal ganglia (CBG) circuits and the brainstem, compute reward prediction error (RPE), the difference between reward obtained or expected to be obtained and reward that had been expected to be obtained. These reward expectations are suggested to be stored in the CBG synapses and updated according to RPE through synaptic plasticity, which is induced by released DA. These together constitute the "DA=RPE" hypothesis, which describes the mutual interaction between DA and the CBG circuits and serves as the primary working hypothesis in studying reward learning and value-based decision-making. However, recent work has revealed a new type of DA signal that appears not to represent RPE. Specifically, it has been found in a reward-associated maze task that striatal DA concentration primarily shows a gradual increase toward the goal. We explored whether such ramping DA could be explained by extending the "DA=RPE" hypothesis by taking into account biological properties of the CBG circuits. In particular, we examined effects of possible time-dependent decay of DA-dependent plastic changes of synaptic strengths by incorporating decay of learned values into the RPE-based reinforcement learning model and simulating reward learning tasks. We then found that incorporation of such a decay dramatically changes the model's behavior, causing gradual ramping of RPE. Moreover, we further incorporated magnitude-dependence of the rate of decay, which could potentially be in accord with some past observations, and found that near-sigmoidal ramping of RPE, resembling the observed DA ramping, could then occur. Given that synaptic decay can be useful for flexibly reversing and updating the learned reward associations, especially in case the baseline DA is low and encoding of negative RPE by DA is limited, the observed DA ramping would be indicative of the operation of such flexible reward learning.

  19. Expression of striatal adenosine and dopamine receptors in mice deficient in the p50 subunit of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaobin; Jhaveri, Krishna A.; Ding, Ming; Hughes, Larry F.; Toth, Linda A.; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2007-01-01

    The striatal dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AAR) exhibit mutually antagonistic effects through physical interactions and by differential modulation of post-receptor signaling pathways. The expression of the A2AAR and the D2R are differentially regulated by nuclear factor-κB (NFkB). In this report, we determined the role of NFkB in regulation of these receptors by comparing mice deficient in the NFκB p50 subunit (p50 KO) with genetically intact B6129PF2/J (F2) mice. Quantification of adenosine receptor (AR) subtypes in mouse striatum by real time PCR, immunocytochemistry and radioligand binding assays showed more A2AAR but less A1AR in p50 KO mice as compared with F2 mice. Striata from p50 KO mice also had less D2R mRNA and [3H]-methylspiperone binding than did striata from F2 mice. Gαolf and Gαs proteins, which are transducers of A2AAR signals, were also present at a higher level in striata from the p50 KO versus F2 mice. In contrast, the Gαi1 protein, which transduces signals from the A1AR and D2R, was significantly reduced in striata from p50-/ mice. Behaviorally, p50 KO mice exhibited increased locomotor activity relative to that of F2 mice after caffeine ingestion. These data are consistent with a role for the NFkB in the regulation of A1AR, A2AAR, D2R and possibly their coupling G proteins in the striatum. Dysregulation of these receptors in the striata of p50 KO mice might sensitize these animals to locomotor stimulatory action of caffeine. PMID:17869311

  20. Sequential Loss of LC Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons Results in a Correlation of Dopaminergic Neuronal Number to Striatal Dopamine Concentration.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W; Raskind, Murray A

    2012-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) are significantly reduced in Parkinson's disease (PD) and the LC exhibits neuropathological changes early in the disease process. It has been suggested that a loss of LC neurons can enhance the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to damage. To determine if LC noradrenergic innervation protects dopaminergic neurons from damage, the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was administered to adult male C57Bl/6 mice 3 days after bilateral LC administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA), a time when there is a significant reduction in LC neuronal number and innervation to forebrain regions. To assess if LC loss can affect dopaminergic loss four groups of animals were studied: control, 6OHDA, MPTP, and 6OHDA + MPTP; animals sacrificed 3 weeks after MPTP administration. The number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), and noradrenergic neurons in the LC were determined. Catecholamine levels in striatum were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The loss of LC neurons did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in the SN and VTA compared to control; however, LC 6OHDA significantly reduced striatal dopamine (DA; 29% reduced) but not norepinephrine (NE) concentration. MPTP significantly reduced SN and VTA neuronal number and DA concentration in the striatum compared to control; however, there was not a correlation of striatal DA concentration with SN or VTA neuronal number. Administration of 6OHDA prior to MPTP did not enhance MPTP-induced damage despite an effect of LC loss on striatal DA concentration. However, the loss of LC neurons before MPTP resulted now in a correlation between SN and VTA neuronal number to striatal DA concentration. These results demonstrate that the loss of either LC or DA neurons can affect the function of each others systems, indicating the importance of both the noradrenergic and

  1. Sequential Loss of LC Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons Results in a Correlation of Dopaminergic Neuronal Number to Striatal Dopamine Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W.; Raskind, Murray A.

    2012-01-01

    Noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) are significantly reduced in Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the LC exhibits neuropathological changes early in the disease process. It has been suggested that a loss of LC neurons can enhance the susceptibility of dopaminergic neurons to damage. To determine if LC noradrenergic innervation protects dopaminergic neurons from damage, the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was administered to adult male C57Bl/6 mice 3 days after bilateral LC administration of 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA), a time when there is a significant reduction in LC neuronal number and innervation to forebrain regions. To assess if LC loss can affect dopaminergic loss four groups of animals were studied: control, 6OHDA, MPTP, and 6OHDA + MPTP; animals sacrificed 3 weeks after MPTP administration. The number of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) and ventral tegmental area (VTA), and noradrenergic neurons in the LC were determined. Catecholamine levels in striatum were measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The loss of LC neurons did not affect the number of dopaminergic neurons in the SN and VTA compared to control; however, LC 6OHDA significantly reduced striatal dopamine (DA; 29% reduced) but not norepinephrine (NE) concentration. MPTP significantly reduced SN and VTA neuronal number and DA concentration in the striatum compared to control; however, there was not a correlation of striatal DA concentration with SN or VTA neuronal number. Administration of 6OHDA prior to MPTP did not enhance MPTP-induced damage despite an effect of LC loss on striatal DA concentration. However, the loss of LC neurons before MPTP resulted now in a correlation between SN and VTA neuronal number to striatal DA concentration. These results demonstrate that the loss of either LC or DA neurons can affect the function of each others systems, indicating the importance of both the noradrenergic and

  2. Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability Is Associated with Executive Function in Healthy Controls but Not Methamphetamine Users.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Michael E; Dean, Andy C; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the striatum has been linked with executive function in healthy individuals, and is below control levels among drug addicts, possibly contributing to diminished executive function in the latter group. This study tested for an association of striatal D2/D3 receptor availability with a measure of executive function among research participants who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence. Methamphetamine users and non-user controls (n = 18 per group) completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride. The methamphetamine users displayed significantly lower striatal D2/D3 receptor availability on average than controls after controlling for age and education (p = 0.008), but they did not register greater proportions of either perseverative or non-perseverative errors when controlling for education (both ps ≥ 0.622). The proportion of non-perseverative, but not perseverative, errors was negatively correlated with striatal D2/D3 receptor availability among controls (r = -0.588, p = 0.010), but not methamphetamine users (r = 0.281, p = 0.258), and the group-wise interaction was significant (p = 0.030). These results suggest that cognitive flexibility, as measured by perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, is not determined by signaling through striatal D2/D3 receptors in healthy controls, and that in stimulant abusers, who have lower D2/D3 receptor availability, compensation can effectively maintain other executive functions, which are associated with D2/D3 receptor signaling in controls.

  3. Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptor Availability Is Associated with Executive Function in Healthy Controls but Not Methamphetamine Users

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Michael E.; Dean, Andy C.; Mandelkern, Mark A.; London, Edythe D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dopamine D2/D3 receptor availability in the striatum has been linked with executive function in healthy individuals, and is below control levels among drug addicts, possibly contributing to diminished executive function in the latter group. This study tested for an association of striatal D2/D3 receptor availability with a measure of executive function among research participants who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence. Methods Methamphetamine users and non-user controls (n = 18 per group) completed the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test and positron emission tomography with [18F]fallypride. Results The methamphetamine users displayed significantly lower striatal D2/D3 receptor availability on average than controls after controlling for age and education (p = 0.008), but they did not register greater proportions of either perseverative or non-perseverative errors when controlling for education (both ps ≥ 0.622). The proportion of non-perseverative, but not perseverative, errors was negatively correlated with striatal D2/D3 receptor availability among controls (r = -0.588, p = 0.010), but not methamphetamine users (r = 0.281, p = 0.258), and the group-wise interaction was significant (p = 0.030). Conclusions These results suggest that cognitive flexibility, as measured by perseverative errors on the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, is not determined by signaling through striatal D2/D3 receptors in healthy controls, and that in stimulant abusers, who have lower D2/D3 receptor availability, compensation can effectively maintain other executive functions, which are associated with D2/D3 receptor signaling in controls. PMID:26657223

  4. Nicotinic and opioid receptor regulation of striatal dopamine D2-receptor mediated transmission

    PubMed Central

    Mamaligas, Aphroditi A.; Cai, Yuan; Ford, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    In addition to dopamine neuron firing, cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) regulate dopamine release in the striatum via presynaptic nicotinic receptors (nAChRs) on dopamine axon terminals. Synchronous activity of ChIs is necessary to evoke dopamine release through this pathway. The frequency-dependence of disynaptic nicotinic modulation has led to the hypothesis that nAChRs act as a high-pass filter in the dopaminergic microcircuit. Here, we used optogenetics to selectively stimulate either ChIs or dopamine terminals directly in the striatum. To measure the functional consequence of dopamine release, D2-receptor synaptic activity was assessed via virally overexpressed potassium channels (GIRK2) in medium spiny neurons (MSNs). We found that nicotinic-mediated dopamine release was blunted at higher frequencies because nAChRs exhibit prolonged desensitization after a single pulse of synchronous ChI activity. However, when dopamine neurons alone were stimulated, nAChRs had no effect at any frequency. We further assessed how opioid receptors modulate these two mechanisms of release. Bath application of the κ opioid receptor agonist U69593 decreased D2-receptor activation through both pathways, whereas the μ opioid receptor agonist DAMGO decreased D2-receptor activity only as a result of cholinergic-mediated dopamine release. Thus the release of dopamine can be independently modulated when driven by either dopamine neurons or cholinergic interneurons. PMID:27886263

  5. Relationship Between L-DOPA-Induced Reduction in Motor and Exploratory Activity and Striatal Dopamine D2 Receptor Binding in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Beu, Markus; de Souza Silva, Maria A.; Huston, Joseph P.; Hautzel, Hubertus; Mattern, Claudia; Antke, Christina; Müller, Hans-Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The present study assessed the influence of L-DOPA administration on neostriatal dopamine (DA) D2 receptor binding in relation to motor and exploratory behaviors in the rat. Methods: D2 receptor binding was measured in baseline, after challenge with the aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase inhibitor benserazide, and after challenge with either 5 or 10 mg/kg L-DOPA plus benserazide. Additional rats received injections of saline. For baseline and challenges, striatal equilibrium ratios (V3″) were computed as estimation of the binding potential. Motor and exploratory behaviors were assessed for 30 min in an open field prior to administration of [123I]IBZM. D2 receptor binding was measured with small animal SPECT 2 h after radioligand administration for 60 min. Results: Both L-DOPA doses significantly reduced D2 receptor binding relative to baseline and led to significantly less ambulation, less head-shoulder motility, and more sitting relative to saline. Moreover, 10 mg/kg L-DOPA induced less head-shoulder motility, more sitting, and more grooming than 5 mg/kg L-DOPA. Analysis of time-behavior curves showed that L-DOPA-treated animals relative to saline exhibited a faster rate of decrease of ambulation frequency and a slower rate of decrease of both duration and frequency of head-shoulder motility from a lower maximum level. Conclusions: The reductions of striatal D2 receptor binding after L-DOPA may be conceived to reflect elevated concentrations of synaptic DA. L-DOPA-treated animals showed less ambulation and less head-shoulder motility than saline-treated animals, indicating an association between less behavioral activity and increased availability of striatal DA. The faster rate of decrease of ambulation frequency and the lower maximum levels of both head-shoulder motility duration and frequency may be interpreted in terms of influence of increased DA availability on behavioral habituation to a novel environment. PMID:26778989

  6. A Bacoside containing Bacopa monnieri extract reduces both morphine hyperactivity plus the elevated striatal dopamine and serotonin turnover.

    PubMed

    Rauf, Khalid; Subhan, Fazal; Sewell, Robert D E

    2012-05-01

    Bacopa monnieri (BM) has been used in Ayurvedic medicine as a nootropic, anxiolytic, antiepileptic and antidepressant. An n-butanol extract of the plant (nBt-ext BM) was analysed and found to contain Bacoside A (Bacoside A3, Bacopaside II and Bacopasaponin C). The effects of the BM extract were then studied on morphine-induced hyperactivity as well as dopamine and serotonin turnover in the striatum since these parameters have a role in opioid sensitivity and dependence. Mice were pretreated with saline or nBt-ext BM (5, 10 and 15 mg/kg, orally), 60 min before morphine administration and locomotor activity was subsequently recorded. Immediately after testing, striatal tissues were analysed for dopamine (DA), serotonin (5HT) and their metabolites using HPLC coupled with electrochemical detection. The results indicated that nBt-ext BM significantly (p < 0.001) decreased locomotor activity in both the saline and morphine treated groups. Additionally, nBt-ext BM significantly lowered morphine-induced dopamine (DA), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-H1AA) upsurges in the striatum but failed to affect DA, 5-HT and their metabolites in the saline treated group. These findings suggest that nBt-ext BM has an antidopaminergic/serotonergic effect and may have potential beneficial effects in the treatment of morphine dependence.

  7. Differential Associations between Cortical Thickness and Striatal Dopamine in Treatment-Naïve Adults with ADHD vs. Healthy Controls.

    PubMed

    Cherkasova, Mariya V; Faridi, Nazlie; Casey, Kevin F; Larcher, Kevin; O'Driscoll, Gillian A; Hechtman, Lily; Joober, Ridha; Baker, Glen B; Palmer, Jennifer; Evans, Alan C; Dagher, Alain; Benkelfat, Chawki; Leyton, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Alterations in catecholamine signaling and cortical morphology have both been implicated in the pathophysiology of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, possible links between the two remain unstudied. Here, we report exploratory analyses of cortical thickness and its relation to striatal dopamine transmission in treatment-naïve adults with ADHD and matched healthy controls. All participants had one magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and two [(11)C]raclopride positron emission tomography scans. Associations between frontal cortical thickness and the magnitude of d-amphetamine-induced [(11)C]raclopride binding changes were observed that were divergent in the two groups. In the healthy controls, a thicker cortex was associated with less dopamine release; in the ADHD participants the converse was seen. The same divergence was seen for baseline D2/3 receptor availability. In healthy volunteers, lower D2/3 receptor availability was associated with a thicker cortex, while in the ADHD group lower baseline D2/3 receptor availability was associated with a thinner cortex. Individual differences in cortical thickness in these regions correlated with ADHD symptom severity. Together, these findings add to the evidence of associations between dopamine transmission and cortical morphology, and suggest that these relationships are altered in treatment-naïve adults with ADHD.

  8. Histamine and spontaneous motor activity: biphasic changes, receptors involved and participation of the striatal dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Chiavegatto, S; Nasello, A G; Bernardi, M M

    1998-01-01

    The time- and dose-related effects of exogenous histamine on spontaneous motor activity and receptors involved were evaluated in male rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of histamine (5.4 and 54.3 nmol) produced a biphasic effect with initial transitory hypoactivity and later hyperactivity expressed by locomotion frequency in an open-field. The rearing frequencies were only reduced by all doses of histamine used. The histamine-induced hypoactivity was inhibited by the H3-antagonist thioperamide and was also induced by the H3-agonist N-alpha-methylhistamine. The histamine-induced hyperactivity phase was blocked by the H1-antagonist mepyramine. The H2-antagonist ranitidine increased locomotion and rearing frequencies. The participation of other neurotransmitters in the persistent hypokinetic effect induced by 135.8 nmol of histamine was determined by HPLC in the striatum and hypothalamus as counter-proof. A decreased DOPAC/DA ratio was observed only in the striatum. In the hypothalamus, low levels of 5HT were detected, probably not correlated with motor activity. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the exogenous histamine-induced hypoactivity response is probably due to activation of H3-receptors as heteroreceptors reducing the activity of the striatal dopaminergic system. This effect can partially overlap with the expression of the hyperactivity induced by H1-receptor activation. The participation of H2-receptors requires further investigation.

  9. Striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability predicts the thalamic and medial prefrontal responses to reward in cocaine abusers three years later

    PubMed Central

    Asensio, Samuel; Romero, Maria J.; Romero, Francisco J.; Wong, Christopher; Alia-Klein, Nelly; Tomasi, Dardo; Wang, Gene-Jack; Telang, Frank; Volkow, Nora D.; Goldstein, Rita Z.

    2009-01-01

    Low levels of dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability at a resting baseline have been previously reported in drug addicted individuals and have been associated with reduced ventral and dorsal prefrontal metabolism. The reduction in DA D2 receptor availability along with the reduced ventral frontal metabolism is thought to underlie compromised sensitivity to non-drug reward, a core characteristic of drug addiction. We therefore hypothesized that variability in DA D2 receptor availability at baseline will covary with dynamic responses to monetary reward in addicted individuals. Striatal DA D2 receptor availability was measured with [11C]raclopride and positron emission tomography and response to monetary reward was measured (an average of 3 years later) with functional magnetic resonance imaging in seven cocaine addicted individuals. Results show that low DA D2 receptor availability in the dorsal striatum was associated with decreased thalamic response to monetary reward; while low availability in ventral striatum was associated with increased medial prefrontal (Brodmann Area 6/8/32) response to monetary reward. These preliminary results, that need to be replicated in larger sample sizes and validated with healthy controls, suggest that resting striatal DA D2 receptor availability predicts variability in functional responses to a non-drug reinforcer (money) in prefrontal cortex, implicated in behavioral monitoring, and in thalamus, implicated in conditioned responses and expectation, in cocaine addicted individuals. PMID:20034014

  10. Striatal dopamine D2 receptor availability predicts the thalamic and medial prefrontal responses to reward in cocaine abusers three years later

    SciTech Connect

    Asensio, S.; Goldstein, R.; Asensio, S.; Romero, M.J.; Romero, F.J.; Wong, C.T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Tomasi, D.; Wang, G.-J.; Telang, F..; Volkow, N.D.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-05-01

    Low levels of dopamine (DA) D2 receptor availability at a resting baseline have been previously reported in drug addicted individuals and have been associated with reduced ventral and dorsal prefrontal metabolism. The reduction in DA D2 receptor availability along with the reduced ventral frontal metabolism is thought to underlie compromised sensitivity to nondrug reward, a core characteristic of drug addiction. We therefore hypothesized that variability in DA D2 receptor availability at baseline will covary with dynamic responses to monetary reward in addicted individuals. Striatal DA D2 receptor availability was measured with [{sup 11}C]raclopride and positron emission tomography and response to monetary reward was measured (an average of three years later) with functional magnetic resonance imaging in seven cocaine-addicted individuals. Results show that low DA D2 receptor availability in the dorsal striatum was associated with decreased thalamic response to monetary reward; while low availability in ventral striatum was associated with increased medial prefrontal (Brodmann Area 6/8/32) response to monetary reward. These preliminary results, that need to be replicated in larger sample sizes and validated with healthy controls, suggest that resting striatal DA D2 receptor availability predicts variability in functional responses to a nondrug reinforcer (money) in prefrontal cortex, implicated in behavioral monitoring, and in thalamus, implicated in conditioned responses and expectation, in cocaine-addicted individuals.

  11. Rats classified as low or high cocaine locomotor responders: A unique model involving striatal dopamine transporters that predicts cocaine addiction-like behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Dorothy J.; Nelson, Anna M.; Mandt, Bruce H.; Larson, Gaynor A.; Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Ng, Christopher M.C.; Barcomb, Kelsey M.; Richards, Toni L.; Allen, Richard M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2013-01-01

    Individual differences are a hallmark of drug addiction. Here, we describe a rat model based on differential initial responsiveness to low dose cocaine. Despite similar brain cocaine levels, individual outbred Sprague-Dawley rats exhibit markedly different magnitudes of acute cocaine-induced locomotor activity and, thereby, can be classified as low or high cocaine responders (LCRs or HCRs). LCRs and HCRs differ in drug-induced, but not novelty-associated, hyperactivity. LCRs have higher basal numbers of striatal dopamine transporters (DATs) than HCRs and exhibit marginal cocaine inhibition of in vivo DAT activity and cocaine-induced increases in extracellular DA. Importantly, lower initial cocaine response predicts greater locomotor sensitization, conditioned place preference and greater motivation to self-administer cocaine following low dose acquisition. Further, outbred Long-Evans rats classified as LCRs, versus HCRs, are more sensitive to cocaine’s discriminative stimulus effects. Overall, results to date with the LCR/HCR model underscore the contribution of striatal DATs to individual differences in initial cocaine responsiveness and the value of assessing the influence of initial drug response on subsequent expression of addiction-like behaviors. PMID:23850581

  12. Pleiotrophin overexpression regulates amphetamine-induced reward and striatal dopaminergic denervation without changing the expression of dopamine D1 and D2 receptors: Implications for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Rodríguez, Marta; Rojo Gonzalez, Loreto; Gramage, Esther; Fernández-Calle, Rosalía; Chen, Ying; Pérez-García, Carmen; Ferrer-Alcón, Marcel; Uribarri, María; Bailey, Alexis; Herradón, Gonzalo

    2016-11-01

    It was previously shown that mice with genetic deletion of the neurotrophic factor pleiotrophin (PTN-/-) show enhanced amphetamine neurotoxicity and impair extinction of amphetamine conditioned place preference (CPP), suggesting a modulatory role of PTN in amphetamine neurotoxicity and reward. We have now studied the effects of amphetamine (10mg/kg, 4 times, every 2h) in the striatum of mice with transgenic PTN overexpression (PTN-Tg) in the brain and in wild type (WT) mice. Amphetamine caused an enhanced loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals, together with a highly significant aggravation of amphetamine-induced increase in the number of GFAP-positive astrocytes, in the striatum of PTN-Tg mice compared to WT mice. Given the known contribution of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors to the neurotoxic effects of amphetamine, we also performed quantitative receptor autoradiography of both receptors in the brains of PTN-Tg and WT mice. D1 and D2 receptors binding in the striatum and other regions of interest was not altered by genotype or treatment. Finally, we found that amphetamine CPP was significantly reduced in PTN-Tg mice. The data demonstrate that PTN overexpression in the brain blocks the conditioning effects of amphetamine and enhances the characteristic striatal dopaminergic denervation caused by this drug. These results indicate for the first time deleterious effects of PTN in vivo by mechanisms that are probably independent of changes in the expression of D1 and D2 dopamine receptors. The data also suggest that PTN-induced neuroinflammation could be involved in the enhanced neurotoxic effects of amphetamine in the striatum of PTN-Tg mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  13. Voluntary exercise improves performance of a discrimination task through effects on the striatal dopamine system

    PubMed Central

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a D1R antagonist into the DLS prior to discrimination learning facilitated the performance of nonexercising rats but not exercising rats. Infusing a D2R antagonist impaired the performance of exercising rats but not nonexercising rats. Exercise-associated facilitation of this task may rely on an exercise-induced decrease in D1R and increase in D2R activation in the DLS. PMID:24934332

  14. Methylphenidate-Induced Increases in Vesicular Dopamine Sequestration and Dopamine Release in the Striatum: The Role of Muscarinic and Dopamine D2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Trent J.; Farnsworth, Sarah J.; Rowley, Shane D.; Hanson, Glen R.; Fleckenstein, Annette E.

    2008-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) administration alters the subcellular distribution of vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT-2)-containing vesicles in rat striatum. This report reveals previously undescribed pharmacological features of MPD by elucidating its receptor-mediated effects on VMAT-2-containing vesicles that co-fractionate with synaptosomal membranes after osmotic lysis (referred to herein as membrane-associated vesicles) and on striatal dopamine (DA) release. MPD administration increased DA transport into, and decreased the VMAT-2 immunoreactivity of, the membrane-associated vesicle subcellular fraction. These effects were mimicked by the D2 receptor agonist, quinpirole, and blocked by the D2 receptor antagonist, eticlopride. Both MPD and quinpirole increased vesicular DA content. However, MPD increased, whereas quinpirole decreased, K+-stimulated DA release from striatal suspensions. Like MPD, the muscarinic receptor agonist, oxotremorine, increased K+-stimulated DA release. Both eticlopride and the muscarinic receptor antagonist, scopolamine, blocked MPD-induced increases in K+-stimulated DA release while the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, MK-801, was without effect. This suggests that D2 receptors mediate both the MPD-induced redistribution of vesicles away from synaptosomal membranes and the MPD-induced upregulation of vesicles remaining at the membrane. This results in a redistribution of DA within the striatum from the cytoplasm into vesicles, leading to increased DA release. However, D2 receptor activation alone is not sufficient to mediate the MPD-induced increases in striatal DA release as muscarinic receptor activation is also required. These novel findings provide insight into the mechanism of action of MPD, regulation of DA sequestration/release, and treatment of disorders affecting DA disposition including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, substance abuse, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:18591219

  15. The effects of gestational and chronic atrazine exposure on motor behaviors and striatal dopamine in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Jennifer L.; Lansdell, Theresa A.; Lookingland, Keith J.; Baker, Lisa E.

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of environmentally relevant gestational followed by continued chronic exposure to the herbicide, atrazine, on motor function, cognition, and neurochemical indices of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) activity in male rats. Dams were treated with 100 µg/kg atrazine, 10 mg/kg atrazine, or vehicle on gestational day 1 through postnatal day 21. Upon weaning, male offspring continued daily vehicle or atrazine gavage treatments for an additional six months. Subjects were tested in a series of behavioral assays, and 24 h after the last treatment, tissue samples from the striatum were analyzed for DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). At 10 mg/kg, this herbicide was found to produce modest disruptions in motor functioning, and at both dose levels it significantly lowered striatal DA and DOPAC concentrations. These results suggest exposures to atrazine have the potential to disrupt nigrostriatal DA neurons and behaviors associated with motor functioning. PMID:26440580

  16. Keep focussing: striatal dopamine multiple functions resolved in a single mechanism tested in a simulated humanoid robot

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Vincenzo G.; Sperati, Valerio; Mannella, Francesco; Mirolli, Marco; Gurney, Kevin; Friston, Karl; Dolan, Raymond J.; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    The effects of striatal dopamine (DA) on behavior have been widely investigated over the past decades, with “phasic” burst firings considered as the key expression of a reward prediction error responsible for reinforcement learning. Less well studied is “tonic” DA, where putative functions include the idea that it is a regulator of vigor, incentive salience, disposition to exert an effort and a modulator of approach strategies. We present a model combining tonic and phasic DA to show how different outflows triggered by either intrinsically or extrinsically motivating stimuli dynamically affect the basal ganglia by impacting on a selection process this system performs on its cortical input. The model, which has been tested on the simulated humanoid robot iCub interacting with a mechatronic board, shows the putative functions ascribed to DA emerging from the combination of a standard computational mechanism coupled to a differential sensitivity to the presence of DA across the striatum. PMID:24600422

  17. Keep focussing: striatal dopamine multiple functions resolved in a single mechanism tested in a simulated humanoid robot.

    PubMed

    Fiore, Vincenzo G; Sperati, Valerio; Mannella, Francesco; Mirolli, Marco; Gurney, Kevin; Friston, Karl; Dolan, Raymond J; Baldassarre, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    The effects of striatal dopamine (DA) on behavior have been widely investigated over the past decades, with "phasic" burst firings considered as the key expression of a reward prediction error responsible for reinforcement learning. Less well studied is "tonic" DA, where putative functions include the idea that it is a regulator of vigor, incentive salience, disposition to exert an effort and a modulator of approach strategies. We present a model combining tonic and phasic DA to show how different outflows triggered by either intrinsically or extrinsically motivating stimuli dynamically affect the basal ganglia by impacting on a selection process this system performs on its cortical input. The model, which has been tested on the simulated humanoid robot iCub interacting with a mechatronic board, shows the putative functions ascribed to DA emerging from the combination of a standard computational mechanism coupled to a differential sensitivity to the presence of DA across the striatum.

  18. Inhibition of ( sup 3 H)dopamine uptake into rat striatal slices by quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Dwoskin, L.P.; Leibee, L.L.; Jewell, A.L.; Fang, Zhaoxia; Crooks, P.A. )

    1992-01-01

    The effects of quaternary N-methylated nicotine derivatives were examined on in vitro uptake of ({sup 3}H)dopamine (({sup 3}H)DA) in rat striatal slices. Striatal slices were incubated with a 10 {mu}M concentration of the following compounds: N-methylnicotinium, N-methylnornicotinium, N-methylcotininium, N,N{prime}-dimethylnicotinium and N{prime}-methylnicotinium salts. The results clearly indicated that significant inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake occurred with those compounds possessing a N-methylpyridinium group; whereas, compounds that were methylated at the N{prime}-pyrrolidinium position were less effective or exhibited no inhibition of ({sup 3}H)DA uptake. The results suggest that high concentrations of quaternary N-methylated nicotine metabolites which are structurally related to the neurotoxin MPP{sup +}, and which may be formed in the CNS, may protect against Parkinson's Disease and explain the inverse relationship between smoking and Parkinsonism reported in epidemiologic studies.

  19. Selective Vulnerability of Striatal D2 versus D1 Dopamine Receptor-Expressing Medium Spiny Neurons in HIV-1 Tat Transgenic Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Schier, Christina J; Marks, William D; Paris, Jason J; Barbour, Aaron J; McLane, Virginia D; Maragos, William F; McQuiston, A Rory; Knapp, Pamela E; Hauser, Kurt F

    2017-06-07

    Despite marked regional differences in HIV susceptibility within the CNS, there has been surprisingly little exploration into the differential vulnerability among neuron types and the circuits they underlie. The dorsal striatum is especially susceptible, harboring high viral loads and displaying marked neuropathology, with motor impairment a frequent manifestation of chronic infection. However, little is known about the response of individual striatal neuron types to HIV or how this disrupts function. Therefore, we investigated the morphological and electrophysiological effects of HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (Tat) in dopamine subtype 1 (D1) and dopamine subtype 2 (D2) receptor-expressing striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) by breeding transgenic Tat-expressing mice to Drd1a-tdTomato- or Drd2-eGFP-reporter mice. An additional goal was to examine neuronal vulnerability early during the degenerative process to gain insight into key events underlying the neuropathogenesis. In D2 MSNs, exposure to HIV-1 Tat reduced dendritic spine density significantly, increased dendritic damage (characterized by swellings/varicosities), and dysregulated neuronal excitability (decreased firing at 200-300 pA and increased firing rates at 450 pA), whereas insignificant morphologic and electrophysiological consequences were observed in Tat-exposed D1 MSNs. These changes were concomitant with an increased anxiety-like behavioral profile (lower latencies to enter a dark chamber in a light-dark transition task, a greater frequency of light-dark transitions, and reduced rearing time in an open field), whereas locomotor behavior was unaffected by 2 weeks of Tat induction. Our findings suggest that D2 MSNs and a specific subset of neural circuits within the dorsal striatum are preferentially vulnerable to HIV-1.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), neurocognitive disorders afflict 30-50% of HIV-infected individuals and synaptodendritic injury

  20. Regulation of striatal dopamine responsiveness by Notch/RBP-J signaling.

    PubMed

    Toritsuka, M; Kimoto, S; Muraki, K; Kitagawa, M; Kishimoto, T; Sawa, A; Tanigaki, K

    2017-03-07

    Dopamine signaling is essential for reward learning and fear-related learning, and thought to be involved in neuropsychiatric diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of dopamine responsiveness is unclear. Here we show the critical roles of Notch/RBP-J signaling in the regulation of dopamine responsiveness in the striatum. Notch/RBP-J signaling regulates various neural cell fate specification, and neuronal functions in the adult central nervous system. Conditional deletion of RBP-J specifically in neuronal cells causes enhanced response to apomorphine, a non-selective dopamine agonist, and SKF38393, a D1 agonist, and impaired dopamine-dependent instrumental avoidance learning, which is corrected by SCH23390, a D1 antagonist. RBP-J deficiency drastically reduced dopamine release in the striatum and caused a subtle decrease in the number of dopaminergic neurons. Lentivirus-mediated gene transfer experiments showed that RBP-J deficiency in the striatum was sufficient for these deficits. These findings demonstrated that Notch/RBP-J signaling regulates dopamine responsiveness in the striatum, which may explain the mechanism whereby Notch/RBP-J signaling affects an individual's susceptibility to neuropsychiatric disease.

  1. Dopamine denervation does not alter in vivo /sup 3/H-spiperone binding in rat striatum: implications for external imaging of dopamine receptors in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, J.P. Jr.; Wooten, G.F.

    1986-04-01

    Striatal particulate preparations, both from rats with lesion-induced striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some striatal dopamine (DA) loss and from some patients with Parkinson's disease, exhibit increased /sup 3/H-neuroleptic binding, which is interpreted to be the mechanism of denervation-induced behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds. After intravenous /sup 3/H-spiperone (/sup 3/H-SP) administration to rats with unilateral nigral lesions, we found no differences in accumulation of total or particulate-bound /sup 3/H-SP in dopamine-denervated compared with intact striata. /sup 3/H-SP in vivo binds to less than 10% of striatal sites labeled by /sup 3/H-SP incubated with striatal particulate preparations in vitro. Quantitative autoradiography of /sup 3/H-SP binding to striatal sections in vitro also failed to reveal any effects of dopamine denervation. /sup 3/H-SP bound to striatal sites in vivo dissociates more slowly than that bound to striatal particulate preparations labeled in vitro. Striatal binding properties of /sup 3/H-SP administered in vivo are quite different from the same kinetic binding parameters estimated in vitro using crude membrane preparations of striatum. In addition, striatal binding of in vivo-administered 3H-SP is not affected by prior lesion of the substantia nigra, which results in profound ipsilateral striatal dopamine depletion. Thus, behavioral supersensitivity to dopaminergic compounds may not be associated with altered striatal binding properties for dopamine receptor ligands in vivo.

  2. Revisiting the ‘self-medication’ hypothesis in light of the new data linking low striatal dopamine to comorbid addictive behavior

    PubMed Central

    Voruganti, Lakshmi L.N.P.

    2015-01-01

    Persons with schizophrenia are at a high risk, almost 4.6 times more likely, of having drug abuse problems than persons without psychiatric illness. Among the influential proposals to explain such a high comorbidity rate, the ‘self-medication hypothesis’ proposed that persons with schizophrenia take to drugs in an effort to cope with the illness and medication side effects. In support of the self-medication hypothesis, data from our earlier clinical study confirmed the strong association between neuroleptic dysphoria and negative subjective responses and comorbid drug abuse. Though dopamine has been consistently suspected as one of the major culprits for the development of neuroleptic dysphoria, it is only recently our neuroimaging studies correlated the emergence of neuroleptic dysphoria to the low level of striatal dopamine functioning. Similarly, more evidence has recently emerged linking low striatal dopamine with the development of vulnerability for drug addictive states in schizophrenia. The convergence of evidence from both the dysphoria and comorbidity research, implicating the role of low striatal dopamine in both conditions, has led us to propose that the person with schizophrenia who develops dysphoria and comorbid addictive disorder is likely to be one and the same. PMID:26199720

  3. 3- and 4-O-sulfoconjugated and methylated dopamine: highly reduced binding affinity to dopamine D2 receptors in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Werle, E; Lenz, T; Strobel, G; Weicker, H

    1988-07-01

    The binding properties of 3- and 4-O-sulfo-conjugated dopamine (DA-3-O-S, DA-4-O-S) as well as 3-O-methylated dopamine (MT) to rat striatal dopamine D2 receptors were investigated. 3H-spiperone was used as a radioligand in the binding studies. In saturation binding experiments (+)butaclamol, which has been reported to bind to dopaminergic D2 and serotoninergic 5HT2 receptors, was used in conjunction with ketanserin and sulpiride, which preferentially label 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively, in order to discriminate between 3H-spiperone binding to D2 and to 5HT2 receptors. Under our particular membrane preparation and assay conditions, 3H-spiperone binds to D2 and 5HT2 receptors with a maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of 340 fmol/mg protein in proportions of about 75%:25% with similar dissociation constants KD (35 pmol/l; 43 pmol/l). This result was verified by the biphasic competition curve of ketanserin, which revealed about 20% high (KD = 24 nmol/l) and 80% low (KD = 420 nmol/l) affinity binding sites corresponding to 5HT2 and D2 receptors, respectively. Therefore, all further competition experiments at a tracer concentration of 50 pmol/l were performed in the presence of 0.1 mumol/l ketanserin to mask the 5HT2 receptors. DA competition curves were best fitted assuming two binding sites, with high (KH = 0.12 mumol/l) and low (KL = 18 mumol/l) affinity, present in a ratio of 3:1. The high affinity binding sites were interconvertible by 100 mumol/l guanyl-5-yl imidodiphosphate [Gpp(NH)p], resulting in a homogenous affinity state of DA receptors (KD = 2.8 mumol/l).2+ off

  4. Increased presynaptic regulation of dopamine neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens core following chronic ethanol self-administration in female macaques

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Calipari, Erin S.; Yorgason, Jordan T.; Lovinger, David M.; Mateo, Yolanda; Jimenez, Vanessa A.; Helms, Christa M.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Hypofunction of striatal dopamine neurotransmission, or hypodopaminergia, is a consequence of excessive ethanol use, and is hypothesized to be a critical component of alcoholism, driving alcohol intake in an attempt to restore dopamine levels; however, the neurochemical mechanisms involved in these dopaminergic deficiencies are unknown. Objective Here we examined the specific dopaminergic adaptations that produce hypodopaminergia and contribute to alcohol use disorders using direct, sub-second measurements of dopamine signaling in nonhuman primates following chronic ethanol self-administration. Methods Female rhesus macaques completed one year of daily (22 hr/day) ethanol self-administration. Subsequently, fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used in nucleus accumbens core brain slices to determine alterations in dopamine terminal function, including release and uptake kinetics, and sensitivity to quinpirole (D2/D3 dopamine receptor agonist) and U50,488 (kappa-opioid receptor agonist) induced inhibition of dopamine release. Results Ethanol drinking greatly increased uptake rates, which were positively correlated with lifetime ethanol intake. Furthermore, the sensitivity of dopamine D2/D3 autoreceptors and kappa-opioid receptors, which both act as negative regulators of presynaptic dopamine release, were moderately and robustly enhanced in ethanol drinkers. Conclusions Greater uptake rates and sensitivity to D2-type autoreceptor and kappa-opioid receptor agonists could converge to drive a hypodopaminergic state, characterized by reduced basal dopamine and an inability to mount appropriate dopaminergic responses to salient stimuli. Together, we outline the specific alterations to dopamine signaling that may drive ethanol-induced hypofunction of the dopamine system, and suggest that the dopamine and dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor systems may be efficacious pharmcotherapeutic targets in the treatment of alcohol use disorders. PMID:26892380

  5. Dopamine Receptor Activation Increases HIV Entry into Primary Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Peter J.; Yano, Hideaki H.; Kalpana, Ganjam V.; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Berman, Joan W.

    2014-01-01

    Macrophages are the primary cell type infected with HIV in the central nervous system, and infection of these cells is a major component in the development of neuropathogenesis and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Within the brains of drug abusers, macrophages are exposed to increased levels of dopamine, a neurotransmitter that mediates the addictive and reinforcing effects of drugs of abuse such as cocaine and methamphetamine. In this study we examined the effects of dopamine on HIV entry into primary human macrophages. Exposure to dopamine during infection increased the entry of R5 tropic HIV into macrophages, irrespective of the concentration of the viral inoculum. The entry pathway affected was CCR5 dependent, as antagonizing CCR5 with the small molecule inhibitor TAK779 completely blocked entry. The effect was dose-dependent and had a steep threshold, only occurring above 108 M dopamine. The dopamine-mediated increase in entry required dopamine receptor activation, as it was abrogated by the pan-dopamine receptor antagonist flupenthixol, and could be mediated through both subtypes of dopamine receptors. These findings indicate that the effects of dopamine on macrophages may have a significant impact on HIV pathogenesis. They also suggest that drug-induced increases in CNS dopamine may be a common mechanism by which drugs of abuse with distinct modes of action exacerbate neuroinflammation and contribute to HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders in infected drug abusers. PMID:25268786

  6. The transfection of BDNF to dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of dopamine D3 receptor agonist recovering the striatal innervation, dendritic spines and motor behavior in an aged rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  7. Neuronal Depolarization Drives Increased Dopamine Synaptic Vesicle Loading via VGLUT.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, Jenny I; Dunn, Matthew; Mingote, Susana; Karam, Caline S; Farino, Zachary J; Sonders, Mark S; Choi, Se Joon; Grygoruk, Anna; Zhang, Yuchao; Cela, Carolina; Choi, Ben Jiwon; Flores, Jorge; Freyberg, Robin J; McCabe, Brian D; Mosharov, Eugene V; Krantz, David E; Javitch, Jonathan A; Sulzer, David; Sames, Dalibor; Rayport, Stephen; Freyberg, Zachary

    2017-08-30

    The ability of presynaptic dopamine terminals to tune neurotransmitter release to meet the demands of neuronal activity is critical to neurotransmission. Although vesicle content has been assumed to be static, in vitro data increasingly suggest that cell activity modulates vesicle content. Here, we use a coordinated genetic, pharmacological, and imaging approach in Drosophila to study the presynaptic machinery responsible for these vesicular processes in vivo. We show that cell depolarization increases synaptic vesicle dopamine content prior to release via vesicular hyperacidification. This depolarization-induced hyperacidification is mediated by the vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT). Remarkably, both depolarization-induced dopamine vesicle hyperacidification and its dependence on VGLUT2 are seen in ventral midbrain dopamine neurons in the mouse. Together, these data suggest that in response to depolarization, dopamine vesicles utilize a cascade of vesicular transporters to dynamically increase the vesicular pH gradient, thereby increasing dopamine vesicle content. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Response contingency directs long-term cocaine-induced neuroplasticity in prefrontal and striatal dopamine terminals.

    PubMed

    Wiskerke, Joost; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; De Vries, Taco J

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to addictive substances such as cocaine is well-known to alter brain organisation. Cocaine-induced neuroadaptations depend on several factors, including drug administration paradigm. To date, studies addressing the consequences of cocaine exposure on dopamine transmission have either not been designed to investigate the role of response contingency or focused only on short-term neuroplasticity. We demonstrate a key role of response contingency in directing long-term cocaine-induced neuroplasticity throughout projection areas of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. We found enhanced electrically-evoked [(3)H]dopamine release from superfused brain slices of nucleus accumbens shell and core, dorsal striatum and medial prefrontal cortex three weeks after cessation of cocaine self-administration. In yoked cocaine rats receiving the same amount of cocaine passively, sensitised dopamine terminal reactivity was only observed in the nucleus accumbens core. Control sucrose self-administration experiments demonstrated that the observed neuroadaptations were not the result of instrumental learning per se. Thus, long-term withdrawal from cocaine self-administration is associated with widespread sensitisation of dopamine terminals throughout frontostriatal circuitries.

  9. Interaction between effects of genes coding for dopamine and glutamate transmission on striatal and parahippocampal function.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Andreina; Prata, Diana P; Mechelli, Andrea; Picchioni, Marco; Fu, Cynthia H Y; Chaddock, Christopher A; Kane, Fergus; Kalidindi, Sridevi; McDonald, Colm; Kravariti, Eugenia; Toulopoulou, Timothea; Bramon, Elvira; Walshe, Muriel; Ehlert, Natascha; Georgiades, Anna; Murray, Robin; Collier, David A; McGuire, Philip

    2013-09-01

    The genes for the dopamine transporter (DAT) and the D-Amino acid oxidase activator (DAOA or G72) have been independently implicated in the risk for schizophrenia and in bipolar disorder and/or their related intermediate phenotypes. DAT and G72 respectively modulate central dopamine and glutamate transmission, the two systems most robustly implicated in these disorders. Contemporary studies have demonstrated that elevated dopamine function is associated with glutamatergic dysfunction in psychotic disorders. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging we examined whether there was an interaction between the effects of genes that influence dopamine and glutamate transmission (DAT and G72) on regional brain activation during verbal fluency, which is known to be abnormal in psychosis, in 80 healthy volunteers. Significant interactions between the effects of G72 and DAT polymorphisms on activation were evident in the striatum, parahippocampal gyrus, and supramarginal/angular gyri bilaterally, the right insula, in the right pre-/postcentral and the left posterior cingulate/retrosplenial gyri (P < 0.05, FDR-corrected across the whole brain). This provides evidence that interactions between the dopamine and the glutamate system, thought to be altered in psychosis, have an impact in executive processing which can be modulated by common genetic variation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., a Wiley company.

  10. Dopamine-dependent long-term depression is expressed in striatal spiny neurons of both direct and indirect pathways: implications for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bagetta, Vincenza; Picconi, Barbara; Marinucci, Silvia; Sgobio, Carmelo; Pendolino, Valentina; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Fusco, Francesca R; Giampà, Carmen; Calabresi, Paolo

    2011-08-31

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are divided into two subpopulations exerting distinct effects on motor behavior. Transgenic mice carrying bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) able to confer cell type-specific expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) for dopamine (DA) receptors have been developed to characterize differences between these subpopulations. Analysis of these mice, in contrast with original pioneering studies, showed that striatal long-term depression (LTD) was expressed in indirect but not in the direct pathway MSNs. To address this mismatch, we applied a new approach using combined BAC technology and receptor immunohistochemistry. We demonstrate that, in physiological conditions, DA-dependent LTD is expressed in both pathways showing that the lack of synaptic plasticity found in D(1) eGFP mice is associated to behavioral deficits. Our findings suggest caution in the use of this tool and indicate that the "striatal segregation" hypothesis might not explain all synaptic dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.

  11. Augmented methamphetamine-induced overflow of striatal dopamine 1 day after GDNF administration.

    PubMed

    Cass, W A; Walker, D J; Manning, M W

    1999-05-08

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) can attenuate the dopamine (DA)-depleting effects of neurotoxic doses of methamphetamine (METH) when given 1 day prior to the METH. The neurotoxic effects of METH may be due, in part, to sustained increases in extracellular levels of DA. It is therefore possible that GDNF may be altering the effects of METH by influencing extracellular levels of DA during the METH treatment. The purpose of the present study was to determine if GDNF has effects on extracellular levels of DA in the striatum by 24-h post-administration. GDNF (10 microgram in 2 microliter vehicle) or vehicle was injected into the right striatum or substantia nigra of anesthetized male rats. The next day the animals were anesthetized again and dialysis probes were positioned in both the right and left striata and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Following the collection of baseline samples the rats were administered METH (5 mg/kg, s.c.). The METH injections dramatically increased extracellular DA levels on both sides of the brain. However, levels on the GDNF injected side were significantly greater than levels on the contralateral side. Basal levels of DA were not significantly different between the two sides, but levels of DA metabolites were elevated on the GDNF side. Post-mortem tissue levels of DA metabolites, but not DA, were also elevated in the striatum and substantia nigra. These results indicate that GDNF has significant effects on DA neuron functioning within 24 h of administration and that GDNF can augment DA overflow while inhibiting the neurotoxic effects of METH. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  12. Sex differences in methamphetamine-evoked striatal dopamine output are abolished following gonadectomy: comparisons with potassium-evoked output and responses in prepubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, Dean E; Salvaterra, Ty J

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences are reported for methamphetamine (MA)-induced neurotoxicity of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system. In an attempt to understand some of the bases for these differences, we investigated MA-evoked dopamine (DA) responses from superfused striatal tissue fragments of intact and male and female CD-1 mice. These responses were compared with that of gonadectomized mice, potassium-evoked DA responses in intact mice and responses in prepubertal mice. In experiment 1, DA responses were tested using infusion of MA at doses of 1, 10, 100 and 1,000 microM. In intact mice, mean peak MA-evoked DA responses were consistently increased and significantly greater in male vs. female mice at the 1,000 microM dose. No such significant differences were observed between gonadectomized male vs. female mice (experiment 2). In contrast to MA, potassium-stimulated DA responses were increased in intact female mice, with statistically significant differences at doses of 30 and 60 mM (experiment 3). No statistically significant differences between intact prepubertal male and female mice were obtained in response to a 1,000 microM dose of MA (experiment 4) or to a 60 mM dose of potassium (experiment 5). These results indicate that intact male mice show greater sensitivity to MA-evoked DA output. This sex difference is abolished following gonadectomy, is not observed with potassium, nor is it present in prepubertal mice. The increased sensitivity to MA shown by intact males may be related to the greater degree of striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity observed in male mice in response to this psychostimulant and appears to be attributable to differences in gonadal steroid hormones between male and female mice.

  13. BDNF over-expression induces striatal serotonin fiber sprouting and increases the susceptibility to l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats.

    PubMed

    Tronci, Elisabetta; Napolitano, Francesco; Muñoz, Ana; Fidalgo, Camino; Rossi, Francesca; Björklund, Anders; Usiello, Alessandro; Carta, Manolo

    2017-11-01

    In addition to its role in neuronal survival, the brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been shown to influence serotonin transmission and synaptic plasticity, events strongly implicated in the appearance of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID), a motor complication occurring in parkinsonian patients after long-term treatment with the dopamine precursor. In order to evaluate a possible influence of BDNF in the appearance of LID, 6-OHDA-lesioned rats received a striatal injection of different concentrations of an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector over-expressing either BDNF or GFP, as control vector. Eight weeks later, animals started to receive a daily treatment with l-DOPA (4-6mg/kg plus benserazide 4-6mg/kg, s.c.) or saline, and dyskinesias, as well as l-DOPA-induced rotations, were evaluated at several time-points. Moreover, molecular changes in striatal D1 receptor-dependent cAMP/PKA and ERK/mTORC signaling pathways, as well as, sprouting of striatal serotonin axons, were measured. Results showed that the AAV-BDNF vector injection induced striatal over-expression of BDNF, as well as striatal and pallidal serotonin axon hyperinnervation. Moreover, rats that over-expressed BDNF were more prone to develop LID and l-DOPA-induced rotations, compared to the GFP-treated control group. Finally, rats that over-expressed BDNF showed increased levels of striatal D1R-dependent signaling phospho-proteins in response to l-DOPA administration. This study suggests that BDNF over-expression, by inducing changes in pre-synaptic serotonin axonal trophism, is able to exacerbate maladaptive responses to l-DOPA administration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Abstinence from Chronic Cocaine Self-Administration Alters Striatal Dopamine Systems in Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Beveridge, Thomas JR; Smith, Hilary R; Nader, Michael A; Porrino, Linda J

    2013-01-01

    Although dysregulation within the dopamine (DA) system is a hallmark feature of chronic cocaine exposure, the question of whether these alterations persist into abstinence remains largely unanswered. Nonhuman primates represent an ideal model in which to assess the effects of abstinence on the DA system following chronic cocaine exposure. In this study, male rhesus monkeys self-administered cocaine (0.3 mg/kg per injection, 30 reinforcers per session) under a fixed-interval 3-min schedule for 100 days followed by either 30 or 90 days abstinence. This duration of cocaine self-administration has been previously shown to decrease DA D2-like receptor densities and increase levels of D1-like receptors and DA transporters (DAT). Responding by control monkeys was maintained by food presentation under an identical protocol and the same abstinence periods. [3H]SCH 23390 binding to DA D1 receptors following 30 days of abstinence was significantly higher in all portions of the striatum, compared to control animals, whereas [3H]raclopride binding to DA D2 receptors was not different between groups. [3H]WIN 35 428 binding to DAT was also significantly higher throughout virtually all portions of the dorsal and ventral striatum following 30 days of abstinence. Following 90 days of abstinence, however, levels of DA D1 receptors and DAT were not different from control values. Although these results indicate that there is eventual recovery of the separate elements of the DA system, they also highlight the dynamic nature of these components during the initial phases of abstinence from chronic cocaine self-administration. PMID:18769473

  15. Microdialysis study of striatal dopamine in MPTP-hemilesioned rats challenged with apomorphine and amphetamine.

    PubMed

    Dombrowski, Patricia Andreia; Carvalho, Milene Cristina; Miyoshi, Edmar; Correia, Diego; Bortolanza, Mariza; Dos Santos, Lucélia Mendes; Wietzikoski, Evellyn Claudia; Eckart, Moritz Thede; Schwarting, Rainer K W; Brandão, Marcus Lira; Da Cunha, Claudio

    2010-12-20

    Motor impairments of Parkinson's disease (PD) appear only after the loss of more than 70% of the DAergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). An earlier phase of this disease can be modeled in rats that received a unilateral infusion of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyrindine (MPTP) into the SNc. Though these animals do not present gross motor impairments, they rotate towards the lesioned side when challenged with DAergic drugs, like amphetamine and apomorphine. The present study aimed to test whether these effects occur because the drugs disrupt compensatory mechanisms that keep extracellular levels of dopamine in the striatum (DA(E)) unchanged. This hypothesis was tested by an in vivo microdialysis study in awake rats with two probes implanted in the right and left striatum. Undrugged rats did not present turning behaviour and their basal DA(E) did not differ between the lesioned and sham-lesioned sides. However, after apomorphine treatment, DA(E) decreased in both sides, but to a larger extent in the lesioned side at the time the animals started ipsiversive turning behaviour. After amphetamine challenge, DA(E) increased in both sides, becoming significantly higher in the non-lesioned side at the time the animals started ipsiversive turning behaviour. These results are in agreement with the hypothesis that absence of gross motor impairments in this rat model of early phase PD depends on maintenance of extracellular DA by mechanisms that may be disrupted by events demanding its alteration to higher or lower levels. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Sex differences, learning flexibility, and striatal dopamine D1 and D2 following adolescent drug exposure in rats

    PubMed Central

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Pozos, Hilda; De La Torre, Adrianna; DeShields, Simone; Cevallos, James; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Stolyarova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Corticostriatal circuitry supports flexible reward learning and emotional behavior from the critical neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence through adulthood. It is still poorly understood how prescription drug exposure in adolescence may impact these outcomes in the long-term. We studied adolescent methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) exposure in rats and their impact on learning and emotion in adulthood. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were administered MPH, FLX, or saline (SAL), and compared with methamphetamine (mAMPH) treatment beginning in postnatal day (PND) 37. The rats were then tested on discrimination and reversal learning in adulthood. In Experiment 2, animals were administered MPH or SAL also beginning in PND 37 and later tested in adulthood for anxiety levels. In Experiment 3, we analyzed striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptor expression in adulthood following either extensive learning (after Experiment 1) or more brief emotional measures (after Experiment 2). We found sex differences in discrimination learning and attenuated reversal learning after MPH and only sex differences in adulthood anxiety. In learners, there was enhanced striatal D1, but not D2, after either adolescent MPH or mAMPH. Lastly, also in learners, there was a sex x treatment group interaction for D2, but not D1, driven by the MPH-pretreated females, who expressed significantly higher D2 levels compared to SAL. These results show enduring effects of adolescent MPH on reversal learning in rats. Developmental psychostimulant exposure may interact with learning to enhance D1 expression in adulthood, and affect D2 expression in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:27091300

  17. Sex differences, learning flexibility, and striatal dopamine D1 and D2 following adolescent drug exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Pozos, Hilda; Torre, Adrianna De La; DeShields, Simone; Cevallos, James; Rodriguez, Jonathan; Stolyarova, Alexandra

    2016-07-15

    Corticostriatal circuitry supports flexible reward learning and emotional behavior from the critical neurodevelopmental stage of adolescence through adulthood. It is still poorly understood how prescription drug exposure in adolescence may impact these outcomes in the long-term. We studied adolescent methylphenidate (MPH) and fluoxetine (FLX) exposure in rats and their impact on learning and emotion in adulthood. In Experiment 1, male and female rats were administered MPH, FLX, or saline (SAL), and compared with methamphetamine (mAMPH) treatment beginning in postnatal day (PND) 37. The rats were then tested on discrimination and reversal learning in adulthood. In Experiment 2, animals were administered MPH or SAL also beginning in PND 37 and later tested in adulthood for anxiety levels. In Experiment 3, we analyzed striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptor expression in adulthood following either extensive learning (after Experiment 1) or more brief emotional measures (after Experiment 2). We found sex differences in discrimination learning and attenuated reversal learning after MPH and only sex differences in adulthood anxiety. In learners, there was enhanced striatal D1, but not D2, after either adolescent MPH or mAMPH. Lastly, also in learners, there was a sex x treatment group interaction for D2, but not D1, driven by the MPH-pretreated females, who expressed significantly higher D2 levels compared to SAL. These results show enduring effects of adolescent MPH on reversal learning in rats. Developmental psychostimulant exposure may interact with learning to enhance D1 expression in adulthood, and affect D2 expression in a sex-dependent manner. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Voluntary Exercise Improves Performance of a Discrimination Task through Effects on the Striatal Dopamine System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a…

  19. Voluntary Exercise Improves Performance of a Discrimination Task through Effects on the Striatal Dopamine System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Stansfield, Katherine J.; Green, John T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that voluntary exercise facilitates discrimination learning in a modified T-maze. There is evidence implicating the dorsolateral striatum (DLS) as the substrate for this task. The present experiments examined whether changes in DLS dopamine receptors might underlie the exercise-associated facilitation. Infusing a…

  20. Activation of GSK-3β and Caspase-3 Occurs in Nigral Dopamine Neurons during the Development of Apoptosis Activated by a Striatal Injection of 6-Hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Baltazar, Daniel; Mendoza-Garrido, Maria E.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease is essential for a better understanding of the pathological processes underlying the human disease and for the evaluation of promising therapeutic interventions. This work evaluated whether a single striatal injection of 6-OHDA causes progressive apoptosis of dopamine (DA) neurons and activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) and caspase-3 in the substantia nigra compacta (SNc). The loss of DA neurons was shown by three neuron markers; tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), NeuN, and β-III tubulin. Apoptosis activation was determined using Apostain and immunostaining against cleaved caspase-3 and GSK-3β pY216. We also explored the possibility that cleaved caspase-3 is produced by microglia and astrocytes. Our results showed that the 6-OHDA caused loss of nigral TH(+) cells, progressing mainly in rostrocaudal and lateromedial directions. In the neostriatum, a severe loss of TH(+) terminals occurred from day 3 after lesion. The disappearance of TH(+) cells was associated with a decrease in NeuN and β-III tubulin immunoreactivity and an increase in Apostain, cleaved caspase-3, and GSK-3β pY216 in the SNc. Apostain immunoreactivity was observed from days 3 to 21 postlesion. Increased levels of caspase-3 immunoreactivity in TH(+) cells were detected from days 1 to 15, and the levels then decreased to day 30 postlesion. The cleaved caspase-3 also collocated with microglia and astrocytes indicating its participation in glial activation. Our results suggest that caspase-3 and GSK-3β pY216 activation might participate in the DA cell death and that the active caspase-3 might also participate in the neuroinflammation caused by the striatal 6-OHDA injection. PMID:23940672

  1. Activation of GSK-3β and caspase-3 occurs in Nigral dopamine neurons during the development of apoptosis activated by a striatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Baltazar, Daniel; Mendoza-Garrido, Maria E; Martinez-Fong, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The 6-Hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease is essential for a better understanding of the pathological processes underlying the human disease and for the evaluation of promising therapeutic interventions. This work evaluated whether a single striatal injection of 6-OHDA causes progressive apoptosis of dopamine (DA) neurons and activation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) and caspase-3 in the substantia nigra compacta (SNc). The loss of DA neurons was shown by three neuron markers; tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), NeuN, and β-III tubulin. Apoptosis activation was determined using Apostain and immunostaining against cleaved caspase-3 and GSK-3β pY216. We also explored the possibility that cleaved caspase-3 is produced by microglia and astrocytes. Our results showed that the 6-OHDA caused loss of nigral TH(+) cells, progressing mainly in rostrocaudal and lateromedial directions. In the neostriatum, a severe loss of TH(+) terminals occurred from day 3 after lesion. The disappearance of TH(+) cells was associated with a decrease in NeuN and β-III tubulin immunoreactivity and an increase in Apostain, cleaved caspase-3, and GSK-3β pY216 in the SNc. Apostain immunoreactivity was observed from days 3 to 21 postlesion. Increased levels of caspase-3 immunoreactivity in TH(+) cells were detected from days 1 to 15, and the levels then decreased to day 30 postlesion. The cleaved caspase-3 also collocated with microglia and astrocytes indicating its participation in glial activation. Our results suggest that caspase-3 and GSK-3β pY216 activation might participate in the DA cell death and that the active caspase-3 might also participate in the neuroinflammation caused by the striatal 6-OHDA injection.

  2. Characterization of Optically and Electrically Evoked Dopamine Release in Striatal Slices from Digenic Knock-in Mice with DAT-Driven Expression of Channelrhodopsin

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FCV) is an established method to monitor increases in extracellular dopamine (DA) concentration ([DA]o) in the striatum, which is densely innervated by DA axons. Ex vivo brain slice preparations provide an opportunity to identify endogenous modulators of DA release. For these experiments, local electrical stimulation is often used to elicit release of DA, as well as other transmitters, in the striatal microcircuitry; changes in evoked increases in [DA]o after application of a pharmacological agent (e.g., a receptor antagonist) indicate a regulatory role for the transmitter system interrogated. Optogenetic methods that allow specific stimulation of DA axons provide a complementary, bottom-up approach for elucidating factors that regulate DA release. To this end, we have characterized DA release evoked by local electrical and optical stimulation in striatal slices from mice that genetically express a variant of channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2). Evoked increases in [DA]o in the dorsal and ventral striatum (dStr and vStr) were examined in a cross of a Cre-dependent ChR2 line (“Ai32” mice) with a DAT::Cre mouse line. In dStr, repeated optical pulse-train stimulation at the same recording site resulted in rundown of evoked [DA]o using heterozygous mice, which contrasted with the stability seen with electrical stimulation. Similar rundown was seen in the presence of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist, implicating the absence of concurrent nAChR activation in DA release instability in slices. Rundown with optical stimulation in dStr could be circumvented by recording from a population of sites, each stimulated only once. Same-site rundown was less pronounced with single-pulse stimulation, and a stable baseline could be attained. In vStr, stable optically evoked increases in [DA]o at single sites could be achieved using heterozygous mice, although with relatively low peak [DA]o. Low release could be overcome by using mice with a

  3. Greater Ethanol-Induced Locomotor Activation in DBA/2J versus C57BL/6J Mice Is Not Predicted by Presynaptic Striatal Dopamine Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Jamie H.; Calipari, Erin S.; Mathews, Tiffany A.; Jones, Sara R.

    2013-01-01

    A large body of research has aimed to determine the neurochemical factors driving differential sensitivity to ethanol between individuals in an attempt to find predictors of ethanol abuse vulnerability. Here we find that the locomotor activating effects of ethanol are markedly greater in DBA/2J compared to C57BL/6J mice, although it is unclear as to what neurochemical differences between strains mediate this behavior. Dopamine elevations in the nucleus accumbens and caudate-putamen regulate locomotor behavior for most drugs, including ethanol; thus, we aimed to determine if differences in these regions predict strain differences in ethanol-induced locomotor activity. Previous studies suggest that ethanol interacts with the dopamine transporter, potentially mediating its locomotor activating effects; however, we found that ethanol had no effects on dopamine uptake in either strain. Ex vivo voltammetry allows for the determination of ethanol effects on presynaptic dopamine terminals, independent of drug-induced changes in firing rates of afferent inputs from either dopamine neurons or other neurotransmitter systems. However, differences in striatal dopamine dynamics did not predict the locomotor-activating effects of ethanol, since the inhibitory effects of ethanol on dopamine release were similar between strains. There were differences in presynaptic dopamine function between strains, with faster dopamine clearance in the caudate-putamen of DBA/2J mice; however, it is unclear how this difference relates to locomotor behavior. Because of the role of the dopamine system in reinforcement and reward learning, differences in dopamine signaling between the strains could have implications for addiction-related behaviors that extend beyond ethanol effects in the striatum. PMID:24349553

  4. Role of purinergic P2X4 receptors in regulating striatal dopamine homeostasis and dependent behaviors.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Sheraz; Shah, Vivek; Garcia, Damaris; Asatryan, Liana; Jakowec, Michael W; Davies, Daryl L

    2016-10-01

    Purinergic P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) belong to the P2X superfamily of ion channels regulated by ATP. We recently demonstrated that P2X4R knockout (KO) mice exhibited deficits in sensorimotor gating, social interaction, and ethanol drinking behavior. Dopamine (DA) dysfunction may underlie these behavioral changes, but there is no direct evidence for P2X4Rs' role in DA neurotransmission. To test this hypothesis, we measured markers of DA function and dependent behaviors in P2X4R KO mice. P2X4R KO mice exhibited altered density of pre-synaptic markers including tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine transporter; post-synaptic markers including dopamine receptors and phosphorylation of downstream targets including dopamine and cyclic-AMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa and cyclic-AMP-response element binding protein in different parts of the striatum. Ivermectin, an allosteric modulator of P2X4Rs, significantly affected dopamine and cyclic AMP regulated phosphoprotein of 32 kDa and extracellular regulated kinase1/2 phosphorylation in the striatum. Sensorimotor gating deficits in P2X4R KO mice were rescued by DA antagonists. Using the 6-hydroxydopamine model of DA depletion, P2X4R KO mice exhibited an attenuated levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced motor behavior, whereas ivermectin enhanced this behavior. Collectively, these findings identified an important role for P2X4Rs in maintaining DA homeostasis and illustrate how this association is important for CNS functions including motor control and sensorimotor gating. We propose that P2X4 receptors (P2X4Rs) regulate dopamine (DA) homeostasis and associated behaviors. Pre-synaptic and post-synaptic DA markers were significantly altered in the dorsal and ventral striatum of P2X4R KO mice, implicating altered DA neurotransmission. Sensorimotor gating deficits in P2X4R KO mice were rescued by DA antagonists. Ivermectin (IVM), a positive modulator of P2X4Rs, enhanced levodopa (L-DOPA)-induced motor behavior. These studies highlight potential

  5. Western Diet Chow Consumption in Rats Induces Striatal Neuronal Activation While Reducing Dopamine Levels without Affecting Spatial Memory in the Radial Arm Maze

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Jason C. D.; Ali, Saher F.; Kosari, Sepideh; Woodman, Owen L.; Spencer, Sarah J.; Killcross, A. Simon; Jenkins, Trisha A.

    2017-01-01

    Rats fed high fat diets have been shown to be impaired in hippocampal-dependent behavioral tasks, such as spatial recognition in the Y-maze and reference memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). It is clear from previous studies, however, that motivation and reward factor into the memory deficits associated with obesity and high-fat diet consumption, and that the prefrontal cortex and striatum and neurotransmitter dopamine play important roles in cognitive performance. In this series of studies we extend our research to investigate the effect of a high fat diet on striatal neurochemistry and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task, a paradigm highly reliant on dopamine-rich brain regions, such as the striatum after high fat diet consumption. Memory performance, neuronal activation and brain dopaminergic levels were compared in rats fed a “Western” (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) chow diet compared to normal diet (6% fat, 0.15% cholesterol)-fed controls. Twelve weeks of dietary manipulation produced an increase in weight in western diet-fed rats, but did not affect learning and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task. Concurrently, there was an observed decrease in dopamine levels in the striatum and a reduction of dopamine turnover in the hippocampus in western diet-fed rats. In a separate cohort of rats Fos levels were measured after rats had been placed in a novel arena and allowed to explore freely. In normal rats, this exposure to a unique environment did not affect neuronal activation. In contrast, rats fed a western diet were found to have significantly increased Fos expression in the striatum, but not prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. Our study demonstrates that while western diet consumption in rats produces weight gain and brain neuronal and neurotransmitter changes, it did not affect performance in the delayed spatial win-shift paradigm in the radial arm maze. We conclude that modeling the cognitive

  6. Western Diet Chow Consumption in Rats Induces Striatal Neuronal Activation While Reducing Dopamine Levels without Affecting Spatial Memory in the Radial Arm Maze.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Jason C D; Ali, Saher F; Kosari, Sepideh; Woodman, Owen L; Spencer, Sarah J; Killcross, A Simon; Jenkins, Trisha A

    2017-01-01

    Rats fed high fat diets have been shown to be impaired in hippocampal-dependent behavioral tasks, such as spatial recognition in the Y-maze and reference memory in the Morris water maze (MWM). It is clear from previous studies, however, that motivation and reward factor into the memory deficits associated with obesity and high-fat diet consumption, and that the prefrontal cortex and striatum and neurotransmitter dopamine play important roles in cognitive performance. In this series of studies we extend our research to investigate the effect of a high fat diet on striatal neurochemistry and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task, a paradigm highly reliant on dopamine-rich brain regions, such as the striatum after high fat diet consumption. Memory performance, neuronal activation and brain dopaminergic levels were compared in rats fed a "Western" (21% fat, 0.15% cholesterol) chow diet compared to normal diet (6% fat, 0.15% cholesterol)-fed controls. Twelve weeks of dietary manipulation produced an increase in weight in western diet-fed rats, but did not affect learning and performance in the delayed spatial win-shift radial arm maze task. Concurrently, there was an observed decrease in dopamine levels in the striatum and a reduction of dopamine turnover in the hippocampus in western diet-fed rats. In a separate cohort of rats Fos levels were measured after rats had been placed in a novel arena and allowed to explore freely. In normal rats, this exposure to a unique environment did not affect neuronal activation. In contrast, rats fed a western diet were found to have significantly increased Fos expression in the striatum, but not prefrontal cortex or hippocampus. Our study demonstrates that while western diet consumption in rats produces weight gain and brain neuronal and neurotransmitter changes, it did not affect performance in the delayed spatial win-shift paradigm in the radial arm maze. We conclude that modeling the cognitive decline

  7. Striatal dopamine modulates song spectral but not temporal features through D1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Leblois, Arthur; Perkel, David J

    2012-01-01

    The activity of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and their projection to the basal ganglia (BG) are thought to play a critical role in the acquisition of motor skills through reinforcement learning, as well as in the expression of learned motor behaviors. The precise role of BG dopamine in mediating and modulating motor performance and learning, however, remains unclear. In songbirds, a specialized portion of the BG is responsible for song learning and plasticity. Previously we found that dopamine acts on D1 receptors in Area X to modulate the BG output signal and thereby trigger changes in song variability. Here, we investigate the effect of D1 receptor blockade in the BG on song behavior in the zebra finch. We report that this manipulation abolishes social context-dependent changes in variability not only in harmonic stacks, but also in other types of syllables. However, song timing seems not to be modulated by this BG dopamine signal. Indeed, injections of a D1 antagonist in the BG altered neither song duration, nor the change of song duration with social context. Finally, D1 receptor activation in the BG was not necessary for the modulation of other features of song such as the number of introductory notes or motif repetitions. Together, our results suggest that activation of D1 receptors in the BG is necessary for the modulation of fine acoustic features of song with social context while it is not involved in the regulation of song timing and structure at a larger time scale. PMID:22594943

  8. Spine Pruning Drives Antipsychotic-sensitive Locomotion via Circuit Control of Striatal Dopamine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il Hwan; Rossi, Mark A.; Aryal, Dipendra K.; Racz, Bence; Kim, Namsoo; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Wang, Fan; Wetsel, William C.; Weinberg, Richard J.; Yin, Henry; Soderling, Scott H.

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders may arise from anomalies in long-range neuronal connectivity downstream of pathologies in dendritic spines. However, the mechanisms that may link spine pathology to circuit abnormalities relevant to atypical behavior remain unknown. Using a mouse model to conditionally disrupt a critical regulator of the dendritic spine cytoskeleton, Arp2/3, we report here a molecular mechanism that unexpectedly reveals the interrelationship of progressive spine pruning, elevated frontal cortical excitation of pyramidal neurons, and striatal hyperdopaminergia within a cortical-to-midbrain circuit abnormality. The main symptomatic manifestations of this circuit abnormality are psychomotor agitation and stereotypical behaviors, which are relieved by antipsychotics. Moreover, antipsychotic-responsive locomotion can be directly mimicked in wildtype mice by optogenetic activation of this circuit. Collectively these results reveal molecular and neural-circuit mechanisms, illustrating how diverse pathologies may converge to drive behaviors relevant to psychiatric disorders. PMID:25938885

  9. Spine pruning drives antipsychotic-sensitive locomotion via circuit control of striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il Hwan; Rossi, Mark A; Aryal, Dipendra K; Racz, Bence; Kim, Namsoo; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Wang, Fan; Wetsel, William C; Weinberg, Richard J; Yin, Henry; Soderling, Scott H

    2015-06-01

    Psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders may arise from anomalies in long-range neuronal connectivity downstream of pathologies in dendritic spines. However, the mechanisms that may link spine pathology to circuit abnormalities relevant to atypical behavior remain unknown. Using a mouse model to conditionally disrupt a critical regulator of the dendritic spine cytoskeleton, the actin-related protein 2/3 complex (Arp2/3), we report here a molecular mechanism that unexpectedly reveals the inter-relationship of progressive spine pruning, elevated frontal cortical excitation of pyramidal neurons and striatal hyperdopaminergia in a cortical-to-midbrain circuit abnormality. The main symptomatic manifestations of this circuit abnormality are psychomotor agitation and stereotypical behaviors, which are relieved by antipsychotics. Moreover, this antipsychotic-responsive locomotion can be mimicked in wild-type mice by optogenetic activation of this circuit. Collectively these results reveal molecular and neural-circuit mechanisms, illustrating how diverse pathologies may converge to drive behaviors relevant to psychiatric disorders.

  10. Striatal plasticity in parkinsonism: dystrophic changes in medium spiny neurons and progression in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Deutch, A Y

    2006-01-01

    Striatal dopamine loss in Parkinson's Disease (PD) sets into play a variety of compensatory responses to help counter dopamine depletion. Most of these changes involve surviving dopamine neurons, but there are also changes in striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs), which are the major target of dopamine axons. Among these changes are decreases in MSN dendritic length and spine density, which may dampen excessive corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto MSNs that occurs secondary to dopamine loss. An increasing knowledge of dendritic changes in PD suggests strategies for tracking progressive worsening of symptoms and is opening new ideas on novel therapeutic strategies for PD.

  11. The effects of gestational and chronic atrazine exposure on motor behaviors and striatal dopamine in male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Walters, Jennifer L; Lansdell, Theresa A; Lookingland, Keith J; Baker, Lisa E

    2015-12-01

    This study sought to investigate the effects of environmentally relevant gestational followed by continued chronic exposure to the herbicide, atrazine, on motor function, cognition, and neurochemical indices of nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) activity in male rats. Dams were treated with 100 μg/kg atrazine, 10mg/kg atrazine, or vehicle on gestational day 1 through postnatal day 21. Upon weaning, male offspring continued daily vehicle or atrazine gavage treatments for an additional six months. Subjects were tested in a series of behavioral assays, and 24h after the last treatment, tissue samples from the striatum were analyzed for DA and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC). At 10mg/kg, this herbicide was found to produce modest disruptions in motor functioning, and at both dose levels it significantly lowered striatal DA and DOPAC concentrations. These results suggest that exposures to atrazine have the potential to disrupt nigrostriatal DA neurons and behaviors associated with motor functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Striatal Signaling in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia: Common Mechanisms with Drug Abuse and Long Term Memory Involving D1 Dopamine Receptor Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Murer, Mario Gustavo; Moratalla, Rosario

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the degeneration of midbrain substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons that project to the striatum. Despite extensive investigation aimed at finding new therapeutic approaches, the dopamine precursor molecule, 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine (l-DOPA), remains the most effective and commonly used treatment. However, chronic treatment and disease progression lead to changes in the brain’s response to l-DOPA, resulting in decreased therapeutic effect and the appearance of dyskinesias. l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID) interferes significantly with normal motor activity and persists unless l-DOPA dosages are reduced to below therapeutic levels. Thus, controlling LID is one of the major challenges in Parkinson’s disease therapy. LID is the result of intermittent stimulation of supersensitive D1 dopamine receptors located in the very severely denervated striatal neurons. Through increased coupling to Gαolf, resulting in greater stimulation of adenylyl-cyclase, D1 receptors phosphorylate DARPP-32, and other protein kinase A targets. Moreover, D1 receptor stimulation activates extracellular signal-regulated kinase and triggers a signaling pathway involving mammalian target for rapamycin and modifications of histones that results in changes in translation, chromatin modification, and gene transcription. In turn, sensitization of D1 receptor signaling causes a widespread increase in the metabolic response to D1 agonists and changes in the activity of basal ganglia neurons that correlate with the severity of LID. Importantly, different studies suggest that dyskinesias may share mechanisms with drug abuse and long term memory involving D1 receptor activation. Here we review evidence implicating D1 receptor signaling in the genesis of LID, analyze mechanisms that may translate enhanced D1 signaling into dyskinetic movements, and discuss the possibility that the mechanisms underlying LID are not unique to the

  13. The effects of endomorphins and diprotin A on striatal dopamine release induced by electrical stimulation-an in vitro superfusion study in rats.

    PubMed

    Bagosi, Zsolt; Jászberényi, Miklós; Bujdosó, Erika; Szabó, Gyula; Telegdy, Gyula

    2006-12-01

    The endomorphins (EM1: Tyr-Pro-Trp-Phe-NH2, and EM2: Tyr-Pro-Phe-Phe-NH2) are recently discovered endogenous ligands for mu-opioid receptors (MORs) with role of neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in mammals. Cessation of their physiological action may be effected through rapid enzymatic degradation by the dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) found in the brain synaptic membranes. An in vitro superfusion system was utilized to investigate the actions of EM1, EM2 and specific DPPIV inhibitor diprotin A on the striatal release of dopamine (DA) induced by electrical stimulation in rats. The involvement of the different MORs (MOR1 and MOR2) in this process was studied by pretreatment with MOR antagonists beta-funaltrexamine (a MOR1 and MOR2 antagonist) and naloxonazine (a MOR1 antagonist). EM1 significantly increased the tritium-labelled dopamine DA release induced by electrical stimulation. EM2 was effective only when the slices were pretreated with diprotin A. beta-Funaltrexamine antagonized the stimulatory effects of both EM1 and EM2. The administration of naloxonazine did not appreciably influence the action of EM1, but blocked the action of EM2, at least when the slices were pretreated with diprotin A. These data suggest that both EM1 and EM2 increase DA release from the striatum and, though diprotin A does not affect the action of EM1, it inhibits the enzymatic degradation of EM2. The DA-stimulating action induced by EM1 seems to be mediated by MOR2, while that evoked by EM2 appears to be transmitted by MOR1.

  14. Evaluation of the effects and mechanisms of action of glufosinate, an organophosphate insecticide, on striatal dopamine release by using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Nunes, Brenda V; Durán, Rafael; Alfonso, Miguel; de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Ferreira Faro, Lilian R

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present work was to assess the effects of glufosinate ammonium (GLA), an aminoacid structurally related to glutamate, on in vivo dopamine (DA) release from rat striatum, using brain microdialysis coupled to HPLC-EC. Intrastriatal administration of GLA produced significant concentration-dependent increases in DA levels. At least two mechanisms can be proposed to explain these increases: GLA could be inducing DA release from synaptic vesicles or producing an inhibition of DA transporter (DAT). Thus, we investigated the effects of GLA under Ca(++)-free condition, and after pretreatment with reserpine and TTX. It was observed that the pretreatment with Ca(++)-free Ringer, reserpine or TTX significantly reduced the DA release induced by GLA. Coinfusion of GLA and nomifensine shows that the GLA-induced DA release did not involve the DAT. These results show that GLA-induced striatal DA release is probably mediated by an exocytotic-, Ca(++)-, action potential-dependent mechanism, being independent of DAT.

  15. MR-PET image coregistration for quantitation of striatal dopamine D{sub 2} receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.J.; Volkow, N.D.; Levy, A.V.

    1996-05-01

    Our goal was to assess the utility of MR-PET image coregistration to quantify dopamine D{sub 2} receptors in striatum. Twenty-nine normal subjects were investigated with PET and [{sup 11}C]raclopride and with MRI. D{sub 2} receptors were quantified using the ratio of the distribution volume in striatum to that in cerebellum. Measures obtained using regions selected directly from the PET images were compared with those obtained from MR images and then projected to coregistered PET images. There were no differences between measures selected from the PET images (3.9 {+-} 0.5) and those from the MR images (3.9 {+-} 0.65). The values for these two measures were significantly correlated and corresponded to r = 0.9, P < 0.0001. Regions of interest selected directly from PET images, where there is a large contrast between the region of interest and background, as for the case of dopamine D{sub 2} ligands, are almost identical to those obtained from coregistered MR images. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A role for D1 dopamine receptors in striatal methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Friend, Danielle M; Keefe, Kristen A

    2013-10-25

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure results in long-term damage to the dopamine system in both human METH abusers and animal models. One factor that has been heavily implicated in this METH-induced damage to the dopaminergic system is the activation of D1 dopamine (DA) receptors. However, a significant caveat to the studies investigating the role of the receptor in such toxicity is that genetic and pharmacological manipulations of the D1 DA receptor also mitigate METH-induced hyperthermia. Importantly, METH-induced hyperthermia is tightly associated with the neurotoxicity, such that simply cooling animals during METH exposure protects against the neurotoxicity. Therefore, it is difficult to determine whether D1 DA receptors per se play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity or whether the protection observed simply resulted from a mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. To answer this important question, the current study infused a D1 DA receptor antagonist into striatum during METH exposure while controlling for METH-induced hyperthermia. Here we found that even when METH-induced hyperthermia is maintained, the coadministration of a D1 DA receptor antagonist protects against METH-induced neurotoxicity, strongly suggesting that D1 DA receptors play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity apart from the mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Role for D1 Dopamine Receptors in Striatal Methamphetamine-Induced Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Friend, Danielle M.; Keefe, Kristen A.

    2015-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) exposure results in long-term damage to the dopamine system in both human METH abusers and animal models. One factor that has been heavily implicated in this METH-induced damage to the dopaminergic system is the activation of D1 Dopamine (DA) receptors. However, a significant caveat to the studies investigating the role of the receptor in such toxicity is that genetic and pharmacological manipulations of the D1 DA receptor also mitigate METH-induced hyperthermia. Importantly, METH-induced hyperthermia is tightly associated with the neurotoxicity, such that simply cooling animals during METH exposure protects against the neurotoxicity. Therefore, it is difficult to determine whether D1 DA receptors per se play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity or whether the protection observed simply resulted from a mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. To answer this important question, the current study infused a D1 DA receptor antagonist into striatum during METH exposure while controlling for METH-induced hyperthermia. Here we found that even when METH-induced hyperthermia is maintained, the coadministration of a D1 DA receptor antagonist protects against METH-induced neurotoxicity, strongly suggesting that D1 DA receptors play an important role in METH-induced neurotoxicity apart from the mitigation of METH-induced hyperthermia. PMID:23994061

  18. Reduced striatal dopamine transmission in REM sleep behavior disorder comorbid with depression.

    PubMed

    Wing, Yun Kwok; Lam, Siu Ping; Zhang, Jihui; Leung, Eric; Ho, Chi Lai; Chen, Sirong; Cheung, Man Ki; Li, Shirley Xin; Chan, Joey Wing Yan; Mok, Vincent; Tsoh, Joshua; Chan, Anne; Ho, Crover Kwok Wah

    2015-02-03

    To investigate dopamine transmission in patients with comorbid REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD) and major depressive disorder (MDD). This is a case-control study including 11 medicated patients with comorbid RBD and MDD (mean age 47.5 ± 8.2), 8 medicated patients with MDD only (mean age 47.9 ± 8.4), and 10 healthy participants (mean age 46.5 ± 10.6 years). They underwent clinical assessment, video-polysomnography, olfactory tests, and neuroimaging studies ((18)F-DOPA, (11)C-raclopride, and (18)F-FDG PET neuroimaging). Compared with the 2 control groups, patients with comorbid RBD and MDD had significantly lower (18)F-DOPA uptake at 60 minutes in the putamen and caudate after controlling for age and sex effect (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences for the (11)C-raclopride and (18)F-FDG-PET. The (18)F-DOPA uptake in putamens had significant inverse correlation with severity of RBD symptoms (p < 0.01) and REM-related tonic muscle activity (p < 0.01). The comorbid RBD and MDD group had more impairment in olfactory function. Patients with comorbid RBD and MDD had presynaptic dopamine dysfunction and impaired olfactory function. There is a distinct possibility that the development of RBD symptoms among patients with MDD may represent an early phase of α-synucleinopathy neurodegeneration instead of a merely antidepressant-induced condition. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Sex differences in striatal dopamine release in young adults after oral alcohol challenge: a PET imaging study with [11C]raclopride

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Nina B.L.; Kegeles, Lawrence S.; Slifstein, Mark; Xu, Xiaoyan; Martinez, Diana; Sakr, Ehab; Castillo, Felipe; Moadel, Tiffany; O’Malley, Stephanie S.; Krystal, John H.; Abi-Dargham, Anissa

    2010-01-01

    Objectives We used a Positron Emission Tomography (PET) paradigm with the D2/3 radiotracer [11C]raclopride and an alcohol challenge to examine the magnitude of alcohol induced dopamine release and compare it between young men and women. Methods Twenty-one non-alcohol dependent young social drinkers completed two PET scans on separate days following ingestion of a juice mix containing either ethanol (0.75 mg/kg body water) or trace ethanol only. The extent of dopamine released after alcohol was estimated by the percent difference in [11C]raclopride binding potential (ΔBPND) between days. Results Alcohol administration significantly displaced [11C]raclopride in all striatal subregions indicating dopamine release, with the largest effect observed in the ventral striatum. Linear mixed model analysis across all striatal subregions of regional ΔBPND with region of interest as repeated measure showed a highly significant effect of sex (p < 0.001). Ventrostriatal dopamine release in men, but not in women, showed a significant positive correlation to alcohol-induced measures of subjective activation. Furthermore, we found a significant negative correlation between the frequency of maximum alcohol consumption per 24 hours and ventrostriatal ΔBPND (r=0.739, p=0.009) in men. Conclusions This study provides definitive evidence that oral alcohol induces dopamine release in non-alcoholic human subjects, and shows sex differences in the magnitude of this effect. The ability of alcohol to stimulate dopamine release may contribute to its rewarding effects and, thereby, to its abuse liability in humans. Our report further suggests several biological mechanisms that may mediate the difference in vulnerability for alcoholism between men and women. PMID:20678752

  20. The presence of cortical neurons in striatal-cortical co-cultures alters the effects of dopamine and BDNF on medium spiny neuron dendritic development

    PubMed Central

    Penrod, Rachel D.; Campagna, Justin; Panneck, Travis; Preese, Laura; Lanier, Lorene M.

    2015-01-01

    Medium spiny neurons (MSNs) are the major striatal neuron and receive synaptic input from both glutamatergic and dopaminergic afferents. These synapses are made on MSN dendritic spines, which undergo density and morphology changes in association with numerous disease and experience-dependent states. Despite wide interest in the structure and function of mature MSNs, relatively little is known about MSN development. Furthermore, most in vitro studies of MSN development have been done in simple striatal cultures that lack any type of non-autologous synaptic input, leaving open the question of how MSN development is affected by a complex environment that includes other types of neurons, glia, and accompanying secreted and cell-associated cues. Here we characterize the development of MSNs in striatal-cortical co-culture, including quantitative morphological analysis of dendritic arborization and spine development, describing progressive changes in density and morphology of developing spines. Overall, MSN growth is much more robust in the striatal-cortical co-culture compared to striatal mono-culture. Inclusion of dopamine (DA) in the co-culture further enhances MSN dendritic arborization and spine density, but the effects of DA on dendritic branching are only significant at later times in development. In contrast, exogenous Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) has only a minimal effect on MSN development in the co-culture, but significantly enhances MSN dendritic arborization in striatal mono-culture. Importantly, inhibition of NMDA receptors in the co-culture significantly enhances the effect of exogenous BDNF, suggesting that the efficacy of BDNF depends on the cellular environment. Combined, these studies identify specific periods of MSN development that may be particularly sensitive to perturbation by external factors and demonstrate the importance of studying MSN development in a complex signaling environment. PMID:26257605

  1. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease.

    PubMed

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms.

  2. Circadian influences on dopamine circuits of the brain: regulation of striatal rhythms of clock gene expression and implications for psychopathology and disease

    PubMed Central

    Verwey, Michael; Dhir, Sabine; Amir, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clock proteins form an autoregulatory feedback loop that is central to the endogenous generation and transmission of daily rhythms in behavior and physiology. Increasingly, circadian rhythms in clock gene expression are being reported in diverse tissues and brain regions that lie outside of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian clock in mammals. For many of these extra-SCN rhythms, however, the region-specific implications are still emerging. In order to gain important insights into the potential behavioral, physiological, and psychological relevance of these daily oscillations, researchers have begun to focus on describing the neurochemical, hormonal, metabolic, and epigenetic contributions to the regulation of these rhythms. This review will highlight important sites and sources of circadian control within dopaminergic and striatal circuitries of the brain and will discuss potential implications for psychopathology and disease . For example, rhythms in clock gene expression in the dorsal striatum are sensitive to changes in dopamine release, which has potential implications for Parkinson’s disease and drug addiction. Rhythms in the ventral striatum and limbic forebrain are sensitive to psychological and physical stressors, which may have implications for major depressive disorder. Collectively, a rich circadian tapestry has emerged that forces us to expand traditional views and to reconsider the psychopathological, behavioral, and physiological importance of these region-specific rhythms in brain areas that are not immediately linked with the regulation of circadian rhythms. PMID:27635233

  3. Striatal dopamine transporter binding for predicting the development of delayed neuropsychological sequelae in suicide attempters by carbon monoxide poisoning: A SPECT study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chun; Ku, Hsiao-Lun; Wu, Chia-Liang; Wang, Shyh-Jen; Yang, Chen-Chang; Deng, Jou-Fang; Lee, Ming-Been; Chou, Yuan-Hwa

    2011-12-30

    Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP) after charcoal burning results in delayed neuropsychological sequelae (DNS), which show clinical resemblance to Parkinson's disease, without adequate predictors at present. This study examined the role of dopamine transporter (DAT) binding for the prediction of DNS. Twenty-seven suicide attempters with COP were recruited. Seven of them developed DNS, while the remainder did not. The striatal DAT binding was measured by single photon emission computed tomography with (99m)Tc-TRODAT. The specific uptake ratio was derived based on a ratio equilibrium model. Using a logistic regression model, multiple clinical variables were examined as potential predictors for DNS. COP patients with DNS had a lower binding on left striatal DAT binding than patients without DNS. Logistic regression analysis showed that a combination of initial loss of consciousness and lower left striatal DAT binding predicted the development of DNS. Our data indicate that the left striatal DAT binding could help to predict the development of DNS. This finding not only demonstrates the feasibility of brain imaging techniques for predicting the development of DNS but will also help clinicians to improve the quality of care for COP patients. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. IBZM SPECT imaging of striatal dopamine-2 receptors in psychotic patients treated with the novel antipsychotic substance quetiapine in comparison to clozapine and haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Küfferle, B; Tauscher, J; Asenbaum, S; Vesely, C; Podreka, I; Brücke, T; Kasper, S

    1997-10-01

    We investigated the striatal dopamine-2 (D2) receptor occupancy caused by different antipsychotic substances in 18 psychotic patients (16 with schizophrenic and two with schizoaffective disorder according to DSM-IV) with single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using 123I-iodobenzamide (IBZM) as tracer substance. Four patients were treated with the novel antipsychotic compound quetiapine (300-700 mg/day), six with clozapine (300-600 mg/ day) and eight with haloperidol (10-20 mg/day). They were compared with eight healthy controls. Measurement of S/F ratios and consecutive calculation of D2 receptor occupancy revealed a significantly lower striatal D2 occupancy rate with quetiapine and clozapine in comparison to haloperidol. In correspondence with the low striatal D2 receptor occupancy rates and again in contrast to the haloperidol treatment group, there were no extrapyramidal motor side-effects (EPS) in the quetiapine and clozapine treatment groups. Therefore, the reported data support the position that quetiapine can be considered to be an atypical antipsychotic substance due to its relatively weak striatal D2 receptor blocking property and therefore its low propensity to induce EPS.

  5. Glutamine triggers long-lasting increase in striatal network activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, Wiebke; Theiss, Stephan; Schnitzler, Alfons; Sergeeva, Olga

    2017-04-01

    Accumulation of ammonium and glutamine in blood and brain is a key factor in hepatic encephalopathy (HE) - a neuropsychiatric syndrome characterized by various cognitive and motor deficits. MRI imaging identified abnormalities notably in the basal ganglia of HE patients, including its major input station, the striatum. While neurotoxic effects of ammonia have been extensively studied, glutamine is primarily perceived as "detoxified" form of ammonia. We applied ammonium and glutamine to striatal and cortical cells from newborn rats cultured on microelectrode arrays. Glutamine, but not ammonium significantly increased spontaneous spike rate with a long-lasting excitation outlasting washout. This effect was more prominent in striatal than in cortical cultures. Calcium imaging revealed that glutamine application caused a rise in intracellular calcium that depended both on system A amino acid transport and activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. This pointed to downstream glutamate release that was triggered by intracellular glutamine. Using an enzymatic assay kit we confirmed glutamine-provoked glutamate release from striatal cells. Real-time PCR and immunocytochemistry demonstrated the presence of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2) necessary for synaptic glutamate release in striatal neurons. We conclude that extracellular glutamine is taken up by neurons, triggers synaptic release of glutamate which is then taken up by astrocytes and again converted to glutamine. This feedback-loop causes a sustained long-lasting excitation of network activity. Thus, apart from ammonia also its "detoxified" form glutamine might be responsible for the neuropsychiatric symptoms in HE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Spike-dependent intrinsic plasticity increases firing probability in rat striatal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Séverine; Casassus, Guillaume; Mulle, Christophe; Charpier, Stéphane

    2003-08-01

    The collision of pre- and postsynaptic activity is known to provide a trigger for controlling the gain of synaptic transmission between neurons. Here, using in vivo intracellular recordings of rat striatal output neurons, we analyse the effect of a single action potential, generated by ongoing synaptic activity, on subsequent excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex. This pairing induced a short-term increase in the probability that cortically evoked EPSPs caused striatal cells to fire. This enhanced EPSP-spike coupling was associated with a decrease in the voltage firing threshold with no apparent change in the synaptic strength itself. Antidromic action potentials in striatal cells were also able to induce the facilitation while subthreshold EPSPs were ineffective, indicating that the postsynaptic spike was necessary and sufficient for the induction of the plasticity. A prior spontaneous action potential also enhanced the probability with which directly applied current pulses elicited firing, suggesting that the facilitation originated from changes in the intrinsic electrical properties of the postsynaptic cell. Using whole-cell recordings in cortico-striatal slices, we found that the increase in membrane excitability as well as in EPSP-spike coupling was abolished by low concentration of 4-aminopyridine. This suggests that the intrinsic plasticity results from a time-dependent modulation of a striatal voltage-dependent potassium current available close to the firing threshold. Action potentials thus provide a postsynaptic signal, not only for associative synaptic plasticity but also for activity-dependent intrinsic plasticity, which directly controls the efficacy of coupling between pre- and postsynaptic neurons.

  7. Spike-Dependent Intrinsic Plasticity Increases Firing Probability in Rat Striatal Neurons In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Séverine; Casassus, Guillaume; Mulle, Christophe; Charpier, Stéphane

    2003-01-01

    The collision of pre- and postynaptic activity is known to provide a trigger for controlling the gain of synaptic transmission between neurons. Here, using in vivo intracellular recordings of rat striatal output neurons, we analyse the effect of a single action potential, generated by ongoing synaptic activity, on subsequent excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) evoked by electrical stimulation of the cerebral cortex. This pairing induced a short-term increase in the probability that cortically evoked EPSPs caused striatal cells to fire. This enhanced EPSP-spike coupling was associated with a decrease in the voltage firing threshold with no apparent change in the synaptic strength itself. Antidromic action potentials in striatal cells were also able to induce the facilitation while subthreshold EPSPs were ineffective, indicating that the postsynaptic spike was necessary and sufficient for the induction of the plasticity. A prior spontaneous action potential also enhanced the probability with which directly applied current pulses elicited firing, suggesting that the facilitation originated from changes in the intrinsic electrical properties of the postsynaptic cell. Using whole-cell recordings in cortico-striatal slices, we found that the increase in membrane excitability as well as in EPSP-spike coupling was abolished by low concentration of 4-aminopyridine. This suggests that the intrinsic plasticity results from a time-dependent modulation of a striatal voltage-dependent potassium current available close to the firing threshold. Action potentials thus provide a postsynaptic signal, not only for associative synaptic plasticity but also for activity-dependent intrinsic plasticity, which directly controls the efficacy of coupling between pre- and postsynaptic neurons. PMID:12844508

  8. Single versus multiple impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease: an ¹¹C-raclopride positron emission tomography study of reward cue-evoked striatal dopamine release.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kit; Politis, Marios; O'Sullivan, Sean S; Lawrence, Andrew D; Warsi, Sarah; Bose, Subrata; Lees, Andrew J; Piccini, Paola

    2015-06-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs) are reported in Parkinson's disease (PD) in association with dopaminergic treatment. Approximately 25 % of patients with ICDs have multiple co-occurring ICDs (i.e. more than one diagnosed ICD). The extent to which dopaminergic neurotransmission in PD patients with multiple ICDs differs from those with only one diagnosed ICD is unknown. The aims of this study are: (1) to investigate dopamine neurotransmission in PD patients diagnosed with multiple ICDs, single ICDs and non-ICD controls in response to reward-related visual cues using positron emission tomography with (11)C-raclopride. (2) to compare clinical features of the above three groups. PD individuals with mulitple ICDs (n = 10), single ICD (n = 7) and no ICDs (n = 9) were recruited and underwent two positron emission tomography (PET) scans with (11)C-raclopride: one where they viewed neutral visual cues and the other where they viewed a range of visual cues related to different rewards. Individuals with both multiple ICDs and single ICDs showed significantly greater ventral striatal dopamine release compared to non-ICD PD individuals in response to reward cues, but the two ICD groups did not differ from each other in the extent of dopamine release. Subjects with multiple ICDs were, however, significantly more depressed, and had higher levels of impulsive sensation-seeking compared to subjects with single ICDs and without ICDs. This is the first study to compare dopamine neurotransmission using PET neuroimaging in PD subjects with multiple vs. single ICDs. Our results suggest that striatal dopamine neurotransmission is not directly related to the co-occurrence of ICDs in PD, potentially implicating non-dopaminergic mechanisms linked to depression; and suggest that physicians should be vigilant in managing depression in PD patients with ICDs.

  9. Striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor-mediated neurotransmission in major depression: Implications for anhedonia, anxiety and treatment response.

    PubMed

    Peciña, Marta; Sikora, Magdalena; Avery, Erich T; Heffernan, Joseph; Peciña, Susana; Mickey, Brian J; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2017-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission within the brain's reward circuit has been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and in both, cognitive and pharmacological mechanisms of treatment response. Still, a direct relationship between measures of DA neurotransmission and reward-related deficits in patients with depression has not been demonstrated. To gain insight into the symptom-specific alterations in the DA system in patients with depression, we used positron emission tomography (PET) and the D2/3 receptor-selective radiotracer [(11)C]raclopride in twenty-three non-smoking un-medicated Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) patients and sixteen healthy controls (HC). We investigated the relationship between D2/3 receptor availability and baseline measures of depression severity, anxiety, anhedonia, and cognitive and pharmacological mechanisms of treatment response. We found that, compared to controls, patients with depression showed greater D2/3 receptor availability in several striatal regions, including the bilateral ventral pallidum/nucleus accumbens (vPAL/NAc), and the right ventral caudate and putamen. In the depressed sample, D2/3 receptor availability in the caudal portion of the ventral striatum (NAc/vPAL) correlated with higher anxiety symptoms, whereas D2/3 receptor availability in the rostral area of the ventral striatum correlated negatively with the severity of motivational anhedonia. Finally, MDD non-remitters showed greater baseline anxiety, greater D2/3 availability in the NAc/vPAL, and greater placebo-induced DA release in the bilateral NAc. Our results demonstrate abnormally high D2/3 receptor availability in the ventral striatum of patients with MDD, which seem to be associated with comorbid anxiety symptoms and lack of response to antidepressants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Reversal-specific learning impairments after a binge regimen of methamphetamine in rats: possible involvement of striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Belcher, Annabelle M; Scott, Lori; Cazares, Victor A; Chen, Jack; O'Dell, Steven J; Malvaez, Melissa; Wu, Tiffany; Marshall, John F

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that protracted use of methamphetamine (mAMPH) causes long-term impairments in cognitive function in humans. Aside from the widely reported problems with attention, mAMPH users exhibit learning and memory deficits, particularly on tasks requiring response control. Although binge mAMPH administration to animals results in cognitive deficits, few studies have attempted to test behavioral flexibility in animals after mAMPH exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether mAMPH would produce impairments in two tasks assessing flexible responding in rats: a touchscreen-based discrimination-reversal learning task and an attentional set shift task (ASST) based on a hallmark test of executive function in humans, the Wisconsin Card Sort. We treated male Long-Evans rats with a regimen of four injections of 2 mg/kg mAMPH (or vehicle) within a single day, a dosing regimen shown earlier to produce object recognition impairments. We then tested them on (1) reversal learning after pretreatment discrimination learning or (2) the ASST. Early reversal learning accuracy was impaired in mAMPH-treated rats. MAMPH pretreatment also selectively impaired reversal performance during ASST testing, leaving set-shifting performance intact. Postmortem analysis of [(125)I]RTI-55 binding revealed small (10-20%) but significant reductions in striatal dopamine transporters produced by this mAMPH regimen. Together, these results lend new information to the growing field documenting impaired cognition after mAMPH exposure, and constitute a rat model of the widely reported decision-making deficits resulting from mAMPH abuse seen in humans.

  11. Striatal dopamine D(2) receptor availability in OCD with and without comorbid social anxiety disorder: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Schneier, Franklin R; Martinez, Diana; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Zea-Ponce, Yolanda; Simpson, H Blair; Liebowitz, Michael R; Laruelle, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Dopamine D(2) receptor availability in the striatum has been reported to be low in generalized social anxiety disorder (GSAD) and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), but it has not been studied in persons with comorbid OCD and GSAD (OCD+GSAD). D(2) receptor availability was assessed in 7 subjects with OCD+GSAD, 8 with OCD, and 7 matched healthy comparison (HC) subjects, all unmedicated adults. D(2) receptor availability was assessed with single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) to measure binding potential (BP) of the D(2) receptor radiotracer [(123)I] iodobenzamide ([(123)I]IBZM). Mean striatal [(123)I]IBZM BP was significantly lower in the OCD+GSAD group (72.58 mL/g, SD=18.17) than in the HC group (118.41 mL/g, SD=45.40; P=.025). Mean BP in the OCD group (93.08 mL/g, SD=36.90) did not differ significantly from the HC group (P=.247). Trait detachment, as measured by the Detachment subscale of the Karolinska Scales of Personality, was negatively correlated with D(2) availability across all subjects (r(s)= -.55, P=.013). Comorbid GSAD and OCD may be associated with decreased availability of D(2) receptors in the striatum, consistent with prior findings in GSAD. Prior findings of decreased D(2) receptor availability in noncomorbid OCD were not confirmed. Decreased D(2) receptor availability was also associated with trait detachment, supporting prior findings in samples of healthy subjects.

  12. Regulation of the synthesis and metabolism of striatal dopamine after disruption of nerve conduction in the medial forebrain bundle.

    PubMed Central

    Commissiong, J. W.; Slimovitch, C.; Toffano, G.

    1990-01-01

    1. After physical (knife-cut) or chemically-mediated (tetrodotoxin 300 nM, 1.5 microliters; 1.0 microliters min-1) interruption of nerve conduction in the nigrostriatal tract, there was a marked increase in the synthesis and metabolism of dopamine in the isolated dopaminergic nerve terminals of the striatum. The effect peaked at 4 h post-transection, at which time 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were increased by 300% and 700% respectively (DOPAC: 27 +/- 13 vs 80 +/- 17 nmol g-1; HVA: 6.66 +/- 3.57 vs 54 +/- 18 nmol g-1). The increases in dopamine content and metabolism are secondary to an increase in the rate of synthesis on the lesioned side, versus the intact, control side. 2. In both experimental situations, haloperidol (1.0 mg kg-1, i.p.) retained its known ability to induce a significant increase in DOPAC and HVA in the striatum, despite the interruption of nerve conduction in the nigrostriatal tract. 3. Six days after cutting the left nigrostriatal tract, dopamine in the left striatum was reduced to less than 5% of the control value, and DOPAC and HVA were not detectable. In the denervated, left striatum, the synthesis of dopamine (from injected L-DOPA), and its metabolism to DOPAC and HVA, occurred to the same degree as in the intact right side. In these DOPA-treated rats, haloperidol (1.0 mg kg-1, i.p.) caused a further increase in DOPAC and HVA in the intact striatum, but not in the denervated striatum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2361171

  13. In vivo brain microdialysis studies on the striatal dopamine and serotonin release in zitter mutant rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Kanji; Nishimura, Akira; Hattori, Hiroyuki; Joyce, Jeffery N; Yoshida, Toshihide; Hioki, Chizuko; Kogure, Akinori; Ueda, Shuichi

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, using in vivo brain microdialysis, we investigated the basal extracellular dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5-HT) release in the caudal striatum (cSTR) of young (4-6 months old) and aged (10-12 months old) zitter mutant rats. The basal extracellular levels of DA release in both young and aged zitter rats were significantly lower than that of age-matched Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, whereas only aged zitter rats showed a significant difference in the basal 5-HT release. Dopaminergic neurons were more vulnerable than serotonergic neurons in the cSTR of zitter mutant rats during aging. Perfusion of 60 mM potassium (K+) enhanced the extracellular levels of cSTR DA in the young zitter rats and the extracellular levels of both DA and 5-HT in the cSTR of the aged zitter rats. The firing rate of K+-stimulated monoamine release in the cSTR was significantly higher in the zitter rats than in the age-matched SD rats. These findings suggest that there are innate quantitative differences in the releasable pool and the availability of monoamines in the cSTR of zitter mutant rats.

  14. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  15. Dopamine transporter SLC6A3 genotype affects cortico-striatal activity of set-shifts in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Habak, Claudine; Noreau, Anne; Nagano-Saito, Atsuko; Mejía-Constaín, Beatriz; Degroot, Clotilde; Strafella, Antonio P.; Chouinard, Sylvain; Lafontaine, Anne-Louise; Rouleau, Guy A.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative condition that affects motor function along with a wide range of cognitive domains, including executive function. The hallmark of the pathology is its significant loss of nigrostriatal dopamine, which is necessary for the cortico-striatal interactions that underlie executive control. Striatal dopamine reuptake is mediated by the SLC6A3 gene (formerly named DAT1) and its polymorphisms, which have been largely overlooked in Parkinson’s disease. Thirty patients (ages 53–68 years; 19 males, 11 females) at early stages of Parkinson’s disease, were genotyped according to a 9-repeat (9R) or 10-repeat (10R) allele on the SLC6A3/DAT1 gene. They underwent neuropsychological assessment and functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a set-shifting task (a computerized Wisconsin Card Sorting Task) that relies on fronto-striatal interactions. Patients homozygous on the 10R allele performed significantly better on working memory tasks than 9R-carrier patients. Most importantly, patients carrying a 9R allele exhibited less activation than their 10R homozygous counterparts in the prefrontal cortex, premotor cortex and caudate nucleus, when planning and executing a set-shift. This pattern was exacerbated for conditions that usually recruit the striatum compared to those that do not. This is the first study indicating that the SLC6A3/DAT1 genotype has a significant effect on fronto-striatal activation and performance in Parkinson’s disease. This effect is stronger for conditions that engage the striatum. Longitudinal studies are warranted to assess this polymorphism’s effect on the clinical evolution of patients with Parkinson’s disease, especially with cognitive decline. PMID:25212851

  16. Ascorbic acid and striatal transport of (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) and (/sup 3/H)dopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Debler, E.A.; Hashim, A.; Lajtha, A.; Sershen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inhibition of uptake of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) was examined in mouse striatal synaptosomal preparations. Kinetic analysis indicated that ascorbic acid is a noncompetitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. No inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dopamine uptake is observed. The dopamine uptake blockers, GBR-12909, cocaine, and mazindol strongly inhibit (IC/sub 50/ < 1 ..mu..M) both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport. Nicotine, its metabolites, and other tobacco alkaloids are weak inhibitors except 4-phenylpyridine and lobeline, which are moderate inhibitors of both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. These similarities in potencies are in agreement with the suggestion that (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ and (/sup 3/H) are transported by the same carrier. The differences observed in the alteration of dopaminergic transport and mazindol binding by ascorbic acid suggest that ascorbic acid's effects on (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport are related to translocation and/or dissociation processes occurring subsequent to the initial binding event.

  17. Motor impairments, striatal degeneration, and altered dopamine-glutamate interplay in mice lacking PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingping; Saur, Taixiang; Duke, Angela N; Grant, Seth G N; Platt, Donna M; Rowlett, James K; Isacson, Ole; Yao, Wei-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Excessive activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) mediate neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration under many neurological conditions, including Huntington's disease (HD), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by the preferential loss of medium spiny projection neurons (MSNs) in the striatum. PSD-95 is a major scaffolding protein in the postsynaptic density (PSD) of dendritic spines, where a classical role for PSD-95 is to stabilize glutamate receptors at sites of synaptic transmission. Our recent studies indicate that PSD-95 also interacts with the D1 DA receptor localized in spines and negatively regulates spine D1 signaling. Moreover, PSD-95 forms ternary protein complexes with D1 and NMDA receptors, and plays a role in limiting the reciprocal potentiation between both receptors from being escalated. These studies suggest a neuroprotective role for PSD-95. Here we show that mice lacking PSD-95, resulting from genetic deletion of the GK domain of PSD-95 (PSD-95-ΔGK mice), sporadically develop progressive neurological impairments characterized by hypolocomotion, limb clasping, and loss of DARPP-32-positive MSNs. Electrophysiological experiments indicated that NMDA receptors in mutant MSNs were overactive, suggested by larger, NMDA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) and higher ratios of NMDA- to AMPA-mediated corticostriatal synaptic transmission. In addition, NMDA receptor currents in mutant cortical neurons were more sensitive to potentiation by the D1 receptor agonist SKF81297. Finally, repeated administration of the psychostimulant cocaine at a dose regimen not producing overt toxicity-related phenotypes in normal mice reliably converted asymptomatic mutant mice to clasping symptomatic mice. These results support the hypothesis that deletion of PSD-95 in mutant mice produces concomitant overactivation of both D1 and NMDA receptors that makes neurons more

  18. Activation of D2 dopamine receptor-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens increases motivation.

    PubMed

    Soares-Cunha, Carina; Coimbra, Barbara; David-Pereira, Ana; Borges, Sonia; Pinto, Luisa; Costa, Patricio; Sousa, Nuno; Rodrigues, Ana J

    2016-06-23

    Striatal dopamine receptor D1-expressing neurons have been classically associated with positive reinforcement and reward, whereas D2 neurons are associated with negative reinforcement and aversion. Here we demonstrate that the pattern of activation of D1 and D2 neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) predicts motivational drive, and that optogenetic activation of either neuronal population enhances motivation in mice. Using a different approach in rats, we further show that activating NAc D2 neurons increases cue-induced motivational drive in control animals and in a model that presents anhedonia and motivational deficits; conversely, optogenetic inhibition of D2 neurons decreases motivation. Our results suggest that the classic view of D1-D2 functional antagonism does not hold true for all dimensions of reward-related behaviours, and that D2 neurons may play a more prominent pro-motivation role than originally anticipated.

  19. Activation of D2 dopamine receptor-expressing neurons in the nucleus accumbens increases motivation

    PubMed Central

    Soares-Cunha, Carina; Coimbra, Barbara; David-Pereira, Ana; Borges, Sonia; Pinto, Luisa; Costa, Patricio; Sousa, Nuno; Rodrigues, Ana J.

    2016-01-01

    Striatal dopamine receptor D1-expressing neurons have been classically associated with positive reinforcement and reward, whereas D2 neurons are associated with negative reinforcement and aversion. Here we demonstrate that the pattern of activation of D1 and D2 neurons in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) predicts motivational drive, and that optogenetic activation of either neuronal population enhances motivation in mice. Using a different approach in rats, we further show that activating NAc D2 neurons increases cue-induced motivational drive in control animals and in a model that presents anhedonia and motivational deficits; conversely, optogenetic inhibition of D2 neurons decreases motivation. Our results suggest that the classic view of D1–D2 functional antagonism does not hold true for all dimensions of reward-related behaviours, and that D2 neurons may play a more prominent pro-motivation role than originally anticipated. PMID:27337658

  20. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake.

    PubMed

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J S

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson's disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity.

  1. A Physical Interaction between the Dopamine Transporter and DJ-1 Facilitates Increased Dopamine Reuptake

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Beryl; Mohammed, Mohinuddin; Liu, Fang; Lee, Frank J. S.

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of the dopamine transporter (DAT) impacts extracellular dopamine levels after release from dopaminergic neurons. Furthermore, a variety of protein partners have been identified that can interact with and modulate DAT function. In this study we show that DJ-1 can potentially modulate DAT function. Co-expression of DAT and DJ-1 in HEK-293T cells leads to an increase in [3H] dopamine uptake that does not appear to be mediated by increased total DAT expression but rather through an increase in DAT cell surface localization. In addition, through a series of GST affinity purifications and co-immunoprecipitations, we provide evidence that the DAT can be found in a complex with DJ-1, which involve distinct regions within both DAT and DJ-1. Using in vitro binding experiments we also show that this complex can be formed in part by a direct interaction between DAT and DJ-1. Co-expression of a mini-gene that can disrupt the DAT/DJ-1 complex appears to block the increase in [3H] dopamine uptake by DJ-1. Mutations in DJ-1 have been linked to familial forms of Parkinson’s disease, yet the normal physiological function of DJ-1 remains unclear. Our study suggests that DJ-1 may also play a role in regulating dopamine levels by modifying DAT activity. PMID:26305376

  2. Increased TRPC5 glutathionylation contributes to striatal neuron loss in Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Chansik; Seo, Hyemyung; Kwak, Misun; Jeon, Jeha; Jang, Jihoon; Jeong, Eui Man; Myeong, Jongyun; Hwang, Yu Jin; Ha, Kotdaji; Kang, Min Jueng; Lee, Kyu Pil; Yi, Eugene C.; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant glutathione or Ca2+ homeostasis due to oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The Ca2+-permeable transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel is predominantly expressed in the brain, which is sensitive to oxidative stress. However, the role of the TRPC channel in neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we report a mechanism of TRPC5 activation by oxidants and the effect of glutathionylated TRPC5 on striatal neurons in Huntington’s disease. Intracellular oxidized glutathione leads to TRPC5 activation via TRPC5 S-glutathionylation at Cys176/Cys178 residues. The oxidized glutathione-activated TRPC5-like current results in a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca2+, activated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and the calpain-caspase pathway, ultimately inducing striatal neuronal cell death. We observed an abnormal glutathione pool indicative of an oxidized state in the striatum of Huntington’s disease transgenic (YAC128) mice. Increased levels of endogenous TRPC5 S-glutathionylation were observed in the striatum in both transgenic mice and patients with Huntington’s disease. Both knockdown and inhibition of TRPC5 significantly attenuated oxidation-induced striatal neuronal cell death. Moreover, a TRPC5 blocker improved rearing behaviour in Huntington’s disease transgenic mice and motor behavioural symptoms in littermate control mice by increasing striatal neuron survival. Notably, low levels of TRPC1 increased the formation of TRPC5 homotetramer, a highly Ca2+-permeable channel, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent apoptosis in Huntington’s disease cells (STHdhQ111/111). Taken together, these novel findings indicate that increased TRPC5 S-glutathionylation by oxidative stress and decreased TRPC1 expression contribute to neuronal damage in the striatum and may underlie neurodegeneration in Huntington’s disease. PMID:26133660

  3. Increased TRPC5 glutathionylation contributes to striatal neuron loss in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chansik; Seo, Hyemyung; Kwak, Misun; Jeon, Jeha; Jang, Jihoon; Jeong, Eui Man; Myeong, Jongyun; Hwang, Yu Jin; Ha, Kotdaji; Kang, Min Jueng; Lee, Kyu Pil; Yi, Eugene C; Kim, In-Gyu; Jeon, Ju-Hong; Ryu, Hoon; So, Insuk

    2015-10-01

    Aberrant glutathione or Ca(2+) homeostasis due to oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The Ca(2+)-permeable transient receptor potential cation (TRPC) channel is predominantly expressed in the brain, which is sensitive to oxidative stress. However, the role of the TRPC channel in neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we report a mechanism of TRPC5 activation by oxidants and the effect of glutathionylated TRPC5 on striatal neurons in Huntington's disease. Intracellular oxidized glutathione leads to TRPC5 activation via TRPC5 S-glutathionylation at Cys176/Cys178 residues. The oxidized glutathione-activated TRPC5-like current results in a sustained increase in cytosolic Ca(2+), activated calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and the calpain-caspase pathway, ultimately inducing striatal neuronal cell death. We observed an abnormal glutathione pool indicative of an oxidized state in the striatum of Huntington's disease transgenic (YAC128) mice. Increased levels of endogenous TRPC5 S-glutathionylation were observed in the striatum in both transgenic mice and patients with Huntington's disease. Both knockdown and inhibition of TRPC5 significantly attenuated oxidation-induced striatal neuronal cell death. Moreover, a TRPC5 blocker improved rearing behaviour in Huntington's disease transgenic mice and motor behavioural symptoms in littermate control mice by increasing striatal neuron survival. Notably, low levels of TRPC1 increased the formation of TRPC5 homotetramer, a highly Ca(2+)-permeable channel, and stimulated Ca(2+)-dependent apoptosis in Huntington's disease cells (STHdh(Q111/111)). Taken together, these novel findings indicate that increased TRPC5 S-glutathionylation by oxidative stress and decreased TRPC1 expression contribute to neuronal damage in the striatum and may underlie neurodegeneration in Huntington's disease.

  4. Striatal dopaminergic stimulation produces c-Fos expression in the PPT and an increase in wakefulness.

    PubMed

    Mena-Segovia, Juan; Giordano, Magda

    2003-10-03

    Striatal activation can modify activity in cortical areas related to specific striatal functions possibly through a process of disinhibition within the basal ganglia. Anatomical studies have shown substantial GABAergic innervation from these nuclei to the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT). Thus, dopaminergic stimulation of the striatum could produce PPT disinhibition and result in non-specific cortical activation. To test this hypothesis, d-amphetamine was infused both into the striatum of freely moving rats for motor and electrocorticographic recordings, and into the striatum of animals under deep anesthesia for c-Fos immunohistochemistry. The results show that intrastriatal amphetamine increases wakefulness independent of motor activity, and it increases c-Fos expression in the PPT and adjacent areas. They also suggest that the striatum participates in non-specific cortical activation probably as a result of its relationship with the PPT.

  5. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2-mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures.

    PubMed

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets.

  6. L-DOPA Reverses the Increased Free Amino Acids Tissue Levels Induced by Dopamine Depletion and Rises GABA and Tyrosine in the Striatum.

    PubMed

    Solís, Oscar; García-Sanz, Patricia; Herranz, Antonio S; Asensio, María-José; Moratalla, Rosario

    2016-07-01

    Perturbations in the cerebral levels of various amino acids are associated with neurological disorders, and previous studies have suggested that such alterations have a role in the motor and non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease. However, the direct effects of chronic L-DOPA treatment, that produces dyskinesia, on neural tissue amino acid concentrations have not been explored in detail. To evaluate whether striatal amino acid concentrations are altered in peak dose dyskinesia, 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned hemiparkinsonian mice were treated chronically with L-DOPA and tissue amino acid concentrations were assessed by HPLC analysis. These experiments revealed that neither 6-OHDA nor L-DOPA treatment are able to alter glutamate in the striatum. However, glutamine increases after 6-OHDA and returns back to normal levels with L-DOPA treatment, suggesting increased striatal glutamatergic transmission with lack of dopamine. In addition, glycine and taurine levels are increased following dopamine denervation and restored to normal levels by L-DOPA. Interestingly, dyskinetic animals showed increased levels of GABA and tyrosine, while aspartate striatal tissue levels are not altered. Overall, our results indicate that chronic L-DOPA treatment, besides normalizing the altered levels of some amino acids after 6-OHDA, robustly increases striatal GABA and tyrosine levels which may in turn contribute to the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

  7. M1 muscarinic activation induces long-lasting increase in intrinsic excitability of striatal projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xiaohui; Dickerson, Jonathan W; Rook, Jerri M; Lindsley, Craig W; Conn, P Jeffrey; Xiang, Zixiu

    2017-05-15

    The dorsolateral striatum is critically involved in movement control and motor learning. Striatal function is regulated by a variety of neuromodulators including acetylcholine. Previous studies have shown that cholinergic activation excites striatal principal projection neurons, medium spiny neurons (MSNs), and this action is mediated by muscarinic acetylcholine subtype 1 receptors (M1) through modulating multiple potassium channels. In the present study, we used electrophysiology techniques in conjunction with optogenetic and pharmacological tools to determine the long-term effects of striatal cholinergic activation on MSN intrinsic excitability. A transient increase in acetylcholine release in the striatum by optogenetic stimulation resulted in a long-lasting increase in excitability of MSNs, which was associated with hyperpolarizing shift of action potential threshold and decrease in afterhyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude, leading to an increase in probability of EPSP-action potential coupling. The M1 selective antagonist VU0255035 prevented, while the M1 selective positive allosteric modulator (PAM) VU0453595 potentiated the cholinergic activation-induced persistent increase in MSN intrinsic excitability, suggesting that M1 receptors are critically involved in the induction of this long-lasting response. This M1 receptor-dependent long-lasting change in MSN intrinsic excitability could have significant impact on striatal processing and might provide a novel mechanism underlying cholinergic regulation of the striatum-dependent motor learning and cognitive function. Consistent with this, behavioral studies indicate that potentiation of M1 receptor signaling by VU0453595 enhanced performance of mice in cue-dependent water-based T-maze, a dorsolateral striatum-dependent learning task. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. D1 dopamine receptors of NS20Y neuroblastoma cells are functionally similar to rat striatal D1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lovenberg, T W; Roth, R H; Nichols, D E; Mailman, R B

    1991-11-01

    Dopamine or agonists with D1 receptor potency stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation in whole cell preparations of NS20Y neuroblastoma cells. The accumulation of cAMP after D1 stimulation was rapid and linear for 3 min. Both dopamine and the novel D1 receptor agonist dihydrexidine stimulated cAMP accumulation two- to three-fold over baseline. The pseudo-Km for dopamine was approximately 2 microM, whereas for dihydrexidine it was approximately 30 nM. The effects of both drugs were blocked by either the D1-selective antagonist SCH23390 (Ki, 0.3 nM) or the nonselective antagonist (+)-butaclamol (Ki, 5 nM). Both (-)-butaclamol and the D2-selective antagonist (-)-sulpiride were ineffective (Ki greater than 3 microM). Forskolin (10 microM), prostaglandin E1 (1 microM), and adenosine (10 microM) also stimulated cAMP accumulation, but none were antagonized by SCH23390 (1 microM). Finally, muscarinic receptor stimulation (100 microM carbachol) inhibited both D1- and forskolin-stimulated increases in cAMP accumulation by 80%. The present results indicate that NS20Y neuroblastoma cells have D1 receptors that are coupled to adenylate cyclase, and that these receptors have a pharmacological profile similar to that of the D1 receptor(s) found in rat striatum.

  9. Increased coherence among striatal regions in the theta range during attentive wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Lepski, G.; Arévalo, A.; do Valle, A.C.; Ballester, G.; Gharabaghi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The striatum, the largest component of the basal ganglia, is usually subdivided into associative, motor and limbic components. However, the electrophysiological interactions between these three subsystems during behavior remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that the striatum might be particularly active during exploratory behavior, which is presumably associated with increased attention. We investigated the modulation of local field potentials (LFPs) in the striatum during attentive wakefulness in freely moving rats. To this end, we implanted microelectrodes into different parts of the striatum of Wistar rats, as well as into the motor, associative and limbic cortices. We then used electromyograms to identify motor activity and analyzed the instantaneous frequency, power spectra and partial directed coherence during exploratory behavior. We observed fine modulation in the theta frequency range of striatal LFPs in 92.5 ± 2.5% of all epochs of exploratory behavior. Concomitantly, the theta power spectrum increased in all striatal channels (P < 0.001), and coherence analysis revealed strong connectivity (coefficients >0.7) between the primary motor cortex and the rostral part of the caudatoputamen nucleus, as well as among all striatal channels (P < 0.001). Conclusively, we observed a pattern of strong theta band activation in the entire striatum during attentive wakefulness, as well as a strong coherence between the motor cortex and the entire striatum. We suggest that this activation reflects the integration of motor, cognitive and limbic systems during attentive wakefulness. PMID:22735177

  10. Free-choice and no-choice high-fat diets affect striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor availability, caloric intake, and adiposity.

    PubMed

    van de Giessen, Elsmarieke; la Fleur, Susanne E; de Bruin, Kora; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2012-08-01

    Different types of high-fat (HF) diets are used to study diet-induced obesity (DIO) in rodents and this has led to different phenotypes. This study assesses whether different HF diets differentially affect striatal dopamine D(2/3) receptor (DRD(2/3)) availability, as decreased striatal DRD(2/3) availability has been implicated in obesity in relation to reward deficiency for food. Thirty rats were randomized to either a free-choice HF diet (HF-choice), a premixed HF diet (HF-no-choice), or a standard chow diet for 28 days. Striatal DRD(2/3) was measured using (123)I-IBZM storage phosphor imaging at day 29. DRD(2/3) availability was significantly decreased in the dorsal striatum in the HF-choice rats compared to chow rats, but not in HF-no-choice rats. Additionally, caloric intake of the HF-choice rats was significantly higher than that of HF-no-choice rats and serum leptin and percentage abdominal fat store weight of total body weight were significantly higher in the HF-choice rats compared to chow rats. These preliminary results suggest that the choice element in HF diets, which is possibly related to the motivational aspects of eating, leads to overconsumption and to a distinct state of obesity. These results are relevant for future studies on DIO when considering choice of diet type.

  11. Muscimol increases acetylcholine release by directly stimulating adult striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Login, I S; Pal, S N; Adams, D T; Gold, P E

    1998-01-01

    Because GabaA ligands increase acetylcholine (ACh) release from adult striatal slices, we hypothesized that activation of GabaA receptors on striatal cholinergic interneurons directly stimulates ACh secretion. Fractional [3H]ACh release was recorded during perifusion of acutely dissociated, [3H]choline-labeled, adult male rat striata. The GabaA agonist, muscimol, immediately stimulated release maximally approximately 300% with EC50 = approximately 1 microM. This action was enhanced by the allosteric GabaA receptor modulators, diazepam and secobarbital, and inhibited by the GabaA antagonist, bicuculline, by ligands for D2 or muscarinic cholinergic receptors or by low calcium buffer, tetrodotoxin or vesamicol. Membrane depolarization inversely regulated muscimol-stimulated secretion. Release of endogenous and newly synthesized ACh was stimulated in parallel by muscimol without changing choline release. Muscimol pretreatment inhibited release evoked by K+ depolarization or by receptor-mediated stimulation with glutamate. Thus, GabaA receptors on adult striatal cholinergic interneurons directly stimulate voltage- and calcium-dependent exocytosis of ACh stored in vesamicol-sensitive synaptic vesicles. The action depends on the state of membrane polarization and apparently depolarizes the membrane in turn. This functional assay demonstrates that excitatory GabaA actions are not limited to neonatal tissues. GabaA-stimulated ACh release may be prevented in situ by normal tonic dopaminergic and muscarinic input to cholinergic neurons.

  12. Regional and cell-type-specific effects of DAMGO on striatal D1 and D2 dopamine receptor-expressing medium-sized spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Cepeda, Carlos; Chatta, Payush; Franklin, Lana; Evans, Christopher J; Levine, Michael S

    2012-03-08

    The striatum can be divided into the DLS (dorsolateral striatum) and the VMS (ventromedial striatum), which includes NAcC (nucleus accumbens core) and NAcS (nucleus accumbens shell). Here, we examined differences in electrophysiological properties of MSSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons) based on their location, expression of DA (dopamine) D1/D2 receptors and responses to the μ-opioid receptor agonist, DAMGO {[D-Ala(2)-MePhe(4)-Gly(ol)(5)]enkephalin}. The main differences in morphological and biophysical membrane properties occurred among striatal sub-regions. MSSNs in the DLS were larger, had higher membrane capacitances and lower Rin (input resistances) compared with cells in the VMS. RMPs (resting membrane potentials) were similar among regions except for D2 cells in the NAcC, which displayed a significantly more depolarized RMP. In contrast, differences in frequency of spontaneous excitatory synaptic inputs were more prominent between cell types, with D2 cells receiving significantly more excitatory inputs than D1 cells, particularly in the VMS. Inhibitory inputs were not different between D1 and D2 cells. However, MSSNs in the VMS received more inhibitory inputs than those in the DLS. Acute application of DAMGO reduced the frequency of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents, but the effect was greater in the VMS, in particular in the NAcS, where excitatory currents from D2 cells and inhibitory currents from D1 cells were inhibited by the largest amount. DAMGO also increased cellular excitability in the VMS, as shown by reduced threshold for evoking APs (action potentials). Together the present findings help elucidate the regional and cell-type-specific substrate of opioid actions in the striatum and point to the VMS as a critical mediator of DAMGO effects.

  13. Effects of amphetamine on striatal dopamine release, open-field activity, and play in Fischer 344 and Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Siviy, Stephen M; McDowell, Lana S; Eck, Samantha R; Turano, Alexandra; Akopian, Garnik; Walsh, John P

    2015-12-01

    Previous work from our laboratories has shown that juvenile Fischer 344 (F344) rats are less playful than other strains and also appear to be compromised in dopamine (DA) functioning. To determine whether the dysfunctional play in this strain is associated with deficits in the handling and delivery of vesicular DA, the following experiments assessed the extent to which F344 rats are differentially sensitive to the effects of amphetamine. When exposed to amphetamine, striatal slices obtained from F344 rats showed a small increase in unstimulated DA release when compared with slices from Sprague-Dawley rats; they also showed a more rapid high K+-mediated release of DA. These data provide tentative support for the hypothesis that F344 rats have a higher concentration of cytoplasmic DA than Sprague-Dawley rats. When rats were tested for activity in an open field, F344 rats presented a pattern of results that was consistent with either an enhanced response to amphetamine (3 mg/kg) or a more rapid release of DA (10 mg/kg). Although there was some indication that amphetamine had a dose-dependent differential effect on play in the two strains, play in F344 rats was not enhanced to any degree by amphetamine. Although these results are not consistent with our working hypothesis that F344 rats are less playful because of a deficit in vesicular release of DA, they still suggest that this strain may be a useful model for better understanding the role of DA in social behavior during the juvenile period.

  14. Behavioral effects of dopamine receptor inactivation during the adolescent period: age-dependent changes in dorsal striatal D2High receptors

    PubMed Central

    McDougall, Sanders A.; Valentine, Joseph M.; Gonzalez, Ashley E.; Humphrey, Danielle E.; Widarma, Crystal B.; Crawford, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Dopamine (DA) receptor inactivation produces opposing behavioral effects across ontogeny. For example, inactivating DA receptors in the dorsal striatum attenuates DA agonist-induced behaviors of adult rats, while potentiating the locomotor activity of preweanling rats. Objective The purpose of this study was to determine if DA receptor inactivation potentiates the DA agonist-induced locomotor activity of adolescent rats, and whether alterations in D2High receptors are responsible for this effect. Methods In the behavioral experiment, the irreversible receptor antagonist N-ethoxycarbonyl-2-ethoxy-1,2-dihydroquinoline (EEDQ) or its vehicle (100% dimethylsulphoxide, DMSO) were bilaterally infused into the dorsal striatum on postnatal day (PD) 39. On PD 40, adolescent rats were given intrastriatal infusions of the DA agonist R(−)-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) or vehicle and locomotor activity was measured for 40 min. In the receptor binding experiment, rats received IP injections of EEDQ or DMSO (1:1 (v/v) in distilled water) on PD 17, PD 39, or PD 84. One day later, striatal samples were taken and subsequently assayed for D2 specific binding and D2High receptors using [3H]-domperidone. Results Unlike what is observed during the preweanling period, EEDQ attenuated the NPA-induced locomotor activity of adolescent rats. EEDQ reduced D2 receptor levels in the dorsal striatum of all age groups, while increasing the proportion of D2High receptors. Regardless of pretreatment condition (i.e., DMSO or EEDQ), preweanling rats had a greater percentage of D2High receptors than adolescent or adult rats. Conclusions DA receptor inactivation affects the behaviors of preweanling and older rats differently. The DA supersensitivity exhibited by EEDQ-treated preweanling rats may result from an excess of D2High receptors. PMID:24287603

  15. A Neurocomputational Model of Dopamine and Prefrontal-Striatal Interactions during Multicue Category Learning by Parkinson Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Gluck, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing models of dopamine and learning in Parkinson disease (PD) focus on simulating the role of basal ganglia dopamine in reinforcement learning. Much data argue, however, for a critical role for prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine in stimulus selection in attentional learning. Here, we present a new computational model that simulates…

  16. A Neurocomputational Model of Dopamine and Prefrontal-Striatal Interactions during Multicue Category Learning by Parkinson Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moustafa, Ahmed A.; Gluck, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Most existing models of dopamine and learning in Parkinson disease (PD) focus on simulating the role of basal ganglia dopamine in reinforcement learning. Much data argue, however, for a critical role for prefrontal cortex (PFC) dopamine in stimulus selection in attentional learning. Here, we present a new computational model that simulates…

  17. Prefrontal Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptors Regulate Dissociable Aspects of Decision Making via Distinct Ventral Striatal and Amygdalar Circuits.

    PubMed

    Jenni, Nicole L; Larkin, Joshua D; Floresco, Stan B

    2017-06-28

    Mesocortical dopamine (DA) regulates a variety of cognitive functions via actions on D1 and/or D2 receptors. For example, risk/reward decision making is modulated differentially by these two receptors within the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with D2 receptors enabling flexible decision making and D1 receptors promoting persistence in choice biases. However, it is unclear how DA mediates opposing patterns of behavior by acting on different receptors within the same terminal region. We explored the possibility that DA may act on separate networks of PFC neurons that are modulated by D1 or D2 receptors and in turn interface with divergent downstream structures such as the basolateral amygdala (BLA) or nucleus accumbens (NAc). Decision making was assessed using a probabilistic discounting task in which well trained male rats chose between small/certain or large/risky rewards, with the odds of obtaining the larger reward changing systematically within a session. Selective disruption of D1 or D2 modulation of separate PFC output pathways was achieved using unilateral intra-PFC infusions of DA antagonists combined with contralateral inactivation of the BLA or NAc. Disrupting D2 (but not D1) modulation of PFC→BLA circuitry impaired adjustments in decision biases in response to changes in reward probabilities. In contrast, disrupting D1 modulation of PFC→NAc networks reduced risky choice, attenuating reward sensitivity and increasing sensitivity to reward omissions. These findings reveal that mesocortical DA can facilitate dissociable components of reward seeking and action selection by acting on different functional networks of PFC neurons that can be distinguished by the subcortical projection targets with which they interface.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prefrontal cortical dopamine regulates a variety of executive functions governed by the frontal lobes via actions on D1 and D2 receptors. These receptors can in some instances mediate different patterns of behavior, but the

  18. Developmental exposure to the pesticide dieldrin alters the dopamine system and increases neurotoxicity in an animal model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jason R; Caudle, W Michael; Wang, Minzheng; Dean, E Danielle; Pennell, Kurt D; Miller, Gary W

    2006-08-01

    Exposure to pesticides has been suggested to increase the risk of Parkinson's disease (PD), but the mechanisms responsible for this association are not clear. Here, we report that perinatal exposure of mice during gestation and lactation to low levels of dieldrin (0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg every 3 days) alters dopaminergic neurochemistry in their offspring and exacerbates MPTP toxicity. At 12 wk of age, protein and mRNA levels of the dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were increased by perinatal dieldrin exposure in a dose-related manner. We then administered MPTP (2 x 10 mg/kg s.c) at 12 wk of age and observed a greater reduction of striatal dopamine in dieldrin-exposed offspring, which was associated with a greater DAT:VMAT2 ratio. Additionally, dieldrin exposure during development potentiated the increase in GFAP and alpha-synuclein levels induced by MPTP, indicating increased neurotoxicity. In all cases there were greater effects observed in the male offspring than the female, similar to that observed in human cases of PD. These data suggest that developmental exposure to dieldrin leads to persistent alterations of the developing dopaminergic system and that these alterations induce a "silent" state of dopamine dysfunction, thereby rendering dopamine neurons more vulnerable later in life.

  19. Fluoxetine Administration Exacerbates Oral Tremor and Striatal Dopamine Depletion in a Rodent Pharmacological Model of Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Podurgiel, Samantha J; Milligan, Meredith N; Yohn, Samantha E; Purcell, Laura J; Contreras-Mora, Hector M; Correa, Mercè; Salamone, John D

    2015-01-01

    The cardinal motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) include resting tremor, akinesia, bradykinesia, and rigidity, and these motor abnormalities can be modeled in rodents by administration of the VMAT-2 (type-2 vesicular monoamine transporter) inhibitor tetrabenazine (9,10-dimethoxy-3-(2-methylpropyl)-1,3,4,6,7, 11b hexahydrobenzo[a]quinolizin-2-one; TBZ). Depression is also commonly associated with PD, and clinical data indicate that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) such as fluoxetine ((±)-N-methyl-γ-[4-(trifluoromethyl)phenoxy]benzenepropanamine hydrochloride; FLX) are frequently used to treat depression in PD patients. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effect of FLX on the motor dysfunctions induced by a low dose of TBZ (0.75 mg/kg), and investigate the neural mechanisms involved. This low dose of TBZ was selected based on studies with rat models of depressive symptoms. In rats, coadministration of FLX (2.5, 5.0, and 10.0 mg/kg) increased TBZ-induced oral tremor (tremulous jaw movements), and decreased locomotor activity compared with administration of TBZ alone. Coadministration of the serotonin 5-HT2A/2C antagonist mianserin (2.5 and 5.0 mg/kg) attenuated the increase in oral tremor induced by coadministration of TBZ (0.75 mg/kg) with FLX (5.0 mg/kg). Consistent with these behavioral data, coadministration of TBZ and FLX decreased DA tissue levels in the rat ventrolateral neostriatum compared with TBZ alone, and coadministration of mianserin with TBZ and FLX attenuated this effect, increasing DA tissue levels compared with the TBZ/FLX condition. These data suggest that SSRI administration in PD patients may result in worsening of motor symptoms, at least in part, by exacerbating existing DA depletions through 5-HT2A/2C-mediated modulation of DA neurotransmission. PMID:25759301

  20. Increased Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5 Signaling Underlies Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder-like Behavioral and Striatal Circuit Abnormalities in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ade, Kristen K; Wan, Yehong; Hamann, Harold C; O'Hare, Justin K; Guo, Weirui; Quian, Anna; Kumar, Sunil; Bhagat, Srishti; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Wetsel, William C; Conn, P Jeffrey; Dzirasa, Kafui; Huber, Kimberly M; Calakos, Nicole

    2016-10-01

    Development of treatments for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is hampered by a lack of mechanistic understanding about this prevalent neuropsychiatric condition. Although circuit changes such as elevated frontostriatal activity are linked to OCD, the underlying molecular signaling that drives OCD-related behaviors remains largely unknown. Here, we examine the significance of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5s) for behavioral and circuit abnormalities relevant to OCD. Sapap3 knockout (KO) mice treated acutely with an mGluR5 antagonist were evaluated for OCD-relevant phenotypes of self-grooming, anxiety-like behaviors, and increased striatal activity. The role of mGluR5 in the striatal circuit abnormalities of Sapap3 KO mice was further explored using two-photon calcium imaging to monitor striatal output from the direct and indirect pathways. A contribution of constitutive signaling to increased striatal mGluR5 activity in Sapap3 KO mice was investigated using pharmacologic and biochemical approaches. Finally, sufficiency of mGluR5 to drive OCD-like behavior in wild-type mice was tested by potentiating mGluR5 with a positive allosteric modulator. Excessive mGluR5 signaling underlies OCD-like behaviors and striatal circuit abnormalities in Sapap3 KO mice. Accordingly, enhancing mGluR5 activity acutely recapitulates these behavioral phenotypes in wild-type mice. In Sapap3 KO mice, elevated mGluR5 signaling is associated with constitutively active receptors and increased and imbalanced striatal output that is acutely corrected by antagonizing striatal mGluR5. These findings demonstrate a causal role for increased mGluR5 signaling in driving striatal output abnormalities and behaviors with relevance to OCD and show the tractability of acute mGluR5 inhibition to remedy circuit and behavioral abnormalities. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Dopamine synapse is a neuroligin-2–mediated contact between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures

    PubMed Central

    Uchigashima, Motokazu; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Midbrain dopamine neurons project densely to the striatum and form so-called dopamine synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSNs), principal neurons in the striatum. Because dopamine receptors are widely expressed away from dopamine synapses, it remains unclear how dopamine synapses are involved in dopaminergic transmission. Here we demonstrate that dopamine synapses are contacts formed between dopaminergic presynaptic and GABAergic postsynaptic structures. The presynaptic structure expressed tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter-2, and plasmalemmal dopamine transporter, which are essential for dopamine synthesis, vesicular filling, and recycling, but was below the detection threshold for molecules involving GABA synthesis and vesicular filling or for GABA itself. In contrast, the postsynaptic structure of dopamine synapses expressed GABAergic molecules, including postsynaptic adhesion molecule neuroligin-2, postsynaptic scaffolding molecule gephyrin, and GABAA receptor α1, without any specific clustering of dopamine receptors. Of these, neuroligin-2 promoted presynaptic differentiation in axons of midbrain dopamine neurons and striatal GABAergic neurons in culture. After neuroligin-2 knockdown in the striatum, a significant decrease of dopamine synapses coupled with a reciprocal increase of GABAergic synapses was observed on MSN dendrites. This finding suggests that neuroligin-2 controls striatal synapse formation by giving competitive advantage to heterologous dopamine synapses over conventional GABAergic synapses. Considering that MSN dendrites are preferential targets of dopamine synapses and express high levels of dopamine receptors, dopamine synapse formation may serve to increase the specificity and potency of dopaminergic modulation of striatal outputs by anchoring dopamine release sites to dopamine-sensing targets. PMID:27035941

  2. The neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii increases dopamine metabolism

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The common parasite Toxoplasma gondii induces behavioral alterations in its hosts including phenotypes increasing the likelihood of its transmission in rodents and reports of psychobehavioral alterations in humans. We have found that elevated levels of dopamine are associated with the encysted stage...

  3. The effect of nicotine on striatal dopamine release in man: A [11C]raclopride PET study.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Andrew J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Egerton, Alice; Nutt, David J; Grasby, Paul M

    2007-08-01

    In common with many addictive substances and behaviors nicotine activates the mesolimbic dopaminergic system. Brain microdialysis studies in rodents have consistently shown increases in extrasynaptic DA levels in the striatum after administration of nicotine but PET experiments in primates have given contradicting results. A recent PET study assessing the effect of smoking in humans showed no change in [(11)C]raclopride binding in the brain, but did find that "hedonia" correlated with a reduction in [(11)C]raclopride binding suggesting that DA may mediate the positive reinforcing effects of nicotine. In this experiment we measured the effect of nicotine, administered via a nasal spray, on DA release using [(11)C]raclopride PET, in 10 regular smokers. There was no overall change in [(11)C]raclopride binding after nicotine administration in any of the striatal regions examined. However, the individual change in [(11)C]raclopride binding correlated with change in subjective measures of "amused" and "happiness" in the associative striatum (AST) and sensorimotor striatum (SMST). Nicotine concentration correlated negatively with change in BP in the limbic striatum. Nicotine had significant effects on cardiovascular measures including pulse rate, systolic blood pressure (BPr), and diastolic BPr. Baseline [(11)C]raclopride binding potential (BP) in the AST correlated negatively with the Fagerström score, an index of nicotine dependence. These results support a role for the DA system in nicotine addiction, but reveal a more complex relationship than suggested by studies in animals.

  4. [The effect of sevoflurane and isoflurane on striatal dopamine of awake freely moving rats observed in an in vivo microdialysis study].

    PubMed

    Adachi, Y; Taoda, M; Uchihashi, Y; Watanabe, K; Satoh, T

    1999-09-01

    We investigated the effect of sevoflurane and isoflurane on the level of interstitial dopamine of in vivo awake, free moving rats brain striatum using microdialysis techniques. Rats were implanted with a microdialysis probe to the right striatum of the brain and administered with 1.2 MAC of each volatile anesthetics for 1 hour, and dialysates from the probe were determined every 20 minutes. Both anesthetics reduced the amount of dopamine derived from dialysate, and increased the efflux of dopamine with pretreatment of nomifensine 10mg. kg-1 i.p. The change of metabolites of dopamine during anesthesia was increased. No significant difference was found between sevoflurane and isoflurane. We hypothesized that these anesthetics might have special actions on interactions between metabolism and re-uptake of dopamine in rats striatum during anesthesia.

  5. HIV-1 transgenic rats display an increase in [3H]dopamine uptake in the prefrontal cortex and striatum

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jun; Yuan, Yaxia; Midde, Narasimha M.; Gomez, Adrian M.; Sun, Wei-Lun; Quizon, Pamela M.; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2017-01-01

    HIV viral proteins within the central nervous system are associated with the development of neurocognitive impairments in HIV-infected individuals. Dopamine transporter (DAT)-mediated dopamine transport is critical for normal dopamine homeostasis. Abnormal dopaminergic transmission has been implicated as a risk determinant of HIV-induced neurocognitive impairments. Our published work has demonstrated that Tat-induced inhibition of DAT is mediated by allosteric binding site(s) on DAT, not the interaction with the dopamine uptake site. The present study investigated whether impaired DAT function induced by Tat exposure in vitro can be documented in HIV-1 transgenic (HIV-1Tg) rats. We assessed kinetic analyses of [3H]dopamine uptake into prefrontal and striatal synaptosomes of HIV-1Tg and Fisher 344 rats. Compared with Fisher 344 rats, the capacity of dopamine transport in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum of HIV-1Tg rats was increased by 34% and 32%, respectively. Assessment of surface biotinylation indicated that DAT expression in the plasma membrane was reduced in PFC and enhanced in striatum, respectively, of HIV-1Tg rats. While the maximal binding sites (Bmax) of [3H]WIN 35,428 was decreased in striatum of HIV-1Tg rats, an increase in DAT turnover proportion was found, relative to Fisher 344 rats. Together, these findings suggest that neuroadaptive changes in DAT function are evidenced in the HIV-1Tg rats, perhaps compensating for viral protein-induced abnormal dopaminergic transmission. Thus, our study provides novel insights into understanding mechanism underlying neurocognitive impairment evident in neuroAIDS. PMID:26501780

  6. Dopamine Increases a Value-Independent Gambling Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Rigoli, Francesco; Rutledge, Robb B; Chew, Benjamin; Ousdal, Olga T; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J

    2016-01-01

    Although the impact of dopamine on reward learning is well documented, its influence on other aspects of behavior remains the subject of much ongoing work. Dopaminergic drugs are known to increase risk-taking behavior, but the underlying mechanisms for this effect are not clear. We probed dopamine's role by examining the effect of its precursor L-DOPA on the choices of healthy human participants in an experimental paradigm that allowed particular components of risk to be distinguished. We show that choice behavior depended on a baseline (ie, value-independent) gambling propensity, a gambling preference scaling with the amount/variance, and a value normalization factor. Boosting dopamine levels specifically increased just the value-independent baseline gambling propensity, leaving the other components unaffected. Our results indicate that the influence of dopamine on choice behavior involves a specific modulation of the attractiveness of risky options—a finding with implications for understanding a range of reward-related psychopathologies including addiction. PMID:27149935

  7. Upregulation of Dopamine D2 Receptors in the Nucleus Accumbens Indirect Pathway Increases Locomotion but Does Not Reduce Alcohol Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Salling, Michael C; Feng, Bo; Morón, Jose A; Harrison, Neil L; Javitch, Jonathan A; Kellendonk, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Brain imaging studies performed in humans have associated low striatal dopamine release and D2R binding with alcohol dependence. Conversely, high striatal D2R binding has been observed in unaffected members of alcoholic families suggesting that high D2R function may protect against alcohol dependence. A possible protective role of increased D2R levels in the striatum is further supported by preclinical studies in non-human primates and rodents. Here, we determined whether there is a causal relationship between D2R levels and alcohol intake. To this end, we upregulated D2R expression levels in the nucleus accumbens of the adult mouse, but selectively restricted the upregulation to the indirect striatal output pathway, which endogenously expresses D2Rs. After overexpression was established, mice were tested in two models of free-choice alcohol drinking: the continuous and intermittent access two-bottle choice models. As anticipated, we found that D2R upregulation leads to hyperactivity in the open field. Contrary to our expectation, D2R upregulation did not reduce alcohol intake during continuous or intermittent access or when alcohol drinking was tested in the context of aversive outcomes. These data argue against a protective role of accumbal indirect pathway D2Rs in alcohol consumption but emphasize their importance in promoting locomotor activity. PMID:25578797

  8. Diminished hippocalcin expression in Huntington's disease brain does not account for increased striatal neuron vulnerability as assessed in primary neurons.

    PubMed

    Rudinskiy, Nikita; Kaneko, Yoshio A; Beesen, Ayshe Ana; Gokce, Ozgun; Régulier, Etienne; Déglon, Nicole; Luthi-Carter, Ruth

    2009-10-01

    Hippocalcin is a neuronal calcium sensor protein previously implicated in regulating neuronal viability and plasticity. Hippocalcin is the most highly expressed neuronal calcium sensor in the medium spiny striatal output neurons that degenerate selectively in Huntington's disease (HD). We have previously shown that decreased hippocalcin expression occurs in parallel with the onset of disease phenotype in mouse models of HD. Here we show by in situ hybridization histochemistry that hippocalcin RNA is also diminished by 63% in human HD brain. These findings lead us to hypothesize that diminished hippocalcin expression might contribute to striatal neurodegeneration in HD. We tested this hypothesis by assessing whether restoration of hippocalcin expression would decrease striatal neurodegeneration in cellular models of HD comprising primary striatal neurons exposed to mutant huntingtin, the mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid or an excitotoxic concentration of glutamate. Counter to our hypothesis, hippocalcin expression did not improve the survival of striatal neurons under these conditions. Likewise, expression of hippocalcin together with interactor proteins including the neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein did not increase the survival of striatal cells in cellular models of HD. These results indicate that diminished hippocalcin expression does not contribute to HD-related neurodegeneration.

  9. D2 dopamine receptor activation inhibits basal and forskolin-evoked acetylcholine release from dissociated striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Login, I S

    1997-02-21

    We tested whether D2 ligands inhibit basal and forskolin-stimulated [3H]ACh release from dissociated striata, as opposed to striatal slices. Quinpirole inhibited both basal (40% maximal inhibition; IC50 approximately 50 nM) and 10 microM forskolin-stimulated release (80% inhibition; IC50 approximately 25 nM quinpirole) and both actions were blocked by a D2 antagonist. Vesamicol prevented the quinpirole and forskolin actions. The ability of D2 agonists to inhibit basal and cyclase-stimulated acetylcholine release emanating from vesamicol-sensitive vesicles appears to be tonically suppressed by inhibitory elements within striatal circuitry.

  10. Striatal Volume Increases in Active Methamphetamine-Dependent Individuals and Correlation with Cognitive Performance

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Reem K.; Lin, Joanne C.; Miles, Sylvester W.; Kydd, Rob R.; Russell, Bruce R.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of methamphetamine (MA) dependence on the structure of the human brain has not been extensively studied, especially in active users. Previous studies reported cortical deficits and striatal gains in grey matter (GM) volume of abstinent MA abusers compared with control participants. This study aimed to investigate structural GM changes in the brains of 17 active MA-dependent participants compared with 20 control participants aged 18–46 years using voxel-based morphometry and region of interest volumetric analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging data, and whether these changes might be associated with cognitive performance. Significant volume increases were observed in the right and left putamen and left nucleus accumbens of MA-dependent compared to control participants. The volumetric gain in the right putamen remained significant after Bonferroni correction, and was inversely correlated with the number of errors (standardised z-scores) on the Go/No-go task. MA-dependent participants exhibited cortical GM deficits in the left superior frontal and precentral gyri in comparison to control participants, although these findings did not survive correction for multiple comparisons. In conclusion, consistent with findings from previous studies of abstinent users, active chronic MA-dependent participants showed significant striatal enlargement which was associated with improved performance on the Go/No-go, a cognitive task of response inhibition and impulsivity. Striatal enlargement may reflect the involvement of neurotrophic effects, inflammation or microgliosis. However, since it was associated with improved cognitive function, it is likely to reflect a compensatory response to MA-induced neurotoxicity in the striatum, in order to maintain cognitive function. Follow-up studies are recommended to ascertain whether this effect continues to be present following abstinence. Several factors may have contributed to the lack of more substantial cortical and

  11. Striatal Dopamine Transporter Modulation After Rotigotine: Results From a Pilot Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Study in a Group of Early Stage Parkinson Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Carlo; Genovesi, Dario; Marzullo, Paolo; Giorgetti, Assuero; Filidei, Elena; Corsini, Giovanni Umberto; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Ceravolo, Roberto

    Several in vitro data have reported negative interference by dopamine-agonists on the expression of dopamine transporter (DAT), whereas the majority of imaging studies have shown that neither L-dopa nor dopamine-agonists interfere with DAT availability. As yet, there are no in vivo studies on DAT expression after treatment with rotigotine. We evaluated presynaptic nigrostriatal function in 8 patients with de novo Parkinson disease (age, 59 ± 6.2 years; male/female sex, 5/3) using 123-I- N-ω-fluoropropyl-2-β-carbomethoxy-3-β-(4-iodophenyl)nortropane (FP-CIT) single-photon emission computed tomography before and after 3 months of treatment with rotigotine (mean dose, 7.75 ± 1.98 mg). For data analysis, specific (left and right caudate, left and right putamen) to nonspecific (occipital cortex) binding ratios, putamen-to-caudate ratios, and asymmetry indices were calculated. After rotigotine, motor symptoms improved in all patients (Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale III mean score, 11.88 ± 2.59 vs 7.63 ± 1.92 on therapy; P = 0.0022). Striatal FP-CIT levels showed a significant improvement in every patient at the follow-up scan. Comparisons between before and after treatment in the whole group revealed a significant improvement in FP-CIT uptake in both caudate and putamen (P < 0.001 in each nucleus). Putamen-to-caudate ratio and asymmetry indices did not show any significant difference before and after treatment. Although the study population was small, we found DAT overexpression after chronic treatment with rotigotine, presumably related to its pharmacological profile. The DAT upregulation by rotigotine in an opposite direction with respect to early Parkinson disease compensatory mechanisms might reduce the risk of dyskinesia, but it could imply less motor benefit because of less stimulation by the dopamine itself on dopaminergic receptors.

  12. Cue-induced craving increases impulsivity via changes in striatal value signals in problem gamblers.

    PubMed

    Miedl, Stephan F; Büchel, Christian; Peters, Jan

    2014-03-26

    Impulsive behavior such as steep temporal discounting is a hallmark of addiction and is associated with relapse. In pathological gamblers, discounting may be further increased by the presence of gambling-related cues in the environment, but the extent to which the gambling relatedness of task settings affects reward responses in gambling addiction is debated. In the present study, human problem gamblers made choices between immediate rewards and individually tailored larger-but-later rewards while visual gambling-related scenes were presented in the background. N = 17 participants were scanned using fMRI, whereas N = 5 additional participants completed a behavioral version of the task. Postscan craving ratings were acquired for each image, and behavioral and neuroimaging data were analyzed separately for high- and low-craving trials (median split analysis). Discounting was steeper for high versus low craving trials. Neuroimaging revealed a positive correlation with model-based subjective value in midbrain and striatum in low-craving trials that was reversed in high-craving trials. These findings reveal a modulation of striatal reward responses in gamblers by addiction-related cues, and highlight a potentially important mechanism that may contribute to relapse. Cue-induced changes in striatal delayed reward signals may lead to increased discounting of future rewards, which might in turn affect the likelihood of relapse.

  13. Subchronic administration of short-acting naltrexone has no effect on striatal dopamine transporter availability, food intake or body weight gain in rats.

    PubMed

    Zaaijer, Eline R; de Bruin, Kora; la Fleur, Susanne E; Goudriaan, Anna E; van den Brink, Wim; Booij, Jan

    2015-03-01

    The opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone is successfully used in the treatment of opioid and alcohol dependence. However, questions have been raised about possible anhedonic side effects, because the opioid system is directly involved in hedonic responses to natural rewarding activities, possibly due to its indirect effects on the striatal dopamine transporter (DAT). In order to test this hypothesis, 30 rats were randomized to either a 10-day treatment with 3 mg/kg short-acting naltrexone or vehicle. No significant differences between the groups were found in striatal DAT availability, cumulative food intake (for 48 or 72 h), body weight gain and abdominal fatpad weight. Thus, the results of this study suggest that (sub)chronic treatment with short-acting naltrexone does not induce possible anhedonic effects. However, it cannot be ruled out the anhedonic effect of naltrexone is only short-lived and thus not detected in the current study. Therefore, future studies are needed to study possible acute anhedonic effects at several time points shortly after short-acting naltrexone administration and to directly compare the possible anhedonic effects of long-acting with those of short-acting opioid antagonists.

  14. Distinct cortical and striatal actions of a β-arrestin-biased dopamine D2 receptor ligand reveal unique antipsychotic-like properties.

    PubMed

    Urs, Nikhil M; Gee, Steven M; Pack, Thomas F; McCorvy, John D; Evron, Tama; Snyder, Joshua C; Yang, Xiaobao; Rodriguiz, Ramona M; Borrelli, Emiliana; Wetsel, William C; Jin, Jian; Roth, Bryan L; O'Donnell, Patricio; Caron, Marc G

    2016-12-13

    The current dopamine (DA) hypothesis of schizophrenia postulates striatal hyperdopaminergia and cortical hypodopaminergia. Although partial agonists at DA D2 receptors (D2Rs), like aripiprazole, were developed to simultaneously target both phenomena, they do not effectively improve cortical dysfunction. In this study, we investigate the potential for newly developed β-arrestin2 (βarr2)-biased D2R partial agonists to simultaneously target hyper- and hypodopaminergia. Using neuron-specific βarr2-KO mice, we show that the antipsychotic-like effects of a βarr2-biased D2R ligand are driven through both striatal antagonism and cortical agonism of D2R-βarr2 signaling. Furthermore, βarr2-biased D2R agonism enhances firing of cortical fast-spiking interneurons. This enhanced cortical agonism of the biased ligand can be attributed to a lack of G-protein signaling and elevated expression of βarr2 and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 in the cortex versus the striatum. Therefore, we propose that βarr2-biased D2R ligands that exert region-selective actions could provide a path to develop more effective antipsychotic therapies.

  15. Distinct cortical and striatal actions of a β-arrestin–biased dopamine D2 receptor ligand reveal unique antipsychotic-like properties

    PubMed Central

    Urs, Nikhil M.; Gee, Steven M.; Pack, Thomas F.; McCorvy, John D.; Evron, Tama; Snyder, Joshua C.; Yang, Xiaobao; Rodriguiz, Ramona M.; Borrelli, Emiliana; Wetsel, William C.; Jin, Jian; Roth, Bryan L.; O’Donnell, Patricio; Caron, Marc G.

    2016-01-01

    The current dopamine (DA) hypothesis of schizophrenia postulates striatal hyperdopaminergia and cortical hypodopaminergia. Although partial agonists at DA D2 receptors (D2Rs), like aripiprazole, were developed to simultaneously target both phenomena, they do not effectively improve cortical dysfunction. In this study, we investigate the potential for newly developed β-arrestin2 (βarr2)-biased D2R partial agonists to simultaneously target hyper- and hypodopaminergia. Using neuron-specific βarr2-KO mice, we show that the antipsychotic-like effects of a βarr2-biased D2R ligand are driven through both striatal antagonism and cortical agonism of D2R-βarr2 signaling. Furthermore, βarr2-biased D2R agonism enhances firing of cortical fast-spiking interneurons. This enhanced cortical agonism of the biased ligand can be attributed to a lack of G-protein signaling and elevated expression of βarr2 and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 in the cortex versus the striatum. Therefore, we propose that βarr2-biased D2R ligands that exert region-selective actions could provide a path to develop more effective antipsychotic therapies. PMID:27911814

  16. Enhancing effect of taurine in the rat caudate spindle. II. Effect of bilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the nigro-striatal dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Kitsukawa, S; Okuyama, S; Aihara, H

    1988-10-01

    Bilateral injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the medial forebrain bundle of rats resulted in destruction of dopamine (DA) nerve terminals in the striatum. DA contents decreased to 16.8, 15.0 and 13.7% of control values on 3, 5 and 7 days after the lesions, respectively. The time course of the effect of 6-OHDA lesions on apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg, IV)-induced stereotypy was investigated as the index of the development of supersensitivity. Stereotypy was unchanged on 3 days, but was enhanced 5 and 7 days after 6-OHDA lesions. Therefore, the sensitivity of postsynaptic DA receptors for apomorphine did not change 3 days after 6-OHDA lesions, although the striatal DA was depleted. The effects of bilateral injections of taurine into the striatum on the rat caudate spindle were determined 3 days after 6-OHDA lesions. Taurine, at a dose of 30 micrograms, enhanced the spindle in sham-operated rats, but this enhancement was not seen after 6-OHDA lesions. Intravenous administration of apomorphine (0.5 mg/kg) to lesioned rats suppressed the spindle, and this effect was prevented by a lower dose (3 micrograms) of taurine. These results provide further evidence that taurine enhances the spindle, possibly by decreasing the activity of the nigro-striatal DA system at the pre- and postsynaptic sites.

  17. Mammal-like striatal functions in Anolis. II. Distribution of dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors, and a laminar pattern of basal ganglia sub-systems.

    PubMed

    Clark, E C; Baxter, L R; Dure, L S; Ackermann, R F; Kemp, G F; Bachus, S E

    2000-11-01

    We used in situ autoradiographic ligand binding methods to determine the occurrence and distribution of dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptor sub-types in the anole lizard, Anolis carolinensis. Both were present and exhibited pharmacological specificity characteristics similar to those described for mammals. However, unlike in mammals where in the neostriatum [outside the nucleus accumbens/olfactory tubercle complex (NA/OT)] these receptors exhibit only slight dorsolateral (D(2) high, D(1) low) to ventromedial (D(1 )high, D(2) low) gradients that co mingle extensively, in the anole striatum outside the NA/OT there was a striking laminar pattern, with little if any overlap between D(2) (high in a dorsal band) and D(1) (high ventral to the D(2) band) distributions. As D(1) receptors are related to the direct and D(2) to the indirect basal ganglia (BG) subsystems in mammals, we also determined anole striatal distributions of pre-proenkephalin mRNA, a marker for striatal efferents to the indirect BG subsystem in mammals. Here, too, there was a striking laminar pattern, with pre-proenkephalin mRNA in a band similar to that seen for D(2) receptors. The crisp neuroanatomical separation between these classic BG subsystem markers in Anolis striatum make this species attractive for the study of such systems' functions during behavior.

  18. Stronger Dopamine D1 Receptor-Mediated Neurotransmission in Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Farré, Daniel; Muñoz, Ana; Moreno, Estefanía; Reyes-Resina, Irene; Canet-Pons, Júlia; Dopeso-Reyes, Iria G; Rico, Alberto J; Lluís, Carme; Mallol, Josefa; Navarro, Gemma; Canela, Enric I; Cortés, Antonio; Labandeira-García, José L; Casadó, Vicent; Lanciego, José L; Franco, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Radioligand binding assays to rat striatal dopamine D1 receptors showed that brain lateralization of the dopaminergic system were not due to changes in expression but in agonist affinity. D1 receptor-mediated striatal imbalance resulted from a significantly higher agonist affinity in the left striatum. D1 receptors heteromerize with dopamine D3 receptors, which are considered therapeutic targets for dyskinesia in parkinsonian patients. Expression of both D3 and D1-D3 receptor heteromers were increased in samples from 6-hydroxy-dopamine-hemilesioned rats rendered dyskinetic by treatment with 3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl-L-alanine (L-DOPA). Similar findings were obtained using striatal samples from primates. Radioligand binding studies in the presence of a D3 agonist led in dyskinetic, but not in lesioned or L-DOPA-treated rats, to a higher dopamine sensitivity. Upon D3-receptor activation, the affinity of agonists for binding to the right striatal D1 receptor increased. Excess dopamine coming from L-DOPA medication likely activates D3 receptors thus making right and left striatal D1 receptors equally responsive to dopamine. These results show that dyskinesia occurs concurrently with a right/left striatal balance in D1 receptor-mediated neurotransmission.

  19. β-phenylethylamine Requires the Dopamine Transporter to Increase Extracellular Dopamine in C. elegans Dopaminergic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Murad; Wickramasekara, Rochelle N.; Carvelli, Lucia

    2013-01-01

    β-phenylethylamine (βPEA) is an endogenous amine that has been shown to increase the synaptic levels of dopamine (DA). A number of in vitro and behavioral studies suggest the dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a role in the effects generated by βPEA, however the mechanism through which βPEA affects DAT has not yet been elucidated. Here, we used Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans DAT (DAT-1) expressing LLC-pk1 cells and neuronal cultures to investigate whether the βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA required DAT-1. Our data show that βPEA increases extracellular dopamine both in DAT-1 transfected cells and cultures of differentiated neurons. RTI-55, a cocaine homologue and DAT inhibitor, completely blocked the βPEA-induced effect in transfected cells. However in neuronal cultures, RTI-55 only partly inhibited the increase of extracellular DA generated by βPEA. These results suggest that βPEA requires DAT-1 and other, not yet identified proteins, to increase extracellular DA when tested in a native system. Furthermore, our results suggest that βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA does not require functional monoamine vesicles as genetic ablation of the C. elegans homologue vesicular monoamine transporter, cat-1, did not compromise the ability of βPEA to increase extracellular DA. Finally, our electrophysiology data show that βPEA caused fast-rising and self-inactivating amperometric currents in a subset of wild-type DA neurons but not in neurons isolated from dat-1 knockout animals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that in both DA neurons and heterogeneous cultures of differentiated C. elegans neurons, βPEA releases cytoplasmic DA through DAT-1 to ultimately increase the extracellular concentration of DA. PMID:24161617

  20. β-Phenylethylamine requires the dopamine transporter to increase extracellular dopamine in Caenorhabditis elegans dopaminergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Murad; Wickramasekara, Rochelle N; Carvelli, Lucia

    2014-07-01

    β-Phenylethylamine (βPEA) is an endogenous amine that has been shown to increase the synaptic levels of dopamine (DA). A number of in vitro and behavioral studies suggest the dopamine transporter (DAT) plays a role in the effects generated by βPEA, however the mechanism through which βPEA affects DAT has not yet been elucidated. Here, we used Caenorhabditis (C.) elegans DAT (DAT-1) expressing LLC-pk1 cells and neuronal cultures to investigate whether the βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA required DAT-1. Our data show that βPEA increases extracellular dopamine both in DAT-1 transfected cells and cultures of differentiated neurons. RTI-55, a cocaine homologue and DAT inhibitor, completely blocked the βPEA-induced effect in transfected cells. However in neuronal cultures, RTI-55 only partly inhibited the increase of extracellular DA generated by βPEA. These results suggest that βPEA requires DAT-1 and other, not yet identified proteins, to increase extracellular DA when tested in a native system. Furthermore, our results suggest that βPEA-induced increase of extracellular DA does not require functional monoamine vesicles as genetic ablation of the C. elegans homologue vesicular monoamine transporter, cat-1, did not compromise the ability of βPEA to increase extracellular DA. Finally, our electrophysiology data show that βPEA caused fast-rising and self-inactivating amperometric currents in a subset of wild-type DA neurons but not in neurons isolated from dat-1 knockout animals. Taken together, these data demonstrate that in both DA neurons and heterogeneous cultures of differentiated C. elegans neurons, βPEA releases cytoplasmic DA through DAT-1 to ultimately increase the extracellular concentration of DA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The relationship between the occupation of the D-1 dopamine receptor by [3H]piflutixol and the activity of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in rat striatal membranes.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, S

    1991-07-05

    The relationship between occupation of the D-1 dopamine receptor by [3H]piflutixol and inhibition of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase has been studied. Experiments were performed in parallel; after the initial incubation to enable binding of [3H]piflutixol, half the tubes were assayed for [3H]piflutixol binding and the other half assayed for adenylate cyclase activity. The assay conditions for the two halves of the experiments were identical. (+/-)Sulpiride (3 x 10(-5)M) was present in all tubes to mask drug binding to the D-2 receptor. The inhibition of dopamine- (10(-3) and 10(-5)M) sensitive adenylate cyclase with increasing concentrations of [3H]piflutixol in the incubation mixture was compared to the saturation of specific [3H]piflutixol binding with those same concentrations of [3H]piflutixol. There was a linear relationship between receptor occupation by [3H]piflutixol and inhibition of dopamine sensitive adenylate cyclase. In a second experiment dopamine was present during the initial incubation with [3H]piflutixol. This resulted in a displacement of specific [3H]piflutixol binding and, as a consequence, a reduction of [3H]piflutixol's inhibition of dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase. In the absence of GTP in the initial incubation dopamine produced a greater reduction of [3H]piflutixol's inhibition of dopamine adenylate cyclase than displacement of specific [3H]piflutixol binding. In the presence of GTP in the initial incubation both displacement curves were shifted to the right, i.e. dopamine was less potent. However, under these conditions dopamine produced less inhibition of [3H]piflutixol's inhibition of dopamine adenylate cyclase than displacement of specific [3H]piflutixol binding. These results are interpreted as resulting from changes in D-1high and D-1low ratios as a result of incubation in the presence or absence of GTP.

  2. A single photon emission computed tomography scan study of striatal dopamine D2 receptor binding with 123I-epidepride in patients with schizophrenia and controls.

    PubMed Central

    Tibbo, P; Silverstone, P H; McEwan, A J; Scott, J; Joshua, A; Golberg, K

    1997-01-01

    The usefulness of 123I-epidepride as a single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scan D2 receptor ligand was examined in vivo in 13 medicated patients with schizophrenia and age- and sex-matched normal controls. To establish the effect of endogenous dopamine on 123I-epidepride binding, 4 of the 13 controls also received 20 mg D-amphetamine. The results showed that 123I-epidepride had high specific binding to the striatum in both patients with schizophrenia and normal controls. There was a trend for the total striatal binding of medicated patients with schizophrenia, as measured by total basal ganglia: frontal cortex (TBG:FC) ratios, to be less than the binding of controls (P = 0.053). This trend confirms previous work showing that antipsychotic medication decreases the number of D2 receptors available for binding to the radioligand. Interestingly, there was also a significant relationship between 123I-epidepride binding ratios and global functioning scales (Global Assessment of Functioning scale [GAF]) for schizophrenia (r = 0.56, P = 0.045), although there was no such relationship with the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). In addition, our results showed that amphetamine-induced dopamine release did not alter 123I-epidepride binding, confirming the high specific binding of 123I-epidepride to the D2 receptor. We conclude that 123I-epidepride appears to be a very useful SPECT ligand for imaging the D2 receptor. PMID:9002391

  3. Gain in Body Fat Is Associated with Increased Striatal Response to Palatable Food Cues, whereas Body Fat Stability Is Associated with Decreased Striatal Response

    PubMed Central

    Yokum, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    Cross-sectional brain-imaging studies reveal that obese versus lean humans show greater responsivity of reward and attention regions to palatable food cues, but lower responsivity of reward regions to palatable food receipt. However, these individual differences in responsivity may result from a period of overeating. We conducted a repeated-measures fMRI study to test whether healthy weight adolescent humans who gained body fat over a 2 or 3 year follow-up period show an increase in responsivity of reward and attention regions to a cue signaling impending milkshake receipt and a simultaneous decrease in responsivity of reward regions to milkshake receipt versus adolescents who showed stability of or loss of body fat. Adolescents who gained body fat, who largely remained in a healthy weight range, showed increases in activation in the putamen, mid-insula, Rolandic operculum, and precuneus to a cue signaling impending milkshake receipt versus those who showed stability of or loss of body fat, though these effects were partially driven by reductions in responsivity among the latter groups. Adolescents who gained body fat reported significantly greater milkshake wanting and milkshake pleasantness ratings at follow-up compared to those who lost body fat. Adolescents who gained body fat did not show a reduction in responsivity of reward regions to milkshake receipt or changes in responsivity to receipt and anticipated receipt of monetary reward. Data suggest that initiating a prolonged period of overeating may increase striatal responsivity to food cues, and that maintaining a balance between caloric intake and expenditure may reduce striatal, insular, and Rolandic operculum responsivity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This novel, repeated-measures brain-imaging study suggests that adolescents who gained body fat over our follow-up period experienced an increase in striatal responsivity to cues for palatable foods compared to those who showed stability of or loss of body fat

  4. Modulation of impulsivity and reward sensitivity in intertemporal choice by striatal and midbrain dopamine synthesis in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Smith, Christopher T; Wallace, Deanna L; Dang, Linh C; Aarts, Esther; Jagust, William J; D'Esposito, Mark; Boettiger, Charlotte A

    2016-03-01

    Converging evidence links individual differences in mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine (DA) to variation in the tendency to choose immediate rewards ("Now") over larger, delayed rewards ("Later"), or "Now bias." However, to date, no study of healthy young adults has evaluated the relationship between Now bias and DA with positron emission tomography (PET). Sixteen healthy adults (ages 24-34 yr; 50% women) completed a delay-discounting task that quantified aspects of intertemporal reward choice, including Now bias and reward magnitude sensitivity. Participants also underwent PET scanning with 6-[(18)F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FMT), a radiotracer that measures DA synthesis capacity. Lower putamen FMT signal predicted elevated Now bias, a more rapidly declining discount rate with increasing delay time, and reduced willingness to accept low-interest-rate delayed rewards. In contrast, lower FMT signal in the midbrain predicted greater sensitivity to increasing magnitude of the Later reward. These data demonstrate that intertemporal reward choice in healthy humans varies with region-specific measures of DA processing, with regionally distinct associations with sensitivity to delay and to reward magnitude.

  5. Modulation of impulsivity and reward sensitivity in intertemporal choice by striatal and midbrain dopamine synthesis in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christopher T.; Wallace, Deanna L.; Dang, Linh C.; Aarts, Esther; Jagust, William J.; D'Esposito, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Converging evidence links individual differences in mesolimbic and mesocortical dopamine (DA) to variation in the tendency to choose immediate rewards (“Now”) over larger, delayed rewards (“Later”), or “Now bias.” However, to date, no study of healthy young adults has evaluated the relationship between Now bias and DA with positron emission tomography (PET). Sixteen healthy adults (ages 24–34 yr; 50% women) completed a delay-discounting task that quantified aspects of intertemporal reward choice, including Now bias and reward magnitude sensitivity. Participants also underwent PET scanning with 6-[18F]fluoro-l-m-tyrosine (FMT), a radiotracer that measures DA synthesis capacity. Lower putamen FMT signal predicted elevated Now bias, a more rapidly declining discount rate with increasing delay time, and reduced willingness to accept low-interest-rate delayed rewards. In contrast, lower FMT signal in the midbrain predicted greater sensitivity to increasing magnitude of the Later reward. These data demonstrate that intertemporal reward choice in healthy humans varies with region-specific measures of DA processing, with regionally distinct associations with sensitivity to delay and to reward magnitude. PMID:26683066

  6. Raclopride and chlorpromazine, but not clozapine, increase muscle rigidity in the rat: relationship with D2 dopamine receptor occupancy.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, K M; Crocker, A D

    1999-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between effects on muscle tone and D2 receptor occupancy of two typical antipsychotic drugs, raclopride and chlorpromazine, and the atypical drug, clozapine. Increased muscle tone (i.e., muscle rigidity), was measured as increases in tonic electromyographic (EMG) activity of the antagonistic muscles of the rat hind limb. D2 dopamine receptor occupancy was assessed in the striatum and substantia nigra, areas involved in the regulation of muscle tone. Raclopride and chlorpromazine produced dose-dependent increases in EMG activity associated with D2 occupancy of 68%-80% in the striatum and 67%-76% in the nigra. No significant increases in EMG were observed with clozapine which showed low D2 occupancy. The results are consistent with those from human studies showing extrapyramidal side effects were associated with striatal D2 occupancy of > 70%.

  7. Relationships among rat ultrasonic vocalizations, behavioral measures of striatal dopamine loss, and striatal tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity at acute and chronic time points following unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Grant, Laura M; Barnett, David G; Doll, Emerald J; Leverson, Glen; Ciucci, Michelle

    2015-09-15

    Voice deficits in Parkinson disease (PD) emerge early in the disease process, but do not improve with standard treatments targeting dopamine. Experimental work in the rat shows that severe and chron