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Sample records for increases p53 stability

  1. Heterozygous p53V172F mutation in cisplatin-resistant human tumor cells promotes MDM4 recruitment and decreases stability and transactivity of p53

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiaolei; Lozano, Guillermina; Siddik, Zahid H.

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is an important antitumor agent, but its clinical utility is often limited by multifactorial mechanism of resistance. Loss of tumor suppressor p53 function is a major mechanism, affected by either mutation in the DNA binding domain or dysregulation by overexpression of p53 inhibitors MDM2 and MDM4 that destabilize p53 by increasing its proteosomal degradation. In the present study, cisplatin-resistant 2780CP/Cl-16 ovarian tumor cells expressed a heterozygous, temperature-sensitive p53V172F mutation, which reduced p53 half-life by 2- to 3-fold compared to homozygous wild-type p53 in parental A2780 cells. Although reduced p53 stability in 2780CP/Cl-16 cells was associated with moderate cellular overexpression of MDM2 or MDM4 (<1.5-fold), their binding to p53 was substantially enhanced (5- to 8-fold). The analogous cisplatin-resistant 2780CP/Cl-24 cells, which express loss of p53 heterozygosity, retained the p53V172F mutation and high p53-MDM4 binding, but demonstrated lower p53-bound MDM2 that was associated with reduced p53 ubiquitination and enhanced p53 stability. The inference that p53 was unstable as a hetromeric p53wt/p53V172F complex was confirmed in 2780CP/Cl-24 cells transfected with wild-type (wt) p53 or multimer-inhibiting p53L344P mutant, and further supported by normalization of p53 stability in both resistant cell lines grown at the permissive temperature of 32.5°C. Surprisingly, in 2780CP/Cl-16 and 2780CP/Cl-24 models, cisplatin-induced transactivity of p53 was attenuated at 37°C, and this correlated with cisplatin resistance. However, downregulation of MDM2 or MDM4 by siRNA in either resistant cell line induced p53 and restored p21 transactivation at 37°C, as did cisplatin-induced DNA damage at 32.5°C that coincided with reduced p53-MDM4 binding and cisplatin resistance. These results demonstrate that cisplatin-mediated p53V172F mutation regulates p53 stability at the normothermic temperature, but it is the increased recruitment of MDM4

  2. p53 loss-of-heterozygosity is a necessary prerequisite for mutant p53 stabilization and gain-of-function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Alexandrova, Evguenia M; Mirza, Safia A; Xu, Sulan; Schulz-Heddergott, Ramona; Marchenko, Natalia D; Moll, Ute M

    2017-03-09

    Missense mutations in TP53 comprise >75% of all p53 alterations in cancer, resulting in highly stabilized mutant p53 proteins that not only lose their tumor-suppressor activity, but often acquire oncogenic gain-of-functions (GOFs). GOF manifests itself in accelerated tumor onset, increased metastasis, increased drug resistance and shortened survival in patients and mice. A known prerequisite for GOF is mutant p53 protein stabilization, which itself is linked to aberrant protein conformation. However, additional determinants for mutant p53 stabilization likely exist. Here we show that in initially heterozygous mouse tumors carrying the hotspot GOF allele R248Q (p53Q/+), another necessary prerequisite for mutant p53 stabilization and GOF in vivo is loss of the remaining wild-type p53 allele, termed loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH). Thus, in mouse tumors with high frequency of p53 LOH (osteosarcomas and fibrosarcomas), we find that mutant p53 protein is stabilized (16/17 cases, 94%) and tumor onset is significantly accelerated compared with p53+/- tumors (GOF). In contrast, in mouse tumors with low frequency of p53 LOH (MMTV-Neu breast carcinomas), mutant p53 protein is not stabilized (16/20 cases, 80%) and GOF is not observed. Of note, human genomic databases (TCGA, METABRIC etc.) show a high degree of p53 LOH in all examined tumor types that carry missense p53 mutations, including sarcomas and breast carcinomas (with and without HER2 amplification). These data - while cautioning that not all genetic mouse models faithfully represent the human situation - demonstrate for the first time that p53 LOH is a critical prerequisite for missense mutant p53 stabilization and GOF in vivo.

  3. MDM4 (MDMX) overexpression enhances stabilization of stress-induced p53 and promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Francesca; Gentiletti, Francesca; D'Angelo, Marco; Giglio, Simona; Nanni, Simona; D'Angelo, Carmen; Farsetti, Antonella; Citro, Gennaro; Sacchi, Ada; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Moretti, Fabiola

    2004-02-27

    Rescue of embryonic lethality in MDM4(-/-) mice through concomitant loss of p53 has revealed a functional partnership between the two proteins. Biochemical studies have suggested that MDM4 may act as a negative regulator of p53 levels and activity. On the other hand, MDM4 overexpression has been reported to stabilize p53 levels and to counteract MDM2-degradative activity. We have investigated the functional role of MDM4 overexpression on cell behavior. In both established and primary cells cultured under stress conditions, overexpression of MDM4 significantly increased p53-dependent cell death, in correlation with enhanced induction of the endogenous p53 protein levels. This phenomenon was associated with induced p53 transcriptional activity and increased levels of the proapoptotic protein, Bax. Further, p53 stabilization was accompanied by decreased association of the protein to its negative regulator, MDM2. These findings reveal a novel role for MDM4 by demonstrating that in non-tumor cells under stress conditions it may act as a positive regulator of p53 activity, mainly by controlling p53 levels. They also indicate a major distinction between the biological consequences of MDM4 and MDM2 overexpression.

  4. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Prokesch, Andreas; Graef, Franziska A.; Madl, Tobias; Kahlhofer, Jennifer; Heidenreich, Steffi; Schumann, Anne; Moyschewitz, Elisabeth; Pristoynik, Petra; Blaschitz, Astrid; Knauer, Miriam; Muenzner, Matthias; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G.; Dohr, Gottfried; Schulz, Tim J.; Schupp, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The ability to adapt cellular metabolism to nutrient availability is critical for survival. The liver plays a central role in the adaptation to starvation by switching from glucose-consuming processes and lipid synthesis to providing energy substrates like glucose to the organism. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of the tumor suppressor p53 in the physiologic adaptation to food withdrawal. We found that starvation robustly increases p53 protein in mouse liver. This induction was posttranscriptional and mediated by a hepatocyte-autonomous and AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism. p53 stabilization was required for the adaptive expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism. Indeed, acute deletion of p53 in livers of adult mice impaired hepatic glycogen storage and induced steatosis. Upon food withdrawal, p53-deleted mice became hypoglycemic and showed defects in the starvation-associated utilization of hepatic amino acids. In summary, we provide novel evidence for a p53-dependent integration of acute changes of cellular energy status and the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Because of its tumor suppressor function, p53 stabilization by starvation could have implications for both metabolic and oncological diseases of the liver.—Prokesch, A., Graef, F. A., Madl, T., Kahlhofer, J., Heidenreich, S., Schumann, A., Moyschewitz, E., Pristoynik, P., Blaschitz, A., Knauer, M., Muenzner, M., Bogner-Strauss, J. G., Dohr, G., Schulz, T. J., Schupp, M. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis. PMID:27811061

  5. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis.

    PubMed

    Prokesch, Andreas; Graef, Franziska A; Madl, Tobias; Kahlhofer, Jennifer; Heidenreich, Steffi; Schumann, Anne; Moyschewitz, Elisabeth; Pristoynik, Petra; Blaschitz, Astrid; Knauer, Miriam; Muenzner, Matthias; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G; Dohr, Gottfried; Schulz, Tim J; Schupp, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The ability to adapt cellular metabolism to nutrient availability is critical for survival. The liver plays a central role in the adaptation to starvation by switching from glucose-consuming processes and lipid synthesis to providing energy substrates like glucose to the organism. Here we report a previously unrecognized role of the tumor suppressor p53 in the physiologic adaptation to food withdrawal. We found that starvation robustly increases p53 protein in mouse liver. This induction was posttranscriptional and mediated by a hepatocyte-autonomous and AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent mechanism. p53 stabilization was required for the adaptive expression of genes involved in amino acid catabolism. Indeed, acute deletion of p53 in livers of adult mice impaired hepatic glycogen storage and induced steatosis. Upon food withdrawal, p53-deleted mice became hypoglycemic and showed defects in the starvation-associated utilization of hepatic amino acids. In summary, we provide novel evidence for a p53-dependent integration of acute changes of cellular energy status and the metabolic adaptation to starvation. Because of its tumor suppressor function, p53 stabilization by starvation could have implications for both metabolic and oncological diseases of the liver.-Prokesch, A., Graef, F. A., Madl, T., Kahlhofer, J., Heidenreich, S., Schumann, A., Moyschewitz, E., Pristoynik, P., Blaschitz, A., Knauer, M., Muenzner, M., Bogner-Strauss, J. G., Dohr, G., Schulz, T. J., Schupp, M. Liver p53 is stabilized upon starvation and required for amino acid catabolism and gluconeogenesis.

  6. AKT regulates NPM dependent ARF localization and p53mut stability in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Jennifer; Sampson, Oliver; Pefani, Dafni E.; Khoronenkova, Svetlana; Grawenda, Anna; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Jamieson, Nigel; McKay, Colin; Sansom, Owen; Dianov, Grigory L.; O'Neill, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Nucleophosmin (NPM) is known to regulate ARF subcellular localization and MDM2 activity in response to oncogenic stress, though the precise mechanism has remained elusive. Here we describe how NPM and ARF associate in the nucleoplasm to form a MDM2 inhibitory complex. We find that oligomerization of NPM drives nucleolar accumulation of ARF. Moreover, the formation of NPM and ARF oligomers antagonizes MDM2 association with the inhibitory complex, leading to activation of MDM2 E3-ligase activity and targeting of p53. We find that AKT phosphorylation of NPM-Ser48 prevents oligomerization that results in nucleoplasmic localization of ARF, constitutive MDM2 inhibition and stabilization of p53. We also show that ARF promotes p53 mutant stability in tumors and suppresses p73 mediated p21 expression and senescence. We demonstrate that AKT and PI3K inhibitors may be effective in treatment of therapeutically resistant tumors with elevated AKT and carrying gain of function mutations in p53. Our results show that the clinical candidate AKT inhibitor MK-2206 promotes ARF nucleolar localization, reduced p53mut stability and increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation in a xenograft model of pancreatic cancer. Analysis of human tumors indicates that phospho-S48-NPM may be a useful biomarker for monitoring AKT activity and in vivo efficacy of AKT inhibitor treatment. Critically, we propose that combination therapy involving PI3K-AKT inhibitors would benefit from a patient stratification rationale based on ARF and p53mut status. PMID:25071014

  7. Iron Metabolism Regulates p53 Signaling through Direct Heme-p53 Interaction and Modulation of p53 Localization, Stability, and Function

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jia; Sheng, Xiangpeng; Chang, ZeNan; Wu, Qian; Wang, Sheng; Xuan, Zongliang; Li, Dan; Wu, Yalan; Shang, Yongjia; Kong, Xiangtao; Yu, Long; Li, Lin; Ruan, Kangchen; Hu, Hongyu; Huang, Ying; Hui, Lijian; Xie, Dong; Wang, Fudi; Hu, Ronggui

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Iron excess is closely associated with tumorigenesis in multiple types of human cancers, with underlying mechanisms yet unclear. Recently, iron deprivation has emerged as a major strategy for chemotherapy, but it exerts tumor suppression only on select human malignancies. Here, we report that the tumor suppressor protein p53 is downregulated during iron excess. Strikingly, the iron polyporphyrin heme binds to p53 protein, interferes with p53-DNA interactions, and triggers both nuclear export and cytosolic degradation of p53. Moreover, in a tumorigenicity assay, iron deprivation suppressed wild-type p53-dependent tumor growth, suggesting that upregulation of wild-type p53 signaling underlies the selective efficacy of iron deprivation. Our findings thus identify a direct link between iron/heme homeostasis and the regulation of p53 signaling, which not only provides mechanistic insights into iron-excess-associated tumorigenesis but may also help predict and improve outcomes in iron-deprivation-based chemotherapy. PMID:24685134

  8. A novel mutant p53 binding partner BAG5 stabilizes mutant p53 and promotes mutant p53 GOFs in tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Xuetian; Zhao, Yuhan; Huang, Grace; Li, Jun; Zhu, Junlan; Feng, Zhaohui; Hu, Wenwei

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human tumors. Many tumor-associated mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins gain new tumor-promoting activities, including increased proliferation, metastasis and chemoresistance of tumor cells, which are defined as gain-of-functions (GOFs). Mutp53 proteins often accumulate at high levels in human tumors, which is important for mutp53 to exert their GOFs. The mechanism underlying mutp53 proteins accumulation in tumors is not fully understood. Here, we report that BAG5, a member of Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG) family proteins, promotes mutp53 accumulation in tumors, which in turn enhances mutp53 GOFs. Mechanistically, BAG5 interacts with mutp53 proteins to protect mutp53 from ubiquitination and degradation by E3 ubiquitin ligases MDM2 and CHIP, which in turn promotes mutp53 protein accumulation and therefore GOFs in promoting cell proliferation, tumor growth, cell migration and chemoresistance. BAG5 is frequently overexpressed in many human tumors and the overexpression of BAG5 is associated with poor prognosis of cancer patients. Altogether, this study revealed that inhibition of mutp53 degradation by BAG5 is a novel and critical mechanism underlying mutp53 protein accumulation and GOFs in cancer. Furthermore, our results also uncovered that promoting mutp53 accumulation and GOFs is a novel mechanism of BAG5 in tumorigenesis. PMID:27807478

  9. Structure of the p53 C-terminus bound to 14-3-3: implications for stabilization of the p53 tetramer.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Benjamin; Mondry, Justine; Thiel, Philipp; Weyand, Michael; Ottmann, Christian

    2010-04-16

    The adaptor protein 14-3-3 binds to and stabilizes the tumor suppressor p53 and enhances its anti-tumour activity. In the regulatory C-terminal domain of p53 several 14-3-3 binding motifs have been identified. Here, we report the crystal structure of the extreme C-terminus (residues 385-393, p53pT387) of p53 in complex with 14-3-3sigma at a resolution of 1.28A. p53pT387 is accommodated by 14-3-3 in a yet unrecognized fashion implying a rationale for 14-3-3 binding to the active p53 tetramer. The structure exhibits a potential binding site for small molecules that could stabilize the p53/14-3-3 protein complex suggesting the possibility for therapeutic intervention. Copyright 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Coumarin-chalcone hybrid instigates DNA damage by minor groove binding and stabilizes p53 through post translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Raghib; Hamidullah; Hasanain, Mohammad; Pandey, Praveen; Maheshwari, Mayank; Singh, L. Ravithej; Siddiqui, M. Quadir; Konwar, Rituraj; Sashidhara, Koneni V.; Sarkar, Jayanta

    2017-01-01

    S009-131, a coumarin-chalcone hybrid, had been shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-tumour effect by triggering apoptosis. In this report, we investigated role of DNA damage signalling pathway in S009-131 induced cancer cell death. Here we show that S009-131 causes DNA damage by potential binding to the minor groove which led to the phosphorylation and activation of ATM and DNA-PK, but not ATR, at earlier time points in order to initiate repair process. S009-131 induced DNA damage response triggered activation of p53 through phosphorylation at its key residues. Pharmacological inhibition of PIKKs abrogated S009-131 induced phosphorylation of p53 at Ser 15. DNA damage induced phosphorylation resulted in reduced proteasomal degradation of p53 by disrupting p53-MDM2 interaction. Additionally, our docking studies revealed that S009-131 might also contribute to increased cellular p53 level by occupying p53 binding pocket of MDM2. Posttranslational modifications of p53 upon S009-131 treatment led to enhanced affinity of p53 towards responsive elements (p53-RE) in the promoter regions of target genes and increased transcriptional efficiency. Together, the results suggest that S009-131 cleaves DNA through minor groove binding and eventually activates PIKKs associated DNA damage response signalling to promote stabilization and enhanced transcriptional activity of p53 through posttranslational modifications at key residues. PMID:28349922

  11. E2F1 plays a direct role in Rb stabilization and p53-independent tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Talos, Flaminia; Nemajerova, Alice; Moll, Ute M.; Petrenko, Oleksi

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the role of E2F1 in tumor formation, we analyzed spontaneous tumorigenesis in p53−/−E2F1+/+ and p53−/−E2F1−/− mice. We show that the combined loss of p53 and E2F1 leads to an increased incidence of sarcomas and carcinomas compared to the loss of p53 alone. E2F1-deficient tumors show wide chromosomal variation, indicative of genomic instability. Consistent with this, p53−/−E2F1−/− primary fibroblasts have a reduced capacity to maintain genomic stability when exposed to S-phase inhibitors or genotoxic drugs. A major mechanism of E2F1’s contribution to genomic integrity lies in mediating stabilization and engagement of the Rb protein. PMID:18583939

  12. Combining p53 stabilizers with metformin induces synergistic apoptosis through regulation of energy metabolism in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Long; Ahmad, Nihal; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since altered energy metabolism is a hallmark of cancer, many drugs targeting metabolic pathways are in active clinical trials. The tumor suppressor p53 is often inactivated in cancer, either through downregulation of protein or loss-of-function mutations. As such, stabilization of p53 is considered as one promising approach to treat those cancers carrying wild type (WT) p53. Herein, SIRT1 inhibitor Tenovin-1 and polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) inhibitor BI2536 were used to stabilize p53. We found that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 increased the anti-neoplastic activity of metformin, an inhibitor of oxidative phosphorylation, in a p53 dependent manner. Since p53 has also been shown to regulate metabolic pathways, we further analyzed glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation upon drug treatments. We showed that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 rescued metformin-induced glycolysis and that both Tennovin-1 and BI2536 potentiated metformin-associated inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation. Of significance, castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) C4-2 cells show a much more robust response to the combination treatment than the parental androgen-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells, indicating that targeting energy metabolism with metformin plus p53 stabilizers might be a valid approach to treat CRPC carrying WT p53. PMID:26900800

  13. Long Non-coding RNA, PANDA, Contributes to the Stabilization of p53 Tumor Suppressor Protein.

    PubMed

    Kotake, Yojiro; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Ohhata, Tatsuya; Sakai, Satoshi; Uchida, Chiharu; Niida, Hiroyuki; Naemura, Madoka; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    P21-associated noncoding RNA DNA damage-activated (PANDA) is induced in response to DNA damage and represses apoptosis by inhibiting the function of nuclear transcription factor Y subunit alpha (NF-YA) transcription factor. Herein, we report that PANDA affects regulation of p53 tumor-suppressor protein. U2OS cells were transfected with PANDA siRNAs. At 72 h post-transfection, cells were subjected to immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Depletion of PANDA was associated with decreased levels of p53 protein, but not p53 mRNA. The stability of p53 protein was markedly reduced by PANDA silencing. Degradation of p53 protein by silencing PANDA was prevented by treatment of MG132, a proteasome inhibitor. Moreover, depletion of PANDA prevented accumulation of p53 protein, as a result of DNA damage, induced by the genotoxic agent etoposide. These results suggest that PANDA stabilizes p53 protein in response to DNA damage, and provide new insight into the regulatory mechanisms of p53. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Okadaic acid mediates p53 hyperphosphorylation and growth arrest in cells with wild-type p53 but increases aberrant mitoses in cells with non-functional p53.

    PubMed

    Milczarek, G J; Chen, W; Gupta, A; Martinez, J D; Bowden, G T

    1999-06-01

    The protein phosphatase inhibitor and tumor promoting agent okadaic acid (OA), has been shown previously to induce hyperphosphorylation of p53 protein, which in turn correlated with increased transactivation or apoptotic function. However, how the tumor promotion effects of OA relate to p53 tumor supressor function (or dysfunction) remain unclear. Rat embryonic fibroblasts harboring a temperature-sensitive mouse p53 transgene were treated with 50 nM doses of OA. At the wild-type permissive temperature this treatment resulted in: (i) the hyperphosphorylation of sites within tryptic peptides of the transactivation domain of p53; (ii) an increase in p53 affinity for a p21(waf1) promotor oligonucleotide; (iii) an increase in cellular steady state levels of p21(waf1) message; (iv) a G2/M cell cycle blockage in addition to the G1/S arrest previously associated with p53; and (v) no increased incidence of apoptosis. On the other hand, OA treatment at the mutated p53 permissive temperature resulted in a relatively high incidence of aberrant mitosis with no upregulation of p21(waf1) message. These results suggest that while wild-type p53 blocks the proliferative effects of OA through p21(waf1)-mediated growth arrest, cells with non-functional p53 cannot arrest and suffer relatively high levels of OA-mediated aberrant mitoses.

  15. Lactose binding to human galectin-7 (p53-induced gene 1) induces long-range effects through the protein resulting in increased dimer stability and evidence for positive cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Elena; Miller, Michelle C; Nesmelova, Irina V; López-Merino, Lara; Berbís, Manuel Alvaro; Nesmelov, Yuri; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Lagartera, Laura; Daragan, Vladimir A; André, Sabine; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Solís, Dolores; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Mayo, Kevin H

    2013-01-01

    The product of p53-induced gene 1 is a member of the galectin family, i.e., galectin-7 (Gal-7). To move beyond structural data by X-ray diffraction, we initiated the study of the lectin by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism spectroscopies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In concert, our results indicate that lactose binding to human Gal-7 induces long-range effects (minor conformational shifts and changes in structural dynamics) throughout the protein that result in stabilization of the dimer state, with evidence for positive cooperativity. Monte Carlo fits of 15N-Gal-7 HSQC titrations with lactose using a two-site model yield K1 = 0.9 ± 0.6 × 103 M−1 and K2 = 3.4 ± 0.8 × 103 M−1. Ligand binding-induced stabilization of the Gal-7 dimer was supported by several lines of evidence: MD-based calculations of interaction energies between ligand-loaded and ligand-free states, gel filtration data and hetero-FRET spectroscopy that indicate a highly reduced tendency for dimer dissociation in the presence of lactose, CD-based thermal denaturation showing that the transition temperature of the lectin is significantly increased in the presence of lactose, and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR using a molecular probe of the monomer state whose presence is diminished in the presence of lactose. MD simulations with the half-loaded ligand-bound state also provided insight into how allosteric signaling may occur. Overall, our results reveal long-range effects on Gal-7 structure and dynamics, which factor into entropic contributions to ligand binding and allow further comparisons with other members of the galectin family. PMID:23376190

  16. Increased Arf/p53 activity in stem cells, aging and cancer.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Moreno, Manuel; Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Matheu, Ander

    2017-04-01

    Arf/p53 pathway protects the cells against DNA damage induced by acute stress. This characteristic is the responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Moreover, it regulates the chronic type of stress associated with aging. This is the basis of its anti-aging activity. Indeed, increased gene dosage of Arf/p53 displays elongated longevity and delayed aging. At a cellular level, it has been recently shown that increased dosage of Arf/p53 delays age-associated stem cell exhaustion and the subsequent decline in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. However, p53 can also promote aging if constitutively activated. In this context, p53 reduces tissue regeneration, which correlates with premature exhaustion of stem cells. We discuss here the current evidence linking the Arf/p53 pathway to the processes of aging and cancer through stem cell regulation. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Small-molecule stabilization of the p53 - 14-3-3 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Doveston, Richard G; Kuusk, Ave; Andrei, Sebastian A; Leysen, Seppe; Cao, Qing; Castaldi, Maria P; Hendricks, Adam; Brunsveld, Luc; Chen, Hongming; Boyd, Helen; Ottmann, Christian

    2017-08-01

    14-3-3 proteins are positive regulators of the tumor suppressor p53, the mutation of which is implicated in many human cancers. Current strategies for targeting of p53 involve restoration of wild-type function or inhibition of the interaction with MDM2, its key negative regulator. Despite the efficacy of these strategies, the alternate approach of stabilizing the interaction of p53 with positive regulators and, thus, enhancing tumor suppressor activity, has not been explored. Here, we report the first example of small-molecule stabilization of the 14-3-3 - p53 protein-protein interaction (PPI) and demonstrate the potential of this approach as a therapeutic modality. We also observed a disconnect between biophysical and crystallographic data in the presence of a stabilizing molecule, which is unusual in 14-3-3 PPIs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  18. Overexpression of PKM2 promotes mitochondrial fusion through attenuated p53 stability

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haili; Yang, Peng; Hu, Wanglai; Wang, Yingying; Lu, Yangxu; Zhang, Lichao; Fan, Yongsheng; Xiao, Hong; Li, Zhuoyu

    2016-01-01

    M2-type pyruvate kinase (PKM2) contributes to the Warburg effect. However, it remains unknown as to whether PKM2 has an inhibitory effect on mitochondrial function. We report in this work that PKM2 overexpression inhibits the expression of Drp1 and results in the mitochondrial fusion. The ATP production was found to be decreased, the mtDNA copy number elevated and the expression level of electron transport chain (ETC) complex I, III, V depressed in PKM2 overexpressed cells. PKM2 overexpression showed a decreased p53 protein level and a shorter p53 half-life. In contrast, PKM2 knockdown resulted in increased p53 expression and prolonged half-life of p53. PKM2 could directly bind with both p53 and MDM2 and promote MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination. The dimeric PKM2 significantly suppressed p53 expression compared with the other PKM2 mutants. The reverse relationship between PKM2 and Drp1 was further confirmed in a large number of clinical samples. Taken together, the present results highlight a new mechanism that link PKM2 to mitochondrial function, based on p53-Drp1 axis down regulation, revealing a novel therapeutic target in patients with abnormal mitochondria. PMID:27801666

  19. Peptide interactions stabilize and restructure human papillomavirus type 16 E6 to interact with p53.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Tina; Brimer, Nicole; Vande Pol, Scott B

    2012-10-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 (16E6) binds the E3 ubiquitin ligase E6AP and p53, thereby targeting degradation of p53 (M. Scheffner, B. A. Werness, J. M. Huibregtse, A. J. Levine, and P. M. Howley, Cell 63:1129-1136, 1990). Here we show that minimal 16E6-binding LXXLL peptides reshape 16E6 to confer p53 interaction and stabilize 16E6 in vivo but that degradation of p53 by 16E6 requires E6AP expression. These experiments establish a general mechanism for how papillomavirus E6 binding to LXXLL peptides reshapes E6 to then act as an adapter molecule.

  20. Peptide Interactions Stabilize and Restructure Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 To Interact with p53

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Tina; Brimer, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 (16E6) binds the E3 ubiquitin ligase E6AP and p53, thereby targeting degradation of p53 (M. Scheffner, B. A. Werness, J. M. Huibregtse, A. J. Levine, and P. M. Howley, Cell 63:1129–1136, 1990). Here we show that minimal 16E6-binding LXXLL peptides reshape 16E6 to confer p53 interaction and stabilize 16E6 in vivo but that degradation of p53 by 16E6 requires E6AP expression. These experiments establish a general mechanism for how papillomavirus E6 binding to LXXLL peptides reshapes E6 to then act as an adapter molecule. PMID:22896608

  1. p53 autoantibodies in patients with malignant mesothelioma: stability through disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Creaney, J; McLaren, B M; Stevenson, S; Musk, A W; Klerk, N de; Robinson, B W S; Lake, R A

    2001-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) generally occurs as a pleural tumour, related to the inhalation of asbestos fibres. It is highly aggressive and largely unresponsive to treatment. The incidence of MM is particularly high in Western Australia because of the extensive blue asbestos mining operations that occurred in the north of the state until 1966. MM is unusual in that mutations in the tumour suppressor gene p53 are rarely observed, whilst over-expression of p53 protein is common. As the level of antibodies directed against p53 is thought to be of prognostic value in some cancers and as MM is known to be immunogenic, we studied a cohort of Western Australian patients to determine the prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies and their value as diagnostic markers or prognostic indicators. 6/88 (7%) of patients had high titres (>2 SD above the mean of controls) of anti-p53 antibodies. There was no correlation between antibody titre and survival. Although 3/38 (8%) of sera obtained from patients exposed to asbestos but prior to a diagnosis of MM contained antibodies, the same proportion of sera obtained from patients exposed to asbestos but who remained disease free also contained antibodies (2/40; 8%). Sera collected sequentially demonstrated a profound temporal stability in the titre of anti-p53 antibodies in patients with MM throughout the course of their illness. These results show that anti-p53 antibodies are observed only at a low frequency in the sera of MM patients and where they do occur, their elicitation is an early event that may be unrelated to antigen load. The occurrence of anti-p53 antibodies does not serve as either a useful prognostic or diagnostic indicator in MM. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11139313

  2. NDRG1 links p53 with proliferation-mediated centrosome homeostasis and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Croessmann, Sarah; Wong, Hong Yuen; Zabransky, Daniel J; Chu, David; Mendonca, Janet; Sharma, Anup; Mohseni, Morassa; Rosen, D Marc; Scharpf, Robert B; Cidado, Justin; Cochran, Rory L; Parsons, Heather A; Dalton, W Brian; Erlanger, Bracha; Button, Berry; Cravero, Karen; Kyker-Snowman, Kelly; Beaver, Julia A; Kachhap, Sushant; Hurley, Paula J; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2015-09-15

    The tumor protein 53 (TP53) tumor suppressor gene is the most frequently somatically altered gene in human cancers. Here we show expression of N-Myc down-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is induced by p53 during physiologic low proliferative states, and mediates centrosome homeostasis, thus maintaining genome stability. When placed in physiologic low-proliferating conditions, human TP53 null cells fail to increase expression of NDRG1 compared with isogenic wild-type controls and TP53 R248W knockin cells. Overexpression and RNA interference studies demonstrate that NDRG1 regulates centrosome number and amplification. Mechanistically, NDRG1 physically associates with γ-tubulin, a key component of the centrosome, with reduced association in p53 null cells. Strikingly, TP53 homozygous loss was mutually exclusive of NDRG1 overexpression in over 96% of human cancers, supporting the broad applicability of these results. Our study elucidates a mechanism of how TP53 loss leads to abnormal centrosome numbers and genomic instability mediated by NDRG1.

  3. The incidence of p53 mutations increases with progression of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Boyle, J O; Hakim, J; Koch, W; van der Riet, P; Hruban, R H; Roa, R A; Correo, R; Eby, Y J; Ruppert, J M; Sidransky, D

    1993-10-01

    To establish a genetic model of the progression of head and neck squamous carcinoma we have defined the incidence and timing of p53 mutations in this type of cancer. We sequenced the conserved regions of the p53 gene in 102 head and neck squamous carcinoma lesions. These included 65 primary invasive carcinomas and 37 noninvasive archival specimens consisting of 13 severe dysplasias and 24 carcinoma in situ lesions. The incidence of p53 mutations in noninvasive lesions was 19% (7/37) and increased to 43% (28/65) in invasive carcinomas. These data suggest that p53 mutations can precede invasion in primary head and neck cancer. Furthermore, the spectrum of codon hotspots is similar to that seen in squamous carcinoma of the lung and 64% of mutations are at G nucleotides, implicating carcinogens from tobacco smoke in the etiology of head and neck squamous carcinoma.

  4. P19ARF stabilizes p53 by blocking nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of Mdm2

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Levine, Arnold J.

    1999-01-01

    The INK4a-ARF locus encodes two distinct tumor suppressors, p16INK4a and p19ARF. Whereas p16INK4a restrains cell growth through preventing phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein, p19ARF acts by attenuating Mdm2-mediated degradation of p53, thereby stabilizing p53. Recent data indicate that Mdm2 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and that nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of Mdm2 is essential for Mdm2’s ability to promote p53 degradation. Therefore, Mdm2 must export p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it targets p53 for degradation. We show here that coexpression of p19ARF blocks the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of Mdm2. Moreover, subnuclear localization of Mdm2 changes from the nucleoplasm to the nucleolus in a shuttling time-dependent manner, whereas p19ARF is exclusively located in the nucleolus. In heterokaryons containing Mdm2 and p19ARF, the longer the Mdm2 shuttling is allowed, the more Mdm2 protein colocalizes with p19ARF in the nucleolus, implying that Mdm2 moves from the nucleoplasm to the nucleolus and then associates with p19ARF there. Furthermore, whether or not Mdm2 colocalizes with p19ARF in the nucleolus, p19ARF prevents Mdm2 shuttling. This observation suggests that Mdm2 might be exported through the nucleolus and p19ARF could inhibit the nuclear export of Mdm2 by tethering Mdm2 in the nucleolus. Taken together, p19ARF could stabilize p53 by inhibiting the nuclear export of Mdm2. PMID:10359817

  5. The Zn-finger domain of MdmX suppresses cancer progression by promoting genome stability in p53-mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Matijasevic, Z; Krzywicka-Racka, A; Sluder, G; Gallant, J; Jones, S N

    2016-01-01

    The MDMX (MDM4) oncogene is amplified or overexpressed in a significant percentage of human tumors. MDMX is thought to function as an oncoprotein by binding p53 tumor suppressor protein to inhibit p53-mediated transcription, and by complexing with MDM2 oncoprotein to promote MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. However, down-regulation or loss of functional MDMX has also been observed in a variety of human tumors that are mutated for p53, often correlating with more aggressive cancers and a worse patient prognosis. We have previously reported that endogenous levels of MdmX can suppress proliferation and promote pseudo-bipolar mitosis in primary and tumor cells derived from p53-deficient mice, and that MdmX-p53 double deficient mice succumb to spontaneously formed tumors more rapidly than p53-deficient mice. These results suggest that the MdmX oncoprotein may act as a tumor-suppressor in cancers with compromised p53 function. By using orthotopic transplantation and lung colonization assays in mice we now establish a p53-independent anti-oncogenic role for MdmX in tumor progression. We also demonstrate that the roles of MdmX in genome stability and in proliferation are two distinct functions encoded by the separate MdmX protein domains. The central Zn-finger domain suppresses multipolar mitosis and chromosome loss, whereas the carboxy-terminal RING domain suppresses proliferation of p53-deficient cells. Furthermore, we determine that it is the maintenance of genome stability that underlies MdmX role in suppression of tumorigenesis in hyperploid p53 mutant tumors. Our results offer a rationale for the increased metastatic potential of p53 mutant human cancers with aberrant MdmX function and provide a caveat for the application of anti-MdmX treatment of tumors with compromised p53 activity. PMID:27694836

  6. USP4 inhibits p53 and NF-κB through deubiquitinating and stabilizing HDAC2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Hao, Q; Luo, J; Xiong, J; Zhang, S; Wang, T; Bai, L; Wang, W; Chen, M; Wang, W; Gu, L; Lv, K; Chen, J

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are major epigenetic modulators involved in a broad spectrum of human diseases including cancers. As HDACs are promising targets of cancer therapy, it is important to understand the mechanisms of HDAC regulation. In this study, we show that ubiquitin-specific peptidase 4 (USP4) interacts directly with and deubiquitinates HDAC2, leading to the stabilization of HDAC2. Accumulation of HDAC2 in USP4-overexpression cells leads to compromised p53 acetylation as well as crippled p53 transcriptional activation, accumulation and apoptotic response upon DNA damage. Moreover, USP4 targets HDAC2 to downregulate tumor necrosis factor TNFα-induced nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. Taken together, our study provides a novel insight into the ubiquitination and stability of HDAC2 and uncovers a previously unknown function of USP4 in cancers. PMID:26411366

  7. Depletion of the Adaptor Protein NCK Increases UV-Induced p53 Phosphorylation and Promotes Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Errington, Timothy M.; Macara, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    The cellular response to DNA damage requires the coordination of many proteins involved in diverse molecular processes. Discrete molecular pathways are becoming increasingly well understood, but the interconnectivity and coordination of multiple pathways remains less clear. We now show that NCK, an adapter protein involved in cytoskeletal responses to tyrosine kinase receptor signaling, accumulates in the nucleus in response to DNA damage and this translocation can be blocked by specific inhibition of the ATR protein kinase. Strikingly, HeLa cells depleted of NCK undergo apoptosis shortly after UV irradiation, as monitored by caspase-3 cleavage and PARP cleavage. This rapid, hyperactive apoptosis in NCK depleted cells might be p53 dependent, because loss of NCK also increased UV-induced p53 phosphorylation. Importantly, depletion of SOCS7, which is necessary for NCK nuclear translocation, phenocopies NCK depletion, indicating the nuclear accumulation of NCK is responsible for these molecular events. There are two NCK isoforms that have mostly redundant functions, and although NCK2 appears to have a greater contribution, depletion of NCK1 or NCK2, led to increased p53 phosphorylation and early apoptosis after UV exposure. These data reveal a novel function for NCK in regulating p53 phosphorylation and apoptosis, and provide evidence for interconnectedness of growth factor signaling proteins and the DNA damage response. PMID:24086708

  8. The Machado–Joseph Disease Deubiquitinase Ataxin-3 Regulates the Stability and Apoptotic Function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongmei; Li, Xiaoling; Ning, Guozhu; Zhu, Shu; Ma, Xiaolu; Liu, Xiuli; Liu, Chunying; Huang, Min; Schmitt, Ina; Wüllner, Ullrich; Niu, Yamei; Guo, Caixia; Wang, Qiang; Tang, Tie-Shan

    2016-01-01

    As a deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), the physiological substrates of ataxin-3 (ATX-3) remain elusive, which limits our understanding of its normal cellular function and that of pathogenic mechanism of spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 (SCA3). Here, we identify p53 to be a novel substrate of ATX-3. ATX-3 binds to native and polyubiquitinated p53 and deubiquitinates and stabilizes p53 by repressing its degradation through the ubiquitin (Ub)-proteasome pathway. ATX-3 deletion destabilizes p53, resulting in deficiency of p53 activity and functions, whereas ectopic expression of ATX-3 induces selective transcription/expression of p53 target genes and promotes p53-dependent apoptosis in both mammalian cells and the central nervous system of zebrafish. Furthermore, the polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded ATX-3 retains enhanced interaction and deubiquitination catalytic activity to p53 and causes more severe p53-dependent neurodegeneration in zebrafish brains and in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) or striatum of a transgenic SCA3 mouse model. Our findings identify a novel molecular link between ATX-3 and p53-mediated cell death and provide an explanation for the direct involvement of p53 in SCA3 disease pathogenesis. PMID:27851749

  9. Probing the alpha-helical structural stability of stapled p53 peptides: molecular dynamics simulations and analysis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zuojun; Mohanty, Udayan; Noehre, Justin; Sawyer, Tomi K; Sherman, Woody; Krilov, Goran

    2010-04-01

    Reactivation of the p53 cell apoptosis pathway through inhibition of the p53-hDM2 interaction is a viable approach to suppress tumor growth in many human cancers and stabilization of the helical structure of synthetic p53 analogs via a hydrocarbon cross-link (staple) has been found to lead to increased potency and inhibition of protein-protein binding (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129: 5298). However, details of the structure and dynamic stability of the stapled peptides are not well understood. Here, we use extensive all-atom molecular dynamics simulations to study a series of stapled alpha-helical peptides over a range of temperatures in solution. The peptides are found to exhibit substantial variations in predicted alpha-helical propensities that are in good agreement with the experimental observations. In addition, we find significant variation in local structural flexibility of the peptides with the position of the linker, which appears to be more closely related to the observed differences in activity than the absolute alpha-helical stability. These simulations provide new insights into the design of alpha-helical stapled peptides and the development of potent inhibitors of alpha-helical protein-protein interfaces.

  10. Metabolites of arsenic and increased DNA damage of p53 gene in arsenic plant workers

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Weihua; Wen Jinghua; Lu Lin; Liu Hua; Yang Jun; Cheng Huirong; Che Wangjun; Li Liang; Zhang Guanbei

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies have shown that monomethylarsonous acid is more cytotoxic and genotoxic than arsenate and arsenite, which may attribute to the increased levels of reactive oxygen species. In this study, we used hydride generation-atomic absorption spectrometry to determine three arsenic species in urine of workers who had been working in arsenic plants,and calculated primary and secondary methylation indexes. The damages of exon 5, 6, 8 of p53 gene were determined by the method developed by Sikorsky, et al. Results show that the concentrations of each urinary arsenic species,and damage indexes of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene in the exposed population were significantly higher, but SMI was significantly lower than in the control group. The closely positive correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and PMI,MMA, DMA were found, but there was closely negative correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and SMI. Those findings suggested that DNA damage of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene existed in the population occupationally exposed to arsenic. For exon 5, the important factors may include the model of arsenic metabolic transformation, the concentrations of MMA and DMA, and the MMA may be of great importance. - Research Highlights: > In our study, the mean SMI for workers came from arsenic plants is 4.06, so they may be in danger. > There are more MMA, there are more damage of exon 5 of p53 gene. > MMA and damage of exon 5 of p53 gene may be useful biomarkers to assess adverse health effects caused by arsenic.

  11. Improving survival by exploiting tumor dependence on stabilized mutant p53 for treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrova, EM; Yallowitz, AR; Li, D; Xu, S; Schulz, R; Proia, DA; Lozano, G; Dobbelstein, M; Moll, UM

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Missense mutations in p53 generate aberrant proteins with abrogated tumor suppressor functions that can also acquire oncogenic gain-of-functions (GOF) that promote malignant progression, invasion, metastasis and chemoresistance1–5. Mutant p53 (mutp53) proteins undergo massive constitutive stabilization specifically in tumors, which is the key requisite for GOF6–8. Although currently 11 million patients worldwide live with tumors expressing highly stabilized mutp53, it is unknown whether mutp53 is a therapeutic target in vivo. Here we use a novel mutp53 mouse model expressing an inactivatible R248Q hotspot mutation (floxQ) to show that tumors depend on sustained mutp53 expression. Upon Tamoxifen-induced mutp53 ablation, allo-transplanted and autochthonous tumors curb their growth, thus extending animal survival by 37%, and advanced tumors undergo apoptosis and tumor regression or stagnation. The HSP90/HDAC6 chaperone machinery, which is significantly upregulated in cancer compared to normal tissues, is a major determinant of mutp53 stabilization9–12. We show that long-term HSP90 inhibition significantly extends the survival of mutp53 Q/−2 and H/H (R172H allele3) mice by 59% and 48%, respectively, but not their respective p53−/− littermates. This mutp53-dependent drug effect occurs in H/H mice treated with 17DMAG+SAHA and in H/H and Q/− mice treated with the potent Hsp90 inhibitor ganetespib. Notably, drug activity correlates with induction of mutp53 degradation, tumor apoptosis and prevention of T-lymphomagenesis. These proof-of-principle data identify mutp53 as an actionable cancer-specific drug target. PMID:26009011

  12. Residues in the alternative reading frame tumor suppressor that influence its stability and p53-independent activities

    SciTech Connect

    Tommaso, Anne di; Hagen, Jussara; Tompkins, Van; Muniz, Viviane; Dudakovic, Amel; Kitzis, Alain; Ladeveze, Veronique; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2009-04-15

    The Alternative Reading Frame (ARF) protein suppresses tumorigenesis through p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways. Most of ARF's anti-proliferative activity is conferred by sequences in its first exon. Previous work showed specific amino acid changes occurred in that region during primate evolution, so we programmed those changes into human p14ARF to assay their functional impact. Two human p14ARF residues (Ala{sup 14} and Thr{sup 31}) were found to destabilize the protein while two others (Val{sup 24} and Ala{sup 41}) promoted more efficient p53 stabilization and activation. Despite those effects, all modified p14ARF forms displayed robust p53-dependent anti-proliferative activity demonstrating there are no significant biological differences in p53-mediated growth suppression associated with simian versus human p14ARF residues. In contrast, p53-independent p14ARF function was considerably altered by several residue changes. Val{sup 24} was required for p53-independent growth suppression whereas multiple residues (Val{sup 24}, Thr{sup 31}, Ala{sup 41} and His{sup 60}) enabled p14ARF to block or reverse the inherent chromosomal instability of p53-null MEFs. Together, these data pinpoint specific residues outside of established p14ARF functional domains that influence its expression and signaling activities. Most intriguingly, this work reveals a novel and direct role for p14ARF in the p53-independent maintenance of genomic stability.

  13. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R.; Fersht, Alan R.; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be ‘rescued’ and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. PMID:27503952

  14. Transfection of rat embryo cells with mutant p53 increases the intrinsic radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Pardo, F.S.; Su, M.; Gerweck, L.; Schmidt, E.V.; Borek, C.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.

    1994-11-01

    Dominant oncogenic sequences have been shown to modulate the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells of both human and murine tumor cell lines. Whether transfection with candidate tumor-suppressor genes can modulate intrinsic radiation sensitivity is unknown. The data presented here demonstrate that transfection of rat embryo cells with a mutant p53 allele can increase the intrinsic radiation resistance of cells in vitro. First, transfection with mutant p53 resulted in transformed cellular morphology. Second, the transfected clone and the corresponding pooled population of transfected clones were more resistant to ionizing radiation in vitro. Last, analyses of the parameters of cell kinetics suggested that the radiobiological effects were unlikely to be due to altered parameters of cell kinetics at the time of irradiation, suggesting that mutant p53 altered the intrinsic radiation resistance of transfected cells by a more direct mechanism. Further experimentation will be necessary to develop a mechanistic approach for the study of these alterations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. UVB-mediated activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase enhances resistance of normal human keratinocytes to apoptosis by stabilizing cytoplasmic p53.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, Nadine; Valerie, Kristoffer; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Huot, Jacques

    2002-07-01

    Human keratinocytes respond to UV rays by developing a fast adaptive response that contributes to maintaining their functions and survival. We investigated the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in transducing the UV signals in normal human keratinocytes. We found that UVA, UVB or UVC induced a marked and persistent activation of p38, whereas c-Jun N-terminal kinase or extracellular signal-regulated kinase were less or not activated respectively. Inhibition of p38 activity by expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p38 or with SB203580 impaired cell viability and led to an increase in UVB-induced apoptosis. This sensitization to apoptosis was independent of caspase activities. Inhibition of p38 did not sensitize transformed HaCaT keratinocytes to UVB-induced apoptosis. In normal keratinocytes, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of p53 increased UVB-induced cell death, pointing to a role for p53. In these cells, UVB triggered a p38-dependent phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-15. This phosphorylation was associated with an SB203580-sensitive accumulation of p53, even in the presence of a serine phosphatase inhibitor. Accumulated p53 was localized mainly in the cytoplasm, independently of CRM1 nuclear export. In HaCaT cells, p53 was localized exclusively in the nucleus and its distribution and level were not affected by UVB or p38 inhibition. However, UVB induced an SB203580-insensitive phosphorylation on Ser-15 of mutated p53. Overall, our results suggest that, in normal human keratinocytes, protection against UVB depends on p38-mediated phosphorylation and stabilization of p53 and is tightly associated with the cytoplasmic sequestration of wild-type p53. We conclude that the p38/p53 pathway plays a key role in the adaptive response of normal human keratinocytes against UV stress.

  16. Mice deficient in poly(C)-binding protein 4 are susceptible to spontaneous tumors through increased expression of ZFP871 that targets p53 for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wensheng; Scoumanne, Ariane; Jung, Yong-Sam; Xu, Enshun; Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Yanhong; Ren, Cong; Sun, Pei; Chen, Xinbin

    2016-01-01

    Poly(C)-binding protein 4 (PCBP4), also called MCG10 and a target of p53, plays a role in the cell cycle and is implicated in lung tumor suppression. Here, we found that PCBP4-deficient mice are prone to lung adenocarcinoma, lymphoma, and kidney tumor and that PCBP4-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) exhibit enhanced cell proliferation but decreased cellular senescence. We also found that p53 expression is markedly reduced in PCBP4-deficient MEFs and mouse tissues, suggesting that PCBP4 in turn regulates p53 expression. To determine how PCBP4 regulates p53 expression, PCBP4 targets were identified by RNA immunoprecipitation followed by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). We found that the transcript encoding ZFP871 (zinc finger protein 871; also called ZNF709 in humans) interacts with and is regulated by PCBP4 via mRNA stability. Additionally, we found that ZFP871 physically interacts with p53 and MDM2 proteins. Consistently, ectopic expression of ZFP871 decreases—whereas knockdown of ZFP871 increases—p53 protein stability through a proteasome-dependent degradation pathway. Moreover, loss of ZFP871 reverses the reduction of p53 expression by lack of PCBP4, and thus increased expression of ZFP871 is responsible for decreased expression of p53 in the PCBP4-deficient MEFs and mouse tissues. Interestingly, we found that, like PCBP4, ZFP871 is also regulated by DNA damage and p53. Finally, we showed that knockdown of ZFP871 markedly enhances p53 expression, leading to growth suppression and apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Thus, the p53–PCBP4–ZFP871 axis represents a novel feedback loop in the p53 pathway. Together, we hypothesize that PCBP4 is a potential tissue-specific tumor suppressor and that ZFP871 is part of MDM2 and possibly other ubiquitin E3 ligases that target p53 for degradation. PMID:26915821

  17. Copper uptake is required for pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidation and protein level increase of p53 in cells.

    PubMed Central

    Furuta, Saori; Ortiz, Fausto; Zhu Sun, Xiu; Wu, Hsiao-Huei; Mason, Andrew; Momand, Jamil

    2002-01-01

    The p53 tumour-suppressor protein is a transcription factor that activates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA repair. The p53 protein is vulnerable to oxidation at cysteine thiol groups. The metal-chelating dithiocarbamates, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), diethyldithiocarbamate, ethylene(bis)dithiocarbamate and H(2)O(2) were tested for their oxidative effects on p53 in cultured human breast cancer cells. Only PDTC oxidized p53, although all oxidants tested increased the p53 level. Inductively coupled plasma MS analysis indicated that the addition of 60 microM PDTC increased the cellular copper concentration by 4-fold, which was the highest level of copper accumulated amongst all the oxidants tested. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid, a membrane-impermeable Cu(I) chelator inhibited the PDTC-mediated copper accumulation. Bathocuproinedisulphonic acid as well as the hydroxyl radical scavenger d-mannitol inhibited the PDTC-dependent increase in p53 protein and oxidation. Our results show that a low level of copper accumulation in the range of 25-40 microg/g of cellular protein increases the steady-state levels of p53. At copper accumulation levels higher than 60 microg/g of cellular protein, p53 is oxidized. These results suggest that p53 is vulnerable to free radical-mediated oxidation at cysteine residues. PMID:11964141

  18. Inhibition of SIRT1 Catalytic Activity Increases p53 Acetylation but Does Not Alter Cell Survival following DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Jonathan M.; Pasupuleti, Rao; Xu, Lei; McDonagh, Thomas; Curtis, Rory; DiStefano, Peter S.; Huber, L. Julie

    2006-01-01

    Human SIRT1 is an enzyme that deacetylates the p53 tumor suppressor protein and has been suggested to modulate p53-dependent functions including DNA damage-induced cell death. In this report, we used EX-527, a novel, potent, and specific small-molecule inhibitor of SIRT1 catalytic activity to examine the role of SIRT1 in p53 acetylation and cell survival after DNA damage. Treatment with EX-527 dramatically increased acetylation at lysine 382 of p53 after different types of DNA damage in primary human mammary epithelial cells and several cell lines. Significantly, inhibition of SIRT1 catalytic activity by EX-527 had no effect on cell growth, viability, or p53-controlled gene expression in cells treated with etoposide. Acetyl-p53 was also increased by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) class I/II inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). EX-527 and TSA acted synergistically to increase acetyl-p53 levels, confirming that p53 acetylation is regulated by both SIRT1 and HDACs. While TSA alone reduced cell survival after DNA damage, the combination of EX-527 and TSA had no further effect on cell viability and growth. These results show that, although SIRT1 deacetylates p53, this does not play a role in cell survival following DNA damage in certain cell lines and primary human mammary epithelial cells. PMID:16354677

  19. Regulation of p53 by metal ions and by antioxidants: dithiocarbamate down-regulates p53 DNA-binding activity by increasing the intracellular level of copper.

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegh, G W; Richard, M J; Hainaut, P

    1997-01-01

    Mutations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene frequently fall within the specific DNA-binding domain and prevent the molecule from transactivating normal targets. DNA-binding activity is regulated in vitro by metal ions and by redox conditions, but whether these factors also regulate p53 in vivo is unclear. To address this question, we have analyzed the effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) on p53 DNA-binding activity in cell lines expressing wild-type p53. PDTC is commonly regarded as an antioxidant, but it can also bind and transport external copper ions into cells and thus exert either pro- or antioxidant effects in different situations. We report that PDTC, but not N-acetyl-L-cysteine, down-regulated the specific DNA-binding activity of p53. Loss of DNA binding correlated with disruption of the immunologically "wild-type" p53 conformation. Using different chelators to interfere with copper transport by PDTC, we found that bathocuproinedisulfonic acid (BCS), a non-cell-permeable chelator of Cu1+, prevented both copper import and p53 down-regulation. In contrast, 1,10-orthophenanthroline, a cell-permeable chelator of Cu2+, promoted the redox activity of copper and up-regulated p53 DNA-binding activity through a DNA damage-dependent pathway. We have previously reported that p53 protein binds copper in vitro in the form of Cu1+ (P. Hainaut, N. Rolley, M. Davies, and J. Milner, Oncogene 10:27-32, 1995). The data reported here indicate that intracellular levels and redox activity of copper are critical for p53 protein conformation and DNA-binding activity and suggest that copper ions may participate in the physiological control of p53 function. PMID:9315628

  20. Immunocytochemical assessment of p53 protein to detect malignancy in increased cell-yield brush cytology from the biliopancreatic tree.

    PubMed

    Villanacci, Vincenzo; Cestari, Renzo; Giulini, Stefano; Cengia, Paolo; Missale, Guido; Berenzi, Angiola; Rossi, Elisa; Bonardi, Massimo; Baiocchi, Luca; Bassotti, Gabrio

    2009-04-01

    Malignancies arising from the biliopancreatic tree are often diagnostic challenges for the gastroenterologist and the pathologist, especially when strictures without masses are present. To evaluate the diagnostic yield of p53 immunocytology for the detection of malignancies in material obtained by biliopancreatic tree brushing by means of an increased cell-yield procedure. Cytologic specimens obtained from biliary and pancreatic tree brushing in 24 patients with biliary strictures suspected for malignancy were assessed by conventional Papanicolau staining and p53 immunocytochemistry. Papanicolau staining detected 67% and p53 87% of the malignancies in the study group. p53 immunocytology displayed excellent sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy. p53 immunocytology may represent a useful diagnostic tool in the detection of malignancies from biliary and pancreatic tree brushing, especially when using an increasing cell-yield procedure.

  1. Interleukin-6 increases matrix metalloproteinase-14 (MMP-14) levels via down-regulation of p53 to drive cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Cathcart, Jillian M.; Banach, Anna; Liu, Alice; Chen, Jun; Goligorsky, Michael; Cao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play critical roles in cancer invasion and metastasis by digesting basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM). Much attention has focused on the enzymatic activities of MMPs; however, the regulatory mechanism of MMP expression remains elusive. By employing bioinformatics analysis, we identified a potential p53 response element within the MMP-14 promoter. Experimentally, we found that p53 can repress MMP-14 promoter activity, whereas deletion of this p53 response element abrogated this effect. Furthermore, we found that p53 expression decreases MMP-14 mRNA and protein levels and attenuates MMP-14-mediated cellular functions. Additional promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation studies identified a mechanism of regulation of MMP-14 expression by which p53 and transcription factor Sp1 competitively bind to the promoter. As the correlation between inflammation and cancer aggressiveness is well described, we next sought to evaluate if inflammatory cytokines could differentially affect p53 and MMP-14 levels. We demonstrate that interleukin-6 (IL-6) down-regulates p53 protein levels and thus results in a concomitant increase in MMP-14 expression, leading to enhanced cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Our data collectively indicate a novel mechanism of regulation of MMP-14 by a cascade of IL-6 and p53, demonstrating that the tumor microenvironment directly stimulates molecular changes in cancer cells to drive an invasive phenotype. PMID:27531896

  2. The effects of dietary supplementation of methionine on genomic stability and p53 gene promoter methylation in rats.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cátia Lira Do; Bueno, Rafaela de Barros E Lima; Burim, Regislaine Valéria; Queiroz, Regina Helena Costa; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi

    2011-05-18

    Methionine is a component of one-carbon metabolism and a precursor of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), the methyl donor for DNA methylation. When methionine intake is high, an increase of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is expected. DNA methyltransferases convert SAM to S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH). A high intracellular SAH concentration could inhibit the activity of DNA methyltransferases. Therefore, high methionine ingestion could induce DNA damage and change the methylation pattern of tumor suppressor genes. This study investigated the genotoxicity of a methionine-supplemented diet. It also investigated the diet's effects on glutathione levels, SAM and SAH concentrations and the gene methylation pattern of p53. Wistar rats received either a methionine-supplemented diet (2% methionine) or a control diet (0.3% methionine) for six weeks. The methionine-supplemented diet was neither genotoxic nor antigenotoxic to kidney cells, as assessed by the comet assay. However, the methionine-supplemented diet restored the renal glutathione depletion induced by doxorubicin. This fact may be explained by the transsulfuration pathway, which converts methionine to glutathione in the kidney. Methionine supplementation increased the renal concentration of SAH without changing the SAM/SAH ratio. This unchanged profile was also observed for DNA methylation at the promoter region of the p53 gene. Further studies are necessary to elucidate this diet's effects on genomic stability and DNA methylation.

  3. Small-molecule inhibitor of USP7/HAUSP ubiquitin protease stabilizes and activates p53 in cells.

    PubMed

    Colland, Frédéric; Formstecher, Etienne; Jacq, Xavier; Reverdy, Céline; Planquette, Cécile; Conrath, Susan; Trouplin, Virginie; Bianchi, Julie; Aushev, Vasily N; Camonis, Jacques; Calabrese, Alessandra; Borg-Capra, Catherine; Sippl, Wolfgang; Collura, Vincent; Boissy, Guillaume; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Guedat, Philippe; Delansorne, Rémi; Daviet, Laurent

    2009-08-01

    Deregulation of the ubiquitin/proteasome system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including cancer. Ubiquitin-specific proteases (USP) are cysteine proteases involved in the deubiquitination of protein substrates. Functional connections between USP7 and essential viral proteins and oncogenic pathways, such as the p53/Mdm2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B networks, strongly suggest that the targeting of USP7 with small-molecule inhibitors may be useful for the treatment of cancers and viral diseases. Using high-throughput screening, we have discovered HBX 41,108, a small-molecule compound that inhibits USP7 deubiquitinating activity with an IC(50) in the submicromolar range. Kinetics data indicate an uncompetitive reversible inhibition mechanism. HBX 41,108 was shown to affect USP7-mediated p53 deubiquitination in vitro and in cells. As RNA interference-mediated USP7 silencing in cancer cells, HBX 41,108 treatment stabilized p53, activated the transcription of a p53 target gene without inducing genotoxic stress, and inhibited cancer cell growth. Finally, HBX 41,108 induced p53-dependent apoptosis as shown in p53 wild-type and null isogenic cancer cell lines. We thus report the identification of the first lead-like inhibitor against USP7, providing a structural basis for the development of new anticancer drugs.

  4. An in silico algorithm for identifying stabilizing pockets in proteins: test case, the Y220C mutant of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Dennis; Bauer, Matthias R; Fersht, Alan R; Daggett, Valerie

    2016-09-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein performs a critical role in stimulating apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in response to oncogenic stress. The function of p53 can be compromised by mutation, leading to increased risk of cancer; approximately 50% of cancers are associated with mutations in the p53 gene, the majority of which are in the core DNA-binding domain. The Y220C mutation of p53, for example, destabilizes the core domain by 4 kcal/mol, leading to rapid denaturation and aggregation. The associated loss of tumor suppressor functionality is associated with approximately 75 000 new cancer cases every year. Destabilized p53 mutants can be 'rescued' and their function restored; binding of a small molecule into a pocket on the surface of mutant p53 can stabilize its wild-type structure and restore its function. Here, we describe an in silico algorithm for identifying potential rescue pockets, including the algorithm's integration with the Dynameomics molecular dynamics data warehouse and the DIVE visual analytics engine. We discuss the results of the application of the method to the Y220C p53 mutant, entailing finding a putative rescue pocket through MD simulations followed by an in silico search for stabilizing ligands that dock into the putative rescue pocket. The top three compounds from this search were tested experimentally and one of them bound in the pocket, as shown by nuclear magnetic resonance, and weakly stabilized the mutant. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. p53-Dependent Elevation of p21Waf1 Expression by UV Light Is Mediated through mRNA Stabilization and Involves a Vanadate-Sensitive Regulatory System

    PubMed Central

    Gorospe, Myriam; Wang, Xiantao; Holbrook, Nikki J.

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of mammalian cells to adverse stimuli triggers the expression of numerous stress response genes, many of which are presumed to enhance cell survival. In this study, we examined the mechanisms contributing to the induction of p21Waf1 by stress and its influence on the survival of cells subjected to short-wavelength UVC irradiation. UVC was found to elevate p21Waf1 mRNA expression in mouse embryonal fibroblasts (MEFs) and human colorectal carcinoma (RKO) cells in a p53-dependent manner. The lack of p21Waf1 induction in p53-deficient MEFs and RKO cells correlated with diminished cell survival following UVC irradiation. Unexpectedly, UVC treatment was also found to block the induction of p21Waf1 by various stress-inducing agents such as mimosine in the p53-deficient cells. Additional studies indicated that induction of p21Waf1 by UVC occurs primarily through enhanced mRNA stability rather than increased transcription; in p53−/− MEFs, failure to elevate p21Waf1 after treatment with UVC appears to be due to their inability to stabilize the p21Waf1 transcripts. Treatment of the p53−/− MEFs with the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor vanadate reversed the UVC-induced block on p21Waf1 induction and resulted in their enhanced survival following irradiation. Thus, in cells bearing normal p53, UVC augments p21Waf1 expression by increasing the half-life of p21Waf1 mRNA; without p53, p21Waf1 mRNA remains unstable after UVC, apparently due to a pathway involving tyrosine phosphatase activity. PMID:9488455

  6. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-08-01

    In patient with Alzheimer's disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIP(U) (box) domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53's DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5' UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP-BACE1-p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. CHIP stabilizes amyloid precursor protein via proteasomal degradation and p53-mediated trans-repression of β-secretase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amir Kumar; Pati, Uttam

    2015-01-01

    In patient with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), deposition of amyloid-beta Aβ, a proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase/BACE1, forms senile plaque in the brain. BACE1 activation is caused due to oxidative stresses and dysfunction of ubiquitin–proteasome system (UPS), which is linked to p53 inactivation. As partial suppression of BACE1 attenuates Aβ generation and AD-related pathology, it might be an ideal target for AD treatment. We have shown that both in neurons and in HEK-APP cells, BACE1 is a new substrate of E3-ligase CHIP and an inverse relation exists between CHIP and BACE1 level. CHIP inhibits ectopic BACE1 level by promoting its ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, thus reducing APP processing; it stabilizes APP in neurons, thus reducing Aβ. CHIPUbox domain physically interacts with BACE1; however, both U-box and TPR domain are essential for ubiquitination and degradation of BACE1. Further, BACE1 is a downstream target of p53 and overexpression of p53 decreases BACE1 level. In HEK-APP cells, CHIP is shown to negatively regulate BACE1 promoter through stabilization of p53’s DNA-binding conformation and its binding upon 5′ UTR element (+127 to +150). We have thus discovered that CHIP regulates p53-mediated trans-repression of BACE1 at both transcriptional and post-translational level. We propose that a CHIP–BACE1–p53 feedback loop might control APP stabilization, which could further be utilized for new therapeutic intervention in AD. PMID:25773675

  8. Probing the origin of structural stability of single and double stapled p53 peptide analogs bound to MDM2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zuojun; Streu, Kristina; Krilov, Goran; Mohanty, Udayan

    2014-06-01

    The stabilization of secondary structure is believed to play an important role in the peptide-protein binding interaction. In this study, the α-helical conformation and structural stability of single and double stapled all-hydrocarbon cross-linked p53 peptides when bound and unbound to MDM2 are investigated. We determined the effects of the peptide sequence, the stereochemistry of the cross-linker, the conformation of the double bond in the alkene bridge, and the length of the bridge, to the relative stability of the α-helix structure. The binding affinity calculations by WaterMap provided over one hundred hydration sites in the MDM2 binding pocket where water density is greater than twice that of the bulk, and the relative value of free energy released by displacing these hydration sites. In agreement with the experimental data, potentials of mean force obtained by weighted histogram analysis methods indicated the order of peptides from lowest to highest binding affinity. Our study provides a comprehensive rationalization of the relationship between peptide stapling strategy, the secondary structural stability, and the binding affinity of p53/MDM2 complex. We hope our efforts can help to further the development of a new generation p53/MDM2 inhibitors that can reactivate the function of p53 as tumor suppressor gene.

  9. The expression of p73 is increased in lung cancer, independent of p53 gene alteration

    PubMed Central

    Tokuchi, Y; Hashimoto, T; Kobayashi, Y; Hayashi, M; Nishida, K; Hayashi, S; Imai, K; Nakachi, K; Ishikawa, Y; Nakagawa, K; Kawakami, Y; Tsuchiya, E

    1999-01-01

    p73 gene, a new p53 homologue, has been identified: it supposedly acts as tumour suppressor gene in neuroblastoma. To clarify whether p73 might be involved in lung carcinogenesis, we examined p73 expression in resected lung cancer and paired normal lung in 60 cases using semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We also examined p73 gene status in three representative cases using Southern blot, and p53 gene alteration in 49 cases using PCR-single-strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and direct sequence. In 87% of the cases (52/60) p73 expression in tumour was more than twice as high as that in paired normal lung tissues, and the difference between p73 expression in tumour and normal lung tissue was significant (P < 0.0001). However, Southern blot analysis revealed that none of the cases showed p73 gene amplification. Compared with clinicopathological characteristics, p73 expression correlates significantly with histological differences and age of patient, independently (P < 0.05). Concerning p53 gene status, 43% (21/49) showed p53 gene alteration, but there was no correlation between p73 overexpression and p53 gene alteration. Our results suggest that need for further functional analysis of the role of p73 in lung carcinogenesis. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10408409

  10. Sprint-interval but not continuous exercise increases PGC-1α protein content and p53 phosphorylation in nuclear fractions of human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Granata, Cesare; Oliveira, Rodrigo S. F.; Little, Jonathan P.; Renner, Kathrin; Bishop, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Sprint interval training has been reported to induce similar or greater mitochondrial adaptations to continuous training. However, there is limited knowledge about the effects of different exercise types on the early molecular events regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, we compared the effects of continuous and sprint interval exercise on key regulatory proteins linked to mitochondrial biogenesis in subcellular fractions of human skeletal muscle. Nineteen men, performed either 24 min of moderate-intensity continuous cycling at 63% of WPeak (CE), or 4 × 30-s “all-out” cycling sprints (SIE). Muscle samples (vastus lateralis) were collected pre-, immediately (+0 h) and 3 (+3 h) hours post-exercise. Nuclear p53 and PHF20 protein content increased at +0 h, with no difference between groups. Nuclear p53 phosphorylation and PGC-1α protein content increased at +0 h after SIE, but not CE. We demonstrate an exercise-induced increase in nuclear p53 protein content, an event that may relate to greater p53 stability - as also suggested by increased PHF20 protein content. Increased nuclear p53 phosphorylation and PGC-1α protein content immediately following SIE but not CE suggests these may represent important early molecular events in the exercise-induced response to exercise, and that SIE is a time-efficient and possibly superior option than CE to promote these adaptations. PMID:28281651

  11. Sprint-interval but not continuous exercise increases PGC-1α protein content and p53 phosphorylation in nuclear fractions of human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Granata, Cesare; Oliveira, Rodrigo S F; Little, Jonathan P; Renner, Kathrin; Bishop, David J

    2017-03-10

    Sprint interval training has been reported to induce similar or greater mitochondrial adaptations to continuous training. However, there is limited knowledge about the effects of different exercise types on the early molecular events regulating mitochondrial biogenesis. Therefore, we compared the effects of continuous and sprint interval exercise on key regulatory proteins linked to mitochondrial biogenesis in subcellular fractions of human skeletal muscle. Nineteen men, performed either 24 min of moderate-intensity continuous cycling at 63% of WPeak (CE), or 4 × 30-s "all-out" cycling sprints (SIE). Muscle samples (vastus lateralis) were collected pre-, immediately (+0 h) and 3 (+3 h) hours post-exercise. Nuclear p53 and PHF20 protein content increased at +0 h, with no difference between groups. Nuclear p53 phosphorylation and PGC-1α protein content increased at +0 h after SIE, but not CE. We demonstrate an exercise-induced increase in nuclear p53 protein content, an event that may relate to greater p53 stability - as also suggested by increased PHF20 protein content. Increased nuclear p53 phosphorylation and PGC-1α protein content immediately following SIE but not CE suggests these may represent important early molecular events in the exercise-induced response to exercise, and that SIE is a time-efficient and possibly superior option than CE to promote these adaptations.

  12. Classical swine fever virus Shimen infection increases p53 signaling to promote cell cycle arrest in porcine alveolar macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Pengbo; Hu, Congxia; Li, Xuepeng; Zhou, Yulu; Hu, Aoxue; Zhang, Ya; Gao, Lifang; Gong, Cunmei; Guo, Kangkang; Zhang, Xianghan; Zhang, Yanming

    2017-01-01

    Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) replicates in macrophages and causes persistent infection. Despite its role in disastrous economic losses in swine industries, the molecular mechanisms underlying its pathogenesis are poorly understood. The virus evades the neutralizing immune response, subverting the immune system to ensure its own survival and persistence. Our genome-wide analysis of porcine alveolar macrophage transcriptional responses to CSFV Shimen infection using the Solexa/Illumina digital gene expression system revealed that p53 pathway components and cell cycle molecules were differentially regulated during infection compared to controls. Further, we investigated the molecular changes in macrophages infected with CSFV Shimen, focusing on the genes involved in the p53 pathway. CSFV Shimen infection led to phosphorylation and accumulation of p53 in a time-dependent manner. Furthermore, CSFV Shimen infection upregulated cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (p21) mRNA and protein. In addition, CSFV Shimen infection induced cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, as well as downregulation of cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). The expression of genes in the p53 pathway did not change significantly after p53 knockdown by pifithrin-α during CSFV Shimen infection. Our data suggest that CSFV Shimen infection increases expression of host p53 and p21, and inhibits expression of cyclin E1 and CDK2, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. CSFV may utilize this strategy to subvert the innate immune response and proliferate in host cells.

  13. Increased damage of exon 5 of p53 gene in workers from an arsenic plant.

    PubMed

    Wen, Weihua; Che, Wangjun; Lu, Lin; Yang, Jun; Gao, Xufang; Wen, Jinghua; Heng, Zhengchang; Cao, Shuqiao; Cheng, Huirong

    2008-08-25

    Mutagenesis is a multistage process. Substitution mutations can be induced by base modified through alteration of pairing property. Mutations of exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene have been found in most arsenicosis patients with precarcinomas and carcinomas, but never in arsenicosis individuals without precarcinomas and carcinomas. This study investigates whether base modification exists in exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene, and explores the dose-effect relationship between damage of exon 5 of p53 gene and urinary arsenic. Concentrations of urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanine (8-OHdG) are analyzed to identify the occurrence of DNA damage. The real-time PCR developed by Sikorsky et al. is applied to detect base modification in exon 5 and 8 of p53 gene for apparently healthy participants. Our results show that the mean total arsenic concentrations of two exposed groups from an arsenic plant are significantly elevated compared with the control group, and the damage level of exon 5 of the high-exposed group is significantly higher than that of the control group, but which does not happen in exon 8. The closely correlation between the damage index of exon 5 and urinary organic arsenic concentration are found. Concentration of 8-OHdG of the high-exposed group is significantly higher than that of the control group. These results imply that base modification in exon 5 of p53 gene can be induced by arsenic. In addition, our study suggests that the damage level of exon 5 is a useful biomarker to assess adverse health effect levels caused by chronic exposure to arsenic.

  14. JNK2 downregulation promotes tumorigenesis and chemoresistance by decreasing p53 stability in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Qian, Chenchen; Wang, Liguo; Qi, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common malignancies of the urinary system, and the 5-year survival rate remains low. A comprehensive understanding of the carcinogenesis and progression of bladder cancer is urgently needed to advance treatment. c-Jun N-terminal kinase-2 (JNK2) exhibits both tumor promoter and tumor suppressor actions, depending on tumor type. Here, we analyzed the JNK2 function in bladder cancer. Using gene expression microarrays, we demonstrated that JNK2 mRNA is downregulated in an orthotopic rat model of bladder cancer. JNK2 protein levels were lower in rat and human bladder cancer tissues than in normal tissues, and the levels correlated with those of p53. Moreover, JNK2 phosphorylated p53 at Thr-81, thus protecting p53 from MDM2-induced proteasome degradation. Decreased expression of JNK2 in T24 cells conferred resistance to cell death induced by mitomycin C. Furthermore, lower JNK2 expression was associated with poorer overall survival among patients who underwent radical cystectomy. These results indicate that JNK2 acts as a tumor suppressor in bladder cancer, and that decreased JNK2 expression promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis. PMID:27147566

  15. Nickel accumulation in lung tissues is associated with increased risk of p53 mutation in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Lee, Huei

    2014-10-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been associated with lung cancer. The correlation between high nickel levels and increased risk of lung cancer has been previously reported in a case-control study. This study assessed whether nickel exposure increased the occurrence of p53 mutations due to DNA repair inhibition by nickel. A total of 189 lung cancer patients were enrolled to determine nickel levels in tumor-adjacent normal lung tissues and p53 mutation status in lung tumors through atomic absorption spectrometry and direct sequencing, respectively. Nickel levels in p53 mutant patients were significantly higher than those in p53 wild-type patients. When patients were divided into high- and low-nickel subgroups by median nickel level, the high-nickel subgroup of patients had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.25 for p53 mutation risk relative to the low-nickel subgroup patients. The OR for p53 mutation risk of lifetime non-smokers, particularly females, in the high-nickel subgroup was greater than that in the low-nickel subgroup. To determine whether nickel affected DNA repair capacity, we conducted the host cell reactivation assay in A549 and H1975 lung cancer cells and showed that the DNA repair activity was reduced by nickel chloride in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with elevated production of hydrogen peroxide-induced 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. Therefore, increased risk of p53 mutation due to defective DNA repair caused by high nickel levels in lung tissues may be one mechanism by which nickel exposure contributes to lung cancer development, especially in lifetime female non-smokers.

  16. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA. PMID:28032591

  17. The pre-existing population of 5S rRNA effects p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition.

    PubMed

    Onofrillo, Carmine; Galbiati, Alice; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Derenzini, Massimo

    2017-01-17

    Pre-ribosomal complex RPL5/RPL11/5S rRNA (5S RNP) is considered the central MDM2 inhibitory complex that control p53 stabilization during ribosome biogenesis inhibition. Despite its role is well defined, the dynamic of 5S RNP assembly still requires further characterization. In the present work, we report that MDM2 inhibition is dependent by a pre-existing population of 5S rRNA.

  18. p53 mutations associated with increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation in human head and neck cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Servomaa, K; Kiuru, A; Grénman, R; Pekkola-Heino, K; Pulkkinen, J O; Rytömaa, T

    1996-05-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor gene is activated following cellular exposure to DNA-damaging agents. The functions of wild-type p53 protein include transient blocking of cell cycle progression, direct or indirect stimulation of DNA repair machinery and triggering of apoptosis if DNA repair fails. Therefore, the status of p53 protein may be critically associated with tumour cell radiosensitivity. In the present study we examine the intrinsic radiosensitivity of 20 human carcinoma cell lines derived from 15 patients with different types of head and neck tumour. Radiosensitivities were measured in a 96-well plate clonogenic assay in terms of the mean inactivation dose, surviving fraction at 2 Gy, and constants alpha and beta in the linear quadratic survival curve. The p53 allele status was determined by amplifying exons 4-10 by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), screening for mutations using single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and determining the exact type and location of a mutation by direct sequencing. The results showed that prevalence of p53 mutations in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines is high (80%), and that deletion of one or both wild-type alleles is common (75%). Intrinsic radiosensitivity of the cell lines varied greatly in terms of mean inactivation dose, from 1.4 +/- 0.1 to 2.6 +/- 0.2 Gy. Radiosensitivity correlated well with the p53 allele status so that cell lines carrying a wild-type p53 allele were significantly (P < 0.01) more radioresistant (mean inactivation dose 2.23 +/- 0.15 Gy) than cell lines which lacked a wild-type gene (1.82 +/- 0.24 Gy). Evaluation of our own results and those published in the literature lead us to conclude that absence of the wild-type p53 allele in human head and neck cancer cell lines is associated with increased radiosensitivity. However, the sensitivity is also strongly dependent on the exact type and location of the p53 mutation.

  19. Aberrant p53 protein expression is associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression in patients with Barrett's oesophagus.

    PubMed

    Kastelein, Florine; Biermann, Katharina; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Verheij, Joanne; Kalisvaart, Marit; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Stoop, Hans A; Walter, Laurens; Kuipers, Ernst J; Spaander, Manon C W; Bruno, Marco J

    2013-12-01

    The value of surveillance for patients with Barrett's oesophagus (BO) is under discussion given the overall low incidence of neoplastic progression and lack of discriminative tests for risk stratification. Histological diagnosis of low-grade dysplasia (LGD) is the only accepted predictor for progression to date, but has a low predictive value. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the value of p53 immunohistochemistry for predicting neoplastic progression in patients with BO. We conducted a case-control study within a prospective cohort of 720 patients with BO. Patients who developed high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or oesophageal adenocarcinoma (OAC) were classified as cases and patients without neoplastic progression were classified as controls. P53 protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry in more than 12 000 biopsies from 635 patients and was scored independently by two expert pathologists who were blinded to long-term outcome. During follow-up, 49 (8%) patients developed HGD or OAC. P53 overexpression was associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression in patients with BO after adjusting for age, gender, Barrett length and oesophagitis (adjusted relative risks (RR(a)) 5.6; 95% CI 3.1 to 10.3), but the risk was even higher with loss of p53 expression (RR(a) 14.0; 95% CI 5.3 to 37.2). The positive predictive value for neoplastic progression increased from 15% with histological diagnosis of LGD to 33% with LGD and concurrent aberrant p53 expression. Aberrant p53 protein expression is associated with an increased risk of neoplastic progression in patients with BO and appears to be a more powerful predictor of neoplastic progression than histological diagnosis of LGD.

  20. Tripeptidyl peptidase II plays a role in the radiation response of selected primary cell types but not based on nuclear translocation and p53 stabilization.

    PubMed

    Firat, Elke; Tsurumi, Chizuko; Gaedicke, Simone; Huai, Jisen; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2009-04-15

    The giant cytosolic protease tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPPII) was recently proposed to play a role in the DNA damage response. Shown were nuclear translocation of TPPII after gamma-irradiation, lack of radiation-induced p53 stabilization in TPPII-siRNA-treated cells, and complete tumor regression in mice after gamma-irradiation when combined with TPPII-siRNA silencing or a protease inhibitor reported to inhibit TPPII. This suggested that TPPII could be a novel target for tumor radiosensitization and prompted us to study radiation responses using TPPII-knockout mice. Neither the sensitivity to total body irradiation nor the radiosensitivity of resting lymphoid cells, which both strongly depend on p53, was altered in the absence of TPPII. Functional integrity of p53 in TPPII-knockout cells is further shown by a proper G(1) arrest and by the accumulation of p53 and its transcriptional targets, p21, Bax, and Fas, on gamma-irradiation. Furthermore, we could not confirm radiation-induced nuclear translocation of TPPII. Nevertheless, after gamma-irradiation, we found slightly increased mitotic catastrophe of TPPII-deficient primary fibroblasts and increased apoptosis of TPPII-deficient activated CD8(+) T cells. The latter was accompanied by delayed resolution of the DNA double-strand break marker gammaH2AX. This could, however, be due to increased apoptotic DNA damage rather than reduced DNA damage repair. Our data do not confirm a role for TPPII in the DNA damage response based on nuclear TPPII translocation and p53 stabilization but nevertheless do show increased radiation-induced cell death of selected nontransformed cell types in the absence of the TPPII protease.

  1. Increased p53 and decreased p21 accompany apoptosis induced by ultraviolet radiation in the nervous system of a crustacean.

    PubMed

    Hollmann, Gabriela; Linden, Rafael; Giangrande, Angela; Allodi, Silvana

    2016-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation can produce biological damage, leading the cell to apoptosis by the p53 pathway. This study evaluated some molecular markers of the apoptosis pathway induced by UVA, UVB and UVA+ UVB (Solar Simulator, SIM) in environmental doses, during five consecutive days of exposure, in the brain of the crab Ucides cordatus. We evaluated the central nervous system (CNS) by immunoblotting the content of proteins p53, p21, phosphorylated AKT, BDNF, GDNF, activated caspase-3 (C3) and phosphohistone H3 (PH3); and by immunohistochemical tests of the cells labeled for PH3 and C3. After the fifth day of exposure, UVB radiation and SIM increased the protein content of p53, increasing the content of AKT and, somehow, blocking p21, increasing the content of activated caspase-3, which led the cells to apoptosis. The signs of death affected the increase in neurotrophins, such as BDNF and GDNF, stimulating the apoptotic cascade of events. Immunohistochemical assays and immunoblotting showed that apoptosis was present in the brains of all UV groups, while the number of mitotic cells in the same groups decreased. In conclusion, environmental doses of UV can cause apoptosis by increasing p53 and decreasing p21, revealing an UV-damage pathway for U. cordatus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. p53/CEP-1 Increases or Decreases Lifespan, Depending on Level of Mitochondrial Bioenergetic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Natascia; Rea, Shane L.; Schiavi, Alfonso; Torgovnick, Alessandro; Testi, Roberto; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial pathologies underlie a number of life-shortening diseases in humans. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, severely reduced expression of mitochondrial proteins involved in electron transport chain-mediated energy production also leads to pathological phenotypes, including arrested development and/or shorter life; in sharp contrast, mild suppression of these same proteins extends lifespan. Here we show that the C. elegans p53 ortholog cep-1 mediates these opposite effects. We find that cep-1 is required to extend longevity in response to mild suppression of several bioenergetically relevant mitochondrial proteins, including frataxin - the protein defective in patients with Friedreich’s Ataxia. Importantly we show that cep-1 also mediates both the developmental arrest and life shortening induced by severe mitochondrial stress. Our findings support an evolutionarily conserved function for p53 in modulating organismal responses to mitochondrial dysfunction and suggest that metabolic checkpoint responses may play a role in longevity control and in human mitochondrial-associated diseases. PMID:19416129

  3. Methotrexate induces apoptosis through p53/p21-dependent pathway and increases E-cadherin expression through downregulation of HDAC/EZH2.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Yu; Yang, Pei-Ming; Chang, Yu-Fan; Marquez, Victor E; Chen, Ching-Chow

    2011-02-15

    Methotrexate (MTX) is a dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitor widely used as an anticancer drug in different kinds of human cancers. Here we investigated the anti-tumor mechanism of MTX against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) A549 cells. MTX not only inhibited in vitro cell growth via induction of apoptosis, but also inhibited tumor formation in animal xenograft model. RNase protection assay (RPA) and RT-PCR demonstrated its induction of p53 target genes including DR5, p21, Puma and Noxa. Moreover, MTX promoted p53 phosphorylation at Ser15 and acetylaion at Lys373/382, which increase its stability and expression. The apoptosis and inhibition of cell viability induced by MTX were dependent on p53 and, partially, on p21. In addition, MTX also increased E-cadherin expression through inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and downregulation of polycomb group protein enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2). Therefore, the anticancer mechanism of MTX acts through initiation of p53-dependent apoptosis and restoration of E-cadherin expression by downregulation of HDAC/EZH2.

  4. Targeting Oncogenic Mutant p53 for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Parrales, Alejandro; Iwakuma, Tomoo

    2015-01-01

    Among genetic alterations in human cancers, mutations in the tumor suppressor p53 gene are the most common, occurring in over 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are missense mutations and result in the accumulation of dysfunctional p53 protein in tumors. These mutants frequently have oncogenic gain-of-function activities and exacerbate malignant properties of cancer cells, such as metastasis and drug resistance. Increasing evidence reveals that stabilization of mutant p53 in tumors is crucial for its oncogenic activities, while depletion of mutant p53 attenuates malignant properties of cancer cells. Thus, mutant p53 is an attractive druggable target for cancer therapy. Different approaches have been taken to develop small-molecule compounds that specifically target mutant p53. These include compounds that restore wild-type conformation and transcriptional activity of mutant p53, induce depletion of mutant p53, inhibit downstream pathways of oncogenic mutant p53, and induce synthetic lethality to mutant p53. In this review article, we comprehensively discuss the current strategies targeting oncogenic mutant p53 in cancers, with special focus on compounds that restore wild-type p53 transcriptional activity of mutant p53 and those reducing mutant p53 levels.

  5. Relative genomic stability of adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells: analysis of ploidy, H19 long non-coding RNA and p53 activity.

    PubMed

    Ravid, Orly; Shoshani, Ofer; Sela, Meirav; Weinstock, Ada; Sadan, Tommy Weiss; Gur, Eyal; Zipori, Dov; Shani, Nir

    2014-12-17

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent and have been derived from various tissues. Although MSCs share many basic features, they often display subtle tissue specific differences. We previously demonstrated that bone marrow (BM) MSCs frequently become polyploid in culture. This tendency was mediated by a reduction in the expression of H19 long non-coding RNA during the transition from a diploid to a polyploid state. MSCs were derived from both BM and adipose tissue of mice and expanded under normoxic and hypoxic culture conditions. Cells were stained by propidium iodide and their ploidy was evaluated by FACS. Gene expression of independent MSC preparations was compared by quantitative real time PCR and protein expression levels by Western blot analysis. p53 silencing in MSCs was performed by a specific small hairpin RNA (shRNA). We set to examine whether genomic instability is common to MSCs originating from different tissues. It is demonstrated that adipose derived MSCs (ASCs) tend to remain diploid during culture while a vast majority of BM MSCs become polyploid. The diploid phenotype of ASCs is correlated with reduced H19 expression compared to BM MSCs. Under hypoxic conditions (3% oxygen) both ASCs and BM MSCs demonstrate increased RNA expression of H19 and Vascular endothelial growth factor A. Importantly, ASC gene expression is significantly less variable than BM MSCs under both oxygen conditions, indicating to their superior homogeneity. Gene expression analysis revealed that p53 target genes, often induced by DNA damage, are up-regulated in ASCs under basal conditions. However, p53 activation following treatment with DNA damaging agents was strongly elevated in BM MSCs compared to ASCs. We found that p53 is involved in maintaining the stable diploid state of ASCs as p53 shRNA induced ploidy changes in ASCs but not in BM MSCs. The increased genomic stability of murine ASCs together with their lower H19 expression and relative homogeneity suggest a

  6. MARVELD1 inhibited cell proliferation and enhance chemosensitivity via increasing expression of p53 and p16 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Youtao; Zhang, Yubao; Hu, Jianran; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Shan; Han, Fang; Yue, Lei; Qu, Youpeng; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Hongjian; Nie, Huan; Li, Yu

    2012-04-01

    We have previously found that expression of MARVELD1 was remarkably downregulated in multiple tumor tissues, but unclear in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and its function has not been explored yet. In the present study, to uncover the underlying mechanism of MARVELD1 in the pathogenesis and development of HCC, we investigated the expression pattern of MARVELD1 and its effect on tumor proliferation in HCC. The results indicated the frequent downregulation of MARVELD1 in clinic samples and cell lines of HCC resulted from promoter methylation, as well as genetic deletion. Furthermore, treatment of MARVELD1 unexpressing Hep3B2.1-7 and PLC/PRF/5 cells with the demethylating agent 5-aza-2' deoxycytidine restored its expression. Overexpression of MARVELD1 suppressed the proliferation of HCC cells in vitro and in vivo, whereas downregulation of endogenous MARVELD1 by shRNAs significantly enhanced these characters. MARVELD1 overexpression could enhance chemosensitivity of HCC cells to epirubicin and 10-hydroxycamptothecin. Corresponding to these results, the expression of p-ERK1/2 and cyclin D1 were decreased, whereas p16 and p53 were increased in MARVELD1-transfected cells. We also demonstrated that knockdown of MARVELD1 resulted in upregulation of p-ERK1/2 and cyclin D1, and downregulation of p16 and p53. Moreover, the effect of the decreased cell growth rate was significantly reversed when MARVELD1-overexpressing cells were trasfected with p53 or p16 siRNA. Our findings suggest that MARVELD1 is a tumor suppressor by negatively regulating proliferation, tumor growth and chemosensitivity of HCC cells via increasing p53 and p16 in vitro and in vivo. MARVELD1 may be a potential target for HCC therapy. © 2012 Japanese Cancer Association.

  7. p53 responsive elements in human retrotransposons

    PubMed Central

    Harris, CR; DeWan, A; Zupnick, A; Normart, R; Gabriel, A; Prives, C; Levine, AJ; Hoh, J

    2011-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (L1s) are highly repetitive DNA elements that are capable of altering the human genome through retrotransposition. To protect against L1 retroposition, the cell downregulates the expression of L1 proteins by various mechanisms, including high-density cytosine methylation of L1 promoters and DICER-dependent destruction of L1 mRNAs. In this report, a large number of p53 responsive elements, or p53 DNA binding sites, were detected in L1 elements within the human genome. At least some of these p53 responsive elements are functional and can act to increase the levels of L1 mRNA expression. The p53 protein can directly bind to a short 15-nucleotide sequence within the L1 promoter. This p53 responsive element within L1 is a recent addition to evolution, appearing ~20 million years ago. This suggests an interplay between L1 elements, which have a rich history of causing changes in the genome, and the p53 protein, the function of which is to protect against genomic changes. To understand these observations, a model is proposed in which the increased expression of L1 mRNAs by p53 actually increases, rather than decreases, the genomic stability through amplification of p53-dependent processes for genomic protection. PMID:19718052

  8. p53 responsive elements in human retrotransposons.

    PubMed

    Harris, C R; Dewan, A; Zupnick, A; Normart, R; Gabriel, A; Prives, C; Levine, A J; Hoh, J

    2009-11-05

    Long interspersed nuclear elements-1 (L1s) are highly repetitive DNA elements that are capable of altering the human genome through retrotransposition. To protect against L1 retroposition, the cell downregulates the expression of L1 proteins by various mechanisms, including high-density cytosine methylation of L1 promoters and DICER-dependent destruction of L1 mRNAs. In this report, a large number of p53 responsive elements, or p53 DNA binding sites, were detected in L1 elements within the human genome. At least some of these p53 responsive elements are functional and can act to increase the levels of L1 mRNA expression. The p53 protein can directly bind to a short 15-nucleotide sequence within the L1 promoter. This p53 responsive element within L1 is a recent addition to evolution, appearing approximately 20 million years ago. This suggests an interplay between L1 elements, which have a rich history of causing changes in the genome, and the p53 protein, the function of which is to protect against genomic changes. To understand these observations, a model is proposed in which the increased expression of L1 mRNAs by p53 actually increases, rather than decreases, the genomic stability through amplification of p53-dependent processes for genomic protection.

  9. p53-stabilizing agent CP-31398 prevents growth and invasion of urothelial cancer of the bladder in transgenic UPII-SV40T mice.

    PubMed

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Zhang, Yuting; Li, Qian; Mohammed, Altaf; Sindhwani, Puneet; Lightfoot, Stan; Wu, Xue-Re; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2013-08-01

    The high prevalence of bladder cancer and its recurrence make it an important target for chemoprevention. About half of invasive urothelial tumors have mutations in p53. We determined the chemopreventive efficacy of a p53-stabilizing agent, CP-31398, in a transgenic UPII-SV40T mouse model of bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) that strongly resembles human TCC. After genotyping, six-week-old UPII-SV40T mice (n = 30/group) were fed control (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing 150 or 300 ppm of CP-31398 for 34 weeks. Progression of bladder cancer growth was monitored by magnetic resonance imaging. At 40 weeks of age, all mice were killed; urinary bladders were collected to determine weights, tumor incidence, and histopathology. There was a significant increase in bladder weights of transgenic versus wild-type mice (male: 140.2 mg vs 27.3 mg, P < .0001; female: 34.2 mg vs 14.8 mg, P < .0001). A significant decrease in the bladder tumor weights (by 68.6-80.2%, P < .0001 in males and by 36.9-55.3%, P < .0001 in females) was observed in CP-31398-treated mice. Invasive papillary TCC incidence was 100% in transgenic mice fed control diet. Both male and female mice exposed to CP-31398 showed inhibition of invasive TCC. CP-31398 (300 ppm) completely blocked invasion in female mice. Molecular analysis of the bladder tumors showed an increase in apoptosis markers (p53, p21, Bax, and Annexin V) with a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor in transgenic mice fed CP-31398. These results suggest that p53-modulating agents can serve as potential chemopreventive agents for bladder TCC.

  10. Dietary selenomethionine increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in rat liver and colon mucosa.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Yan, Lin; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Uthus, Eric O

    2011-08-01

    The regulation of site-specific DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes has been considered as a leading mechanism by which certain nutrients exert their anticancer property. This study was to investigate whether selenium (Se) affects the methylation of globe genomic DNA and the exon-specific p53 gene. Three groups of rats (n = 6-7/group) were fed the AIN-93G basal diet supplemented with 0 [Se deficient (D)], 0.15 [Se adequate (A)], or 4 mg [Se supranutritional (S)] (Se as l-selenomethionine)/kg diet for 104 d, respectively. Rats fed the A or S diet had greater plasma and liver glutathione peroxidase activity, liver thioredoxin reductase activity, and plasma homocysteine concentration than those fed the D diet. However, compared with the A diet, rats fed the S diet did not further increase these Se-dependent enzyme activities or homocysteine concentration. In contrast, Se concentrations in kidney, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, and plasma were increased in a Se-dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, rats fed the S diet had significantly less global liver genomic DNA methylation than those fed the D diet. However, the S diet significantly increased the methylation of the p53 gene (exons 5-8) but not the β-actin gene (exons 2-3) DNA in liver and colon mucosa compared with those fed the D diet. Taken together, long-term Se consumption not only affects selenoprotein enzyme activities, homocysteine, tissue Se concentrations, and global genomic DNA methylation but also increases exon-specific DNA methylation of the p53 gene in a Se-dose-dependent manner in rat liver and colon mucosa.

  11. Ell3 stabilizes p53 following CDDP treatment via its effects on ubiquitin-dependent and -independent proteasomal degradation pathways in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hee-Jin; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Shin, Kyung-Won; Lim, Kee-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Ock; Lee, Je-Yong; Kim, Jiewan; Park, Ji-Hoon; Yang, Kyung-Min; Baek, Kwang-Hyun; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2015-12-29

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 is unstable in quiescent cells and undergoes proteosomal degradation. Under conditions of cellular stress, p53 is rapidly stabilized by post-translational modification, thereby escaping degradation and translocating to the nucleus where it activates genes related to cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. Here, we report that the transcription elongation factor Ell3 sensitizes luminal type-cancer cell line, MCF7, which have wild-type p53, to the chemotherapeutic agent cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) by stabilizing p53. Overexpression of Ell3 in MCF7 cells suppressed the MDM2-mediated ubiquitin-dependent degradation pathway. In addition, Ell3 promoted binding of p53 to NADH quinone oxidoreductase 1, which is linked to the ubiquitin-independent degradation of p53. We found that Ell3 activates interleukin-20 (IL20) expression, which is linked to the ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Chemical inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling or molecular suppression of IL20 revealed that the ERK1/2 signaling pathway and IL20 are the main causes of p53 stabilization in Ell3-overexpressing MCF7 cells. These findings suggest that the ERK1/2 pathway can be targeted in the rational development of therapies to induce chemosensitization of breast cancer cells.

  12. Resistance for Genotoxic Damage in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Is Increased by Hypoxia but Not Generally Dependent on p53-Regulated Cell Cycle Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Wieduwild, Elisabeth; Nerger, Katrin; Lambrecht, Nina; Schmoll, Hans-Joachim; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Müller, Lutz Peter

    2017-01-01

    Adult stem cells including multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) acquire a high amount of DNA-damage due to their prolonged lifespan. MSC may exert specific mechanisms of resistance to avoid loss of functional activity. We have previously shown that resistance of MSC is associated with an induction of p53 and proliferation arrest upon genotoxic damage. Hypoxia may also contribute to resistance in MSC due to the low oxygen tension in the niche. In this study we characterized the role of p53 and contribution of hypoxia in resistance of MSC to genotoxic damage. MSC exhibited increased resistance to cisplatin induced DNA-damage. This resistance was associated with a temporary G2/M cell cycle arrest, induction of p53- and p21-expression and reduced cyclin B / cdk1-levels upon subapoptotic damage. Resistance of MSC to cisplatin was increased at hypoxic conditions i. e. oxygen <0.5%. However, upon hypoxia the cisplatin-induced cell cycle arrest and expression of p53 and p21 were abrogated. MSC with shRNA-mediated p53 knock-down showed a reduced cell cycle arrest and increased cyclin B / cdk1 expression. However, this functional p53 knock down did not alter the resistance to cisplatin. In contrast to cisplatin, functional p53-knock-down increased the resistance of MSC to etoposide. We conclude that resistance of MSC to genotoxic damage is influenced by oxygen tension but is not generally dependent on p53. Thus, p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms of resistance are likely to contribute to the life-long functional activity of MSC in vivo. These findings indicate that hypoxia and different resistance pathways contribute to the phenotype that enables the prolonged lifespan of MSC. PMID:28081228

  13. Subchronic oral toxicity and metabolite profiling of the p53 stabilizing agent, CP-31398, in rats and dogs

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, William D.; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J.; Kapetanovic, Izet M.; Kopelovich, Levy; McCormick, David L.

    2011-01-01

    CP-31398 (N′-[2-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-4-quinazolinyl]-N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine dihydrochloride) is a styrylquinazoline that stabilizes the DNA binding conformation of p53, thereby maintaining the activity of p53 as a transcription factor and tumor suppressor. In consideration of the potential use of p53 stabilizers for cancer prevention and therapy, 28-day studies (with recovery) were performed to characterize the toxicity of CP-31398 in rats and dogs. In the rat study, groups of 15 CD rats/sex received daily gavage exposure to CP-31398 at 0, 40, 80, or 160 mg/kg/day (0, 240, 480, or 960 mg/m2/day). In the dog study, groups of five beagle dogs received daily gavage exposure to CP-31398 at 0, 10, 20, or 40 mg/kg/day (0, 200, 400, or 800 mg/m2/day). The high dose of CP-31398 induced mortality in both species: seven male rats and four female rats died as a result of hepatic infarcts, and two female dogs died as a result of hepatic necrosis without evidence of thrombosis. No deaths were seen in the mid- or low dose groups in either species. In dogs, sporadic emesis was seen in the high dose and mid dose groups, and reductions in body weight gain were observed in all drug-exposed groups. CP-31398 induced mild anemia in both species; clinical pathology data also demonstrated hepatic toxicity, renal toxicity, inflammatory reactions, and coagulopathies in rats in the high dose and mid dose groups. Treatment-related microscopic changes in high dose and mid dose rats were identified in the liver, kidney, heart, bone marrow, lung, adrenals, spleen, thymus, skeletal muscle, and ovary; microscopic changes in the liver, heart, lung, and adrenals persisted through the recovery period. In dogs, microscopic changes were identified in the central nervous system, lung, and liver; changes in all tissues remained at the end of the recovery period. The liver is the primary site of limiting toxicity for CP-31398 in rats, and is also a key site of toxicity in dogs. The

  14. Subchronic oral toxicity and metabolite profiling of the p53 stabilizing agent, CP-31398, in rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William D; Muzzio, Miguel; Detrisac, Carol J; Kapetanovic, Izet M; Kopelovich, Levy; McCormick, David L

    2011-11-18

    CP-31398 (N'-[2-[2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethenyl]-4-quinazolinyl]-N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine dihydrochloride) is a styrylquinazoline that stabilizes the DNA binding conformation of p53, thereby maintaining the activity of p53 as a transcription factor and tumor suppressor. In consideration of the potential use of p53 stabilizers for cancer prevention and therapy, 28-day studies (with recovery) were performed to characterize the toxicity of CP-31398 in rats and dogs. In the rat study, groups of 15 CD rats/sex received daily gavage exposure to CP-31398 at 0, 40, 80, or 160mg/kg/day (0, 240, 480, or 960mg/m(2)/day). In the dog study, groups of five beagle dogs received daily gavage exposure to CP-31398 at 0, 10, 20, or 40mg/kg/day (0, 200, 400, or 800mg/m(2)/day). The high dose of CP-31398 induced mortality in both species: seven male rats and four female rats died as a result of hepatic infarcts, and two female dogs died as a result of hepatic necrosis without evidence of thrombosis. No deaths were seen in the mid- or low-dose groups in either species. In dogs, sporadic emesis was seen in the high dose and mid dose groups, and reductions in body weight gain were observed in all drug-exposed groups. CP-31398 induced mild anemia in both species; clinical pathology data also demonstrated hepatic toxicity, renal toxicity, inflammatory reactions, and coagulopathies in rats in the high dose and mid dose groups. Treatment-related microscopic changes in high dose and mid dose rats were identified in the liver, kidney, heart, bone marrow, lung, adrenals, spleen, thymus, skeletal muscle, and ovary; microscopic changes in the liver, heart, lung, and adrenals persisted through the recovery period. In dogs, microscopic changes were identified in the central nervous system, lung, and liver; changes in all tissues remained at the end of the recovery period. The liver is the primary site of limiting toxicity for CP-31398 in rats, and is also a key site of toxicity in dogs. The

  15. p53 increase mitochondrial copy number via up-regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Linhao; Zhou, Hongying; Fang, Dingzhi; Feng, Shi

    2016-01-01

    In colorectal cancer, no study has been carried out discovering the relationship among p53, mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) expression and change of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number. In our study, co-expression of p53 and TFAM was observed in colon adenocarcinoma tissues, paracancerous tissues and 9 colorectal cancer cell lines. Then, a significant linear correlation was established between either p53 or TFAM expression and advanced TNM stage, positive lymph nodes and low 5-year survival rate in patients with colon adenocarcinoma. Additionally, advanced TNM stage, large tumor burden, presence of distant metastasis, and high TFAM expression were significantly related to poor overall 5-years survival. Moreover, alteration of p53 expression could change TFAM expression but TFAM could not influence p53 expression, and p53 could enhance TFAM expression via binding to TFAM promoter. While, both of p53 and TFAM expression could incrase mtDNA copy number in vitro. In conclusions, p53 might incrase mtDNA copy number through its regulation on TFAM expression via TFAMpromoter. PMID:27732955

  16. S100A4 interacts with p53 in the nucleus and promotes p53 degradation.

    PubMed

    Orre, L M; Panizza, E; Kaminskyy, V O; Vernet, E; Gräslund, T; Zhivotovsky, B; Lehtiö, J

    2013-12-05

    S100A4 is a small calcium-binding protein that is commonly overexpressed in a range of different tumor types, and it is widely accepted that S100A4 has an important role in the process of cancer metastasis. In vitro binding assays has shown that S100A4 interacts with the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating that S100A4 may have additional roles in tumor development. In the present study, we show that endogenous S100A4 and p53 interact in complex samples, and that the interaction increases after inhibition of MDM2-dependent p53 degradation using Nutlin-3A. Further, using proximity ligation assay, we show that the interaction takes place in the cell nucleus. S100A4 knockdown experiments in two p53 wild-type cell lines, A549 and HeLa, resulted in stabilization of p53 protein, indicating that S100A4 is promoting p53 degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown leads to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data add a new layer to the oncogenic properties of S100A4 through its inhibition of p53-dependent processes.

  17. Abrogation of p53 by its antisense in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells increases cyclin D1 via activation of Akt and promotion of cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Kumari, Ratna; Upadhyay, Ankur Kumar; Bhat, Manoj Kumar

    2007-11-15

    The p53 protein has been a subject of intense research interest since its discovery as about 50% of human cancers carry p53 mutations. Mutations in the p53 gene are the most frequent genetic lesions in breast cancers suggesting a critical role of p53 in breast cancer development, growth and chemosensitivity. This report describes the derivation and characterization of MCF-7As53, an isogenic cell line derived from MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells in which p53 was abrogated by antisense p53 cDNA. Similar to MCF-7 and simultaneously selected hygromycin resistant MCF-7H cells, MCF-7As53 cells have consistent basal epithelial phenotype, morphology, and estrogen receptor expression levels at normal growth conditions. Present work documents investigation of molecular variations, growth kinetics, and cell cycle related studies in relation to absence of wild-type p53 protein and its transactivation potential as well. Even though wild-type tumor suppressor p53 is an activator of cell growth arrest and apoptosis-mediator genes such as p21, Bax, and GADD45 in MCF-7As53 cells, no alterations in expression levels of these genes were detected. The doubling time of these cells decreased due to depletion of G0/G1 cell phase because of constitutive activation of Akt and increase in cyclin D1 protein levels. This proliferative property was abrogated by wortmannin, an inhibitor of PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway. Therefore this p53 null cell line indicates that p53 is an indispensable component of cellular signaling system which is regulated by caveolin-1 expression, involving Akt activation and increase in cyclin D1, thereby promoting proliferation of breast cancer cells.

  18. Ki-67 expression is increased in p16-expressing triple-negative breast carcinoma and correlates with p16 only in p53-negative tumors.

    PubMed

    Sugianto, Jessica; Sarode, Venetia; Peng, Yan

    2014-04-01

    Increased Ki-67 expression is associated with worse prognosis in patients with triple-negative breast carcinoma (TNBC); Ki-67 is widely used as a prognostic marker for TNBC patients. p16 and p53 are tumor suppressors. The status of p53 expression can divide TNBCs into 2 biologically distinct subgroups. The relationship of p16 expression with Ki-67 and its association with the status of p53 in TNBC patients have not been well characterized. In this study, we investigated p16 expression in 60 high-grade invasive TNBC cases and its relationship with Ki-67 in different groups of TNBCs and correlated p16 with Ki-67 in p53-positive and p53-negative subgroups. The tumors were immunolabeled for p16, Ki-67, and p53. Tissue microarrays were constructed with each tumor and adjacent normal breast tissue. Of the 60 tumors, 45 (75%) were found to have p16 expression. The triple-negative tumors had significantly higher p16 expression compared with paired normal ducts (P < .0001). Mean expression level of Ki-67 in p16-positive tumors was significantly higher than that in p16-negative tumors regardless of the status of p53 (P < .05). p16 expression positively correlated with Ki-67 (69.05% ± 7.23%) in the 22 p53-negative tumors (r = 0.739; P < .001). However, no correlation was found between p16 and Ki-67 (77.2% ± 3.83%) in the 38 p53-positive tumors (r = 0.157; P = .424). These findings suggest that p16 may play a role in the proliferation and aggressiveness of p53-negative TNBC and provide insights into the potential prognostic value of p16 as well as a better understanding of tumor biology related to the Rb/p16 pathway abnormalities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Hyperglycemia promotes p53-Mdm2 interaction but reduces p53 ubiquitination in RINm5F cells.

    PubMed

    Barzalobre-Gerónimo, R; Raúl, Barzalobre-Gerónimo; Flores-López, L A; Antonio, Flores-López Luis; Baiza-Gutman, L A; Arturo, Baiza-Gutman Luis; Cruz, M; Miguel, Cruz; García-Macedo, R; Rebeca, García-Macedo; Ávalos-Rodríguez, A; Alejandro, Ávalos-Rodríguez; Contreras-Ramos, A; Alejandra, Contreras-Ramos; Díaz-Flores, A; Margarita, Díaz-Flores; Ortega-Camarillo, C; Clara, Ortega-Camarillo

    2015-07-01

    The apoptosis of β cells induced by hyperglycemia has been associated with p53 mobilization to mitochondria and p53 phosphorylation. Murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) induces the degradation of p53 and thereby protects cells from apoptosis. We studied the effect of glucose at high concentration on the ability of Mdm2 to ubiquitinate p53 and promote its degradation. RINm5F cells were grown in RPMI-1640 medium with 5 or 30 mM glucose for varying periods of time. After this treatment, the expression of Mdm2 was measured using real-time PCR. The phosphorylation of Mdm2 at Ser166, p53 at Ser15, and the kinases Akt and ATM were measured by Western blotting. The formation of the p53-Mdm2 complex and p53 ubiquitination was assessed by p53 immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence. Our results showed that high glucose reduced Mdm2 mRNA expression and protein concentration and increased Mdm2 and Akt phosphorylation, albeit with slower kinetics for Akt. It also promoted p53-Mdm2 complex formation, whereas p53 ubiquitination was suppressed. Furthermore, phosphorylation of both p53 Ser15 and ATM was increased in the presence of 30 mM glucose. These data indicate that high concentration glucose decrease the mRNA expression and cytosolic concentration of Mdm2. However, although the increase in glucose promoted the phosphorylation of Mdm2, it also decreased p53 ubiquitination, thus avoiding p53 degradation. In hyperglycemic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus, the reduction of pancreatic β cells mass is favored by stabilization of p53 in association with low p53 ubiquitination and reduced expression of Mdm2.

  20. Induction of MDM2-P2 Transcripts Correlates with Stabilized Wild-Type p53 in Betel- and Tobacco-Related Human Oral Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ralhan, Ranju; Sandhya, Agarwal; Meera, Mathur; Bohdan, Wasylyk; Nootan, Shukla K.

    2000-01-01

    MDM2, a critical element of cellular homeostasis mechanisms, is involved in complex interactions with important cell-cycle and stress-response regulators including p53. The mdm2-P2 promoter is a transcriptional target of p53. The aim of this study was to determine the association between mdm2-P2 transcripts and the status of the p53 gene in betel- and tobacco-related oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) to understand the mechanism of deregulation of MDM2 and p53 expression and their prognostic implications in oral tumorigenesis. Elevated levels of MDM2 proteins were observed in 11 of 25 (44%) oral hyperplastic lesions, nine of 15 (60%) dysplastic lesions, and 71 of 100 (71%) SCCs. The intriguing feature of the study was the identification and different subcellular localization of three isoforms of MDM2 (ie, 90 kd, 76 kd, and 57 kd) in oral SCCs and their correlation with p53 overexpression in each tumor. The hallmark of the study was the detection of mdm2-P2 transcripts in 12 of 20 oral SCCs overexpressing both MDM2 and p53 proteins while harboring wild-type p53 alleles. Furthermore, mdm2 amplification was an infrequent event in betel- and tobacco-associated oral tumorigenesis. The differential compartmentalization of the three isoforms of MDM2 suggests that each has a distinct function, potentially in the regulation of p53 and other gene products implicated in oral tumorigenesis. In conclusion, we report herein the first evidence suggesting that enhanced translation of mdm2-P2 transcripts (S-mdm2) may represent an important mechanism of overexpression and consequent stabilization and functional inactivation of wild-type p53 serving as an adverse prognosticator in betel- and tobacco-related oral cancer. The clinical significance of the functional inactivation of wild-type p53 by MDM2 is underscored by the significantly shorter median disease-free survival time (16 months) observed in p53/MDM2-positive cases as compared to those which did not show co-expression of

  1. WP1130 increases doxorubicin sensitivity in hepatocellular carcinoma cells through usp9x-dependent p53 degradation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Chen, Wei; Liang, Chao; Chen, Bryan Wei; Zhi, Xiao; Zhang, Shufeng; Zheng, Xiaoxiao; Bai, Xueli; Liang, Tingbo

    2015-06-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is a major obstacle in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) therapy. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that deubiquitinases (DUB) are key regulators in the mechanisms of cell proliferation, apoptosis and chemoresistance. The present study aimed to investigate whether WP1130, which inhibits activity of deubiquitinases, exerts synergistic cytotoxicity with doxorubicin in HCC and the underlying mechanisms. In the study, we found that Huh7, HepG2, and SNU387 HCC cells with p53 expression displayed enhanced response to the combination therapy compared with p53-deficient HCC cells (Hep3B) in the manner of inhibiting cell proliferation. Downregulation of p53 abolished the synergistic cytotoxicity of doxorubicin and WP1130 on HCC cells. Mechanistically, we found that combined treatment with WP1130 suppressed doxorubicin-mediated upregulation of p53 via promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome dependent degradation, whereas knockdown of DUB usp9x abolished this effect. Taken together, these results demonstrate that combined treatment with WP1130 sensitized HCC cells to doxorubicin via usp9x-depedent p53 degradation.

  2. The p53 circuit board

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kelly D.; Gallant-Behm, Corrie L.; Henry, Ryan E.; Fraikin, Jean-Luc; Espinosa, Joaquín M.

    2012-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is embedded in a large gene network controlling diverse cellular and organismal phenotypes. Multiple signaling pathways converge onto p53 activation, mostly by relieving the inhibitory effects of its repressors, MDM2 and MDM4. In turn, signals originating from increased p53 activity diverge into distinct effector pathways to deliver a specific cellular response to the activating stimuli. Much attention has been devoted to dissecting how the various input pathways trigger p53 activation and how the activity of the p53 protein itself can be modulated by a plethora of co-factors and post-translational modifications. In this review we will focus instead on the multiple configurations of the effector pathways. We will discuss how p53-generated signals are transmitted, amplified, resisted and eventually integrated by downstream gene circuits operating at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. We will also discuss how context-dependent variations in these gene circuits define the cellular response to p53 activation and how they may impact the clinical efficacy of p53-based targeted therapies. PMID:22333261

  3. HMGA1 silencing restores normal stem cell characteristics in colon cancer stem cells by increasing p53 levels

    PubMed Central

    Puca, Francesca; Colamaio, Marianna; Federico, Antonella; Gemei, Marica; Tosti, Nadia; Bastos, André Uchimura; Vecchio, Luigi Del; Pece, Salvatore; Battista, Sabrina; Fusco, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    High-mobility group A1 (HMGA1) proteins are architectural chromatinic proteins, abundantly expressed during embryogenesis and in most cancer tissues, but expressed at low levels or absent in normal adult tissues. Several studies have demonstrated that HMGA1 proteins play a causal role in neoplastic cell transformation. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of these proteins in the control of cancer stem cells (CSCs), which have emerged as a preferred target in cancer therapy, because of their role in cancer recurrence. We observed that HMGA1 is overexpressed in colon tumour stem cell (CTSC) lines compared to normal and colon cancer tissues. We demonstrated that HMGA1 silencing in CTSCs increases stem cell quiescence and reduces self-renewal and sphere-forming efficiency (SFE). The latter, together with the upregulation and asymmetric distribution of NUMB, is indicative of the recovery of an asymmetric division pattern, typical of normal stem cells. We further found that HMGA1 transcriptionally regulates p53, which is known to control the balance between symmetric and asymmetric divisions in CSCs. Therefore, our data indicate a critical role for HMGA1 in regulating both self-renewal and the symmetric/asymmetric division ratio in CSCs, suggesting that blocking HMGA1 function may be an effective anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24833610

  4. p53 isoform Δ133p53 promotes efficiency of induced pluripotent stem cells and ensures genomic integrity during reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Lu; Pan, Xiao; Chen, Haide; Rao, Lingjun; Zeng, Yelin; Hang, Honghui; Peng, Jinrong; Xiao, Lei; Chen, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have great potential in regenerative medicine, but this depends on the integrity of their genomes. iPS cells have been found to contain a large number of de novo genetic alterations due to DNA damage response during reprogramming. Thus, to maintain the genetic stability of iPS cells is an important goal in iPS cell technology. DNA damage response can trigger tumor suppressor p53 activation, which ensures genome integrity of reprogramming cells by inducing apoptosis and senescence. p53 isoform Δ133p53 is a p53 target gene and functions to not only antagonize p53 mediated apoptosis, but also promote DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here we report that Δ133p53 is induced in reprogramming. Knockdown of Δ133p53 results 2-fold decrease in reprogramming efficiency, 4-fold increase in chromosomal aberrations, whereas overexpression of Δ133p53 with 4 Yamanaka factors showes 4-fold increase in reprogamming efficiency and 2-fold decrease in chromosomal aberrations, compared to those in iPS cells induced only with 4 Yamanaka factors. Overexpression of Δ133p53 can inhibit cell apoptosis and promote DNA DSB repair foci formation during reprogramming. Our finding demonstrates that the overexpression of Δ133p53 not only enhances reprogramming efficiency, but also results better genetic quality in iPS cells. PMID:27874035

  5. CNOT3 contributes to early B cell development by controlling Igh rearrangement and p53 mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Takeshi; Morita, Masahiro; Hijikata, Atsushi; Fukuda-Yuzawa, Yoko; Adachi, Shungo; Isono, Kyoichi; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Natsume, Tohru; Fukao, Taro; Ohara, Osamu; Yamamoto, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    The CCR4–NOT deadenylase complex plays crucial roles in mRNA decay and translational repression induced by poly(A) tail shortening. Although the in vitro activities of each component of this complex have been well characterized, its in vivo role in immune cells remains unclear. Here we show that mice lacking the CNOT3 subunit of this complex, specifically in B cells, have a developmental block at the pro- to pre–B cell transition. CNOT3 regulated generation of germline transcripts in the VH region of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (Igh) locus, compaction of the locus, and subsequent Igh gene rearrangement and destabilized tumor suppressor p53 mRNA. The developmental defect in the absence of CNOT3 could be partially rescued by ablation of p53 or introduction of a pre-rearranged Igh transgene. Thus, our data suggest that the CCR4–NOT complex regulates B cell differentiation by controlling Igh rearrangement and destabilizing p53 mRNA. PMID:26238124

  6. Inflammatory stimuli induce inhibitory S-nitrosylation of the deacetylase SIRT1 to increase acetylation and activation of p53 and p65

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Shohei; Chang, Kyungho; Sakai, Michihiro; Shimizu, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Marina; Tanaka, Tomokazu; Nakazawa, Harumasa; Ichinose, Fumito; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Ishigami, Akihito; Ito, Hideki; Ouchi, Yasuyoshi; Starr, Marlene E.; Saito, Hiroshi; Shimokado, Kentaro; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Kaneki, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation increases the abundance of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), leading to enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO), which can modify proteins by S-nitrosylation. Enhanced NO production increases the activities of the transcription factors p53 and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in several models of disease-associated inflammation. S-Nitrosylation inhibits the activity of the protein deacetylase SIRT1. SIRT1 limits apoptosis and inflammation by deacetylating p53 and p65 (also known as RelA), a subunit of NF-κB. We showed in multiple cultured mammalian cell lines that NO donors or inflammatory stimuli induced S-nitrosylation of SIRT1 within CXXC motifs, which inhibited SIRT1 by disrupting its ability to bind zinc. Inhibition of SIRT1 reduced deacetylation and promoted activation of p53 and p65, leading to apoptosis and increased expression of proinflammatory genes. In rodent models of systemic inflammation, Parkinson’s disease, or aging-related muscular atrophy, S-nitrosylation of SIRT1 correlated with increased acetylation of p53 and p65 and activation of p53 and NF-κB target genes, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of SIRT1 may represent a proinflammatory switch common to many diseases and aging. PMID:25389371

  7. Infiltrating mast cells increase prostate cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistances via modulation of p38/p53/p21 and ATM signals.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongjun; Li, Chong; Dang, Qiang; Chang, Luke S; Li, Lei

    2016-01-12

    Early studies indicated that mast cells in prostate tumor microenvironment might influence prostate cancer (PCa) progression. Their impacts to PCa therapy, however, remained unclear. Here we found PCa could recruit more mast cells than normal prostate epithelial cells then alter PCa chemotherapy and radiotherapy sensitivity, leading to PCa more resistant to these therapies. Mechanism dissection revealed that infiltrated mast cells could increase p21 expression via modulation of p38/p53 signals, and interrupting p38-p53 signals via siRNAs of p53 or p21 could reverse mast cell-induced docetaxel chemotherapy resistance of PCa. Furthermore, recruited mast cells could also increase the phosphorylation of ATM at ser-1981 site, and inhibition of ATM activity could reverse mast cell-induced radiotherapy resistance. The in vivo mouse model with xenografted PCa C4-2 cells co-cultured with mast cells also confirmed that mast cells could increase PCa chemotherapy resistance via activating p38/p53/p21 signaling. Together, our results provide a new mechanism showing infiltrated mast cells could alter PCa chemotherapy and radiotherapy sensitivity via modulating the p38/p53/p21 signaling and phosphorylation of ATM. Targeting this newly identified signaling may help us better suppress PCa chemotherapy and radiotherapy resistance.

  8. Drp1 stabilizes p53 on the mitochondria to trigger necrosis under oxidative stress conditions in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xing; Sesaki, Hiromi; Qi, Xin

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative-stress-induced necrosis is considered to be one of the main pathological mediators in various neurological disorders, such as brain ischaemia. However, little is known about the mechanism by which cells modulate necrosis in response to oxidative stress. In the present study, we showed that Drp1 (dynamin-related protein 1), a primary mitochondrial fission protein, stabilizes the well-known stress gene p53 and is required for p53 translocation to the mitochondria under conditions of oxidative stress. We found that Drp1 binding to p53 induced mitochondria-related necrosis. In contrast, inhibition of Drp1 hyperactivation by Drp1 siRNA reduced necrotic cell death in cell cultures exposed to oxidative stress. Most significantly, we demonstrated that inhibition of Drp1 by the Drp1 peptide inhibitor P110, which was developed recently by our group, abolished p53 association with the mitochondria and reduced brain infarction in rats subjected to brain ischaemia/reperfusion injury. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism of Drp1 hyperactivation in the induction of mitochondrial damage and subsequent cell death. We propose that a Drp1 inhibitor such as P110 is a possible therapeutic agent for diseases in which hyperactivated Drp1 contributes to the pathology.

  9. Stabilization of LSD1 by deubiquitinating enzyme USP7 promotes glioblastoma cell tumorigenesis and metastasis through suppression of the p53 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lei; Cui, Yan; Xu, Qingfu; Jiang, Yugang

    2016-11-01

    The substrates and mechanisms of ubiquitin specific peptidase 7 (USP7) in glioma remain unclear. Lysine‑specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) may undergo proteasomal degradation; however, a reciprocal mechanism that stabilizes LSD1 in glioma has not been dertermined. Here co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays revealed that LSD1 is associated with USP7 in vivo and in vitro. USP7 inhibited LSD1 ubiquitination and stabilized LSD1 in A172 and T98G cells. MTT, EdU proliferation, flow cytometry and Transwell assays indicated that LSD1 played a critical role in the proliferation and invasion of glioblastoma (GBM) cells. We defined the mechanism of USP7 in GBM, through counterbalanced LSD1 ubiquitylation. USP7 caused G0/G1 arrest, promoted tumorigenesis and invasion of A172 and T98G cells. We also uncovered the suppression of the p53 signaling pathway that mediated the activity of USP7 and LSD1. Furthermore, USP7 and LSD1 expression levels were higher in the 150 glioma patients than these levels in normal brain tissues and were correlated with glioma progression. LSD1 was increased concurrently with USP7 during glioblastoma progression and both were predictors for worsened prognosis. Collectively, our study suggested that USP7-LSD1 affects GBM cell proliferation and invasion and may be valuable as novel therapeutic targets and prognostic tools for GBM.

  10. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer. PMID:25545885

  11. Triptolide sensitizes AML cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis via decrease of XIAP and p53-mediated increase of DR5.

    PubMed

    Carter, Bing Z; Mak, Duncan H; Schober, Wendy D; Dietrich, Martin F; Pinilla, Clemencia; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Reed, John C; Andreeff, Michael

    2008-04-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells are relatively resistant to tumor necrosis factor alpha-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). We previously reported that triptolide, a potent anticancer agent from a Chinese herb, decreases XIAP in leukemic cells. We evaluated the combination of triptolide and TRAIL and found synergistic promotion of apoptosis in AML cells. XIAP-overexpressing U937 cells (U937XIAP) were more resistant to TRAIL than U937neo cells, and inhibition of XIAP with the small-molecule inhibitor 1396-11 enhanced TRAIL-induced apoptosis, implying XIAP as a resistance factor in AML. Furthermore, triptolide increased DR5 levels in OCI-AML3, while the DR5 increase was blunted in p53-knockdown OCI-AML3 and p53-mutated U937 cells, confirming a role for p53 in the regulation of DR5. In support of this finding, disruption of MDM2-p53 binding with subsequent increase in p53 levels by nutlin3a increased DR5 levels and sensitized OCI-AML3 cells to TRAIL. The combination of 1396-11 plus nutlin3a plus TRAIL was more effective than either the 1396-11 and TRAIL or nutlin3a and TRAIL combinations in OCI-AML3 cells, further supporting the role of triptolide as a sensitizer to TRAIL-induced apoptosis in part by independent modulation of XIAP expression and p53 signaling. Thus, the combination of triptolide and TRAIL may provide a novel strategy for treating AML by overcoming critical mechanisms of apoptosis resistance.

  12. The increase of cell-membranous phosphatidylcholines containing polyunsaturated fatty acid residues induces phosphorylation of p53 through activation of ATR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu Hannah; Zhao, Chunying; Ma, Zhongmin Alex

    2010-01-01

    Summary The G1 phase of the cell cycle is marked by the rapid turnover of phospholipids. This turnover is regulated by CTP:phosphocholine-cytidylyltransferase (CCT) and group VIA Ca2+-independent-phospholipase A2 (iPLA2). We previously reported that inhibition of iPLA2 arrests cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle by activating the p53-p21 checkpoint. Here we further characterize the mechanism of p53 activation. We show that specific inhibition of iPLA2 induces a time dependent phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 in the absence of DNA damage. This phosphorylation requires the kinase ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad-3-related (ATR) but not the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase. Moreover, we identify in cell membranes a significant increase of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) containing chains of polyunsaturated fatty acids and a decrease of PCs containing saturated fatty acids in response to inhibition of iPLA2. The time course of phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 correlates with increasing levels of PCs containing polyunsaturated fatty acids. We further demonstrate that the PCs with linoleic acid in their sn-2 position (18:2n6) induce phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 in an ATR-dependent manner. Our findings establish that cells can regulate the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids through iPLA2-mediated deacylation of PCs. Disruption of this regulation increases the proportions of PCs containing polyunsaturated fatty acids and activates the ATR-p53 signalling pathway. PMID:18032786

  13. The increase of cell-membranous phosphatidylcholines containing polyunsaturated fatty acid residues induces phosphorylation of p53 through activation of ATR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu Hannah; Zhao, Chunying; Ma, Zhongmin Alex

    2007-12-01

    The G1 phase of the cell cycle is marked by the rapid turnover of phospholipids. This turnover is regulated by CTP:phosphocholine-cytidylyltransferase (CCT) and group VIA Ca(2+)-independent-phospholipase A(2) (iPLA(2)). We previously reported that inhibition of iPLA(2) arrests cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle by activating the p53-p21 checkpoint. Here we further characterize the mechanism of p53 activation. We show that specific inhibition of iPLA(2) induces a time dependent phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 in the absence of DNA damage. This phosphorylation requires the kinase ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad-3-related (ATR) but not the ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) kinase. Moreover, we identify in cell membranes a significant increase of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) containing chains of polyunsaturated fatty acids and a decrease of PCs containing saturated fatty acids in response to inhibition of iPLA(2). The time course of phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 correlates with increasing levels of PCs containing polyunsaturated fatty acids. We further demonstrate that the PCs with linoleic acid in their sn-2 position (18:2n6) induce phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 in an ATR-dependent manner. Our findings establish that cells can regulate the levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids through iPLA(2)-mediated deacylation of PCs. Disruption of this regulation increases the proportions of PCs containing polyunsaturated fatty acids and activates the ATR-p53 signalling pathway.

  14. Regulation of Human p53 Activity and Cell Localization by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Anirban; Stewart, Deborah; Matlashewski, Greg

    2004-01-01

    The development of cancer is a multistep process involving mutations in proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and other genes which control cell proliferation, telomere stability, angiogenesis, and other complex traits. Despite this complexity, the cellular pathways controlled by the p53 tumor suppressor protein are compromised in most, if not all, cancers. In normal cells, p53 controls cell proliferation, senescence, and/or mediates apoptosis in response to stress, cell damage, or ectopic oncogene expression, properties which make p53 the prototype tumor suppressor gene. Defining the mechanisms of regulation of p53 activity in normal and tumor cells has therefore been a major priority in cell biology and cancer research. The present study reveals a novel and potent mechanism of p53 regulation originating through alternative splicing of the human p53 gene resulting in the expression of a novel p53 mRNA. This novel p53 mRNA encodes an N-terminally deleted isoform of p53 termed p47. As demonstrated within, p47 was able to effectively suppress p53-mediated transcriptional activity and impair p53-mediated growth suppression. It was possible to select for p53-null cells expressing p47 alone or coexpressing p53 in the presence of p47 but not cells expressing p53 alone. This showed that p47 itself does not suppress cell viability but could control p53-mediated growth suppression. Interestingly, p47 was monoubiquitinated in an Mdm2-independent manner, and this was associated with its export out of the nucleus. In the presence of p47, there was a reduction in Mdm2-mediated polyubiquitination and degradation of p53, and this was also associated with increased monoubiquitination and nuclear export of p53. The expression of p47 through alternative splicing of the p53 gene thus has a major influence over p53 activity at least in part through controlling p53 ubiquitination and cell localization. PMID:15340061

  15. P53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer upregulate endosomal recycling of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) increasing its oncogenic potency.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Iuliana; Lee, Annette; Vora, Reena; Budman, Daniel R

    2013-11-01

    There is no available targeted therapy for triple-negative or its more aggressive subtype, basal-like breast cancer. Multiple therapeutic strategies based on translational knowledge have not improved the treatment options for triple negative patients. As understanding of molecular pathways that drive tumor development is rapidly increasing, it is imperative to adapt our treatment strategies to perturbations in molecular pathways driving the malignant process. Basal-like breast cancers over-express EGFR (without mutations or EGFR gene amplifications) and have p53 mutations. While EGFR drives the malignant behavior in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), anti-EGFR therapies have fallen short of the expected results in clinical trials. Here we bring evidence that the less than optimal results of the anti-EGFR therapies may be explained in part by the increased potency of the EGFR signaling due to increased endosomal recycling. The functional connection between EGFR and endosomal trafficking in TNBC is mutant p53 found in the most aggressive forms of TNBC. Mutant p53 acquires oncogenic functions and binds p63 protein, a member of p53 family with tumor suppressor activities. In the absence of functional p63 there is an upregulation of endosomal recycling EGFR and integrin to the membrane with increased proinvasive abilities of cancer cells. Blocking endosomal trafficking combined with anti-EGFR treatments may result in better clinical outcomes in TNBC.

  16. Low Levels of p53 Protein and Chromatin Silencing of p53 Target Genes Repress Apoptosis in Drosophila Endocycling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Bingqing; Mehrotra, Sonam; Ng, Wei Lun; Calvi, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death is an important response to genotoxic stress that prevents oncogenesis. It is known that tissues can differ in their apoptotic response, but molecular mechanisms are little understood. Here, we show that Drosophila polyploid endocycling cells (G/S cycle) repress the apoptotic response to DNA damage through at least two mechanisms. First, the expression of all the Drosophila p53 protein isoforms is strongly repressed at a post-transcriptional step. Second, p53-regulated pro-apoptotic genes are epigenetically silenced in endocycling cells, preventing activation of a paused RNA Pol II by p53-dependent or p53-independent pathways. Over-expression of the p53A isoform did not activate this paused RNA Pol II complex in endocycling cells, but over-expression of the p53B isoform with a longer transactivation domain did, suggesting that dampened p53B protein levels are crucial for apoptotic repression. We also find that the p53A protein isoform is ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome in endocycling cells. In mitotic cycling cells, p53A was the only isoform expressed to detectable levels, and its mRNA and protein levels increased after irradiation, but there was no evidence for an increase in protein stability. However, our data suggest that p53A protein stability is regulated in unirradiated cells, which likely ensures that apoptosis does not occur in the absence of stress. Without irradiation, both p53A protein and a paused RNA pol II were pre-bound to the promoters of pro-apoptotic genes, preparing mitotic cycling cells for a rapid apoptotic response to genotoxic stress. Together, our results define molecular mechanisms by which different cells in development modulate their apoptotic response, with broader significance for the survival of normal and cancer polyploid cells in mammals. PMID:25211335

  17. Quercetin regulates the sestrin 2-AMPK-p38 MAPK signaling pathway and induces apoptosis by increasing the generation of intracellular ROS in a p53-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Kim, Guen Tae; Lee, Se Hee; Kim, Jong Il; Kim, Young Min

    2014-04-01

    The induction of apoptosis in cancer cells is a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms responsible for quercetin-induced apoptosis, mamely the increased expression of sestrin 2 and the activation of the 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Our results revealed that quercetin induced apoptosis by generating the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increasing the expression of sestrin 2. The induction of apoptosis by quercetin occurred through the activation of the AMPK/p38 signaling pathway and was dependent on sestrin 2. However, the silencing of sestrin 2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting sestrin 2 revealed that quercetin did not regulate AMPK or p38 phosphorylation in the cells in which sestrin 2 was silenced. On the other hand, it has been previously reported that sestrin 2 expression is not dependent on p53 expression under hypoxic conditions, whereas DNA damage is dependent on p53. We demonstrate that the increase in the expression of sestrin 2 by quercetin-generated intracellular ROS is p53-independent. The increased expression of sestrin 2 induced apoptosis through the AMPK/p38 signaling pathway in the HT-29 colon cancer cells, which are p53 mutant, treated with quercetin. Thus, our data suggest that quercetin induces apoptosis by reducing mitochondrial membrane potential, generating intracellular ROS production and increasing sestrin 2 expression through the AMPK/p38 pathway. In addition, p53 is not a necessary element for an apoptotic event induced by sestrin 2.

  18. Quercetin regulates the sestrin 2-AMPK-p38 MAPK signaling pathway and induces apoptosis by increasing the generation of intracellular ROS in a p53-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    KIM, GUEN TAE; LEE, SE HEE; KIM, JONG IL; KIM, YOUNG MIN

    2014-01-01

    The induction of apoptosis in cancer cells is a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. In the present study, we investigated the regulatory mechanisms responsible for quercetin-induced apoptosis, mamely the increased expression of sestrin 2 and the activation of the 5′ AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Our results revealed that quercetin induced apoptosis by generating the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and increasing the expression of sestrin 2. The induction of apoptosis by quercetin occurred through the activation of the AMPK/p38 signaling pathway and was dependent on sestrin 2. However, the silencing of sestrin 2 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting sestrin 2 revealed that quercetin did not regulate AMPK or p38 phosphorylation in the cells in which sestrin 2 was silenced. On the other hand, it has been previously reported that sestrin 2 expression is not dependent on p53 expression under hypoxic conditions, whereas DNA damage is dependent on p53. We demonstrate that the increase in the expression of sestrin 2 by quercetin-generated intracellular ROS is p53-independent. The increased expression of sestrin 2 induced apoptosis through the AMPK/p38 signaling pathway in the HT-29 colon cancer cells, which are p53 mutant, treated with quercetin. Thus, our data suggest that quercetin induces apoptosis by reducing mitochondrial membrane potential, generating intracellular ROS production and increasing sestrin 2 expression through the AMPK/p38 pathway. In addition, p53 is not a necessary element for an apoptotic event induced by sestrin 2. PMID:24535669

  19. Stabilization of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, up-regulation of MYCC and accumulation of stabilized p53 constitute hallmarks of CNS-PNET animal model

    PubMed Central

    Malchenko, Sergey; Sredni, Simone Treiger; Bi, Yingtao; Margaryan, Naira V.; Boyineni, Jerusha; Mohanam, Indra; Tomita, Tadanori; Davuluri, Ramana V.; Soares, Marcelo B.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we described a new animal model of CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumors (CNS-PNET), which was generated by orthotopic transplantation of human Radial Glial (RG) cells into NOD-SCID mice’s brain sub-ventricular zone. In the current study we conducted comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses to gain insights on the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis in this mouse model of CNS-PNET. Here we show that the RNA-Seq profiles derived from these tumors cluster with those reported for patients’ PNETs. Moreover, we found that (i) stabilization of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, which are involved in mediation of the hypoxic responses in the majority of cell types, (ii) up-regulation of MYCC, a key onco-protein whose dysregulation occurs in ~70% of human tumors, and (iii) accumulation of stabilized p53, which is commonly altered in human cancers, constitute hallmarks of our tumor model, and might represent the basis for CNS-PNET tumorigenesis in this model. We discuss the possibility that these three events might be interconnected. These results indicate that our model may prove invaluable to uncover the molecular events leading to MYCC and TP53 alterations, which would be of broader interest considering their relevance to many human malignancies. Lastly, this mouse model might prove useful for drug screening targeting MYCC and related members of its protein interaction network. PMID:28249000

  20. Stabilization of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, up-regulation of MYCC and accumulation of stabilized p53 constitute hallmarks of CNS-PNET animal model.

    PubMed

    Malchenko, Sergey; Sredni, Simone Treiger; Bi, Yingtao; Margaryan, Naira V; Boyineni, Jerusha; Mohanam, Indra; Tomita, Tadanori; Davuluri, Ramana V; Soares, Marcelo B

    2017-01-01

    Recently, we described a new animal model of CNS primitive neuroectodermal tumors (CNS-PNET), which was generated by orthotopic transplantation of human Radial Glial (RG) cells into NOD-SCID mice's brain sub-ventricular zone. In the current study we conducted comprehensive RNA-Seq analyses to gain insights on the mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis in this mouse model of CNS-PNET. Here we show that the RNA-Seq profiles derived from these tumors cluster with those reported for patients' PNETs. Moreover, we found that (i) stabilization of HIF-1α and HIF-2α, which are involved in mediation of the hypoxic responses in the majority of cell types, (ii) up-regulation of MYCC, a key onco-protein whose dysregulation occurs in ~70% of human tumors, and (iii) accumulation of stabilized p53, which is commonly altered in human cancers, constitute hallmarks of our tumor model, and might represent the basis for CNS-PNET tumorigenesis in this model. We discuss the possibility that these three events might be interconnected. These results indicate that our model may prove invaluable to uncover the molecular events leading to MYCC and TP53 alterations, which would be of broader interest considering their relevance to many human malignancies. Lastly, this mouse model might prove useful for drug screening targeting MYCC and related members of its protein interaction network.

  1. Mimulone-induced autophagy through p53-mediated AMPK/mTOR pathway increases caspase-mediated apoptotic cell death in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    An, Hyun-Kyu; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy.

  2. Mimulone-Induced Autophagy through p53-Mediated AMPK/mTOR Pathway Increases Caspase-Mediated Apoptotic Cell Death in A549 Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji-Won; Park, Mi-Hyun; Moon, Hyung-In; Park, Shin-Ji; Baik, Ji-Sue; Kim, Cheorl-Ho; Lee, Young-Choon

    2014-01-01

    Anticancer properties and mechanisms of mimulone (MML), C-geranylflavonoid isolated from the Paulownia tomentosa fruits, were firstly elucidated in this study. MML prevented cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent way and triggered apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway in A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. Furthermore, MML-treated cells displayed autophagic features, such as the formation of autophagic vacuoles, a primary morphological feature of autophagy, and the accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) puncta, another typical maker of autophagy, as determined by FITC-conjugated immunostaining and monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, respectively. The expression levels of LC3-I and LC3-II, specific markers of autophagy, were also augmented by MML treatment. Autophagy inhibition by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), pharmacological autophagy inhibitor, and shRNA knockdown of Beclin-1 reduced apoptotic cell death induced by MML. Autophagic flux was not significantly affected by MML treatment and lysosomal inhibitor, chloroquine (CQ) suppressed MML-induced autophagy and apoptosis. MML-induced autophagy was promoted by decreases in p53 and p-mTOR levels and increase of p-AMPK. Moreover, inhibition of p53 transactivation by pifithrin-α (PFT-α) and knockdown of p53 enhanced induction of autophagy and finally promoted apoptotic cell death. Overall, the results demonstrate that autophagy contributes to the cytotoxicity of MML in cancer cells harboring wild-type p53. This study strongly suggests that MML is a potential candidate for an anticancer agent targeting both autophagy and apoptotic cell death in human lung cancer. Moreover, co-treatment of MML and p53 inhibitor would be more effective in human lung cancer therapy. PMID:25490748

  3. Constant rate of p53 tetramerization in response to DNA damage controls the p53 response

    PubMed Central

    Gaglia, Giorgio; Lahav, Galit

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the tumor suppressor protein p53 have been previously investigated in single cells using fluorescently tagged p53. Such approach reports on the total abundance of p53 but does not provide a measure for functional p53. We used fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay (PCA) to quantify in single cells the dynamics of p53 tetramers, the functional units of p53. We found that while total p53 increases proportionally to the input strength, p53 tetramers are formed in cells at a constant rate. This breaks the linear input–output relation and dampens the p53 response. Disruption of the p53-binding protein ARC led to a dose-dependent rate of tetramers formation, resulting in enhanced tetramerization and induction of p53 target genes. Our work suggests that constraining the p53 response in face of variable inputs may protect cells from committing to terminal outcomes and highlights the importance of quantifying the active form of signaling molecules in single cells. Quantification of the dynamics of p53 tetramers in single cells using a fluorescent protein-fragment complementation assay reveals that, while total p53 increases proportionally to the DNA damage strength, p53 tetramers are formed at a constant rate. PMID:25344068

  4. p53: out of Africa.

    PubMed

    Lane, David

    2016-04-15

    Somatic mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53 occur in more than half of all human cancers. Rare germline mutations result in the Li-Fraumeni cancer family syndrome. In this issue ofGenes&Development, Jennis and colleagues (pp. 918-930) use an elegant mouse model to examine the affect of a polymorphism, P47S (rs1800371), in the N terminus of p53 that is found in Africans as well as more than a million African Americans. Remarkably, the single nucleotide change causes the mice to be substantially tumor-prone compared with littermates, suggesting that this allele causes an increased risk of developing cancer. The defect in p53 function is traced to a restriction in downstream gene regulation that reduces cell death in response to stress.

  5. Enhancement of oligomeric stability by covalent linkage and its application to the human p53tet domain: thermodynamics and biological implications.

    PubMed

    Poon, G M K

    2007-12-01

    The formation of oligomeric proteins proceeds at a major cost of reducing the translational and rotational entropy for their subunits in order to form the stabilizing interactions found in the oligomeric state. Unlike site-directed mutations, covalent linkage of subunits represents a generically applicable strategy for enhancing oligomeric stability by reducing the entropic driving force for dissociation. Although this can be realized by introducing de novo disulfide cross-links between subunits, issues with irreversible aggregation limit the utility of this approach. In contrast, tandem linkage of subunits in a single polypeptide chain offers a universal method of pre-paying the entropic cost of oligomer formation. In the present paper, thermodynamic, structural and experimental aspects of designing and characterizing tandem-linked oligomers are discussed with reference to engineering a stabilized tetramer of the oligomerization domain of the human p53 tumour-suppressor protein by tandem dimerization.

  6. Akt phosphorylates myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ), releases P-MAZ from the p53 promoter, and activates p53 transcription.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Ping; Lan, Keng-Hsin; Li, Chung-Pin; Chao, Yee; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Shou-Dong

    2016-05-28

    The p53 protein is a cell cycle regulator. When the cell cycle progresses, p53 plays an important role in putting a brake on the G1 phase to prevent unwanted errors during cell division. Akt is a downstream kinase of receptor tyrosine kinase. Upon activation, Akt phorphorylates IKK that then phosphorylates IκB and releases NF-κB, leading to transcriptional activation of Dmp1. Dmp1 is a transcriptional activator of Arf. It has been known that oncogene activation stabilizes p53 through transcriptional activation of Arf, which then binds and inhibits Mdm2. In the current study, we show that myc-associated zinc finger protein (MAZ) is a transcriptional repressor of the p53 promoter. Akt phosphorylates MAZ at Thr385, and the phosphorylated MAZ is released from the p53 promoter, leading to transcriptional activation of p53, a new mechanism that contributes to increased p53 protein pool during oncogene activation.

  7. Regulation of hdm2 by stress-induced hdm2alt1 in tumor and nontumorigenic cell lines correlating with p53 stability.

    PubMed

    Dias, Chrisanne S; Liu, Yan; Yau, Amy; Westrick, Lindsay; Evans, Susan C

    2006-10-01

    Alternative and aberrant splicing of hdm2 occurs in tumor and normal tissues. However, the factors that induce these splice variants and whether they are translated to protein products in vivo is unknown, making it difficult to decipher which of these hdm2 transcripts have a normal physiologic function or contribute to carcinogenesis. We investigated the conditions that induce this post-transcriptional modification of hdm2 in tumor and nontumorigenic cell lines. We showed that UV and gamma radiation as well as cisplatin treatment induced alternative splicing of hdm2, which resulted in a single splice variant, hdm2(alt1), irrespective of the cell type. Interestingly, the mechanism of UV-induced splicing is independent of p53 status. Immunoanalysis revealed that, after UV radiation, HDM2(ALT1) protein was expressed and interacted with HDM2 that correlated to increased p53 protein levels and its accumulation in the nucleus, whereas HDM2 localized more to the cytoplasm with a decrease in its RNA and protein level. We propose that stress-induced HDM2(ALT1) regulates HDM2 at two levels, RNA and protein, further modulating the p53-HDM2 interaction or interactions of HDM2 with other cell cycle regulatory proteins. This kind of regulation may possibly restrict oncogenic functions of HDM2 and contribute to the many protective responses triggered by certain stress signals. Our data imply that HDM2(ALT1) possesses a normal physiologic function in damaged cells, perhaps facilitating cellular defense.

  8. Mouse models of p53 functions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Guillermina

    2010-04-01

    Studies in mice have yielded invaluable insight into our understanding of the p53 pathway. Mouse models with activated p53, no p53, and mutant p53 have queried the role of p53 in development and tumorigenesis. In these models, p53 is activated and stabilized via redundant posttranslational modifications. On activation, p53 initiates two major responses: inhibition of proliferation (via cell-cycle arrest, quiescence, senescence, and differentiation) and induction of apoptosis. Importantly, these responses are cell-type and tumor-type-specific. The analysis of mutant p53 alleles has established a gain-of-function role for p53 mutants in metastasis. The development of additional models that can precisely time the oncogenic events in single cells will provide further insight into the evolution of tumors, the importance of the stroma, and the cooperating events that lead to disruption of the p53 pathway. Ultimately, these models should serve to study the effects of novel drugs on tumor response as well as normal homeostasis.

  9. Suppression of p53 activity through the cooperative action of Ski and histone deacetylase SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasumichi; Iemura, Shun-ichiro; Natsume, Tohru; Miyazawa, Keiji; Imamura, Takeshi

    2011-02-25

    Ski was originally identified as an oncogene based on the fact that Ski overexpression transformed chicken and quail embryo fibroblasts. Consistent with these proposed oncogenic roles, Ski is overexpressed in various human tumors. However, whether and how Ski functions in mammalian tumorigenesis has not been fully investigated. Here, we show that Ski interacts with p53 and attenuates the biological functions of p53. Ski overexpression attenuated p53-dependent transactivation, whereas Ski knockdown enhanced the transcriptional activity of p53. Interestingly, Ski bound to the histone deacetylase SIRT1 and stabilized p53-SIRT1 interaction to promote p53 deacetylation, which subsequently decreased the DNA binding activity of p53. Consistent with the ability of Ski to inactivate p53, overexpressing Ski desensitized cells to genotoxic drugs and Nutlin-3, a small-molecule antagonist of Mdm2 that stabilizes p53 and activates the p53 pathway, whereas knocking down Ski increased the cellular sensitivity to these agents. These results indicate that Ski negatively regulates p53 and suggest that the p53-Ski-SIRT1 axis is an attractive target for cancer therapy.

  10. Effects of prostaglandin E2 on p53 mRNA transcription and p53 mutagenesis during T-cell-independent human B-cell clonal expansion

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Shabirul; Yan, Xiao Jie; Rosen, Lisa; McCormick, Steven; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Mongini, Patricia K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Within T-cell-dependent germinal centers, p53 gene transcription is repressed by Bcl-6 and is thus less vulnerable to mutation. Malignant lymphomas within inflamed extranodal sites exhibit a relatively high incidence of p53 mutations. The latter might originate from normal B-cell clones manifesting activation-induced cytosine deaminase (AID) and up-regulated p53 following T-cell-independent (TI) stimulation. We here examine p53 gene transcription in such TI clones, with a focus on modulatory effects of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and evaluate progeny for p53 mutations. Resting IgM+IgD+CD27− B cells from human tonsils were labeled with CFSE and stimulated in vitro with complement-coated antigen surrogate, IL-4, and BAFF ± exogenous PGE2 (50 nM) or an analog specific for the EP2 PGE2 receptor. We use flow cytometry to measure p53 and AID protein within variably divided blasts, qRT-PCR of p53 mRNA from cultures with or without actinomycin D to monitor mRNA transcription/stability, and single-cell p53 RT-PCR/sequencing to assess progeny for p53 mutations. We report that EP2 signaling triggers increased p53 gene transcriptional activity in AID+ cycling blasts (P<0.01). Progeny exhibit p53 mutations at a frequency (8.5×10−4) greater than the baseline error rate (<0.8×10−4). We conclude that, devoid of the repressive influences of Bcl-6, dividing B lymphoblasts in inflamed tissues should display heightened p53 transcription and increased risk of p53 mutagenesis.—Haque, S., Yan, X. J., Rosen, L., McCormick, S., Chiorazzi, N., Mongini, P. K. A. Effects of prostaglandin E2 on p53 mRNA transcription and p53 mutagenesis during T-cell-independent human B-cell clonal expansion. PMID:24145719

  11. Oxazoloisoindolinones with in vitro antitumor activity selectively activate a p53-pathway through potential inhibition of the p53-MDM2 interaction.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Pereira, Nuno A L; Monteiro, Ângelo; Leão, Mariana; Bessa, Cláudia; Dos Santos, Daniel J V A; Raimundo, Liliana; Queiroz, Glória; Bisio, Alessandra; Inga, Alberto; Pereira, Clara; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2015-01-23

    One of the most appealing targets for anticancer treatment is the p53 tumor suppressor protein. In half of human cancers, this protein is inactivated due to endogenous negative regulators such as MDM2. Actually, restoring the p53 activity, particularly through the inhibition of its interaction with MDM2, is considered a valuable therapeutic strategy against cancers with a wild-type p53 status. In this work, we report the synthesis of nine enantiopure phenylalaninol-derived oxazolopyrrolidone lactams and the evaluation of their biological effects as p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. Using a yeast-based screening assay, two oxazoloisoindolinones, compounds 1b and 3a, were identified as potential p53-MDM2 interaction inhibitors. The molecular mechanism of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further validated in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells with wild-type p53 (HCT116 p53(+/+)) and in its isogenic derivative without p53 (HCT116 p53(-/-)). Indeed, using these cells, we demonstrated that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a exhibited a p53-dependent in vitro antitumor activity through induction of G0/G1-phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. The selective activation of a p53-apoptotic pathway by oxazoloisoindolinone 3a was further supported by the occurrence of PARP cleavage only in p53-expressing HCT116 cells. Moreover, oxazoloisoindolinone 3a led to p53 protein stabilization and to the up-regulation of p53 transcriptional activity with increased expression levels of several p53 target genes, as p21(WAF1/CIP1), MDM2, BAX and PUMA, in p53(+/+) but not in p53(-/-) HCT116 cells. Additionally, the ability of oxazoloisoindolinone 3a to block the p53-MDM2 interaction in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. Finally, the molecular docking analysis of the interactions between the synthesized compounds and MDM2 revealed that oxazoloisoindolinone 3a binds to MDM2. Altogether, this work adds, for the first time, the oxazoloisoindolinone scaffold to the list of

  12. Ubiquitination of p53 and p21 is differentially affected by ionizing and UV radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Maki, C G; Howley, P M

    1997-01-01

    Levels of the tumor suppressor protein p53 are normally quite low due in part to its short half-life. p53 levels increase in cells exposed to DNA-damaging agents, such as radiation, and this increase is thought to be responsible for the radiation-induced G1 cell cycle arrest or delay. The mechanisms by which radiation causes an increase in p53 are currently unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of gamma and UV radiation on the stability and ubiquitination of p53 in vivo. Ubiquitin-p53 conjugates could be detected in nonirradiated and gamma-irradiated cells but not in cells which were UV treated, despite the fact that both treatments resulted in the stabilization of the p53 protein. These results demonstrate that UV and gamma radiation have different effects on ubiquitinated p53 and suggest that the UV-induced stabilization of p53 results from a loss of p53 ubiquitination. Ubiquitinated forms of p21, an inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, were detected in vivo, demonstrating that p21 is also a target for degradation by the ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic pathway. However, UV and gamma radiation had no effect on the stability or in vivo ubiquitination of p21, indicating that the radiation effects on p53 are specific. PMID:8972216

  13. Reciprocal repression between P53 and TCTP.

    PubMed

    Amson, Robert; Pece, Salvatore; Lespagnol, Alexandra; Vyas, Rajesh; Mazzarol, Giovanni; Tosoni, Daniela; Colaluca, Ivan; Viale, Giuseppe; Rodrigues-Ferreira, Sylvie; Wynendaele, Jessika; Chaloin, Olivier; Hoebeke, Johan; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo; Telerman, Adam

    2011-12-11

    Screening for genes that reprogram cancer cells for the tumor reversion switch identified TCTP (encoding translationally controlled tumor protein) as a crucial regulator of apoptosis. Here we report a negative feedback loop between P53 and TCTP. TCTP promotes P53 degradation by competing with NUMB for binding to P53-MDM2-containing complexes. TCTP inhibits MDM2 auto-ubiquitination and promotes MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of P53. Notably, Tctp haploinsufficient mice are sensitized to P53-dependent apoptosis. In addition, P53 directly represses TCTP transcription. In 508 breast cancers, high-TCTP status associates with poorly differentiated, aggressive G3-grade tumors, predicting poor prognosis (P < 0.0005). Tctp knockdown in primary mammary tumor cells from ErbB2 transgenic mice results in increased P53 expression and a decreased number of stem-like cancer cells. The pharmacological compounds sertraline and thioridazine increase the amount of P53 by neutralizing TCTP's action on the MDM2-P53 axis. This study links TCTP and P53 in a previously unidentified regulatory circuitry that may underlie the relevance of TCTP in cancer.

  14. A Regulatory Loop Composed of RAP80-HDM2-p53 Provides RAP80-enhanced p53 Degradation by HDM2 in Response to DNA Damage*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Jun; Menendez, Daniel; Yang, Xiao-Ping; Resnick, Michael A.; Jetten, Anton M.

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin interaction motif-containing protein RAP80 plays a key role in DNA damage response signaling. Using genomic and functional analysis, we established that the expression of the RAP80 gene is regulated in a DNA damage-responsive manner by the master regulator p53. This regulation occurs at the transcriptional level through a noncanonical p53 response element in the RAP80 promoter. Although it is inducible by p53, RAP80 is also able to regulate p53 through an association with both p53 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2, providing HDM2-dependent enhancement of p53 polyubiquitination. Depletion of RAP80 by small interfering RNA stabilizes p53, which, following DNA damage, results in an increased transactivation of several p53 target genes as well as greater apoptosis. Consistent with these observations, exogenous expression of RAP80 selectively inhibits p53-dependent transactivation of target genes in an mdm2-dependent manner in MEF cells. Thus, we identify a new DNA damage-associated role for RAP80. It can function in an autoregulatory loop consisting of RAP80, HDM2, and the p53 master regulatory network, implying an important role for this loop in genome stability and oncogenesis. PMID:19433585

  15. The Enigma of p53.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Guillermina

    2016-12-08

    This perspective will focus on the physiological impact of wild-type and mutant p53 activities. In particular, the tissue-specific nature of activation of p53 targets and their subsequent effects on cell behavior will be discussed. Because mutations in p53 are common in human cancers, the regulation and physiological consequences of mutant p53 proteins will also be discussed.

  16. Identification of HEXIM1 as a Positive Regulator of p53*

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Qiao Jing; Chia, Yi Ling; Chu, Kai Ling; Lam, Yuen Ting; Gurumurthy, Meera; Xu, Shengli; Lam, Kong Peng; Cheong, Nge; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2012-01-01

    Hexamethylene bisacetamide-inducible protein 1 (HEXIM1) is best known as the inhibitor of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which regulates the transcription elongation of RNA polymerase II and controls 60–70% of mRNA synthesis. Our previous studies show that HEXIM1 interacts with two key p53 regulators, nucleophosmin and human double minute-2 protein (HDM2), implying a possible connection between HEXIM1 and the p53 signaling pathway. Here we report the interaction between p53 and HEXIM1 in breast cancer, acute myeloid leukemia, and colorectal carcinoma cells. The C-terminal regions of p53 and HEXIM1 are required for the protein-protein interaction. Overexpression of HEXIM1 prevents the ubiquitination of p53 by HDM2 and enhances the protein stability of p53, resulting in up-regulation of p53 target genes, such as Puma and p21. Induction of p53 can be achieved by several means, such as UV radiation and treatment with anti-cancer agents (including doxorubicin, etoposide, roscovitine, flavopiridol, and nutlin-3). Under all the conditions examined, elevated protein levels of p53 are found to associate with the increased p53-HEXIM1 interaction. In addition, knockdown of HEXIM1 significantly inhibits the induction of p53 and releases the cell cycle arrest caused by p53. Finally, the transcription of the p53 target genes is regulated by HEXIM1 in a p53-dependent fashion. Our results not only identify HEXIM1 as a positive regulator of p53, but also propose a novel molecular mechanism of p53 activation caused by the anti-cancer drugs and compounds. PMID:22948151

  17. p53: good cop/bad cop.

    PubMed

    Sharpless, Norman E; DePinho, Ronald A

    2002-07-12

    Activation of the p53 transcription factor in response to a variety of cellular stresses, including DNA damage and oncogene activation, initiates a program of gene expression that blocks the proliferative expansion of damaged cells. While the beneficial impact of the anticancer function of p53 is well established, several recent papers suggest that p53 activation may in some circumstances act in a manner detrimental to the long-term homeostasis of the organism. Here, we discuss the significant participation of p53 in three non-mutually exclusive theories of human aging involving DNA damage, telomere shortening, and oxidative stress. These "good cop/bad cop" functions of p53 appear to place it at the nexus of two opposing forces, cancer and aging. By extension, this relationship implies that therapies aimed to reduce cancer and postpone aging, and thereby increase longevity, will necessarily work either upstream or downstream, but not on the level of, p53.

  18. Multiple stress signals activate mutant p53 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Young-Ah; Post, Sean M.; Elizondo-Fraire, Ana C.; Maccio, Danela R.; Jackson, James G.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Van Pelt, Carolyn; Terzian, Tamara; Lozano, Guillermina

    2012-01-01

    p53 levels are tightly regulated in normal cells, and thus the wild-type p53 protein is nearly undetectable until stimulated through a variety of stresses. In response to stress, p53 is released from its negative regulators, mainly Mdm2, allowing p53 to be stabilized to activate cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis programs. Many of the upstream signals that regulate wild type p53 are known; however, limited information for the regulation of mutant p53 exists. Previously, we demonstrated that wild-type and mutant p53R172H are regulated in a similar manner in the absence of Mdm2 or p16. Additionally, this stabilization of mutant p53 is responsible for the gain-of-function metastatic phenotype observed in the mouse. In this report, we examined the role of oncogenes, DNA damage, and reactive oxygen species, signals that stabilize wild type p53, on the stabilization of mutant p53 in vivo and the consequences of this expression on tumor formation and survival. These factors stabilized mutant p53 protein which often times contributed to exacerbated tumor phenotypes. These findings, coupled with the fact that patients carry p53 mutations without stabilization of p53, suggest that personalized therapeutic schemes may be needed for individual patients depending on their p53 status. PMID:21983037

  19. Intermediate progenitors are increased by lengthening of the cell cycle through calcium signaling and p53 expression in human neural progenitors

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Elisa; Pino-Barrio, María José; López-Medina, Laura; Martínez-Serrano, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    During development, neurons can be generated directly from a multipotent progenitor or indirectly through an intermediate progenitor (IP). This last mode of division amplifies the progeny of neurons. The mechanisms governing the generation and behavior of IPs are not well understood. In this work, we demonstrate that the lengthening of the cell cycle enhances the generation of neurons in a human neural progenitor cell system in vitro and also the generation and expansion of IPs. These IPs are insulinoma-associated 1 (Insm1)+/BTG family member 2 (Btg2)−, which suggests an increase in a self-amplifying IP population. Later the cultures express neurogenin 2 (Ngn2) and become neurogenic. The signaling responsible for this cell cycle modulation is investigated. It is found that the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol in response to B cell lymphoma-extra large overexpression or ATP addition lengths the cell cycle and increases the number of IPs and, in turn, the final neuron outcome. Moreover, data suggest that the p53–p21 pathway is responsible for the changes in cell cycle. In agreement with this, increased p53 levels are necessary for a calcium-induced increase in neurons. Our findings contribute to understand how calcium signaling can modulate cell cycle length during neurogenesis. PMID:22323293

  20. SCH529074, a small molecule activator of mutant p53, which binds p53 DNA binding domain (DBD), restores growth-suppressive function to mutant p53 and interrupts HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of wild type p53.

    PubMed

    Demma, Mark; Maxwell, Eugene; Ramos, Robert; Liang, Lianzhu; Li, Cheng; Hesk, David; Rossman, Randall; Mallams, Alan; Doll, Ronald; Liu, Ming; Seidel-Dugan, Cynthia; Bishop, W Robert; Dasmahapatra, Bimalendu

    2010-04-02

    Abrogation of p53 function occurs in almost all human cancers, with more than 50% of cancers harboring inactivating mutations in p53 itself. Mutation of p53 is indicative of highly aggressive cancers and poor prognosis. The vast majority of mutations in p53 occur in its core DNA binding domain (DBD) and result in inactivation of p53 by reducing its thermodynamic stability at physiological temperature. Here, we report a small molecule, SCH529074, that binds specifically to the p53 DBD in a saturable manner with an affinity of 1-2 microm. Binding restores wild type function to many oncogenic mutant forms of p53. This small molecule reactivates mutant p53 by acting as a chaperone, in a manner similar to that previously reported for the peptide CDB3. Binding of SCH529074 to the p53 DBD is specifically displaced by an oligonucleotide with a sequence derived from the p53-response element. In addition to reactivating mutant p53, SCH529074 binding inhibits ubiquitination of p53 by HDM2. We have also developed a novel variant of p53 by changing a single amino acid in the core domain of p53 (N268R), which abolishes binding of SCH529074. This amino acid change also inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination of p53. Our novel findings indicate that through its interaction with p53 DBD, SCH529074 restores DNA binding activity to mutant p53 and inhibits HDM2-mediated ubiquitination.

  1. The NEDD8 inhibitor MLN4924 increases the size of the nucleolus and activates p53 through the ribosomal-Mdm2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Bailly, A; Perrin, A; Bou Malhab, L J; Pion, E; Larance, M; Nagala, M; Smith, P; O'Donohue, M-F; Gleizes, P-E; Zomerdijk, J; Lamond, A I; Xirodimas, D P

    2016-01-28

    The ubiquitin-like molecule NEDD8 is essential for viability, growth and development, and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. We found that the small molecule inhibitor of NEDDylation, MLN4924, alters the morphology and increases the surface size of the nucleolus in human and germline cells of Caenorhabditis elegans in the absence of nucleolar fragmentation. SILAC proteomics and monitoring of rRNA production, processing and ribosome profiling shows that MLN4924 changes the composition of the nucleolar proteome but does not inhibit RNA Pol I transcription. Further analysis demonstrates that MLN4924 activates the p53 tumour suppressor through the RPL11/RPL5-Mdm2 pathway, with characteristics of nucleolar stress. The study identifies the nucleolus as a target of inhibitors of NEDDylation and provides a mechanism for p53 activation upon NEDD8 inhibition. It also indicates that targeting the nucleolar proteome without affecting nucleolar transcription initiates the required signalling events for the control of cell cycle regulators.

  2. In Vivo Bystander Effect: Cranial X-Irradiation Leads to Elevated DNA Damage, Altered Cellular Proliferation and Apoptosis, and Increased p53 Levels in Shielded Spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Koturbash, Igor; Loree, Jonathan; Kutanzi, Kristy; Koganow, Clayton; Pogribny, Igor; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: It is well accepted that irradiated cells may 'forward' genome instability to nonirradiated neighboring cells, giving rise to the 'bystander effect' phenomenon. Although bystander effects were well studied by using cell cultures, data for somatic bystander effects in vivo are relatively scarce. Methods and Materials: We set out to analyze the existence and molecular nature of bystander effects in a radiation target-organ spleen by using a mouse model. The animal's head was exposed to X-rays while the remainder of the body was completely protected by a medical-grade shield. Using immunohistochemistry, we addressed levels of DNA damage, cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and p53 protein in the spleen of control animals and completely exposed and head-exposed/body bystander animals. Results: We found that localized head radiation exposure led to the induction of bystander effects in the lead-shielded distant spleen tissue. Namely, cranial irradiation led to increased levels of DNA damage and p53 expression and also altered levels of cellular proliferation and apoptosis in bystander spleen tissue. The observed bystander changes were not caused by radiation scattering and were observed in two different mouse strains; C57BL/6 and BALB/c. Conclusion: Our study proves that bystander effects occur in the distant somatic organs on localized exposures. Additional studies are required to characterize the nature of an enigmatic bystander signal and analyze the long-term persistence of these effects and possible contribution of radiation-induced bystander effects to secondary radiation carcinogenesis.

  3. Mutant conformation of p53 translated in vitro or in vivo requires functional HSP90.

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, M V; Toretsky, J; Bohen, S; Neckers, L

    1996-01-01

    The p53 mutant, 143ala, was translated in vitro in either rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) or wheat germ extract (WGE). In RRL, p53-143ala protein of both mutant and wild-type conformation, as detected immunologically with conformation-specific antibodies, was translated. The chaperone protein HSP90, present in RRL, was found to coprecipitate only with the mutated conformation of p53. Geldanamycin, shown previously to bind to HSP90 and destabilize its association with other proteins, decreased the amount of immunologically detectable mutated p53 and increased the amount of detectable wild-type protein, without affecting the total translation of p53. When translated in WGE, known to contain functionally deficient HSP90, p53-143ala produced p53 protein, which was not recognized by a mutated conformation-specific antibody. In contrast, the synthesis of conformationally detectable wild-type p53 in this system was not compromised. Reconstitution of HSP90 function in WGE permitted synthesis of conformationally detectable mutated p53, and this was abrogated by geldanamycin. Finally, when p53-143ala was stably tansfected into yeast engineered to be defective for HSP90 function, conformational recognition of mutated p53 was impaired. When stable transfectants of p53-143ala were prepared in yeast expressing wild-type HSP90, conformational recognition of mutated p53 was antagonized by macbecin I, a geldanamycin analog also known to bind HSP90. Taken together, these data demonstrate a role for HSP90 in the achievement and/or stabilization of the mutated conformation of p53-143ala. Furthermore, we show that the mutated conformation of p53 can be pharmacologically antagonized by drugs targeting HSP90. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:8710879

  4. The p53-dependent radioadaptive response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo

    We already reported that conditioning exposures at low doses, or at low dose-rates, lowered radiation-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cultured cells in vitro and in the spleens of mice in vivo. In this study, the aim was to characterize the p53-dependent radioadaptive response at the molecular level. We used wild-type (wt) p53 and mutated (m) p53 containing cells derived from the human lung cancer H1299 cell line, which is p53-null. Cellular radiation sensitivities were determined with a colony-forming assay. The accumulation of p53, Hdm2, and iNOS was analyzed with Western blotting. The quantification of chromosomal aberrations was estimated by scoring dicentrics per cell. In wtp53 cells, it was demonstrated that the lack of p53 accumulation was coupled with the activation of Hdm2 after low dose irradiation (0.02 Gy). Although NO radicals were only minimally induced in wtp53 cells irradiated with a challenging irradiation (6 Gy) alone, NO radicals were seen to increase about 2-4 fold after challenging irradiation following a priming irradiation (0.02 Gy). Under similar irradiation conditions with a priming and challenging irradiation in wtp53 cells, induction of radioresistance and a depression of chromosomal aberrations were observed only in the absence of Pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor), RITA or Nutlin-3 (p53-Hdm2 interaction inhibitors), aminoguanidine (an iNOS inhibitor) and c-PTIO (an NO radical scavenger). On the other hand, in p53 dysfunctional cells, a radioadaptive response was not observed in the presence or absence of those inhibitors. Moreover, radioresistance developed when wtp53 cells were treated with ISDN (an NO generating agent) alone. These findings suggest that NO radicals are an initiator of the radioadaptive response acting through the activation of Hdm2 and the depression of p53 accumulations.

  5. What's new in p53

    PubMed Central

    Maritsi, D; Stagikas, D; Charalabopoulos, K; Batistatou, A

    2006-01-01

    p53 is the main intrinsic factor inducing apoptosis by recognizing the external stimuli and activating the p53 responsive genes to an irreversible series of events. P53 activates the transcription of specific proapoptotic genes called p53 target genes. A growing number of p53 responsive genes have been identified and numerous studies have demonstrated that p53 proapoptotic factors such as Noxa, Puma and Perp play cell type specific roles in p53's mediated response to certain stimuli. Perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22) is a direct proapoptotic target gene encoding a tetraspan protein. Perp is highly expressed in cells undergoing apoptosis compared to cells under G1 arrest and its overexpression is sufficient to cause cell death in fibroblasts. Noxa is another member of the preapoptotic p53 genes family. When expressed Noxa acts in a BH3 motif-dependent localization to mitochondria, causing structural changes, activation of caspase 9 and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. Puma (p53 mutant of apoptosis) is another critical mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis. P53 binds to Puma-promoter gene sites, leading to puma production. The mtCLIC, a member of intracellular chloride channels, is a cytoplasmic and mitochondrial protein positively regulated by p53. Caspase 10 is induced in p53-dependent manner leading to cellular apoptosis. Other newly announced factors are also involved in p53-regulated apoptosis such as brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor - 1 (BSAI1), MSOD and GPX genes. A global discussion on this topic is attempted in the present review article. PMID:20351806

  6. What's new in p53?

    PubMed

    Maritsi, D; Stagikas, D; Charalabopoulos, K; Batistatou, A

    2006-07-01

    p53 is the main intrinsic factor inducing apoptosis by recognizing the external stimuli and activating the p53 responsive genes to an irreversible series of events. P53 activates the transcription of specific proapoptotic genes called p53 target genes. A growing number of p53 responsive genes have been identified and numerous studies have demonstrated that p53 proapoptotic factors such as Noxa, Puma and Perp play cell type specific roles in p53's mediated response to certain stimuli. Perp (p53 apoptosis effector related to PMP-22) is a direct proapoptotic target gene encoding a tetraspan protein. Perp is highly expressed in cells undergoing apoptosis compared to cells under G1 arrest and its overexpression is sufficient to cause cell death in fibroblasts. Noxa is another member of the preapoptotic p53 genes family. When expressed Noxa acts in a BH3 motif-dependent localization to mitochondria, causing structural changes, activation of caspase 9 and release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol. Puma (p53 mutant of apoptosis) is another critical mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis. P53 binds to Puma-promoter gene sites, leading to puma production. The mtCLIC, a member of intracellular chloride channels, is a cytoplasmic and mitochondrial protein positively regulated by p53. Caspase 10 is induced in p53-dependent manner leading to cellular apoptosis. Other newly announced factors are also involved in p53-regulated apoptosis such as brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor-1 (BSAI1), MSOD and GPX genes. A global discussion on this topic is attempted in the present review article.

  7. SUMOylation of p53 mediates interferon activities

    PubMed Central

    Marcos-Villar, Laura; Pérez-Girón, José V; Vilas, Jéssica M; Soto, Atenea; de la Cruz-Hererra, Carlos F; Lang, Valerie; Collado, Manuel; Vidal, Anxo; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Muñoz-Fontela, César; Rivas, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that many host proteins involved in innate and intrinsic immunity are regulated by SUMOylation, and that SUMO contributes to the regulatory process that governs the initiation of the type I interferon (IFN) response. The tumor suppressor p53 is a modulator of the IFN response that plays a role in virus-induced apoptosis and in IFN-induced senescence. Here we demonstrate that IFN treatment increases the levels of SUMOylated p53 and induces cellular senescence through a process that is partially dependent upon SUMOylation of p53. Similarly, we show that vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection induces p53 SUMOylation, and that this modification favors the control of VSV replication. Thus, our study provides evidence that IFN signaling induces p53 SUMOylation, which results in the activation of a cellular senescence program and contributes to the antiviral functions of interferon. PMID:23966171

  8. S(+)-ibuprofen destabilizes MYC/MYCN and AKT, increases p53 expression, and induces unfolded protein response and favorable phenotype in neuroblastoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAKI, NAOHIKO; HICKS, SAKEENAH L.; REGAN, PAUL L.; JACOBS, JOSHUA; JUMBO, AMINA S.; LEONHARDT, PAYTON; RAPPAPORT, ERIC F.; TANG, XAO X.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric solid tumor that exhibits a striking clinical bipolarity favorable and unfavorable. The survival rate of children with unfavorable neuroblastoma remains low among all childhood cancers. MYCN and MYC play a crucial role in determining the malignancy of unfavorable neuroblastomas, whereas high-level expression of the favorable neuroblastoma genes is associated with a good disease outcome and confers growth suppression of neuroblastoma cells. A small fraction of neuroblastomas harbors TP53 mutations at diagnosis, but a higher proportion of the relapse cases acquire TP53 mutations. In this study, we investigated the effect of S(+)-ibuprofen on neuroblastoma cell lines, focusing on the expression of the MYCN, MYC, AKT, p53 proteins and the favorable neuroblastoma genes in vitro as biomarkers of malignancy. Treatment of neuroblastoma cell lines with S(+)-ibuprofen resulted in a significant growth suppression. This growth effect was accompanied by a marked decrease in the expression of MYC, MYCN, AKT and an increase in p53 expression in neuroblastoma cell lines without TP53 mutation. In addition, S(+)-ibuprofen enhanced the expression of some favorable neuroblastoma genes (EPHB6, CD44) and genes involved in growth suppression and differentiation (EGR1, EPHA2, NRG1 and SEL1L). Gene expression profile and Ingenuity pathway analyses using TP53-mutated SKNAS cells further revealed that S(+)-ibuprofen suppressed molecular pathways associated with cell growth and conversely enhanced those of cell cycle arrest and the unfolded protein response. Collectively, these results suggest that S(+)-ibuprofen or its related compounds may have the potential for therapeutic and/or palliative use for unfavorable neuroblastoma. PMID:24173829

  9. Effects of p53-knockout in vascular smooth muscle cells on atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lilly; Funk, Colin D.; Jia, Zongchao; Mak, Alan S.

    2017-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo evidence has indicated that the tumor suppressor, p53, may play a significant role in the regulation of atherosclerotic plaque formation. In vivo studies using global knockout mice models, however, have generated inconclusive results that do not address the roles of p53 in various cell types involved in atherosclerosis. In this study, we have specifically ablated p53 in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in the ApoE-/- mouse model to investigate the roles of p53 in VSMC in atherosclerotic plaque formation and stability. We found that p53 deficiency in VSMC alone did not affect the overall size of atherosclerotic lesions. However, there was a significant increase in the number of p53-/- VSMC in the fibrous caps of atherosclerotic plaques in the early stages of plaque development. Loss of p53 results in migration of VSMC at a faster rate using wound healing assays and augments PDGF-induced formation of circular dorsal ruffles (CDR), known to be involved in cell migration and internalization of surface receptors. Furthermore, aortic VSMC from ApoE-/- /p53-/- mice produce significantly more podosomes and are more invasive. We conclude that p53-/- VSMC are enriched in the fibrous caps of lesions at early stages of plaque formation, which is caused in part by an increase in VSMC migration and invasion as shown by p53-/- VSMC in culture having significantly higher rates of migration and producing more CDRs and invasive podosomes. PMID:28362832

  10. Radiation response and cell cycle regulation of p53 rescued malignant keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Jongmans, Wim; Backendorf, Claude . E-mail: backendo@chem.leidenuniv.nl

    2005-10-15

    Mutations in the tumor suppressor gene p53 were found in more than 90% of all human squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). To study the function of p53 in a keratinocyte background, a tetracycline-controlled p53 transgene was introduced into a human SCC cell line (SCC15), lacking endogenous p53. Conditional expression of wild-type p53 protein upon withdrawal of tetracycline was accompanied with increased expression of p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} resulting in reduced cell proliferation. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that these cells were transiently arrested in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. However, when SCC15 cells expressing p53 were exposed to ionizing radiation (IR), a clear shift from a G1/S to a G2/M cell cycle arrest was observed. This effect was greatly depending on the presence of wild-type p53, as it was not observed to the same extent in SCC15 cells lacking p53. Unexpectedly, the p53- and IR-dependent G2/M cell cycle arrest in the keratinocyte background was not depending on increased expression or stabilization of 14-3-3{sigma}, a p53-regulated effector of G2/M progression in colorectal cancer cells. In keratinocytes, 14-3-3{sigma} (stratifin) is involved in terminal differentiation and its cell cycle function in this cell type might diverge from the one it fulfills in other cellular backgrounds.

  11. p53, Oxidative Stress, and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongping

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian aging is associated with elevated levels of oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids as a result of unbalanced prooxidant and antioxidant activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress is a major physiological inducer of aging. p53, the guardian of the genome that is important for cellular responses to oxidative stresses, might be a key coordinator of oxidative stress and aging. In response to low levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits antioxidant activities to eliminate oxidative stress and ensure cell survival; in response to high levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits prooxidative activities that further increase the levels of stresses, leading to cell death. p53 accomplishes these context-dependent roles by regulating the expression of a panel of genes involved in cellular responses to oxidative stresses and by modulating other pathways important for oxidative stress responses. The mechanism that switches p53 function from antioxidant to prooxidant remains unclear, but could account for the findings that increased p53 activities have been linked to both accelerated aging and increased life span in mice. Therefore, a balance of p53 antioxidant and prooxidant activities in response to oxidative stresses could be important for longevity by suppressing the accumulation of oxidative stresses and DNA damage. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1669–1678. PMID:21050134

  12. Oral administration of Polypodium leucotomos delays skin tumor development and increases epidermal p53 expression and the anti-oxidant status of UV-irradiated hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Yanes, Esperanza; Cuevas, Jesús; González, Salvador; Mallol, Jordi

    2014-07-01

    Chronic exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) induces skin tumors in hairless mice. Daily oral administration of a Polypodium leucotomos (PL) extract significantly delayed tumor development in PL-treated versus non-PL-treated mice. UVR and/or PL treatment modified several oxidative stress markers. In all irradiated mice, erythrocytic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and glutathione disulphide (GSSG) content increased and in all PL-treated mice GSSG content decreased, specially in non-irradiated animals, and total plasma anti-oxidant capacity (ORAC) increased. In dorsolateral non-tumoral skin of all irradiated mice, glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities increased and GSSG decreased in non-irradiated PL-treated animals. UVR induced a steep increase of p53 expression in epidermal cells. In non-tumoral skin, this increase was significantly higher in PL-treated animals than in non-treated mice and can contribute in delaying tumor development, either by repairing the damaged DNA or by increasing apoptosis. These results reinforce the usefulness of PL as systemic photoprotective agent, especially in patients highly sensitive to UVR.

  13. USP7/HAUSP promotes the sequence-specific DNA binding activity of p53.

    PubMed

    Sarkari, Feroz; Sheng, Yi; Frappier, Lori

    2010-09-27

    The p53 tumor suppressor invokes cellular responses to stressful stimuli by coordinating distinct gene expression programs. This function relies heavily on the ability of p53 to function as a transcription factor by binding promoters of target genes in a sequence specific manner. The DNA binding activity of the core domain of p53 is subject to regulation via post-translational modifications of the C-terminal region. Here we show that the ubiquitin specific protease, USP7 or HAUSP, known to stabilize p53, also regulates the sequence-specific DNA binding mediated by the core domain of p53 in vitro. This regulation is contingent upon interaction between USP7 and the C-terminal regulatory region of p53. However, our data suggest that this effect is not mediated through the N-terminal domain of USP7 previously shown to bind p53, but rather involves the USP7 C-terminal domain and is independent of the deubiquitylation activity of USP7. Consistent with our in vitro observations, we found that overexpression of catalytically inactive USP7 in cells promotes p53 binding to its target sequences and p21 expression, without increasing the levels of p53 protein. We also found that the USP7 C-terminal domain was sufficient for p21 induction. Our results suggest a novel mode of regulation of p53 function by USP7, which is independent of USP7 deubiquitylating activity.

  14. USP7/HAUSP Promotes the Sequence-Specific DNA Binding Activity of p53

    PubMed Central

    Sarkari, Feroz; Sheng, Yi; Frappier, Lori

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor invokes cellular responses to stressful stimuli by coordinating distinct gene expression programs. This function relies heavily on the ability of p53 to function as a transcription factor by binding promoters of target genes in a sequence specific manner. The DNA binding activity of the core domain of p53 is subject to regulation via post-translational modifications of the C-terminal region. Here we show that the ubiquitin specific protease, USP7 or HAUSP, known to stabilize p53, also regulates the sequence-specific DNA binding mediated by the core domain of p53 in vitro. This regulation is contingent upon interaction between USP7 and the C-terminal regulatory region of p53. However, our data suggest that this effect is not mediated through the N-terminal domain of USP7 previously shown to bind p53, but rather involves the USP7 C-terminal domain and is independent of the deubiquitylation activity of USP7. Consistent with our in vitro observations, we found that overexpression of catalytically inactive USP7 in cells promotes p53 binding to its target sequences and p21 expression, without increasing the levels of p53 protein. We also found that the USP7 C-terminal domain was sufficient for p21 induction. Our results suggest a novel mode of regulation of p53 function by USP7, which is independent of USP7 deubiquitylating activity. PMID:20885946

  15. Functional activation of p53 via phosphorylation following DNA damage by UV but not gamma radiation.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, M; Lozano, G

    1998-03-17

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein in which DNA-binding activity is increased on exposure to DNA-damaging agents such as UV or gamma radiation by unknown mechanisms. Because phosphorylation of p53 at the casein kinase (CK) II site activates p53 for DNA-binding function in vitro, we sought to determine the in vivo relevance of phosphorylation at this site after UV and gamma radiation. A polyclonal antibody was generated that binds to bacterially expressed p53 only when phosphorylated in vitro by CK II. Using this antibody, we showed that p53 is phosphorylated at the CK II site upon UV treatment of early passage rat embryo fibroblasts and RKO cells. In addition, DNA-binding assays indicated that phosphorylated p53 bound to a p53-responsive element, suggesting functional activation. However, gamma radiation, which also stabilizes p53, did not result in phosphorylation at the CK II site. These results indicate that phosphorylation at the CK II site is one of the post-translational mechanisms through which p53 is activated in response to UV radiation and that different mechanisms activate p53 after DNA damage by gamma radiation.

  16. Different Mutant/Wild-Type p53 Combinations Cause a Spectrum of Increased Invasive Potential in Nonmalignant Immortalized Human Mammary Epithelial Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Junk, Damian J; Vrba, Lukas; Watts, George S; Oshiro, Marc M; Martinez, Jesse D; Futscher, Bernard W

    2008-01-01

    Aberrations of p53 occur in most, if not all, human cancers. In breast cancer, p53 mutation is the most common genetic defect related to a single gene. Immortalized human mammary epithelial cells resemble the earliest forms of aberrant breast tissue growth but do not express many malignancy-associated phenotypes. We created a model of human mammary epithelial tumorigenesis by infecting hTERT-HME1 immortalized human mammary epithelial cells expressing wild-type p53 with four different mutant p53 constructs to determine the role of p53 mutation on the evolution of tumor phenotypes. We demonstrate that different mutant/wild-type p53 heterozygous models generate loss of function, dominant negative activity, and a spectrum of gain of function activities that induce varying degrees of invasive potential. We suggest that this model can be used to elucidate changes that occur in early stages of human mammary epithelial tumorigenesis. These changes may constitute novel biomarkers or reveal novel treatment modalities that could inhibit progression from primary to metastatic breast disease. PMID:18472962

  17. MIF family members cooperatively inhibit p53 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Stephanie E; Rendon, Beatriz E; Xin, Dan; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Mitchell, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is induced by genotoxic stress in both normal and transformed cells and serves to transcriptionally coordinate cell cycle checkpoint control and programmed cell death responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an autocrine and paracrine acting cytokine/growth factor that promotes lung adenocarcinoma cell motility, anchorage-independence and neo-angiogenic potential. Several recent studies indicate that the only known homolog of MIF, D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT - also referred to as MIF-2), has functionally redundant activities with MIF and cooperatively promotes MIF-dependent pro-tumorigenic phenotypes. We now report that MIF and D-DT synergistically inhibit steady state p53 phosphorylation, stabilization and transcriptional activity in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The combined loss of MIF and D-DT by siRNA leads to dramatically reduced cell cycle progression, anchorage independence, focus formation and increased programmed cell death when compared to individual loss of MIF or D-DT. Importantly, p53 mutant and p53 null lung adenocarcinoma cell lines were only nominally rescued from the cell growth effects of MIF/D-DT combined deficiency suggesting only a minor role for p53 in these transformed cell growth phenotypes. Finally, increased p53 activation was found to be independent of aberrantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that occurs in response to MIF/D-DT-deficiency but is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediate aberrant AMPK activation in these cells. Combined, these findings suggest that both p53 wildtype and mutant human lung adenocarcinoma tumors rely on MIF family members for maximal cell growth and survival.

  18. High fat diet increases and the polyphenol, S17834, decreases acetylation of the SirT1-dependent lysine-382 on p53 and apoptotic signaling in atherosclerotic lesion-prone aortic endothelium of normal mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shanqin; Jiang, Bingbing; Hou, Xiuyun; Shi, Chaomei; Bachschmid, Markus; Zang, Mengwei; Verbeuren, Tony J.; Cohen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    Our purpose was to determine if high fat diet and treatment with a polyphenol regulates acetylation of lysine-382 of p53, the site regulated by sirtuin-1, and apoptosis in the endothelium of the atherosclerotic lesion-prone mouse aortic arch. In cultured endothelial cells two atherogenic stimuli, hydrogen peroxide and tumor necrosis factor-α, increased acetylation of p53 lysine-382, as well as caspase-3 cleavage, an indicator of apoptotic signaling. The polyphenol, S17834, significantly prevented these changes. In LDL receptor-deficient mice, a high fat diet increased, and treatment with S17834 attenuated early atherosclerotic lesions on the lesser curvature of the aortic arch. In wild type C57BL6 mice fed the same diet, no atherosclerotic lesions were observed in this lesion-prone area, but p53 acetylation and caspase-3 cleavage increased in the endothelium. In high fat fed mice, S17834 increased sirtuin-1 protein in the lesion-prone endothelium and prevented both the increase in p53 acetylation and caspase-3 cleavage without affecting blood lipids. These results indicate that high fat diet increases and S17834 decreases acetylation of p53 in lesion-prone aortic endothelial cells of normal mice independently of blood lipids, suggesting that the polyphenol may regulate endothelial cell p53 acetylation and apoptosis via local actions. PMID:21654327

  19. The PIDDosome activates p53 in response to supernumerary centrosomes

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Luca L.; Schuler, Fabian; Sladky, Valentina; Haschka, Manuel D.; Soratroi, Claudia; Eiterer, Lisa; Demetz, Egon; Weiss, Guenter; Geley, Stephan; Nigg, Erich A.; Villunger, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes, the main microtubule-organizing centers in animal cells, are replicated exactly once during the cell division cycle to form the poles of the mitotic spindle. Supernumerary centrosomes can lead to aberrant cell division and have been causally linked to chromosomal instability and cancer. Here, we report that an increase in the number of mature centrosomes, generated by disrupting cytokinesis or forcing centrosome overduplication, triggers the activation of the PIDDosome multiprotein complex, leading to Caspase-2-mediated MDM2 cleavage, p53 stabilization, and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest. This pathway also restrains the extent of developmentally scheduled polyploidization by regulating p53 levels in hepatocytes during liver organogenesis. Taken together, the PIDDosome acts as a first barrier, engaging p53 to halt the proliferation of cells carrying more than one mature centrosome to maintain genome integrity. PMID:28130345

  20. Mutant p53 stimulates chemoresistance of pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells to gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Claudia; Cordani, Marco; Padroni, Chiara; Blandino, Giovanni; Di Agostino, Silvia; Donadelli, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide; PDAC is characterized by poor prognosis, resistance to conventional chemotherapy and high mortality rate. TP53 tumor suppressor gene is frequently mutated in PDAC, resulting in the accumulation of mutated protein with potential gain-of-function (GOF) activities, such as genomic instability, hyperproliferation and chemoresistance. The purpose of this study was to assess the relevance of the p53 status on the PDAC cells response to the standard drug gemcitabine. We also examined the potential therapeutic effect of p53-reactivating molecules to restore the mutant p53 function in GEM treated PDAC cells. We showed that gemcitabine stabilized mutant p53 protein in the nuclei and induced chemoresistance, concurrent with the mutant p53-dependent expression of Cdk1 and CCNB1 genes, resulting in a hyperproliferation effect. Despite the adverse activation of mutant p53 by gemcitabine, simultaneous treatment of PDAC cells with gemcitabine and p53-reactivating molecules (CP-31398 and RITA) reduced growth rate and induced apoptosis. This synergistic effect was observed in both wild-type and mutant p53 cell lines and was absent in p53-null cells. The combination drug treatment induced p53 phosphorylation on Ser15, apoptosis and autophagosome formation. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of autophagy further increased apoptosis stimulated by gemcitabine/CP-31398 treatment. Together, our results show that gemcitabine aberrantly stimulates mutant p53 activity in PDAC cells identifying key processes with potential for therapeutic targeting. Our data also support an anti-tumoral strategy based on inhibition of autophagy combined with p53 activation and standard chemotherapy for both wild-type and mutant p53 expressing PDACs.

  1. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 abolishes the increase in both p53 and Bax/Bcl2 index induced by adult-onset hypothyroidism in rat.

    PubMed

    Alva-Sanchez, Claudia; Rodriguez, Adair; Villanueva, Ivan; Anguiano, Brenda; Aceves, Carmen; Pacheco-Rosado, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Hypothyroidism affects neuron population dynamics in the hippocampus of the adult rat, with neuronal damage as the main feature of its effect. This effect is prevented by the blockade of NMDA receptors, which suggests that glutamatergic activity mediates cell death in this condition. Glutamate can also stimulate cell proliferation and survival of newborn neurons, indicating that it can affect different stages of the cell cycle. In this work we measured the expression of specific proteins that control cell proliferation (cycline-D1), cell arrest (p21), damage (p53) or apoptosis (Bax and Bcl2) in the hippocampus of hypothyroid rats treated with the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) blocker MK-801 during the induction of hypothyroidism. The results show that hypothyroidism increases the expression of markers of DNA damage, cell arrest, and apoptosis, but does not affect the marker of cell proliferation. NMDAR blockade prevents the increase on markers of DNA damage and apoptosis, but does not influence cell arrest or cell proliferation. This suggests that hypothyroidism promotes cell death mainly by an excitotoxic effect of glutamate.

  2. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  3. Enigma negatively regulates p53 through MDM2 and promotes tumor cell survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cho-Rok; Lim, Jung Hwa; Choi, Yoonjung; Kim, Dae-Ghon; Kang, Koo Jeong; Noh, Seung-Moo; Im, Dong-Soo

    2010-12-01

    The human E3 ubiquitin ligase murine double minute 2 (MDM2) targets the tumor suppressor p53 for ubiquitination and degradation but also promotes its own ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. As the balance between MDM2 and p53 levels plays a crucial role in regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis, we sought to identify factors selectively inhibiting MDM2 self-ubiquitination. Here we have shown that the LIM domain protein Enigma directly interacts with MDM2 to form a ternary complex with p53 in vitro and in human hepatoma and colon carcinoma cell lines and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. We found that Enigma elicited p53 degradation by inhibiting MDM2 self-ubiquitination and increasing its ubiquitin ligase activity toward p53 in cells. Moreover, mitogenic stimuli such as serum, FGF, and HGF increased Enigma transcription via induction of serum response factor (SRF), leading to MDM2 stabilization and subsequent p53 degradation. We observed similar results in the livers of mice treated with HGF. In humans, we found SRF and Enigma coexpressed with MDM2 but not p53 in several liver and stomach tumors. Finally, we showed that Enigma promoted cell survival and chemoresistance by suppressing p53-mediated apoptosis in both cell lines and a mouse xenograft model. Our findings suggest a role for Enigma in tumorigenesis and uncover a mechanism whereby mitogens attenuate p53 antiproliferative activity through an SRF/Enigma/MDM2 pathway.

  4. MPI depletion enhances O-GlcNAcylation of p53 and suppresses the Warburg effect.

    PubMed

    Shtraizent, Nataly; DeRossi, Charles; Nayar, Shikha; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Katz, Liora S; Prince, Adam; Koh, Anna P; Vincek, Adam; Hadas, Yoav; Hoshida, Yujin; Scott, Donald K; Eliyahu, Efrat; Freeze, Hudson H; Sadler, Kirsten C; Chu, Jaime

    2017-06-23

    Rapid cellular proliferation in early development and cancer depends on glucose metabolism to fuel macromolecule biosynthesis. Metabolic enzymes are presumed regulators of this glycolysis-driven metabolic program, known as the Warburg effect; however, few have been identified. We uncover a previously unappreciated role for Mannose phosphate isomerase (MPI) as a metabolic enzyme required to maintain Warburg metabolism in zebrafish embryos and in both primary and malignant mammalian cells. The functional consequences of MPI loss are striking: glycolysis is blocked and cells die. These phenotypes are caused by induction of p53 and accumulation of the glycolytic intermediate fructose 6-phosphate, leading to engagement of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP), increased O-GlcNAcylation, and p53 stabilization. Inhibiting the HBP through genetic and chemical methods reverses p53 stabilization and rescues the Mpi-deficient phenotype. This work provides mechanistic evidence by which MPI loss induces p53, and identifies MPI as a novel regulator of p53 and Warburg metabolism.

  5. The APE1 Asp/Asp genotype and the combination of APE1 Asp/Asp and hOGG1-Cys variants are associated with increased p53 mutation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-Hsuan; Chen, Po-Ming; Cheng, Ya-Wen; Chen, Chih-Yi; Yuan, Chiun-Jye; Lee, Huei

    2012-01-01

    The hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism is associated with lung cancer risk, but there are limited data regarding an association between the APE1 Asp148Glu polymorphism and lung cancer. Biological evidence shows that the hOGG1-Cys allele results in less DNA repair activity; however, this is not associated with p53 mutation in lung cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether an interaction between hOGG1 and APE1 is associated with the frequency of p53 mutation in lung cancer. We studied 217 Taiwanese adults with primary lung cancer. DNA polymorphisms of hOGG1 and APE1 were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism. Mutations in p53 exons 5-8 were detected by direct sequencing. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% CIs for the risk of p53 mutation associated with polymorphisms of hOGG1 and APE1 in lung cancer. As expected, no association between hOGG1 polymorphism and p53 mutation was observed in this population. However, a higher risk of p53 mutation was found in participants with the APE1 Asp/Asp genotype than in those with the APE1-Glu allele (OR, 2.15; 95% CI, 1.19-3.87; P = 0.011). The risk of p53 mutation was also higher in participants with APE1 Asp/Asp plus hOGG1-Cys than in those with APE1-Glu plus hOGG1 Ser/Ser (OR, 3.72; 95% CI, 1.33-10.40; P = 0.012). These results suggest that the APE1 Asp/Asp genotype and the combination of the APE1 Asp/Asp and hOGG1-Cys variants are associated with increased risk of p53 mutation in non-small cell lung cancer.

  6. Interference with p53 protein inhibits hematopoietic and muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The involvement of p53 protein in cell differentiation has been recently suggested by some observations made with tumor cells and the correlation found between differentiation and increased levels of p53. However, the effect of p53 on differentiation is in apparent contrast with the normal development of p53-null mice. To test directly whether p53 has a function in cell differentiation, we interfered with the endogenous wt-p53 protein of nontransformed cells of two different murine histotypes: 32D myeloid progenitors, and C2C12 myoblasts. A drastic inhibition of terminal differentiation into granulocytes or myotubes, respectively, was observed upon expression of dominant- negative p53 proteins. This inhibition did not alter the cell cycle withdrawal typical of terminal differentiation, nor p21(WAF1/CIP1) upregulation, indicating that interference with endogenous p53 directly affects cell differentiation, independently of the p53 activity on the cell cycle. We also found that the endogenous wt-p53 protein of C2C12 cells becomes transcriptionally active during myogenesis, and this activity is inhibited by p53 dominant-negative expression. Moreover, we found that p53 DNA-binding and transcriptional activities are both required to induce differentiation in p53-negative K562 cells. Taken together, these data strongly indicate that p53 is a regulator of cell differentiation and it exerts this role, at least in part, through its transcriptional activity. PMID:8698814

  7. Annexin A2 and PSF proteins interact with p53 IRES and regulate translation of p53 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Sharathchandra, Arandkar; Lal, Ridhima; Khan, Debjit; Das, Saumitra

    2012-12-01

    p53 mRNA has been shown to be translated into two isoforms, full-length p53 (FL-p53) and a truncated isoform ΔN-p53, which modulates the functions of FL-p53 and also has independent functions. Previously, we have shown that translation of p53 and ΔN-p53 can be initiated at Internal Ribosome Entry Sites (IRES). These two IRESs were shown to regulate the translation of p53 and ΔN-p53 in a distinct cell-cycle phase-dependent manner. Earlier observations from our laboratory also suggest that the structural integrity of the p53 RNA is critical for IRES function and is compromised by mutations that affect the structure as well as RNA protein interactions. In the current study, using RNA affinity approach we have identified Annexin A2 and PTB associated Splicing Factor (PSF/SFPQ) as novel ITAFs for p53 IRESs. We have showed that the purified Annexin A2 and PSF proteins specifically bind to p53 IRES elements. Interestingly, in the presence of calcium ions Annexin A2 showed increased binding with p53 IRES. Immunopulldown experiments suggest that these two proteins associate with p53 mRNA ex vivo as well. Partial knockdown of Annexin A2 and PSF showed decrease in p53 IRES activity and reduced levels of both the p53 isoforms. More importantly the interplay between Annexin A2, PSF and PTB proteins for binding to p53mRNA appears to play a crucial role in IRES function. Taken together, our observations suggest pivotal role of two new trans-acting factors in regulating the p53-IRES function, which in turn influences the synthesis of p53 isoforms.

  8. Dipeptide analysis of p53 mutations and evolution of p53 family proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiang; Yu, Long; Levine, Arnold J; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2014-01-01

    p53 gain-of-function mutations are similar to driver mutations in cancer genes, with both promoting tumorigenesis. Most previous studies focused on residues lost by mutations, providing information related to a dominantly-negative effect. However, to understand gain-of-function mutations, it is also important to investigate what are the distributions of residues gained by mutations. We compile available p53/p63/p73 protein sequences and construct a non-redundant dataset. We analyze the amino acid and dipeptide composition of p53/p63/p73 proteins across evolution and compare them with the gain/loss of amino acids and dipeptides in human p53 following cancer-related somatic mutations. We find that the ratios of amino acids gained via somatic mutations during evolution to those lost through p53 cancer mutations correlate with the ratios found in single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human proteome. The dipeptide mutational gain/loss ratios are inversely correlated with those observed over p53 evolution but tend to follow the increasing p63/p73-like dipeptide propensities. We successfully simulated the p53 cancer mutation spectrum using the dipeptide composition across the p53 family accounting for the likelihood of mutations in p53 codons. The results revealed that the p53 mutation spectrum is dominated not only by p53 evolution but also by reversal of evolution to a certain degree. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics, Systems Biology & Clinical Implications. Guest Editor: Yudong Cai.

  9. C6 ceramide dramatically increases vincristine sensitivity both in vivo and in vitro, involving AMP-activated protein kinase-p53 signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min-Bin; Jiang, Qin; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Zhang, Yan; He, Bang-shun; Wei, Mu-Xin; Lu, Jian-Wei; Ji, Yong; Lu, Pei-Hua

    2015-09-01

    Use of the conventional cancer chemotherapy (i.e. vincristine) is limited in tumor cells exhibiting pre-existing or acquired resistance. Here, we found that C6 ceramide (C6) dramatically sensitized vincristine's activity. In vitro, C6 and vincristine coadministration induced substantial necrosis and apoptosis in multiple human cancer cell lines, which were accompanied by a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, subsequent p53 activation, mTORC1 inactivation and Bcl-2/HIF-1α downregulation. Such synergistic effects were attenuated by AMPK inactivation through genetic mutation or short hairpin RNA silencing. Coadministration-activated p53 translocated to mitochondria, and formed a complex with cyclophilin-D, leading to mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and cell necrosis. Disrupting p53-Cyp-D complexation through pharmacological or genetic means reduced costimulation-induced cytotoxicity. In vivo, a liposomal C6 was synthesized, which dramatically enhanced the antiproliferative activity of vincristine on HCT-116 or A2780 xenografts. Together, C6 sensitizes vincristine-induced anticancer activity in vivo and in vitro, involving activating AMPK-p53 signaling.

  10. Identification and characterization of the intercellular adhesion molecule-2 gene as a novel p53 target

    PubMed Central

    Ogi, Kazuhiro; Nakagaki, Takafumi; Koyama, Ryota; Idogawa, Masashi; Hiratsuka, Hiroyoshi; Tokino, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor inhibits cell growth through the activation of both cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, which maintain genome stability and prevent cancer development. Here, we report that intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM2) is transcriptionally activated by p53. Specifically, ICAM2 is induced by the p53 family and DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner. We identified a p53 binding sequence located within the ICAM2 gene that is responsive to wild-type p53, TAp73, and TAp63. In terms of function, we found that the ectopic expression of ICAM2 inhibited cancer cell migration and invasion. In addition, we demonstrated that silencing endogenous ICAM2 in cancer cells caused a marked increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation levels, suggesting that ICAM2 inhibits migration and invasion of cancer cells by suppressing ERK signaling. Moreover, ICAM2 is underexpressed in human cancer tissues containing mutant p53 as compared to those with wild-type p53. Notably, the decreased expression of ICAM2 is associated with poor survival in patients with various cancers. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM2 induction by p53 has a key role in inhibiting migration and invasion. PMID:27556181

  11. Au nanoparticle decorated graphene nanosheets for electrochemical immunosensing of p53 antibodies for cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Elshafey, Reda; Siaj, Mohamed; Tavares, Ana C

    2016-04-25

    The accurate quantification of the level of p53 antibodies in serum is crucial for cancer prognosis. We report a novel and sensitive label-free immunosensor based on gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) self-assembled onto electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) for the detection of p53 antibodies. An electrografted p-aminophenol organic layer was used to immobilize graphene oxide (GO) onto the surface of screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCE). The Au NP/ERGO hybrid interface provides a large surface area for the effective immobilization of p53 antigens, as well as it ascertains the bioactivity and stability of immobilized p53 antigens. Scanning electron microscope, Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies were used to monitor the sensor fabrication and cyclic voltammetry was used to quantify the extent of Au NPs' surface coverage by p53 antigens. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) of a [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) couple was employed to investigate the immunosensor fabrication and to monitor the binding events between p53 antigens and p53 antibodies. Under optimized experimental conditions, the biosensor displayed good sensitivity and specificity. The p53 antibodies were detected in a concentration as low as 0.088 pg mL(-1) with a linear range from 0.1 pg mL(-1) to 10 ng mL(-1). The high sensitivity of the immunosensor may derive from the high loading of p53 antibodies on Au NPs which increases the number of binding events.

  12. p53 regulates thymic Notch1 activation.

    PubMed

    Laws, Amy M; Osborne, Barbara A

    2004-03-01

    Notch is crucial for multiple stages of T cell development, including the CD4+CD8+ double positive (DP)/CD8+ single positive (SP) transition, but regulation of Notchactivation is not well understood. p53 regulates Presenilin1 (PS1) expression, and PS1 cleaves Notch, releasing its intracellular domain (NIC), leading to the expression of downstream targets, e.g. the HES1 gene. We hypothesize that p53 regulates Notch activity during T cell development. We found that Notch1 expression and activation were negatively regulated by p53in several thymoma lines. Additionally, NIC was elevated in Trp53(-/-) thymocytes as compared to Trp53(+/+) thymocytes. To determine if elevated Notch1 activation in Trp53(-/-) thymocytes had an effect on T cell development, CD4 and CD8 expression were analyzed. The CD4+ SP/CD8+ SP T cell ratio was decreased in Trp53(-/-) splenocytes and thymocytes. This alteration in T cell development correlated with the increased Notch1 activation observed in the absence of p53. These data indicate that p53 negatively regulates Notch1 activation during T cell development. Skewing of T cell development toward CD8+SP T cells in Trp53(-/-) mice is reminiscent of the phenotype of NIC-overexpressing mice. Thus, we suggest that p53 plays a role in T cell development, in part by regulating Notch1 activation.

  13. Stability and structural recovery of the tetramerization domain of p53-R337H mutant induced by a designed templating ligand.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Susana; Martos, Vera; Santos, Eva; Menéndez, Margarita; Bo, Carles; Giralt, Ernest; de Mendoza, Javier

    2008-10-28

    Protein p53 is a transcription factor crucial for cell cycle and genome integrity. It is able to induce both cell arrest when DNA is damaged and the expression of DNA repair machinery. When the damage is irreversible, it triggers apoptosis. Indeed, the protein, which is a homotetramer, is mutated in most human cancers. For instance, the inherited mutation p53-R337H results in destabilization of the tetramer and, consequently, leads to an organism prone to tumor setup. We describe herein a rational designed molecule capable of holding together the four monomers of the mutated p53-R337H protein, recovering the tetramer integrity as in the wild-type structure. Two ligand molecules, based on a conical calix[4]arene with four cationic guanidiniomethyl groups at the wider edge (upper rim) and hydrophobic loops at the narrower edge (lower rim), fit nicely and cooperatively into the hydrophobic clefts between two of the monomers at each side of the protein and keep the tetrameric structure, like molecular templates, by both ion-pair and hydrophobic interactions. We found a good agreement between the structure of the complex and the nature of the interactions involved by a combination of theory (molecular dynamics) and experiments (circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry and (1)H saturation transfer difference NMR).

  14. p53, ROS and senescence in the control of aging.

    PubMed

    Vigneron, Arnaud; Vousden, Karen H

    2010-08-01

    In addition to its function as a tumour suppressor, p53 is also involved in an increasing number of pathology associated with aging. Several activities of p53 appear contribute to its role in aging; one function that might be particularly relevant in this context is the regulation of senescence. The control of ROS and senescence by p53 may help to explain how p53 can function to both restrain and promote aging.

  15. Graphene-based immunosensor for electrochemical quantification of phosphorylated p53 (S15)

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yunying; Chen, Aiqiong; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-08-01

    We reported a graphene-based immunosensor for electrochemical quantification of phosphorylated p53 on serine 15 (phospho-p5315), a potential biomarker of gamma-radiation exposure. The principle is based on sandwich immunoassay and the resulting immunocomplex is formed among phospho-p53 capture antibody, phospho-p5315 antigen, biotinylated phospho-p5315 detection antibody and horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-labeled streptavidin. The introduced HRP results in an electrocatalytic response to reduction of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of thionine. Graphene served as sensor platform not only promotes electron transfer, but also increases the surface area to introduce a large amount of capture antibody, thus increasing the detection sensitivity. The experimental conditions including blocking agent, immunoreaction time and substrate concentration have been optimized. Under the optimum conditions, the increase of response current is proportional to the phospho-p5315 concentration in the range of 0.2–10 ng mL-1, with the detection limit of 0.1 ng mL-1. The developed immunosensor exhibits acceptable stability and reproducibility and the assay results for phospho-p5315 are in good correlation with the known values. This easily fabricated immunosensor provides a new promising tool for analysis of phospho-p5315 and other phosphorylated proteins.

  16. Ribosomal Protein Mutations Result in Constitutive p53 Protein Degradation through Impairment of the AKT Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hermkens, Dorien; Wlodarski, Marcin W.; Da Costa, Lydie; MacInnes, Alyson W.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ribosomal protein (RP) genes can result in the loss of erythrocyte progenitor cells and cause severe anemia. This is seen in patients with Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA), a pure red cell aplasia and bone marrow failure syndrome that is almost exclusively linked to RP gene haploinsufficiency. While the mechanisms underlying the cytopenia phenotype of patients with these mutations are not completely understood, it is believed that stabilization of the p53 tumor suppressor protein may induce apoptosis in the progenitor cells. In stark contrast, tumor cells from zebrafish with RP gene haploinsufficiency are unable to stabilize p53 even when exposed to acute DNA damage despite transcribing wild type p53 normally. In this work we demonstrate that p53 has a limited role in eliciting the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA. In fact, we find that RP-deficient embryos exhibit the same normal p53 transcription, absence of p53 protein, and impaired p53 response to DNA damage as RP haploinsufficient tumor cells. Recently we reported that RP mutations suppress activity of the AKT pathway, and we show here that this suppression results in proteasomal degradation of p53. By re-activating the AKT pathway or by inhibiting GSK-3, a downstream modifier that normally represses AKT signaling, we are able to restore the stabilization of p53. Our work indicates that the anemia phenotype of zebrafish models of DBA is dependent on factors other than p53, and may hold clinical significance for both DBA and the increasing number of cancers revealing spontaneous mutations in RP genes. PMID:26132763

  17. Dynamics of Delayed p53 Mutations in Mice Given Whole-Body Irradiation at 8 Weeks

    SciTech Connect

    Okazaki, Ryuji; Ootsuyama, Akira; Kakihara, Hiroyo; Mabuchi, Yo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Michikawa, Yuichi; Imai, Takashi; Norimura, Toshiyuki

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Ionizing irradiation might induce delayed genotoxic effects in a p53-dependent manner. However, a few reports have shown a p53 mutation as a delayed effect of radiation. In this study, we investigated the p53 gene mutation by the translocation frequency in chromosome 11, loss of p53 alleles, p53 gene methylation, p53 nucleotide sequence, and p53 protein expression/phosphorylation in p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup +/-} mice after irradiation at a young age. Methods and Materials: p53{sup +/+} and p53{sup +/-} mice were exposed to 3 Gy of whole-body irradiation at 8 weeks of age. Chromosome instability was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. p53 allele loss was evaluated by polymerase chain reaction, and p53 methylation was evaluated by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. p53 sequence analysis was performed. p53 protein expression was evaluated by Western blotting. Results: The translocation frequency in chromosome 11 showed a delayed increase after irradiation. In old irradiated mice, the number of mice that showed p53 allele loss and p53 methylation increased compared to these numbers in old non-irradiated mice. In two old irradiated p53{sup +/-} mice, the p53 sequence showed heteromutation. In old irradiated mice, the p53 and phospho-p53 protein expressions decreased compared to old non-irradiated mice. Conclusion: We concluded that irradiation at a young age induced delayed p53 mutations and p53 protein suppression.

  18. Mutant p53: One, No One, and One Hundred Thousand.

    PubMed

    Walerych, Dawid; Lisek, Kamil; Del Sal, Giannino

    2015-01-01

    Encoded by the mutated variants of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene, mutant p53 proteins are getting an increased experimental support as active oncoproteins promoting tumor growth and metastasis. p53 missense mutant proteins are losing their wild-type tumor suppressor activity and acquire oncogenic potential, possessing diverse transforming abilities in cell and mouse models. Whether various mutant p53s differ in their oncogenic potential has been a matter of debate. Recent discoveries are starting to uncover the existence of mutant p53 downstream programs that are common to different mutant p53 variants. In this review, we discuss a number of studies on mutant p53, underlining the advantages and disadvantages of alternative experimental approaches that have been used to describe the numerous mutant p53 gain-of-function activities. Therapeutic possibilities are also discussed, taking into account targeting either individual or multiple mutant p53 proteins in human cancer.

  19. p53-dependent ceramide response to genotoxic stress.

    PubMed Central

    Dbaibo, G S; Pushkareva, M Y; Rachid, R A; Alter, N; Smyth, M J; Obeid, L M; Hannun, Y A

    1998-01-01

    Both p53 and ceramide have been implicated in the regulation of growth suppression. p53 has been proposed as the "guardian of the genome" and ceramide has been suggested as a "tumor suppressor lipid. " Both molecules appear to regulate cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the relationship between p53 and ceramide. We found that treatment of Molt-4 cells with low concentrations of actinomycin D or gamma-irradiation, which activate p53-dependent apoptosis, induces apoptosis only in cells expressing normal levels of p53. In these cells, p53 activation was followed by a dose- and time-dependent increase in endogenous ceramide levels which was not seen in cells lacking functional p53 and treated similarly. Similar results were seen in irradiated L929 cells whereby the p53-deficient clone was significantly more resistant to irradiation and exhibited no ceramide response. However, in p53-independent systems, such as growth suppression induced by TNF-alpha or serum deprivation, ceramide accumulated irrespective of the upregulation of p53, indicating that p53 regulates ceramide accumulation in only a subset of growth-suppressive pathways. Finally, ceramide did not increase p53 levels when used at growth-suppressive concentrations. Also, when cells lacking functional p53, either due to mutation or the expression of the E6 protein of human papilloma virus, were treated with exogenous ceramide, there was equal growth suppression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis as compared with cells expressing normal p53. These results indicate that p53 is unlikely to function "downstream" of ceramide. Instead, they suggest that, in situations where p53 performs a critical regulatory role, such as the response to genotoxic stress, it functions "upstream" of ceramide. These studies begin to define a relationship between these two pathways of growth inhibition. PMID:9664074

  20. Ribosomal protein S27-like is a physiological regulator of p53 that suppresses genomic instability and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xiufang; Zhao, Yongchao; Tang, Fei; Wei, Dongping; Thomas, Daffyd; Wang, Xiang; Liu, Yang; Zheng, Pan; Sun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Cell-based studies showed that several Mdm2-binding ribosomal proteins, upon overexpression, stabilize and activate p53. In contrast, here we show in a mouse knockout study that Mdm2-binding ribosomal protein S27-like (Rps27l), upon disruption, activates p53. Germline inactivation of Rps27l triggers ribosomal stress to stabilize Mdm2, which degrades Mdm4 to reduce Mdm2-Mdm4 E3 ligase towards p53, leading to p53-dependent apoptotic depletion of hematopoietic stem cells and postnatal death, which is rescued by Trp53 deletion. Paradoxically, while increased p53 is expected to inhibit tumorigenesis, Rps27l−/−;Trp53+/− mice develop lymphomas at higher incidence with p53 loss-of-heterozygosity and severe genome aneuploidy, suggesting that Rps27l disruption impose a selection pressure against p53. Thus, Rps27l has dual functions in p53 regulation: under Trp53+/+ background, Rps27l disruption triggers ribosomal stress to induce p53 and apoptosis, whereas under Trp53+/− background, Rps27l disruption triggers genomic instability and Trp53 deletion to promote tumorigenesis. Our study provides a new paradigm of p53 regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02236.001 PMID:25144937

  1. Pyrimidine biosynthesis links mitochondrial respiration to the p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Khutornenko, Anastasia A.; Roudko, Vladimir V.; Chernyak, Boris V.; Vartapetian, Andrey B.; Chumakov, Peter M.; Evstafieva, Alexandra G.

    2010-01-01

    While many functions of the p53 tumor suppressor affect mitochondrial processes, the role of altered mitochondrial physiology in a modulation of p53 response remains unclear. As mitochondrial respiration is affected in many pathologic conditions such as hypoxia and intoxications, the impaired electron transport chain could emit additional p53-inducing signals and thereby contribute to tissue damage. Here we show that a shutdown of mitochondrial respiration per se does not trigger p53 response, because inhibitors acting in the proximal and distal segments of the respiratory chain do not activate p53. However, strong p53 response is induced specifically after an inhibition of the mitochondrial cytochrome bc1 (the electron transport chain complex III). The p53 response is triggered by the deficiency in pyrimidines that is developed due to a suppression of the functionally coupled mitochondrial pyrimidine biosynthesis enzyme dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH). In epithelial carcinoma cells the activation of p53 in response to mitochondrial electron transport chain complex III inhibitors does not require phosphorylation of p53 at Serine 15 or up-regulation of p14ARF. Instead, our data suggest a contribution of NQO1 and NQO2 in stabilization of p53 in the nuclei. The results establish the deficiency in pyrimidine biosynthesis as the cause of p53 response in the cells with impaired mitochondrial respiration. PMID:20566882

  2. BRCA1 Expression is an Important Biomarker for Chemosensitivity: Suppression of BRCA1 Increases the Apoptosis via Up-regulation of p53 and p21 During Cisplatin Treatment in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Horiuchi, Akiko; Wang, Cuiju; Kikuchi, Norihiko; Osada, Ryosuke; Nikaido, Toshio; Konishi, Ikuo

    2006-01-01

    BRCA1 is a tumor suppressor which plays a crucial role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks, and its abnormality is responsible for hereditary ovarian cancer syndrome. It has recently been reported that reduced expression of BRCA1 is also common in sporadic ovarian carcinoma via its promoter hypermethylation, and that ovarian carcinoma patients negative for BRCA1 expression showed favorable prognosis. To address if BRCA1 expression plays a role in the chemotherapeutic response, we analyzed the effect of BRCA1 suppression on the sensitivity to cisplatin and paclitaxel in ovarian cancer cells. Specific siRNA for BRCA1 gene was transfected into 3 ovarian cancer cell lines with various p53 status. Reduced expression of BRCA1 by transfection of BRCA1-siRNA resulted in a 5.3-fold increase in sensitivity to cisplatin in p53-wild A2780 cells, but not in p53-mutated A2780/CDDP and p53-deleted SKOV3 cells. Regarding the sensitivity to paclitaxel, BRCA1 suppression caused no significant changes in all the 3 cell lines. For ionizing radiation sensitivity, BRCA1 suppression also showed a significant higher sensitivity in A2780 cells. Growth curve and cell cycle analyses showed no significant differences between BRCA1-siRNA-transfected A2780 cells and control cells. However, cisplatin treatment under suppression of BRCA1 showed a significantly increased apoptosis along with up-regulation of p53 and p21 in A2780 cells. Accordingly, reduced expression of BRCA1 enhances the cisplatin sensitivity and apoptosis via up-regulation of p53 and p21, but does not affect the paclitaxel sensitivity. Expression of BRCA1 might be an important biomarker for cisplatin resistance in ovarian carcinoma. PMID:19690636

  3. Tumor suppressor p53 protects mice against Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaohui; Liu, Pingping; Wei, Jianchao; Zhu, Zixiang; Shi, Zixue; Shao, Donghua; Ma, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 is involved in regulating immune responses, which contribute to antitumor and antiviral activity. However, whether p53 has anti-bacterial functions remains unclear. Listeria monocytogenes (LM) causes listeriosis in humans and animals, and it is a powerful model for studying innate and adaptive immunity. In the present study, we illustrate an important regulatory role of p53 during LM infection. p53 knockout (p53KO) mice were more susceptible to LM infection, which was manifested by a shorter survival time and lower survival rate. p53KO mice showed significant impairments in LM eradication. Knockdown of p53 in RAW264.7 and HeLa cells resulted in increased invasion and intracellular survival of LM. Furthermore, the invasion and intracellular survival of LM was inhibited in p53-overexpressing RAW264.7 and HeLa cells. LM-infected p53KO mice exhibited severe clinical symptoms and organ injury, presumably because of the abnormal production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-12, and IL-18. Decreased IFN-γ and GBP1 productions were observed in LM-infected p53-deficient mice or cells. The combination of these defects likely resulted in the overwhelming LM infection in the p53KO mice. These observations indicate that p53 serves as an important regulator of the host innate immune that protects against LM infection. PMID:27644341

  4. Genetic basis for p53 overexpression in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davidoff, A M; Humphrey, P A; Iglehart, J D; Marks, J R

    1991-01-01

    Overexpression of an activated form of the p53 protein may be involved in neoplastic transformation. We found widespread overexpression of p53 by immunohistochemical staining in 11 (22%) of 49 primary invasive human breast cancers. Northern blot analysis showed that this overexpression was not due to an increase in the steady-state level of p53 mRNA. The p53 gene was directly sequenced in 7 of these tumors with elevated levels of the protein and, in each case, a mutation that altered the coding sequence for p53 was found in a highly conserved region of the gene. Whereas 4 of these tumors contained only a mutant p53 allele, the other 3 tumors exhibited coding sequences from both a mutant and a wild-type allele. p53 mutations have previously been correlated with allelic loss of part of chromosome 17p that contains the p53 locus. Examination of all 49 breast tumors revealed a 61% frequency of deletion at or near the p53 locus. However, the presence of allelic deletion did not correlate with overexpression of the protein. Six tumors that were deleted but did not express high levels of the protein were sequenced and all retained a wild-type p53 allele. In this series of human breast cancers, overexpression of the p53 protein, not allelic loss on chromosome 17p, was always associated with mutation of the p53 gene. Images PMID:2052583

  5. p53 and rapamycin are additive

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith; Huang, Jing; Jones, Diane; Dodds, Sherry G.; Williams, Charnae; Hubbard, Gene; Livi, Carolina B.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan; Curiel, Tyler; Sharp, Z. Dave; Hasty, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase found in a complex (mTORC1) that enables macromolecular synthesis and cell growth and is implicated in cancer etiology. The rapamycin-FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP12) complex allosterically inhibits mTORC1. In response to stress, p53 inhibits mTORC1 through a separate pathway involving cell signaling and amino acid sensing. Thus, these different mechanisms could be additive. Here we show that p53 improved the ability of rapamycin to: 1) extend mouse life span, 2) suppress ionizing radiation (IR)-induced senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and 3) increase the levels of amino acids and citric acid in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. This additive effect could have implications for cancer treatment since rapamycin and p53 are anti-oncogenic. PMID:26158292

  6. p53: its mutations and their impact on transcription.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Catherine; Pearsall, Isabella; Yeudall, Andrew; Deb, Swati Palit; Deb, Sumitra

    2014-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor protein whose key function is to maintain the integrity of the cell. Mutations in p53 have been found in up to 50 % of all human cancers and cause an increase in oncogenic phenotypes such as proliferation and tumorigenicity. Both wild-type and mutant p53 have been shown to transactivate their target genes, either through directly binding to DNA, or indirectly through protein-protein interactions. This review discusses possible mechanisms behind both wild-type and mutant p53-mediated transactivation and touches on the concept of addiction to mutant p53 of cancer cells and how that may be used for future therapies.

  7. Gallium compound GaQ3-induced Ca2+ signalling triggers p53-dependent and -independent apoptosis in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gogna, Rajan; Madan, Esha; Keppler, Bernhard; Pati, Uttam

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE A novel anti-neoplastic gallium complex GaQ3 (KP46), earlier developed by us, is currently in phase I clinical trial. GaQ3 induced S-phase arrest and apoptosis via caspase/PARP cleavage in a variety of cancers. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis is unknown. Here, we have explored the mechanism(s) of GaQ3-induced apoptosis in cancer cells, focusing on p53 and intracellular Ca2+ signalling. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH GaQ3-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis were determined in cancer cell lines, with different p53 status (p53+/+, p53−/− and p53 mutant). Time course analysis of intracellular Ca2+ calcium release, p53 promoter activation, p53-nuclear/cytoplasmic movements and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were conducted. Ca2+-dependent formation of the p53–p300 transcriptional complex was analysed by co-immunoprecipitation and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Ca2+ signalling, p53, p300 and ROS were serially knocked down to study Ca2+–p53–ROS ineractions in GaQ3-induced apoptosis. KEY RESULTS GaQ3 triggered intracellular Ca2+ release stabilizing p53–p300 complex and recruited p53 to p53 promoter, leading to p53 mRNA and protein synthesis. p53 induced higher intracellular Ca2+ release and ROS followed by activation of p53 downstream genes including those for the micro RNA mir34a. In p53−/− and p53 mutant cells, GaQ3-induced Ca2+-signalling generated ROS. ROS further increased membrane translocation of FAS and FAS-mediated extrinsic apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study disclosed a novel mechanism of Ca2+-signalling-mediated p53 activation and ROS up-regulation. Understanding the mechanism of GaQ3-induced apoptosis will help establish this gallium-based organic compound as a potent anti-cancer drug. PMID:22074401

  8. Neutron activation increases activity of ruthenium-based complexes and induces cell death in glioma cells independent of p53 tumor suppressor gene.

    PubMed

    Montel, Aline Monezi; Dos Santos, Raquel Gouvêa; da Costa, Pryscila Rodrigues; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela de Paula; Batista, Alzir Azevedo; Dos Santos, Wagner Gouvêa

    2017-04-01

    Novel metal complexes have received great attention in the last decades due to their potential anticancer activity. Notably, ruthenium-based complexes have emerged as good alternative to the currently used platinum-based drugs for cancer therapy, providing less toxicity and side effects to patients. Glioblastoma is an aggressive and invasive type of brain tumor and despite of advances is the field of neurooncology there is no effective treatment until now. Therefore, we sought to investigate the potential antiproliferative activity of phosphine-ruthenium-based complexes on human glioblastoma cell lines. Due to its octahedral structure as opposed to the square-planar geometry of platinum(II) compounds, ruthenium(II) complexes exhibit different structure-function relationship probably acting through a different mechanism from that of cisplatin beyond their ability to bind DNA. To better improve the pharmacological activity of metal complexes we hypothesized that neutron activation of ruthenium in the complexes would allow to decrease the effective concentration of the compound needed to kill tumor cells. Herein we report on the effect of unmodified and neutron activated phosphine ruthenium II complexes on glioblastoma cell lines carrying wild-type and mutated p53 tumor suppressor gene. Induction of apoptosis/authophagy as well as generation of reactive oxygen species were determined. The phosphine ruthenium II complexes tested were highly active against glioblastoma cell lines inducing cell death both through apoptosis and autophagy in a p53 independent fashion. Neutron activation of ruthenium compounds rendered them more active than their original counterparts suggesting a new strategy to improve the antitumor activity of these compounds.

  9. Discovery of Novel Isatin-Based p53 Inducers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of isatin Schiff base derivatives were identified during in silico screening of the small molecule library for novel activators of p53. The compounds selected based on molecular docking results were further validated by a high-content screening assay using U2OS human osteosarcoma cells with an integrated EGFP-expressing p53-dependent reporter. The hit compounds activated and stabilized p53, as shown by Western blotting, at higher rates than the well-known positive control Nutlin-3. Thus, the p53-activating compounds identified by this approach represent useful molecular probes for various cancer studies. PMID:26288684

  10. Novel small molecule induces p53-dependent apoptosis in human colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang Eun; Min, Yong Ki; Ha, Jae Du; Kim, Bum Tae; Lee, Woo Ghil . E-mail: bigguy@krict.re.kr

    2007-07-06

    Using high-throughput screening with small-molecule libraries, we identified a compound, KCG165 [(2-(3-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)ethoxy)-1,10b-dihydro-[1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-c] quinazolin-5(6H)-one)], which strongly activated p53-mediated transcriptional activity. KCG165-induced phosphorylations of p53 at Ser{sup 6}, Ser{sup 15}, and Ser{sup 20}, which are all key residues involved in the activation and stabilization of p53. Consistent with these findings, KCG165 increased level of p53 protein and led to the accumulation of transcriptionally active p53 in the nucleus with the increased occupancy of p53 in the endogenous promoter region of its downstream target gene, p21{sup WAF1/CIP}. Notably, KCG165-induced p53-dependent apoptosis in cancer cells. Furthermore, we suggested topoisomerase II as the molecular target of KCG165. Together, these results indicate that KCG165 may have potential applications as an antitumor agent.

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-1 regulates the SIRT1-p53 pathway in cellular senescence

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Duc; Bergholz, Johann; Zhang, Haibo; He, Hanbing; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Yujun; Li, Qintong; Kirkland, James L; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence, which is known to halt proliferation of aged and stressed cells, plays a key role against cancer development and is also closely associated with organismal aging. While increased insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling induces cell proliferation, survival and cancer progression, disrupted IGF signaling is known to enhance longevity concomitantly with delay in aging processes. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of aging by IGF signaling and whether IGF regulates cellular senescence are still poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that IGF-1 exerts a dual function in promoting cell proliferation as well as cellular senescence. While acute IGF-1 exposure promotes cell proliferation and is opposed by p53, prolonged IGF-1 treatment induces premature cellular senescence in a p53-dependent manner. We show that prolonged IGF-1 treatment inhibits SIRT1 deacetylase activity, resulting in increased p53 acetylation as well as p53 stabilization and activation, thus leading to premature cellular senescence. In addition, either expression of SIRT1 or inhibition of p53 prevented IGF-1-induced premature cellular senescence. Together, these findings suggest that p53 acts as a molecular switch in monitoring IGF-1-induced proliferation and premature senescence, and suggest a possible molecular connection involving IGF-1-SIRT1-p53 signaling in cellular senescence and aging. PMID:25070626

  12. p53: key conductor of all anti-acne therapies.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2017-09-19

    This review based on translational research predicts that the transcription factor p53 is the key effector of all anti-acne therapies. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) enhance p53 expression. Tetracyclines and macrolides via inhibiting p450 enzymes attenuate ATRA degradation, thereby increase p53. Benzoyl peroxide and hydrogen peroxide elicit oxidative stress, which upregulates p53. Azelaic acid leads to mitochondrial damage associated with increased release of reactive oxygen species inducing p53. p53 inhibits the expression of androgen receptor and IGF-1 receptor, and induces the expression of IGF binding protein 3. p53 induces FoxO1, FoxO3, p21 and sestrin 1, sestrin 2, and tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), the key inducer of isotretinoin-mediated sebocyte apoptosis explaining isotretinoin's sebum-suppressive effect. Anti-androgens attenuate the expression of miRNA-125b, a key negative regulator of p53. It can thus be concluded that all anti-acne therapies have a common mode of action, i.e., upregulation of the guardian of the genome p53. Immortalized p53-inactivated sebocyte cultures are unfortunate models for studying acne pathogenesis and treatment.

  13. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  14. P53 alters the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity for oxidized graphene in human B-lymphoblastoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibone, Dayton Matthew

    Widespread use of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products raises concern about potential adverse impacts on human health. The p53 tumor suppressor protein is crucial to maintaining cellular and genetic stability to prevent carcinogenesis. Here, we show that oxygen functionalized graphene (f-G) absorption and p53 functional status correlate with cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in human B-lymphoblastoid cells. Trends in f-G absorption by were dose-dependent. Cells with functional p53 exposed to f-G arrested in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, suppressed f-G induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and had elevated apoptosis. While compared to p53 competent cells, the p53 deficient cells exposed to f-G accumulated in S-phase of the cell cycle, had elevated ROS levels, and evaded apoptosis. The f-G genotoxicity was evident as increased loss-of-heterozygosity mutants independent of p53 status, and structural chromosome damage in p53 deficient cells. These findings have broad implications for the safety and efficacy of oxidized graphene nanomaterials in industrial, consumer products and biomedical applications.

  15. Ubiquitin-specific protease 2 decreases p53-dependent apoptosis in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Tianling; Biskup, Edyta; Gjerdrum, Lise Mette Rahbek; Niazi, Omid; Ødum, Niels; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-07-26

    Treatment of advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) is challenging because they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. USP2 has been shown to promote resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in several cancer models.We show here USP2 is expressed in quiescent and activated T-cells and its expression is 50% lower in CTCL cell lines (MyLa2000, SeAx and Hut-78) than in normal T-cells. USP2 is expressed in neoplastic cells in early, plaque-stage mycosis fungoides (MF) and is downregulated in advanced tumor stages. Upon treatment with psoralen with UVA (PUVA) or a p53 activator, nutlin3a, USP2 expression is significantly increased in MyLa2000 (p53wt/wt), but not in SeAx (p53mut) or Hut-78 (p53-/-). USP2 knockdown decreases MyLa2000 cell viability after PUVA by 50% but not Hut-78, suggesting that the function of USP2 in CTCL cells is p53-dependent. Furthermore, USP2 knockdown results in a decreased Mdm2 expression and upregulation of p53. Taken together, our findings suggest that USP2 stabilizes Mdm2 which antagonizes pro-apoptotic activity of p53 and possibly contributes to therapeutic resistance in CTCL.

  16. Ubiquitin-specific protease 2 decreases p53-dependent apoptosis in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Tianling; Biskup, Edyta; Rahbek Gjerdrum, Lise Mette; Niazi, Omid; Ødum, Niels; Gniadecki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of advanced cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) is challenging because they are resistant to conventional chemotherapy. USP2 has been shown to promote resistance to chemotherapeutic agents in several cancer models. We show here USP2 is expressed in quiescent and activated T-cells and its expression is 50% lower in CTCL cell lines (MyLa2000, SeAx and Hut-78) than in normal T-cells. USP2 is expressed in neoplastic cells in early, plaque-stage mycosis fungoides (MF) and is downregulated in advanced tumor stages. Upon treatment with psoralen with UVA (PUVA) or a p53 activator, nutlin3a, USP2 expression is significantly increased in MyLa2000 (p53wt/wt), but not in SeAx (p53mut) or Hut-78 (p53−/−). USP2 knockdown decreases MyLa2000 cell viability after PUVA by 50% but not Hut-78, suggesting that the function of USP2 in CTCL cells is p53-dependent. Furthermore, USP2 knockdown results in a decreased Mdm2 expression and upregulation of p53. Taken together, our findings suggest that USP2 stabilizes Mdm2 which antagonizes pro-apoptotic activity of p53 and possibly contributes to therapeutic resistance in CTCL. PMID:27351221

  17. Regulation of p53 and MDM2 activity by MTBP.

    PubMed

    Brady, Mark; Vlatkovic, Nikolina; Boyd, Mark T

    2005-01-01

    p53 is a critical coordinator of a wide range of stress responses. To facilitate a rapid response to stress, p53 is produced constitutively but is negatively regulated by MDM2. MDM2 can inhibit p53 in multiple independent ways: by binding to its transcription activation domain, inhibiting p53 acetylation, promoting nuclear export, and probably most importantly by promoting proteasomal degradation of p53. The latter is achieved via MDM2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity harbored within the MDM2 RING finger domain. We have discovered that MTBP promotes MDM2-mediated ubiquitination and degradation of p53 and also MDM2 stabilization in an MDM2 RING finger-dependent manner. Moreover, using small interfering RNA to down-regulate endogenous MTBP in unstressed cells, we have found that MTBP significantly contributes to MDM2-mediated regulation of p53 levels and activity. However, following exposure of cells to UV, but not gamma-irradiation, MTBP is destabilized as part of the coordinated cellular response. Our findings suggest that MTBP differentially regulates the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2 towards two of its most critical targets (itself and p53) and in doing so significantly contributes to MDM2-dependent p53 homeostasis in unstressed cells.

  18. The Mechanism of p53 Rescue by SUSP4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do-Hyoung; Lee, Chewook; Lee, Si-Hyung; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Han, Joan J; Cha, Eun-Ji; Lim, Ji-Eun; Cho, Ye-Jin; Hong, Seung-Hee; Han, Kyou-Hoon

    2017-01-24

    p53 is an important tumor-suppressor protein deactivation of which by mdm2 results in cancers. A SUMO-specific protease 4 (SUSP4) was shown to rescue p53 from mdm2-mediated deactivation, but the mechanism is unknown. The discovery by NMR spectroscopy of a "p53 rescue motif" in SUSP4 that disrupts p53-mdm2 binding is presented. This 29-residue motif is pre-populated with two transient helices connected by a hydrophobic linker. The helix at the C-terminus binds to the well-known p53-binding pocket in mdm2 whereas the N-terminal helix serves as an affinity enhancer. The hydrophobic linker binds to a previously unidentified hydrophobic crevice in mdm2. Overall, SUSP4 appears to use two synergizing modules, the p53 rescue motif described here and a globular-structured SUMO-binding catalytic domain, to stabilize p53. A p53 rescue motif peptide exhibits an anti-tumor activity in cancer cell lines expressing wild-type p53. A pre-structures motif in the intrinsically disordered proteins is thus important for target recognition. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Novel roles for p53 in the genesis and targeting of tetraploid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Davaadelger, Batzaya; Shen, Hong; Maki, Carl G

    2014-01-01

    Tetraploid (4N) cells are considered important in cancer because they can display increased tumorigenicity, resistance to conventional therapies, and are believed to be precursors to whole chromosome aneuploidy. It is therefore important to determine how tetraploid cancer cells arise, and how to target them. P53 is a tumor suppressor protein and key regulator of tetraploidy. As part of the "tetraploidy checkpoint", p53 inhibits tetraploid cell proliferation by promoting a G1-arrest in incipient tetraploid cells (referred to as a tetraploid G1 arrest). Nutlin-3a is a preclinical drug that stabilizes p53 by blocking the interaction between p53 and MDM2. In the current study, Nutlin-3a promoted a p53-dependent tetraploid G1 arrest in two diploid clones of the HCT116 colon cancer cell line. Both clones underwent endoreduplication after Nutlin removal, giving rise to stable tetraploid clones that showed increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and cisplatin (CP)-induced apoptosis compared to their diploid precursors. These findings demonstrate that transient p53 activation by Nutlin can promote tetraploid cell formation from diploid precursors, and the resulting tetraploid cells are therapy (IR/CP) resistant. Importantly, the tetraploid clones selected after Nutlin treatment expressed approximately twice as much P53 and MDM2 mRNA as diploid precursors, expressed approximately twice as many p53-MDM2 protein complexes (by co-immunoprecipitation), and were more susceptible to p53-dependent apoptosis and growth arrest induced by Nutlin. Based on these findings, we propose that p53 plays novel roles in both the formation and targeting of tetraploid cells. Specifically, we propose that 1) transient p53 activation can promote a tetraploid-G1 arrest and, as a result, may inadvertently promote formation of therapy-resistant tetraploid cells, and 2) therapy-resistant tetraploid cells, by virtue of having higher P53 gene copy number and expressing twice as many p53-MDM2

  20. A High-Throughput Cell-Based Screen Identified a 2-[(E)-2-Phenylvinyl]-8-Quinolinol Core Structure That Activates p53.

    PubMed

    Bechill, John; Zhong, Rong; Zhang, Chen; Solomaha, Elena; Spiotto, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    p53 function is frequently inhibited in cancer either through mutations or by increased degradation via MDM2 and/or E6AP E3-ubiquitin ligases. Most agents that restore p53 expression act by binding MDM2 or E6AP to prevent p53 degradation. However, fewer compounds directly bind to and activate p53. Here, we identified compounds that shared a core structure that bound p53, caused nuclear localization of p53 and caused cell death. To identify these compounds, we developed a novel cell-based screen to redirect p53 degradation to the Skip-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex in cells expressing high levels of p53. In a multiplexed assay, we coupled p53 targeted degradation with Rb1 targeted degradation in order to identify compounds that prevented p53 degradation while not inhibiting degradation through the SCF complex or other proteolytic machinery. High-throughput screening identified several leads that shared a common 2-[(E)-2-phenylvinyl]-8-quinolinol core structure that stabilized p53. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that these compounds bound p53 with a KD of 200 ± 52 nM. Furthermore, these compounds increased p53 nuclear localization and transcription of the p53 target genes PUMA, BAX, p21 and FAS in cancer cells. Although p53-null cells had a 2.5±0.5-fold greater viability compared to p53 wild type cells after treatment with core compounds, loss of p53 did not completely rescue cell viability suggesting that compounds may target both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to inhibit cell proliferation. Thus, we present a novel, cell-based high-throughput screen to identify a 2-[(E)-2-phenylvinyl]-8-quinolinol core structure that bound to p53 and increased p53 activity in cancer cells. These compounds may serve as anti-neoplastic agents in part by targeting p53 as well as other potential pathways.

  1. A High-Throughput Cell-Based Screen Identified a 2-[(E)-2-Phenylvinyl]-8-Quinolinol Core Structure That Activates p53

    PubMed Central

    Bechill, John; Zhong, Rong; Zhang, Chen; Solomaha, Elena

    2016-01-01

    p53 function is frequently inhibited in cancer either through mutations or by increased degradation via MDM2 and/or E6AP E3-ubiquitin ligases. Most agents that restore p53 expression act by binding MDM2 or E6AP to prevent p53 degradation. However, fewer compounds directly bind to and activate p53. Here, we identified compounds that shared a core structure that bound p53, caused nuclear localization of p53 and caused cell death. To identify these compounds, we developed a novel cell-based screen to redirect p53 degradation to the Skip-Cullin-F-box (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex in cells expressing high levels of p53. In a multiplexed assay, we coupled p53 targeted degradation with Rb1 targeted degradation in order to identify compounds that prevented p53 degradation while not inhibiting degradation through the SCF complex or other proteolytic machinery. High-throughput screening identified several leads that shared a common 2-[(E)-2-phenylvinyl]-8-quinolinol core structure that stabilized p53. Surface plasmon resonance analysis indicated that these compounds bound p53 with a KD of 200 ± 52 nM. Furthermore, these compounds increased p53 nuclear localization and transcription of the p53 target genes PUMA, BAX, p21 and FAS in cancer cells. Although p53-null cells had a 2.5±0.5-fold greater viability compared to p53 wild type cells after treatment with core compounds, loss of p53 did not completely rescue cell viability suggesting that compounds may target both p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to inhibit cell proliferation. Thus, we present a novel, cell-based high-throughput screen to identify a 2-[(E)-2-phenylvinyl]-8-quinolinol core structure that bound to p53 and increased p53 activity in cancer cells. These compounds may serve as anti-neoplastic agents in part by targeting p53 as well as other potential pathways. PMID:27124407

  2. Differential salt-induced dissociation of the p53 protein complexes with circular and linear plasmid DNA substrates suggest involvement of a sliding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Šebest, Peter; Brázdová, Marie; Fojta, Miroslav; Pivoňková, Hana

    2015-01-30

    A study of the effects of salt conditions on the association and dissociation of wild type p53 with different ~3 kbp long plasmid DNA substrates (supercoiled, relaxed circular and linear, containing or lacking a specific p53 binding site, p53CON) using immunoprecipitation at magnetic beads is presented. Salt concentrations above 200 mM strongly affected association of the p53 protein to any plasmid DNA substrate. Strikingly different behavior was observed when dissociation of pre-formed p53-DNA complexes in increased salt concentrations was studied. While contribution from the p53CON to the stability of the p53-DNA complexes was detected between 100 and 170 mM KCl, p53 complexes with circular DNAs (but not linear) exhibited considerable resistance towards salt treatment for KCl concentrations as high as 2 M provided that the p53 basic C-terminal DNA binding site (CTDBS) was available for DNA binding. On the contrary, when the CTDBS was blocked by antibody used for immunoprecipitation, all p53-DNA complexes were completely dissociated from the p53 protein in KCl concentrations≥200 mM under the same conditions. These observations suggest: (a) different ways for association and dissociation of the p53-DNA complexes in the presence of the CTDBS; and (b) a critical role for a sliding mechanism, mediated by the C-terminal domain, in the dissociation process.

  3. The putative oncotarget CSN5 controls a transcription-uncorrelated p53-mediated autophagy implicated in cancer cell survival under curcumin treatment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Jin, Rui; Zhang, Xian; Sheng, Ji-Po; Yu, Fang; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Pan, Ying; Huang, Jun-Jian; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2016-10-25

    Curcumin has shown promise as a safe and specific anticancer agent. The COP9 signalosome (CSN) component CSN5, a known specific target for curcumin, can control p53 stability by increasing its degradation through ubiquitin system. But the correlation of CSN5-controlled p53 to anticancer therapeutic effect of curcumin is currently unknown. Here we showed that CSN5-controlled p53 was transcriptional inactive and responsible for autophagy in human normal BJ cells and cancer HepG2 cells under curcumin treatment. Of note, CSN5-initiated cellular autophagy by curcumin treatment was abolished in p53-null HCT116p53-/- cancer cells, which could be rescued by reconstitution with wild-type p53 or transcription inactive p53 mutant p53R273H. Furthermore, CSN5-controlled p53 conferred a pro-survival autophagy in diverse cancer cells response to curcumin. Genetic p53 deletion, as well as autophagy pharmacological inhibition by chloroquine, significantly enhanced the therapeutic effect of curcumin on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, but not normal cells. This study identifies a novel CSN5-controlled p53 in autophagy of human cells. The p53 expression state is a useful biomarker for predicting the anticancer therapeutic effect of curcumin. Therefore, the pharmacologic autophagy manipulation may benefit the ongoing anticancer clinical trials of curcumin.

  4. The putative oncotarget CSN5 controls a transcription-uncorrelated p53-mediated autophagy implicated in cancer cell survival under curcumin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Ji-Po; Yu, Fang; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Pan, Ying; Huang, Jun-Jian; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin has shown promise as a safe and specific anticancer agent. The COP9 signalosome (CSN) component CSN5, a known specific target for curcumin, can control p53 stability by increasing its degradation through ubiquitin system. But the correlation of CSN5-controlled p53 to anticancer therapeutic effect of curcumin is currently unknown. Here we showed that CSN5-controlled p53 was transcriptional inactive and responsible for autophagy in human normal BJ cells and cancer HepG2 cells under curcumin treatment. Of note, CSN5-initiated cellular autophagy by curcumin treatment was abolished in p53-null HCT116p53−/− cancer cells, which could be rescued by reconstitution with wild-type p53 or transcription inactive p53 mutant p53R273H. Furthermore, CSN5-controlled p53 conferred a pro-survival autophagy in diverse cancer cells response to curcumin. Genetic p53 deletion, as well as autophagy pharmacological inhibition by chloroquine, significantly enhanced the therapeutic effect of curcumin on cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, but not normal cells. This study identifies a novel CSN5-controlled p53 in autophagy of human cells. The p53 expression state is a useful biomarker for predicting the anticancer therapeutic effect of curcumin. Therefore, the pharmacologic autophagy manipulation may benefit the ongoing anticancer clinical trials of curcumin. PMID:27626169

  5. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    PubMed Central

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  6. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-01-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53. PMID:21597459

  7. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-12-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53.

  8. INGN 201: Ad-p53, Ad5CMV-p53, Adenoviral p53, INGN 101, p53 gene therapy--Introgen, RPR/INGN 201.

    PubMed

    2003-01-01

    products. Aventis Gencell will increase its equity stake in Introgen by investing $US 20 million in non-voting preferred shares of Introgen that will be convertible to Introgen common shares at a premium to the market price. Introgen will also receive a 5% equity stake in Aventis Gencell. Introgen intends to use the proceeds of Aventis Gencell's investment to fund the commercialisation of the p53 gene therapy product and to begin building its internal sales and marketing division to support the products anticipated market introduction. In April 2001, Aventis Pharma announced that it intended to spin off its gene therapy division, Aventis Gencell, as a separate operating company. In mid-2002, Aventis Pharma was still attempting to spin off Aventis Gencell but negotiations with venture capital partners had failed. Gene Logic (formerly OncorMed) of the US was contracted by Introgen to perform the p53 status testing for RPR/INGN 201 phase I clinical trials. In February 2003, Introgen announced it will streamline its phase III clinical trials for head and neck cancer to reduce spending, and that INGN 201 received Orphan Drug Status for head and neck cancer in the US. According to results (published in January 2003) of Introgen's phase II study of non-metastatic patients with non-small cell lung cancer (ineligible to receive surgery or combination therapy with radiation and cancer chemotherapy) treated with INGN 201 combined with radiation therapy, approximately 60% of patients' primary tumours regressed or disappeared after the combination therapy, as assessed by both biopsies and by CT scans 3 months after treatment. Investigators commented that further randomised trials are needed to follow-up on these observations. In February 2003, Introgen announced that it will move ahead with the development of registration plans for a non-small cell lung cancer indication for INGN 201, and is now including support for lung cancer registration in partnering discussions. RPR/INGN 201 is

  9. Influenza A Viruses Control Expression of Proviral Human p53 Isoforms p53β and Δ133p53α

    PubMed Central

    Marcel, Virginie; Cartet, Gaëlle; Lane, David P.; Lina, Bruno; Rosa-Calatrava, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have described the role of p53 isoforms, including p53β and Δ133p53α, in the modulation of the activity of full-length p53, which regulates cell fate. In the context of influenza virus infection, an interplay between influenza viruses and p53 has been described, with p53 being involved in the antiviral response. However, the role of physiological p53 isoforms has never been explored in this context. Here, we demonstrate that p53 isoforms play a role in influenza A virus infection by using silencing and transient expression strategies in human lung epithelial cells. In addition, with the help of a panel of different influenza viruses from different subtypes, we also show that infection differentially regulates the expressions of p53β and Δ133p53α. Altogether, our results highlight the role of p53 isoforms in the viral cycle of influenza A viruses, with p53β and Δ133p53α acting as regulators of viral production in a p53-dependent manner. PMID:22647703

  10. Low p53 Binding Protein 1 (53BP1) Expression Is Associated With Increased Local Recurrence in Breast Cancer Patients Treated With Breast-Conserving Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Neboori, Hanmanth J.R.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Wu Hao; Yang Qifeng; Aly, Amal; Goyal, Sharad; Schiff, Devora; Moran, Meena S.; Golhar, Ryan; Chen Chunxia; Moore, Dirk; and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether the expression of p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) has prognostic significance in a cohort of early-stage breast cancer patients treated with breast-conserving surgery and radiotherapy (BCS+RT). Methods and Materials: A tissue microarray of early-stage breast cancer treated with BCS+RT from a cohort of 514 women was assayed for 53BP1, estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER2 expression by immunohistochemistry. Through log-rank tests and univariate and multivariate models, the staining profile of each tumor was correlated with clinical endpoints, including ipsilateral breast recurrence-free survival (IBRFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Results: Of the 477 (93%) evaluable tumors, 63 (13%) were scored as low. Low expression of 53BP1 was associated with worse outcomes for all endpoints studied, including 10-year IBRFS (76.8% vs. 90.5%; P=.01), OS (66.4% vs. 81.7%; P=.02), CSS (66.0% vs. 87.4%; P<.01), DMFS (55.9% vs. 87.0%; P<.01), and RFS (45.2% vs. 80.6%; P<.01). Multivariate analysis incorporating various clinico-pathologic markers and 53BP1 expression found that 53BP1 expression was again an independent predictor of all endpoints (IBRFS: P=.0254; OS: P=.0094; CSS: P=.0033; DMFS: P=.0006; RFS: P=.0002). Low 53BP1 expression was also found to correlate with triple-negative (TN) phenotype (P<.01). Furthermore, in subset analysis of all TN breast cancer, negative 53BP1 expression trended for lower IBRFS (72.3% vs. 93.9%; P=.0361) and was significant for worse DMFS (48.2% vs. 86.8%; P=.0035) and RFS (37.8% vs. 83.7%; P=.0014). Conclusion: Our data indicate that low 53BP1 expression is an independent prognostic indicator for local relapse among other endpoints in early-stage breast cancer and TN breast cancer patients treated with BCS+RT. These results should be verified in larger cohorts of patients to validate their clinical

  11. The Transcription Factor p53 Influences Microglial Activation Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jayadev, Suman; Nesser, Nicole K.; Hopkins, Stephanie; Myers, Scott J.; Case, Amanda; Lee, Rona J.; Seaburg, Luke A.; Uo, Takuma; Murphy, Sean P.; Morrison, Richard S.; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2011-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by the innate immune response in the central nervous system (CNS). Microglia, have pro-inflammatory and subsequently neurotoxic actions as well as anti-inflammatory functions that promote recovery and repair. Very little is known about the transcriptional control of these specific microglial behaviors. We have previously shown that in HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), the transcription factor p53 accumulates in microglia and that microglial p53 expression is required for the in vitro neurotoxicity of the HIV coat glycoprotein gp120. These findings suggested a novel function for p53 in regulating microglial activation. Here we report that in the absence of p53, microglia demonstrate a blunted response to interferon-γ, failing to increase expression of genes associated with classical macrophage activation or secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines. Microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles revealed increased expression of genes associated with anti-inflammatory functions, phagocytosis and tissue repair in p53 knockout (p53−/−) microglia compared with those cultured from strain matched p53 expressing (p53+/+) mice. We further observed that p53−/− microglia demonstrate increased phagocytic activity in vitro and expression of markers for alternative macrophage activation both in vitro and in vivo. In HAND brain tissue, the alternative activation marker CD163 was expressed in a separate subset of microglia than those demonstrating p53 accumulation. These data suggest that p53 influences microglial behavior, supporting the adoption of a pro-inflammatory phenotype, while p53 deficiency promotes phagocytosis and gene expression associated with alternative activation and anti-inflammatory functions. PMID:21598312

  12. p53 associates with and targets ΔNp63 into a protein degradation pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ratovitski, Edward A.; Patturajan, Meera; Hibi, Kenji; Trink, Barry; Yamaguchi, Kengo; Sidransky, David

    2001-01-01

    A human p53 homologue, p63 (p40/p51/p73L/CUSP) that maps to the chromosomal region 3q27–29 was found to produce a variety of transcripts that encode DNA-binding proteins with and without a trans-activation domain (TA- or ΔN-, respectively). The p63 gene locus was found to be amplified in squamous cell carcinoma, and overexpression of ΔNp63 (p40) led to increased growth of transformed cells in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, p63-null mice displayed abnormal epithelial development and germ-line human mutations were found to cause ectodermal dysplasia. We now demonstrate that certain p63 isotypes form complexes with p53. p53 mutations R175H or R248W abolish the association of p53 with p63, whereas V143A or R273H has no effect. Deletion studies suggest that the DNA-binding domains of both p53 and p63 mediate the association. Overexpression of wild type but not mutant (R175H) p53 results in the caspase-dependent degradation of certain ΔNp63 proteins (p40 and ΔNp63α). The association between p53 and ΔNp63 supports a previously unrecognized role for p53 in regulation of ΔNp63 stability. The ability of p53 to mediate ΔNp63 degradation may balance the capacity of ΔNp63 to accelerate tumorigenesis or to induce epithelial proliferation. PMID:11172034

  13. Green Tea Polyphenols Induce p53-Dependent and p53-Independent Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells through Two Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Karishma; Thakur, Vijay S.; Bhaskaran, Natarajan; Nawab, Akbar; Babcook, Melissa A.; Jackson, Mark W.; Gupta, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor gene p53 is commonly observed in human prostate cancer and is associated with therapeutic resistance. We have previously demonstrated that green tea polyphenols (GTP) induce apoptosis in prostate cancer cells irrespective of p53 status. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these observations remain elusive. Here we investigated the mechanisms of GTP-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells stably-transfected with short hairpin-RNA against p53 (LNCaPshp53) and control vector (LNCaPshV). GTP treatment induced p53 stabilization and activation of downstream targets p21/waf1 and Bax in a dose-dependent manner specifically in LNCaPshV cells. However, GTP-induced FAS upregulation through activation of c-jun-N-terminal kinase resulted in FADD phosphorylation, caspase-8 activation and truncation of BID, leading to apoptosis in both LNCaPshV and LNCaPshp53 cells. In parallel, treatment of cells with GTP resulted in inhibition of survival pathway, mediated by Akt deactivation and loss of BAD phosphorylation more prominently in LNCaPshp53 cells. These distinct routes of cell death converged to a common pathway, leading to loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cytochrome c release and activation of terminal caspases, resulting in PARP-cleavage. GTP-induced apoptosis was attenuated with JNK inhibitor, SP600125 in both cell lines; whereas PI3K-Akt inhibitor, LY294002 resulted in increased cell death prominently in LNCaPshp53 cells, establishing the role of two distinct pathways of GTP-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, GTP exposure resulted in inhibition of class I HDAC protein, accumulation of acetylated histone-H3 in total cellular chromatin, resulting in increased accessibility of transcription factors to bind with the promoter sequences of p21/waf1 and Bax, regardless of the p53 status of cells, consistent with effects elicited by an HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A. These results demonstrate that GTP induces

  14. Loss of p21{sup Sdi1} expression in senescent cells after DNA damage accompanied with increase of miR-93 expression and reduced p53 interaction with p21{sup Sdi1} gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Ok Ran; Lim, In Kyoung

    2011-04-08

    Highlights: {yields} Reduced p21 expression in senescent cells treated with DNA damaging agents. {yields} Increase of [{sup 3}H]thymidine and BrdU incorporations in DNA damaged-senescent cells. {yields} Upregulation of miR-93 expression in senescent cells in response to DSB. {yields} Failure of p53 binding to p21 promoter in senescent cells in response to DSB. {yields} Molecular mechanism of increased cancer development in aged than young individuals. -- Abstract: To answer what is a critical event for higher incidence of tumor development in old than young individuals, primary culture of human diploid fibroblasts were employed and DNA damage was induced by doxorubicin or X-ray irradiation. Response to the damage was different between young and old cells; loss of p21{sup sdi1} expression in spite of p53{sup S15} activation in old cells along with [{sup 3}H]thymidine and BrdU incorporation, but not in young cells. The phenomenon was confirmed by other tissue fibroblasts obtained from different donor ages. Induction of miR-93 expression and reduced p53 binding to p21 gene promoter account for loss of p21{sup sdi1} expression in senescent cells after DNA damage, suggesting a mechanism of in vivo carcinogenesis in aged tissue without repair arrest.

  15. Model-driven experimental approach reveals the complex regulatory distribution of p53 by the circadian factor Period 2

    PubMed Central

    Gotoh, Tetsuya; Liu, Jingjing; Vila-Caballer, Marian; Stauffer, Philip E.; Tyson, John J.; Finkielstein, Carla V.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock and cell cycle networks are interlocked on the molecular level, with the core clock loop exerting a multilevel regulatory role over cell cycle components. This is particularly relevant to the circadian factor Period 2 (Per2), which modulates the stability of the tumor suppressor p53 in unstressed cells and transcriptional activity in response to genotoxic stress. Per2 binding prevents Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and, therefore, its degradation, and oscillations in the peaks of Per2 and p53 were expected to correspond. However, our findings showed that Per2 and p53 rhythms were significantly out-of-phase relative to each other in cell lysates and in purified cytoplasmic fractions. These seemingly conflicting experimental data motivated the use of a combined theoretical and experimental approach focusing on the role played by Per2 in dictating the phase of p53 oscillations. Systematic modeling of all possible regulatory scenarios predicted that the observed phase relationship between Per2 and p53 could be simulated if (i) p53 was more stable in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm, (ii) Per2 associates to various ubiquitinated forms of p53, and (iii) Per2 mediated p53 nuclear import. These predictions were supported by a sevenfold increase in p53’s half-life in the nucleus and by in vitro binding of Per2 to the various ubiquitinated forms of p53. Last, p53’s nuclear shuttling was significantly favored by ectopic expression of Per2 and reduced because of Per2 down-regulation. Our combined theoretical/mathematical approach reveals how clock regulatory nodes can be inferred from oscillating time course data. PMID:27834218

  16. Targeting cancer stem cells with p53 modulators

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Ryo; Appella, Ettore; Kopelovich, Levy; DeLeo, Albert B.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) typically over-express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH). Thus, ALDHbright tumor cells represent targets for developing novel cancer prevention/treatment interventions. Loss of p53 function is a common genetic event during cancer development wherein small molecular weight compounds (SMWC) that restore p53 function and reverse tumor growth have been identified. Here, we focused on two widely studied p53 SMWC, CP-31398 and PRIMA-1, to target ALDHbright CSC in human breast, endometrial and pancreas carcinoma cell lines expressing mutant or wild type (WT) p53. CP-31398 and PRIMA-1 significantly reduced CSC content and sphere formation by these cell lines in vitro. In addition, these agents were more effective in vitro against CSC compared to cisplatin and gemcitabine, two often-used chemotherapeutic agents. We also tested a combinatorial treatment in methylcholantrene (MCA)-treated mice consisting of p53 SMWC and p53-based vaccines. Yet using survival end-point analysis, no increased efficacy in the presence of either p53 SMWC alone or with vaccine compared to vaccine alone was observed. These results may be due, in part, to the presence of immune cells, such as activated lymphocytes expressing WT p53 at levels comparable to some tumor cells, wherein further increase of p53 expression by p53 SMWC may alter survival of these immune cells and negatively impact an effective immune response. Continuous exposure of mice to MCA may have also interfered with the action of these p53 SMWC, including potential direct interaction with MCA. Nonetheless, the effect of p53 SMWC on CSC and cancer treatment remains of great interest. PMID:27074569

  17. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation.

  18. A Platform for Interrogating Cancer-Associated p53 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    D’Brot, Alejandro; Kurtz, Paula; Regan, Erin; Jakubowski, Brandon; Abrams, John M

    2016-01-01

    p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancer. Compelling evidence argues that full transformation involves loss of growth suppression encoded by wild-type p53 together with poorly understood oncogenic activity encoded by missense mutations. Furthermore, distinguishing disease alleles from natural polymorphisms is an important clinical challenge. To interrogate the genetic activity of human p53 variants, we leveraged the Drosophila model as an in vivo platform. We engineered strains that replace the fly p53 gene with human alleles, producing a collection of stocks that are, in effect, ‘humanized’ for p53 variants. Like the fly counterpart, human p53 transcriptionally activated a biosensor and induced apoptosis after DNA damage. However, all humanized strains representing common alleles found in cancer patients failed to complement in these assays. Surprisingly, stimulus-dependent activation of hp53 occurred without stabilization, demonstrating that these two processes can be uncoupled. Like its fly counterpart, hp53 formed prominent nuclear foci in germline cells but cancer-associated p53 variants did not. Moreover, these same mutant alleles disrupted hp53 foci and inhibited biosensor activity, suggesting that these properties are functionally linked. Together these findings establish a functional platform for interrogating human p53 alleles and suggest that simple phenotypes could be used to stratify disease variants. PMID:26996664

  19. Regulation of iron homeostasis by the p53-ISCU pathway

    PubMed Central

    Funauchi, Yuki; Tanikawa, Chizu; Yi Lo, Paulisally Hau; Mori, Jinichi; Daigo, Yataro; Takano, Atsushi; Miyagi, Yohei; Okawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of iron in tissues increases the risk of cancer, but iron regulatory mechanisms in cancer tissues are largely unknown. Here, we report that p53 regulates iron metabolism through the transcriptional regulation of ISCU (iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme), which encodes a scaffold protein that plays a critical role in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. p53 activation induced ISCU expression through binding to an intronic p53-binding site. Knockdown of ISCU enhanced the binding of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), a cytosolic Fe-S protein, to an iron-responsive element in the 5′ UTR of ferritin heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1) mRNA and subsequently reduced the translation of FTH1, a major iron storage protein. In addition, in response to DNA damage, p53 induced FTH1 and suppressed transferrin receptor, which regulates iron entry into cells. HCT116 p53+/+ cells were resistant to iron accumulation, but HCT116 p53−/− cells accumulated intracellular iron after DNA damage. Moreover, excess dietary iron caused significant elevation of serum iron levels in p53−/− mice. ISCU expression was decreased in the majority of human liver cancer tissues, and its reduced expression was significantly associated with p53 mutation. Our finding revealed a novel role of the p53-ISCU pathway in the maintenance of iron homeostasis in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. PMID:26560363

  20. Glioblastoma cells inhibit astrocytic p53-expression favoring cancer malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Biasoli, D; Sobrinho, M F; da Fonseca, A C C; de Matos, D G; Romão, L; de Moraes Maciel, R; Rehen, S K; Moura-Neto, V; Borges, H L; Lima, F R S

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment has a dynamic and usually cancer-promoting function during all tumorigenic steps. Glioblastoma (GBM) is a fatal tumor of the central nervous system, in which a substantial number of non-tumoral infiltrated cells can be found. Astrocytes neighboring these tumor cells have a particular reactive phenotype and can enhance GBM malignancy by inducing aberrant cell proliferation and invasion. The tumor suppressor p53 has a potential non-cell autonomous function by modulating the expression of secreted proteins that influence neighbor cells. In this work, we investigated the role of p53 on the crosstalk between GBM cells and astrocytes. We show that extracellular matrix (ECM) from p53+/− astrocytes is richer in laminin and fibronectin, compared with ECM from p53+/+ astrocytes. In addition, ECM from p53+/− astrocytes increases the survival and the expression of mesenchymal markers in GBM cells, which suggests haploinsufficient phenotype of the p53+/– microenvironment. Importantly, conditioned medium from GBM cells blocks the expression of p53 in p53+/+ astrocytes, even when DNA was damaged. These results suggest that GBM cells create a dysfunctional microenvironment based on the impairment of p53 expression that in turns exacerbates tumor endurance. PMID:25329722

  1. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-01-01

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells. PMID:28208646

  2. Regulation of neuronal P53 activity by CXCR4

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Muhammad Z.; Shimizu, Saori; Patel, Jeegar P.; Nelson, Autumn; Le, My-Thao; Mullen-Przeworski, Anna; Brandimarti, Renato; Fatatis, Alessandro; Meucci, Olimpia

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal activation of CXCR4 during inflammatory/infectious states may lead to neuronal dysfunction or damage. The major goal of this study was to determine the coupling of CXCR4 to p53-dependent survival pathways in primary neurons. Neurons were stimulated with the HIV envelope protein gp120IIIB or the endogenous CXCR4 agonist, SDF-1α. We found that gp120 stimulates p53 activity and induces expression of the p53 pro-apoptotic target Apaf-1 in cultured neurons. Inhibition of CXCR4 by AMD3100 abrogates the effect of gp120 on both p53 and Apaf-1. Moreover, gp120 neurotoxicity is markedly reduced by the p53-inhibitor, pifithrin-α. The viral protein also regulates p53 phosphorylation and expression of other p53-responsive genes, such as MDM2 and p21. Conversely, SDF-1α, which can promote neuronal survival, increases p53 acetylation and p21 expression in neurons. Thus, the stimulation of different p53 targets could be instrumental in determining the outcome of CXCR4 activation on neuronal survival in neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:16005638

  3. Recognition of Local DNA Structures by p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Coufal, Jan

    2017-02-10

    p53 plays critical roles in regulating cell cycle, apoptosis, senescence and metabolism and is commonly mutated in human cancer. These roles are achieved by interaction with other proteins, but particularly by interaction with DNA. As a transcription factor, p53 is well known to bind consensus target sequences in linear B-DNA. Recent findings indicate that p53 binds with higher affinity to target sequences that form cruciform DNA structure. Moreover, p53 binds very tightly to non-B DNA structures and local DNA structures are increasingly recognized to influence the activity of wild-type and mutant p53. Apart from cruciform structures, p53 binds to quadruplex DNA, triplex DNA, DNA loops, bulged DNA and hemicatenane DNA. In this review, we describe local DNA structures and summarize information about interactions of p53 with these structural DNA motifs. These recent data provide important insights into the complexity of the p53 pathway and the functional consequences of wild-type and mutant p53 activation in normal and tumor cells.

  4. p53-dependent NDRG1 expression induces inhibition of intestinal epithelial cell proliferation but not apoptosis after polyamine depletion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ai-Hong; Rao, Jaladanki N; Zou, Tongtong; Liu, Lan; Marasa, Bernard S; Xiao, Lan; Chen, Jie; Turner, Douglas J; Wang, Jian-Ying

    2007-07-01

    Normal intestinal mucosal growth requires polyamines that regulate expression of various genes involved in cell proliferation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. Our previous studies have shown that polyamine depletion stabilizes p53, resulting in inhibition of intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation, but the exact downstream targets of induced p53 are still unclear. The NDRG1 (N-myc downregulated gene-1) gene encodes a growth-related protein, and its transcription can be induced in response to stress. The current study tests the hypothesis that induced p53 inhibits IEC proliferation by upregulating NDRG1 expression following polyamine depletion. Depletion of cellular polyamines by inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) with alpha-difluoromethylornithine not only induced p53 but also increased NDRG1 transcription as indicated by induction of the NDRG1 promoter activity and increased levels of NDRG1 mRNA and protein, all of which were prevented by using specific p53 siRNA and in cells with a targeted deletion of p53. In contrast, increased levels of cellular polyamines by ectopic expression of the ODC gene decreased p53 and repressed expression of NDRG1. Consistently, polyamine depletion-induced activation of the NDRG1-promoter was decreased when p53-binding sites within the NDRG1 proximal promoter region were deleted. Ectopic expression of the wild-type NDRG1 gene inhibited DNA synthesis and decreased final cell numbers regardless of the presence or absence of endogenous p53, whereas silencing NDRG1 promoted cell growth. However, overexpression of NDRG1 failed to directly induce cell death and to alter susceptibility to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha/cycloheximide. These results indicate that NDRG1 is one of the direct mediators of induced p53 following polyamine depletion and that p53-dependent NDRG1 expression plays a critical role in the negative control of IEC proliferation.

  5. Cadherin-6 type 2, K-cadherin (CDH6) is regulated by mutant p53 in the fallopian tube but is not expressed in the ovarian surface.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Subbulakshmi; Lantvit, Daniel D; Chae, Dam Hee; Burdette, Joanna E

    2016-10-25

    High-grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is the most lethal gynecological malignancy and may arise in either the fallopian tube epithelium (FTE) or ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). A mutation in p53 is reported in 96% of HGSOC, most frequently at R273 and R248. The goal of this study was to identify specific gene targets in the FTE that are altered by mutant p53, but not in the OSE. Gene analysis revealed that both R273 and R248 mutant p53 reduces CDH6 expression in the oviduct, but CDH6 was not detected in murine OSE cells. p53R273H induced SLUG and FOXM1 while p53R248W did not induce SLUG and only modestly increased FOXM1, which correlated with less migration as compared to p53R273H. An oviduct specific PAX8Cre/+/p53R270H/+ mouse model was created and confirmed that in vivo mutant p53 repressed CDH6 but was not sufficient to stabilize p53 expression alone. Overexpression of mutant p53 in the p53 null OVCAR5 cells decreased CDH6 levels indicating this was a gain-of-function. SLUG knockdown in murine oviductal cells with p53R273H restored CDH6 repression and a ChIP analysis revealed direct binding of mutant p53 on the CDH6 promoter. NSC59984, a small molecule that degrades mutant p53R273H, rescued CDH6 expression. In summary, CDH6 is expressed in the oviduct, but not the ovary, and is repressed by mutant p53. CDH6 expression with further validations may aide in establishing markers that inform upon the cell of origin of high grade serous tumors.

  6. Prospective therapeutic applications of p53 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gudkov, Andrei V. . E-mail: gudkov@ccf.org; Komarova, Elena A.

    2005-06-10

    p53, in addition to being a key cancer preventive factor, is also a determinant of cancer treatment side effects causing excessive apoptotic death in several normal tissues during cancer therapy. p53 inhibitory strategy has been suggested to protect normal tissues from chemo- and radiotherapy, and to treat other pathologies associated with stress-mediated activation of p53. This strategy was validated by isolation and testing of small molecule p53 inhibitor pifithrin-{alpha} that demonstrated broad tissue protecting capacity. However, in some normal tissues and tumors p53 plays protective role by inducing growth arrest and preventing cells from premature entrance into mitosis and death from mitotic catastrophe. Inhibition of this function of p53 can sensitize tumor cells to chemo- and radiotherapy, thus opening new potential application of p53 inhibitors and justifying the need in pharmacological agents targeting specifically either pro-apoptotic or growth arrest functions of p53.

  7. Heat shock factor 1 deficiency via its downstream target gene αB-crystallin (Hspb5) impairs p53 degradation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiongjie; Moskophidis, Demetrius; Hu, Yanzhong; Phillips, Andrew; Mivechi, Nahid F.

    2009-01-01

    Heat shock factor Hsf1 regulates the stress-inducibility of heat shock proteins (Hsps) or molecular chaperones. One of the functions attributed to Hsps is their participation in folding and degradation of proteins. We recently showed that hsf1−/− cells accumulate ubiquitinated proteins. However, a direct role for Hsf1 in stability of specific proteins such as p53 has not been elucidated. We present evidence that cells deficient in hsf1 accumulate wild type p53 protein. We further show that hsf1−/− cells express lower levels of αB-crystallin and cells deficient in αB-crystallin also accumulate p53 protein. Reports indicate that αB-crystallin binds to Fbx4 ubiquitin ligase, and they target cyclin D1 for degradation through a pathway involving the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box) complex. Towards determining a mechanism for p53 degradation involving αB-crystallin and Hsf1, we have found that ectopic expression of Fbx4 in wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) expressing mutant p53 (p53R175H) leads to increase in its degradation, while MEFs deficient in hsf1 or αBcry are defective in degradation of this p53 protein. In addition, immunoprecipitated p53R175H from wild type MEFs is able to pull-down both αB-crystallin and Fbx4. Finally, immunoprecipitated wild type p53 from doxorubicin treated U2OS cells can pull-down endogenous αB-crystallin and Fbx4. These results indicate that hsf1- and αBcry- deficient cells accumulate p53 due to reduced levels of αB-crystallin in these cells. Elevated levels of p53 in hsf1- and αBcry- deficient cells lead to their increased sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. These data reveal a novel mechanism for protein degradation through Hsf1 and αB-crystallin. PMID:19343786

  8. Interaction of p53 with the human Rad51 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Buchhop, S; Gibson, M K; Wang, X W; Wagner, P; Stürzbecher, H W; Harris, C C

    1997-01-01

    p53 is thought to function in the maintenance of genomic stability by modulating transcription and interacting with cellular proteins to influence the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. p53 mutations occur in >50% of human cancers, and cells which lack wild type p53 accumulate karyotypic abnormalities such as amplifications, deletions, inversions and translocations. We propose that p53 hinders these promiscuous recombinational events by interacting with cellular recombination and repair machinery. We recently reported that p53 can directly bind in vivo to human Rad51 (hRad51) protein and in vitro to its bacterial homologue RecA. We used GST-fusion and his-tagged protein systems to further investigate the physical interaction between p53 and hRad51, homologue of the yeast Rad51 protein that is involved in recombination and DNA double strand repair. The hRad51 binds to wild-type p53 and to a lesser extent, point mutants 135Y, 249S and 273H. This binding is not mediated by a DNA or RNA intermediate. Mapping studies using a panel of p53 deletion mutants indicate that hRad51 could bind to two regions of p53; one between amino acids 94 and 160 and a second between 264 and 315. Addition of anti-p53 antibody PAb421 (epitope 372-381 amino acids) inhibited the interaction with hRad51. In contrast, p53 interacts with the region between aa 125 and 220 of hRad51, which is highly conserved among Rad51 related proteins from bacteria to human. In Escherichia coli ecA protein, this region is required for homo-oligomerization, suggesting that p53 might disrupt the interaction between RecA and Rad51 subunits, thus inhibiting biochemical functions of Rad51 like proteins. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that p53 interaction with hRAD51 may influence DNA recombination and repair and that additional modifications of p53 by mutation and protein binding may affect this interaction. PMID:9380510

  9. Increased toll-like receptors and p53 levels regulate apoptosis and angiogenesis in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: mechanism of action of P-MAPA biological response modifier.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Patrick Vianna; Seiva, Fábio Rodrigues Ferreira; Carniato, Amanda Pocol; de Mello Júnior, Wilson; Duran, Nelson; Macedo, Alda Maria; de Oliveira, Alexandre Gabarra; Romih, Rok; Nunes, Iseu da Silva; Nunes, Odilon da Silva; Fávaro, Wagner José

    2016-07-07

    The new modalities for treating patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) for whom BCG (Bacillus Calmette-Guerin) has failed or is contraindicated are recently increasing due to the development of new drugs. Although agents like mitomycin C and BCG are routinely used, there is a need for more potent and/or less-toxic agents. In this scenario, a new perspective is represented by P-MAPA (Protein Aggregate Magnesium-Ammonium Phospholinoleate-Palmitoleate Anhydride), developed by Farmabrasilis (non-profit research network). This study detailed and characterized the mechanisms of action of P-MAPA based on activation of mediators of Toll-like Receptors (TLRs) 2 and 4 signaling pathways and p53 in regulating angiogenesis and apoptosis in an animal model of NMIBC, as well as, compared these mechanisms with BCG treatment. Our results demonstrated the activation of the immune system by BCG (MyD88-dependent pathway) resulted in increased inflammatory cytokines. However, P-MAPA intravesical immunotherapy led to distinct activation of TLRs 2 and 4-mediated innate immune system, resulting in increased interferons signaling pathway (TRIF-dependent pathway), which was more effective in the NMIBC treatment. Interferon signaling pathway activation induced by P-MAPA led to increase of iNOS protein levels, resulting in apoptosis and histopathological recovery. Additionally, P-MAPA immunotherapy increased wild-type p53 protein levels. The increased wild-type p53 protein levels were fundamental to NO-induced apoptosis and the up-regulation of BAX. Furthermore, interferon signaling pathway induction and increased p53 protein levels by P-MAPA led to important antitumor effects, not only suppressing abnormal cell proliferation, but also by preventing continuous expansion of tumor mass through suppression of angiogenesis, which was characterized by decreased VEGF and increased endostatin protein levels. Thus, P-MAPA immunotherapy could be considered an important therapeutic

  10. p53 mutations promote proteasomal activity.

    PubMed

    Oren, Moshe; Kotler, Eran

    2016-07-27

    p53 mutations occur very frequently in human cancer. Besides abrogating the tumour suppressive functions of wild-type p53, many of those mutations also acquire oncogenic gain-of-function activities. Augmentation of proteasome activity is now reported as a common gain-of-function mechanism shared by different p53 mutants, which promotes cancer resistance to proteasome inhibitors.

  11. Molecular interplay between mutant p53 proteins and autophagy in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cordani, Marco; Butera, Giovanna; Pacchiana, Raffaella; Donadelli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of studies highlight the role of mutant p53 proteins in cancer cell growth and in the worsening of cancer patients' clinical outcome. Autophagy has been widely recognized as a main biological event involved in both the regulation of cancer cell proliferation and in the response of several anticancer drugs. A thorough analysis of scientific literature underlines the reciprocal interplay between mutant p53 proteins and autophagy regulation. In this review, we analytically summarize recent findings, which indicate that gain-of-function (GOF) mutant p53 proteins counteract the autophagic machinery by various molecular mechanisms including the regulation of AMPK and Akt/mTOR pathways, autophagy-related genes (ATGs), HIF-1α target genes, and the mitochondrial citrate carrier CIC. Moreover, we report that mutant p53 protein stability is affected by lysosome-mediated degradation through macroautophagy or chaperone-mediated autophagy, suggesting the use of autophagy stimulators to counteract mutant p53 oncogenic activity. Finally, we discuss the functional role of the interplay between mutant p53 proteins and autophagy in cancer progression, a fundamental knowledge to design more effective therapies against cancers bearing mutant TP53 gene.

  12. p53 and MDM2 in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Noon, Aidan P.; Vlatković, Nikolina; Polański, Radosław; Maguire, Maria; Shawki, Howida; Parsons, Keith; Boyd, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer and follows an unpredictable disease course. To improve prognostication, a better understanding of critical genes associated with disease progression is required. The objective of this review was to focus attention on 2 such genes, p53 and murine double minute 2 (MDM2), and to provide a comprehensive summary and critical analysis of the literature regarding these genes in RCC. Information was compiled by searching the PubMed database for articles that were published or e-published up to April 1, 2009. Search terms included renal cancer, renal cell carcinoma, p53, and MDM2. Full articles and any supplementary data were examined; and, when appropriate, references were checked for additional material. All studies that described assessment of p53 and/or MDM2 in renal cancer were included. The authors concluded that increased p53 expression, but not p53 mutation, is associated with reduced overall survival/more rapid disease progression in RCC. There also was evidence that MDM2 up-regulation is associated with decreased disease-specific survival. Two features of RCC stood out as unusual and will require further investigation. First, increased p53 expression is tightly linked with increased MDM2 expression; and, second, patients who have tumors that display increased p53 and MDM2 expression may have the poorest overall survival. Because there was no evidence to support the conclusion that p53 mutation is associated with poorer survival, it seemed clear that increased p53 expression in RCC occurs independent of mutation. Further investigation of the mechanisms leading to increased p53/MDM2 expression in RCC may lead to improved prognostication and to the identification of novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:20052733

  13. p53 downregulates the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jaber, Sara; Toufektchan, Eléonore; Lejour, Vincent; Bardot, Boris; Toledo, Franck

    2016-01-01

    Germline mutations affecting telomere maintenance or DNA repair may, respectively, cause dyskeratosis congenita or Fanconi anaemia, two clinically related bone marrow failure syndromes. Mice expressing p53Δ31, a mutant p53 lacking the C terminus, model dyskeratosis congenita. Accordingly, the increased p53 activity in p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts correlated with a decreased expression of 4 genes implicated in telomere syndromes. Here we show that these cells exhibit decreased mRNA levels for additional genes contributing to telomere metabolism, but also, surprisingly, for 12 genes mutated in Fanconi anaemia. Furthermore, p53Δ31/Δ31 fibroblasts exhibit a reduced capacity to repair DNA interstrand crosslinks, a typical feature of Fanconi anaemia cells. Importantly, the p53-dependent downregulation of Fanc genes is largely conserved in human cells. Defective DNA repair is known to activate p53, but our results indicate that, conversely, an increased p53 activity may attenuate the Fanconi anaemia DNA repair pathway, defining a positive regulatory feedback loop. PMID:27033104

  14. Expression of P53 protein after exposure to ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar, A. M.; Salvador, C.; Ruiz-Trejo, C.; Ostrosky, P.; Brandan, M. E.

    2001-10-01

    One of the most important tumor suppressor genes is p53 gene, which is involved in apoptotic cell death, cell differentiation and cell cycle arrest. The expression of p53 gene can be evaluated by determining the presence of P53 protein in cells using Western Blot assay with a chemiluminescent method. This technique has shown variabilities that are due to biological factors. Film developing process can influence the quality of the p53 bands obtained. We irradiated tumor cell lines and human peripheral lymphocytes with 137Cs and 60Co gamma rays to standardize irradiation conditions, to compare ionizing radiation with actinomycin D and to reduce the observed variability of P53 protein induction levels. We found that increasing radiation doses increase P53 protein induction while it decreases viability. We also conclude that ionizing radiation could serve as a positive control for Western Blot analysis of protein P53. In addition, our results show that the developing process may play an important role in the quality of P53 protein bands and data interpretation.

  15. Tetramerization-defects of p53 result in aberrant ubiquitylation and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Lang, Valérie; Pallara, Chiara; Zabala, Amaia; Lobato-Gil, Sofia; Lopitz-Otsoa, Fernando; Farrás, Rosa; Hjerpe, Roland; Torres-Ramos, Monica; Zabaleta, Lorea; Blattner, Christine; Hay, Ronald T; Barrio, Rosa; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Fernandez-Recio, Juan; Rodríguez, Manuel S; Aillet, Fabienne

    2014-07-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 regulates the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression, senescence and apoptosis. Here, we investigated the effect of single point mutations in the oligomerization domain (OD) on tetramerization, transcription, ubiquitylation and stability of p53. As predicted by docking and molecular dynamics simulations, p53 OD mutants show functional defects on transcription, Mdm2-dependent ubiquitylation and 26S proteasome-mediated degradation. However, mutants unable to form tetramers are well degraded by the 20S proteasome. Unexpectedly, despite the lower structural stability compared to WT p53, p53 OD mutants form heterotetramers with WT p53 when expressed transiently or stably in cells wild type or null for p53. In consequence, p53 OD mutants interfere with the capacity of WT p53 tetramers to be properly ubiquitylated and result in changes of p53-dependent protein expression patterns, including the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and PUMA under basal and adriamycin-induced conditions. Importantly, the patient derived p53 OD mutant L330R (OD1) showed the more severe changes in p53-dependent gene expression. Thus, in addition to the well-known effects on p53 stability, ubiquitylation defects promote changes in p53-dependent gene expression with implications on some of its functions.

  16. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  17. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protei...

  18. Measurement of the cellular deacetylase activity of SIRT1 on p53 via LanthaScreen® technology.

    PubMed

    Robers, Matthew B; Loh, Christine; Carlson, Coby B; Yang, Hongying; Frey, Elizabeth A; Hermanson, Spencer B; Bi, Kun

    2011-01-01

    Upon genomic insult, the tumor suppressor p53 is phosphorylated and acetylated at specific serine and lysine residues, increasing its stability and transactivation function. Deacetylases, including the type III histone deacetylase SIRT1, remove acetyl groups from p53 and counterbalance acetyltransferase activity during a DNA damage response. This report describes a series of high-throughput LanthaScreen® time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) immunoassays for detection of intracellular p53 phosphorylation of Ser15 and acetylation of Lys382 upon treatment with DNA damage agents, such as etoposide. These assays were used to measure the deacetylase activity of SIRT1 and/or Type I/II Histone deacetylases (HDACs). First, BacMam-mediated overexpression of SIRT1 resulted in dose-dependent deacetylation of GFP-p53 following etoposide treatment of U-2 OS cells, confirming that GFP-p53 serves as a SIRT1 substrate in this assay format. Further, overexpression of the acetyltransferase p300 via BacMam increased the acetylation of GFP-p53 at Lys382. Next, siRNA-mediated knockdown of SIRT1 resulted in increased GFP-p53 acetylation, indicating that endogenous SIRT1 activity can also be measured in U-2 OS cells. Consistent with these results, GFP-p53 acetylation was also increased upon treatment of cells with a small-molecule inhibitor of SIRT1, EX-527. The effect of this compound was dramatically increased when used in combination with chemotherapeutic drug and/or the HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A, confirming a proposed synergistic mechanism of p53 deacetylation by SIRT1 and Type I/II HDACs. Taken together, the cellular assays described here can be used as high-throughput alternatives to traditional immunoassays such as western blotting for identifying pharmacological modulators of specific p53-modifying enzymes.

  19. Targeting p53-MDM2-MDMX Loop for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Shelya X.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in anti-tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. It has been described as “the guardian of the genome”, because it is essential for conserving genomic stability by preventing mutation, and its mutation and inactivation are highly related to all human cancers. Two important p53 regulators, MDM2 and MDMX, inactivate p53 by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its ubiquitination in a feedback fashion, as their genes are also the transcriptional targets of p53. On account of the importance of the p53-MDM2- MDMX loop in the initiation and development of wild type p53-containing tumors, intensive studies over the past decade have been aiming to identify small molecules or peptides that could specifically target individual protein molecules of this pathway for developing better anti-cancer therapeutics. In this chapter, we review the approaches for screening and discovering efficient and selective MDM2 inhibitors with emphasis on the most advanced synthetic small molecules that interfere with the p53-MDM2 interaction and are currently on Phase I clinical trials. Other therapeutically useful strategies targeting this loop, which potentially improve the prospects of cancer therapy and prevention, will also be discussed briefly. PMID:25201201

  20. p53-dependent and p53-independent anticancer activity of a new indole derivative in human osteosarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cappadone, C.; Stefanelli, C.; Malucelli, E.; Zini, M.; Onofrillo, C.; Locatelli, A.; Rambaldi, M.; Sargenti, A.; Merolle, L.; Farruggia, G.; Graziadio, A.; Montanaro, L.; Iotti, S.

    2015-11-13

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumor of bone, occurring most frequently in children and adolescents. The mechanism of formation and development of OS have been studied for a long time. Tumor suppressor pathway governed by p53 gene are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of osteosarcoma. Moreover, loss of wild-type p53 activity is thought to be a major predictor of failure to respond to chemotherapy in various human cancers. In previous studies, we described the activity of a new indole derivative, NSC743420, belonging to the tubulin inhibitors family, capable to induce apoptosis and arrest of the cell cycle in the G2/M phase of various cancer cell lines. However, this molecule has never been tested on OS cell line. Here we address the activity of NSC743420 by examine whether differences in the p53 status could influence its effects on cell proliferation and death of OS cells. In particular, we compared the effect of the tested molecule on p53-wild type and p53-silenced U2OS cells, and on SaOS2 cell line, which is null for p53. Our results demonstrated that NSC743420 reduces OS cell proliferation by p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. In particular, the molecule induces proliferative arrest that culminate to apoptosis in SaOS2 p53-null cells, while it brings a cytostatic and differentiating effect in U2OS cells, characterized by the cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase and increased alkaline phosphatase activity. - Highlights: • The indole derivative NSC743420 induces antitumor effects on osteosarcoma cells. • p53 status could drive the activity of antitumor agents on osteosarcoma cells. • NSC743420 induces cytostatic and differentiating effects on U2OS cells. • NSC743420 causes apoptosis on p53-null SaOS2 cells.

  1. The role of the p53 protein in nitrosative stress-induced apoptosis of PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Varga, Judit; Bátor, Judit; Péter, Márton; Árvai, Zita; Pap, Marianna; Sétáló, György; Szeberényi, József

    2014-10-01

    PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells are widely used to investigate signaling pathways. The p143p53PC12 cell line expresses a Val143Ala mutant p53 protein that is less capable of binding to the p53 consensus site in DNA than its wild-type counterpart. Nitric oxide (NO), depending on its concentration, is able to activate several signal transduction pathways. We used sodium nitroprusside (SNP), an NO donor compound, to analyze NO-induced cellular stress in order to clarify the mechanism and role of nitrosative stress in pathological processes, including inflammation and cancer. SNP caused cell death when applied at a concentration of 400 μM, p143p53PC12 cells showing higher sensitivity than wild-type PC12 cells. The mechanisms leading to the increased SNP-sensitivity of p143p53PC12 cells were then investigated. The 400-μM SNP treatment caused stress kinase activation, phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor eIF2α and p53 protein, proteolytic activation of protein kinase R, caspase-9, and caspase-3, p53 stabilization, CHOP induction, cytochrome c release from mitochondria, and a decline in the level of the Bcl-2 protein in both cell lines. All these SNP-induced changes were more robust and/or permanent in cells with the mutant p53 protein. We thus conclude that (1) the main cause of the SNP-induced apoptosis of PC12 cells is the repression of the bcl-2 gene, evoked through p53 stabilization, stress kinase activation, and CHOP induction; (2) the higher SNP sensitivity of p143p53PC12 cells is the consequence of the stronger and earlier activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

  2. E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 negatively regulates tumor suppressor p53 to promote tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju; Zhang, C; Wang, X L; Ly, P; Belyi, V; Xu-Monette, Z Y; Young, K H; Hu, W; Feng, Z

    2014-11-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 has a key role in maintaining genomic stability and preventing tumorigenesis through its regulation of cellular stress responses, including apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence. To ensure its proper levels and functions in cells, p53 is tightly regulated mainly through post-translational modifications, such as ubiquitination. Here, we identified E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 as a novel p53 target gene and negative regulator to regulate p53-mediated stress responses. In response to stress, such as DNA damage, p53 binds to the p53 responsive element in the promoter of the TRIM32 gene and transcriptionally induces the expression of TRIM32 in cells. In turn, TRIM32 interacts with p53 and promotes p53 degradation through ubiquitination. Thus, TRIM32 negatively regulates p53-mediated apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and senescence in response to stress. TRIM32 is frequently overexpressed in different types of human tumors. TRIM32 overexpression promotes cell oncogenic transformation and tumorigenesis in mice in a largely p53-dependent manner. Taken together, our results demonstrated that as a novel p53 target and a novel negative regulator for p53, TRIM32 has an important role in regulation of p53 and p53-mediated cellular stress responses. Furthermore, our results also revealed that impairing p53 function is a novel mechanism for TRIM32 in tumorigenesis.

  3. Long Noncoding RNA PURPL Suppresses Basal p53 Levels and Promotes Tumorigenicity in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao Ling; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Chaudhary, Ritu; Singh, Deepak K; Zong, Xinying; Gryder, Berkley; Sindri, Sivasish; Mo, Min; Schetter, Aaron; Wen, Xinyu; Parvathaneni, Swetha; Kazandjian, Dickran; Jenkins, Lisa M; Tang, Wei; Elloumi, Fathi; Martindale, Jennifer L; Huarte, Maite; Zhu, Yuelin; Robles, Ana I; Frier, Susan M; Rigo, Frank; Cam, Maggie; Ambs, Stefan; Sharma, Sudha; Harris, Curtis C; Dasso, Mary; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Lal, Ashish

    2017-09-05

    Basal p53 levels are tightly suppressed under normal conditions. Disrupting this regulation results in elevated p53 levels to induce cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and tumor suppression. Here, we report the suppression of basal p53 levels by a nuclear, p53-regulated long noncoding RNA that we termed PURPL (p53 upregulated regulator of p53 levels). Targeted depletion of PURPL in colorectal cancer cells results in elevated basal p53 levels and induces growth defects in cell culture and in mouse xenografts. PURPL associates with MYBBP1A, a protein that binds to and stabilizes p53, and inhibits the formation of the p53-MYBBP1A complex. In the absence of PURPL, MYBBP1A interacts with and stabilizes p53. Silencing MYBBP1A significantly rescues basal p53 levels and proliferation in PURPL-deficient cells, suggesting that MYBBP1A mediates the effect of PURPL in regulating p53. These results reveal a p53-PURPL auto-regulatory feedback loop and demonstrate a role for PURPL in maintaining basal p53 levels. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. E3 ubiquitin ligase Cullin4B mediated polyubiquitination of p53 for its degradation.

    PubMed

    Thirunavukarasou, Anand; Singh, Prachi; Govindarajalu, Gokulapriya; Bandi, Venkateshwarlu; Baluchamy, Sudhakar

    2014-05-01

    Controlled protein ubiquitination through E3 ubiquitin ligases and degradation via 26S proteasome machinery is required for orderly progression through cell cycle, chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and development. Each cullin-dependent ubiquitin ligase (E3) complex can recruit various substrates for their degradation. Cullin 4A (CUL4A) and Cullin 4B (CUL4B) are members of cullin family proteins that mediate ubiquitin dependent proteolysis. Though, these two cul4 genes are functionally redundant, Cullin 4B is not a substitute for all the Cullin 4A functions. Published report has shown that CUL4A interacts with p53 and induces its decay. Although, CUL4A has been known to control several cellular processes, little is known about CUL4B functions. Therefore, in this study, we analyzed the role of CUL4B on p53 polyubiquitination. Our stable cell line and transient transfection studies show that CUL4B indeed interacts with p53 and induces its polyubiquitination. Importantly, both CUL4A and CUL4B overexpressing cells show almost equal levels of p53 polyubiquitination. Moreover, we observed an increased level of polyubiquitination on p53 in CUL4B overexpressing stable cell line upon treatment with siRNA specific for CUL4A indicating that CUL4B plays a vital role in p53 stability. In addition, we have observed the differential expression of CUL4B in various eukaryotic cell lines and mouse tissues suggesting the important role of CUL4B in various tissues. Together, these observations establish an important negative regulatory role of CUL4B on p53 stability.

  5. p53-independent death and p53-induced protection against apoptosis in fibroblasts treated with chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Malcomson, R. D.; Oren, M.; Wyllie, A. H.; Harrison, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Many recent studies have implicated p53 in the cellular response to injury and induction of cell death by apoptosis. In a rat embryonal fibroblast cell line transformed with c-Ha-ras and a mutant temperature-sensitive p53 (val135), cells were G1 arrested at the permissive temperature of 32 degrees C when overexpressed p53 was in wild-type conformation. In this state cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by etoposide (at up to 50 microM) or bleomycin (15 microU ml-1). Cells at 37 degrees C with overexpressed p53 in mutant conformation were freed from this growth arrest, continued proliferating and showed dose-dependent increases in apoptosis. This death is independent of wild-type p53 function. Control cells containing a non-temperature-sensitive mutant p53 (phe132) were sensitive to both etoposide and bleomycin after 24 h at 32 degrees C and 37 degrees C, indicating that the results are not simply due to temperature effects on pharmacokinetics or DNA damage. Our data show that induction of a stable p53-mediated growth arrest renders these cells much less likely to undergo apoptosis in response to certain anti-cancer drugs, and we conclude that the regulatory role of p53 in apoptosis is influenced by the particular cellular context in which this gene is expressed. PMID:7547247

  6. Limiting the power of p53 through the ubiquitin proteasome pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pant, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome pathway is critical in restraining the activities of the p53 tumor suppressor. Numerous E3 and E4 ligases regulate p53 levels. Additionally, deubquitinating enzymes that modify p53 directly or indirectly also impact p53 function. When alterations of these proteins result in increased p53 activity, cells arrest in the cell cycle, senesce, or apoptose. On the other hand, alterations that result in decreased p53 levels yield tumor-prone phenotypes. This review focuses on the physiological relevance of these important regulators of p53 and their therapeutic implications. PMID:25128494

  7. MPI depletion enhances O-GlcNAcylation of p53 and suppresses the Warburg effect

    PubMed Central

    Shtraizent, Nataly; DeRossi, Charles; Nayar, Shikha; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Katz, Liora S; Prince, Adam; Koh, Anna P; Vincek, Adam; Hadas, Yoav; Hoshida, Yujin; Scott, Donald K; Eliyahu, Efrat; Freeze, Hudson H; Sadler, Kirsten C; Chu, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Rapid cellular proliferation in early development and cancer depends on glucose metabolism to fuel macromolecule biosynthesis. Metabolic enzymes are presumed regulators of this glycolysis-driven metabolic program, known as the Warburg effect; however, few have been identified. We uncover a previously unappreciated role for Mannose phosphate isomerase (MPI) as a metabolic enzyme required to maintain Warburg metabolism in zebrafish embryos and in both primary and malignant mammalian cells. The functional consequences of MPI loss are striking: glycolysis is blocked and cells die. These phenotypes are caused by induction of p53 and accumulation of the glycolytic intermediate fructose 6-phosphate, leading to engagement of the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway (HBP), increased O-GlcNAcylation, and p53 stabilization. Inhibiting the HBP through genetic and chemical methods reverses p53 stabilization and rescues the Mpi-deficient phenotype. This work provides mechanistic evidence by which MPI loss induces p53, and identifies MPI as a novel regulator of p53 and Warburg metabolism. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22477.001 PMID:28644127

  8. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    PubMed

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  9. Identification of p53 in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Vaseva, Angelina V; Moll, Ute M

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a master regulator of cell death pathways and has transcription-dependent and transcription-independent modes of action. Mitochondria are major signal transducers in apoptosis and are critical for p53-dependent cell death. Our lab and others have discovered that a fraction of stress-induced wild-type p53 protein rapidly translocates to mitochondria upon various stress stimuli and exerts p53-dependent apoptosis. Suborganellar localization by various methods shows that p53 localizes to the surface of mitochondria. Direct targeting of p53 to mitochondria is sufficient to induce apoptosis in p53-null cells, without requiring further DNA damage. Recently, p53 has been also shown to localize to other mitochondrial compartments such as the mitochondrial matrix where it plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial genome integrity. Here, we describe subcellular fractionation as a classic technique for detecting mitochondrial p53 in cell extracts. It consists of cell homogenization by hypo-osmotic swelling, removal of nuclear components by low-speed centrifugation, and mitochondrial isolation by a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. Additionally, we describe a method for submitochondrial fractionation, performed by phosphate buffer mediated swelling/shrinking. p53 and other mitochondrial proteins can then be detected by standard immunoblotting procedures. The quality of mitochondrial isolates/subfractions can be verified for purity and intactness.

  10. p53 regulates the cardiac transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Tak W.; Hauck, Ludger; Grothe, Daniela; Billia, Filio

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor Trp53 (p53) inhibits cell growth after acute stress by regulating gene transcription. The mammalian genome contains hundreds of p53-binding sites. However, whether p53 participates in the regulation of cardiac tissue homeostasis under normal conditions is not known. To examine the physiologic role of p53 in adult cardiomyocytes in vivo, Cre-loxP–mediated conditional gene targeting in adult mice was used. Genome-wide transcriptome analyses of conditional heart-specific p53 knockout mice were performed. Genome-wide annotation and pathway analyses of >5,000 differentially expressed transcripts identified many p53-regulated gene clusters. Correlative analyses identified >20 gene sets containing more than 1,000 genes relevant to cardiac architecture and function. These transcriptomic changes orchestrate cardiac architecture, excitation-contraction coupling, mitochondrial biogenesis, and oxidative phosphorylation capacity. Interestingly, the gene expression signature in p53-deficient hearts confers resistance to acute biomechanical stress. The data presented here demonstrate a role for p53, a previously unrecognized master regulator of the cardiac transcriptome. The complex contributions of p53 define a biological paradigm for the p53 regulator network in the heart under physiological conditions. PMID:28193895

  11. Benzyl Isothiocyanate potentiates p53 signaling and antitumor effects against breast cancer through activation of p53-LKB1 and p73-LKB1 axes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Bei; Nagalingam, Arumugam; Kuppusamy, Panjamurthy; Muniraj, Nethaji; Langford, Peter; Győrffy, Balázs; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Sharma, Dipali

    2017-01-01

    Functional reactivation of p53 pathway, although arduous, can potentially provide a broad-based strategy for cancer therapy owing to frequent p53 inactivation in human cancer. Using a phosphoprotein-screening array, we found that Benzyl Isothiocynate, (BITC) increases p53 phosphorylation in breast cancer cells and reveal an important role of ERK and PRAS40/MDM2 in BITC-mediated p53 activation. We show that BITC rescues and activates p53-signaling network and inhibits growth of p53-mutant cells. Mechanistically, BITC induces p73 expression in p53-mutant cells, disrupts the interaction of p73 and mutant-p53, thereby releasing p73 from sequestration and allowing it to be transcriptionally active. Furthermore, BITC-induced p53 and p73 axes converge on tumor-suppressor LKB1 which is transcriptionally upregulated by p53 and p73 in p53-wild-type and p53-mutant cells respectively; and in a feed-forward mechanism, LKB1 tethers with p53 and p73 to get recruited to p53-responsive promoters. Analyses of BITC-treated xenografts using LKB1-null cells corroborate in vitro mechanistic findings and establish LKB1 as the key node whereby BITC potentiates as well as rescues p53-pathway in p53-wild-type as well as p53-mutant cells. These data provide first in vitro and in vivo evidence of the integral role of previously unrecognized crosstalk between BITC, p53/LKB1 and p73/LKB1 axes in breast tumor growth-inhibition. PMID:28071670

  12. p53 pathway determines the cellular response to alcohol-induced DNA damage in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Howard, Erin W.; Guo, Zhiying; Parris, Amanda B.; Yang, Xiaohe

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is associated with increased breast cancer risk; however, the underlying mechanisms that contribute to mammary tumor initiation and progression are unclear. Alcohol is known to induce oxidative stress and DNA damage; likewise, p53 is a critical modulator of the DNA repair pathway and ensures genomic integrity. p53 mutations are frequently detected in breast and other tumors. The impact of alcohol on p53 is recognized, yet the role of p53 in alcohol-induced mammary carcinogenesis remains poorly defined. In our study, we measured alcohol-mediated oxidative DNA damage in MCF-7 cells using 8-OHdG and p-H2AX foci formation assays. p53 activity and target gene expression after alcohol exposure were determined using p53 luciferase reporter assay, qPCR, and Western blotting. A mechanistic study delineating the role of p53 in DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest was based on isogenic MCF-7 cells stably transfected with control (MCF-7/Con) or p53-targeting siRNA (MCF-7/sip53), and MCF-7 cells that were pretreated with Nutlin-3 (Mdm2 inhibitor) to stabilize p53. Alcohol treatment resulted in significant DNA damage in MCF-7 cells, as indicated by increased levels of 8-OHdG and p-H2AX foci number. A p53-dependent signaling cascade was stimulated by alcohol-induced DNA damage. Moderate to high concentrations of alcohol (0.1–0.8% v/v) induced p53 activation, as indicated by increased p53 phosphorylation, reporter gene activity, and p21/Bax gene expression, which led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest. Importantly, compared to MCF-7/Con cells, alcohol-induced DNA damage was significantly enhanced, while alcohol-induced p21/Bax expression and cell cycle arrest were attenuated in MCF-7/sip53 cells. In contrast, inhibition of p53 degradation via Nutlin-3 reinforced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in MCF-7 control cells. Our study suggests that functional p53 plays a critical role in cellular responses to alcohol-induced DNA damage, which protects the cells from DNA damage

  13. p53-independent increase in p21WAF1 and reciprocal down-regulation of cyclin A and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in bromodeoxyuridine-mediated growth arrest of human melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Strasberg Rieber, M; Welch, D R; Miele, M E; Rieber, M

    1996-02-01

    Differentially regulated expression of activators and inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinases (cdks) modulate cell cycle progression. In normal fibroblasts, these complexes consist of the cdk inhibitor p21WAF1/PCNA/G1 cyclin/cdk. We now show that bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd), a thymidine analogue and radiation sensitizer, inhibits growth and activity of cyclin A-cdk2 kinase in metastatic C8161 and nonmetastatic neo 6.3/C8161 human melanoma cells. Inhibition is not due to altered levels of cyclin D or catalytic cdk2 but involves a decrease in cyclin A and proliferating cell nuclear antigen, paralleled by higher levels of p21WAF1 without increases in p53. In contrast to serum starvation, which prevents accumulation of cyclins A and D in normal fibroblasts, such treatment did not down-regulate either cyclin in these melanoma cells, implying an aberrant control for G1 cyclins in these tumor cells. However, cyclin A was decreased by BrdUrd, suggesting that this pyrimidine analogue arrests melanoma cells at a G1 transition point, unlike that of serum starvation. This is the first report indicating that the antitumor therapeutic action of BrdUrd may be mediated by a p53-independent reciprocal effect on activators and inhibitors of cdk kinases.

  14. The expanding universe of p53 targets.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Daniel; Inga, Alberto; Resnick, Michael A

    2009-10-01

    The p53 tumour suppressor is modified through mutation or changes in expression in most cancers, leading to the altered regulation of hundreds of genes that are directly influenced by this sequence-specific transcription factor. Central to the p53 master regulatory network are the target response element (RE) sequences. The extent of p53 transactivation and transcriptional repression is influenced by many factors, including p53 levels, cofactors and the specific RE sequences, all of which contribute to the role that p53 has in the aetiology of cancer. This Review describes the identification and functionality of REs and highlights the inclusion of non-canonical REs that expand the universe of genes and regulation mechanisms in the p53 tumour suppressor network.

  15. p53 mutation heterogeneity in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Soussi, T. . E-mail: thierry.soussi@free.fr; Lozano, G.

    2005-06-10

    The p53 gene is inactivated in about 50% of human cancers and the p53 protein is an essential component of the cell response induced by genotoxic stresses such as those generated by radiotherapy or chemotherapy. It is therefore highly likely that these alterations are an important component in tumor resistance to therapy. The particular characteristics of these alterations, 80% of which are missense mutations leading to functionally heterogeneous proteins, make p53 a unique gene in the class of tumor suppressor genes. A considerable number of mutant p53 proteins probably have an oncogenic activity per se and therefore actively participate in cell transformation. The fact that the apoptotic and antiproliferative functions of p53 can be dissociated in certain mutants also suggests another level of complexity in the relationships between p53 inactivation and neoplasia.

  16. Functionalized Graphene Oxide as a Nanocarrier in a Multienzyme Labeling Amplification Strategy for Ultrasensitive Electrochemical Immunoassay of Phosphorylated p53 (S392)

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Dan; Wang, Limin; Shao, Yuyan; Wang, Jun; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-01-06

    P53 phosphorylation plays an important role in many biological processes and might be used as a potential biomarker in clinical diagnoses. We report a new electrochemical immunosensor for ultrasensitive detection of phosphorylated p53 at Ser392 (phospho-p53-392) based on graphene oxide (GO) as a nanocarrier in multienzymes amplification strategy. Greatly enhanced sensitivity was achieved by using the bioconjugates featuring horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and p53392 signal antibody (p53Ab2) linked to functionalized GO (HRP-p53Ab2-GO) at high ratio of HRP/p53Ab2. After a sandwich immunoreaction, the HRP-p53Ab2-GO captured onto the electrode surface produced an amplified electrocatalytic response by the reduction of enzymatically oxidized thionine in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. The increase of response current was proportional to the phospho-p53 concentration in the range of 0.02 to 2 nM with the detection limit of 0.01 nM, which was 10-fold lower than that of traditional sandwich electrochemical measurement for p53. The amplified immunoassay developed in this work shows acceptable stability and reproducibility and the assay results for phospho-p53 spiked in human plasma also show good recovery (92%~103.8%). This simple and low-cost immunosensor shows great promise for detection of other phosphorylated proteins and clinical applications.

  17. p53MVA therapy in patients with refractory gastrointestinal malignancies elevates p53-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Hardwick, Nicola R; Carrol, Mary; Kaltcheva, Teodora; Qian, Dajun; Lim, Dean; Leong, Lucille; Chu, Peiguo; Kim, Joseph; Chao, Joseph; Fakih, Marwan; Yen, Yun; Espenschied, Jonathan; Ellenhorn, Joshua D I; Diamond, Don J; Chung, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To conduct a Phase I trial of a Modified Vaccinia Ankara vaccine delivering wild type human p53 (p53MVA) in patients with refractory gastrointestinal cancers. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Three patients were vaccinated with 1.0 × 108 pfu p53MVA followed by nine patients at 5.6 × 108 pfu. Toxicity was classified using the NCI Common Toxicity Criteria and clinical responses were assessed by CT scan. Peripheral blood samples were collected pre- and post-immunization for immunophenotyping, monitoring of p53MVA induced immune response and examination of PD-1 checkpoint inhibition in vitro. RESULTS: p53MVA immunization was well tolerated at both doses, with no adverse events above grade 2. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells showing enhanced recognition of a p53 overlapping peptide library were detectable after the first immunization, particularly in the CD8+ T cell compartment (p=0.03). However in most patients this did not expand further with the second and third immunization. The frequency of PD-1+ T cells detectable in patients PBMC was significantly higher than in healthy controls. Furthermore, the frequency of PD-1+ CD8+ T cells showed an inverse correlation with the peak CD8+ p53 response (p=0.02) and antibody blockade of PD-1 in vitro increased the p53 immune responses detected after the second or third immunizations. Induction of strong T cell and antibody responses to the MVA backbone were also apparent. CONCLUSION: p53MVA was well tolerated and induced robust CD8+ T cell responses. Combination of p53MVA with immune checkpoint inhibition could help sustain immune responses and lead to enhanced clinical benefit. PMID:24987057

  18. Increases in apoptosis, caspase activity and expression of p53 and bax, and the transition between two types of mitochondrion-rich cells, in the gills of the climbing perch, Anabas testudineus, during a progressive acclimation from freshwater to seawater

    PubMed Central

    Ching, Biyun; Chen, Xiu L.; Yong, Jing H. A.; Wilson, Jonathan M.; Hiong, Kum C.; Sim, Eugene W. L.; Wong, Wai P.; Lam, Siew H.; Chew, Shit F.; Ip, Yuen K.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to test the hypothesis that branchial osmoregulatory acclimation involved increased apoptosis and replacement of mitochdonrion-rich cells (MRCs) in the climbing perch, Anabas testudineus, during a progressive acclimation from freshwater to seawater. A significant increase in branchial caspase-3/-7 activity was observed on day 4 (salinity 20), and an extensive TUNEL-positive apoptosis was detected on day 5 (salinity 25), indicating salinity-induced apoptosis had occurred. This was further supported by an up-regulation of branchial mRNA expression of p53, a key regulator of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, between day 2 (salinity 10) and day 6 (seawater), and an increase in branchial p53 protein abundance on day 6. Seawater acclimation apparently activated both the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, as reflected by significant increases in branchial caspase-8 and caspase-9 activities. The involvement of the intrinsic pathway was confirmed by the significant increase in branchial mRNA expression of bax between day 4 (salinity 20) and day 6 (seawater). Western blotting results revealed the presence of a freshwater Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka) α-isoform, Nka α1a, and a seawater isoform, Nka α1b, the protein abundance of which decreased and increased, respectively, during seawater acclimation. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed the presence of two types of MRCs distinctly different in sizes, and confirmed that the reduction in Nka α1a expression, and the prominent increases in expression of Nka α1b, Na+:K+:2Cl− cotransporter 1, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel coincided with the salinity-induced apoptotic event. Since modulation of existing MRCs alone could not have led to extensive salinity-induced apoptosis, it is probable that some, if not all, freshwater-type MRCs could have been removed through increased apoptosis and subsequently replaced by seawater-type MRCs in the gills of A. testudineus during seawater

  19. p53-Induced inflammation exacerbates cardiac dysfunction during pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yohko; Shimizu, Ippei; Katsuumi, Goro; Jiao, Shuang; Suda, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Yuka; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-08-01

    The rates of death and disability caused by severe heart failure are still unacceptably high. There is evidence that the sterile inflammatory response has a critical role in the progression of cardiac remodeling in the failing heart. The p53 signaling pathway has been implicated in heart failure, but the pathological link between p53 and inflammation in the failing heart is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate a critical role of p53-induced inflammation in heart failure. Expression of p53 was increased in cardiac endothelial cells and bone marrow cells in response to pressure overload, leading to up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) expression by endothelial cells and integrin expression by bone marrow cells. Deletion of p53 from endothelial cells or bone marrow cells significantly reduced ICAM1 or integrin expression, respectively, as well as decreasing cardiac inflammation and ameliorating systolic dysfunction during pressure overload. Conversely, overexpression of p53 in bone marrow cells led to an increase of integrin expression and cardiac inflammation that reduced systolic function. Norepinephrine markedly increased p53 expression in endothelial cells and macrophages. Reducing β2-adrenergic receptor expression in endothelial cells or bone marrow cells attenuated cardiac inflammation and improved systolic dysfunction during pressure overload. These results suggest that activation of the sympathetic nervous system promotes cardiac inflammation by up-regulating ICAM1 and integrin expression via p53 signaling to exacerbate cardiac dysfunction. Inhibition of p53-induced inflammation may be a novel therapeutic strategy for heart failure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer radiosensitizes H1299 cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Zhang, Hong; Duan, Xin; Hao, Jifang; Xie, Yi; Zhou, Qingming; Wang, Yanling; Tian, Yuan; Wang, Tao

    2009-02-01

    To determine whether adenovirus-mediated wild-type p53 transfer after radiotherapy could radiosensitize non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells to subclinical-dose carbon-ion beam (C-beam), H1299 cells were exposed to a C-beam or gamma-ray and then infected with 5 MOI of AdCMV-p53 or GFP (C-beam or gamma-ray with p53 or GFP). Cell cycle was detected by flow cytometric analysis. The apoptosis was examined by a fluorescent microscope with DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation was monitored by the TUNEL assay. P53 mRNA was detected by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The expression of p53, MDM(2), and p21 was monitored by Western blot. Survival fractions were determined by colony-forming assay. The percentages of G(1)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 8.2%-16.0%, 5.2%-7.0%, and 5.8%-18.9%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The accumulation of G(2)-phase cells in C-beam with p53 increased by 5.7%-8.9% and 8.8%-14.8%, compared with those in gamma-ray with p53 or p53 only, respectively. The percentage of apoptosis for C-beam with p53 increased by 7.4%-19.1%, 5.8%-11.7%, and 5.2 %-19.2%, respectively, compared with C-beam only, gamma-ray with p53, or p53 only. The level of p53 mRNA in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in p53 only. The expression level of p53 and p21 in C-beam with p53 was significantly higher than that in both C-beam with GFP and p53 only. The survival fractions for C-beam with p53 were significantly less than those for the other groups (p < 0.05). The data suggested that AdCMV-p53 transfer could more efficiently radiosensitize H1299 cells to subclinical-dose C-beam irradiation through the restoration of p53 function.

  1. Mutant p53 accumulation in human breast cancer is not an intrinsic property or dependent on structural or functional disruption but is regulated by exogenous stress and receptor status.

    PubMed

    Bouchalova, Pavla; Nenutil, Rudolf; Muller, Petr; Hrstka, Roman; Appleyard, M Virginia; Murray, Karen; Jordan, Lee B; Purdie, Colin A; Quinlan, Philip; Thompson, Alastair M; Vojtesek, Borivoj; Coates, Philip J

    2014-07-01

    Many human cancers contain missense TP53 mutations that result in p53 protein accumulation. Although generally considered as a single class of mutations that abrogate wild-type function, individual TP53 mutations may have specific properties and prognostic effects. Tumours that contain missense TP53 mutations show variable p53 stabilization patterns, which may reflect the specific mutation and/or aspects of tumour biology. We used immunohistochemistry on cell lines and human breast cancers with known TP53 missense mutations and assessed the effects of each mutation with four structure-function prediction methods. Cell lines with missense TP53 mutations show variable percentages of cells with p53 stabilization under normal growth conditions, ranging from approximately 50% to almost 100%. Stabilization is not related to structural or functional disruption, but agents that stabilize wild-type p53 increase the percentages of cells showing missense mutant p53 accumulation in cell lines with heterogeneous stabilization. The same heterogeneity of p53 stabilization occurs in primary breast cancers, independent of the effect of the mutation on structural properties or functional disruption. Heterogeneous accumulation is more common in steroid receptor-positive or HER2-positive breast cancers and cell lines than in triple-negative samples. Immunohistochemcal staining patterns associate with Mdm2 levels, proliferation, grade and overall survival, whilst the type of mutation reflects downstream target activity. Inhibiting Mdm2 activity increases the extent of p53 stabilization in some, but not all, breast cancer cell lines. The data indicate that missense mutant p53 stabilization is a complex and variable process in human breast cancers that associates with disease characteristics but is unrelated to structural or functional properties. That agents which stabilize wild-type p53 also stabilize mutant p53 has implications for patients with heterogeneous mutant p53 accumulation

  2. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53

    PubMed Central

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M. Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M.; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53-/- cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53. PMID:18454141

  3. Detection of mitochondrial localization of p53.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Motohiro; Moll, Ute M

    2003-01-01

    p53 is a master regulator of cell death pathways and has transcription-dependent and transcription- independent modes of action. Mitochondria are major signal transducers in apoptosis and are critical for p53-dependent cell death. Recently, we discovered that a fraction of stress-induced wild-type p53 protein rapidly translocates to mitochondria during p53-dependent apoptosis. Suborganellar localization by various methods shows that p53 predominantly localizes to the surface of mitochondria. Moreover, bypassing the nucleus by targeting p53 to mitochondria is sufficient to induce apoptosis in p53-null cells, without requiring further DNA damage. Here, we describe subcellular fractionation as a classic technique for detecting mitochondrial p53 in cell extracts. It consists of cell homogenization by hypo-osmotic swelling, removal of nuclear components by low-speed centrifugation, and mitochondrial isolation by a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. p53 and other mitochondrial proteins can then be detected by standard immunoblotting procedures. The quality of mitochondrial isolates can be verified for purity and intactness.

  4. Concordant p53 and mdm-2 protein expression in vulvar squamous cell carcinoma and adjacent lichen sclerosus.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J A; Amin, S; Malfetano, J; Tien, A T; Selkin, B; Hou, J; Goncharuk, V; Wilson, V L; Rohwedder, A; Ambros, R; Ross, J S

    2001-06-01

    To determine if carcinogenic events in vulvar skin precede the onset of morphologic atypia, the authors investigated for derangements in DNA content, cell proliferation, and cell death in vulvar carcinomas and surrounding skin in 140 samples of tumor and surrounding skin collected from 35 consecutive vulvectomy specimen for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN) 3. Vulvar non-cancer excisions were used as controls. Investigations consisted of histologic classification and measurement of 9 variables--epidermal thickness (acanthosis and rete ridge length), immunolabeling index (LI) for 3 proteins (p53 protein, Ki-67, and mdm-2), pattern of p53 expression (dispersed vs. compact), DNA content index, and presence of aneuploidy by image analysis and apoptotic rate by Apotag labeling. Significant positive correlations were found for all nine variables studied versus increasing histologic severity in two proposed histologic stepwise models of vulvar carcinogenesis (lichen sclerosus (LS) and VIN 3 undifferentiated associated SCC groups). High p53 LI (>25) and the compact pattern of p53 expression (suspected oncoprotein) significantly correlated with LS and its associated vulvar samples compared with samples not associated with LS (P < or = 0.001). Furthermore, p53 LI, mdm-2 LI, and pattern of p53 expression were concordant between patient matched samples of LS and SCC. In addition, mdm-2 LI significantly correlated with dispersed pattern p53 LI suggesting a response to wild-type p53 protein accumulation. These findings support the hypothesis that neoplastic transformation occurs in sequential steps and compromises proteins involved in the cell cycle control. Concordance of p53 and mdm-2 protein expression in LS and adjacent SCC provides evidence that LS can act as a precursor lesion in the absence of morphologic atypia. Overexpression of mdm-2 with stabilization and inactivation of p53 protein may provide an alternate pathway for vulvar

  5. Regulation of p53 function by lysine methylation.

    PubMed

    West, Lisandra E; Gozani, Or

    2011-06-01

    The reversible and dynamic methylation of proteins on lysine residues can greatly increase the signaling potential of the modified factor. In addition to histones, several other nuclear factors such as the tumor suppressor and transcription factor p53 undergo lysine methylation, suggesting that this modification may be a common mechanism for modulating protein–protein interactions and key cellular signaling pathways. This article focuses on how lysine methylation events on the C-terminal tail of p53 are generated, sensed and transduced to modulate p53 functions.

  6. Long story short: p53 mediates innate immunity

    PubMed Central

    Miciak, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The story of p53 and how we came to understand it is punctuated by fundamental insights into the essence of cancer. In the decades since its discovery, p53 has been shown to be centrally involved in most, if not all, of the cellular processes that maintain tissue homeostasis. Extensive functional analyses of p53 and its tumor-associated mutants have illuminated many of the common defects shared by most cancer cells. As the central character in a tale that continues to unfold, p53 has become increasingly familiar and yet remains surprisingly inscrutable. New relationships periodically come to light, and surprising, novel activities continue to emerge, thereby revealing new dimensions and aspects of its function. What lies at the very core of this complex protagonist? What is its prime motivation? As every avid reader knows, the elements of character are profoundly shaped by adversity – originating from within and without. And so it is with p53. This review will briefly recap the coordinated responses of p53 to viral infection, and outline a hypothetical model that would explain how an abundance of seemingly unrelated phenotypic attributes may in the end reflect a singular function. All stories eventually draw to a conclusion. This epic tale may eventually leave us with the realization that p53, most simply described, is a protein that evolved to mediate immune surveillance. PMID:26951863

  7. Long story short: p53 mediates innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Miciak, Jessica; Bunz, Fred

    2016-04-01

    The story of p53 and how we came to understand it is punctuated by fundamental insights into the essence of cancer. In the decades since its discovery, p53 has been shown to be centrally involved in most, if not all, of the cellular processes that maintain tissue homeostasis. Extensive functional analyses of p53 and its tumor-associated mutants have illuminated many of the common defects shared by most cancer cells. As the central character in a tale that continues to unfold, p53 has become increasingly familiar and yet remains surprisingly inscrutable. New relationships periodically come to light, and surprising, novel activities continue to emerge, thereby revealing new dimensions and aspects of its function. What lies at the very core of this complex protagonist? What is its prime motivation? As every avid reader knows, the elements of character are profoundly shaped by adversity--originating from within and without. And so it is with p53. This review will briefly recap the coordinated responses of p53 to viral infection, and outline a hypothetical model that would explain how an abundance of seemingly unrelated phenotypic attributes may in the end reflect a singular function. All stories eventually draw to a conclusion. This epic tale may eventually leave us with the realization that p53, most simply described, is a protein that evolved to mediate immune surveillance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. p53 and the pathogenesis of skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, Cara L.; Ananthaswamy, Honnavara N.

    2007-11-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene and gene product are among the most diverse and complex molecules involved in cellular functions. Genetic alterations within the p53 gene have been shown to have a direct correlation with cancer development and have been shown to occur in nearly 50% of all cancers. p53 mutations are particularly common in skin cancers and UV irradiation has been shown to be a primary cause of specific 'signature' mutations that can result in oncogenic transformation. There are certain 'hot-spots' in the p53 gene where mutations are commonly found that result in a mutated dipyrimidine site. This review discusses the role of p53 from normal function and its dysfunction in pre-cancerous lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. Additionally, special situations are explored, such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome in which there is an inherited p53 mutation, and the consequences of immune suppression on p53 mutations and the resulting increase in non-melanoma skin cancer in these patients.

  9. p53 and the Pathogenesis of Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Cara L.

    2007-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene and gene product are among the most diverse and complex molecules involved in cellular functions. Genetic alterations within the p53 gene have been shown to have a direct correlation with cancer development and have been shown to occur in nearly 50% of all cancers. p53 mutations are particularly common in skin cancers and UV irradiation has been shown to be a primary cause of specific ‘signature’ mutations that can result in oncogenic transformation. There are certain ‘hot-spots’ in the p53 gene where mutations are commonly found that result in a mutated dipyrimidine site. This review discusses the role of p53 from normal function and its dysfunction in pre-cancerous lesions and non-melanoma skin cancers. Additionally, special situations are explored, such as Li-Fraumeni syndrome in which there is an inherited p53 mutation, and the consequences of immune suppression on p53 mutations and the resulting increase in non-melanoma skin cancer in these patients. PMID:17270229

  10. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  11. The p53 Transcriptional Network Influences Microglia Behavior and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Aloi, Macarena S; Su, Wei; Garden, Gwenn A

    2015-01-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein p53 belongs to a family of proteins that play pivotal roles in multiple cellular functions including cell proliferation, cell death, genome stability, and regulation of inflammation. Neuroinflammation is a common feature of central nervous system (CNS) pathology, and microglia are the specialized resident population of CNS myeloid cells that initiate innate immune responses. Microglia maintain CNS homeostasis through pathogen containment, phagocytosis of debris, and initiation of tissue-repair cascades. However, an unregulated pro-inflammatory response can lead to tissue injury and dysfunction in both acute and chronic inflammatory states. Therefore, regulation of the molecular signals that control the induction, magnitude, and resolution of inflammation are necessary for optimal CNS health. We and others have described a novel mechanism by which p53 transcriptional activity modulates microglia behaviors in vitro and in vivo. Activation of p53 induces expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) that support microglia pro-inflammatory functions and suppress anti-inflammatory and tissue repair behaviors. In this review, we introduce the previously described roles of the p53 signaling network and discuss novel functions of p53 in the microglia-mediated inflammatory response in CNS health and disease. Ultimately, improved understanding of the molecular regulators modulated by p53 transcriptional activity in microglia will enhance the development of rational therapeutic strategies to harness the homeostatic and tissue repair functions of microglia.

  12. Mitochondrial death functions of p53

    PubMed Central

    Marchenko, N D; Moll, U M

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor network plays a fundamental surveillance role in both homeostatic and adaptive cell biology. p53 is one of the most important barriers against malignant derailment of normal cells, orchestrating growth arrest, senescence, or cell death by linking many different pathways in response to genotoxic and non-genotoxic insults. p53 is the key broadband sensor for numerous cellular stresses such as DNA damage, hypoxia, oxidative stress, oncogenic signaling, and nucleolar stress. The crucial tumor suppressive and tissue homeostasis activity of p53 is its ability to activate cell death via multiple different pathways. A well-characterized biochemical function of p53 in the regulation of apoptosis is its role as a potent transcriptional regulator. p53 activates a panel of proapoptotic genes from the mitochondrial apoptotic and death receptor programs while repressing antiapoptotic Bcl2 family genes. In addition, over the last 10 y a growing body of evidence has also defined direct extranuclear non-transcriptional p53 activities within mitochondria-mediated cell death pathways that are based on p53 protein accumulation in cytosolic and mitochondrial compartments and protein-protein interactions. To date, transcription-independent p53-mediated cell death regulation has been described for apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy. Because mitochondrial dysregulation is central to the development of a number of pathologic processes such as cancer and neurodegenerative and age-related diseases, understanding the direct roles of p53 protein in mitochondria has high translational impact and could facilitate the development of novel drug targets to combat these diseases. In this review we will mainly focus on mechanisms of p53-mediated transcription-independent cell death pathways at mitochondria. PMID:27308326

  13. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β

    PubMed Central

    Papke, Christina L.; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S.; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L.; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y.; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2−/− mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2−/− SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations. PMID:23591991

  14. Smooth muscle hyperplasia due to loss of smooth muscle α-actin is driven by activation of focal adhesion kinase, altered p53 localization and increased levels of platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β.

    PubMed

    Papke, Christina L; Cao, Jiumei; Kwartler, Callie S; Villamizar, Carlos; Byanova, Katerina L; Lim, Soon-Mi; Sreenivasappa, Harini; Fischer, Grant; Pham, John; Rees, Meredith; Wang, Miranda; Chaponnier, Christine; Gabbiani, Giulio; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Chandra, Joya; Trache, Andreea; Zimmer, Warren; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2013-08-01

    Mutations in ACTA2, encoding the smooth muscle cell (SMC)-specific isoform of α-actin (α-SMA), cause thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections and occlusive vascular diseases, including early onset coronary artery disease and stroke. We have shown that occlusive arterial lesions in patients with heterozygous ACTA2 missense mutations show increased numbers of medial or neointimal SMCs. The contribution of SMC hyperplasia to these vascular diseases and the pathways responsible for linking disruption of α-SMA filaments to hyperplasia are unknown. Here, we show that the loss of Acta2 in mice recapitulates the SMC hyperplasia observed in ACTA2 mutant SMCs and determine the cellular pathways responsible for SMC hyperplasia. Acta2(-/-) mice showed increased neointimal formation following vascular injury in vivo, and SMCs explanted from these mice demonstrated increased proliferation and migration. Loss of α-SMA induced hyperplasia through focal adhesion (FA) rearrangement, FA kinase activation, re-localization of p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and increased expression and ligand-independent activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (Pdgfr-β). Disruption of α-SMA in wild-type SMCs also induced similar cellular changes. Imatinib mesylate inhibited Pdgfr-β activation and Acta2(-/-) SMC proliferation in vitro and neointimal formation with vascular injury in vivo. Loss of α-SMA leads to SMC hyperplasia in vivo and in vitro through a mechanism involving FAK, p53 and Pdgfr-β, supporting the hypothesis that SMC hyperplasia contributes to occlusive lesions in patients with ACTA2 missense mutations.

  15. Mdm2 and Mdm4 Loss Regulates Distinct p53 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Barboza, Juan A.; Iwakuma, Tomoo; Terzian, Tamara; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Lozano, Guillermina

    2009-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of p53 is a hallmark of most human tumors. Loss of p53 function also occurs by overexpression of negative regulators such as MDM2 and MDM4. Deletion of Mdm2 or Mdm4 in mice results in p53-dependent embryo lethality due to constitutive p53 activity. However, Mdm2−/− and Mdm4−/− embryos display divergent phenotypes, suggesting that Mdm2 and Mdm4 exert distinct control over p53. To explore the interaction between Mdm2 and Mdm4 in p53 regulation, we first generated mice and cells that are triple null for p53, Mdm2, and Mdm4. These mice had identical survival curves and tumor spectrum as p53−/− mice, substantiating the principal role of Mdm2 and Mdm4 as negative p53 regulators. We next generated mouse embryo fibroblasts null for p53 with deletions of Mdm2, Mdm4, or both; introduced a retrovirus expressing a temperature-sensitive p53 mutant, p53A135V; and examined p53 stability and activity. In this system, p53 activated distinct target genes, leading to apoptosis in cells lacking Mdm2 and a cell cycle arrest in cells lacking Mdm4. Cells lacking both Mdm2 and Mdm4 had a stable p53 that initiated apoptosis similar to Mdm2-null cells. Additionally, stabilization of p53 in cells lacking Mdm4 with the Mdm2 antagonist nutlin-3 was sufficient to induce a cell death response. These data further differentiate the roles of Mdm2 and Mdm4 in the regulation of p53 activities. PMID:18567799

  16. Morphological Heterogeneity of p53 Positive and p53 Negative Nuclei in Breast Cancers Stratified by Clinicopathological Variables

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, Katrin; Dimmer, Volker; Haroske, Gunter; Meyer, Wolfdietrich; Theissig, Franz; Thieme, Berit; Kunze, Klaus Dietmar

    1997-01-01

    The study was aimed to detect differences in nuclear morphology between nuclear populations as well as between tumours with different p53 expression in breast cancers with different clinicopathological features, which also reflect the stage of tumour progression. The p53 immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin sections from 88 tumour samples. After the cells had been localised by means of an image cytometry workstation and their immunostaining had been categorised visually, the sections were destained and stained by the Feulgen protocol. The nuclei were relocated and measured cytometrically by the workstation. There were significant differences in the nuclear features between tumours as well as between nuclear populations with different p53 expression in the most subgroups. The variability of nuclear shape in tumour groups, classified by the tumour size or the lymph node status, increase with the p53 immunoreactive score, whereas in tumours grouped by the Bloom–Richardson grade features of the chromatin distribution were different between the p53 staining categories. The nuclear subpopulations showed differences in the amount and distribution of chromatin in most subgroups. The results demonstrate the relationship between the nuclear morphology and the p53 expression in different stages of breast cancers. The p53 status is an important factor of the biological behaviour but not the only one. PMID:9313826

  17. Exploiting tyrosinase expression and activity in melanocytic tumors: quercetin and the central role of p53.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ashley J; Sittadjody, Sivanandane; Thangasamy, Thilakavathy; Mendoza, Erin E; Limesand, Kirsten H; Burd, Randy

    2011-12-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive tumor that expresses the pigmentation enzyme tyrosinase. Tyrosinase expression increases during tumorigenesis, which could allow for selective treatment of this tumor type by strategies that use tyrosinase activity. Approaches targeting tyrosinase would involve gene transcription or signal transduction pathways mediated by p53 in a direct or indirect manner. Two pathways are proposed for exploiting tyrosinase expression: (a) a p53-dependent pathway leading to apoptosis or arrest and (b) a reactive oxygen species-mediated induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress in p53 mutant tumors. Both strategies could use tyrosinase-mediated activation of quercetin, a dietary polyphenol that induces the expression of p53 and modulates reactive oxygen species. In addition to antitumor signaling properties, activation of quercetin could complement conventional cancer therapy by the induction of phase II detoxification enzymes resulting in p53 stabilization and transduction of its downstream targets. In conclusion, recent advances in tyrosinase enzymology, prodrug chemistry, and modern chemotherapeutics present an intriguing and selective multitherapy targeting system where dietary bioflavonoids could be used to complement conventional cancer treatments.

  18. The emerging role of p53 in exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Jonathan D; Close, Graeme L; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2014-03-01

    The major tumour suppressor protein, p53, is one of the most well-studied proteins in cell biology. Often referred to as the Guardian of the Genome, the list of known functions of p53 include regulatory roles in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, angiogenesis, DNA repair and cell senescence. More recently, p53 has been implicated as a key molecular player regulating substrate metabolism and exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle. In this context, the study of p53 therefore has obvious implications for both human health and performance, given that impaired mitochondrial content and function is associated with the pathology of many metabolic disorders such as ageing, type 2 diabetes, obesity and cancer, as well as reduced exercise performance. Studies on p53 knockout (KO) mice collectively demonstrate that ablation of p53 content reduces intermyofibrillar (IMF) and subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondrial yield, reduces cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma co-activator 1-α protein content whilst also reducing mitochondrial respiration and increasing reactive oxygen species production during state 3 respiration in IMF mitochondria. Additionally, p53 KO mice exhibit marked reductions in exercise capacity (in the magnitude of 50 %) during fatiguing swimming, treadmill running and electrical stimulation protocols. p53 may regulate contractile-induced increases in mitochondrial content via modulating mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) content and/or activity, given that p53 KO mice display reduced skeletal muscle mitochondrial DNA, Tfam messenger RNA and protein levels. Furthermore, upon muscle contraction, p53 is phosphorylated on serine 15 and subsequently translocates to the mitochondria where it forms a complex with Tfam to modulate expression of mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the COX complex. In human skeletal muscle, the exercise-induced phosphorylation of p53(Ser15) is enhanced in conditions

  19. Phosphorylation of Tip60 by GSK-3 determines the induction of PUMA and apoptosis by p53

    PubMed Central

    Charvet, Céline; Wissler, Manuela; Brauns-Schubert, Prisca; Wang, Shang-Jui; Tang, Yi; Sigloch, Florian C.; Mellert, Hestia; Brandenburg, Martin; Lindner, Silke E.; Breit, Bernhard; Green, Douglas R.; McMahon, Steven B.; Borner, Christoph; Gu, Wei; Maurer, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Summary Activation of p53 by DNA damage results in either cell cycle arrest, allowing DNA repair and cell survival, or induction of apoptosis. As these opposite outcomes are both mediated by p53 stabilization, additional mechanisms to determine this decision must exist. Here we show that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) is required for the p53-mediated induction of the pro-apoptotic BH3 only-protein PUMA, an essential mediator of p53-induced apoptosis. Inhibition of GSK-3 protected from cell death induced by DNA damage and promoted increased long-term cell survival. We demonstrate that GSK-3 phosphorylates serine 86 of the p53-acetyltransferase Tip60. A Tip60S86A mutant was less active to induce p53 K120 acetylation, Histone 4 acetylation and expression of PUMA. Our data suggest that GSK-3 mediated Tip60S86-phosphorylation provides a link between PI3K signaling and the choice for or against apoptosis induction by p53. PMID:21658600

  20. p53 regulation of metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, Eyal; Vousden, Karen H

    2010-04-01

    During the course of tumorigenesis, cells acquire a number of alterations that contribute to the acquisition of the malignant phenotype, allowing them to survive and flourish in increasingly hostile environments. Cancer cells can be characterized by perturbations in the control of cell proliferation and growth, resistance to death, and alterations in their interactions with the microenvironment. Underpinning many of these changes are shifts in metabolism that allow cancer cells to use alternative pathways for energy production and building the macromolecules necessary for growth, as well as regulating the generation of signaling molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the past few years, it became clear that p53, the most studied, if not most important, tumor suppressor protein, can also directly control metabolic traits of cells.

  1. Long-term administration of the fungus toxin, sterigmatocystin, induces intestinal metaplasia and increases the proliferative activity of PCNA, p53, and MDM2 in the gastric mucosa of aged Mongolian gerbils.

    PubMed

    Kusunoki, Masahiro; Misumi, Junichi; Shimada, Tatsuo; Aoki, Kazuo; Matsuo, Noritaka; Sumiyoshi, Hideaki; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Hidekatsu

    2011-07-01

    The causal agents of gastric cancer could include fungus toxins. Sterigmatocystin (ST), a fungus toxin, is a risk factor of gastric cancer. We investigated the effects of ST on the stomach tissues of Mongolian gerbils. Seventy-five-week-old male Mongolian gerbils received ST ad libitum at a concentration of 0 ppb (non-treated, n = 11), 100 ppb (n = 7), or 1000 ppb (n = 13) dissolved in drinking water for a period of 24 weeks. After administration, we tested the histopathological changes and immunostaining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), p53, and MDM2 expression. We investigated the histopathological changes and determined the incidence of histopathological changes in animals with various gastric diseases after ST administration at a dose of 0 ppb (non-treated control), 100, or 1,000 ppb as follows: firstly, indices for gastritis were 18.2, 100, and 100%, those for erosion events were 9.1, 100, and 92.3%, and those for polyps were 0, 71.4, and 61.5%, respectively. These incidences in the ST-administered groups (100 or 1000 ppb) showed significant increases compared with those in the non-treated control group. And, lastly, indices for intestinal metaplasia were 0, 100, and 15.4%, respectively. Furthermore, immunostaining for PCNA, p53, and MDM2 expression showed significantly greater rates in the ST-administered groups (100 or 1000 ppb) than in the non-treated control group. The histopathological and immunohistopathological findings of this study indicate that ST exerts a marked influence on gastric mucus and gland cells, showing dominant gastritis, erosion events, polyps, and intestinal metaplasia in these animals.

  2. p53 isoforms - a conspiracy to kidnap p53 tumor suppressor activity?

    PubMed

    Marcel, V; Hainaut, P

    2009-02-01

    For 25 years, the p53 tumor suppressor protein was considered the only protein expressed by the (TP53) gene. However, in several studies the existence of p53 alternative transcripts in mouse and human cells has been documented, while their expression patterns and functions remained a mystery. Since 2002, several groups have identified and described the existence of up to 10 p53 isoforms and have demonstrated their roles in modulation of p53 suppressive activity. It is now clear that the patterns of p53 expression are much more complex than previously recognized and that these isoforms have the potential to act either synergistically or antagonistically, depending on their structure and mechanism of production. This review focuses on the different ways to produce p53 isoforms, on their specific properties, on their effect on p53 suppressive activity as well as on their implication in a new potential mechanism involved in p53 deregulation in cancer.

  3. Dial 9-1-1 for p53: Mechanisms of p53 Activation by Cellular Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ljungman, Mats

    2000-01-01

    Abstract The tumor suppressor protein, p53, is part of the cell's emergency team that is called upon following cellular insult. How do cells sense DNA damage and other cellular stresses and what signal transduction pathways are used to alert p53? How is the resulting nuclear accumulation of p53 accomplished and what determines the outcome of p53 induction? Many posttranslational modifications of p53, such as phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, acetylation and ribosylation, have been shown to occur following cellular stress. Some of these modifications may activate the p53 protein, interfere with MDM2 binding and/or dictate cellular localization of p53. This review will focus on recent findings about how the p53 response may be activated following cellular stress. PMID:10935507

  4. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce apoptosis in p53-wildtype and p53-null HCT116 colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, Emily H; Schoenbach, Karl H; Beebe, Stephen J

    2007-09-01

    Non-ionizing radiation produced by nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) is an alternative to ionizing radiation for cancer treatment. NsPEFs are high power, low energy (non-thermal) pulses that, unlike plasma membrane electroporation, modulate intracellular structures and functions. To determine functions for p53 in nsPEF-induced apoptosis, HCT116p53(+/+) and HCT116p53(-/-) colon carcinoma cells were exposed to multiple pulses of 60 kV/cm with either 60 ns or 300 ns durations and analyzed for apoptotic markers. Several apoptosis markers were observed including cell shrinkage and increased percentages of cells positive for cytochrome c, active caspases, fragmented DNA, and Bax, but not Bcl-2. Unlike nsPEF-induced apoptosis in Jurkat cells (Beebe et al. 2003a) active caspases were observed before increases in cytochrome c, which occurred in the presence and absence of Bax. Cell shrinkage occurred only in cells with increased levels of Bax or cytochrome c. NsPEFs induced apoptosis equally in HCT116p53(+/+) and HCT116p53(-/-) cells. These results demonstrate that non-ionizing radiation produced by nsPEFs can act as a non-ligand agonist with therapeutic potential to induce apoptosis utilizing mitochondrial-independent mechanisms in HCT116 cells that lead to caspase activation and cell death in the presence or absence of p-53 and Bax.

  5. p53 in the game of transposons.

    PubMed

    Wylie, Annika; Jones, Amanda E; Abrams, John M

    2016-11-01

    Throughout the animal kingdom, p53 genes function to restrain mobile elements and recent observations indicate that transposons become derepressed in human cancers. Together, these emerging lines of evidence suggest that cancers driven by p53 mutations could represent "transpospoathies," i.e. disease states linked to eruptions of mobile elements. The transposopathy hypothesis predicts that p53 acts through conserved mechanisms to contain transposon movement, and in this way, prevents tumor formation. How transposon eruptions provoke neoplasias is not well understood but, from a broader perspective, this hypothesis also provides an attractive framework to explore unrestrained mobile elements as inciters of late-onset idiopathic disease. Also see the video abstract here.

  6. DIMP53-1: A novel small-molecule dual inhibitor of p53-MDM2/X interactions with multifunctional p53-dependent anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Soares, Joana; Espadinha, Margarida; Raimundo, Liliana; Ramos, Helena; Gomes, Ana Sara; Gomes, Sara; Loureiro, Joana B; Inga, Alberto; Reis, Flávio; Gomes, Célia; Santos, Maria M M; Saraiva, Lucília

    2017-03-10

    The transcription factor p53 plays a crucial role in cancer development and dissemination, and thus p53-targeted therapies are amongst the most encouraging anticancer strategies. In human cancers with wild-type (wt) p53, its inactivation by interaction with murine double minute (MDM)2 and MDMX is a common event. Simultaneous inhibition of the p53 interaction with both MDMs is crucial to restore the tumor suppressor activity of p53. Here we describe the synthesis of the new tryptophanol-derived oxazoloisoindolinone DIMP53-1 and identify its activity as a dual inhibitor of the p53-MDM2/X interactions using a yeast-based assay. DIMP53-1 caused growth inhibition, mediated by p53 stabilization and upregulation of p53 transcriptional targets involved in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, in wt p53-expressing tumor cells, including MDM2- or MDMX-overexpressing cells. Importantly, DIMP53-1 abolishes the p53-MDM2/X interactions by binding to p53, in human colon adenocarcinoma HCT116 cells. DIMP53-1 also inhibited the migration and invasion of HCT116 cells, and the migration and tube formation of HMVEC-D endothelial cells. Notably, in human tumor xenograft mice models, DIMP53-1 showed a p53-dependent antitumor activity through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation and angiogenesis. Finally, no genotoxicity or undesirable toxic effects were observed with DIMP53-1. In conclusion, DIMP53-1 is a novel p53 activator, which potentially binds to p53 inhibiting its interaction with MDM2 and MDMX. Although target-directed, DIMP53-1 has a multifunctional activity, targeting major hallmarks of cancer through its anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic, anti-angiogenic, anti-invasive and anti-migratory properties. DIMP53-1 is a promising anticancer drug candidate and an encouraging starting point to develop improved derivatives for clinical application.

  7. Dominant-negative but not gain-of-function effects of a p53.R270H mutation in mouse epithelium tissue after DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Wijnhoven, Susan W P; Speksnijder, Ewoud N; Liu, Xiaoling; Zwart, Edwin; vanOostrom, Conny Th M; Beems, Rudolf B; Hoogervorst, Esther M; Schaap, Mirjam M; Attardi, Laura D; Jacks, Tyler; van Steeg, Harry; Jonkers, Jos; de Vries, Annemieke

    2007-05-15

    p53 alterations in human tumors often involve missense mutations that may confer dominant-negative or gain-of-function properties. Dominant-negative effects result in inactivation of wild-type p53 protein in heterozygous mutant cells and as such in a p53 null phenotype. Gain-of-function effects can directly promote tumor development or metastasis through antiapoptotic mechanisms or transcriptional activation of (onco)genes. Here, we show, using conditional mouse technology, that epithelium-specific heterozygous expression of mutant p53 (i.e., the p53.R270H mutation that is equivalent to the human hotspot R273H) results in an increased incidence of spontaneous and UVB-induced skin tumors. Expression of p53.R270H exerted dominant-negative effects on latency, multiplicity, and progression status of UVB-induced but not spontaneous tumors. Surprisingly, gain-of-function properties of p53.R270H were not detected in skin epithelium. Apparently, dominant-negative and gain-of-function effects of mutant p53 are highly tissue specific and become most manifest upon stabilization of p53 after DNA damage.

  8. Post-translational regulation enables robust p53 regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays important roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Due to its critical functions, the level of p53 is tightly regulated by a negative feedback mechanism to increase its tolerance towards fluctuations and disturbances. Interestingly, the p53 level is controlled by post-translational regulation rather than transcriptional regulation in this feedback mechanism. Results We analyzed the dynamics of this feedback to understand whether post-translational regulation provides any advantages over transcriptional regulation in regard to disturbance rejection. When a disturbance happens, even though negative feedback reduces the steady-state error, it can cause a system to become less stable and transiently overshoots, which may erroneously trigger downstream reactions. Therefore, the system needs to balance the trade-off between steady-state and transient errors. Feedback control and adaptive estimation theories revealed that post-translational regulation achieves a better trade-off than transcriptional regulation, contributing to a more steady level of p53 under the influence of noise and disturbances. Furthermore, post-translational regulation enables cells to respond more promptly to stress conditions with consistent amplitude. However, for better disturbance rejection, the p53- Mdm2 negative feedback has to pay a price of higher stochastic noise. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the p53-Mdm2 feedback favors regulatory mechanisms that provide the optimal trade-offs for dynamic control. PMID:23992617

  9. Apigenin-induced prostate cancer cell death is initiated by reactive oxygen species and p53 activation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Sanjeev; Gupta, Sanjay

    2008-05-15

    Apigenin, a plant flavone, potentially activates wild-type p53 and induces apoptosis in cancer cells. We conducted detailed studies to understand its mechanism of action. Exposure of human prostate cancer 22Rv1 cells, harboring wild-type p53, to growth-suppressive concentrations (10-80 microM) of apigenin resulted in the stabilization of p53 by phosphorylation on critical serine sites, p14ARF-mediated downregulation of MDM2 protein, inhibition of NF-kappaB/p65 transcriptional activity, and induction of p21/WAF-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apigenin at these doses resulted in ROS generation, which was accompanied by rapid glutathione depletion, disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytosolic release of cytochrome c, and apoptosis. Interestingly, we observed accumulation of a p53 fraction to the mitochondria, which was rapid and occurred between 1 and 3 h after apigenin treatment. All these effects were significantly blocked by pretreatment of cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine, p53 inhibitor pifithrin-alpha, and enzyme catalase. Apigenin-mediated p53 activation and apoptosis were further attenuated by p53 antisense oligonucleotide treatment. Exposure of cells to apigenin led to a decrease in the levels of Bcl-XL and Bcl-2 and increase in Bax, triggering caspase activation. Treatment with the caspase inhibitors Z-VAD-FMK and DEVD-CHO partially rescued these cells from apigenin-induced apoptosis. In vivo, apigenin administration demonstrated p53-mediated induction of apoptosis in 22Rv1 tumors. These results indicate that apigenin-induced apoptosis in 22Rv1 cells is initiated by a ROS-dependent disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential through transcriptional-dependent and -independent p53 pathways.

  10. PML IV/ARF interaction enhances p53 SUMO-1 conjugation, activation, and senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ivanschitz, Lisa; Takahashi, Yuki; Jollivet, Florence; Ayrault, Olivier; Le Bras, Morgane; de Thé, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) recruit multiple partners, including p53 and many of its regulators. NBs are believed to facilitate several posttranslational modifications and are key regulators of senescence. PML, the organizer of NBs, is expressed as a number of splice variants that all efficiently recruit p53 partners. However, overexpression of only one of them, PML IV, triggers p53-driven senescence. Here, we show that PML IV specifically binds ARF, a key p53 regulator. Similar to ARF, PML IV enhances global SUMO-1 conjugation, particularly that of p53, resulting in p53 stabilization and activation. ARF interacts with and stabilizes the NB-associated UBC9 SUMO-conjugating enzyme, possibly explaining PML IV-enhanced SUMOylation. These results unexpectedly link two key tumor suppressors, highlighting their convergence for global control of SUMO conjugation, p53 activation, and senescence induction. PMID:26578773

  11. PML IV/ARF interaction enhances p53 SUMO-1 conjugation, activation, and senescence.

    PubMed

    Ivanschitz, Lisa; Takahashi, Yuki; Jollivet, Florence; Ayrault, Olivier; Le Bras, Morgane; de Thé, Hugues

    2015-11-17

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) recruit multiple partners, including p53 and many of its regulators. NBs are believed to facilitate several posttranslational modifications and are key regulators of senescence. PML, the organizer of NBs, is expressed as a number of splice variants that all efficiently recruit p53 partners. However, overexpression of only one of them, PML IV, triggers p53-driven senescence. Here, we show that PML IV specifically binds ARF, a key p53 regulator. Similar to ARF, PML IV enhances global SUMO-1 conjugation, particularly that of p53, resulting in p53 stabilization and activation. ARF interacts with and stabilizes the NB-associated UBC9 SUMO-conjugating enzyme, possibly explaining PML IV-enhanced SUMOylation. These results unexpectedly link two key tumor suppressors, highlighting their convergence for global control of SUMO conjugation, p53 activation, and senescence induction.

  12. p53 activation by Ni(II) is a HIF-1α independent response causing caspases 9/3-mediated apoptosis in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Victor C.; Morse, Jessica L.; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2013-06-15

    Hypoxia mimic nickel(II) is a human respiratory carcinogen with a suspected epigenetic mode of action. We examined whether Ni(II) elicits a toxicologically significant activation of the tumor suppressor p53, which is typically associated with genotoxic responses. We found that treatments of H460 human lung epithelial cells with NiCl{sub 2} caused activating phosphorylation at p53-Ser15, accumulation of p53 protein and depletion of its inhibitor MDM4 (HDMX). Confirming the activation of p53, its knockdown suppressed the ability of Ni(II) to upregulate MDM2 and p21 (CDKN1A). Unlike DNA damage, induction of GADD45A by Ni(II) was p53-independent. Ni(II) also increased p53-Ser15 phosphorylation and p21 expression in normal human lung fibroblasts. Although Ni(II)-induced stabilization of HIF-1α occurred earlier, it had no effect on p53 accumulation and Ser15 phosphorylation. Ni(II)-treated H460 cells showed no evidence of necrosis and their apoptosis and clonogenic death were suppressed by p53 knockdown. The apoptotic role of p53 involved a transcription-dependent program triggering the initiator caspase 9 and its downstream executioner caspase 3. Two most prominently upregulated proapoptotic genes by Ni(II) were PUMA and NOXA but only PUMA induction required p53. Knockdown of p53 also led to derepression of antiapoptotic MCL1 in Ni(II)-treated cells. Overall, our results indicate that p53 plays a major role in apoptotic death of human lung cells by Ni(II). Chronic exposure to Ni(II) may promote selection of resistant cells with inactivated p53, providing an explanation for the origin of p53 mutations by this epigenetic carcinogen. - Highlights: • Ni(II) is a strong activator of the transcription factor p53. • Apoptosis is a principal form of death by Ni(II) in human lung epithelial cells. • Ni(II)-activated p53 triggers caspases 9/3-mediated apoptotic program. • NOXA and PUMA are two main proapoptotic genes induced by Ni(II). • HIF-1α and p53 are independent

  13. Microvessel density and p53 mutations in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nadkarni, Niyati J; Geest, Koen De; Neff, Traci; Young, Barry De; Bender, David P; Ahmed, Amina; Smith, Brian J; Button, Anna; Goodheart, Michael J

    2013-04-30

    We planned to determine the relationship between angiogenesis and p53 mutational status in advanced-stage epithelial ovarian cancer. Using 190 tumor samples from patients with stage III and IV ovarian cancer we performed p53 sequencing, immunohistochemistry, and CD31 microvessel density (MVD) determination. MVD was elevated in tumors with p53 null mutations compared to p53 missense mutation or no mutation. Disease recurrence was increased with higher MVD in both unadjusted and adjusted analyses. In adjusted analysis, p53 null mutation was associated with increased recurrence and worse overall survival. Worse overall survival and increased recurrence risk were also associated with the combination of CD31 MVD values >25 vessels/HPF and any p53 mutation. P53 mutation status and MVD may have prognostic significance in patients with advanced-stage ovarian cancer. Tumors with p53 null mutations are likely to be more vascular, contributing to decreased survival and increased recurrence probability.

  14. DDP-induced cytotoxicity is not influenced by p53 in nine human ovarian cancer cell lines with different p53 status.

    PubMed Central

    De Feudis, P.; Debernardis, D.; Beccaglia, P.; Valenti, M.; Graniela Siré, E.; Arzani, D.; Stanzione, S.; Parodi, S.; D'Incalci, M.; Russo, P.; Broggini, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nine human ovarian cancer cell lines that express wild-type (wt) or mutated (mut) p53 were used to evaluate the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin (DDP). The concentrations inhibiting the growth by 50% (IC50) were calculated for each cell line, and no differences were found between cells expressing wt p53 and mut p53. Using, for each cell line, the DDP IC50, we found that these concentrations were able to induce an increase in p53 levels in all four wt-p53-expressing cell lines and in one out of five mut-p53-expressing cell lines. WAF1 and GADD45 mRNAs were also increased by DDP treatment, independently of the presence of a wt p53. Bax levels were only marginally affected by DDP, and this was observed in both wt-p53- and mut-p53-expressing cells. DDP-induced apoptosis was evident 72 h after treatment, and the percentage of cells undergoing apoptosis was slightly higher for wt-p53-expressing cells. However, at doses near the IC50, the percentage of apoptotic cells was less than 20% in all the cell lines investigated. We conclude that the presence of wt p53 is not a determinant for the cytotoxicity induced by DDP in human ovarian cancer cell lines. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9275024

  15. p53 protein, EGF receptor, and anti-p53 antibodies in serum from patients with occupationally derived lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, J; Presek, P; Braun, A; Bauer, P; Konietzko, N; Wiesner, B; Woitowitz, H-J

    1999-01-01

    The oncogene product epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R), the tumour suppressor gene product p53 and anti-p53 antibodies are detectable in the serum of certain cancer patients. Increased levels of some of these products were reported in lung cancer patients after occupational asbestos exposure and after exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons or vinylchloride. In the first step, this study investigated the possible diagnostic value of serum EGF-R, p53-protein and anti-p53 antibodies, measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, in lung tumour patients. In addition to being investigated on a molecular epidemiological basis, these parameters were examined as biomarkers of carcinogenesis, especially with regard to asbestos incorporation effects or of radon-induced lung cancers. Also, a possible effect of cigarette smoking and age dependence were studied. A total of 116 male patients with lung or pleural tumours were examined. The histological classification was four small-cell cancers, six large-cell cancers, 32 adenocarcinomas, 47 squamous carcinomas, 12 mixed lung carcinomas, five diffuse malignant mesotheliomas and ten lung metastasis of extrapulmonary tumours. Twenty-two lung cancers and all mesotheliomas were related to asbestos, 22 lung cancers were related to ionizing radiation and 61 patients had cigarette smoke-related lung cancer. Besides these patients 50 male patients with non-malignant lung or pleural diseases were included; of the latter eight subjects suffered from asbestosis. Controls were 129 male subjects without any lung disease. No significantly elevated or decreased serum values for p53 protein, EGF-R, or anti-p53 antibodies as a function of histological tumour type, age, or degree and type of exposure (asbestos, smoking, ionizing radiation) could be found. The utility of p53-protein, EGF-R and anti-p53 antibodies as routine biomarkers for screening occupationally derived lung cancers is limited. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign

  16. Identification of GRO1 as a critical determinant for mutant p53 gain of function.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wensheng; Chen, Xinbin

    2009-05-01

    Mutant p53 gain of function contributes to cancer progression, increased invasion and metastasis potentials, and resistance to anticancer therapy. The ability of mutant p53 to acquire its gain of function is shown to correlate with increased expression of progrowth genes, such as c-MYC, MDR1, and NF-kappaB2. However, most of the published studies to identify mutant p53 target genes were performed in a cell system that artificially overexpresses mutant p53. Thus, it remains unclear whether such mutant p53 targets can be regulated by endogenous physiological levels of mutant p53. Here, we utilized SW480 and MIA-PaCa-2 cells, in which endogenous mutant p53 can be inducibly knocked down, to identify mutant p53 target genes that potentially mediate mutant p53 gain of function. We found that knockdown of mutant p53 inhibits GRO1 expression, whereas ectopic expression of mutant R175H in p53-null HCT116 cells increases GRO1 expression. In addition, we found that endogenous mutant p53 is capable of binding to and activating the GRO1 promoter. Interestingly, ectopic expression of GRO1 can rescue the proliferative defect in SW480 and MIA-PaCa-2 cells induced by knockdown of mutant p53. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous GRO1 inhibits cell proliferation and thus abrogates mutant p53 gain of function in SW480 cells. Taken together, our findings define a novel mechanism by which mutant p53 acquires its gain of function via transactivating the GRO1 gene in cancer cells. Thus, targeting GRO1 for cancer therapy would be applicable to a large portion of human tumors with mutant p53, but the exploration of GRO1 as a potential target should take the mutation status of p53 into consideration.

  17. Nucleolar stress with and without p53

    PubMed Central

    James, Allison; Wang, Yubo; Raje, Himanshu; Rosby, Raphyel; DiMario, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A veritable explosion of primary research papers within the past 10 years focuses on nucleolar and ribosomal stress, and for good reason: with ribosome biosynthesis consuming ~80% of a cell’s energy, nearly all metabolic and signaling pathways lead ultimately to or from the nucleolus. We begin by describing p53 activation upon nucleolar stress resulting in cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. The significance of this mechanism cannot be understated, as oncologists are now inducing nucleolar stress strategically in cancer cells as a potential anti-cancer therapy. We also summarize the human ribosomopathies, syndromes in which ribosome biogenesis or function are impaired leading to birth defects or bone narrow failures; the perplexing problem in the ribosomopathies is why only certain cells are affected despite the fact that the causative mutation is systemic. We then describe p53-independent nucleolar stress, first in yeast which lacks p53, and then in other model metazoans that lack MDM2, the critical E3 ubiquitin ligase that normally inactivates p53. Do these presumably ancient p53-independent nucleolar stress pathways remain latent in human cells? If they still exist, can we use them to target >50% of known human cancers that lack functional p53? PMID:25482194

  18. Nucleolar stress with and without p53.

    PubMed

    James, Allison; Wang, Yubo; Raje, Himanshu; Rosby, Raphyel; DiMario, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    A veritable explosion of primary research papers within the past 10 years focuses on nucleolar and ribosomal stress, and for good reason: with ribosome biosynthesis consuming ~80% of a cell's energy, nearly all metabolic and signaling pathways lead ultimately to or from the nucleolus. We begin by describing p53 activation upon nucleolar stress resulting in cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. The significance of this mechanism cannot be understated, as oncologists are now inducing nucleolar stress strategically in cancer cells as a potential anti-cancer therapy. We also summarize the human ribosomopathies, syndromes in which ribosome biogenesis or function are impaired leading to birth defects or bone narrow failures; the perplexing problem in the ribosomopathies is why only certain cells are affected despite the fact that the causative mutation is systemic. We then describe p53-independent nucleolar stress, first in yeast which lacks p53, and then in other model metazoans that lack MDM2, the critical E3 ubiquitin ligase that normally inactivates p53. Do these presumably ancient p53-independent nucleolar stress pathways remain latent in human cells? If they still exist, can we use them to target >50% of known human cancers that lack functional p53?

  19. Smoking, p53 mutation, and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Don L; Byers, Lauren A; Kurie, Jonathan M

    2014-01-01

    This issue marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the U.S. Surgeon General's Report on Smoking and Health. Perhaps no other singular event has done more to highlight the effects of smoking on the development of cancer. Tobacco exposure is the leading cause of cancers involving the oral cavity, conductive airways, and the lung. Owing to the many carcinogens in tobacco smoke, smoking-related malignancies have a high genome-wide burden of mutations, including in the gene encoding for p53. The p53 protein is the most frequently mutated tumor suppressor in cancer, responsible for a range of critical cellular functions that are compromised by the presence of a mutation. Herein, we review the epidemiologic connection between tobacco exposure and cancer, the molecular basis of p53 mutation in lung cancer, and the normal molecular and cellular roles of p53 that are abrogated during lung tumor development and progression as defined by in vitro and in vivo studies. We also consider the therapeutic potential of targeting mutant p53 in a clinical setting based upon the cellular role of mutant p53 and data from genetic murine models.

  20. Effects of chronic deoxynivalenol exposure on p53 heterozygous and p53 homozygous mice.

    PubMed

    Bondy, G S; Coady, L; Curran, I; Caldwell, D; Armstrong, C; Aziz, S A; Nunnikhoven, A; Gannon, A M; Liston, V; Shenton, J; Mehta, R

    2016-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a secondary metabolite associated with Fusarium species pathogenic to important food crops. A two-year feeding study reported that DON was non-carcinogenic in B6C3F1 mice. The present study was conducted to further characterize the chronic effects of DON by exposing cancer-prone transgenic p53 heterozygous (p53+/-) male mice and p53 homozygous (p53+/+) male mice to 0, 1, 5, or 10 mg DON/kg in diet for 26 weeks. Gross and microscopic organ-specific neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes and expression profiles of key hepatic and renal genes were assessed. Few toxicologic differences between p53+/+ and p53+/- mice were observed, and no tumours were observed due to DON. The results indicated that DON was non-carcinogenic and that reduced expression of the p53 gene did not play a key role in responses to DON toxicity. The lack of inflammatory and proliferative lesions in mice may be attributed to the anorectic effects of DON, which resulted in dose-dependent reductions in body weight in p53+/+ and p53+/- mice. Hepatic and renal gene expression analyses confirmed that chronic exposure to DON was noninflammatory. The effects of 26-week DON exposure on p53+/+ and p53+/-mice were consistent with those previously seen in B6C3F1 mice exposed to DON for two years.

  1. p53 directly suppresses BNIP3 expression to protect against hypoxia-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xi; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Wei; Xiao, Wuhan

    2011-01-01

    Hypoxia stabilizes the tumour suppressor p53, allowing it to function primarily as a transrepressor; however, the function of p53 during hypoxia remains unclear. In this study, we showed that p53 suppressed BNIP3 expression by directly binding to the p53-response element motif and recruiting corepressor mSin3a to the BNIP3 promoter. The DNA-binding site of p53 must remain intact for the protein to suppress the BNIP3 promoter. In addition, taking advantage of zebrafish as an in vivo model, we confirmed that zebrafish nip3a, a homologous gene of mammalian BNIP3, was indeed induced by hypoxia and p53 mutation/knockdown enhanced nip3a expression under hypoxia resulted in cell death enhancement in p53 mutant embryos. Furthermore, p53 protected against hypoxia-induced cell death mediated by p53 suppression of BNIP3 as illustrated by p53 knockdown/loss assays in both human cell lines and zebrafish model, which is in contrast to the traditional pro-apoptotic role of p53. Our results suggest a novel function of p53 in hypoxia-induced cell death, leading to the development of new treatments for ischaemic heart disease and cerebral stoke. PMID:21792176

  2. Targeting the p53 signaling pathway in cancer therapy - The promises, challenges, and perils

    PubMed Central

    Stegh, Alexander H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Research over the past three decades has identified p53 as a multifunctional transcription factor, which regulates the expression of >2,500 target genes. p53 impacts myriad, highly diverse cellular processes, including the maintenance of genomic stability and fidelity, metabolism, longevity, and represents one of the most important and extensively studied tumor suppressors. Activated by various stresses, foremost genotoxic damage, hypoxia, heat shock and oncogenic assault, p53 blocks cancer progression by provoking transient or permanent growth arrest, by enabling DNA repair or by advancing cellular death programs. This potent and versatile anti-cancer activity profile, together with genomic and mutational analyses documenting inactivation of p53 in more than 50% of human cancers, motivated drug development efforts to (re-) activate p53 in established tumors. Areas covered In this review the complexities of p53 signaling in cancer are summarized. Current strategies and challenges to restore p53’s tumor suppressive function in established tumors, i.e. adenoviral gene transfer and small molecules to activate p53, to inactivate p53 inhibitors and to restore wild type function of p53 mutant proteins are discussed. Expert opinion It is indubitable that p53 represents an attractive target for the development of anti-cancer therapies. Whether p53 is ‘druggable’, however, remains an area of active research and discussion, as p53 has pro-survival functions and chronic p53 activation accelerates aging, which may compromise the long-term homeostasis of an organism. Thus, the complex biology and dual functions of p53 in cancer prevention and age-related cellular responses pose significant challenges on the development of p53-targeting cancer therapies. PMID:22239435

  3. Mutant p53 (p53-R248Q) functions as an oncogene in promoting endometrial cancer by up-regulating REGγ.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huihui; Bao, Wei; Jiang, Feizhou; Che, Qi; Chen, Zheng; Wang, Fangyuan; Tong, Huan; Dai, Chenyun; He, Xiaoying; Liao, Yun; Liu, Binya; Sun, Jing; Wan, Xiaoping

    2015-05-01

    P53 mutation plays a pivotal role in tumorigenesis of endometrial cancer (EC), here we report that the gain-of-function mutant p53-R248Q targets the proteasome activator REGγ to promote EC progression. Increased p53 expression significantly correlated with high pathological grade and lymph node metastasis in EC specimens. Manipulation of p53-R248Q in EC cells caused coincident changes in REGγ expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with PCR further indicated that p53-R248Q bound to the REGγ gene promoter at a p53 responsive element. Silencing of REGγ in EC cells attenuated the cell proliferation, migration and invasion abilities, whereas overexpression of p53-R248Q rescued these activities. Overexpression of REGγ also induced an epithelial-mesenchymal transition phenotype. Moreover, a mouse xenograft tumor model showed that REGγ promoted tumor growth, further demonstrating a p53-R248Q-REGγ oncogenic pathway. Finally, examination of EC and normal endometrium specimens confirmed the oncogenic role of REGγ, in that REGγ was more highly overexpressed in p53-positive specimens than in p53-negative specimens. Our data suggest that REGγ is a promising therapeutic target for EC with the p53-R248Q mutation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Matthias R.; Joerger, Andreas C.; Fersht, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53’s oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1MET(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells. PMID:27551077

  5. 2-Sulfonylpyrimidines: Mild alkylating agents with anticancer activity toward p53-compromised cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Matthias R; Joerger, Andreas C; Fersht, Alan R

    2016-09-06

    The tumor suppressor p53 has the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Many of p53's oncogenic mutants are just destabilized and rapidly aggregate, and are targets for stabilization by drugs. We found certain 2-sulfonylpyrimidines, including one named PK11007, to be mild thiol alkylators with anticancer activity in several cell lines, especially those with mutationally compromised p53. PK11007 acted by two routes: p53 dependent and p53 independent. PK11007 stabilized p53 in vitro via selective alkylation of two surface-exposed cysteines without compromising its DNA binding activity. Unstable p53 was reactivated by PK11007 in some cancer cell lines, leading to up-regulation of p53 target genes such as p21 and PUMA. More generally, there was cell death that was independent of p53 but dependent on glutathione depletion and associated with highly elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, as also found for the anticancer agent PRIMA-1(MET)(APR-246). PK11007 may be a lead for anticancer drugs that target cells with nonfunctional p53 or impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) detoxification in a wide variety of mutant p53 cells.

  6. Resveratrol increases nitric oxide synthase, induces accumulation of p53 and p21(WAF1/CIP1), and suppresses cultured bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell proliferation by perturbing progression through S and G2.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, T C; Juan, G; Darzynkiewicz, Z; Wu, J M

    1999-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that the regular consumption of red wine may in part account for the apparent compatibility of a high fat diet with a low incidence of coronary atherosclerosis. This phenomenon, commonly referred to as the French paradox, may be associated with red wine constituents that exhibit tumor-preventive properties as well as inhibit reactions that increase the risk of coronary heart disease. Here we show that resveratrol, a polyphenol in red wine, induces nitric oxide synthase, the enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of NO, in cultured pulmonary artery endothelial cells, suggesting that resveratrol could afford cardioprotection by affecting the expression of nitric oxide synthase. We also show that resveratrol inhibits the proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells, which, based on flow cytometric analysis, correlates with the suppression of cell progression through S and G2 phases of the cell cycle. Western blot analysis and immunocytochemical protein detection combined with multiparameter flow cytometry further demonstrate that the perturbed progression through S and G2 phases is accompanied by an increase in the expression of tumor suppressor gene protein p53 and elevation of the level of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/CIP1). All of the observed effects of resveratrol, including induction of apoptosis at its higher concentration, are also compatible with its putative chemopreventive and/or antitumor activity.

  7. MEF/ELF4 transactivation by E2F1 is inhibited by p53.

    PubMed

    Taura, Manabu; Suico, Mary Ann; Fukuda, Ryosuke; Koga, Tomoaki; Shuto, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Takashi; Morino-Koga, Saori; Okada, Seiji; Kai, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid elf-1-like factor (MEF) or Elf4 is an E-twenty-six (ETS)-related transcription factor with strong transcriptional activity that influences cellular senescence by affecting tumor suppressor p53. MEF downregulates p53 expression and inhibits p53-mediated cellular senescence by transcriptionally activating MDM2. However, whether p53 reciprocally opposes MEF remains unexplored. Here, we show that MEF is modulated by p53 in human cells and mice tissues. MEF expression and promoter activity were suppressed by p53. While we found that MEF promoter does not contain p53 response elements, intriguingly, it contains E2F consensus sites. Subsequently, we determined that E2F1 specifically binds to MEF promoter and transactivates MEF. Nevertheless, E2F1 DNA binding and transactivation of MEF promoter was inhibited by p53 through the association between p53 and E2F1. Furthermore, we showed that activation of p53 in doxorubicin-induced senescent cells increased E2F1 and p53 interaction, diminished E2F1 recruitment to MEF promoter and reduced MEF expression. These observations suggest that p53 downregulates MEF by associating with and inhibiting the binding activity of E2F1, a novel transcriptional activator of MEF. Together with previous findings, our present results indicate that a negative regulatory mechanism exists between p53 and MEF.

  8. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53.

    PubMed

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2-catalase and p53/PIG3-catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively.

  9. UBE4B targets phosphorylated p53 at serines 15 and 392 for degradation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Cheng; Wu, Hong; Leng, Roger P.

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of p53 is a key mechanism responsible for the activation of its tumor suppressor functions in response to various stresses. In unstressed cells, p53 is rapidly turned over and is maintained at a low basal level. After DNA damage or other forms of cellular stress, the p53 level increases, and the protein becomes metabolically stable. However, the mechanism of phosphorylated p53 regulation is unclear. In this study, we studied the kinetics of UBE4B, Hdm2, Pirh2, Cop1 and CHIP induction in response to p53 activation. We show that UBE4B coimmunoprecipitates with phosphorylated p53 at serines 15 and 392. Notably, the affinity between UBE4B and Hdm2 is greatly decreased after DNA damage. Furthermore, we observe that UBE4B promotes endogenous phospho-p53(S15) and phospho-p53(S392) degradation in response to IR. We demonstrate that UBE4B and Hdm2 repress p53S15A, p53S392A, and p53-2A(S15A, S392A) functions, including p53-dependent transactivation and growth inhibition. Overall, our results reveal that UBE4B plays an important role in regulating phosphorylated p53 following DNA damage. PMID:26673821

  10. Inactivation of p53 by HTLV type 1 and HTLV type 2 Tax trans-activators.

    PubMed

    Mahieux, R; Pise-Masison, C A; Nicot, C; Green, P; Hall, W W; Brady, J N

    2000-11-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type II (HTLV-2) was originally isolated from a patient with a hairy T cell leukemia. It has been associated with rare cases of CD8(+) T lymphoproliferative disorders, and has a controversial role as a pathogen. The loss of p53 function, as a consequence of mutation or inactivation, increases the chances of genetic damage. Indeed, the importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor is evident from the fact that over 60% of all human cancers have a mutant or inactive p53. p53 status has been extensively studied in HTLV-1-infected cell lines. Interestingly, despite the fact that p53 mutations have been found in only a minority of cells, the p53 functions were found to be impaired. We have analyzed the functional activity of the p53 tumor suppressor in cells transformed with HTLV-2 subtypes A and B. As with HTLV-1-infected cells, abundant levels of the p53 protein are detected in HTLV-2 virus-infected cell lines. Using p53 reporter plasmid or induction of p53-responsive genes in response to gamma-irradiation, the p53 was found to be transcriptionally inhibited in HTLV-2-infected cells. Interestingly, although Tax-2A and-2B inactivate p53, the Tax-2A protein appears to inhibit p53 function less efficiently than either Tax-1 or Tax-2B in T cells, but not in fibroblasts.

  11. The critical role of catalase in prooxidant and antioxidant function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Kang, M Y; Kim, H-B; Piao, C; Lee, K H; Hyun, J W; Chang, I-Y; You, H J

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is an important regulator of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, although downstream mediators of p53 remain to be elucidated. Here, we show that p53 and its downstream targets, p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (p53R2) and p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), physically and functionally interact with catalase for efficient regulation of intracellular ROS, depending on stress intensity. Under physiological conditions, the antioxidant functions of p53 are mediated by p53R2, which maintains increased catalase activity and thereby protects against endogenous ROS. After genotoxic stress, high levels of p53 and PIG3 cooperate to inhibit catalase activity, leading to a shift in the oxidant/antioxidant balance toward an oxidative status, which could augment apoptotic cell death. These results highlight the essential role of catalase in p53-mediated ROS regulation and suggest that the p53/p53R2–catalase and p53/PIG3–catalase pathways are critically involved in intracellular ROS regulation under physiological conditions and during the response to DNA damage, respectively. PMID:22918438

  12. Changes in O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Homeostasis Activate the p53 Pathway in Ovarian Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    de Queiroz, Rafaela Muniz; Madan, Rashna; Chien, Jeremy; Dias, Wagner Barbosa; Slawson, Chad

    2016-09-02

    O-GlcNAcylation is a dynamic post-translational modification consisting of the addition of a single N-acetylglucosamine sugar to serine and threonine residues in proteins by the enzyme O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT), whereas the enzyme O-GlcNAcase (OGA) removes the modification. In cancer, tumor samples present with altered O-GlcNAcylation; however, changes in O-GlcNAcylation are not consistent between tumor types. Interestingly, the tumor suppressor p53 is modified by O-GlcNAc, and most solid tumors contain mutations in p53 leading to the loss of p53 function. Because ovarian cancer has a high frequency of p53 mutation rates, we decided to investigate the relationship between O-GlcNAcylation and p53 function in ovarian cancer. We measured a significant decrease in O-GlcNAcylation of tumor tissue in an ovarian tumor microarray. Furthermore, O-GlcNAcylation was increased, and OGA protein and mRNA levels were decreased in ovarian tumor cell lines not expressing the protein p53. Treatment with the OGA inhibitor Thiamet-G (TMG), silencing of OGA, or overexpression of OGA and OGT led to p53 stabilization, increased nuclear localization, and increased protein and mRNA levels of p53 target genes. These data suggest that changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the p53 pathway. Combination treatment of the chemotherapeutic cisplatin with TMG decreased tumor cell growth and enhanced cell cycle arrest without impairing cytotoxicity. The effects of TMG on tumor cell growth were partially dependent on wild type p53 activation. In conclusion, changes in O-GlcNAc homeostasis activate the wild type p53 pathway in ovarian cancer cells, and OGA inhibition has the potential as an adjuvant treatment for ovarian carcinoma.

  13. The polymorphisms of P53 codon 72 and MDM2 SNP309 and renal cell carcinoma risk in a low arsenic exposure area

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Su, Chien-Tien; Chu, Jan-Show; Huang, Shu-Pin; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Yang, Hsiu-Yuan; Chung, Chi-Jung; Wu, Chia-Chang; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2011-12-15

    Our recent study demonstrated the increased risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) associated with high urinary total arsenic levels among people living in a low arsenic exposure area. Genomic instability is important in arsenic carcinogenesis. This study evaluated the relationship between the polymorphisms of p53, p21, and MDM2, which plays a role in gene stability, and the arsenic-related RCC risk. Here, we found that p53 Pro/Pro genotype and MDM2 SNP309 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk compared to the p53 Arg/Arg genotype and MDM2 SNP309 TT genotype. RCC patients with the p53Arg/Arg genotype had a signicantly low percentage of inorganic arsenic, a low percentage of monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and a high percentage of dimethylarsinic acid (DMA), which indicates efcient arsenic methylation capacity. Subjects with the p53 Arg/Pro + Pro/Pro genotype or MDM2 SNP309 TG + GG genotype, in conjunction with high urinary total arsenic ({>=} 14.02 {mu}g/L), had a signicantly higher RCC risk than those with the p53 Arg/Arg or MDM2 SNP309 TT genotypes and low urinary total arsenic. Taken together, this is the first study to show that a variant genotype of p53 Arg{sup 72}Pro or MDM2 SNP309 may modify the arsenic-related RCC risk even in a non-obvious arsenic exposure area. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Subjects with p53 Pro/Pro or MDM2 GG genotype significantly increased RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A significant multiplicative joint effect of p53 and p21 on RCC risk. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RCC patients with p53 Arg/Arg genotype had efficient arsenic methylation capacity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Joint effect of p53 or MDM2 genotype and high urinary total arsenic on RCC risk.

  14. Tumor protein 53-induced nuclear protein 1 is a major mediator of p53 antioxidant function.

    PubMed

    Cano, Carla E; Gommeaux, Julien; Pietri, Sylvia; Culcasi, Marcel; Garcia, Stéphane; Seux, Mylène; Barelier, Sarah; Vasseur, Sophie; Spoto, Rose P; Pébusque, Marie-Josèphe; Dusetti, Nelson J; Iovanna, Juan L; Carrier, Alice

    2009-01-01

    p53 exerts its tumor suppressor function mainly through transcriptional induction of target genes involved in several processes, including cell cycle checkpoints, apoptosis, and regulation of cell redox status. p53 antioxidant function is dependent on its transcriptional activity and proceeds by sequential induction of antioxidant and proapoptotic targets. However, none of the thus far renowned p53 targets have proved able to abolish on their own the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation caused by p53 deficiency, therefore pointing to the existence of other prominent and yet unknown p53 antioxidant targets. Here, we show that TP53INP1 represents such a target. Indeed, TP53INP1 transcript induction on oxidative stress is strictly dependent on p53. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) and splenocytes derived from TP53INP1-deficient (inp1(-/-)) mice accumulate intracellular ROS, whereas overexpression of TP53INP1 in p53-deficient MEFs rescues ROS levels to those of p53-proficient cells, indicating that TP53INP1 antioxidant function is p53 independent. Furthermore, accumulation of ROS in inp1(-/-) cells on oxidant challenge is associated with decreased expression of p53 targets p21/Cdkn1a, Sesn2, TAp73, Puma, and Bax. Mutation of p53 Ser(58) (equivalent to human p53 Ser(46)) abrogates transcription of these genes, indicating that TP53INP1-mediated p53 Ser(58) phosphorylation is implicated in this process. In addition, TP53INP1 deficiency results in an antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine)-sensitive acceleration of cell proliferation. Finally, TP53INP1 deficiency increases oxidative stress-related lymphoma incidence and decreases survival of p53(+/-) mice. In conclusion, our data show that TP53INP1 is a major actor of p53-driven oxidative stress response that possesses both a p53-independent intracellular ROS regulatory function and a p53-dependent transcription regulatory function.

  15. Differentiation-dependent p53 regulation of nucleotide excision repair in keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Li, G.; Ho, V. C.; Mitchell, D. L.; Trotter, M. J.; Tron, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in repair of ultraviolet light (UV)-induced DNA damage was evaluated using a host-cell reactivation (HCR) assay. HCR determines a cell's ability to repair UV-damaged DNA through reactivation of a transfected CAT reported plasmid. Most UV damage is removed through nucleotide excision repair (NER). Primary murine keratinocytes isolated from p53-deficient and wild-type p53 mice were used in the HCR assay. The NER was reduced in p53-/- keratinocytes as compared with p53+/+ keratinocytes. The reduced DNA repair in p53-/- mice was confirmed with a radioimmunoassay comparing cyclobutane dimers (CPDs) and (6-4) photoproducts in p53+/+ and p53-/- keratinocytes after the cells were exposed to UV irradiation. Our results demonstrate that wildtype p53 plays a significant role in regulating NER. Furthermore, as there is evidence that p53 protein levels decrease after keratinocytes become differentiated, we sought to determine whether p53 plays a role in NER in differentiated keratinocytes. Differentiation of the keratinocytes by increasing the Ca2+ concentration in the culture media resulted in a marked reduction in NER equally in both p53+/+ and p53-/- groups. This finding suggests that reduced DNA repair after differentiation is p53 independent. A similar reduction in HCR was confirmed in differentiated human keratinocytes. These data, taken together, indicate that p53 or p53-regulated proteins enhance NER in basal undifferentiated keratinocytes but not in differentiated cells. As nonmelanoma skin cancers originate from the basal keratinocytes, our findings suggest that loss of p53 may contribute to the pathogenesis of this common skin cancer. PMID:9095000

  16. R248Q mutation--Beyond p53-DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Ng, Jeremy W K; Lama, Dilraj; Lukman, Suryani; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S; Sim, Adelene Y L

    2015-12-01

    R248 in the DNA binding domain (DBD) of p53 interacts directly with the minor groove of DNA. Earlier nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies indicated that the R248Q mutation resulted in conformation changes in parts of DBD far from the mutation site. However, how information propagates from the mutation site to the rest of the DBD is still not well understood. We performed a series of all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to dissect sterics and charge effects of R248 on p53-DBD conformation: (i) wild-type p53 DBD; (ii) p53 DBD with an electrically neutral arginine side-chain; (iii) p53 DBD with R248A; (iv) p53 DBD with R248W; and (v) p53 DBD with R248Q. Our results agree well with experimental observations of global conformational changes induced by the R248Q mutation. Our simulations suggest that both charge- and sterics are important in the dynamics of the loop (L3) where the mutation resides. We show that helix 2 (H2) dynamics is altered as a result of a change in the hydrogen bonding partner of D281. In turn, neighboring L1 dynamics is altered: in mutants, L1 predominantly adopts the recessed conformation and is unable to interact with the major groove of DNA. We focused our attention the R248Q mutant that is commonly found in a wide range of cancer and observed changes at the zinc-binding pocket that might account for the dominant negative effects of R248Q. Furthermore, in our simulations, the S6/S7 turn was more frequently solvent exposed in R248Q, suggesting that there is a greater tendency of R248Q to partially unfold and possibly lead to an increased aggregation propensity. Finally, based on the observations made in our simulations, we propose strategies for the rescue of R248Q mutants.

  17. p53 alteration in morphologically normal/benign breast tissue in patients with triple-negative high-grade breast carcinomas: breast p53 signature?

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Stolla, Moritz; Ring, Brian Z; Yang, Qi; Laughlin, Todd S; Rothberg, Paul G; Skinner, Kristin; Hicks, David G

    2016-09-01

    p53 alterations have been identified in approximately 23% of breast carcinomas, particularly in hormone receptor-negative high-grade carcinomas. It is considered to be an early event in breast carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, the putative precursor lesion of high-grade breast carcinoma remains elusive. Breast excision specimens from 93 triple-negative high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, 48 estrogen receptor (ER)-positive/progesterone receptor-positive/Her2-negative non-high-grade invasive ductal carcinomas, and 50 mammoplasty breasts were selected. At least 2 tissue blocks with tumor and adjacent benign tissue were sectioned and subjected to immunohistochemistry staining for p53. TP53 gene sequencing was performed on select tumors. Further immunohistochemistry staining for ER and Ki-67 was performed on consecutive sections of tissue with p53-positive normal/benign cells. Of the 93 high-grade carcinomas, 51 (55%) were positive for p53 alteration, whereas only 3 (6.25%) of the 48 non-high-grade carcinomas were p53 altered. Focal p53 positivity in adjacent normal/benign breast tissue was identified in 19 cases, and 18 of them also had p53 alteration in their carcinomas. Only 1 case had focal p53 staining in normal/benign tissue, but the tumor was negative for p53 alteration. No p53 staining positivity was identified in the mammoplasty specimens. The p53-stained normal/benign cells were ER negative and did not show an increase in the Ki-67 labeling index. These findings indicate that the p53 staining positivity in normal/benign breast tissue is not a random event. It could be considered as the "p53 signature" in breast and serve as an indicator for future potential risk of p53-positive high-grade breast carcinoma. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. p53 gene alterations and protein accumulation in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertorelle, R; Esposito, G; Belluco, C; Bonaldi, L; Del Mistro, A; Nitti, D; Lise, M; Chieco-Bianchi, L

    1996-01-01

    Aim—To correlate immunohistochemical staining with single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the p53 gene in colorectal cancer in order to understand how the findings provided by the two techniques complement each other in defining p53 functional status. Methods—Frozen tumour tissue from 94 patients with colorectal cancer was studied for p53 protein accumulation and gene mutations. Accumulation of p53 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry using PAb1801 and BP53-12-1 monoclonal antibodies. The findings were then compared with SSCP analysis of exons 5 to 8 of the p53 gene. All cases with a positive result by SSCP analysis were confirmed by sequencing. Results—Nuclear staining was observed in 51 (54.2%) cases. SSCP analysis of the DNA amplified by PCR revealed that the electrophoretic pattern had shifted in 30 cases; sequence analysis confirmed the occurrence of a mutation in 29 cases and of a polymorphism in one. In 27 cases both assays gave a positive result, and in 40 both were negative; therefore, concordance between PCR-SSCP and immunohistochemistry was seen in 72% of cases. Conclusion—The data indicate that positive immunostaining corresponds with the presence of a mutation in most, but not all, cases studied; other mechanisms could be responsible for stabilisation and accumulation of p53 protein in the nucleus. Nonsense mutations which do not confer stability on the protein will not be detected by immunohistochemistry and false negative results can also occur with SSCP analysis. Images PMID:16696056

  19. The p53 core domain is a molten globule at low pH: functional implications of a partially unfolded structure.

    PubMed

    Bom, Ana Paula D Ano; Freitas, Monica S; Moreira, Flavia S; Ferraz, Danielly; Sanches, Daniel; Gomes, Andre M O; Valente, Ana Paula; Cordeiro, Yraima; Silva, Jerson L

    2010-01-22

    p53 is a transcription factor that maintains genome integrity, and its function is lost in 50% of human cancers. The majority of p53 mutations are clustered within the core domain. Here, we investigate the effects of low pH on the structure of the wild-type (wt) p53 core domain (p53C) and the R248Q mutant. At low pH, the tryptophan residue is partially exposed to the solvent, suggesting a fluctuating tertiary structure. On the other hand, the secondary structure increases, as determined by circular dichroism. Binding of the probe bis-ANS (bis-8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate) indicates that there is an increase in the exposure of hydrophobic pockets for both wt and mutant p53C at low pH. This behavior is accompanied by a lack of cooperativity under urea denaturation and decreased stability under pressure when p53C is in acidic pH. Together, these results indicate that p53C acquires a partially unfolded conformation (molten-globule state) at low pH (5.0). The hydrodynamic properties of this conformation are intermediate between the native and denatured conformation. (1)H-(15)N HSQC NMR spectroscopy confirms that the protein has a typical molten-globule structure at acidic pH when compared with pH 7.2. Human breast cells in culture (MCF-7) transfected with p53-GFP revealed localization of p53 in acidic vesicles, suggesting that the low pH conformation is present in the cell. Low pH stress also tends to favor high levels of p53 in the cells. Taken together, all of these data suggest that p53 may play physiological or pathological roles in acidic microenvironments.

  20. Thrombocytopenia induced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor abexinostat involves p53-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ali, A; Bluteau, O; Messaoudi, K; Palazzo, A; Boukour, S; Lordier, L; Lecluse, Y; Rameau, P; Kraus-Berthier, L; Jacquet-Bescond, A; Lelièvre, H; Depil, S; Dessen, P; Solary, E; Raslova, H; Vainchenker, W; Plo, I; Debili, N

    2013-01-01

    Abexinostat is a pan histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) that demonstrates efficacy in malignancy treatment. Like other HDACi, this drug induces a profound thrombocytopenia whose mechanism is only partially understood. We have analyzed its effect at doses reached in patient plasma on in vitro megakaryopoiesis derived from human CD34+ cells. When added at day 0 in culture, abexinostat inhibited CFU-MK growth, megakaryocyte (MK) proliferation and differentiation. These effects required only a short incubation period. Decreased proliferation was due to induction of apoptosis and was not related to a defect in TPO/MPL/JAK2/STAT signaling. When added later (day 8), the compound induced a dose-dependent decrease (up to 10-fold) in proplatelet (PPT) formation. Gene profiling from MK revealed a silencing in the expression of DNA repair genes with a marked RAD51 decrease at protein level. DNA double-strand breaks were increased as attested by elevated γH2AX phosphorylation level. Moreover, ATM was phosphorylated leading to p53 stabilization and increased BAX and p21 expression. The use of a p53 shRNA rescued apoptosis, and only partially the defect in PPT formation. These results suggest that HDACi induces a thrombocytopenia by a p53-dependent mechanism along MK differentiation and a p53-dependent and -independent mechanism for PPT formation. PMID:23887629

  1. [Effect of recombinant human p53 adenovirus (Ad-p53) combined with EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on the sensitivity of breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinzhao; Guan, Xiyun; Wang, Leilei; Xie, Li; Liu, Qi; Yu, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    To observe the impact of concurrent administration of recombinant human p53 adenovirus (Ad-p53) with EGFR inhibitor gefitinib on breast cancer MDA-MB-468 cells. MDA-MB-468 cells were treated with Ad-p53 and/or gefitinib. The effect of Ad-p53 and gefitinib on the growth of MDA-MB-468 cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry. Western blot analysis was used to detect the alteration of p53,EGFR, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway and apoptosis-related proteins. Ad-p53 combined with gefitinib was used in vivo to explore their effect on tumor xenograft in nude mice. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the p53 expression in vivo. The MTT assay showed a stronger inhibitory effect of gefitinib on MDA-MB-468 cells infected with Ad-p53 than on the control cells. Cell apoptosis assay revealed that the apoptosis rates of MDA-MB-468 cells in vehicle-treated group, Ad-p53 group, gefitinib group, and combination group were 8.5%, 17.4%, 20.5% and 32.6%, respectively. The apoptosis rate of MDA-MB-468 cells in the combination group was higher than that in other groups (P < 0.05, for all) . Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of p53 was significantly up-regulated in the presence of Ad-p53. The combination of Ad-p53 and gefitinib significantly down-regulated p-Akt (S473)(P < 0.01) and up-regulated caspase-9 and cleaved caspase-3 (P < 0.01 for both). Tumor inhibition rates (TIR) in the Ad-p53, gefitinib, and combination groups were 35.7%, 28.7% and 74.4%, respectively. Ad-p53 and gefitinib combination therapy significantly reduced the tumor burden in nude mice (P < 0.05 for all).Immunohistochemistry showed that after intratumoral administration of Ad-p53, wild-type p53 was increased (P < 0.01). p53 expressions in the vehicle-treated, Ad-p53, gefitinib and combination groups were 45.2%, 80.1%, 50.7% and 90.6%, respectively. Wild-type p53 may reverse the sensitivity of MDA-MB-468 cells to gefitinib through

  2. The role of p53 in ribosomopathies.

    PubMed

    Fumagalli, Stefano; Thomas, George

    2011-04-01

    Impaired ribosome biogenesis is the underlying cause of the pathological conditions collectively known as ribosomopathies. Several hypotheses have been advanced to explain the mechanisms by which deficiencies in ribosome biogenesis interfere with developmental processes leading eventually to the emergence of these diseases. In recent years it has become clear that perturbation of this process triggers a cell-cycle checkpoint that, through activation of the tumor-suppressor p53, leads to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis. Indeed, evidence is accumulating from studies in animal models that the unscheduled activation of p53 is responsible for perturbations in tissue homeostasis that cause the development of ribosomopathies such as Treacher-Collins syndrome (TCS) and 5q(-) syndrome. These findings imply that inhibition of p53, or better, of mechanisms that specifically lead to p53 activation in response to inhibition of ribosome biogenesis, could be targeted in the treatment of ribosomopathies where activation of p53 is shown to play a pathogenic role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of p53 in the progression of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Busuttil, Rita A; Zapparoli, Giada V; Haupt, Sue; Fennell, Christina; Wong, Stephen Q; Pang, Jia-Min B; Takeno, Elena A; Mitchell, Catherine; Di Costanzo, Natasha; Fox, Stephen; Haupt, Ygal; Dobrovic, Alexander; Boussioutas, Alex

    2014-12-15

    Intestinal metaplasia (IM) is a premalignant lesion associated with gastric cancer (GC) but is poorly described in terms of molecular changes. Here, we explored the role of TP53, a commonly mutated gene in GC, to determine if p53 protein expression and/or the presence of somatic mutations in TP53 can be used as a predictive marker for patients at risk of progressing to GC from IM. Immunohistochemistry and high resolution melting were used to determine p53 protein expression and TP53 mutation status respectively in normal gastric mucosa, IM without concurrent GC (IM-GC), IM with concurrent GC (IM+GC) and GC. This comparative study revealed an incremental increase in p53 expression levels with progression of disease from normal mucosa, via an IM intermediate to GC. TP53 mutations however, were not detected in IM but occurred frequently in GC. Further, we identified increased protein expression of Mdm2/x, both powerful regulators of p53, in 100% of the IM+GC cohort with these samples also exhibiting high levels of wild-type p53 protein. Our data suggests that TP53 mutations occur late in gastric carcinogenesis contributing to the final transition to cancer. We also demonstrated involvement of Mdmx in GC.

  4. Cr(VI) induces premature senescence through ROS-mediated p53 pathway in L-02 hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujing; Zhang, Yiyuan; Zhong, Caigao; Xiao, Fang

    2016-01-01

    Hexavalent Chromium [Cr(VI)], which can be found of various uses in industries such as metallurgy and textile dying, can cause a number of human disease including inflammation and cancer. Unlike previous research that focused on Cr(VI)-induced oxidative damage and apoptosis, this study placed emphasis on premature senescence that can be induced by low-dose and long-term Cr(VI) exposure. We found Cr(VI) induced premature senescence in L-02 hepatocytes, as confirmed by increase in senescence associated-β-galactosidase (SA-β-Gal) activity. Cr(VI) stabilized p53 through phosphorylation at Ser15 and increased expression of p53-transcriptional target p21. Mechanism study revealed Cr(VI) targeted and inhibited mitochondrial respiratory chain complex (MRCC) I and II to enhance reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. By applying antioxidant Trolox, we also confirmed that ROS mediated p53 activation. A tetracycline-inducible lentiviral expression system containing shRNA to p53 was used to knockout p53. We found p53 could inhibit pro-survival genes B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), myeloid leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) and S phase related cell cycle proteins cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2), Cyclin E to induce premature senescence, and the functional role of ROS in Cr(VI)-induced premature senescence is depend on p53. The results suggest that Cr(VI) has a role in premature senescence by promoting ROS-dependent p53 activation in L-02 hepatocytes. PMID:27698449

  5. Synergistic efficacy of sorafenib and genistein in growth inhibition by down regulating angiogenic and survival factors and increasing apoptosis through upregulation of p53 and p21 in malignant neuroblastoma cells having N-Myc amplification or non-amplification.

    PubMed

    Roy Choudhury, Subhasree; Karmakar, Surajit; Banik, Naren L; Ray, Swapan K

    2010-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is an extracranial, solid, and heterogeneous malignancy in children. The conventional therapeutic modalities are mostly ineffective and thus new therapeutic strategies for malignant neuroblastoma are urgently warranted. We examined the synergistic efficacy of combination of sorafenib (SF) and genistein (GST) in human malignant neuroblastoma SK-N-DZ (N-Myc amplified) and SH-SY5Y (N-Myc non-amplified) cell lines. MTT assay showed dose-dependent decrease in cell viability and the combination therapy more prominently inhibited the cell proliferation in both cell lines than either treatment alone. Apoptosis was confirmed morphologically by Wright staining. Flow cytometric analysis of cell cycle phase distribution and Annexin V-FITC/PI staining showed increase in subG1 DNA content and early apoptosis, respectively, after treatment with the combination of drugs. Apoptosis was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. Combination therapy showed activation of caspase-8, cleavage of Bid to tBid, increase in p53 and p21 expression, down regulation of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1, and increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio to trigger apoptosis. Down regulation of MDR, hTERT, N-Myc, VEGF, FGF-2, NF-κB, p-Akt, and c-IAP2 indicated suppression of angiogenic and survival pathways. Mitochondrial release of cytochrome c and Smac into cytosol indicated involvement of mitochondia in apoptosis. Increases in proteolytic activities of calpain and caspase-3 were also confirmed. Our results suggested that combination of SF and GST inhibited angiogenic and survival factors and increased apoptosis via receptor and mitochondria mediated pathways in both neuroblastoma SK-N-DZ and SH-SY5Y cell lines. Thus, this combination of drugs could be a potential therapeutic strategy against human malignant neuroblastoma cells having N-Myc amplification or non-amplification.

  6. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-01-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications. PMID:27872473

  7. Increasing entropy for colloidal stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, Songping; Shao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ying; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2016-11-01

    Stability is of paramount importance in colloidal applications. Attraction between colloidal particles is believed to lead to particle aggregation and phase separation; hence, stability improvement can be achieved through either increasing repulsion or reducing attraction by modifying the fluid medium or by using additives. Two traditional mechanisms for colloidal stability are electrostatic stabilization and steric stabilization. However, stability improvement by mixing attractive and unstable particles has rarely been considered. Here, we emphasize the function of mixing entropy in colloidal stabilization. Dispersion stability improvement is demonstrated by mixing suspensions of attractive nanosized titania spheres and platelets. A three-dimensional phase diagram is proposed to illustrate the collaborative effects of particle mixing and particle attraction on colloidal stability. This discovery provides a novel method for enhancing colloidal stability and opens a novel opportunity for engineering applications.

  8. p53 and gamma radiation in the normal breast.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yajing; Appleyard, M Virginia C L; Coates, Phillip J; Thompson, Alastair M

    2009-11-01

    With the increasing use of radiation as adjuvant therapy in breast cancer, the effects of gamma radiation on the remaining normal breast are of increasing importance. The complexities of multiple cellular types within breast tissues and the role of the pleiotropic Tumour Protein 53 (TP53, p53) protein with its downstream transcriptional targets and cellular processes may be central to the effects on residual normal breast tissues. While a detailed understanding of p53 protein-mediated responses in normal breast tissues remains elusive, p53 appears to have a pivotal role in the effects of gamma radiation on normal breast epithelium, but not stromal cells, which may account for the differing clinical effects of gamma radiation in women treated for breast cancer.

  9. p53 Suppresses Tetraploid Development in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Horii, Takuro; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian tetraploid embryos die in early development because of defects in the epiblast. Experiments with diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice, obtained via the aggregation of embryonic stem cells, clarified that while tetraploid cells are excluded from epiblast derivatives, diploid embryos with tetraploid extraembryonic tissues can develop to term. Today, this method, known as tetraploid complementation, is usually used for rescuing extraembryonic defects or for obtaining completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived pups. However, it is still unknown why defects occur in the epiblast during mammalian development. Here, we demonstrated that downregulation of p53, a tumour suppressor protein, rescued tetraploid development in the mammalian epiblast. Tetraploidy in differentiating epiblast cells triggered p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting the activation of a tetraploidy checkpoint during early development. Finally, we found that p53 downregulation rescued tetraploid embryos later in gestation. PMID:25752699

  10. p53 suppresses tetraploid development in mice.

    PubMed

    Horii, Takuro; Yamamoto, Masamichi; Morita, Sumiyo; Kimura, Mika; Nagao, Yasumitsu; Hatada, Izuho

    2015-03-10

    Mammalian tetraploid embryos die in early development because of defects in the epiblast. Experiments with diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice, obtained via the aggregation of embryonic stem cells, clarified that while tetraploid cells are excluded from epiblast derivatives, diploid embryos with tetraploid extraembryonic tissues can develop to term. Today, this method, known as tetraploid complementation, is usually used for rescuing extraembryonic defects or for obtaining completely embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived pups. However, it is still unknown why defects occur in the epiblast during mammalian development. Here, we demonstrated that downregulation of p53, a tumour suppressor protein, rescued tetraploid development in the mammalian epiblast. Tetraploidy in differentiating epiblast cells triggered p53-dependent cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis, suggesting the activation of a tetraploidy checkpoint during early development. Finally, we found that p53 downregulation rescued tetraploid embryos later in gestation.

  11. Interferons alpha and gamma induce p53-dependent and p53-independent apoptosis, respectively.

    PubMed

    Porta, Chiara; Hadj-Slimane, Reda; Nejmeddine, Mohamed; Pampin, Mathieu; Tovey, Michael G; Espert, Lucile; Alvarez, Sandra; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K

    2005-01-20

    Type I interferon (IFN) enhances the transcription of the tumor suppressor gene p53. To elucidate the molecular mechanism mediating IFN-induced apoptosis, we analysed programmed cell death in response to type I (IFNalpha) or type II (IFNgamma) treatment in relation to p53 status. In two cell lines (MCF-7, SKNSH), IFNalpha, but not IFNgamma, enhanced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Furthermore, only IFNalpha upregulated p53 as well as p53 target genes (Noxa, Mdm2 and CD95). The apoptotic response to IFNalpha decreased in the presence of ZB4, an anti-CD95 antibody, suggesting that CD95 is involved in this process. When p53 was inactivated by the E6 viral protein or the expression of a p53 mutant, IFNalpha-induced apoptosis and p53 target genes upregulation were abrogated. Altogether these results demonstrate that p53 plays a pivotal role in the IFNalpha-induced apoptotic response. IFNalpha-induced PML was unable to recruit p53 into nuclear bodies and its downregulation by siRNA did not alter CD95 expression. In contrast, IFNgamma-induced apoptosis is p53-independent. CD95 and IFN-regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) are directly upregulated by this cytokine. Apoptotic response to IFNgamma is decreased in the presence of ZB4 and strongly diminished by IRF1 siRNA, implicating both CD95 and IRF1 in IFNgamma-induced apoptotic response. Taken together, these results show that in two different cell lines, IFNalpha and IFNgamma, induce p53-dependent -independent apoptosis, respectively.

  12. PHTS, a novel putative tumor suppressor, is involved in the transformation reversion of HeLaHF cells independently of the p53 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Dehua; Fan, Wufang; Liu, Guohong; Nguy, Vivian; Chatterton, Jon E.; Long Shilong; Ke, Ning; Meyhack, Bernd; Bruengger, Adrian; Brachat, Arndt; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang . E-mail: li@immusol.com

    2006-04-01

    HeLaHF is a non-transformed revertant of HeLa cells, likely resulting from the activation of a putative tumor suppressor(s). p53 protein was stabilized in this revertant and reactivated for certain transactivation functions. Although p53 stabilization has not conclusively been linked to the reversion, it is clear that the genes in p53 pathway are involved. The present study confirms the direct role of p53 in HeLaHF reversion by demonstrating that RNAi-mediated p53 silencing partially restores anchorage-independent growth potential of the revertant through the suppression of anoikis. In addition, we identified a novel gene, named PHTS, with putative tumor suppressor properties, and showed that this gene is also involved in HeLaHF reversion independently of the p53 pathway. Expression profiling revealed that PHTS is one of the genes that is up-regulated in HeLaHF but not in HeLa. It encodes a putative protein with CD59-like domains. RNAi-mediated PHTS silencing resulted in the partial restoration of transformation (anchorage-independent growth) in HeLaHF cells, similar to that of p53 gene silencing, implying its tumor suppressor effect. However, the observed increased transformation potential by PHTS silencing appears to be due to an increased anchorage-independent proliferation rate rather than suppression of anoikis, unlike the effect of p53 silencing. p53 silencing did not affect PHTS gene expression, and vice versa, suggesting PHTS may function in a new and p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway. Furthermore, over-expression of PHTS in different cancer cell lines, in addition to HeLa, reduces cell growth likely via induced apoptosis, confirming the broad PHTS tumor suppressor properties.

  13. Cell cycle regulation and p53 activation by protein phosphatase 2C alpha.

    PubMed

    Ofek, Paula; Ben-Meir, Daniella; Kariv-Inbal, Zehavit; Oren, Moshe; Lavi, Sara

    2003-04-18

    Protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) dephosphorylates a broad range of substrates, regulating stress response and growth-related pathways in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. We now demonstrate that PP2C alpha, a major mammalian isoform, inhibits cell growth and activates the p53 pathway. In 293 cell clones, in which PP2C alpha expression is regulated by a tetracycline-inducible promoter, PP2C alpha overexpression led to G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Furthermore, PP2C alpha induced the expression of endogenous p53 and the p53-responsive gene p21. Activation of the p53 pathway by PP2C alpha took place both in cells harboring endogenous p53, as well as in p53-null cells transfected with exogenous p53. Induction of PP2C alpha resulted in an increase in the overall levels of p53 protein as well as an augmentation of p53 transcription activity. The dephosphorylation activity of PP2C alpha is essential to the described phenomena, as none of these effects was detected when an enzymatically inactive PP2C alpha mutant was overexpressed. p53 plays an important role in PP2C alpha-directed cell cycle arrest and apoptosis because perturbation of p53 expression in human 293 cells by human papillomavirus E6 led to a significant increase in cell survival. The role of PP2C alpha in p53 activation is discussed.

  14. Regulation of p53 is critical for vertebrate limb regeneration.

    PubMed

    Yun, Maximina H; Gates, Phillip B; Brockes, Jeremy P

    2013-10-22

    Extensive regeneration of the vertebrate body plan is found in salamander and fish species. In these organisms, regeneration takes place through reprogramming of differentiated cells, proliferation, and subsequent redifferentiation of adult tissues. Such plasticity is rarely found in adult mammalian tissues, and this has been proposed as the basis of their inability to regenerate complex structures. Despite their importance, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the differentiated state during regeneration remain unclear. Here, we analyzed the role of the tumor-suppressor p53 during salamander limb regeneration. The activity of p53 initially decreases and then returns to baseline. Its down-regulation is required for formation of the blastema, and its up-regulation is necessary for the redifferentiation phase. Importantly, we show that a decrease in the level of p53 activity is critical for cell cycle reentry of postmitotic, differentiated cells, whereas an increase is required for muscle differentiation. In addition, we have uncovered a potential mechanism for the regulation of p53 during limb regeneration, based on its competitive inhibition by ΔNp73. Our results suggest that the regulation of p53 activity is a pivotal mechanism that controls the plasticity of the differentiated state during regeneration.

  15. p53 as a retrovirus-induced oxidative stress modulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Wong, Paul K Y

    2015-01-01

    Infection of astrocytes by the neuropathogenic mutant of Moloney murine leukemia virus, ts1, exhibits increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signs of oxidative stress compared with uninfected astrocytes. Previously, we have demonstrated that ts1 infection caused two separate events of ROS upregulation. The first upregulation occurs during early viral establishment in host cells and the second during the virus-mediated apoptotic process. In this study, we show that virus-mediated ROS upregulation activates the protein kinase, ataxia telangiectasia mutated, which in turn phosphorylates serine 15 on p53. This activation of p53 however, is unlikely associated with ts1-induced cell death. Rather p53 appears to be involved in suppressing intracellular ROS levels in astrocytes under oxidative stress. The activated p53 appears to delay retroviral gene expression by suppressing NADPH oxidase, a superoxide-producing enzyme. These results suggest that p53 plays a role as a retrovirus-mediated oxidative stress modulator. © 2015 The Authors.

  16. Two faces of p53: aging and tumor suppression

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis; Campisi, Judith; Bhaumik, Dipa

    2007-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein, often termed guardian of the genome, integrates diverse physiological signals in mammalian cells. In response to stress signals, perhaps the best studied of which is the response to DNA damage, p53 becomes functionally active and triggers either a transient cell cycle arrest, cell death (apoptosis) or permanent cell cycle arrest (cellular senescence). Both apoptosis and cellular senescence are potent tumor suppressor mechanisms that irreversibly prevent damaged cells from undergoing neoplastic transformation. However, both processes can also deplete renewable tissues of proliferation-competent progenitor or stem cells. Such depletion, in turn, can compromise the structure and function of tissues, which is a hallmark of aging. Moreover, whereas apoptotic cells are by definition eliminated from tissues, senescent cells can persist, acquire altered functions, and thus alter tissue microenvironments in ways that can promote both cancer and aging phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that increased p53 activity can, at least under some circumstances, promote organismal aging. Here, we discuss the role of p53 as a key regulator of the DNA damage responses, and discuss how p53 integrates the outcome of the DNA damage response to optimally balance tumor suppression and longevity. PMID:17942417

  17. The expanding regulatory universe of p53 in gastrointestinal cancer.

    PubMed

    Fesler, Andrew; Zhang, Ning; Ju, Jingfang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppresser gene TP53 is one of the most frequently deleted or mutated genes in gastrointestinal cancers. As a transcription factor, p53 regulates a number of important protein coding genes to control cell cycle, cell death, DNA damage/repair, stemness, differentiation and other key cellular functions. In addition, p53 is also able to activate the expression of a number of small non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs) through direct binding to the promoter region of these miRNAs.  Many miRNAs have been identified to be potential tumor suppressors by regulating key effecter target mRNAs. Our understanding of the regulatory network of p53 has recently expanded to include long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Like miRNA, lncRNAs have been found to play important roles in cancer biology.  With our increased understanding of the important functions of these non-coding RNAs and their relationship with p53, we are gaining exciting new insights into the biology and function of cells in response to various growth environment changes. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the ever expanding involvement of non-coding RNAs in the p53 regulatory network and its implications for our understanding of gastrointestinal cancer.

  18. The transcription factor CREBZF is a novel positive regulator of p53

    PubMed Central

    López-Mateo, Irene; Villaronga, M. Ángeles; Llanos, Susana; Belandia, Borja

    2012-01-01

    CREBZF is a member of the mammalian ATF/CREB family of transcription factors. Here, we describe a novel functional interaction between CREBZF and the tumor suppressor p53. CREBZF was identified in a yeast two-hybrid screen using HEY1, recently characterized as an indirect p53 activator, as bait. CREBZF interacts in vitro with both HEY1 and p53, and CREBZF expression stabilizes and activates p53. Moreover, CREBZF cooperates synergistically with HEY1 to enhance p53 transcriptional activity. On the other hand, partial depletion of endogenous CREBZF diminishes p53 protein levels and inhibits HEY1-mediated activation of p53. CREBZF-positive effects on p53 signaling may reflect, at least in part, an observed induction of posttranslational modifications in p53 known to prevent its degradation. CREBZF expression protects HCT116 cells from UV radiation-induced cell death. In addition, CREBZF expression confers sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, a p53-activating chemotherapeutic drug. Our study suggests that CREBZF may participate in the modulation of p53 tumor suppressor function. PMID:22983008

  19. Amyloidogenicity of p53: a hidden link between protein misfolding and cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hao; Yang, Xin; Zhao, Yudan; Petersen, Robert B; Liu, Xinran; Liu, Yang; Huang, Kun

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic aggregation is closely associated with various protein misfolding diseases such as type 2 diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease. Amyloidogenic proteins that have a propensity to assemble into amyloid oligomers and fibrils form the aggregates. The tumor suppressor p53, a transcription factor that regulates the cell cycle and apoptosis, is also amyloidogenic. In tumor models, both wild type and mutant p53 proteins show aggregation kinetics and morphology similar to those of classical amyloidogenic proteins, such as β-amyloid peptide and α- synuclein. Wild type p53 loses its anticancer activity when it aggregates, while p53 mutants with enhanced amyloidogenicity show accelerated aggregation. So far, amyloidogenic p53 mutations have been implicated in more than ten different types of cancer, suggesting a connection between p53 aggregation and cancer. Therefore, inhibition of both inherent and mutation induced p53 aggregation may stabilize p53 in a functional conformation and provide a novel approach to cancer prevention and treatment. Here, we summarize recent findings on carcinogenic aggregation of wild type p53 and its clinical mutants, structure-dependent amyloidogenesis of p53, and several promising strategies based on inhibition of p53 aggregation are also discussed.

  20. Transcriptional repressor NIR interacts with the p53-inhibiting ubiquitin ligase MDM2.

    PubMed

    Heyne, Kristina; Förster, Juliane; Schüle, Roland; Roemer, Klaus

    2014-04-01

    NIR (novel INHAT repressor) can bind to p53 at promoters and inhibit p53-mediated gene transactivation by blocking histone acetylation carried out by p300/CBP. Like NIR, the E3 ubiquitin ligase MDM2 can also bind and inhibit p53 at promoters. Here, we present data indicating that NIR, which shuttles between the nucleolus and nucleoplasm, not only binds to p53 but also directly to MDM2, in part via the central acidic and zinc finger domain of MDM2 that is also contacted by several other nucleolus-based MDM2/p53-regulating proteins. Like some of these, NIR was able to inhibit the ubiquitination of MDM2 and stabilize MDM2; however, unlike these nucleolus-based MDM2 regulators, NIR did not inhibit MDM2 to activate p53. Rather, NIR cooperated with MDM2 to repress p53-induced transactivation. This cooperative repression may at least in part involve p300/CBP. We show that NIR can block the acetylation of p53 and MDM2. Non-acetylated p53 has been documented previously to more readily associate with inhibitory MDM2. NIR may thus help to sustain the inhibitory p53:MDM2 complex, and we present evidence suggesting that all three proteins can indeed form a ternary complex. In sum, our findings suggest that NIR can support MDM2 to suppress p53 as a transcriptional activator.

  1. DJ-1 restores p53 transcription activity inhibited by Topors/p53BP3.

    PubMed

    Shinbo, Yumi; Taira, Takahiro; Niki, Takeshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M M; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2005-03-01

    DJ-1 is a multi-functional protein that plays roles in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidative stress, and loss of its function is thought to result in onset of Parkinson's disease. Here, we report that DJ-1 bound to Topors/p53BP3, a ring finger protein binding to both topoisomerase I and p53, in vitro and in vivo and that both proteins were colocalized in cells. DJ-1 and p53 were then found to be sumoylated by Topors in cells. It was also found that DJ-1 bound to p53 in vitro and in vivo and that colocalization with and its binding to p53 were stimulated by UV irradiation of cells. Transcription activity of p53 was found to be abrogated by Topors concomitant with sumoylation of p53 in a dose-dependent manner, and DJ-1 restored its repressed activity by releasing the sumoylated form of p53. These findings suggest that DJ-1 positively regulates p53 through Topors-mediated sumoylation.

  2. P53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    suppressor gene in sporadic breast tumours . 1991. Loss of chromosome 17 pl3 sequences and mutation of p53 Oncogene 5 :1573-1579. in human breast...COVERED March 2005 Final (I Aug 2000 - 1 Feb 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5 . FUNDING NUMBERS p53 Gene Mutagenesis in Breast Cancer DAMD17-00-1-0204 6. AUTHOR...The central hypothesis of this proposal is that variability in the patterns of p 5 3 mutagenesis in breast cancer reflects differences in exposures to

  3. Acetylation of Lysine 382 and Phosphorylation of Serine 392 in p53 Modulate the Interaction between p53 and MDC1 In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Or David; Gabizon, Ronen; Feine, Oren; Alhadeff, Raphael; Ganoth, Assaf; Argaman, Liron; Shimshoni, Elee; Friedler, Assaf; Goldberg, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Occurrence of DNA damage in a cell activates the DNA damage response, a survival mechanism that ensures genomics stability. Two key members of the DNA damage response are the tumor suppressor p53, which is the most frequently mutated gene in cancers, and MDC1, which is a central adaptor that recruits many proteins to sites of DNA damage. Here we characterize the in vitro interaction between p53 and MDC1 and demonstrate that p53 and MDC1 directly interact. The p53-MDC1 interaction is mediated by the tandem BRCT domain of MDC1 and the C-terminal domain of p53. We further show that both acetylation of lysine 382 and phosphorylation of serine 392 in p53 enhance the interaction between p53 and MDC1. Additionally, we demonstrate that the p53-MDC1 interaction is augmented upon the induction of DNA damage in human cells. Our data suggests a new role for acetylation of lysine 382 and phosphorylation of serine 392 in p53 in the cellular stress response and offers the first evidence for an interaction involving MDC1 that is modulated by acetylation. PMID:24194938

  4. Shifting p53-induced senescence to cell death by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) gene through posttranslational modification of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ok Ran; Ryu, Min Sook; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence and apoptosis can be regulated by p53 activity, although the underlying mechanism of the switch between the two events remains largely unknown. Cells exposed to cancer chemotherapy can escape to senescence phenotype rather than undergoing apoptosis. By employing adenoviral transduction of p53 or TIS21 genes, we observed shifting of p53 induced-senescence to apoptosis in EJ bladder cancer cells, which express H-RasV12 and mutant p53; transduction of p53 increased H-RasV12 expression along with senescence phenotypes, whereas coexpression with TIS21 (p53+TIS21) induced cell death rather than senescence. The TIS21-mediated switch of senescence to apoptosis was accompanied by nuclear translocation of p53 protein and its modifications on Ser-15 and Ser-46 phosphorylation and acetylations on Lys-120, -320, -373 and -382 residues. Mechanistically, TIS21(/BTG2) regulated posttranslational modification of p53 via enhancing miR34a and Bax expressions as opposed to inhibiting SIRT1 and Bcl2 expression. At the same time, TIS21 increased APAF-1 and p53AIP1 expressions, but inhibited the interaction of p53 with iASPP. In vitro tumorigenicity was significantly reduced in the p53+TIS21 expresser through inhibiting micro-colony proliferation by TIS21. Effect of TIS21 on the regulation of p53 activity was confirmed by knockdown of TIS21 expression by RNA interference. Therefore, we suggest TIS21 expression as an endogenous cell death inducer at the downstream of p53 gene, which might be useful for intractable cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Aggregation tendencies in the p53 family are modulated by backbone hydrogen bonds

    PubMed Central

    Cino, Elio A.; Soares, Iaci N.; Pedrote, Murilo M.; de Oliveira, Guilherme A. P.; Silva, Jerson L.

    2016-01-01

    The p53 family of proteins is comprised of p53, p63 and p73. Because the p53 DNA binding domain (DBD) is naturally unstable and possesses an amyloidogenic sequence, it is prone to form amyloid fibrils, causing loss of functions. To develop p53 therapies, it is necessary to understand the molecular basis of p53 instability and aggregation. Light scattering, thioflavin T (ThT) and high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) assays showed that p53 DBD aggregates faster and to a greater extent than p63 and p73 DBDs, and was more susceptible to denaturation. The aggregation tendencies of p53, p63, and p73 DBDs were strongly correlated with their thermal stabilities. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations indicated specific regions of structural heterogeneity unique to p53, which may be promoted by elevated incidence of exposed backbone hydrogen bonds (BHBs). The results indicate regions of structural vulnerability in the p53 DBD, suggesting new targetable sites for modulating p53 stability and aggregation, a potential approach to cancer therapy. PMID:27600721

  6. Promotion of CHIP-mediated p53 degradation protects the heart from ischemic injury.

    PubMed

    Naito, Atsuhiko T; Okada, Sho; Minamino, Tohru; Iwanaga, Koji; Liu, Mei-Lan; Sumida, Tomokazu; Nomura, Seitaro; Sahara, Naruhiko; Mizoroki, Tatsuya; Takashima, Akihiko; Akazawa, Hiroshi; Nagai, Toshio; Shiojima, Ichiro; Komuro, Issei

    2010-06-11

    The number of patients with coronary heart disease, including myocardial infarction, is increasing and novel therapeutic strategy is awaited. Tumor suppressor protein p53 accumulates in the myocardium after myocardial infarction, causes apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, and plays an important role in the progression into heart failure. We investigated the molecular mechanisms of p53 accumulation in the heart after myocardial infarction and tested whether anti-p53 approach would be effective against myocardial infarction. Through expression screening, we found that CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein) is an endogenous p53 antagonist in the heart. CHIP suppressed p53 level by ubiquitinating and inducing proteasomal degradation. CHIP transcription was downregulated after hypoxic stress and restoration of CHIP protein level prevented p53 accumulation after hypoxic stress. CHIP overexpression in vivo prevented p53 accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis after myocardial infarction. Promotion of CHIP function by heat shock protein (Hsp)90 inhibitor, 17-allylamino-17-demethoxy geldanamycin (17-AAG), also prevented p53 accumulation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. CHIP-mediated p53 degradation was at least one of the cardioprotective effects of 17-AAG. We found that downregulation of CHIP level by hypoxia was responsible for p53 accumulation in the heart after myocardial infarction. Decreasing the amount of p53 prevented myocardial apoptosis and ameliorated ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction. We conclude that anti-p53 approach would be effective to treat myocardial infarction.

  7. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Green, M L; Pisano, M M; Prough, R A; Knudsen, T B

    2013-12-01

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protein led by a sense (m53-EGFP) or antisense (c53-EGFP) mitochondrial import signal. Rotenone exposure (100nM, 1h) triggered the translocation of m53-EGFP from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, thus shifting the transfected cells from a mitochondrial p53 to a nuclear p53 state. Antibodies for p53 serine phosphorylation or lysine acetylation indicated a different post-translational status of recombinant p53 in the nucleus and mitochondrion, respectively. These data suggest that cycling of p53 through the mitochondria may establish a direct pathway for p53 signaling from the mitochondria to the nucleus during mitochondrial dysfunction. PK11195, a pharmacological ligand of mitochondrial TSPO (formerly known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor), partially suppressed the release of mitochondria-sequestered p53. These findings support the notion that p53 function mediates a direct signaling pathway from the mitochondria to nucleus during mitochondrial dysfunction.

  8. Impact of G-quadruplex structures and intronic polymorphisms rs17878362 and rs1642785 on basal and ionizing radiation-induced expression of alternative p53 transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Perriaud, Laury; Marcel, Virginie; Sagne, Charlotte; Favaudon, Vincent; Guédin, Aurore; De Rache, Aurore; Guetta, Corinne; Hamon, Florian; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Hainaut, Pierre; Mergny, Jean-Louis; Hall, Janet

    2014-01-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) structures in intron 3 of the p53 pre-mRNA modulate intron 2 splicing, altering the balance between the fully spliced p53 transcript (FSp53, encoding full-length p53) and an incompletely spliced transcript retaining intron 2 (p53I2 encoding the N-terminally truncated Δ40p53 isoform). The nucleotides forming G4s overlap the polymorphism rs17878362 (A1 wild-type allele, A2 16-base pair insertion) which is in linkage disequilibrium with rs1642785 in intron 2 (c.74+38 G>C). Biophysical and biochemical analyses show rs17878362 A2 alleles form similar G4 structures as A1 alleles although their position is shifted with respect to the intron 2 splice acceptor site. In addition basal FSp53 and p53I2 levels showed allele specific differences in both p53-null cells transfected with reporter constructs or lymphoblastoid cell lines. The highest FSp53 and p53I2 levels were associated with combined rs1642785-GG/rs17878362-A1A1 alleles, whereas the presence of rs1642785-C with either rs17878362 allele was associated with lower p53 pre-mRNA, total TP53, FSp53 and p53I2 levels, due to the lower stability of transcripts containing rs1642785-C. Treatment of lymphoblastoid cell with the G4 binding ligands 360A or PhenDC3 or with ionizing radiation increased FSp53 levels only in cells with rs17878362 A1 alleles, suggesting that under this G4 configuration full splicing is favoured. These results demonstrate the complex effects of intronic TP53 polymorphisms on G4 formation and identify a new role for rs1642785 on mRNA splicing and stability, and thus on the differential expression of isoform-specific transcripts of the TP53 gene. PMID:25269805

  9. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  10. Mechanisms of p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    exclusion assay and under control of the IGFBP3 promoter and 1 pig of empty pcDNA3 or pcDNA3 vector expressing p53 and various mutants. (A) The BD found that...C. C. Harris, and P. p73-deficient mice have neurological, pheromonal and inflammatory defects Hainaut. 2002. The IARC TP53 database: new online

  11. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis. PMID:27689798

  12. 1800MHz Microwave Induces p53 and p53-Mediated Caspase-3 Activation Leading to Cell Apoptosis In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Xing, Fuqiang; Zhan, Qiuqiang; He, Yiduo; Cui, Jiesheng; He, Sailing; Wang, Guanyu

    Recent studies have reported that exposure of mammalian cells to microwave radiation may have adverse effects such as induction of cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying microwave induced mammalian cell apoptosis are not fully understood. Here, we report a novel mechanism: exposure to 1800MHz microwave radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis through cytochrome c-mediated caspase-3 activation pathway. We first measured intensity of microwave radiation from several electronic devices with an irradiation detector. Mouse NIH/3T3 and human U-87 MG cells were then used as receivers of 1800MHz electromagnetic radiation (EMR) at a power density of 1209 mW/m2. Following EMR exposure, cells were analyzed for viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage, p53 expression, and caspase-3 activity. Our analysis revealed that EMR exposure significantly decreased viability of NIH/3T3 and U-87 MG cells, and increased caspase-3 activity. ROS burst was observed at 6 h and 48 h in NIH/3T3 cells, while at 3 h in U-87 MG cells. Hoechst 33258 staining and in situ TUNEL assay detected that EMR exposure increased DNA damage, which was significantly restrained in the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC, an antioxidant). Moreover, EMR exposure increased the levels of p53 protein and p53 target gene expression, promoted cytochrome c release from mitochondrion, and increased caspase-3 activity. These events were inhibited by pretreatment with NAC, pifithrin-α (a p53 inhibitor) and caspase inhibitor. Collectively, our findings demonstrate, for the first time, that 1800MHz EMR induces apoptosis-related events such as ROS burst and more oxidative DNA damage, which in turn promote p53-dependent caspase-3 activation through release of cytochrome c from mitochondrion. These findings thus provide new insights into physiological mechanisms underlying microwave-induced cell apoptosis.

  13. BAC transgenic mice provide evidence that p53 expression is highly regulated in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Zhang, G X; Zhou, Y; Zhang, C X; Xie, Y Y; Xiang, C; He, X Y; Zhang, Q; Liu, G

    2015-09-17

    p53 is an important tumor suppressor and stress response mediator. Proper control of p53 level and activity is tightly associated with its function. Posttranslational modifications and the interactions with Mdm2 and Mdm4 are major mechanisms controlling p53 activity and stability. As p53 protein is short-lived and hardly detectable in unstressed situations, less is known on its basal level expression and the corresponding controlling mechanisms in vivo. In addition, it also remains obscure how p53 expression might contribute to its functional regulation. In this study, we established bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic E.coli β-galactosidase Z gene reporter mice to monitor p53 expression in mouse tissues and identify important regulatory elements critical for the expression in vivo. We revealed preferentially high level of p53 reporter expressions in the proliferating, but not the differentiated compartments of the majority of tissues during development and tissue homeostasis. In addition, tumors as well as regenerating tissues in the p53 reporter mice also expressed high level of β-gal. Furthermore, both the enhancer box sequence (CANNTG) in the p53 promoter and the 3' terminal untranslated region element were critical in mediating the high-level expression of the reporter. We also provided evidence that cellular myelocytomatosis oncogene was a critical player regulating p53 mRNA expression in proliferating cells and tissues. Finally, we found robust p53 activation preferentially in the proliferating compartment of mouse tissues upon DNA damage and the proliferating cells exhibited an enhanced p53 response as compared with cells in a quiescent state. Together, these results suggested a highly regulated expression pattern of p53 in the proliferating compartment controlled by both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, and such regulated p53 expression may impose functional significance upon stress by setting up a precautionary mode in defense

  14. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of oncoprotein Hdm2 is required for Hdm2-mediated degradation of p53

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Weikang; Levine, Arnold J.

    1999-01-01

    The Hdm2 oncoprotein inhibits p53 functions by two means: (i) it blocks p53’s transactivation activity and (ii) it targets p53 for degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. Recent data indicate that Hdm2 shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and that the regulation of p53 levels by Hdm2 requires its nuclear export activity. Two different models are consistent with these observations. In the first, Hdm2 binds to p53 in the nucleus and shuttles p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, and then it targets p53 to the cytoplasmic proteasome. Alternatively, Hdm2 and p53 could be exported separately from the nucleus and then associate in the cytoplasm, where Hdm2 promotes the degradation of p53. To distinguish between these two models, several Hdm2 mutants were employed. Hdm2NLS lacks the ability to enter the nucleus, whereas Hdm2NES is deficient in nuclear export. Hdm2NLS, Hdm2NES, or the combination of both mutants were unable to promote p53 degradation in the cotransfected 2KO cells (which were null for both the p53 and mdm2 genes), although wild-type Hdm2 efficiently reduced p53 levels under the same conditions. This observation is not a result of the differences in expression levels or stability between Hdm2 and these mutants. Moreover, coexpression of these mutants had no effect on wild-type Hdm-2-induced p53 destabilization. Thus, Hdm2 must shuttle p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm to target it for degradation in the cytoplasm. PMID:10077639

  15. Regulation of p53 tetramerization and nuclear export by ARC

    PubMed Central

    Foo, Roger S.-Y.; Nam, Young-Jae; Ostreicher, Marc Jason; Metzl, Mark D.; Whelan, Russell S.; Peng, Chang-Fu; Ashton, Anthony W.; Fu, Weimin; Mani, Kartik; Chin, Suet-Feung; Provenzano, Elena; Ellis, Ian; Figg, Nichola; Pinder, Sarah; Bennett, Martin R.; Caldas, Carlos; Kitsis, Richard N.

    2007-01-01

    Inactivation of the transcription factor p53 is central to carcinogenesis. Yet only approximately one-half of cancers have p53 loss-of-function mutations. Here, we demonstrate a mechanism for p53 inactivation by apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC), a protein induced in multiple cancer cells. The direct binding in the nucleus of ARC to the p53 tetramerization domain inhibits p53 tetramerization. This exposes a nuclear export signal in p53, triggering Crm1-dependent relocation of p53 to the cytoplasm. Knockdown of endogenous ARC in breast cancer cells results in spontaneous tetramerization of endogenous p53, accumulation of p53 in the nucleus, and activation of endogenous p53 target genes. In primary human breast cancers with nuclear ARC, p53 is almost always WT. Conversely, nearly all breast cancers with mutant p53 lack nuclear ARC. We conclude that nuclear ARC is induced in cancer cells and negatively regulates p53. PMID:18087040

  16. Combination of p53-DC vaccine and rAd-p53 gene therapy induced CTLs cytotoxic against p53-deleted human prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saito, H; Kitagawa, K; Yoneda, T; Fukui, Y; Fujsawa, M; Bautista, D; Shirakawa, T

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the US FDA approved sipuleucel-T, which is composed of autologous DCs stimulated with a recombinant fusion protein of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), as the first immunotherapeutic agent for metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, sipuleucel-T demonstrated only modest efficacy in mCPRC patients. Researchers are now investigating the potential of p53 protein as a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) loaded in DC-based cancer vaccine. Approximately half of all tumors overexpress p53, and up to 20% of prostate cancer cells overexpresses p53. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of combining p53-DC vaccine and rAd-p53 gene therapy, using the p53-overexpressing and non-expressing prostate cancer cells in vitro. We successfully generated the p53-DC vaccine by culturing autologous DCs infected with rAd-p53. This p53-DC vaccine can differentiate CTLs specifically cytotoxic to p53-overexpressing prostate cancer cells. In addition, rAd-p53 infection can induce overexpression of p53 and thus the cytotoxicity of CTLs differentiated by the p53-DC vaccine in p53 non-expressing prostate cancer cells. These findings suggest that this combination therapy using p53-DC vaccine and rAd-p53 gene therapy together may represent a new paradigm for the treatment of mCRPC.

  17. Suppression of the p300-dependent mdm2 negative-feedback loop induces the p53 apoptotic function

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Anju; White, Eileen

    1998-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene product interacts with the p300 transcriptional coactivator that regulates the transactivation of p53-inducible genes. The adenovirus E1A protein has been shown to bind to p300 and inhibit its function. E1A inhibits p53 transactivation and also promotes p53 accumulation by a p300-dependent mechanism. Murine double minute 2 (Mdm2) is a transcriptional target of p53 that binds to p53 and inhibits its transcriptional activity. E1A inhibited mdm2 transactivation without affecting the expression of p21WAF1 or Bax, which resulted in high levels of p53 accumulation and apoptosis. Ectopic expression of p300 restored Mdm2 levels and inhibited p53-dependent apoptosis, as did ectopic expression of Mdm2. Thus, p300 is required for mdm2 induction by p53 and the subsequent inhibition of p53 stabilization. Inhibition of p300 by E1A results in stabilization of p53 and causes apoptosis. Moreover, E1B 19K or Bcl-2 expression in E1A-transformed cells abrogated p53-dependent apoptosis by restoring mdm2 transactivation by p53. Hence, p300 regulation of mdm2 expression controls apoptotic activity of p53, and 19K or Bcl-2 bypass E1A inhibition of p300 transactivation of Mdm2. PMID:9649502

  18. Rap2b, a novel p53 target, regulates p53-mediated pro-survival function

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinyue; He, Yunlong; Lee, Kyoung-Hwa; Dubois, Wendy; Li, Ziqing; Wu, Xiaolin; Kovalchuk, Alexander; Zhang, Weimin; Huang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is a critical regulator of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest/pro-survival. Upon DNA damage, p53 evokes both cell cycle arrest/pro-survival and apoptosis transcriptional programs. The ultimate cellular outcome depends on the balance of these two programs. However, the p53 downstream targets that mediate this cell fate decision remain to be identified. Using an integrative genomic approach, we identify Rap2b as a conserved p53-activated gene that counters p53-mediated apoptosis after DNA damage. Upon DNA damage, p53 directly binds to the promoter of Rap2b and activates its transcription. The reduction of Rap2b levels by small interference RNA sensitizes cells to DNA damage-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-survival function, analysis of cancer genomic data reveals that Rap2b is overexpressed in many types of tumors. Anchorage-independent growth assays show that Rap2b has only weak transformation activity, suggesting that it is not an oncogene by itself. Together, our results identify Rap2b as a new player in the pro-survival program conducted by p53 and raise the possibility that targeting Rap2b could sensitize tumor cells to apoptosis in response to DNA damage. PMID:23535297

  19. The p53R172H Mutant Does Not Enhance Hepatocellular Carcinoma Development and Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ahronian, Leanne G.; Driscoll, David R.; Klimstra, David S.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is a highly deadly malignancy, accounting for approximately 800,000 deaths worldwide every year. Mutation of the p53 tumor suppressor gene is a common genetic change in HCC, present in 30% of cases. p53R175H (corresponding to p53R172H in mice) is a hotspot for mutation that demonstrates “prometastatic” gain-of-function in other cancer models. Since the frequency of p53 mutation increases with tumor grade in HCC, we hypothesized that p53R172H is a gain-of-function mutation in HCC that contributes to a decrease in tumor-free survival and an increase in metastasis. In an HCC mouse model, we found that p53R172H/flox mice do not have decreased survival, increased tumor incidence, or increased metastasis, relative to p53flox/flox littermates. Analysis of cell lines derived from both genotypes indicated that there are no differences in anchorage-independent growth and cell migration. However, shRNA-mediated knockdown of mutant p53 in p53R172H-expressing HCC cell lines resulted in decreased cell migration and anchorage-independent growth. Thus, although p53 mutant-expressing cells and tumors do not have enhanced properties relative to their p53 null counterparts, p53R172H-expressing HCC cells depend on this mutant for their transformation. p53 mutants have been previously shown to bind and inhibit the p53 family proteins p63 and p73. Interestingly, we find that the levels of p63 and p73 target genes are similar in p53 mutant and p53 null HCC cells. These data suggest that pathways regulated by these p53 family members are similarly impacted by p53R172H in mutant expressing cells, and by alternate mechanisms in p53 null cells, resulting in equivalent phenotypes. Consistent with this, we find that p53 null HCC cell lines display lower levels of the TA isoforms of p63 and p73 and higher levels of ΔNp63. Taken together these data point to the importance of p63 and p73 in constraining HCC progression. PMID:25885474

  20. Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the ionizing radiation response by ATM and p53

    PubMed Central

    Venkata Narayanan, Ishwarya; Paulsen, Michelle T.; Bedi, Karan; Berg, Nathan; Ljungman, Emily A.; Francia, Sofia; Veloso, Artur; Magnuson, Brian; di Fagagna, Fabrizio d’Adda; Wilson, Thomas E.; Ljungman, Mats

    2017-01-01

    In response to ionizing radiation (IR), cells activate a DNA damage response (DDR) pathway to re-program gene expression. Previous studies using total cellular RNA analyses have shown that the stress kinase ATM and the transcription factor p53 are integral components required for induction of IR-induced gene expression. These studies did not distinguish between changes in RNA synthesis and RNA turnover and did not address the role of enhancer elements in DDR-mediated transcriptional regulation. To determine the contribution of synthesis and degradation of RNA and monitor the activity of enhancer elements following exposure to IR, we used the recently developed Bru-seq, BruChase-seq and BruUV-seq techniques. Our results show that ATM and p53 regulate both RNA synthesis and stability as well as enhancer element activity following exposure to IR. Importantly, many genes in the p53-signaling pathway were coordinately up-regulated by both increased synthesis and RNA stability while down-regulated genes were suppressed either by reduced synthesis or stability. Our study is the first of its kind that independently assessed the effects of ionizing radiation on transcription and post-transcriptional regulation in normal human cells. PMID:28256581

  1. Clinical and pathological correlations of marrow PUMA and P53 expressions in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bektas, Ozlen; Uner, Aysegul; Buyukasik, Yahya; Uz, Burak; Bozkurt, Sureyya; Eliacik, Eylem; Işik, Ayse; Haznedaroglu, Ibrahim Celalettin; Goker, Hakan; Demiroglu, Haluk; Aksu, Salih; Ozcebe, Osman Ilhami; Sayinalp, Nilgun

    2015-05-01

    p53 is a key regulator of apoptosis. p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) is a critical mediator of p53-dependent and independent apoptosis. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship of p53 and PUMA to the prognosis of MDS. Bone marrow biopsies of MDS patients at the time of diagnosis (n = 76) and at the time of transformation (n = 19) were included in the study group. The expression of p53 and PUMA was evaluated using immunohistochemistry. When compared to the control group, both p53 (p < 0.001) and PUMA (p = 0.012) expression levels were significantly higher in MDS group. In MDS group, there was a moderate positive correlation between p53 and PUMA expressions. PUMA expression was not correlated with event free and overall survival. However, overall survival was significantly lower in cases with p53 expression in more than 50% of the cells. There was an increase in PUMA expression in cases that showed transformation as compared to the initial diagnostic bone marrows but was not statistically significant. The correlation that existed between p53 and PUMA was lost in transformed cases. Our results showed that PUMA and p53 expressions are increased in MDS marrows compared to normal marrows. PUMA expression increases further during transformation while the expression of p53 is not significantly altered which suggests that PUMA alterations might be a late event during the evolution of MDS.

  2. BRCA1 regulates PIG3-mediated apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Jiayan; Chen, Fengxia; Yang, Fang; Song, Wei; Zhu, Aiyu; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2015-04-10

    BRCA1 plays a key role in the regulation of p53-dependent target gene transcription activation. Meanwhile, the p53 inducible gene 3 (PIG3) is a downstream target of p53 and is involved in p53-initiated apoptosis. However, little is known about whether BRCA1 can regulate PIG3-mediated apoptosis. Using a tissue microarray containing 149 breast cancer patient samples, we found that BRCA1 and PIG3 expression status were significantly positively correlated (r = 0.678, P < 0.001) and identified a significant positive correlation between high expression of BRCA1 and/or PIG3 and overall survival (OS). Moreover, we reveal that overexpression of BRCA1 significantly increased expression of PIG3 in cells with intact p53, whereas no increase in PIG3 was observed in p53-null MDA-MB-157 cells and p53-depleted HCT116p53-/- cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of BRCA1 could not lead to an increase expression level of prohibitin (PHB), which we have previously identified to induce PIG3-mediated apoptosis. Finally, ChIP analysis revealed that PHB can bind to the PIG3 promoter and activate PIG3 transcription independent of p53, although p53 presence did enhance this process. Taken together, our findings suggest that BRCA1 regulates PIG3-mediated apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner, and that PIG3 expression is associated with a better OS in breast cancer patients.

  3. Apoptosis and p53 expression in rat adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Paul P; Klapwijk, Maartje S; Broersen, Sophie FM; van de Geest, Deliana A; Overbeek, Marieke; Firestein, Gary S

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: RA is a chronic inflammatory disorder that is characterized by inflammation and proliferation of synovial tissue. The amount of DNA fragmentation is significantly increased in rheumatoid synovium. Only low numbers of apoptotic cells are present in rheumatoid synovial tissue, however. The proportion of cells with DNA strand breaks is so great that this disparity suggests impaired apoptosis. Therefore, the development of novel therapeutic strategies that are aimed at inducing apoptosis in rheumatoid synovial tissue is an attractive goal. Although animal models for arthritis only approximate RA, they provide a useful test system for the evaluation of apoptosis-inducing therapies. AA in rats is among the most commonly used animal models for RA. For the interpretation of such studies, it is essential to characterize the extent to which apoptosis occurs during the natural course of the disease. Therefore, we evaluated the number of apoptotic cells and the expression of p53 in various phases of AA. Materials and methods: In order to generate the AA rat model, Lewis rats were immunized with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mineral oil on day 0. Paw swelling usually started around day 10. For the temporal analysis rats were sacrificed on days 0, 5 (prearthritis), 11 (onset of arthritis), 17 (accelerating arthritis), or 23 (chronic arthritis). For the detection of apoptotic cells, the hind paws were harvested on days 0(n=6),5 (n=6), 11 (n=6), 17 (n=6), or 23 (n=4). The right ankle joints were fixed in formalin, decalcified in ethylenediaminetetra-acetic acid, embedded in paraffin, and sectioned. The TUNEL method was applied. The percentage of TUNEL-positive cells of the total inflammatory cell infiltrate was noted. For Western blot analysis, hind paws were harvested on days 0 (n=2), 5 (n=3), 11 (n=4), 17 (n=4), or 23 (n=4). In addition, hind paws of normal rats (n=2) were studied. The right ankle joints were snap frozen and pulverized. Synovial tissue was also

  4. The roles of transcription and genotoxins underlying p53 mutagenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wright, Barbara E; Schmidt, Karen H; Hunt, Aaron T; Lodmell, J Stephen; Minnick, Michael F; Reschke, Dennis K

    2011-10-01

    Transcription drives supercoiling which forms and stabilizes single-stranded (ss) DNA secondary structures with loops exposing G and C bases that are intrinsically mutable and vulnerable to non-enzymatic hydrolytic reactions. Since many studies in prokaryotes have shown direct correlations between the frequencies of transcription and mutation, we conducted in silico analyses using the computer program, mfg, which simulates transcription and predicts the location of known mutable bases in loops of high-stability secondary structures. Mfg analyses of the p53 tumor suppressor gene predicted the location of mutable bases and mutation frequencies correlated with the extent to which these mutable bases were exposed in secondary structures. In vitro analyses have now confirmed that the 12 most mutable bases in p53 are in fact located in predicted ssDNA loops of these structures. Data show that genotoxins have two independent effects on mutagenesis and the incidence of cancer: Firstly, they activate p53 transcription, which increases the number of exposed mutable bases and also increases mutation frequency. Secondly, genotoxins increase the frequency of G-to-T transversions resulting in a decrease in G-to-A and C mutations. This precise compensatory shift in the 'fate' of G mutations has no impact on mutation frequency. Moreover, it is consistent with our proposed mechanism of mutagenesis in which the frequency of G exposure in ssDNA via transcription is rate limiting for mutation frequency in vivo.

  5. Nuclear interactor of ARF and Mdm2 regulates multiple pathways to activate p53

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Sara M; Hagen, Jussara; Tompkins, Van S; Thies, Katie; Quelle, Frederick W; Quelle, Dawn E

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is controlled by an interactive network of factors that stimulate or inhibit its transcriptional activity. Within that network, Mdm2 functions as the major antagonist of p53 by promoting its ubiquitylation and degradation. Conversely, Tip60 activates p53 through direct association on target promoters as well as acetylation of p53 at lysine 120 (K120). This study examines the functional relationship between Mdm2 and Tip60 with a novel p53 regulator, NIAM (nuclear interactor of ARF and Mdm2). Previous work showed NIAM can suppress proliferation and activate p53 independently of ARF, indicating that other factors mediate those activities. Here, we demonstrate that NIAM is a chromatin-associated protein that binds Tip60. NIAM can promote p53 K120 acetylation, although that modification is not required for NIAM to inhibit proliferation or induce p53 transactivation of the p21 promoter. Notably, Tip60 silencing showed it contributes to but is not sufficient for NIAM-mediated p53 activation, suggesting other mechanisms are involved. Indeed, growth-inhibitory forms of NIAM also bind to Mdm2, and increased NIAM expression levels disrupt p53–Mdm2 association, inhibit p53 polyubiquitylation, and prevent Mdm2-mediated inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity. Importantly, loss of NIAM significantly impairs p53 activation. Together, these results show that NIAM activates p53 through multiple mechanisms involving Tip60 association and Mdm2 inhibition. Thus, NIAM regulates 2 critical pathways that control p53 function and are altered in human cancers, implying an important role for NIAM in tumorigenesis. PMID:24621507

  6. Divergence between the high rate of p53 mutations in skin carcinomas and the low prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Moch, C; Moysan, A; Lubin, R; Salmonière, P de La; Soufir, N; Galisson, F; Vilmer, C; Venutolo, E; Pelletier, F Le; Janin, A; Basset-Séguin, N

    2001-01-01

    Circulating anti-p53 antibodies have been described and used as tumoural markers in patients with various cancers and strongly correlate with the p53 mutated status of the tumours. No study has yet looked at the prevalence of such antibodies in skin carcinoma patients although these tumours have been shown to be frequently p53 mutated. Most skin carcinoma can be diagnosed by examination or biopsy, but aggressive, recurrent and/or non-surgical cases' follow up would be helped by a biological marker of residual disease. We performed a prospective study looking at the prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies using an ELISA technique in a series of 105 skin carcinoma patients in comparison with a sex- and age-matched control skin carcinoma-free group (n = 130). Additionally, p53 accumulation was studied by immunohistochemistry to confirm p53 protein altered expression in a sample of tumours. Anti-p53 antibodies were detected in 2.9% of the cases, with a higher prevalence in patients suffering from the more aggressive squamous cell type (SCC) of skin carcinoma (8%) than for the more common and slowly growing basal cell carcinoma type or BCC (1.5%). p53 protein stabilization could be confirmed in 80% of tumours studied by IHC. This low level of anti-p53 antibody detection contrasts with the high rate of p53 mutations reported in these tumours. This observation shows that the anti-p53 humoral response is a complex and tissue-specific mechanism. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747330

  7. Regulation of p53 in NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts following hyperosmotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Ian Henry; Enghoff, Maria Stine; Brandi, Marie-Luise; Hoffmann, Else Kay

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this project was to analyze the regulation of p53 expression in NIH3T3 fibroblasts under the influence of increasing hyperosmotic stress. Expression of p53 showed a biphasic response pattern in NIH3T3 cells under increasing osmotic stress (337 mOsm to 737 mOsm) with a maximum at 587 mOsm. Under isotonic conditions p53 expression increased after addition of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 indicating that cellular p53 levels in unperturbed cells is kept low by proteasomal degradation. However, under hypertonic conditions p53 synthesis as well as p53 degradation were significantly reduced and it is demonstrated that the increase in p53 expression observed when tonicity is increased from 337 to 587 mOsm reflects that degradation is more inhibited than synthesis, whereas the decrease in p53 expression at higher tonicities reflects that synthesis is more inhibited than degradation. The activity of the p53 regulating proteins p38 MAP kinase and the ubiquitin ligase MDM2 were studied as a function of increasing osmolarity. MDM2 protein expression was unchanged at all osmolarities, whereas MDM2 phosphorylation (Ser166) increased at osmolarities up to 537 mOsm and remained constant at higher osmolarities. Phosphorylation of p38 increased at osmolarities up to 687 mOsm which correlated with an increased phosphorylation of p53 (Ser15) and the decreased p53 degradation. Caspase-3 activity increased gradually with hypertonicity and at 737 mOsm both Caspase-3 activity and annexin V binding are high even though p53 expression and activity are low, indicating that initiation of apoptosis under severe hypertonic conditions is not strictly controlled by p53. PMID:26056062

  8. Glucose tolerance in mice is linked to the dose of the p53 transactivation domain

    PubMed Central

    Franck, Debra; Tracy, Laura; Armata, Heather L.; Delaney, Christine L.; Jung, Dae Young; Ko, Hwi Jin; Ong, Helena; Kim, Jason K.; Scrable, Heidi; Sluss, Hayla K.

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 has a critical role in maintenance of glucose homeostasis. Phosphorylation of Ser18 in the transaction domain of p53 controls the expression of Zpf385a, a zinc finger protein that regulates adipogenesis and adipose function. Mice with a mutation in p53Ser18 exhibit reduced Zpf385a expression in adipose tissue, adipose tissue-specific insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance. Mice with relative deficits in the transactivation domain of p53 exhibit similar defects in glucose homeostasis, while “Super p53” mice with an increased dosage of p53 exhibit improved glucose tolerance. These data support the role of an ATM—p53 cellular stress axis that helps combat glucose intolerance and insulin resistance and regulates glucose homeostasis. PMID:23102272

  9. Expression of the human tumor suppressor p53 induces cell death in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Mabrouk, Imed; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2012-02-01

    The human tumor suppressor p53 is known as guardian of genome because of its involvement in many signals related to cell life or death. In this work, we report that human p53 induces cell death in the yeast Pichia pastoris. We showed a growth inhibition effect, which increased with the p53 protein expression level in recombinant Mut(s) (methanol utilization slow) strain of Pichia. However, no effect of p53 was observed in recombinant strain of Mut(+) (methanol utilization plus) phenotype. Interestingly, human p53 induces cell death in recombinant strains Mut(s) with characteristic markers of apoptosis such as DNA fragmentation, exposure of phosphatidylserine, and reactive oxygen species generation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that human p53 is biologically active in this heterologous context. Thus, we propose that P. pastoris could be a useful tool to better understand the biological function of human p53.

  10. Delayed expression of apoptosis in X-irradiated human leukemic MOLT-4 cells transfected with mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hisako; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Shinohara, Kunio

    2003-06-01

    The effects of X-rays on cell survival, apoptosis, and long-term response in the development of cell death as measured by the dye exclusion test were studied in human leukemic MOLT-4 cells (p53 wild-type) stably transfected with a mutant p53 cDNA expression vector. Cell survival, as determined from colony-forming ability, was increased in an expression level dependent manner, but the increase was partial even with the highest-expressing clone (B3). This contrasts with the prior observation that cell death and apoptosis in B3 are completely inhibited at 24 h after irradiation with 1.8 Gy of X-rays. The examination of B3 cells incubated for longer than 24 h after X-irradiation showed a delay in the induction of cell death and apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed that the time required to reach the highest level of wild-type p53 protein in B3 was longer than the time in MOLT-4 and that the p53 may be stabilized by the phosphorylation at Ser-15. These results suggest that the introduction of mutant p53 into MOLT-4 merely delays the development of apoptosis, during which the cells could repair the damage induced by X-rays, and results in the partial increase in cell survival.

  11. Essential Roles of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Sanam; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitination pathway and proteasomal degradation machinery dominantly regulate p53 tumor suppressor protein stability, localization, and functions in both normal and cancerous cells. Selective E3 ubiquitin ligases dominantly regulate protein levels and activities of p53 in a large range of physiological conditions and in response to cellular changes induced by exogenous and endogenous stresses. The regulation of p53’s functions by E3 ubiquitin ligases is a complex process that can lead to positive or negative regulation of p53 protein in a context- and cell type-dependent manner. Accessory proteins bind and modulate E3 ubiquitin ligases, adding yet another layer of regulatory control for p53 and its downstream functions. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of p53 regulation by selective E3 ubiquitin ligases and their potential to be considered as a new class of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in diverse types of cancers. PMID:28218667

  12. Accumulation of p53 in a mutant cell line defective in the ubiquitin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdary, D R; Dermody, J J; Jha, K K; Ozer, H L

    1994-01-01

    The wild-type p53 gene product plays an important role in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Altered function is frequently associated with changes in p53 stability. We have studied the role of the ubiquitination pathway in the degradation of p53, utilizing a temperature-sensitive mutant, ts20, derived from the mouse cell line BALB/c 3T3. We found that wild-type p53 accumulates markedly because of decreased breakdown when cells are shifted to the restrictive temperature. Introduction of sequences encoding the human ubiquitin-activating enzyme E1 corrects the temperature sensitivity defect in ts20 and prevents accumulation of p53. The data therefore strongly indicate that wild-type p53 is degraded intracellularly by the ubiquitin-mediated proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:8114731

  13. Tumor Suppressor WWOX and p53 Alterations and Drug Resistance in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Ming-Fu; Chou, Pei-Yi; Wang, Wan-Jen; Sze, Chun-I; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 are frequently mutated in glioblastomas (GBMs) and appears to contribute, in part, to resistance to temozolomide (TMZ) and therapeutic drugs. WW domain-containing oxidoreductase WWOX (FOR or WOX1) is a proapoptotic protein and is considered as a tumor suppressor. Loss of WWOX gene expression is frequently seen in malignant cancer cells due to promoter hypermethylation, genetic alterations, and translational blockade. Intriguingly, ectopic expression of wild type WWOX preferentially induces apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells harboring mutant p53. WWOX is known to physically bind and stabilize wild type p53. Here, we provide an overview for the updated knowledge in p53 and WWOX, and postulate potential scenarios that wild type and mutant p53, or isoforms, modulate the apoptotic function of WWOX. We propose that triggering WWOX activation by therapeutic drugs under p53 functional deficiency is needed to overcome TMZ resistance and induce GBM cell death. PMID:23459853

  14. Stimulation of autophagy by the p53 target gene Sestrin2.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Morselli, Eugenia; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Mouchel, Pierre-Luc; Carnuccio, Rosa; Kroemer, Guido

    2009-05-15

    The oncosuppressor protein p53 regulates autophagy in a dual fashion. The pool of cytoplasmic p53 protein represses autophagy in a transcription-independent fashion, while the pool of nuclear p53 stimulates autophagy through the transactivation of specific genes. Here we report the discovery that Sestrin2, a novel p53 target gene, is involved in the induction of autophagy. Depletion of Sestrin2 by RNA interference reduced the level of autophagy in a panel of p53-sufficient human cancer cell lines responding to distinct autophagy inducers. In quantitative terms, Sestrin2 depletion was as efficient in preventing autophagy induction as was the depletion of Dram, another p53 target gene. Knockout of either Sestrin2 or Dram reduced autophagy elicited by nutrient depletion, rapamycin, lithium or thapsigargin. Moreover, autophagy induction by nutrient depletion or pharmacological stimuli led to an increase in Sestrin2 expression levels in p53-proficient cells. In strict contrast, the depletion of Sestrin2 or Dram failed to affect autophagy in p53-deficient cells and did not modulate the inhibition of baseline autophagy by a cytoplasmic p53 mutant that was reintroduced into p53-deficient cells. We conclude that Sestrin2 acts as a positive regulator of autophagy in p53-proficient cells.

  15. p53 status in stromal fibroblasts modulates tumor growth in an SDF1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Addadi, Yoseph; Moskovits, Neta; Granot, Dorit; Lozano, Guillermina; Carmi, Yaron; Apte, Ron N.; Neeman, Michal; Oren, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor exerts a variety of cell-autonomous effects that are aimed to thwart tumor development. In addition, however, there is growing evidence for cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor effects of p53. In the present study, we investigated the impact of stromal p53 on tumor growth. Specifically, we found that ablation of p53 in fibroblasts enabled them to promote more efficiently the growth of tumors initiated by PC3 prostate cancer-derived cells. This stimulatory effect was dependent on the increased expression of the chemokine SDF-1 in the p53-deficient fibroblasts. Notably, fibroblasts harboring mutant p53 protein were more effective than p53-null fibroblasts in promoting tumor growth. The presence of either p53-null or p53-mutant fibroblasts led also to a markedly elevated rate of metastatic spread of the PC3 tumors. These findings implicate p53 in a cell non-autonomous tumor suppressor role within stromal fibroblasts, through suppressing the production of tumor-stimulatory factors by these cells. Moreover, expression of mutant p53 by tumor stroma fibroblasts might exert a gain of function effect, further accelerating tumor development. PMID:20952507

  16. Mutant p53 forms a complex with Sp1 on HIV-LTR DNA.

    PubMed

    Chicas, A; Molina, P; Bargonetti, J

    2000-12-20

    Many mutants of p53 activate HIV-LTR driven transcription and promote HIV replication. The region of the HIV-LTR containing Sp1-binding sites is important for this effect. In this study we test the hypothesis that mutant p53 interacts with DNA-bound Sp1 and in this way can increase transcription from Sp1-dependent promoters. We have used the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 that expresses endogenous mutant p53(His273) as our source of p53 protein. First, we demonstrated that this mutant p53 participates in activating transcription from the HIV-LTR by showing that HIV-LTR-directed transcription in MDA-MB-468 cells is inhibited in a dominant-negative manner by p53(Val135). Using HIV-LTR DNA affinity chromatography, we detected coelution of p53(His273) and Sp1. We also demonstrated that this mutant p53 binds sequence specifically to the super consensus sequence (SCS) and that Sp1 coeluted with p53(His273) from a column containing this site. These data indicate that p53(His273) can associate with DNA-bound Sp1 suggesting that activated HIV-LTR transcription associated with mutant p53 occurs through a DNA driven multi-protein complex.

  17. Distinct tumor protein p53 mutants in breast cancer subgroups.

    PubMed

    Dumay, Anne; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Wittmer, Evelyne; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Bertheau, Philippe; Espié, Marc; Plassa, Louis-François; Cottu, Paul; Marty, Michel; André, Fabrice; Sotiriou, Christos; Pusztai, Lajos; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-03-01

    Tumor protein p53 (TP53) is mutated in approximately 30% of breast cancers, but this frequency fluctuates widely between subclasses. We investigated the p53 mutation status in 572 breast tumors, classified into luminal, basal and molecular apocrine subgroups. As expected, the lowest mutation frequency was observed in luminal (26%), and the highest in basal (88%) tumors. Luminal tumors showed significantly higher frequency of substitutions (82 vs. 65%), notably A/T to G/C transitions (31 vs. 15%), whereas molecular apocrine and basal tumors presented much higher frequencies of complex mutations (deletions/insertions) (36 and 33%, respectively, vs. 18%). Accordingly, missense mutations were significantly more frequent in luminal tumors (75 vs. 54%), whereas basal tumors displayed significantly increased rates of TP53 truncations (43 vs. 25%), resulting in loss of function and/or expression. Interestingly, as basal tumors, molecular apocrine tumors presented with a high rate of complex mutations, but paradoxically, these were not associated with increased frequency of p53 truncation. As in luminal tumors, this could reflect a selective pressure for p53 gain of function, possibly through P63/P73 inactivation. Collectively, these observations point not only to different mechanisms of TP53 alterations, but also to different functional consequences in the different breast cancer subtypes. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  18. p53-Dependent suppression of genome instability in germ cells.

    PubMed

    Otozai, Shinji; Ishikawa-Fujiwara, Tomoko; Oda, Shoji; Kamei, Yasuhiro; Ryo, Haruko; Sato, Ayuko; Nomura, Taisei; Mitani, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Tohru; Inohara, Hidenori; Todo, Takeshi

    2014-02-01

    Radiation increases mutation frequencies at tandem repeat loci. Germline mutations in γ-ray-irradiated medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) were studied, focusing on the microsatellite loci. Mismatch-repair genes suppress microsatellite mutation by directly removing altered sequences at the nucleotide level, whereas the p53 gene suppresses genetic alterations by eliminating damaged cells. The contribution of these two defense mechanisms to radiation-induced microsatellite instability was addressed. The spontaneous mutation frequency was significantly higher in msh2(-/-) males than in wild-type fish, whereas there was no difference in the frequency of radiation-induced mutations between msh2(-/-) and wild-type fish. By contrast, irradiated p53(-/-) fish exhibited markedly increased mutation frequencies, whereas their spontaneous mutation frequency was the same as that of wild-type fish. In the spermatogonia of the testis, radiation induced a high level of apoptosis both in wild-type and msh2(-/-) fish, but negligible levels in p53(-/-) fish. The results demonstrate that the msh2 and p53 genes protect genome integrity against spontaneous and radiation-induced mutation by two different pathways: direct removal of mismatches and elimination of damaged cells.

  19. Emerging Non-Canonical Functions and Regulation by p53: p53 and Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Olivos, David J.; Mayo, Lindsey D.

    2016-01-01

    Since its discovery nearly 40 years ago, p53 has ascended to the forefront of investigated genes and proteins across diverse research disciplines and is recognized most exclusively for its role in cancer as a tumor suppressor. Levine and Oren (2009) reviewed the evolution of p53 detailing the significant discoveries of each decade since its first report in 1979. In this review, we will highlight the emerging non-canonical functions and regulation of p53 in stem cells. We will focus on general themes shared among p53’s functions in non-malignant stem cells and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and the influence of p53 on the microenvironment and CSC niche. We will also examine p53 gain of function (GOF) roles in stemness. Mutant p53 (mutp53) GOFs that lead to survival, drug resistance and colonization are reviewed in the context of the acquisition of advantageous transformation processes, such as differentiation and dedifferentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell senescence and quiescence. Finally, we will conclude with therapeutic strategies that restore wild-type p53 (wtp53) function in cancer and CSCs, including RING finger E3 ligases and CSC maintenance. The mechanisms by which wtp53 and mutp53 influence stemness in non-malignant stem cells and CSCs or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are poorly understood thus far. Further elucidation of p53’s effects on stemness could lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer research. PMID:27898034

  20. The proto-oncogene PBF binds p53 and is associated with prognostic features in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Read, Martin L; Seed, Robert I; Modasia, Bhavika; Kwan, Perkin P K; Sharma, Neil; Smith, Vicki E; Watkins, Rachel J; Bansal, Sukhchain; Gagliano, Teresa; Stratford, Anna L; Ismail, Tariq; Wakelam, Michael J O; Kim, Dae S; Ward, Stephen T; Boelaert, Kristien; Franklyn, Jayne A; Turnell, Andrew S; McCabe, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    The PTTG1-binding factor (PBF) is a transforming gene capable of eliciting tumor formation in xenograft models. However, the precise role of PBF in tumorigenesis and its prognostic value as a cancer biomarker remain largely uncharacterised, particularly in malignancies outside the thyroid. Here, we provide the first evidence that PBF represents a promising prognostic marker in colorectal cancer. Examination of a total of 39 patients demonstrated higher PBF expression at both the mRNA (P = 0.009) and protein (P < 0.0001) level in colorectal tumors compared to matched normal tissue. Critically, PBF was most abundant in colorectal tumors associated with Extramural Vascular Invasion (EMVI), increased genetic instability (GI) and somatic TP53 mutations, all features linked with recurrence and poorer patient survival. We further demonstrate by glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation that PBF binds to the tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as to p53 mutants (Δ126-132, M133K, V197E, G245D, I255F and R273C) identified in the colorectal tumors. Importantly, overexpression of PBF in colorectal HCT116 cells interfered with the transcriptional activity of p53-responsive genes such as mdm2, p21 and sfn. Diminished p53 stability (> 90%; P < 0.01) was also evident with a concurrent increase in ubiquitinated p53. Human colorectal tumors with wild-type TP53 and high PBF expression also had low p53 protein levels (P < 0.05), further emphasizing a putative interaction between these genes in vivo. Overall, these results demonstrate an emerging role for PBF in colorectal tumorigenesis through regulating p53 activity, with implications for PBF as a prognostic indicator for invasive tumors.

  1. Mechanisms of p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    BD) within residues 364 to 393. AD1 is important for transactivation; this domain contains residues that contact the basal transcriptional machinery...256 IGFBP3, a genomic fragment of the IGFBP3 promoter spanning nucleo - tides (nt) 256 to 72, with 1 being the transcriptional start site, was...BD) bind to the IGFBP3 promoter, but full-length p53 cannot recruit the basal transcriptional machinery due to its association with HDAC activity (Fig

  2. p53 Represses the Oncogenic Sno-MiR-28 Derived from a SnoRNA

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Feng; Bracken, Cameron P.; Pillman, Katherine A.; Lawrence, David M.; Goodall, Gregory J.; Callen, David F.; Neilsen, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    p53 is a master tumour repressor that participates in vast regulatory networks, including feedback loops involving microRNAs (miRNAs) that regulate p53 and that themselves are direct p53 transcriptional targets. We show here that a group of polycistronic miRNA-like non-coding RNAs derived from small nucleolar RNAs (sno-miRNAs) are transcriptionally repressed by p53 through their host gene, SNHG1. The most abundant of these, sno-miR-28, directly targets the p53-stabilizing gene, TAF9B. Collectively, p53, SNHG1, sno-miR-28 and TAF9B form a regulatory loop which affects p53 stability and downstream p53-regulated pathways. In addition, SNHG1, SNORD28 and sno-miR-28 are all significantly upregulated in breast tumours and the overexpression of sno-miR-28 promotes breast epithelial cell proliferation. This research has broadened our knowledge of the crosstalk between small non-coding RNA pathways and roles of sno-miRNAs in p53 regulation. PMID:26061048

  3. Chk2 regulates transcription-independent p53-mediated apoptosis in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Chen; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Tsujimoto, Yoshihide; Motoyama, Noboru . E-mail: motoyama@nils.go.jp

    2005-07-29

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a central role in the induction of apoptosis in response to genotoxic stress. The protein kinase Chk2 is an important regulator of p53 function in mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation (IR). Cells derived from Chk2-deficient mice are resistant to the induction of apoptosis by IR, and this resistance has been thought to be a result of the defective transcriptional activation of p53 target genes. It was recently shown, however, that p53 itself and histone H1.2 translocate to mitochondria and thereby induces apoptosis in a transcription-independent manner in response to IR. We have now examined whether Chk2 also regulates the transcription-independent induction of apoptosis by p53 and histone H1.2. The reduced ability of IR to induce p53 stabilization in Chk2-deficient thymocytes was associated with a marked impairment of p53 and histone H1 translocation to mitochondria. These results suggest that Chk2 regulates the transcription-independent mechanism of p53-mediated apoptosis by inducing stabilization of p53 in response to IR.

  4. p53, a New Master Regulator of Stem Cell Differentiation | Center for Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    When the genome is damaged, a key player in stabilizing and maintaining genomic integrity is a protein called p53.  This protein can activate or shut down gene activity in response to DNA damage.  But how exactly does p53 accomplish its task? This question has yet to be answered completely at the molecular level.   

  5. DNA strand breaks: the DNA template alterations that trigger p53-dependent DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W G; Kastan, M B

    1994-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 serves as a critical regulator of a G1 cell cycle checkpoint and of apoptosis following exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The mechanism by which DNA-damaging agents elevate p53 protein levels to trigger G1/S arrest or cell death remains to be elucidated. In fact, whether damage to the DNA template itself participates in transducing the signal leading to p53 induction has not yet been demonstrated. We exposed human cell lines containing wild-type p53 alleles to several different DNA-damaging agents and found that agents which rapidly induce DNA strand breaks, such as ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and DNA topoisomerase-targeted drugs, rapidly triggered p53 protein elevations. In addition, we determined that camptothecin-stimulated trapping of topoisomerase I-DNA complexes was not sufficient to elevate p53 protein levels; rather, replication-associated DNA strand breaks were required. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the antimetabolite N(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) did not cause rapid p53 protein increases but resulted in delayed increases in p53 protein levels temporally correlated with the appearance of DNA strand breaks. Finally, we concluded that DNA strand breaks were sufficient for initiating p53-dependent signal transduction after finding that introduction of nucleases into cells by electroporation stimulated rapid p53 protein elevations. While DNA strand breaks appeared to be capable of triggering p53 induction, DNA lesions other than strand breaks did not. Exposure of normal cells and excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells to low doses of UV light, under conditions in which thymine dimers appear but DNA replication-associated strand breaks were prevented, resulted in p53 induction attributable to DNA strand breaks associated with excision repair. Our data indicate that DNA strand breaks are sufficient and probably necessary for p53 induction in cells with wild-type p53 alleles exposed to DNA

  6. DNA Damage Is a Prerequisite for p53-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of HIF-1α in Hypoxic Cells and Downregulation of the Hypoxia Marker Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    PubMed Central

    Kaluzová, Milota; Kaluz, Stefan; Lerman, Michael I.; Stanbridge, Eric J.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the tumor suppressor p53 and the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1)-dependent expression of the hypoxia marker, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX). MCF-7 (wt p53) and Saos-2 (p53-null) cells displayed similar induction of CAIX expression and CA9 promoter activity under hypoxic conditions. Activation of p53 by the DNA damaging agent mitomycin C (MC) was accompanied by a potent repression of CAIX expression and the CA9 promoter in MCF-7 but not in Saos-2 cells. The activated p53 mediated increased proteasomal degradation of HIF-1α protein, resulting in considerably lower steady-state levels of HIF-1α protein in hypoxic MCF-7 cells but not in Saos-2 cells. Overexpression of HIF-1α relieved the MC-induced repression in MCF-7 cells, confirming regulation at the HIF-1α level. Similarly, CA9 promoter activity was downregulated by MC in HCT 116 p53+/+ but not the isogenic p53−/− cells. Activated p53 decreased HIF-1α protein levels by accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation without affecting significantly HIF-1α transcription. In summary, our results demonstrate that the presence of wtp53 under hypoxic conditions has an insignificant effect on the stabilization of HIF-1α protein and HIF-1-dependent expression of CAIX. However, upon activation by DNA damage, wt p53 mediates an accelerated degradation of HIF-1α protein, resulting in reduced activation of CA9 transcription and, correspondingly, decreased levels of CAIX protein. A model outlining the quantitative relationship between p53, HIF-1α, and CAIX is presented. PMID:15199132

  7. Knockdown of CDK2AP1 in Primary Human Fibroblasts Induces p53 Dependent Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Alsayegh, Khaled N.; Gadepalli, Venkat S.; Iyer, Shilpa; Rao, Raj R.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin Dependent Kinase-2 Associated Protein-1 (CDK2AP1) is known to be a tumor suppressor that plays a role in cell cycle regulation by sequestering monomeric CDK2, and targeting it for proteolysis. A reduction of CDK2AP1 expression is considered to be a negative prognostic indicator in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and also associated with increased invasion in human gastric cancer tissue. CDK2AP1 overexpression was shown to inhibit growth, reduce invasion and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the effect of CDK2AP1 downregulation in primary human dermal fibroblasts. Using a short-hairpin RNA to reduce its expression, we found that knockdown of CDK2AP1in primary human fibroblasts resulted in reduced proliferation and in the induction of senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Immunocytochemical analysis also revealed that the CDK2AP1 knockdown significantly increased the percentage of cells that exhibited γ-H2AX foci, which could indicate presence of DNA damage. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in increased mRNA levels of p53, p21, BAX and PUMA and p53 protein levels. In primary human fibroblasts in which p53 and CDK2AP1 were simultaneously downregulated, there was: (a) no increase in senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity, (b) decrease in the number of cells in the G1-phase and increase in number of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle, and (c) decrease in the mRNA levels of p21, BAX and PUMA when compared with CDK2AP1 knockdown only fibroblasts. Taken together, this suggests that the observed phenotype is p53 dependent. We also observed a prominent increase in the levels of ARF protein in the CDK2AP1 knockdown cells, which suggests a possible role of ARF in p53 stabilization following CDK2AP1 knockdown. Altogether

  8. Assessment of Augmented Immune Surveillance and Tumor Cell Death by Cytoplasmic Stabilization of p53 as a Chemopreventive Strategy of 3 Promising Medicinal Herbs in Murine 2-Stage Skin Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ali, Farrah; Khan, Rehan; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Lateef, Md Abdul; Maqbool, Tahir; Sultana, Sarwat

    2014-07-01

    Cancer is the final outcome of a plethora of events. Targeting the proliferation or inducing programmed cell death in a proliferating population is a major standpoint in the cancer therapy. However, proliferation is regulated by several cellular and immunologic processes. This study reports the inhibition of proliferation by augmenting immune surveillance, silencing acute inflammation, and inducing p53-mediated apoptosis of skin cancer by 3 promising medicinal extracts. We used the well-characterized model for experimental skin carcinogenesis in mice for 32 weeks to study the chemopreventive effect of the methanolic extracts of Trigonella foenumgraecum, Eclipta alba, and Calendula officinalis. All 3 extracts reduced the number, incidence, and multiplicity of tumors, which was confirmed by the pathologic studies that showed regressed tumors. There was a significant reduction in the PCNA+ nuclei in all treatment groups 32 weeks after the initiation. Mechanistic studies revealed that proliferative population in tumors is diminished by the restoration of the endogenous antioxidant defense, inhibition of the stress-related signal-transducing element NFκB, reduction of inflammation, enhancement of immunosurveillance of the genetically mutated cells, along with silencing of the cell cycle progression signals. Finally, all 3 medicinal extracts induced stable expression of p53 within the tumors, confirmed by the CFDA-Cy3 apoptosis assay. Results of our study confirm that these extracts not only limit the rate of proliferation by inhibition of the processes integral to cancer development but also induce stable cytoplasmic expression of p53-mediated apoptosis, leading to fewer and regressed tumors in mice. © The Author(s) 2013.

  9. Influence of p53 in the transition of myotrophin-induced cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure.

    PubMed

    Das, Biswajit; Young, David; Vasanji, Amit; Gupta, Sudhiranjan; Sarkar, Sagartirtha; Sen, Subha

    2010-08-01

    Cardiac-specific overexpression of myotrophin (myo) protein in transgenic (myo-Tg) mice results in hypertrophy at 4 weeks that progresses to heart failure (HF) by 36 weeks. Gene profiling showed that p53 expression increases as hypertrophy worsens to HF, suggesting that p53 may influence myo-induced HF. We aimed to define how the p53 signalling cascade affects the spectrum of cardiac hypertrophy (CH)/HF. Immunoblot analysis showed that in myo-Tg mice (Mus musculus), upregulation of p53 occurs only when hypertrophy transitions to HF (16 weeks onward). To elucidate the role of p53, a double-Tg mouse line (p53(-/-)/myo(+/+)) was developed by crossing myo-Tg mice with p53-null mice. A significant reduction in cardiac mass with improved cardiac function was observed in p53(-/-)/myo(+/+) mice, suggesting that absence of p53 prevents hypertrophy from turning into HF. Analysis via real-time reverse-transcription PCR revealed changes in transcripts of the p53 pathway in p53(-/-)/myo(+/+) mice. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that cross-talk among several key nodal molecules (e.g. cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A, caspase-3, nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells etc.) may play a regulatory role in the transition of CH to HF. Our data provide evidence, for the first time, that the coherence of p53 with myo plays an active role during the transition of CH to HF in a model of HF induced by myo overexpression. Transition from CH to HF can be prevented in the absence of p53 in myo-induced hypertrophy. Therefore, deletion/inhibition of p53 could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent CH from transitioning to HF.

  10. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed.

  11. Mutant p53: Multiple Mechanisms Define Biologic Activity in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Michael Paul; Zhang, Yun; Lozano, Guillermina

    2015-01-01

    The functional importance of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene is evident through its pervasiveness in cancer biology. The p53 gene is the most commonly altered gene in human cancer; however, not all genetic alterations are biologically equivalent. The majority of alterations involve p53 missense mutations that result in the production of mutant p53 proteins. Such mutant p53 proteins lack normal p53 function and may concomitantly gain novel functions, often with deleterious effects. Here, we review characterized mechanisms of mutant p53 gain of function in various model systems. In addition, we review mutant p53 addiction as emerging evidence suggests that tumors may depend on sustained mutant p53 activity for continued growth. We also discuss the role of p53 in stromal elements and their contribution to tumor initiation and progression. Lastly, current genetic mouse models of mutant p53 in various organ systems are reviewed and their limitations discussed. PMID:26618142

  12. p53 stimulates transcription from the human transforming growth factor alpha promoter: a potential growth-stimulatory role for p53.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, T H; Paterson, A J; Kudlow, J E

    1995-01-01

    Physical and chemical agents can damage the genome. Part of the protective response to this damage is the increased expression of p53. p53, a transcription factor, controls the expression of genes, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Another protective mechanism is the proliferative response required to replace the damaged cells. This proliferation is likely to be signaled by growth factors. In this communication, we show that the transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) gene is a direct target for p53-mediated transcriptional activation. In a stable cell line containing an inducible p53 construct, p53 induction leads to a threefold accumulation of the native TGF-alpha mRNA. IN cotransfection assays using a TGF-alpha promoter reporter construct, we show that expression of wild-type but not mutant p53 increases transcriptional activity of the TGF-alpha promoter by approximately 2.5-fold. In vitro, wild-type p53 binds to a consensus binding site found in the proximal portion of the promoter, and this sequence is necessary for the p53 transcriptional response. Furthermore, this element confers p53 induction to the otherwise nonresponsive adenovirus major late promoter. In addition to these results, we found that the TGF-alpha promoter contains a nonconsensus but functional TATA box-binding protein-binding site approximately 30 bp upstream of the transcription start site. Although p53 can repress transcription from promoters containing a TATA box, the nonconsensus TGF-alpha TATA motif is resistant to this effect. On the basis of these results, we propose that p53 may play a dual role, which includes both the elimination of irreparably genetically damage cells and the proliferative response necessary for their replacement, in the response to physical-chemical damage. PMID:7651386

  13. Necdin, a p53-Target Gene, Is an Inhibitor of p53-Mediated Growth Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Lafontaine, Julie; Rodier, Francis; Ouellet, Véronique; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    In vitro, cellular immortalization and transformation define a model for multistep carcinogenesis and current ongoing challenges include the identification of specific molecular events associated with steps along this oncogenic pathway. Here, using NIH3T3 cells, we identified transcriptionally related events associated with the expression of Polyomavirus Large-T antigen (PyLT), a potent viral oncogene. We propose that a subset of these alterations in gene expression may be related to the early events that contribute to carcinogenesis. The proposed tumor suppressor Necdin, known to be regulated by p53, was within a group of genes that was consistently upregulated in the presence of PyLT. While Necdin is induced following p53 activation with different genotoxic stresses, Necdin induction by PyLT did not involve p53 activation or the Rb-binding site of PyLT. Necdin depletion by shRNA conferred a proliferative advantage to NIH3T3 and PyLT-expressing NIH3T3 (NIHLT) cells. In contrast, our results demonstrate that although overexpression of Necdin induced a growth arrest in NIH3T3 and NIHLT cells, a growing population rapidly emerged from these arrested cells. This population no longer showed significant proliferation defects despite high Necdin expression. Moreover, we established that Necdin is a negative regulator of p53-mediated growth arrest induced by nutlin-3, suggesting that Necdin upregulation could contribute to the bypass of a p53-response in p53 wild type tumors. To support this, we characterized Necdin expression in low malignant potential ovarian cancer (LMP) where p53 mutations rarely occur. Elevated levels of Necdin expression were observed in LMP when compared to aggressive serous ovarian cancers. We propose that in some contexts, the constitutive expression of Necdin could contribute to cancer promotion by delaying appropriate p53 responses and potentially promote genomic instability. PMID:22355404

  14. Epimorphic regeneration in mice is p53-independent.

    PubMed

    Arthur, L Matthew; Demarest, Renee M; Clark, Lise; Gourevitch, Dmitri; Bedelbaeva, Kamila; Anderson, Rhonda; Snyder, Andrew; Capobianco, Anthony J; Lieberman, Paul; Feigenbaum, Lionel; Heber-Katz, E

    2010-09-15

    The process of regeneration is most readily studied in species of sponge, hydra, planarian and salamander (i.e., newt and axolotl). The closure of MRL mouse ear pinna through-and-through holes provides a mammalian model of unusual wound healing/regeneration in which a blastema-like structure closes the ear hole and cartilage and hair follicles are replaced. Recent studies, based on a broad level of DNA damage and a cell cycle pattern of G₂/M "arrest," showed that p21(Cip1/Waf1) was missing from the MRL mouse ear and that a p21-null mouse could close its ear holes. Given the p53/p21 axis of control of DNA damage, cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and senescence, we tested the role of p53 in the ear hole regenerative response. Using backcross mice, we found that loss of p53 in MRL mice did not show reduced healing. Furthermore, cross sections of MRL. p53(-/-) mouse ears at 6 weeks post-injury showed an increased level of adipocytes and chondrocytes in the region of healing whereas MRL or p21(-/-) mice showed chondrogenesis alone in this same region, though at later time points. In addition, we also investigated other cell cycle-related mutant mice to determine how p21 was being regulated. We demonstrate that p16 and Gadd45 null mice show little healing capacity. Interestingly, a partial healing phenotype in mice with a dual Tgfβ/Rag2 knockout mutation was seen. These data demonstrate an independence of p53 signaling for mouse appendage regeneration and suggest that the role of p21 in this process is possibly through the abrogation of the Tgfβ/Smad pathway.

  15. Delphinidin induces apoptosis via cleaved HDAC3-mediated p53 acetylation and oligomerization in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyelin; Sung, Gi-Jun; Park, Soo-Yeon; Jun, Woo Jin; Lee, Yoo-Hyun; Lee, Jeongmin; Lee, Sang-wook; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    Delphinidin is a major anthocyanidin compound found in various fruits. It has anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and various other biological activities. In this study, we identified the epigenetic modulators that mediate the apoptotic effect of delphinidin in human prostate cancer cells. We found that treatment of LNCaP cells (a p53 wild-type, human prostate cancer cell line) with delphinidin increased caspase-3, −7, and −8 activity, whereas it decreased histone deacetylase activity. Among class I HDACs, the activity of HDAC3 was specifically inhibited by delphinidin. Moreover, the induction of apoptosis by delphinidin was dependent on caspase-mediated cleavage of HDAC3, which results in the acetylation and stabilization of p53. We also observed that delphinidin potently upregulated pro-apoptotic genes that are positively regulated by p53, and downregulated various anti-apoptotic genes. Taken together, these results show that delphinidin induces p53-mediated apoptosis by suppressing HDAC activity and activating p53 acetylation in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Therefore, delphinidin may be useful in the prevention of prostate cancer. PMID:27462923

  16. 2-Phenylethynesulfonamide (PES) uncovers a necrotic process regulated by oxidative stress and p53.

    PubMed

    Mattiolo, Paolo; Barbero-Farran, Ares; Yuste, Víctor J; Boix, Jacint; Ribas, Judit

    2014-10-01

    2-Phenylethynesulfonamide (PES) or pifithrin-μ is a promising anticancer agent with preferential toxicity for cancer cells. The type of cell death and the molecular cascades activated by this compound are controversial. Here, we demonstrate PES elicits a caspase- and BAX/BAK-independent non-necroptotic necrotic cell death, since it is not inhibited by necrostatin-1. This process is characterized by an early generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) resulting in p53 up-regulation. Accordingly, thiolic antioxidants protect cells from PES-induced death. Furthermore, inhibiting the natural sources of glutathione with l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) strongly cooperates with PES in triggering cytotoxicity. Genetically modified p53-null or p53 knocked-down cells show resistance to PES-driven necrosis. The predominant localization of p53 in chromatin-enriched fractions added to the up-regulation of the p53-responsive gene p21, strongly suggest the involvement of a transcription-dependent p53 program. On the other hand, we report an augmented production of ROS in p53-positive cells that, added to the increased p53 content in response to PES-elicited ROS, suggests that p53 and ROS are mutually regulated in response to PES. In sum, p53 up-regulation by ROS triggers a positive feedback loop responsible of further increasing ROS production and reinforcing PES-driven non-necroptotic necrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Depression of p53-independent Akt survival signals after high-LET radiation in mutated p53 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Takeo; Takahashi, Akihisa; Nakagawa, Yosuke

    Although mutations and deletions in the p53 tumor suppressor gene lead to resistance to low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation, high-LET radiation efficiently induces cell lethality and apoptosis regardless of the p53 gene status. Recently, it has been suggested that the induction of p53-independent apoptosis takes place through the activation of Caspase-9 which results in the cleavage of Caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). This study was designed to examine if high-LET radiation depresses the activities of serine/threonine protein kinase B (PKB, also known as Akt) and Akt-related proteins. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) harboring a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with 2 Gy of X-rays or Fe-ion beams. The cellular contents of Akt-related proteins participating in cell survival signals were analyzed with Western blotting analysis 1 h, 2 h, 3 h and 6 h after irradiation. Cell cycle distributions after irradiation were assayed with flow cytometric analysis.Akt-related protein levels were decreased when cells were irradiated with high-LET radiation. High-LET radiation increased G _{2}/M phase arrests and suppressed the progression of the cell cycle much more efficiently when compared to low-LET radiation. These results suggest that high-LET radiation enhances apoptosis through the activation of Caspase-3 and Caspase-9, and depresses cell growth by suppressing Akt-related signals, even in the mp53 cells.

  18. The impact of p53 on the early stage replication of retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Kinnetz, Michaela; Alghamdi, Faris; Racz, Michael; Hu, Wenwei; Shi, Binshan

    2017-08-09

    The function of p53 in cancer biology has been studied extensively, but its role in anti-retrovirus infection has been elusive for many years. The restriction of retrovirus early stage replication by p53 was investigated in this study. VSV-G pseudotyped retrovirus with GFP reporter gene was used to infect both HCT116 p53(+/+) cells and its isogenic p53 knockout HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. The infection was detected by flow cytometry. Reverse transcription products were quantified by real time PCR. Mutation analysis was performed after 1-LTR cycle and 2-LTR cycle DNA were amplified and PCR products were sequenced. Transcription and translation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 (p21(Cip1)) and SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) were analyzed by TaqMan PCR and Western blot experiments. siRNA experiment was applied to study the role of p53 downstream gene p21(Cip1) in the restriction of retrovirus infection. It was found that the block of retrovirus infection in non-cycling cells was significantly attenuated in HCT116 p53(-/-) cells when compared to HCT116 p53(+/+) cells. It was found that both late reverse transcription products and viral 2-LTR cycle DNA were significantly increased in infected non-cycling HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. Furthermore, the mutation frequency detected in 1-LTR DNA from HCT116 p53(+/+) cells were significantly decreased in comparison to HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. A higher number of insertion and deletion mutations were detected in the joint region of 2-LTR cycle DNA in infected p53(+/+) cells. Cell cycle analysis showed retrovirus infection promoted host cell replication. Higher levels of mRNA and protein of p21(Cip1) were found in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells in comparison to the HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. Furthermore, knockdown of p21(Cip1) in non-cycling HCT116 p53(+/+) cells significantly increased the infection. The results of this study showed that p53 is an important restriction factor that interferes with retrovirus infection in its

  19. Molecular dynamics of the full-length p53 monomer

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Giovanni; Davidovich, Pavel; D’Abramo, Marco; Mametnabiev, Tazhir; Garabadzhiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Desideri, Alessandro; Melino, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    The p53 protein is frequently mutated in a very large proportion of human tumors, where it seems to acquire gain-of-function activity that facilitates tumor onset and progression. A possible mechanism is the ability of mutant p53 proteins to physically interact with other proteins, including members of the same family, namely p63 and p73, inactivating their function. Assuming that this interaction might occurs at the level of the monomer, to investigate the molecular basis for this interaction, here, we sample the structural flexibility of the wild-type p53 monomeric protein. The results show a strong stability up to 850 ns in the DNA binding domain, with major flexibility in the N-terminal transactivations domains (TAD1 and TAD2) as well as in the C-terminal region (tetramerization domain). Several stable hydrogen bonds have been detected between N-terminal or C-terminal and DNA binding domain, and also between N-terminal and C-terminal. Essential dynamics analysis highlights strongly correlated movements involving TAD1 and the proline-rich region in the N-terminal domain, the tetramerization region in the C-terminal domain; Lys120 in the DNA binding region. The herein presented model is a starting point for further investigation of the whole protein tetramer as well as of its mutants. PMID:23974096

  20. EBNA3C regulates p53 through induction of Aurora kinase B.

    PubMed

    Jha, Hem C; Yang, Karren; El-Naccache, Darine W; Sun, Zhiguo; Robertson, Erle S

    2015-03-20

    In multicellular organisms p53 maintains genomic integrity through activation of DNA repair, and apoptosis. EBNA3C can down regulate p53 transcriptional activity. Aurora kinase (AK) B phosphorylates p53, which leads to degradation of p53. Aberrant expression of AK-B is a hallmark of numerous human cancers. Therefore changes in the activities of p53 due to AK-B and EBNA3C expression is important for understanding EBV-mediated cell transformation. Here we show that the activities of p53 and its homolog p73 are dysregulated in EBV infected primary cells which can contribute to increased cell transformation. Further, we showed that the ETS-1 binding site is crucial for EBNA3C-mediated up-regulation of AK-B transcription. Further, we determined the Ser 215 residue of p53 is critical for functional regulation by AK-B and EBNA3C and that the kinase domain of AK-B which includes amino acid residues 106, 111 and 205 was important for p53 regulation. AK-B with a mutation at residue 207 was functionally similar to wild type AK-B in terms of its kinase activities and knockdown of AK-B led to enhanced p73 expression independent of p53. This study explores an additional mechanism by which p53 is regulated by AK-B and EBNA3C contributing to EBV-induced B-cell transformation.

  1. Dynamic roles of p53-mediated metabolic activities in ROS-induced stress responses.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Le; Hickman, Justin H; Wang, Shang-Jui; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a multifaceted polypeptide that impedes tumorigenesis by regulating a diverse array of cellular processes. Triggered by a wide variety of stress stimuli, p53 transcriptionally regulates genes involved in the canonical tumor suppression pathways of apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, and senescence. We recently discovered a novel mechanism whereby p53 inhibits cystine uptake through repression of the SLC7A11 gene to mediate ferroptosis. Importantly, this p53-SLC7A11 axis is preserved in the p53(3KR) mutant, and contributes to its ability to suppress tumorigenesis in the absence of the classical tumor suppression mechanisms. Here, we report that wild type p53 can induce both apoptosis and ferroptosis upon reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced stress. Furthermore, we demonstrate that p53's functional N-terminal domain is required for its capacity to regulate oxidative stress responses and ferroptosis. Notably, activated p53 dynamically modulates intracellular ROS, causing an initial reduction and a subsequent increase of ROS levels. Taken together, these data implicate ferroptosis as an additional component of the cell death program induced by wild type p53 in human cancer cells, and reveal a complex and dynamic role of p53 in oxidative stress responses.

  2. Mutation of Lkb1 and p53 genes exert a cooperative effect on tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chongjuan; Amos, Christopher I; Stephens, L Clifton; Campos, Imelda; Deng, Jian Min; Behringer, Richard R; Rashid, Asif; Frazier, Marsha L

    2005-12-15

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a dominantly inherited disorder characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous melanin pigmentation. Germ line mutations in LKB1 cause PJS. We have generated mice carrying an Lkb1 exon 2 to 8 deletion by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. Heterozygotes develop gastric hamartomas that are histologically similar to those found in humans with PJS. LKB1 is also reportedly a mediator of p53-dependent apoptosis. To explore the potential combined effects of p53 and Lkb1 alterations on tumorigenesis, we carried out a series of matings with Lkb1(+/-) and p53 null mice to generate Lkb1(+/-)/p53(+/-) and Lkb1(+/-)/p53(-/-) mice. Similar to the Lkb1(+/-) mice, gastrointestinal hamartomas have also been detected in the mice with these two genotypes. The Lkb1(+/-)/p53(+/-) mice displayed a dramatically reduced life span and increased tumor incidence compared to the mice with either Lkb1 or p53 single gene knockout. The time to onset of polyposis in Lkb1(+/-)/p53(-/-) mice is approximately 2 months earlier than Lkb1(+/-)/p53(+/-) and Lkb1(+/-) mice, whereas the latter two show a similar time to onset which is at approximately 6 months of age. These results strongly suggested that mutations of p53 and Lkb1 gene cooperate in the acceleration of tumorigenesis.

  3. Immunomodulatory Function of the Tumor Suppressor p53 in Host Immune Response and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers. Most of the mutations are missense leading to loss of p53 function in inducing apoptosis and senescence. In addition to these autonomous effects of p53 inactivation/dysfunction on tumorigenesis, compelling evidence suggests that p53 mutation/inactivation also leads to gain-of-function or activation of non-autonomous pathways, which either directly or indirectly promote tumorigenesis. Experimental and clinical results suggest that p53 dysfunction fuels pro-tumor inflammation and serves as an immunological gain-of-function driver of tumorigenesis via skewing immune landscape of the tumor microenvironment (TME). It is now increasingly appreciated that p53 dysfunction in various cellular compartments of the TME leads to immunosuppression and immune evasion. Although our understanding of the cellular and molecular processes that link p53 activity to host immune regulation is still incomplete, it is clear that activating/reactivating the p53 pathway in the TME also represents a compelling immunological strategy to reverse immunosuppression and enhance antitumor immunity. Here, we review our current understanding of the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms by which p53 participates in immune regulation and discuss how targeting the p53 pathway can be exploited to alter the immunological landscape of tumors for maximizing therapeutic outcome. PMID:27869779

  4. Wild-type p53 controls cell motility and invasion by dual regulation of MET expression

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Chang-Il; Matoso, Andres; Corney, David C.; Flesken-Nikitin, Andrea; Körner, Stefanie; Wang, Wei; Boccaccio, Carla; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.; Comoglio, Paolo M.; Hermeking, Heiko; Nikitin, Alexander Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that p53 mutations are responsible not only for growth of primary tumors but also for their dissemination. However, mechanisms involved in p53-mediated control of cell motility and invasion remain poorly understood. By using the primary ovarian surface epithelium cell culture, we show that conditional inactivation of p53 or expression of its mutant forms results in overexpression of MET receptor tyrosine kinase, a crucial regulator of invasive growth. At the same time, cells acquire increased MET-dependent motility and invasion. Wild-type p53 negatively regulates MET expression by two mechanisms: (i) transactivation of MET-targeting miR-34, and (ii) inhibition of SP1 binding to MET promoter. Both mechanisms are not functional in p53 absence, but mutant p53 proteins retain partial MET promoter suppression. Accordingly, MET overexpression, cell motility, and invasion are particularly high in p53-null cells. These results identify MET as a critical effector of p53 and suggest that inhibition of MET may be an effective antimetastatic approach to treat cancers with p53 mutations. These results also show that the extent of advanced cancer traits, such as invasion, may be determined by alterations in individual components of p53/MET regulatory network. PMID:21831840

  5. Oxidative stress activates a specific p53 transcriptional response that regulates cellular senescence and aging