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Sample records for increases quantal size

  1. Regulation of quantal size by presynaptic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sulzer, D; Pothos, E N

    2000-01-01

    Quantal size is often modeled as invariant, although it is now well established that the number of transmitter molecules released per synaptic vesicle during exocytosis can be modulated in central and peripheral synapses. In this review, we suggest why presynaptically altered quantal size would be important at social synapses that provide extrasynaptic neurotransmitter. Current techniques used to measure quantal size are reviewed with particular attention to amperometry, the first approach to provide direct measurement of the number of molecules and kinetics of presynaptic quantal release, and to CNS dopamine neuronal terminals. The known interventions that alter quantal size at the presynaptic locus are reviewed and categorized as (1) alteration of transvesicular free energy gradients, (2) modulation of vesicle transmitter transporter activity, (3) modulation of fusion pore kinetics, (4) altered transmitter degranulation, and (5) changes in synaptic vesicle volume. Modulation of the number of molecules released per quantum underlies mechanisms of drug action of L-DOPA and the amphetamines, and seems likely to be involved in both normal synaptic modification and disease states. Statistical analysis for examining quantal size and data presentation is discussed. We include detailed information on performing nonparametric resampling statistical analysis, the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test for two populations, and random walk simulations using spreadsheet programs.

  2. Presynaptic Molecular Determinants of Quantal Size

    PubMed Central

    Takamori, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    The quantal hypothesis for the release of neurotransmitters at the chemical synapse has gained wide acceptance since it was first worked out at the motor endplate in frog skeletal muscle in the 1950’s. Considering the morphological identification of synaptic vesicles (SVs) at the nerve terminals that appeared to be homogeneous in size, the hypothesis proposed that signal transduction at synapses is mediated by the release of neurotransmitters packed in SVs that are individually uniform in size; the amount of transmitter in a synaptic vesicle is called a quantum. Although quantal size—the amplitude of the postsynaptic response elicited by the release of neurotransmitters from a single vesicle—clearly depends on the number and sensitivity of the postsynaptic receptors, accumulating evidence has also indicated that the amount of neurotransmitters stored in SVs can be altered by various presynaptic factors. Here, I provide an overview of the concepts and underlying presynaptic molecular underpinnings that may regulate quantal size. PMID:26903855

  3. Presynaptic recording of quanta from midbrain dopamine neurons and modulation of the quantal size.

    PubMed

    Pothos, E N; Davila, V; Sulzer, D

    1998-06-01

    The observation of quantal release from central catecholamine neurons has proven elusive because of the absence of evoked rapid postsynaptic currents. We adapted amperometric methods to observe quantal release directly from axonal varicosities of midbrain dopamine neurons that predominantly contain small synaptic vesicles. Quantal events were elicited by high K+ or alpha-latrotoxin, required extracellular Ca2+, and were abolished by reserpine. The events indicated the release of 3000 molecules over 200 microsec, much smaller and faster events than quanta associated with large dense-core vesicles previously recorded in vertebrate preparations. The number of dopamine molecules per quantum increased as a population to 380% of controls after glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) exposure and to 350% of controls after exposure to the dopamine precursor L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA). These results introduce a means to measure directly the number of transmitter molecules released from small synaptic vesicles of CNS neurons. Moreover, quantal size was not an invariant parameter in CNS neurons but could be modulated by neurotrophic factors and altered neurotransmitter synthesis.

  4. The active zone protein CAST regulates synaptic vesicle recycling and quantal size in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shizuka; Hida, Yamato; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Eiji; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Fukaya, Masahiro; Kitajima, Isao; Takai, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Manabe, Toshiya

    2016-09-01

    Synaptic efficacy is determined by various factors, including the quantal size, which is dependent on the amount of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic terminal. It is essential for stable synaptic transmission that the quantal size is kept within a constant range and that synaptic efficacy during and after repetitive synaptic activation is maintained by replenishing release sites with synaptic vesicles. However, the mechanisms for these fundamental properties have still been undetermined. We found that the active zone protein CAST (cytomatrix at the active zone structural protein) played pivotal roles in both presynaptic regulation of quantal size and recycling of endocytosed synaptic vesicles. In the CA1 region of hippocampal slices of the CAST knockout mice, miniature excitatory synaptic responses were increased in size, and synaptic depression after prolonged synaptic activation was larger, which was attributable to selective impairment of synaptic vesicle trafficking via the endosome in the presynaptic terminal likely mediated by Rab6. Therefore, CAST serves as a key molecule that regulates dynamics and neurotransmitter contents of synaptic vesicles in the excitatory presynaptic terminal in the central nervous system.

  5. The active zone protein CAST regulates synaptic vesicle recycling and quantal size in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shizuka; Hida, Yamato; Ishizaki, Hiroyoshi; Inoue, Eiji; Tanaka-Okamoto, Miki; Yamasaki, Miwako; Miyazaki, Taisuke; Fukaya, Masahiro; Kitajima, Isao; Takai, Yoshimi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Ohtsuka, Toshihisa; Manabe, Toshiya

    2016-09-01

    Synaptic efficacy is determined by various factors, including the quantal size, which is dependent on the amount of neurotransmitters in synaptic vesicles at the presynaptic terminal. It is essential for stable synaptic transmission that the quantal size is kept within a constant range and that synaptic efficacy during and after repetitive synaptic activation is maintained by replenishing release sites with synaptic vesicles. However, the mechanisms for these fundamental properties have still been undetermined. We found that the active zone protein CAST (cytomatrix at the active zone structural protein) played pivotal roles in both presynaptic regulation of quantal size and recycling of endocytosed synaptic vesicles. In the CA1 region of hippocampal slices of the CAST knockout mice, miniature excitatory synaptic responses were increased in size, and synaptic depression after prolonged synaptic activation was larger, which was attributable to selective impairment of synaptic vesicle trafficking via the endosome in the presynaptic terminal likely mediated by Rab6. Therefore, CAST serves as a key molecule that regulates dynamics and neurotransmitter contents of synaptic vesicles in the excitatory presynaptic terminal in the central nervous system. PMID:27422015

  6. Dynamin-dependent and dynamin-independent processes contribute to the regulation of single vesicle release kinetics and quantal size

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Margaret E.; O'Callaghan, Dermott W.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Burgoyne, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the kinetics of release from single secretory vesicles can be regulated and that quantal size can be modified during fast kiss-and-run fusion. Multiple pathways for vesicle retrieval have been identified involving clathrin and dynamin. It has been unclear whether dynamin could participate in a fast kiss-and-run process to reclose a transient fusion pore and thereby limit vesicle release. We have disrupted dynamin function in adrenal chromaffin cells by expression of the amphiphysin Src-homology domain 3 (SH3) or by application of guanosine 5′-[γ-thio]triphosphate (GTPγS), and have monitored single vesicle release events, evoked by digitonin and Ca2+, by using carbon-fiber amperometry. Under both conditions, there was an increase in mean quantal size accompanying an increase in the half-width of amperometric spikes and a slowing of the fall time. These data suggest the existence of a dynamin-dependent process that can terminate vesicle release under basal conditions. Protein kinase C activation changed release kinetics and decreased quantal size by shortening the release period. The effects of phorbol ester treatment were not prevented by expression of the amphiphysin SH3 domain or by GTPγS suggesting the existence of alternative dynamin-independent process underlying fast kiss-and-run exocytosis. PMID:11997474

  7. Increased quantal release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction following scald injury in the rat.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J P; Hatton, P A; Little, R A; Pennington, R A; Wareham, A C

    1999-12-01

    Following severe burns, patients frequently develop a profound resistance to nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers. Several mechanisms have been proposed to account for this, including upregulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We investigated the effects of a 30% body surface area (BSA) scald on neuromuscular transmission in slow-twitch soleus (SOL) and fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) of rats. Rats were sacrificed 72 h after the injury, a time at which sepsis is unlikely and body weight gain and core temperature have returned to normal. Further groups of rats were sham operated and either pair fed to the scalded rats or freely fed to assess the influence of food restriction. When compared with muscle from pair-fed control rats, scald resulted in an almost 50% increase in miniature endplate potential (mEPP) frequency in both SOL and EDL. However, scald did not increase mean mEPP amplitude in SOL, although it did cause a 10% increase in EDL. Scald injury did produce a significant increase in the size of the evoked endplate potential in SOL (33%) and EDL (37%). These data indicate that a significant increase in the quantal content of evoked transmitter released in SOL (38%) and EDL (30%) occurred by 72 h after scald. Such an increase may contribute to the resistance to nondepolarizing neuromuscular blockers documented in patients following thermal injury.

  8. Optical quantal analysis indicates that long-term potentiation at single hippocampal mossy fiber synapses is expressed through increased release probability, recruitment of new release sites, and activation of silent synapses.

    PubMed

    Reid, Christopher A; Dixon, Don B; Takahashi, Michiko; Bliss, Tim V P; Fine, Alan

    2004-04-01

    It is generally believed that long-term potentiation (LTP) at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses between dentate granule and CA3 pyramidal cells is expressed through presynaptic mechanisms leading to an increase in quantal content. The source of this increase has remained undefined but could include enhanced probability of transmitter release at existing functional release sites or increases in the number of active release sites. We performed optical quantal analyses of transmission at individual mossy fiber synapses in cultured hippocampal slices, using confocal microscopy and intracellular fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators. Our results indicate that LTP is expressed at functional synapses by both increased probability of transmitter release and recruitment of new release sites, including the activation of previously silent synapses here visualized for the first time.

  9. The development of transmission at an identified molluscan synapse. II. A quantal analysis of transmission.

    PubMed

    Pawson, P A; Chase, R

    1988-12-01

    1. A quantal analysis of transmission at the identified molluscan synapse, V2-RPr1, was performed during development. The study was intended to determine the pre- and postsynaptic contributions to the marked changes in transmitter release described in the previous report. 2. The success of the quantal analysis was predicated on overcoming the problems associated with extending the quantal analysis technique to central synapses. This involved adopting the following strategies: 1) using a low-noise recording system coupled with electrical filtering; 2) establishing objective criteria for failures recognition; and 3) using three methods to determine the quantal content: amplitude histograms, failures analysis, and the coefficient of variation. 3. The correlation of the results obtained from an analysis of amplitude histograms and from failures analysis were highly significant (P less than 0.01) at all times studied. A similar significant correlation was observed between the failures method and the coefficient of variation methods. 4. The amplitude of the quantal unit declined progressively during development (range: 131-25 microV), in parallel with the decrease in the postsynaptic input resistance (range: 103-5 M omega). 5. At both frequencies of stimulation (0.02 and 0.2 Hz), there is an approximately 20-fold increase in quantal content over the period of the study. Frequency facilitation at the synapse is due to an increase in quantal content. 6. Possible structural correlates for the developmental increase in quantal content were discussed.

  10. Facilitation at single synapses probed with optical quantal analysis.

    PubMed

    Oertner, Thomas G; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Nimchinsky, Esther A; Svoboda, Karel

    2002-07-01

    Many synapses can change their strength rapidly in a use-dependent manner, but the mechanisms of such short-term plasticity remain unknown. To understand these mechanisms, measurements of neurotransmitter release at single synapses are required. We probed transmitter release by imaging transient increases in [Ca(2+)] mediated by synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) in individual dendritic spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat brain slices, enabling quantal analysis at single synapses. We found that changes in release probability, produced by paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) or by manipulation of presynaptic adenosine receptors, were associated with changes in glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft, indicating that single synapses can release a variable amount of glutamate per action potential. The relationship between release probability and response size is consistent with a binomial model of vesicle release with several (>5) independent release sites per active zone, suggesting that multivesicular release contributes to facilitation at these synapses.

  11. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced ...

  12. Estimation of nonuniform quantal parameters with multiple-probability fluctuation analysis: theory, application and limitations.

    PubMed

    Silver, R Angus

    2003-12-15

    Synapses are a key determinant of information processing in the central nervous system. Investigation of the mechanisms underlying synaptic transmission at central synapses is complicated by the inaccessibility of synaptic contacts and the fact that their temporal dynamics are governed by multiple parameters. Multiple-probability fluctuation analysis (MPFA) is a recently developed method for estimating quantal parameters from the variance and mean amplitude of evoked steady-state synaptic responses recorded under a range of release probability conditions. This article describes the theoretical basis and the underlying assumptions of MPFA, illustrating how a simplified multinomial model can be used to estimate mean quantal parameters at synapses where quantal size and release probability are nonuniform. Interpretations of the quantal parameter estimates are discussed in relation to uniquantal and multiquantal models of transmission. Practical aspects of this method are illustrated including a new method for estimating quantal size and variability, approaches for optimising data collection, error analysis and a method for identifying multivesicular release. The advantages and limitations of investigating synaptic function with MPFA are explored and contrasted with those for traditional quantal analysis and more recent optical quantal analysis methods.

  13. Quantal Response Techniques for Random Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McSweeney, Maryellen; Schmidt, William H.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between quantitative predictor variables and the probability of occurrence of one or more levels of a qualitative criterion variable can be analyzed by quantal response techniques. This paper presents and discusses two quantal response models, comparing them to multiple linear regression and discriminant analysis. (Author/JKS)

  14. Quantal Heating of Conducting Electrons with Discrete Spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Vitkalov, S. A.; Bykov, A. A.

    2011-12-23

    Usually heating of conducting electrons by dc electric field results in an increase of electron temperature. In this paper we show that the dc heating of 2D electrons, placed in quantized magnetic fields, results in a peculiar electron distribution, which has the same broadening or an effective 'temperature' as the unbiased electron system. The quantal heating, however, violates strongly the Ohm's Law. In the conducting system with discrete electron spectrum the quantal heating results in spectacular decrease of electron resistance and transition of the electrons into a state with zero differential resistance (ZDR). Finally the heating leads to apparent dc driven metal-insulator transition, which correlates with the transition into the ZDR state. The correlation is very unexpected and is not understood.

  15. Dose-response model for teratological experiments involving quantal responses

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, K.; Van Ryzin, J.

    1985-03-01

    This paper introduces a dose-response model for teratological quantal response data where the probability of response for an offspring from a female at a given dose varies with the litter size. The maximum likelihood estimators for the parameters of the model are given as the solution of a nonlinear iterative algorithm. Two methods of low-dose extrapolation are presented, one based on the litter size distribution and the other a conservative method. The resulting procedures are then applied to a teratological data set from the literature.

  16. Increasing the Size of Microwave Popcorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoyer, Justin

    2005-03-01

    Each year Americans consume approximately 17 billion quarts of popcorn. Since the 1940s, microwaves have been the heating source of choice for most. By treating the popcorn mechanism as a thermodynamic system, it has been shown mathematically and experimentally that reducing the surrounding pressure of the unpopped kernels, results in an increased volume of the kernels [Quinn et al, http://xxx.lanl.gov/abs/cond-mat/0409434 v1 2004]. In this project an alternate method of popping with the microwave was used to further test and confirm this hypothesis. Numerous experimental trials where run to test the validity of the theory. The results show that there is a significant increase in the average kernel size as well as a reduction in the number of unpopped kernels.

  17. Quantal localization and the uncertainty principle

    SciTech Connect

    Leopold, J.G.; Richards, D.

    1988-09-01

    We give a dynamical explanation for the localization of the wave function for the one-dimensional hydrogen atom, with the Coulomb singularity, in a high-frequency electric field, which leads to a necessary condition for classical dynamics to be valid. Numerical tests confirm the accuracy of the condition. Our analysis is relevant to the comparison between the classical and quantal dynamics of the kicked rotor and standard map.

  18. Dynamin-2 regulates fusion pore expansion and quantal release through a mechanism that involves actin dynamics in neuroendocrine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    González-Jamett, Arlek M; Momboisse, Fanny; Guerra, María José; Ory, Stéphane; Báez-Matus, Ximena; Barraza, Natalia; Calco, Valerie; Houy, Sébastien; Couve, Eduardo; Neely, Alan; Martínez, Agustín D; Gasman, Stéphane; Cárdenas, Ana M

    2013-01-01

    Over the past years, dynamin has been implicated in tuning the amount and nature of transmitter released during exocytosis. However, the mechanism involved remains poorly understood. Here, using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, we investigated whether this mechanism rely on dynamin's ability to remodel actin cytoskeleton. According to this idea, inhibition of dynamin GTPase activity suppressed the calcium-dependent de novo cortical actin and altered the cortical actin network. Similarly, expression of a small interfering RNA directed against dynamin-2, an isoform highly expressed in chromaffin cells, changed the cortical actin network pattern. Disruption of dynamin-2 function, as well as the pharmacological inhibition of actin polymerization with cytochalasine-D, slowed down fusion pore expansion and increased the quantal size of individual exocytotic events. The effects of cytochalasine-D and dynamin-2 disruption were not additive indicating that dynamin-2 and F-actin regulate the late steps of exocytosis by a common mechanism. Together our data support a model in which dynamin-2 directs actin polymerization at the exocytosis site where both, in concert, adjust the hormone quantal release to efficiently respond to physiological demands.

  19. Preferential cell attachment to nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) for the measurement of quantal exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Atanu; Barizuddin, Syed; Hossain, Maruf; Polo-Parada, Luis; Gillis, Kevin D.; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical measurement of transmitter or hormone release from individual cells on microchips has applications both in basic science and drug screening. High-resolution measurement of quantal exocytosis requires the working electrode to be small (cell-sized) and located in immediate proximity to the cell. We examined the ability of candidate electrode materials to promote the attachment of two hormone-secreting cell types as a mechanism for targeting cells for to recording electrodes with high precision. We found that nitrogen-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) promoted cell attachment relative to other materials tested in the rank order of DLC:N > In2O3/SnO2 (ITO), Pt > Au. In addition, we found that treating candidate electrode materials with polylysine did not increase attachment of chromaffin cells to DLC:N, but promoted cell attachment to the other tested materials. We found that hormone-secreting cells did not attach readily to Teflon AF as a potential insulating material, and demonstrated that patterning of Teflon AF leads to selective cell targeting to DLC:N “docking sites”. These results will guide the design of the next generation of biochips for automated and high-throughput measurement of quantal exocytosis. PMID:19124153

  20. Reducing Class Size To Increase Student Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lottes, Christine R.

    Reducing class size was considered an important element in a revised health course at Gettysburg College (Pennsylvania). However, reducing class size to approximately 15 students per class would require 38 sections, more than the health faculty could handle. To recruit additional instructors, the course was marketed to faculty and administrators…

  1. Quantal analysis of synaptic processes in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Thomson, A M

    1998-01-01

    The application of fluctuation analysis to studies of synaptic function in the neocortex is discussed. Analysis of failures of transmission has been valuable in indicating whether a presynaptic or a postsynaptic site is responsible for a change in synaptic efficacy. When combined with detailed ultrastructural verification of all synapses involved in an individual cell to cell connection, a reasonable estimate of quantal size and release probability under conditions of low frequency activity can be obtained. However, both the number of available release sites in functional terms and the probability that an action potential (AP) will release transmitter from any given site can vary from AP to AP at higher frequencies. A variety of presynaptic mechanisms that modulate release are now apparent. For example, one mechanism dominates release patterns at one class of connection which is insensitive to absolute firing frequency, but responsive to changes in frequency. At another class of connection, a different mechanism dominates, resulting in high sensitivity to frequency. PMID:9759331

  2. Illustrating Concepts of Quantal Analysis with an Intuitive Classroom Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xu-Friedman, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    The quantal hypothesis is central to the modern understanding of how a neurotransmitter is released from synapses. This hypothesis expresses that a neurotransmitter is packaged together in quanta that are released probabilistically. The experiments that led to the quantal hypothesis are often related in introductory neuroscience textbooks, but…

  3. Slow kinetics of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca2+ release: is the release 'quantal' or 'non-quantal'?

    PubMed Central

    Missiaen, L; De Smedt, H; Parys, J B; Sienaert, I; Sipma, H; Vanlingen, S; Casteels, R

    1997-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)-induced Ca2+ release from intracellular stores is generally assumed to be a 'quantal' process because low InsP3 concentrations mobilize less Ca2+ than high concentrations and a submaximal concentration does not release all the InsP3-mobilizable Ca2+. However, some recent reports questioned the generally accepted view that a low dose of InsP3 is unable to empty the whole store. We have now challenged the stores of permeabilized A7r5 cells in InsP3 for much longer periods than previously reported, to assess directly whether the slow phase of the release would empty the whole store (a non-quantal response) or only a fraction of it (a quantal response). Addition of a maximal [InsP3] at the end of a prolonged (92 min) stimulation with a submaximal [InsP3] resulted in additional Ca2+ release. Experiments in which the stores were challenged with different submaximal InsP3 concentrations for long time periods revealed that a lower [InsP3] never released the same amount of Ca2+ as a higher [InsP3]. This quantal pattern of Ca2+ release occurred both at 25 degrees C and at 4 degrees C. There was a time-dependent increase in the fraction of Ca2+ recruited by the lower compared with the higher [InsP3]. This recruitment of Ca2+ persisted if the [InsP3] was decreased, but was largely prevented by palmitoyl-CoA, a potent blocker of the luminal Ca2+ translocation between individual store units. ATP, in the presence of InsP3, released Ca2+ under conditions permitting the recruitment of no additional InsP3 receptors, indicating that an all-or-none emptying of a fraction of the stores cannot be the only mechanism responsible for quantal Ca2+ release in A7r5 cells. We conclude that some of the previously published evidence for a non-quantal Ca2+ release pattern should be reinterpreted. PMID:9173870

  4. Ecological determinism increases with organism size.

    PubMed

    Farjalla, Vinicius F; Srivastava, Diane S; Marino, Nicholas A C; Azevedo, Fernanda D; Dib, Viviane; Lopes, Paloma M; Rosado, Alexandre S; Bozelli, Reinaldo L; Esteves, Francisco A

    2012-07-01

    After much debate, there is an emerging consensus that the composition of many ecological communities is determined both by species traits, as proposed by niche theory, as well as by chance events. A critical question for ecology is, therefore, which attributes of species predict the dominance of deterministic or stochastic processes. We outline two hypotheses by which organism size could determine which processes structure ecological communities, and we test these hypotheses by comparing the community structure in bromeliad phytotelmata of three groups of organisms (bacteria, zooplankton, and macroinvertebrates) that encompass a 10 000-fold gradient in body size, but live in the same habitat. Bacteria had no habitat associations, as would be expected from trait-neutral stochastic processes, but still showed exclusion among species pairs, as would be expected from niche-based processes. Macroinvertebrates had strong habitat and species associations, indicating niche-based processes. Zooplankton, with body size between bacteria and macroinvertebrates, showed intermediate habitat associations. We concluded that a key niche process, habitat filtering, strengthened with organism size, possibly because larger organisms are both less plastic in their fundamental niches and more able to be selective in dispersal. These results suggest that the relative importance of deterministic and stochastic processes may be predictable from organism size.

  5. LNG fleet increases in size and capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Linser, H.J. Jr.; Drudy, M.J.; Endrizzi, F.; Urbanelli, A.A.

    1997-06-02

    The LNG fleet as of early 1997 consisted of 99 vessels with total cargo capacity of 10.7 million cu m, equivalent to approximately 4.5 million tons. One of the newest additions to the fleet, the 137,000-cu m tanker Al Zubarah, is five times the size of the original commercial vessel Methane Princess. Al Zubarah`s first loading of more than 60,000 tons occurred in December 1996 for deliver to Japanese buyers from the newly commissioned Qatargas LNG plant at Ras Laffan. That size cargo contains enough clean-burning energy to heat 60,000 homes in Japan for 1 month. Measuring nearly 1,000 ft long, the tanker is among the largest in the industry fleet and joined 70 other vessels of more than 100,000 cu m. Most LNG tankers built since 1975 have been larger-capacity vessels. The paper discusses LNG shipping requirements, containment systems, vessel design, propulsion, construction, operations and maintenance, and the future for larger vessels.

  6. The quantal component of synaptic transmission from sensory hair cells to the vestibular calyx.

    PubMed

    Highstein, Stephen M; Mann, Mary Anne; Holstein, Gay R; Rabbitt, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Spontaneous and stimulus-evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) were recorded in calyx nerve terminals from the turtle vestibular lagena to quantify key attributes of quantal transmission at this synapse. On average, EPSC events had a magnitude of ∼ 42 pA, a rise time constant of τ(0) ∼ 229 μs, decayed to baseline with a time constant of τ(R) ∼ 690 μs, and carried ∼ 46 fC of charge. Individual EPSCs varied in magnitude and decay time constant. Variability in the EPSC decay time constant was hair cell dependent and due in part to a slow protraction of the EPSC in some cases. Variability in EPSC size was well described by an integer summation of unitary quanta, with each quanta of glutamate gating a unitary postsynaptic current of ∼ 23 pA. The unitary charge was ∼ 26 fC for EPSCs with a simple exponential decay and increased to ∼ 48 fC for EPSCs exhibiting a slow protraction. The EPSC magnitude and the number of simultaneous unitary quanta within each event increased with presynaptic stimulus intensity. During tonic hair cell depolarization, both the EPSC magnitude and event rate exhibited adaptive run down over time. Present data from a reptilian calyx are remarkably similar to noncalyceal vestibular synaptic terminals in diverse species, indicating that the skewed EPSC size distribution and multiquantal release might be an ancestral property of inner ear ribbon synapses. PMID:25878150

  7. Release kinetics, quantal parameters and their modulation during short-term depression at a developing synapse in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Taschenberger, Holger; Scheuss, Volker; Neher, Erwin

    2005-10-15

    We have characterized developmental changes in the kinetics and quantal parameters of action potential (AP)-evoked neurotransmitter release during maturation of the calyx of Held synapse. Quantal size (q) and peak amplitudes of evoked EPSCs increased moderately, whereas the fraction of vesicles released by single APs decreased. During synaptic depression induced in postnatal day (P) 5-7 synapses by 10-100 Hz stimulation, q declined rapidly to 40-12% of its initial value. The decrease in q was generally smaller in more mature synapses (P12-14), but quite severe for frequencies > or = 300 Hz. The stronger decline of q in immature synapses resulted from a slower recovery from desensitization, presumably due to delayed glutamate clearance. Recovery from this desensitization followed an exponential time course with a time constant of approximately 480 ms in P5-7 synapses, and sped up > 20-fold during maturation. Deconvolution analysis of EPSCs revealed a significant acceleration of the release time course during development, which was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the peak release rate. During long 100 Hz trains, more mature synapses were able to sustain average rates of 8-10 quanta s(-1) per active zone for phasic release. The rates of asynchronous vesicle release increased transiently > 35-fold immediately after such stimuli and decayed rapidly with an exponential time constant of approximately 50 ms to low resting levels of spontaneous release. However, even following extended periods of 100 Hz stimulation, the amount of asynchronous release was relatively minor with peak rates of less than 5% of the average rate of synchronous release measured at steady state during the tetani. Therefore, a multitude of mechanisms seems to converge on the generation of fast, temporally precise and reliable high-frequency transmission at the mature calyx of Held synapse.

  8. RCAN1 regulates vesicle recycling and quantal release kinetics via effects on calcineurin activity.

    PubMed

    Zanin, Mark P; Mackenzie, Kimberly D; Peiris, Heshan; Pritchard, Melanie A; Keating, Damien J

    2013-02-01

    We have previously shown that Regulator of Calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) regulates multiple stages of vesicle exocytosis. However, the mechanisms by which RCAN1 affects secretory vesicle exocytosis and quantal release kinetics remain unknown. Here, we use carbon fibre amperometry to detect exocytosis from chromaffin cells and identify these underlying mechanisms. We observe reduced exocytosis with repeated stimulations in chromaffin cells over-expressing RCAN1 (RCAN1(ox)), but not in wild-type (WT) cells, indicating a negative effect of RCAN1 on vesicle recycling and endocytosis. Acute exposure to calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine A and FK-506, replicates this effect in WT cells but has no additional effect in RCAN1(ox) cells. When we chronically expose WT cells to cyclosporine A and FK-506 we find that catecholamine release per vesicle and pre-spike foot (PSF) signal parameters are decreased, similar to that in RCAN1(ox) cells. Inhibiting calcineurin activity in RCAN1(ox) cells has no additional effect on the amount of catecholamine release per vesicle but further reduces PSF signal parameters. Although electron microscopy studies indicate these changes are not because of altered vesicle number or distribution in RCAN1(ox) cells, the smaller vesicle and dense core size we observe in RCAN1(ox) cells may underlie the reduced quantal release in these cells. Thus, our results indicate that RCAN1 most likely affects vesicle recycling and quantal release kinetics via the inhibition of calcineurin activity.

  9. A microwell device for targeting single cells to electrochemical microelectrodes for high-throughput amperometric detection of quantal exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Barizuddin, Syed; Shin, Wonchul; Mathai, Cherian J.; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra; Gillis, Kevin D.

    2011-01-01

    Electrochemical microelectrodes are commonly used to detect spikes of amperometric current that correspond to exocytosis of oxidizable transmitter from individual vesicles, i.e., quantal exocytosis. We are developing transparent multi- electrochemical electrode arrays on microchips in order to automate measurement of quantal exocytosis. Here we report development of an improved device to target individual cells to each microelectrode in an array. Efficient targeting (~75%) is achieved using cell-sized micro-well traps fabricated in SU-8 photoresist together with patterning of poly (L-lysine) in register with electrodes to promote cell adhesion. The surface between electrodes is made resistant to cell adhesion using poly (ethylene glycol) in order to facilitate movement of cells to electrode “docking sites”. We demonstrate the activity of the electrodes using the test analyte ferricyanide and perform recordings of quantal exocytosis from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells on the device. Multiple cell recordings on a single device demonstrate the consistency of spike measurements and multiple recordings from the same electrodes demonstrate that the device can be cleaned and reused without degradation of performance. The new device will enable high-throughput studies of quantal exocytosis and may also find application in rapidly screening drugs or toxins for effects on exocytosis. PMID:21355543

  10. Quantal Aspects of - Energy Transfer and Photodissociation of Oscillators.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, John Joseph

    1988-12-01

    Our first chapter examines the mechanism by which molecular rotation enhances vibrational relaxation of a diatomic molecule. Three factors are discussed, lowering by rotational transitions of the vibrational energy defect, coupling due to potential matrix elements off diagonal in rotational state, and additional phase shifts introduced into the incoming and outgoing waves by anisotropy in the intermolecular potential. The distorted wave solution of the coupled states scattering equations elucidates the importance of each factor for H_2(v = 1) - He, CO(v = 1) - H_2, and for vibrational energy transfer from H_2 (v = 1) to CO(v = 0,1,2). Rotation is found to play both an energetic and a dynamical role. In the energetic role, rotation lowers the vibrational energy defect and thereby enhances vibrational relaxation, while the dynamic contribution takes the form of additional phase shifts introduced into the incoming and outgoing waves by the potential anisotropy. Our results suggest that molecular anisotropy in the region of the classical turning point is an important factor in the rotational enhancement observed in recent comparisons of CSA and IOSA vibrational relaxation rate constants for the N_2-He and CO-He systems. In the second chapter we study the response of a highly excited Morse oscillator with 179 bound states to an intense, below resonance electromagnetic field. A dynamic, quantal description of dissociation is obtained from an inspection of the time dependent wavefunction. The bound to continuum transitions which occur during dissociation involve the emission of a high energy, coherent wave which propagates to infinity--a feature not observed in other studies of the periodically driven Morse oscillator. Initially, the exodus of this wave results in a rapid increase in the dissociation probability. However, at longer times the dissociation slows down and concurrently the system is localized in the bound state basis, indicating that even though the classical

  11. Larger brain size indirectly increases vulnerability to extinction in mammals.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; González-Suárez, Manuela; Vilà, Carles; Revilla, Eloy

    2016-06-01

    Although previous studies have addressed the question of why large brains evolved, we have limited understanding of potential beneficial or detrimental effects of enlarged brain size in the face of current threats. Using novel phylogenetic path analysis, we evaluated how brain size directly and indirectly, via its effects on life history and ecology, influences vulnerability to extinction across 474 mammalian species. We found that larger brains, controlling for body size, indirectly increase vulnerability to extinction by extending the gestation period, increasing weaning age, and limiting litter sizes. However, we found no evidence of direct, beneficial, or detrimental effects of brain size on vulnerability to extinction, even when we explicitly considered the different types of threats that lead to vulnerability. Order-specific analyses revealed qualitatively similar patterns for Carnivora and Artiodactyla. Interestingly, for Primates, we found that larger brain size was directly (and indirectly) associated with increased vulnerability to extinction. Our results indicate that under current conditions, the constraints on life history imposed by large brains outweigh the potential benefits, undermining the resilience of the studied mammals. Contrary to the selective forces that have favored increased brain size throughout evolutionary history, at present, larger brains have become a burden for mammals. PMID:27159368

  12. Larger brain size indirectly increases vulnerability to extinction in mammals.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Voyer, Alejandro; González-Suárez, Manuela; Vilà, Carles; Revilla, Eloy

    2016-06-01

    Although previous studies have addressed the question of why large brains evolved, we have limited understanding of potential beneficial or detrimental effects of enlarged brain size in the face of current threats. Using novel phylogenetic path analysis, we evaluated how brain size directly and indirectly, via its effects on life history and ecology, influences vulnerability to extinction across 474 mammalian species. We found that larger brains, controlling for body size, indirectly increase vulnerability to extinction by extending the gestation period, increasing weaning age, and limiting litter sizes. However, we found no evidence of direct, beneficial, or detrimental effects of brain size on vulnerability to extinction, even when we explicitly considered the different types of threats that lead to vulnerability. Order-specific analyses revealed qualitatively similar patterns for Carnivora and Artiodactyla. Interestingly, for Primates, we found that larger brain size was directly (and indirectly) associated with increased vulnerability to extinction. Our results indicate that under current conditions, the constraints on life history imposed by large brains outweigh the potential benefits, undermining the resilience of the studied mammals. Contrary to the selective forces that have favored increased brain size throughout evolutionary history, at present, larger brains have become a burden for mammals.

  13. Computer Simulation of Quantal Dose-Response Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGilliard, Kip L.

    1985-01-01

    Describes a program which simulates animal pharmacology experiments involving "all-or-none" responses. Use of the Applesoft BASIC program in the pharmacology teaching laboratory provides students with a rapid and economical way to gain experience in the design and statistical analysis of quantal dose-response experiments. Information on obtaining…

  14. Genome size increases in recently diverged hornwort clades.

    PubMed

    Bainard, Jillian D; Villarreal, Juan Carlos

    2013-08-01

    As our knowledge of plant genome size estimates continues to grow, one group has continually been neglected: the hornworts. Hornworts (Anthocerotophyta) have been traditionally grouped with liverworts and mosses because they share a haploid dominant life cycle; however, recent molecular studies place hornworts as the sister lineage to extant tracheophytes. Given the scarcity of information regarding the DNA content of hornworts, our objective was to estimate the 1C-value for a range of hornwort species within a phylogenetic context. Using flow cytometry, we estimated genome size for 36 samples representing 24 species. This accounts for roughly 10% of known hornwort species. Haploid genome sizes (1C-value) ranged from 160 Mbp or 0.16 pg (Leiosporoceros dussii) to 719 Mbp or 0.73 pg (Nothoceros endiviifolius). The average 1C-value was 261 ± 104 Mbp (0.27 ± 0.11 pg). Ancestral reconstruction of genome size on a hornwort phylogeny suggests a small ancestral genome size and revealed increases in genome size in the most recently divergent clades. Much more work is needed to understand DNA content variation in this phylogenetically important group, but this work has significantly increased our knowledge of genome size variation in hornworts.

  15. Increase of linear size uniformity of synthetic diamond grinding powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilnitskaya, G.; Bogatyreva, G.; Novikov, N.; Shepelev, A.; Nevstryev, G.; Leshchenko, O.

    2008-07-01

    It has been shown in article that increase of powder uniformity is achieved by carrying out additional sorting of powders in the sizes and form of grains. The sorting process includes the following stages: chemical rounding of diamond grains by strong oxidants; special grain size classification on sieves with mesh sizes corresponded to geometrical progression of twentieth (R-20) and fortieth (R-40) number series; additional separation of diamond grains in narrow graininess by grain form. Diamond powder of AC6 100/80 series has been produced by this technology, as a result of that the content of basic fraction runs up 85%.

  16. Economic Effects of Increased Control Zone Sizes in Conflict Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Koushik

    1998-01-01

    A methodology for estimating the economic effects of different control zone sizes used in conflict resolutions between aircraft is presented in this paper. The methodology is based on estimating the difference in flight times of aircraft with and without the control zone, and converting the difference into a direct operating cost. Using this methodology the effects of increased lateral and vertical control zone sizes are evaluated.

  17. Increasing the size of a piece of popcorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Paul V.; Hong, Daniel C.; Both, J. A.

    2005-08-01

    Popcorn is an extremely popular snack food in the world today. Thermodynamics can be used to analyze how popcorn is produced. By treating the popping mechanism of the corn as a thermodynamic expansion, a method of increasing the volume or size of a kernel of popcorn can be studied. By lowering the pressure surrounding the unpopped kernel, one can use a thermodynamic argument to show that the expanded volume of the kernel when it pops must increase. In this project, a variety of experiments are run to test the qualitative validity of this theory. The results show that there is a significant increase in the average kernel size when the pressure of the surroundings is reduced.

  18. Increasing the Size of a Piece of Popcorn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Paul; Hong, Daniel C.; Both, Joseph

    2003-03-01

    Popcorn is an extremely popular snack food in the world today. Thermodynamics can be used to analyze how popcorn is produced. By treating the popping mechanism of the corn as a thermodynamic expansion, a method of increasing the volume or size of a kernel of popcorn can be studied. By lowering the pressure surrounding the unpopped kernel, one can use a thermodynamic argument to show that the expanded volume of the kernel when it pops must increase. In this project, a variety of experiments are run to test the validity of this theory. The results show that there is a significant increase in the average kernel size when the pressure of the surroundings is reduced.

  19. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, N L; Das, A J; Condit, R; Russo, S E; Baker, P J; Beckman, N G; Coomes, D A; Lines, E R; Morris, W K; Rüger, N; Alvarez, E; Blundo, C; Bunyavejchewin, S; Chuyong, G; Davies, S J; Duque, A; Ewango, C N; Flores, O; Franklin, J F; Grau, H R; Hao, Z; Harmon, M E; Hubbell, S P; Kenfack, D; Lin, Y; Makana, J-R; Malizia, A; Malizia, L R; Pabst, R J; Pongpattananurak, N; Su, S-H; Sun, I-F; Tan, S; Thomas, D; van Mantgem, P J; Wang, X; Wiser, S K; Zavala, M A

    2014-03-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle--particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage--increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree's total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to undertand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence.

  20. Trees increase their P:N ratio with size

    PubMed Central

    Sardans, J; Peñuelas, J.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Phosphorus (P) tends to become limiting in aging terrestrial ecosystems, and its resorption efficiency is higher than for other elements such as nitrogen (N). We thus hypothesized that trees should store more P than those other elements such as N when tree size increases and that this process should be enhanced in slow-growing late successional trees. Location Catalan forests. Methods We have used data from the Catalan Forest Inventory that contains field data of the P and N contents of total aboveground, foliar and woody biomasses of the diverse Mediterranean, temperate and alpine forests of Catalonia (1018 sites). We used correlation and general lineal models (GLM) to analyze the allometric relationships between nutrient contents of different aboveground biomass fractions (foliar, branches and stems) and total aboveground biomass. Results Aboveground forest P content increases proportionally more than aboveground forest N content with increasing aboveground biomass. Two mechanisms underlie this. First, woody biomass increases proportionally more than foliar biomass having woody biomass higher P:N ratio than foliar biomass. Second, wood P:N ratio increases with tree size. These results are consistent with the generally higher foliar resorption of P than of N. Slow-growing species accumulate more P in total aboveground with size than fast-growing species mainly as a result of their large capacity to store P in wood. Main conclusions Trees may have thus developed long-term adaptive mechanisms to store P in biomass, mainly in wood, thereby slowing the loss of P from the ecosystems, reducing its availability for competitors, and implying an increase in the P:N ratio in forest biomass with aging. This trend to accumulate more P than N with size is more accentuated in slow-growing, large, long-living species of late successional stages. This way they partly counterbalance the gradual decrease of P in the soil. PMID:25983656

  1. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, N. L.; Das, A. J.; Condit, R.; Russo, S. E.; Baker, P. J.; Beckman, N. G.; Coomes, D. A.; Lines, E. R.; Morris, W. K.; Rüger, N.; Álvarez, E.; Blundo, C.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Chuyong, G.; Davies, S. J.; Duque, Á.; Ewango, C. N.; Flores, O.; Franklin, J. F.; Grau, H. R.; Hao, Z.; Harmon, M. E.; Hubbell, S. P.; Kenfack, D.; Lin, Y.; Makana, J.-R.; Malizia, A.; Malizia, L. R.; Pabst, R. J.; Pongpattananurak, N.; Su, S.-H.; Sun, I.-F.; Tan, S.; Thomas, D.; van Mantgem, P. J.; Wang, X.; Wiser, S. K.; Zavala, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle--particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage--increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree's total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to undertand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence.

  2. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, N L; Das, A J; Condit, R; Russo, S E; Baker, P J; Beckman, N G; Coomes, D A; Lines, E R; Morris, W K; Rüger, N; Alvarez, E; Blundo, C; Bunyavejchewin, S; Chuyong, G; Davies, S J; Duque, A; Ewango, C N; Flores, O; Franklin, J F; Grau, H R; Hao, Z; Harmon, M E; Hubbell, S P; Kenfack, D; Lin, Y; Makana, J-R; Malizia, A; Malizia, L R; Pabst, R J; Pongpattananurak, N; Su, S-H; Sun, I-F; Tan, S; Thomas, D; van Mantgem, P J; Wang, X; Wiser, S K; Zavala, M A

    2014-03-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle--particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage--increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree's total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to undertand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence. PMID:24429523

  3. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; Das, A.J.; Condit, R.; Russo, S.E.; Baker, P.J.; Beckman, N.G.; Coomes, D.A.; Lines, E.R.; Morris, W.K.; Rüger, N.; Álvarez, E.; Blundo, C.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Chuyong, G.; Davies, S.J.; Duque, Á.; Ewango, C.N.; Flores, O.; Franklin, J.F.; Grau, H.R.; Hao, Z.; Harmon, M.E.; Hubbell, S.P.; Kenfack, D.; Lin, Y.; Makana, J.-R.; Malizia, A.; Malizia, L.R.; Pabst, R.J.; Pongpattananurak, N.; Su, S.-H.; Sun, I-F.; Tan, S.; Thomas, D.; van Mantgem, P.J.; Wang, X.; Wiser, S.K.; Zavala, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle—particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage—increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree’s total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to understand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence.

  4. Individual increase in inbreeding allows estimating effective sizes from pedigrees

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Cervantes, Isabel; Molina, Antonio; Valera, Mercedes; Goyache, Félix

    2008-01-01

    We present here a simple approach to obtain reliable estimates of the effective population size in real world populations via the computation of the increase in inbreeding for each individual (delta Fi) in a given population. The values of delta Fi are computed as t-root of 1 - (1 - Fi) where Fi is the inbreeding coefficient and t is the equivalent complete generations for each individual. The values of delta F computed for a pre-defined reference subset can be averaged and used to estimate effective size. A standard error of this estimate of Ne can be further computed from the standard deviation of the individual increase in inbreeding. The methodology is demonstrated by applying it to several simulated examples and to a real pedigree in which other methodologies fail when considering reference subpopulations. The main characteristics of the approach and its possible use are discussed both for predictive purposes and for analyzing genealogies. PMID:18558071

  5. Increasing the portion size of a packaged snack increases energy intake in men and women.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Barbara J; Roe, Liane S; Kral, Tanja V E; Meengs, Jennifer S; Wall, Denise E

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to determine how the portion size of a packaged snack affects energy intake of the snack and of the subsequent meal. On five separate days, 60 subjects (34 women and 26 men) ate an afternoon snack and dinner in individual cubicles. For each snack, subjects were served one of five packages of potato chips (28, 42, 85, 128, or 170 g), which they consumed ad libitum directly from the unlabelled, opaque package. Subjects returned to the lab three hours later for a standard dinner, which was also consumed ad libitum. Results showed that snack intake increased significantly as the package size increased for both males and females (p < 0.001). The combined energy intake from snack and dinner also increased as the package size increased. On average, when served the largest snack package compared to the smallest, subjects consumed an additional 596 kJ (143 kcal) at snack and dinner combined. Results from this study demonstrate that short-term energy intake increases with increasing package size of a snack. These data suggest that the availability of large packages of energy-dense snacks may be one of the environmental influences associated with excess energy intake. PMID:15036784

  6. Enhanced Sucrose Loading Improves Rice Yield by Increasing Grain Size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Lu, Qingtao; Wen, Xiaogang; Lu, Congming

    2015-12-01

    Yield in cereals is a function of grain number and size. Sucrose (Suc), the main carbohydrate product of photosynthesis in higher plants, is transported long distances from source leaves to sink organs such as seeds and roots. Here, we report that transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa) expressing the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phloem-specific Suc transporter (AtSUC2), which loads Suc into the phloem under control of the phloem protein2 promoter (pPP2), showed an increase in grain yield of up to 16% relative to wild-type plants in field trials. Compared with wild-type plants, pPP2::AtSUC2 plants had larger spikelet hulls and larger and heavier grains. Grain filling was accelerated in the transgenic plants, and more photoassimilate was transported from the leaves to the grain. In addition, microarray analyses revealed that carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was enhanced in the leaves and grain of pPP2::AtSUC2 plants. Thus, enhancing Suc loading represents a promising strategy to improve rice yield to feed the global population.

  7. Dynamics of quantal heating in electron systems with discrete spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Scott; Mayer, William; Vitkalov, Sergey; Bykov, A. A.

    2015-05-01

    The temporal evolution of quantal Joule heating of two-dimensional (2D) electrons in a GaAs quantum well placed in quantizing magnetic fields is studied using a difference-frequency method. The method is based on measurements of the electron conductivity oscillating at the beat frequency f =f1-f2 between two microwaves applied to the 2D system at frequencies f1 and f2. The method provides direct access to the dynamical characteristics of the heating and yields the inelastic-scattering time τi n of 2D electrons. The obtained τi n is strongly temperature dependent, varying from 0.13 ns at 5.5 K to 1 ns at 2.4 K in magnetic field B =0.333 T . When the temperature T exceeds the Landau-level separation, the relaxation rate 1 /τi n is proportional to T2, indicating electron-electron interaction as the dominant mechanism limiting the quantal heating. At lower temperatures, the rate tends to be proportional to T3, indicating considerable contribution from electron-phonon scattering.

  8. Dynamics of Quantal Heating in Electron Systems with Discrete Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, William; Dietrich, Scott; Vitkalov, Sergey; Bykov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    The temporal evolution of quantal Joule heating of 2D electrons in GaAs quantum well placed in quantizing magnetic fields is studied using a difference frequency method. The method is based on measurements of the electron conductivity oscillating at the beat frequency f =f1 -f2 between two microwaves applied to 2D system at frequencies f1 and f2. The method provides direct access to the dynamical characteristics of the heating and yields the inelastic scattering time τin of 2D electrons. The obtained τin is strongly temperature dependent, varying from 0.13 ns at 5.5K to 1 ns at 2.4K in magnetic field B=0.333T. When temperature T exceeds the Landau level separation the relaxation rate 1 /τin is proportional to T2, indicating the electron-electron interaction as the dominant mechanism limiting the quantal heating. At lower temperatures the rate tends to be proportional to T3, indicating considerable contribution from electron-phonon scattering. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR 1104503), the Russian Foundation for Basic Research (project no.14-02-01158) and the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation.

  9. A Microscopic Quantal Model for Nuclear Collective Rotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gulshani, P.

    2007-10-26

    A microscopic, quantal model to describe nuclear collective rotation in two dimensions is derived from the many-nucleon Schrodinger equation. The Schrodinger equation is transformed to a body-fixed frame to decompose the Hamiltonian into a sum of intrinsic and rotational components plus a Coriolis-centrifugal coupling term. This Hamiltonian (H) is expressed in terms of space-fixed-frame particle coordinates and momenta by using commutator of H with a rotation angle. A unified-rotational-model type wavefunction is used to obtain an intrinsic Schrodinger equation in terms of angular momentum quantum number and two-body operators. A Hartree-Fock mean-field representation of this equation is then obtained and, by means of a unitary transformation, is reduced to a form resembling that of the conventional semi-classical cranking model when exchange terms and intrinsic spurious collective excitation are ignored.

  10. Local ergodicity in coupled harmonic vibrators: classical and quantal treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englman, R.

    2016-03-01

    Ensemble-time ergodicity is proven under some restrictive assumptions for a classical system, comprising interacting harmonic oscillators. An atom in a monatomic chain or lattice is shown to behave ergodically, in the sense that the time average behavior of a lattice point is identical to the ensemble average of the behavior of a lattice point at any long time (in large excess of the inverse vibrational frequencies). This equivalence (for ‘local observables’) differs from the Fermi-Pasta-Ulam result for mode energies (which are non-local). Then, the analogous quantal result is derived, with extensions to wider instances. Relationships to canonical typicality and to the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis are discussed and possibilities of experimental verifications of the results are indicated.

  11. Plant genotypic diversity increases population size of a herbivorous insect

    PubMed Central

    Utsumi, Shunsuke; Ando, Yoshino; Craig, Timothy P.; Ohgushi, Takayuki

    2011-01-01

    It is critical to incorporate the process of population dynamics into community genetics studies to identify the mechanisms of the linkage between host plant genetics and associated communities. We studied the effects of plant genotypic diversity of tall goldenrod Solidago altissima on the population dynamics of the aphid Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum. We found genotypic variation in plant resistance to the aphid in our experiments. To determine the impact of plant genotypic diversity on aphid population dynamics, we compared aphid densities under conditions of three treatments: single-genotype plots, mixed-genotype plots and mixed-genotype-with-cages plots. In the latter treatment plants were individually caged to prevent natural enemy attack and aphid movement among plants. The synergistic effects of genotypes on population size were demonstrated by the greater aphid population size in the mixed-genotype treatment than expected from additive effects alone. Two non-exclusive hypotheses are proposed to explain this pattern. First, there is a source–sink relationship among plant genotypes: aphids move from plant genotypes where their reproduction is high to genotypes where their reproduction is low. Second, natural enemy mortality is reduced in mixed plots in a matrix of diverse plant genotypes. PMID:21378084

  12. Increased power and size in Arctic boat future

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, P.G.; Duerr, J.M.

    1985-11-01

    As offshore activity increases in hostile areas around the world such as the Beaufort Sea, Bering Sea, Canadian east coast, Barents Sea, etc., highly capable offshore supply boats are becoming an integral part of the drilling systems. These boats have a continuously expanding role to play as general utility craft for such offshore oil operations. From their initial mission strictly as supply tenders for shallow-water operations in the Gulf of Mexico, they have grown to undertake towing and standby service, fire protection service, anchor handling, subsea survey work, diving tender duties, rescue craft and recently as icebreakers for Arctic exploration. When operations move into these remote, hostile environments, the basic required capabilities for workboats increase in several directions. The requirements for these supply boats are discussed.

  13. Automated maximum likelihood separation of signal from baseline in noisy quantal data.

    PubMed

    Bruno, William J; Ullah, Ghanim; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Pearson, John E

    2013-07-01

    Data recordings often include high-frequency noise and baseline fluctuations that are not generated by the system under investigation, which need to be removed before analyzing the signal for the system's behavior. In the absence of an automated method, experimentalists fall back on manual procedures for removing these fluctuations, which can be laborious and prone to subjective bias. We introduce a maximum likelihood formalism for separating signal from a drifting baseline plus noise, when the signal takes on integer multiples of some value, as in ion channel patch-clamp current traces. Parameters such as the quantal step size (e.g., current passing through a single channel), noise amplitude, and baseline drift rate can all be optimized automatically using the expectation-maximization algorithm, taking the number of open channels (or molecules in the on-state) at each time point as a hidden variable. Our goal here is to reconstruct the signal, not model the (possibly highly complex) underlying system dynamics. Thus, our likelihood function is independent of those dynamics. This may be thought of as restricting to the simplest possible hidden Markov model for the underlying channel current, in which successive measurements of the state of the channel(s) are independent. The resulting method is comparable to an experienced human in terms of results, but much faster. FORTRAN 90, C, R, and JAVA codes that implement the algorithm are available for download from our website. PMID:23823225

  14. Increasing portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school lunch program can increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nicole; Reicks, Marla; Redden, Joseph P; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Vickers, Zata

    2015-08-01

    Increasing portion size can increase children's consumption of food. The goal of this study was to determine whether increasing the portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school cafeteria environment would increase children's consumption of them. We measured each child's consumption of the fruit and vegetables served in a cafeteria line on a control day (normal cafeteria procedures) and on two intervention days. When we increased the portion size of 3 of the 4 fruits and vegetables by about 50%, children who took those foods increased their consumption of them. Although this was an effective strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among students who took those foods, many children chose not to take any fruits or vegetables. Further efforts are needed to increase children's selection and consumption of fruits and vegetables in an environment of competing foods of higher palatability.

  15. Increasing portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school lunch program can increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nicole; Reicks, Marla; Redden, Joseph P; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Vickers, Zata

    2015-08-01

    Increasing portion size can increase children's consumption of food. The goal of this study was to determine whether increasing the portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school cafeteria environment would increase children's consumption of them. We measured each child's consumption of the fruit and vegetables served in a cafeteria line on a control day (normal cafeteria procedures) and on two intervention days. When we increased the portion size of 3 of the 4 fruits and vegetables by about 50%, children who took those foods increased their consumption of them. Although this was an effective strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among students who took those foods, many children chose not to take any fruits or vegetables. Further efforts are needed to increase children's selection and consumption of fruits and vegetables in an environment of competing foods of higher palatability. PMID:25958117

  16. Reversible Recruitment of a Homeostatic Reserve Pool of Synaptic Vesicles Underlies Rapid Homeostatic Plasticity of Quantal Content.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xueyong; Pinter, Martin J; Rich, Mark M

    2016-01-20

    Homeostatic regulation is essential for the maintenance of synaptic strength within the physiological range. The current study is the first to demonstrate that both induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds of blocking or unblocking acetylcholine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction. Our data suggest that the homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca(2+)-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). Blocking vesicle refilling prevented upregulation of quantal content (QC), while leaving baseline release relatively unaffected. This suggested that the upregulation of QC was due to mobilization of a distinct pool of vesicles that were rapidly recycled and thus were dependent on continued vesicle refilling. We term this pool the "homeostatic reserve pool." A detailed analysis of the time course of vesicle release triggered by a presynaptic action potential suggests that the homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles is normally released more slowly than other vesicles, but the rate of their release becomes similar to that of the major pool during homeostatic upregulation of QC. Remarkably, instead of finding a generalized increase in the recruitment of vesicles into RRP, we identified a distinct homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles that appear to only participate in synchronized release following homeostatic upregulation of QC. Once this small pool of vesicles is depleted by the block of vesicle refilling, homeostatic upregulation of QC is no longer observed. This is the first identification of the population of vesicles responsible for the blockade-induced upregulation of release previously described. Significance statement: The current study is the first to demonstrate that both the induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds. Our data suggest that homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca(2+)-dependent

  17. Reversible Recruitment of a Homeostatic Reserve Pool of Synaptic Vesicles Underlies Rapid Homeostatic Plasticity of Quantal Content

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, Martin J.; Rich, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    Homeostatic regulation is essential for the maintenance of synaptic strength within the physiological range. The current study is the first to demonstrate that both induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds of blocking or unblocking acetylcholine receptors at the mouse neuromuscular junction. Our data suggest that the homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca2+-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP). Blocking vesicle refilling prevented upregulation of quantal content (QC), while leaving baseline release relatively unaffected. This suggested that the upregulation of QC was due to mobilization of a distinct pool of vesicles that were rapidly recycled and thus were dependent on continued vesicle refilling. We term this pool the “homeostatic reserve pool.” A detailed analysis of the time course of vesicle release triggered by a presynaptic action potential suggests that the homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles is normally released more slowly than other vesicles, but the rate of their release becomes similar to that of the major pool during homeostatic upregulation of QC. Remarkably, instead of finding a generalized increase in the recruitment of vesicles into RRP, we identified a distinct homeostatic reserve pool of vesicles that appear to only participate in synchronized release following homeostatic upregulation of QC. Once this small pool of vesicles is depleted by the block of vesicle refilling, homeostatic upregulation of QC is no longer observed. This is the first identification of the population of vesicles responsible for the blockade-induced upregulation of release previously described. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The current study is the first to demonstrate that both the induction and reversal of homeostatic upregulation of synaptic vesicle release can occur within seconds. Our data suggest that homeostatic upregulation of release is due to Ca2+-dependent

  18. Membrane Na+-K+ ATPase inhibition mediated quantal model for brain evolution.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-05-01

    The hypothalamus secretes an endogenous membrane Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor, digoxin. A digoxin-mediated model of quantal perception is proposed. In the quantal state, self replication of self-organized macromolecules is possible. This leads to the origin of molecular organisms like prions. Macromolecules group together to form organelle, which in evolutionary terms are independent bacteria. The organelle/bacteria symbiotically cluster together to form the cell. The human organism, including the brain, can be visualized as an organized cluster or colony of unicellular, symbiotically grouped flagellated bacteria. Synaptic connections form in the bacterial cluster leading to the evolution of the primitive neuronal networks, and later the human brain. The role of quantal perception and the observer function of consciousness in the origin of matter is important. Symbiotically clustered intergalactic magnetotactic bacterial networks are important in the evolution of the universe.

  19. Receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of quantal release of acetylcholine induced by pralidoxime in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fossier, P; Baux, G; Poulain, B; Tauc, L

    1990-09-01

    1. Possible interactions of contrathion (pralidoxime sulfomethylate), a reactivator of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with the regulation of cholinergic transmission were investigated on an identified synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Transmitter release was evoked either by a presynaptic action potential or, under voltage clamp, by a long depolarization of the presynaptic cell. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, bath-applied contrathion decreased the amplitude of miniature postsynaptic currents and increased their decay time. At the same time, the quantal release of ACh was transiently facilitated. The facilitatory effect of contrathion was prevented by tubocurarine but not by atropine. Because in this preparation, these drugs block, respectively, the presynaptic nicotinic-like and muscarinic-like receptors involved in positive and negative feedback of ACh release, we proposed that contrathion activates presynaptic nicotinic-like receptors. 3. Differential desensitization of the presynaptic receptors is proposed to explain the transience of the facilitatory action of contrathion on ACh release. 4. The complexity of the synaptic action of contrathion raises the possibility that its therapeutic effects in AChE poisonings are not limited to AChE reactivation. PMID:2253262

  20. Receptor-mediated presynaptic facilitation of quantal release of acetylcholine induced by pralidoxime in Aplysia.

    PubMed

    Fossier, P; Baux, G; Poulain, B; Tauc, L

    1990-09-01

    1. Possible interactions of contrathion (pralidoxime sulfomethylate), a reactivator of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), with the regulation of cholinergic transmission were investigated on an identified synapse in the buccal ganglion of Aplysia californica. 2. Transmitter release was evoked either by a presynaptic action potential or, under voltage clamp, by a long depolarization of the presynaptic cell. At concentrations higher than 10(-5) M, bath-applied contrathion decreased the amplitude of miniature postsynaptic currents and increased their decay time. At the same time, the quantal release of ACh was transiently facilitated. The facilitatory effect of contrathion was prevented by tubocurarine but not by atropine. Because in this preparation, these drugs block, respectively, the presynaptic nicotinic-like and muscarinic-like receptors involved in positive and negative feedback of ACh release, we proposed that contrathion activates presynaptic nicotinic-like receptors. 3. Differential desensitization of the presynaptic receptors is proposed to explain the transience of the facilitatory action of contrathion on ACh release. 4. The complexity of the synaptic action of contrathion raises the possibility that its therapeutic effects in AChE poisonings are not limited to AChE reactivation.

  1. Optical quantal analysis of synaptic transmission in wild-type and rab3-mutant Drosophila motor axons.

    PubMed

    Peled, Einat S; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2011-04-01

    Synaptic transmission from a neuron to its target cells occurs via neurotransmitter release from dozens to thousands of presynaptic release sites whose strength and plasticity can vary considerably. We report an in vivo imaging method that monitors real-time synaptic transmission simultaneously at many release sites with quantal resolution. We applied this method to the model glutamatergic system of the Drosophila melanogaster larval neuromuscular junction. We find that, under basal conditions, about half of release sites have a very low release probability, but these are interspersed with sites with as much as a 50-fold higher probability. Paired-pulse stimulation depresses high-probability sites, facilitates low-probability sites, and recruits previously silent sites. Mutation of the small GTPase Rab3 substantially increases release probability but still leaves about half of the sites silent. Our findings suggest that basal synaptic strength and short-term plasticity are regulated at the level of release probability at individual sites.

  2. Life history evolution and cellular mechanisms associated with increased size in high-altitude Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lack, Justin B; Yassin, Amir; Sprengelmeyer, Quentin D; Johanning, Evan J; David, Jean R; Pool, John E

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the physiological and genetic basis of growth and body size variation has wide-ranging implications, from cancer and metabolic disease to the genetics of complex traits. We examined the evolution of body and wing size in high-altitude Drosophila melanogaster from Ethiopia, flies with larger size than any previously known population. Specifically, we sought to identify life history characteristics and cellular mechanisms that may have facilitated size evolution. We found that the large-bodied Ethiopian flies laid significantly fewer but larger eggs relative to lowland, smaller-bodied Zambian flies. The highland flies were found to achieve larger size in a similar developmental period, potentially aided by a reproductive strategy favoring greater provisioning of fewer offspring. At the cellular level, cell proliferation was a strong contributor to wing size evolution, but both thorax and wing size increases involved important changes in cell size. Nuclear size measurements were consistent with elevated somatic ploidy as an important mechanism of body size evolution. We discuss the significance of these results for the genetic basis of evolutionary changes in body and wing size in Ethiopian D. melanogaster. PMID:27547363

  3. 43 CFR 4300.54 - Can BLM increase the size of the land in my permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION; ALASKA; REINDEER; GENERAL Changes in the Size of the Permit Area § 4300.54 Can BLM increase the... if BLM determines that the area is too small for the number of reindeer you are grazing. BLM...

  4. 43 CFR 4300.54 - Can BLM increase the size of the land in my permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION; ALASKA; REINDEER; GENERAL Changes in the Size of the Permit Area § 4300.54 Can BLM increase the... if BLM determines that the area is too small for the number of reindeer you are grazing. BLM...

  5. 43 CFR 4300.54 - Can BLM increase the size of the land in my permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION; ALASKA; REINDEER; GENERAL Changes in the Size of the Permit Area § 4300.54 Can BLM increase the... if BLM determines that the area is too small for the number of reindeer you are grazing. BLM...

  6. 43 CFR 4300.54 - Can BLM increase the size of the land in my permit?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION; ALASKA; REINDEER; GENERAL Changes in the Size of the Permit Area § 4300.54 Can BLM increase the... if BLM determines that the area is too small for the number of reindeer you are grazing. BLM...

  7. Culling experiments demonstrate size-class specific biomass increases with mortality.

    PubMed

    Schröder, A; Persson, L; de Roos, A M

    2009-02-24

    Size-selective mortality inevitably leads to a decrease in population density and exerts a direct negative effect on targeted size classes. But density and population size structure are also shaped by food-dependent processes, such as individual growth, maturation, and reproduction. Mortality relaxes competition and thereby alters the dynamic interplay among these processes. As shown by the recently developed size-structured theory, which can account for food-dependent individual performance, this altered interplay can lead to overcompensatory responses in size class-specific biomass, with increasing mortality. We experimentally tested this theory by subjecting laboratory fish populations to a range of size-selective mortality rates. Overall, the results were in agreement with theoretical predictions. Biomass of the juvenile size class increased above control levels at intermediate adult mortality rates and thereafter declined at high mortality rates. Juvenile biomass also increased when juveniles themselves were subjected to intermediate mortality rates. Biomass in other size classes decreased with mortality. Such biomass overcompensation can have wide-ranging implications for communities and food webs, including a high sensitivity of top predators to irreversible catastrophic collapses, the establishment of alternative stable community states, and the promotion of coexistence and biodiversity. PMID:19193850

  8. Increased InAs quantum dot size and density using bismuth as a surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Dasika, Vaishno D.; Krivoy, E. M.; Nair, H. P.; Maddox, S. J.; Park, K. W.; Yu, E. T.; Bank, S. R.; Jung, D.; Lee, M. L.

    2014-12-22

    We have investigated the growth of self-assembled InAs quantum dots using bismuth as a surfactant to control the dot size and density. We find that the bismuth surfactant increases the quantum dot density, size, and uniformity, enabling the extension of the emission wavelength with increasing InAs deposition without a concomitant reduction in dot density. We show that these effects are due to bismuth acting as a reactive surfactant to kinetically suppress the surface adatom mobility. This mechanism for controlling quantum dot density and size has the potential to extend the operating wavelength and enhance the performance of various optoelectronic devices.

  9. Temporal coincidence between synaptic vesicle fusion and quantal secretion of acetylcholine

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We applied the quick-freezing technique to investigate the precise temporal coincidence between the onset of quantal secretion and the appearance of fusions of synaptic vesicles with the prejunctional membrane. Frog cutaneous pectoris nerve-muscle preparations were soaked in modified Ringer's solution with 1 mM 4-aminopyridine, 10 mM Ca2+, and 10(-4) M d-Tubocurarine and quick-frozen 1-10 ms after a single supramaximal shock. The frozen muscles were then either freeze- fractured or cryosubstituted in acetone with 13% OsO4 and processed for thin section electron microscopy. Temporal resolution of less than 1 ms can be achieved using a quick-freeze device that increases the rate of freezing of the muscle after it strikes the chilled copper block (15 degrees K) and that minimizes the precooling of the muscle during its descent toward the block. We minimized variations in transmission time by examining thin sections taken only from the medial edge of the muscle, which was at a fixed distance from the point of stimulation of the nerve. The ultrastructure of the cryosubstituted preparations was well preserved to a depth of 5 - 10 micron, and within this narrow band vesicles were found fused with the axolemma after a minimum delay of 2.5 ms after stimulation of the nerve. Since the total transmission time to this edge of the muscle was approximately 3 ms, these results indicate that the vesicles fuse with the axolemma precisely at the same time the quanta are released. Freeze-fracture does not seem to be an adequate experimental technique for this work because in the well- preserved band of the muscle the fracture plane crosses, but does not cleave, the inner hydrophobic domain of the plasmalemma. Fracture faces may form in deeper regions of the muscle where tissue preservation is unsatisfactory and freezing is delayed. PMID:2995407

  10. Increased CPC batch size study for Tank 42 sludge in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, W.E.

    2000-01-06

    A series of experiments have been completed at TNX for the sludge-only REDOX adjusted flowsheet using Tank 42 sludge simulant in response to the Technical Task Request HLW/DWPT/TTR-980013 to increase CPC batch sizes. By increasing the initial SRAT batch size, a melter feed batch at greater waste solids concentration can be prepared and thus increase melter output per batch by about one canister. The increased throughput would allow DWPF to dispose of more waste in a given time period thus shortening the overall campaign.

  11. Demyelination increases axonal stationary mitochondrial size and the speed of axonal mitochondrial transport

    PubMed Central

    Kiryu-Seo, Sumiko; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Kidd, Grahame J.; Komuro, Hitoshi; Trapp, Bruce D.

    2010-01-01

    Axonal degeneration contributes to permanent neurological disability in inherited and acquired diseases of myelin. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as a major contributor to this axonal degeneration. It remains to be determined, however, if myelination, demyelination or remyelination alter the size and distribution of axonal mitochondrial stationary sites or the rates of axonal mitochondrial transport. Using live myelinated rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cultures, we investigated whether myelination and lysolecithin-induced demyelination affect axonal mitochondria. Myelination increased the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites by 2.3 fold. Following demyelination, the size of axonal stationary mitochondrial sites was increased by an additional 2.2 fold and the transport velocity of motile mitochondria was increased by 47%. These measures returned to the levels of myelinated axons following remyelination. Demyelination induced activating transcription factor (ATF) 3 in DRG neurons. Knockdown of neuronal ATF3 by shRNA abolished the demyelination-induced increase in axonal mitochondrial transport and increased nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in axonal mitochondria, suggesting that neuronal ATF3 expression and increased mitochondrial transport protect demyelinated axons from oxidative damage. In response to insufficient ATP production, demyelinated axons increase the size of stationary mitochondrial sites and thereby balance ATP production with the increased energy needs of nerve conduction. PMID:20463228

  12. Feeding damage to plants increases with plant size across 21 Brassicaceae species.

    PubMed

    Schlinkert, Hella; Westphal, Catrin; Clough, Yann; Ludwig, Martin; Kabouw, Patrick; Tscharntke, Teja

    2015-10-01

    Plant size is a major predictor of ecological functioning. We tested the hypothesis that feeding damage to plants increases with plant size, as the conspicuousness of large plants makes resource finding and colonisation easier. Further, large plants can be attractive to herbivores, as they offer greater amounts and ranges of resources and niches, but direct evidence from experiments testing size effects on feeding damage and consequently on plant fitness is so far missing. We established a common garden experiment with a plant size gradient (10-130 cm height) using 21 annual Brassicaceae species, and quantified plant size, biomass and number of all aboveground components (flowers, fruits, leaves, stems) and their proportional feeding damage. Plant reproductive fitness was measured using seed number, 1000 seed weight and total seed weight. Feeding damage to the different plant components increased with plant size or component biomass, with mean damage levels being approximately 30 % for flowers, 5 % for fruits and 1 % for leaves and stems. Feeding damage affected plant reproductive fitness depending on feeding damage type, with flower damage having the strongest effect, shown by greatly reduced seed number, 1000 seed weight and total seed weight. Finally, we found an overall negative effect of plant size on 1000 seed weight, but not on seed number and total seed weight. In conclusion, being conspicuous and attractive to herbivores causes greater flower damage leading to higher fitness costs for large plants, which might be partly counterbalanced by benefits such as enhanced competitive/compensatory abilities or more mutualistic pollinator visits.

  13. Evolution of ASPM is associated with both increases and decreases in brain size in primates.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Stephen H; Mundy, Nicholas I

    2012-03-01

    A fundamental trend during primate evolution has been the expansion of brain size. However, this trend was reversed in the Callitrichidae (marmosets and tamarins), which have secondarily evolved smaller brains associated with a reduction in body size. The recent pursuit of the genetic basis of brain size evolution has largely focused on episodes of brain expansion, but new insights may be gained by investigating episodes of brain size reduction. Previous results suggest two genes (ASPM and CDK5RAP2) associated with microcephaly, a human neurodevelopmental disorder, may have an evolutionary function in primate brain expansion. Here we use new sequences encoding key functional domains from 12 species of callitrichids to show that positive selection has acted on ASPM across callitrichid evolution and the rate of ASPM evolution is significantly negatively correlated with callitrichid brain size, whereas the evolution of CDK5RAP2 shows no correlation with brain size. Our findings strongly suggest that ASPM has a previously unsuspected role in the evolution of small brains in primates. ASPM is therefore intimately linked to both evolutionary increases and decreases in brain size in anthropoids and is a key target for natural selection acting on brain size. PMID:22380452

  14. Increasing stimulus size impairs first- but not second-order motion perception.

    PubMed

    Glasser, Davis M; Tadin, Duje

    2011-11-23

    As stimulus size increases, the direction of high-contrast moving stimuli becomes increasingly difficult to perceive. This counterintuitive effect, termed spatial suppression, is believed to reflect antagonistic center-surround interactions--mechanisms that play key roles in tasks requiring sensitivity to relative motion. It is unknown, however, whether second-order motion also exhibits spatial suppression. To test this hypothesis, we measured direction discrimination thresholds for first- and second-order stimuli of varying sizes. The results revealed increasing thresholds with increasing size for first-order stimuli but demonstrated no spatial suppression of second-order motion. This selective impairment of first-order motion predicts increasing predominance of second-order cues as stimulus size increases. We confirmed this prediction by utilizing compound stimuli that contain first- and second-order information moving in opposite directions. Specifically, we found that for large stimuli, motion perception becomes increasingly determined by the direction of second-order cues. Overall, our findings show a lack of spatial suppression for second-order stimuli, suggesting that the second-order system may have distinct functional roles, roles that do not require high sensitivity to relative motion.

  15. Stability of mixed-strategy-based iterative logit quantal response dynamics in game theory.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qian; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    Using the Logit quantal response form as the response function in each step, the original definition of static quantal response equilibrium (QRE) is extended into an iterative evolution process. QREs remain as the fixed points of the dynamic process. However, depending on whether such fixed points are the long-term solutions of the dynamic process, they can be classified into stable (SQREs) and unstable (USQREs) equilibriums. This extension resembles the extension from static Nash equilibriums (NEs) to evolutionary stable solutions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. The relation between SQREs and other solution concepts of games, including NEs and QREs, is discussed. Using experimental data from other published papers, we perform a preliminary comparison between SQREs, NEs, QREs and the observed behavioral outcomes of those experiments. For certain games, we determine that SQREs have better predictive power than QREs and NEs. PMID:25157502

  16. Thermal and quantal isospin and spin fluctuations in heavy ion reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Moretto, L.G.

    1980-01-01

    The isobaric charge distributions are discussed in terms of quantal and classical isospin fluctuations. The roles of mass asymmetry and of the higher giant isovector modes are treated within the framework of a cylinder model that is worked out exactly. Spin fluctuations are considered first in terms of quantal fluctuations in a cylinder model and second in terms of thermal fluctuations in a two-sphere model. The results are applied to the calculation of in- and out-of-plane angular distributions for sequential fission, alpha and gamma decay. Analytical expressions are obtained for the angular distributions. The theoretical predictions are compared with experimental results for sequential fission, alpha, and gamma angular distributions. 23 figures.

  17. Stability of mixed-strategy-based iterative logit quantal response dynamics in game theory.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qian; Di, Zengru; Wu, Jinshan

    2014-01-01

    Using the Logit quantal response form as the response function in each step, the original definition of static quantal response equilibrium (QRE) is extended into an iterative evolution process. QREs remain as the fixed points of the dynamic process. However, depending on whether such fixed points are the long-term solutions of the dynamic process, they can be classified into stable (SQREs) and unstable (USQREs) equilibriums. This extension resembles the extension from static Nash equilibriums (NEs) to evolutionary stable solutions in the framework of evolutionary game theory. The relation between SQREs and other solution concepts of games, including NEs and QREs, is discussed. Using experimental data from other published papers, we perform a preliminary comparison between SQREs, NEs, QREs and the observed behavioral outcomes of those experiments. For certain games, we determine that SQREs have better predictive power than QREs and NEs.

  18. Increasing the size of portion options affects intake but not portion selection at a meal.

    PubMed

    Zuraikat, Faris M; Roe, Liane S; Privitera, Gregory J; Rolls, Barbara J

    2016-03-01

    In an environment with large portion sizes, allowing consumers more control over their portion selection could moderate the effects on energy intake. We tested whether having subjects choose a portion from several options influenced the amount selected or consumed when all portion sizes were systematically increased. In a crossover design, 24 women and 26 men ate lunch in the lab once a week for 3 weeks. At each meal, subjects chose a portion of macaroni and cheese from a set of 3 portion options and consumed it ad libitum. Across 3 conditions, portion sizes in the set were increased; the order of the conditions was counterbalanced across subjects. For women the portion sets by weight (g) were 300/375/450, 375/450/525, and 450/525/600; for men the portions were 33% larger. The results showed that increasing the size of available portions did not significantly affect the relative size selected; across all portion sets, subjects chose the smallest available portion at 59% of meals, the medium at 27%, and the largest at 15%. The size of portions offered did, however, influence meal intake (P < 0.0001). Mean intake (±SEM) was 16% greater when the largest set was offered (661 ± 34 kcal) than when the medium and smallest sets were offered (both 568 ± 18 kcal). These results suggest that portions are selected in relation to the other available options, and confirm the robust effect of portion size on intake. Although presenting a choice of portions can allow selection of smaller amounts, the sizes offered are a critical determinant of energy intake. Thus, the availability of choices could help to moderate intake if the portions offered are within an appropriate range for energy needs. PMID:26721718

  19. Increases in plasma pool size of lipoprotein components in copper-deficient hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Othman, A.A.; Rosenstein, F.; Lei, K.Y. )

    1991-03-15

    Twenty-four male Golden Syrian hamsters, were randomly assigned to 2 dietary copper (Cu) treatments; deficient and adequate. Reductions in weight gain, hematocrit and liver Cu as well as increases in heart weight and plasma volume were observed in CD hamsters after 7 weeks of treatment. Plasma very low (VLDL), low (LDL) and high (HDL) density lipoproteins were isolated by ultracentrifugation and Sepharose column chromatography. The percentage of total plasma cholesterol carried by LDL was increased from 20 to 24% but was reduced from 71 to 68% for HDL as a result of Cu deficiency. In LDL the % composition of triglycerides (TG) and phospholipids (PL) was increased by 25% but that of cholesterol was reduced by 13%. The % composition of protein was reduced 24% but that of TG was increased 18% in VLDL by Cu deficiency. Since plasma volume was increased 50% in CD hamsters, the data were expressed as the amount present in the plasma pool corrected for body weight. With the exceptions of smaller increased in VLDL protein and PL as well as the more than threefold increases in LDL TG and PL plasma pool size, the pool size for the rest of the lipoprotein components were increased about twofold in CD hamsters. The lipoprotein data further indicate that Cu deficiency increased the particle number of VLDL, LDL and HDL but enlarged the size of only VLDL and LDL.

  20. Prey size structure diminishes cascading effects by increasing interference competition and predation among prey.

    PubMed

    Geraldii, Nathan R

    2015-09-01

    The size of an organism can change by orders of magnitude during its lifespan. Size can determine whether an individual consumes, is consumed, competes, or avoids individuals of the same or different species. Two complementary mesocosm experiments with a tri-trophic food chain (top predator, toadfish, Opsanus tau; intermediate prey, mud crab, family Xanthidae; basal resource, oyster, Crassostrea virginica) were conducted to measure how the size of both the top predator and the intermediate prey affects consumptive and behavioral interactions in trophic cascades. In the first experiment, I systematically varied the sizes of predators and prey, respectively. The amount of crab biomass consumed was dependent on crab size and not toadfish size, but the effect of crab size did not cascade to alter oyster survival. Increased oyster survival from crab interference competition in the absence of toadfish was similar to oyster survival,from predator-avoidance behavior in the presence of a toadfish. When all crab size classes were present, crab mortality was similar in the presence and absence of toadfish, highlighting the importance of intraguild predation in food-web dynamics. The second experiment separated crab mortality by other crabs from crab mortality by predatory toadfish and found that crab mortality generally switched from intra- to interguild predation when a toadfish was present. In addition, field surveys indicated mud crab abundance and size was primarily influenced by mud crab recruitment, but not by toadfish abundance, which supports our experimental results that interactions among mud crabs have similar effects to predator-prey interactions. These findings indicate that changes in size or abundance of intermediate prey may be comparable to changes in top predator abundance in terms of trophic interactions and their transmission to lower levels, which suggests that certain types of relatively simple food chains can be resilient to the loss of higher trophic

  1. Quantal potential fields around individual active zones of amphibian motor-nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M R; Farnell, L; Gibson, W G; Macleod, G T; Dickens, P

    2000-01-01

    The release of a quantum from a nerve terminal is accompanied by the flow of extracellular current, which creates a field around the site of transmitter action. We provide a solution for the extent of this field for the case of a quantum released from a site on an amphibian motor-nerve terminal branch onto the receptor patch of a muscle fiber and compare this with measurements of the field using three extracellular electrodes. Numerical solution of the equations for the quantal potential field in cylindrical coordinates show that the density of the field at the peak of the quantal current gives rise to a peak extracellular potential, which declines approximately as the inverse of the distance from the source at distances greater than about 4 microm from the source along the length of the fiber. The peak extracellular potential declines to 20% of its initial value in a distance of about 6 microm, both along the length of the fiber and in the circumferential direction around the fiber. Simultaneous recordings of quantal potential fields, made with three electrodes placed in a line at right angles to an FM1-43 visualized branch, gave determinations of the field strengths in accord with the numerical solutions. In addition, the three electrodes were placed so as to straddle the visualized release sites of a branch. The positions of these sites were correctly predicted on the basis of the theory and independently ascertained by FM1-43 staining of the sites. It is concluded that quantal potential fields at the neuromuscular junction that can be measured with available recording techniques are restricted to regions within about 10 microm of the release site. PMID:10692301

  2. Electroporation followed by electrochemical measurement of quantal transmitter release from single cells using a patterned microelectrode

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Jaya; Liu, Xin; Gillis, Kevin D.

    2013-01-01

    An electrochemical microelectrode located immediately adjacent to a single neuroendocrine cell can record spikes of amperometric current that result from exocytosis of oxidizable transmitter from individual vesicles, i.e., quantal exocytosis. Here, we report the development of an efficient method where the same electrochemical microelectrode is used to electropermeabilize an adjacent chromaffin cell and then measure the consequent quantal catecholamine release using amperometry. Trains of voltage pulses, 5–7 V in amplitude and 0.1–0.2 ms in duration, were used to reliably trigger release from cells using gold electrodes. Amperometric spikes induced by electropermeabilization had similar areas, peak heights and durations as amperometric spikes elicited by depolarizing high K+ solutions, therefore release occurs from individual secretory granules. Uptake of trypan blue stain into cells demonstrated that the plasma membrane is permeabilized by the voltage stimulus. Voltage pulses did not degrade the electrochemical sensitivity of the electrodes assayed using a test analyte. Surprisingly, robust quantal release was elicited upon electroporation in the absence of Ca2+ in the bath solution (0 Ca2+/5 mM EGTA). In contrast, electropermeabilization-induced transmitter release required Cl− in the bath solution in that bracketed experiments demonstrated a steep dependence of the rate of electropermeabilization-induced transmitter release on [Cl−] between 2 and 32 mM. Using the same electrochemical electrode to electroporate and record quantal release of catecholamines from an individual chromaffin cell allows precise timing of the stimulus, stimulation of a single cell at a time, and can be used to load membrane-impermeant substances into a cell. PMID:23598689

  3. Conspicuous visual signals do not coevolve with increased body size in marine sea slugs.

    PubMed

    Cheney, K L; Cortesi, F; How, M J; Wilson, N G; Blomberg, S P; Winters, A E; Umanzör, S; Marshall, N J

    2014-04-01

    Many taxa use conspicuous colouration to attract mates, signal chemical defences (aposematism) or for thermoregulation. Conspicuousness is a key feature of aposematic signals, and experimental evidence suggests that predators avoid conspicuous prey more readily when they exhibit larger body size and/or pattern elements. Aposematic prey species may therefore evolve a larger body size due to predatory selection pressures, or alternatively, larger prey species may be more likely to evolve aposematic colouration. Therefore, a positive correlation between conspicuousness and body size should exist. Here, we investigated whether there was a phylogenetic correlation between the conspicuousness of animal patterns and body size using an intriguing, understudied model system to examine questions on the evolution of animal signals, namely nudibranchs (opisthobranch molluscs). We also used new ways to compare animal patterns quantitatively with their background habitat in terms of intensity variance and spatial frequency power spectra. In studies of aposematism, conspicuousness is usually quantified using the spectral contrast of animal colour patches against its background; however, other components of visual signals, such as pattern, luminance and spectral sensitivities of potential observers, are largely ignored. Contrary to our prediction, we found that the conspicuousness of body patterns in over 70 nudibranch species decreased as body size increased, indicating that crypsis was not limited to a smaller body size. Therefore, alternative selective pressures on body size and development of colour patterns, other than those inflicted by visual hunting predators, may act more strongly on the evolution of aposematism in nudibranch molluscs. PMID:24588922

  4. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation. PMID:27129192

  5. Multi-trait interactions, not phylogeny, fine-tune leaf size reduction with increasing altitude

    PubMed Central

    Milla, Rubén; Reich, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims Despite long-held interest, knowledge on why leaf size varies widely among species is still incomplete. This study was conducted to assess whether abiotic factors, phylogenetic histories and multi-trait interactions act together to shape leaf size. Methods Fifty-seven pairs of altitudinal vicariant species were selected in northern Spain, and leaf area and a number of functionally related leaf, shoot and whole plant traits were measured for each pair. Structural equation modelling helped unravel trait interactions affecting leaf size, and Mantel tests weighed the relative relevance of phylogeny, environment and trait interactions to explain leaf size reduction with altitude. Key Results Leaves of highland vicariants were generally smaller than those of lowlands. However, the extent of leaf size reduction with increasing altitude was widely variable among genera: from approx. 700 cm2 reduction (96 % in Polystichum) to approx. 30 cm2 increase (37 % in Sorbus). This was partially explained by shifts in leaf, shoot and whole plant traits (35–64 % of explained variance, depending on models), with size/number trade-offs more influential than shifts in leaf form and leaf economics. Shifts in traits were more important than phylogenetic distances or site-specific environmental variation in explaining the degree of leaf size reduction with altitude. Conclusions Ecological filters, constraints due to phylogenetic history (albeit modest in the study system), and phenotypic integration contribute jointly to shape single-trait evolution. Here, it was found that phenotypic change was far more important than shared ancestry to explaine leaf size differences of closely related species segregated along altitudes. PMID:21199835

  6. Does increasing daylength control seasonal changes in clutch sizes of Northern Pintails (Anas acuta)?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krapu, G.L.; Sargeant, G.A.; Perkins, A.E.H.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated spatiotemporal variation in clutch sizes of Northern Pintails (pintails; Anas acuta) nesting in California (1985 to 1996), North Dakota (1982 to 1985), Saskatchewan (1982 to 1985) and Alaska (1991 to 1993) to determine whether seasonal declines in clutch size varied in ways that were consistent with a controlling influence of increasing day length. Pintails began nesting in mid-March in California, mid-April in North Dakota and Saskatchewan, and mid-May in Alaska. Observed durations of nesting were 70 ?? 2.6 days (SE) in California, 60 ?? 6.3 days in North Dakota, 66 ?? 1.3 days in Saskatchewan, and 42 ?? 0.7 days in Alaska. Annual differences were the principal source of variation in mean clutch sizes (????Y2 = 0.15, SE = 0.049), which varied little among study locations (????A2 = 0.002, SE = 0.013). Predicted rates of seasonal decline in clutch sizes increased with latitude early in the nesting season, but declined as the nesting season progressed, except in California. Rates of decline in clutch sizes thus were not directly related to rates of increase in day length. Predicted declines in numbers of eggs per clutch over the nesting season were similar for all four locations (range, 3.05-3.12) despite wide variation in durations of nesting. Evidence suggests that reduced nutrient availability during nesting contributes to a higher rate of decline in clutch sizes in Alaska than in temperate regions. Pintails that nest early lay large initial clutches, but thereafter clutch sizes decline rapidly and breeding terminates early. This reproductive strategy is adaptive because young that hatch earliest exhibit the highest survival rates; however, the conversion of grassland to cropland on the primary prairie breeding grounds has reduced hatching rates of clutches laid early in the nesting season. Under these conditions, the limited capacity to renest in late spring on their prairie breeding grounds probably has contributed to Pintail population declines.

  7. An increased feed intake during early pregnancy improves sow body weight recovery and increases litter size in young sows.

    PubMed

    Hoving, L L; Soede, N M; van der Peet-Schwering, C M C; Graat, E A M; Feitsma, H; Kemp, B

    2011-11-01

    This study evaluated the effect of feeding level and protein content in feed in first- and second-parity sows during the first month of gestation on sow BW recovery, farrowing rate, and litter size during the first month of gestation. From d 3 to 32 after the first insemination, sows were fed either 2.5 kg/d of a standard gestation diet (control, n = 49), 3.25 kg/d (+30%) of a standard gestation diet (plus feed, n = 47), or 2.5 kg/d of a gestation diet with 30% greater ileal digestible AA (plus protein, n = 49). Feed intake during the experimental period was 29% greater for sows in the plus feed group compared with those in the control and plus protein groups (93 vs. 72 kg, P < 0.05). Sows in the plus feed group gained 10 kg more BW during the experimental period compared with those in the control and plus protein groups (24.2 ± 1.2 vs. 15.5 ± 1.2 and 16.9 ± 1.2 kg, respectively, P < 0.001). Backfat gain and loin muscle depth gain were not affected by treatment (P = 0.56 and P = 0.37, respectively). Farrowing rate was smaller, although not significantly, for sows in the plus feed group compared with those in the control and plus protein groups (76.6% vs. 89.8 and 89.8%, respectively, P = 0.16). Litter size, however, was larger for sows in the plus feed group (15.2 ± 0.5 total born) compared with those in the control and plus protein groups (13.2 ± 0.4 and 13.6 ± 0.4 total born, respectively, P = 0.006). Piglet birth weight was not different among treatments (P = 0.65). For both first- and second-parity sows, the plus feed treatment showed similar effects on BW gain, farrowing rate, and litter size. In conclusion, an increased feed intake (+30%) during the first month of gestation improved sow BW recovery and increased litter size, but did not significantly affect farrowing rate in the subsequent parity. Feeding a 30% greater level of ileal digestible AA during the same period did not improve sow recovery or reproductive performance in the subsequent parity.

  8. Ectopic expression of a Chinese cabbage BrARGOS gene in Arabidopsis increases organ size.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bao; Zhou, Xincheng; Xu, Feng; Gao, Jianwei

    2010-06-01

    Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. pekinensis) is a common and economically important crop in Asia. Specific targets of plant breeding programs for cabbage have been improvement in yield, resistance to environment stresses, and nutrition quality by means of genetic manipulation. To obtain information on yield improvement applicable for the genetic engineering approach, we have attempted to dissect the molecular pathways that regulate organ size. We first isolated a putative homolog of ARGOS full-length cDNA from Chinese cabbage leaves, which we designated BrARGOS. At the transcription level, BrARGOS was detected in all organs tested in Chinese cabbage. To test the function of this gene, we then engineered Arabidopsis plants that would overexpress BrARGOS ectopically. The organs of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants were significantly larger than those of the control plants. This increase in size was due to enhanced cell proliferation, with no contribution from cell expansion. The molecular analysis revealed that overexpression of BrARGOS up-regulated the transcription of several genes involved in the control of organ size. These results suggest that the BrARGOS gene may function as one of the regulators of organ size in Chinese cabbage. As such, manipulation of the BrARGOS gene may significantly increase the size of Chinese cabbage organs, such as Chinese cabbage heads.

  9. Altered properties of quantal neurotransmitter release at endplates of mice lacking P/Q-type Ca2+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Urbano, Francisco J.; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S.; Jun, Kisun; Shin, Hee-Sup; Uchitel, Osvaldo D.; Tsien, Richard W.

    2003-01-01

    Transmission at the mouse neuromuscular junction normally relies on P/Q-type channels, but became jointly dependent on both N- and R-type Ca2+ channels when the P/Q-type channel α1A subunit was deleted. R-type channels lay close to Ca2+ sensors for exocytosis and IK(Ca) channel activation, like the P/Q-type channels they replaced. In contrast, N-type channels were less well localized, but abundant enough to influence secretion strongly, particularly when action potentials were prolonged. Our data suggested that active zone structures may select among multiple Ca2+ channels in the hierarchy P/Q>R>N. The α1A−/− neuromuscular junction displayed several other differences from wild-type: lowered quantal content but greater ability to withstand reductions in the Ca2+/Mg2+ ratio, and little or no paired-pulse facilitation, the latter findings possibly reflecting compensatory mechanisms at individual release sites. Changes in presynaptic function were also associated with a significant reduction in the size of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor clusters. PMID:12624181

  10. Small and large size for gestational age and neighborhood deprivation measured within increasing proximity to homes

    PubMed Central

    Wentz, Anna E.; Messer, Lynne C.; Nguyen, Thuan; Boone-Heinonen, Janne

    2015-01-01

    Neighborhood deprivation is consistently associated with greater risk of low birthweight. However, large birth size is increasingly relevant but overlooked in neighborhood health research, and proximity within which neighborhood deprivation may affect birth outcomes is unknown. We estimated race/ethnic-specific effects of neighborhood deprivation index (NDI) within 1, 3, 5, and 8 km buffers around Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (n=3,716; 2004-2007) respondents’ homes on small and large for gestational age (SGA, LGA). NDI was positively associated with LGA and SGA in most race/ethnic groups. The results varied little across the four buffer sizes. PMID:25240489

  11. Floral herbivory increases with inflorescence size and local plant density in Digitalis purpurea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sletvold, Nina; Grindeland, John M.

    2008-07-01

    Insect herbivores search for their host plants in heterogeneous environments, and the efficiency of host location may be influenced by plant architecture and abundance. In this study, we ask how plant and habitat characteristics traditionally thought to attract pollinators are related to attack rates by floral herbivores. Patterns of floral herbivory by the moth larva Eupithecia pulchellata were studied in relation to inflorescence size and local plant density in two years in a natural population of the facultative biennial Digitalis purpurea. Overall levels of herbivory were low, 84% of the infested plants lost less than 10% of their flowers. Only 9% of the plants lost more than 20% of their flowers. Probability of herbivory at the plant level increased strongly with inflorescence height, and it was considerably higher in dense patches compared to sparse ones. There was no effect of local plant density on the functional relationship between inflorescence size and probability of herbivory. Both number and proportion of damaged flowers per plant increased with inflorescence height. The results suggest that E. pulchellata is attracted to dense patches and large individuals of D. purpurea, and that negative effects of herbivory increase with plant size. This implies diminishing returns for investment in more flowers in D. purpurea, and indicates that herbivory may select for smaller flowering size and flower number in this monocarpic species.

  12. Decrease in PTEN and increase in Akt expression and neuron size in aged rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues De Amorim, Miguel Augusto; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel; Goya, Rodolfo Gustavo; Portiansky, Enrique Leo

    2010-01-01

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene known to play an important role in the regulation of cell size. In this study we compared PTEN expression in the spinal cord of young (5 mo.) versus aged (32 mo.) female rats and correlated them with alterations in neuron size and morphology in the same animals. Total and phosphorylated PTEN (pPTEN) as well as its downstream target phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) were assessed by western blotting. Spinal cord neurons were morphometrically characterized. Total PTEN, pPTEN and total Akt expression were significantly higher in young rats than in aged animals. Expression of pAkt was stronger in aged animals. A significant increase in neuronal size was observed in large motoneurons of aged as compared with young rats. Our data show that in the spinal cord of rats, neuronal PTEN expression diminishes with advanced age while neuronal size increases. These results suggest that in the spinal cord, an age-related reduction in PTEN and increase of pAkt expression may be involved in the progressive enlargement of neurons. PMID:20347952

  13. Marine mixotrophy increases trophic transfer efficiency, mean organism size, and vertical carbon flux

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Ben A.; Follows, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Mixotrophic plankton, which combine the uptake of inorganic resources and the ingestion of living prey, are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems, but their integrated biogeochemical impacts remain unclear. We address this issue by removing the strict distinction between phytoplankton and zooplankton from a global model of the marine plankton food web. This simplification allows the emergence of a realistic trophic network with increased fidelity to empirical estimates of plankton community structure and elemental stoichiometry, relative to a system in which autotrophy and heterotrophy are mutually exclusive. Mixotrophy enhances the transfer of biomass to larger sizes classes further up the food chain, leading to an approximately threefold increase in global mean organism size and an ∼35% increase in sinking carbon flux. PMID:26831076

  14. Marine mixotrophy increases trophic transfer efficiency, mean organism size, and vertical carbon flux.

    PubMed

    Ward, Ben A; Follows, Michael J

    2016-03-15

    Mixotrophic plankton, which combine the uptake of inorganic resources and the ingestion of living prey, are ubiquitous in marine ecosystems, but their integrated biogeochemical impacts remain unclear. We address this issue by removing the strict distinction between phytoplankton and zooplankton from a global model of the marine plankton food web. This simplification allows the emergence of a realistic trophic network with increased fidelity to empirical estimates of plankton community structure and elemental stoichiometry, relative to a system in which autotrophy and heterotrophy are mutually exclusive. Mixotrophy enhances the transfer of biomass to larger sizes classes further up the food chain, leading to an approximately threefold increase in global mean organism size and an ∼35% increase in sinking carbon flux. PMID:26831076

  15. Density-functional errors in ionization potential with increasing system size

    SciTech Connect

    Whittleton, Sarah R.; Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M.; Johnson, Erin R.

    2015-05-14

    This work investigates the effects of molecular size on the accuracy of density-functional ionization potentials for a set of 28 hydrocarbons, including series of alkanes, alkenes, and oligoacenes. As the system size increases, delocalization error introduces a systematic underestimation of the ionization potential, which is rationalized by considering the fractional-charge behavior of the electronic energies. The computation of the ionization potential with many density-functional approximations is not size-extensive due to excessive delocalization of the incipient positive charge. While inclusion of exact exchange reduces the observed errors, system-specific tuning of long-range corrected functionals does not generally improve accuracy. These results emphasize that good performance of a functional for small molecules is not necessarily transferable to larger systems.

  16. Underestimating a serving size may lead to increased food consumption when using Canada's Food Guide.

    PubMed

    Abramovitch, Sharona L; Reddigan, Jacinta I; Hamadeh, Mazen J; Jamnik, Veronica K; Rowan, Chip P; Kuk, Jennifer L

    2012-10-01

    It is unclear whether Canadians accurately estimate serving sizes and the number of servings in their diet as intended by Canada's Food Guide (CFG). The objective of this study was to determine if participants can accurately quantify the size of 1 serving and the number of servings consumed per day. White, Black, South Asian, and East Asian adults (n = 145) estimated the quantity of food that constituted 1 CFG serving, and used CFG to estimate the number of servings that they consumed from their 24-h dietary recall. Participants estimated 1 serving size of vegetables and fruit (+43%) and grains (+55%) to be larger than CFG serving sizes (p ≤ 0.05); meat alternatives (-33%) and cheese (-31%) to be smaller than a CFG serving size (p ≤ 0.05); and chicken, carrots, and milk servings accurately (p > 0.05). Serving size estimates were positively correlated with the amount of food participants regularly consumed at 1 meal (p < 0.001). From their food records, all ethnicities estimated that they consumed fewer servings of vegetables and fruit (-15%), grains (-28%), and meat and alternatives (-14%) than they actually consumed, and more servings of milk and alternatives (+26%, p ≤ 0.05) than they actually consumed. Consequently, 68% of participants believed they needed to increase consumption by greater than 200 kcal to meet CFG recommendations. In conclusion, estimating serving sizes to be larger than what is defined by CFG may inadvertently lead to estimating that fewer servings were consumed and overeating if Canadians follow CFG recommendations without guidance. Thus, revision to CFG or greater public education regarding the dietary guidelines is warranted.

  17. Dietary fatty acid enrichment increases egg size and quality of yellow seahorse Hippocampus kuda.

    PubMed

    Saavedra, M; Masdeu, M; Hale, P; Sibbons, C M; Holt, W V

    2014-02-01

    Seahorses populations in the wild have been declining and to restore them a better knowledge of seahorse reproduction is required. This study examines the effect of dietary quality on seahorse fecundity and egg quality. Two different diets were tested with Hippocampus kuda females: frozen mysis (control) and frozen mysis enriched with a liposome spray containing essential fatty acids. Diets were given to females (two groups of five) over a seven week period. After this period, males (fed the control diet) and females were paired and the eggs dropped by the females were collected. Fatty acid profile were analysed and eggs were counted and measured. Results showed that females fed on enriched mysis had larger eggs and that these had a higher content of total polyunsaturated fatty acids. The size of the egg was especially affected in the first spawn, where egg size for females fed the enriched diet was significantly higher than the egg size from control females. This effect was reduced in the following spawning where no significant differences were found. Egg size is an important quality descriptor as seahorse juveniles originating from smaller eggs and/or eggs of poor quality will have less chances of overcoming adverse conditions in the wild and consequently have lower survival and growth rates. This study shows that enriching frozen mysis with polyunsaturated fatty acids increases egg size and egg quality of H. kuda.

  18. Magnetron sputtered diamond-like carbon microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of quantal catecholamine release from cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuanfang; Chen, Xiaohui; Gupta, Sanju; Gillis, Kevin D; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2008-10-01

    Carbon electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry due to their low cost, wide potential window, and low and stable background noise. Carbon-fiber electrodes (CFE) are commonly used to electrochemically measure "quantal" catecholamine release via exocytosis from individual cells, but it is difficult to integrate CFEs into lab-on-a-chip devices. Here we report the development of nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) microelectrodes on a chip to monitor quantal release of catecholamines from cells. Advantages of DLC:N microelectrodes are that they are batch producible at low cost, and are harder and more durable than graphite films. The DLC:N microelectrodes were prepared by a magnetron sputtering process with nitrogen doping. The 30 microm by 40 microm DLC:N microelectrodes were patterned onto microscope glass slides by photolithography and lift-off technology. The properties of the DLC:N microelectrodes were characterized by AFM, Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Quantal catecholamine release was recorded amperometrically from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells on the DLC:N microelectrodes. Amperometric spikes due to quantal release of catecholamines were similar in amplitude and area as those recorded using CFEs and the background current and noise levels of microchip DLC:N electrodes were also comparable to CFEs. Therefore, DLC:N microelectrodes are suitable for microchip-based high-throughput measurement of quantal exocytosis with applications in basic research, drug discovery and cell-based biosensors.

  19. Magnetron sputtered diamond-like carbon microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of quantal catecholamine release from cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuanfang; Chen, Xiaohui; Gupta, Sanju; Gillis, Kevin D; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2008-10-01

    Carbon electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry due to their low cost, wide potential window, and low and stable background noise. Carbon-fiber electrodes (CFE) are commonly used to electrochemically measure "quantal" catecholamine release via exocytosis from individual cells, but it is difficult to integrate CFEs into lab-on-a-chip devices. Here we report the development of nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) microelectrodes on a chip to monitor quantal release of catecholamines from cells. Advantages of DLC:N microelectrodes are that they are batch producible at low cost, and are harder and more durable than graphite films. The DLC:N microelectrodes were prepared by a magnetron sputtering process with nitrogen doping. The 30 microm by 40 microm DLC:N microelectrodes were patterned onto microscope glass slides by photolithography and lift-off technology. The properties of the DLC:N microelectrodes were characterized by AFM, Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Quantal catecholamine release was recorded amperometrically from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells on the DLC:N microelectrodes. Amperometric spikes due to quantal release of catecholamines were similar in amplitude and area as those recorded using CFEs and the background current and noise levels of microchip DLC:N electrodes were also comparable to CFEs. Therefore, DLC:N microelectrodes are suitable for microchip-based high-throughput measurement of quantal exocytosis with applications in basic research, drug discovery and cell-based biosensors. PMID:18493856

  20. Slit2 overexpression results in increased microvessel density and lesion size in mice with induced endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sun-Wei; Zheng, Yu; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Xishi; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2013-03-01

    We recently reported that Slit/Roundabout (ROBO) 1 pathway may be a constituent biomarker for recurrence of endometriosis, likely through promoting angiogenesis. In this study, we sought to determine as whether Slit2 overexpression can facilitate angiogenesis, increase lesion size, and induce hyperalgesia in mice with induced endometriosis. We used 30 Slit2 transgenic (S) and 29 wild-type (W) mice and cross-transplanted endometrial fragments from S to W (group SW) and vice versa (group WS), and also within the S and W (groups SS and WW, respectively), into the peritoneal cavity, inducing endometriosis. We also performed a sham surgery within both S and W mice (groups Sm and Wm, respectively). The size of the ectopic implants, microvessel density (MVD) and immunoreactivity to ROBO1, and vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) in ectopic and eutopic endometrium, along with hotplate and tail-flick tests in all mice, were then evaluated. We found that the induction of endometriosis resulted in generalized hyperalgesia, which was unaffected by Slit2 overexpression. Slit2 overexpression did increase the lesion size significantly and correlated positively with the MVD in ectopic and eutopic endometrium. Slit2 expression levels appear to correlate with the MVD, but not with VEGF immunoreactivity, in ectopic endometrium. Consequently, we conclude that Slit2 may play an important role in angiogenesis in endometriosis. The increased angiogenesis, as measured by MVD, but not VEGF immunoreactivity, likely resulted in increased lesion size in induced endometriosis. Thus, SLIT2/ROBO1 pathway may be a potential therapeutic target for treating endometriosis.

  1. Increase in tracheal investment with beetle size supports hypothesis of oxygen limitation on insect gigantism.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Alexander; Klok, C Jaco; Socha, John J; Lee, Wah-Keat; Quinlan, Michael C; Harrison, Jon F

    2007-08-01

    Recent studies have suggested that Paleozoic hyperoxia enabled animal gigantism, and the subsequent hypoxia drove a reduction in animal size. This evolutionary hypothesis depends on the argument that gas exchange in many invertebrates and skin-breathing vertebrates becomes compromised at large sizes because of distance effects on diffusion. In contrast to vertebrates, which use respiratory and circulatory systems in series, gas exchange in insects is almost exclusively determined by the tracheal system, providing a particularly suitable model to investigate possible limitations of oxygen delivery on size. In this study, we used synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging to visualize the tracheal system and quantify its dimensions in four species of darkling beetles varying in mass by 3 orders of magnitude. We document that, in striking contrast to the pattern observed in vertebrates, larger insects devote a greater fraction of their body to the respiratory system, as tracheal volume scaled with mass1.29. The trend is greatest in the legs; the cross-sectional area of the trachea penetrating the leg orifice scaled with mass1.02, whereas the cross-sectional area of the leg orifice scaled with mass0.77. These trends suggest the space available for tracheae within the leg may ultimately limit the maximum size of extant beetles. Because the size of the tracheal system can be reduced when oxygen supply is increased, hyperoxia, as occurred during late Carboniferous and early Permian, may have facilitated the evolution of giant insects by allowing limbs to reach larger sizes before the tracheal system became limited by spatial constraints.

  2. Wildfires increasing in size and frequency across the U.S. West

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-08-01

    Since 1984, wildfires have increased in size and frequency, correlating with higher drought severity across the western United States. Dennison et al. looked at remotely sensed data from the U.S. government's Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project from the years 1984-2011, focusing on fires larger than 400 hectares in nine ecoregions that included mountains, plains, and deserts. The authors found that not only are wildfires becoming more frequent—by an estimated seven large fires per year—but they are also burning more total area, increasing by about 355 square kilometers per year.

  3. Increased monolayer domain size and patterned growth of tungsten disulfide through controlling surface energy of substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Kyle; Kang, Kyungnam; Fu, Shichen; Yang, Eui-Hyeok

    2016-08-01

    We report a surface energy-controlled low-pressure chemical vapor deposition growth of WS2 monolayers on SiO2 using pre-growth oxygen plasma treatment of substrates, facilitating increased monolayer surface coverage and patterned growth without lithography. Oxygen plasma treatment of the substrate caused an increase in the average domain size of WS2 monolayers by 78%  ±  2% while having a slight reduction in nucleation density, which translates to increased monolayer surface coverage. This substrate effect on growth was exploited to grow patterned WS2 monolayers by patterned plasma treatment on patterned substrates and by patterned source material with resolutions less than 10 µm. Contact angle-based surface energy measurements revealed a dramatic increase in polar surface energy. A growth model was proposed with lowered activation energies for growth and increased surface diffusion length consistent with the range of results observed. WS2 samples grown with and without oxygen plasma were similar high quality monolayers verified through transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, Raman, and photoluminescence measurements. This technique enables the production of large-grain size, patterned WS2 without a post-growth lithography process, thereby providing clean surfaces for device applications.

  4. NDA PDP Program PuO{sub 2} increased particle size specification and design

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, R.S.; Taggart, D.P.; Becker, G.K.; Woon, W.Y.

    1996-12-31

    Provisions in the National TRU Program Quality Assurance Program Plan require an assessment of performance for nondestructive waste assay (NDA) systems employed in the program. This requirement is in part fulfilled through the use of Performance Demonstration programs. In order to optimize the quality and quantity of information acquired during a given Performance Demonstration Program cycle, the assessment employed is to be carefully specified and designed. The assessment must yield measurement system performance data meaningful with respect to NDA system capability to accommodate attributes of interest known to occur in actual waste forms. The design and specification of the increased particle size PuO{sub 2} PDP working reference materials (WRMs) is directed at providing a straightforward mechanism to assess waste NDA system capability to account for biases introduced by large PuO{sub 2} particles. The increased particle size PuO{sub 2} PDP WRM design addresses actual waste form attributes associated with PuO{sub 2} particle size and distributions thereof, the issue of a known and stable WRM configuration and equally important appropriate certification and tractability considerations.

  5. Increasing body size among adult cook islanders between 1966 and 1996.

    PubMed

    Ulijaszek, S J

    2001-01-01

    There is limited evidence of a secular trend toward increased body size among populations in the Pacific Region, although some populations have shown a clear rise in overweight and obesity across the past 30 years or so. Mean height, weight and body mass index (BMI) of adults surveyed in 1996 on Rarotonga, the Cook Islands, are reported by age group and compared with data collected in 1966 by Evans and Prior, to determine the extent to which a secular trend in increasing body size has taken place across this 30-year period. In addition, a comparison of these anthropometric variables between subjects born on the most modernized island of Rarotonga with those born on other less-modernized islands is made, to determine the extent to which adult body size differs according to place of origin. Comparing the sample of those born on Rarotonga, the most modernized island, with those born on other, less modernized islands shows those born on Rarotonga to be taller, but not relatively heavier than those born elsewhere in the Cook Islands. Both males and females of the 1996 sample of adults are significantly taller, heavier, with higher BMI compared with the 1966 sample, indicating a secular trend toward increased body size across this 30-year period. The mean BMIs of the younger age groups in 1996 are greater than those of the same age groups in 1966, indicating a secular trend toward greater body fatness. There has been a significant increase in obesity among both males and females. In 1966, 14% of males had a BMI greater than 30, while in 1996, the proportion was 52%. Among females, 44% of those measured in 1966 had a BMI greater than 30, while in 1996 the proportion was 57%. The higher mean stature of younger adult males relative to older ones suggests that the secular trend toward increasing height may have been underway prior to 1966. The mean statures and weights of adults aged 60 years and older in the 1996 sample are more similar to values given for most age groups

  6. A pre-docking source for the power-law behavior of spontaneous quantal release: application to the analysis of LTP

    PubMed Central

    Lamanna, Jacopo; Signorini, Maria G.; Cerutti, Sergio; Malgaroli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In neurons, power-law behavior with different scaling exponents has been reported at many different levels, including fluctuations in membrane potentials, synaptic transmission up to neuronal network dynamics. Unfortunately in most cases the source of this non-linear feature remains controversial. Here we have analyzed the dynamics of spontaneous quantal release at hippocampal synapses and characterized their power-law behavior. While in control conditions a fractal exponent greater than zero was rarely observed, its value was greatly increased by α-latrotoxin (α-LTX), a potent stimulator of spontaneous release, known to act at the very last step of vesicle fusion. Based on computer modeling, we confirmed that at an increase in fusion probability would unmask a pre-docking phenomenon with 1/f structure, where α estimated from the release series appears to sense the increase in release probability independently from the number of active sites. In the simplest scenario the pre-docking 1/f process could coincide with the Brownian diffusion of synaptic vesicles. Interestingly, when the effect of long-term potentiation (LTP) was tested, a ~200% long-lasting increase in quantal frequency was accompanied by a significant increase in the scaling exponent. The similarity between the action of LTP and of α-LTX suggests an increased contribution of high release probability sites following the induction of LTP. In conclusion, our results indicate that the source of the synaptic power-law behavior arises before synaptic vesicles dock to the active zone and that the fractal exponent α is capable of sensing a change in release probability independently from the number of active sites or synapses. PMID:25741239

  7. Quantal evoked depolarizations underlying the excitatory junction potential of the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    Manchanda, Rohit; Venkateswarlu, K

    1999-01-01

    The effects of a putative gap junction uncoupling agent, heptanol, on the intracellularly recorded junction potentials of the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens have been investigated. After the stimulation-evoked excitatory junction potentials (EJPs) had been suppressed by heptanol (2.0 mm) to undetectable levels, a different pattern of evoked activity ensued. This consisted of transient depolarizations that were similar to EJPs in being stimulus locked and in occurring at a fixed latency, but differed from EJPs in that they occurred intermittently and had considerably briefer time courses. Analysis of the amplitudes and temporal parameters of the rapid residual depolarizations revealed a close similarity with spontaneous EJPs (SEJPs). There was no statistically significant difference between the rise times, time constants of decay and durations of the rapid residual depolarizations and of SEJPs. Selected evoked depolarizations were virtually identical to SEJPs occurring in the same cell. Evoked depolarizations of closely similar amplitude and time course also occurred, usually within a few stimuli of each other. These depolarizations appear to represent the individual quantal depolarizations that normally underlie the EJP and are therefore termed ‘quantal excitatory junction potentials’ (QEJPs) to distinguish them from both EJPs and SEJPs. We examined the possibility that heptanol revealed QEJPs by disrupting electrical coupling between cells in the smooth muscle syncytium. Heptanol (2.0 mm) had no effect on the amplitude distribution, time courses, or the frequency of occurrence of SEJPs. Intracellular input impedance (Rin) of smooth muscle cells was left unaltered by heptanol. ‘Cable’ potentials of the vas deferens, recorded using the partition stimulation method, also remained unchanged in the presence of heptanol. Thus, heptanol appeared not to modify syncytial electrical properties of the smooth muscle in any significant way. Our observations show

  8. Parallel cone bipolar pathways to a ganglion cell use different rates and amplitudes of quantal excitation.

    PubMed

    Freed, M A

    2000-06-01

    The cone signal reaches the cat's On-beta (X) ganglion cell via several parallel circuits (bipolar cell types b1, b2, and b3). These circuits might convey different regions of the cone's temporal bandwidth. To test this, I presented a step of light that elicited a transient depolarization followed by a sustained depolarization. The contribution of bipolar cells to these response components was isolated by blocking action potentials with tetrodotoxin and by blocking inhibitory synaptic potentials with bicuculline and strychnine. Stationary fluctuation analysis of the sustained depolarization gave the rate of quantal bombardment: approximately 5100 quanta sec(-1) for small central cells and approximately 45,000 quanta sec(-1) for large peripheral cells. Normalizing these rates for the vastly different numbers of bipolar synapses (150-370 per small cell vs 2000 per large cell), quantal rate was constant across the retina, approximately 22 quanta synapse(-1) sec(-1). Nonstationary fluctuation analysis gave the mean quantal EPSP amplitude: approximately 240 microV for the transient depolarization and 30 microV for the sustained depolarization. The b1 bipolar cell is known from noise analysis of the On-alpha ganglion cell to have a near-maximal sustained release of only approximately two quanta synapse(-1) sec(-1). This implies that the other bipolar types (b2 and b3) contribute many more quanta to the sustained depolarization (>/=46 synapse(-1) sec(-1)). Type b1 probably contributes large quanta to the transient depolarization. Thus, bipolar cell types b1 and b2/b3 apparently constitute parallel circuits that convey, respectively, high and low frequencies. PMID:10818130

  9. Evolution of plasmonic and hybrid photoionization properties of alkaline earth metallofullerenes with the increasing fullerene size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Aakash; Chakraborty, Himadri

    2013-05-01

    A theoretical study of the photoionization of endohedral fullerenes with a selection of fullerene molecules of increasing size and with confined alkaline earth atoms like Be and Mg is carried out. The fullerene ion cores, comprised of C4+ ions, are smudged into a continuous jellium charge distribution, while the delocalized cloud of carbon valence electrons plus the electrons of the encaged atom are treated in the Kohn-Sham local density approximation (LDA). Only the spherical geometry is considered. The photoionization spectra are calculated by the time-dependent LDA that includes essential electron correlations. A systematic evolution of the mixing of valence atomic levels with states of fullerene single-electron bands is found along the sequence. This hybridization as a function of the fullerene size is seen to primarily define the properties of the subshell-differential ionization spectra both in the low energy plasmonic as well as the high energy oscillatory regions. Supported by NSF and DOE.

  10. A Bayesian approach to the analysis of quantal bioassay studies using nonparametric mixture models.

    PubMed

    Fronczyk, Kassandra; Kottas, Athanasios

    2014-03-01

    We develop a Bayesian nonparametric mixture modeling framework for quantal bioassay settings. The approach is built upon modeling dose-dependent response distributions. We adopt a structured nonparametric prior mixture model, which induces a monotonicity restriction for the dose-response curve. Particular emphasis is placed on the key risk assessment goal of calibration for the dose level that corresponds to a specified response. The proposed methodology yields flexible inference for the dose-response relationship as well as for other inferential objectives, as illustrated with two data sets from the literature. PMID:24354490

  11. Correlation between quantal secretion and vesicle loss at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Hurlbut, W P; Iezzi, N; Fesce, R; Ceccarelli, B

    1990-06-01

    1. We measured the rate of occurrence of miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs) at identified endplates in frog cutaneous pectoris muscles treated with crude black widow spider venom (BWSV) or purified alpha-latrotoxin (alpha-LTX) in calcium-free solutions, and we examined the relationship between the length of the nerve terminal and the total number of quanta secreted, and the relationship between the number of quanta secreted and the number of vesicles remaining at different times. 2. The venom, or toxin, was applied in a modified Ringer solution with tetrodotoxin, 1 mM-EGTA and no divalent cations, and quantal secretion was started by applying Ca2(+)-free solutions with Mg2+. This was done to synchronize the quantal discharge at the various junctions in a muscle. Ringer solution was applied after the MEPP rate had declined to low levels, and then the muscle fibre was injected with Lucifer Yellow, the endplate stained for acetylcholinesterase and the length of the nerve terminal and the length of a sarcomere were measured on the fluorescent fibre. 3. The total number of quanta secreted by a terminal was measured under a wide variety of experimental conditions: the weights of the frogs ranged from 13 to 68 g, the temperature from 9 to 28 degrees C, and the concentration of Mg2+ from 2 to 10 mM. In one series of experiments the Mg2+ was withdrawn after 3-4 min and reapplied 35-40 min later in order to divide the total output of quanta into two approximately equal bouts of secretion that were well separated in time. 4. The total number of MEPPs recorded at a junction was loosely correlated with the length of its nerve terminal, but it was not affected by the temperature, the concentration of Mg2+ or the division of secretion into well-separated bouts of quantal release. The average total secretion per unit length was about 3700 quanta/sarcomere or about 1200 quanta/microns. 5. The average time course of quantal secretion per micrometre of terminal was determined at

  12. Correlation between quantal secretion and vesicle loss at the frog neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed Central

    Hurlbut, W P; Iezzi, N; Fesce, R; Ceccarelli, B

    1990-01-01

    1. We measured the rate of occurrence of miniature endplate potentials (MEPPs) at identified endplates in frog cutaneous pectoris muscles treated with crude black widow spider venom (BWSV) or purified alpha-latrotoxin (alpha-LTX) in calcium-free solutions, and we examined the relationship between the length of the nerve terminal and the total number of quanta secreted, and the relationship between the number of quanta secreted and the number of vesicles remaining at different times. 2. The venom, or toxin, was applied in a modified Ringer solution with tetrodotoxin, 1 mM-EGTA and no divalent cations, and quantal secretion was started by applying Ca2(+)-free solutions with Mg2+. This was done to synchronize the quantal discharge at the various junctions in a muscle. Ringer solution was applied after the MEPP rate had declined to low levels, and then the muscle fibre was injected with Lucifer Yellow, the endplate stained for acetylcholinesterase and the length of the nerve terminal and the length of a sarcomere were measured on the fluorescent fibre. 3. The total number of quanta secreted by a terminal was measured under a wide variety of experimental conditions: the weights of the frogs ranged from 13 to 68 g, the temperature from 9 to 28 degrees C, and the concentration of Mg2+ from 2 to 10 mM. In one series of experiments the Mg2+ was withdrawn after 3-4 min and reapplied 35-40 min later in order to divide the total output of quanta into two approximately equal bouts of secretion that were well separated in time. 4. The total number of MEPPs recorded at a junction was loosely correlated with the length of its nerve terminal, but it was not affected by the temperature, the concentration of Mg2+ or the division of secretion into well-separated bouts of quantal release. The average total secretion per unit length was about 3700 quanta/sarcomere or about 1200 quanta/microns. 5. The average time course of quantal secretion per micrometre of terminal was determined at

  13. Oxidative Damage Does Not Occur in Striped Hamsters Raising Natural and Experimentally Increased Litter Size.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Ji-Ying; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Life-history theory assumes that animals can balance the allocation of limited energy or resources to the competing demands of growth, reproduction and somatic maintenance, while consequently maximizing their fitness. However, somatic damage caused by oxidative stress in reproductive female animals is species-specific or is tissue dependent. In the present study, several markers of oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 and malonadialdehyde, MDA) and antioxidant (catalase, CAT and total antioxidant capacity, T-AOC) were examined in striped hamsters during different stages of reproduction with experimentally manipulated litter size. Energy intake, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and mRNA expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and UCP3 in skeletal muscle were also examined. H2O2 and MDA levels did not change in BAT and liver, although they significantly decreased in skeletal muscle in the lactating hamsters compared to the non-reproductive group. However, H2O2 levels in the brain were significantly higher in lactating hamsters than non-reproductive controls. Experimentally increasing litter size did not cause oxidative stress in BAT, liver and skeletal muscle, but significantly elevated H2O2 levels in the brain. CAT activity of liver decreased, but CAT and T-AOC activity of BAT, skeletal muscle and the brain did not change in lactating hamsters compared to non-reproductive controls. Both antioxidants did not change with the experimentally increasing litter size. RMR significantly increased, but BAT UCP1 mRNA expression decreased with the experimentally increased litter size, suggesting that it was against simple positive links between metabolic rate, UCP1 expression and free radicals levels. It may suggest that the cost of reproduction has negligible effect on oxidative stress or even attenuates oxidative stress in some active tissues in an extensive range of animal species. But the increasing reproductive effort may cause oxidative

  14. Oxidative Damage Does Not Occur in Striped Hamsters Raising Natural and Experimentally Increased Litter Size.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiao-Ya; Zhang, Ji-Ying; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Life-history theory assumes that animals can balance the allocation of limited energy or resources to the competing demands of growth, reproduction and somatic maintenance, while consequently maximizing their fitness. However, somatic damage caused by oxidative stress in reproductive female animals is species-specific or is tissue dependent. In the present study, several markers of oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2 and malonadialdehyde, MDA) and antioxidant (catalase, CAT and total antioxidant capacity, T-AOC) were examined in striped hamsters during different stages of reproduction with experimentally manipulated litter size. Energy intake, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and mRNA expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and UCP3 in skeletal muscle were also examined. H2O2 and MDA levels did not change in BAT and liver, although they significantly decreased in skeletal muscle in the lactating hamsters compared to the non-reproductive group. However, H2O2 levels in the brain were significantly higher in lactating hamsters than non-reproductive controls. Experimentally increasing litter size did not cause oxidative stress in BAT, liver and skeletal muscle, but significantly elevated H2O2 levels in the brain. CAT activity of liver decreased, but CAT and T-AOC activity of BAT, skeletal muscle and the brain did not change in lactating hamsters compared to non-reproductive controls. Both antioxidants did not change with the experimentally increasing litter size. RMR significantly increased, but BAT UCP1 mRNA expression decreased with the experimentally increased litter size, suggesting that it was against simple positive links between metabolic rate, UCP1 expression and free radicals levels. It may suggest that the cost of reproduction has negligible effect on oxidative stress or even attenuates oxidative stress in some active tissues in an extensive range of animal species. But the increasing reproductive effort may cause oxidative

  15. An analysis of increasing the size of the strategic petroleum reserve to one billion barrels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Emergency Policy and Evaluation requested that the Energy Information Administration complete an analysis of the proposed expansion in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) from its currently planned size of 750 million barrels to 1000 million barrels. Because the SPR contains only 580 million barrels at this point in time, the benefits and costs of increasing the SPR from 600 to 750 million barrels were also estimated. This report documents the assumptions, methodology, and results of the analysis. 17 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. Horizontal transfer of fipronil is enhanced with increased group size in Coptotermes formosanus (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Cai; Henderson, Gregg; Chen, Xuan; Gautam, Bal K

    2013-12-01

    Fipronil is a widely used insecticide for termite control. Although transfer of fipronil among termite cohorts has been investigated in previous studies, no study has yet focused on the influence of termite group size (density) on horizontal transfer. In this study, the mortality of donor and recipient Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae) was compared among groups of 10, 25, and 50 workers. Most donor termites were dead within 20 h. There was a significantly higher mortality of recipient termites starting at 44 h when in bigger groups. LT50 and LT90 of recipient termites decreased with increase in group size, being significantly shorter in groups of 50 termites compared with groups of 10 termites. Moreover, the variance (within-group difference) of recipient mortality and lethal time estimations was lowest in the groups of 50 termites, indicating a more uniform horizontal transfer of fipronil by termites in bigger groups. Our findings suggest that group size has an influence on fipronil transfer among C. formosanus workers and should be considered as a variable of importance.

  17. Stated response to increased enforcement density and penalty size for speeding and driving unbelted.

    PubMed

    Hössinger, Reinhard; Berger, Wolfgang J

    2012-11-01

    To what extent can traffic offences be reduced through stronger enforcement, higher penalties, and the provision of information to road users? This question was addressed with respect to the offences of "speeding" and "driving unbelted." Data were collected by a telephone survey of admitted speeders, followed by 438 face-to-face stated response interviews. Based on the data collected, separate statistical models were developed for the two offences. The models predict the behavioral effect of increasing enforcement density and/or penalty size as well as the additional effect of providing information to car drivers. All three factors are predicted to be effective in reducing speeding. According to the model, one additional enforcement event per year will cause a driver to reduce his current frequency of speeding by 5%. A penalty increase of 10 Euros is predicted to have the same effect. An announcement of stronger enforcement or higher fines is predicted to have an additional effect on behavior, independent of the actual magnitudes of increase in enforcement or fines. With respect to the use of a seat belt, however, neither an increase in enforcement density nor its announcement is predicted to have a significant effect on driver behavior. An increase in the penalty size is predicted to raise the stated wearing rate, which is already 90% in Austria. It seems that both the fear of punishment and the motivation for driving unbelted are limited, so that there is only a weak tradeoff between the two. This may apply to most traffic offences, with the exception of speeding, which accounts for over 80% of tickets alone, whereas all other offences account for less than 3% each.

  18. Warming Nights and Increased Precipitation Event Size Decrease Picea engelmannii Productivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orgill, A. N.; Laflin, M.; Walker, B. J.; Gill, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Climate change has the potential to change the distribution of upper treeline in alpine systems. Two elements of climate change—rising low temperatures and changes in precipitation event size--are likely to influence the physiological ecology of treeline species. Rising low temperatures will influence plant carbon status, likely increasing respiration but reducing low-temperature stress. Changes in precipitation event size and frequency may influence the duration of dry periods between rain events. This growth-chamber study was designed to observe the physiological changes to Picea engelmannii (Engelman Spruce), a dominant treeline species in the subalpine, as the seedlings were subjected to warmer nighttime temperatures and less frequent but heavier waterings. The hypothesis was that warm nights were going to increase respiration rates, which would therefore decrease the available carbon and reduce productivity. The changes in water were expected to increase the time that the P. engelmannii were dry with the additional water not compensating for the time between events. Two growth chambers were programmed to the same daytime temperatures, but with one set three degrees warmer to imitate nighttime warming. Daylength was set to mimic daily patterns in the subalpine of central Utah, USA. Half of the seedlings received a watering schedule similar to its indigenous location, and the other half received an increase of 50% in water, but 50% more time between watering. There was a significant interaction between temperature and watering frequency. Maximum photosynthetic rates were sensitive to watering frequency in ambient conditions, but watering frequency had no influence under elevated nighttime temperature. Results indicated that the plants with longer periods between watering had higher glucose levels than the more frequently watered plants. Overall, the trees grown at ambient temperature with the more frequent watering were more productive than all other

  19. Developmental mortality increases sex-ratio bias of a size-dimorphic bark beetle.

    PubMed

    Lachowsky, Leanna E; Reid, Mary L

    2014-06-01

    1. Given sexual size dimorphism, differential mortality owing to body size can lead to sex-biased mortality, proximately biasing sex ratios. This mechanism may apply to mountain pine beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae Hopkins, which typically have female-biased adult populations (2 : 1) with females larger than males. Smaller males could be more susceptible to stresses than larger females as developing beetles overwinter and populations experience high mortality. 2. Survival of naturally-established mountain pine beetles during the juvenile stage and the resulting adult sex ratios and body sizes (volume) were studied. Three treatments were applied to vary survival in logs cut from trees containing broods of mountain pine beetles. Logs were removed from the forest either in early winter, or in spring after overwintering below snow or after overwintering above snow. Upon removal, logs were placed at room temperature to allow beetles to complete development under similar conditions. 3. Compared with beetles from logs removed in early winter, mortality was higher and the sex ratio was more female-biased in overwintering logs. The bias increased with overwinter mortality. However, sex ratios were female-biased even in early winter, so additional mechanisms, other than overwintering mortality, contributed to the sex-ratio bias. Body volume varied little relative to sex-biased mortality, suggesting other size-independent causes of male-biased mortality. 4. Overwintering mortality is considered a major determinant of mountain pine beetle population dynamics. The disproportionate survival of females, who initiate colonisation of live pine trees, may affect population dynamics in ways that have not been previously considered.

  20. Inhibitors of swelling-activated chloride channels increase infarct size and apoptosis in rabbit myocardium.

    PubMed

    Souktani, Rachid; Ghaleh, Bijan; Tissier, Renaud; d'Anglemont de Tassigny, Alexandra; Aouam, Karim; Bedossa, Pierre; Charlemagne, Danièle; Samuel, Janelyse; Henry, Patrick; Berdeaux, Alain

    2003-10-01

    Apoptosis is a significant contributor to myocardial cell death during ischemia-reperfusion and swelling-activated chloride channels (I(Cl,swell)) contribute to apoptosis. However, the relationship between I(Cl,swell) ischemia-reperfusion and apoptosis remains unknown. To further investigate this, New Zealand rabbits underwent a 20-min coronary artery occlusion (CAO) followed by 72 h of coronary artery reperfusion (CAR). Two I(Cl,swell) blockers, 5-nitro-2-[3-phenylpropylamino]benzoic acid (NPPB) and indanyloxyacetic acid 94 (IAA-94) (both 1 mg/kg), were administered prior to CAO and throughout the 72 h CAR. Infarct size (IS) was increased with NPPB and IAA-94 compared with control (vehicle) rabbits (51 +/- 2% and 48 +/- 3% and vs. 35 +/- 2%, respectively, P < 0.05). Similar results were found when NPPB was administered only during the reperfusion period. The percentage of TUNEL-positive nuclei in the border zone of the infarct was increased with NPPB compared with control (37 +/- 2% vs. 25 +/- 31%, P < 0.05) as well as the number of cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments (0.45 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.33 +/- 0.04 absorbance units, P < 0.05). These findings support the concept that I(Cl,swell) channels play an important role in the determination of myocardial infarct size and apoptosis during ischemia-reperfusion. PMID:14703716

  1. [Characteristics of pedigree cat breeding in the Netherlands: breeds, population increase and litter size].

    PubMed

    Gerrits, P O; Huisman, T; Knol, B W

    1999-03-01

    A survey of the Dutch Cat Fancy was carried out to determine reproductive, patterns of pedigree cats. The data of the present study were obtained by questioning the pedigree registers of the cat clubs participating in the foundation 'Overleg Platform van de Nederlandse Cat Fancy'. The Dutch Cat Fancy registers 34 different cat breeds. From 1992 up to 1996 a total of 25.985 litters were registered. Over this period the number of litters increased from 4989 to 5313. Litters from Longhair and Exotic Shorthair cats comprised the biggest group and accounted for 55% of the total number of litters. However, over this period, the number of Longhair and Exotic Shorthair litters decreased by 9%. Litters from British Shorthair, Birman, Maine Coon and Norwegian Forrest Cat increased in number as did litters from small breeds such as Ragdoll, Bengal and Sphynx. Litters from Abyssinian, Siamese, Oriental Shorthair cats remained relatively the same. The average litter size of the total cat population, based on pedigree certificates, was calculated at 3.3 kittens per litter. For different breeds litter size varied from 2.7 (Longhair and Exotic Shorthair) to 4.3 (Burmese and Maine Coon). Taking into account an average age of 14 years, the total Dutch pedigree cat population was estimated at 240,000 viz. about 10% of the total cat population.

  2. Increasing the size of an aromatic helical foldamer cavity by strand intercalation.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Michael L; Pirotte, Geert; Kauffmann, Brice; Ferrand, Yann; Huc, Ivan

    2014-11-24

    The postsynthetic modulation of capsules based on helical aromatic oligoamide foldamers would be a powerful approach for controlling their receptor properties without altering the initial monomer sequences. With the goal of developing a method to increase the size of a cavity within a helix, a single-helical foldamer capsule was synthesized with a wide-diameter central segment that was designed to intercalate with a second shorter helical strand. Despite the formation of stable double-helical homodimers (K(dim)>10(7) M(-1)) by the shorter strand, when it was mixed with the single-helical capsule sequence, a cross-hybridized double helix was formed with K(a)>10(5) M(-1). This strategy makes it possible to direct the formation of double-helical heterodimers. On the basis of solution- and solid-state structural data, this intercalation resulted in an increase in the central-cavity size to give a new interior volume of approximately 150 Å(3). PMID:25284711

  3. Dynamic size responses to climate change: prevailing effects of rising temperature drive long-term body size increases in a semi-arid passerine.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Janet L; Amano, Tatsuya; Mackey, Brendan G; Sutherland, William J; Clayton, Mark; Peters, Anne

    2014-07-01

    Changes in animal body size have been widely reported as a correlate of contemporary climate change. Body size affects metabolism and fitness, so changing size has implications for resilience, yet the climatic factors that drive size variation remain poorly understood. We test the role of mean and extreme temperature, rainfall, and remotely sensed primary productivity (NDVI) as drivers of body size in a sedentary, semi-arid Australian passerine, Ptilotula (Lichenostomus)penicillatus, over 23 years. To distinguish effects due to differential growth from changes in population composition, we analysed first-year birds and adults separately and considered climatic variation at three temporal scales (current, previous, and preceding 5 years). The strongest effects related to temperature: in both age classes, larger size was associated with warmer mean temperatures in the previous year, contrary to Bergmann's Rule. Moreover, adults were larger in warmer breeding seasons, while first years was larger after heat waves; these effects are more likely to be mediated through size-dependent mortality, highlighting the role of body size in determining vulnerability to extinction. In addition to temperature, larger adult size was associated with lower primary productivity, which may reflect a trade-off between vegetative growth and nectar production, on which adults rely. Finally, lower rainfall was associated with decreasing size in first year and adults, most likely related to decreased food availability. Overall,body size increased over 23 years, strongly in first-year birds (2.7%) compared with adults (1%), with size outcomes a balance between competing drivers. As rainfall declined over time and productivity remained fairly stable, the temporal increase in body size appears largely driven by rising mean temperature and temperature extremes. Body size responses to environmental change are thus complex and dynamic, driven by effects on growth as well as mortality. PMID

  4. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking is an important concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson–Nambu–Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intensity relation. At high spin, the semiclassical cranking prescription works well. We discuss properties of collective vibrational motions under rapid rotation and/or large deformation. The superdeformed shell structure plays a key role in emergence of a new soft mode which could lead to instability toward the {K}π ={1}- octupole shape. A wobbling mode of excitation, which is a clear signature of the triaxiality, is discussed in terms of a microscopic point of view. A crucial role played by the quasiparticle alignment is presented.

  5. Quantal rotation and its coupling to intrinsic motion in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Matsuyanagi, Kenichi; Matsuzaki, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoshifumi R.

    2016-07-01

    Symmetry breaking is an important concept in nuclear physics and other fields of physics. Self-consistent coupling between the mean-field potential and the single-particle motion is a key ingredient in the unified model of Bohr and Mottelson, which could lead to a deformed nucleus as a consequence of spontaneous breaking of the rotational symmetry. Some remarks on the finite-size quantum effects are given. In finite nuclei, the deformation inevitably introduces the rotation as a symmetry-restoring collective motion (Anderson-Nambu-Goldstone mode), and the rotation affects the intrinsic motion. In order to investigate the interplay between the rotational and intrinsic motions in a variety of collective phenomena, we use the cranking prescription together with the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). At low spin, the coupling effect can be seen in the generalized intensity relation. A feasible quantization of the cranking model is presented, which provides a microscopic approach to the higher-order intensity relation. At high spin, the semiclassical cranking prescription works well. We discuss properties of collective vibrational motions under rapid rotation and/or large deformation. The superdeformed shell structure plays a key role in emergence of a new soft mode which could lead to instability toward the {K}π ={1}- octupole shape. A wobbling mode of excitation, which is a clear signature of the triaxiality, is discussed in terms of a microscopic point of view. A crucial role played by the quasiparticle alignment is presented.

  6. [A case of solitary bone cyst in the skull increasing in size after trivial head injury].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Homare; Nikaido, Takashi; Uchida, Masashi; Suzuki, Yu; Onodera, Hidetaka; Furuya, Yu; Taguchi, Yoshio

    2012-07-01

    A 12-year-old boy had been known to have a small swelling in the left high vertex for several years. After a trivial head hit to the site of the swelling, the swelling enlarged gradually. A bone window CT scan showed a lesion having bubble-like lytic change in the left parietal bone. Similar changes, but small, were able to be pointed out in a CT scan taken seven years previously. In the following 13 months CT scans eventually revealed sequential increases to 3.5 cm in diameter. Surgical exploratory resection of the mass was performed. Intraoperatively, partial destruction of the outer skull table and a simple cyst with serous yellowish brown colored fluid were identified. There was no finding adherent to the diploic structure. The bone defect after excision was reconstructed by using a titanium plate. The patient was followed up for 2 years after the surgery. Bone window CT showed bony development of normal appearance. Histological examination showed the cyst wall consisted of fibrous connective tissue but there were neither epithelial nor endothelial cells. The histopathological diagnosis of SBC was most likely. SBC is relatively common in long bones, but rarely in flat bones. Only several cases of the SBC of cranial bone have been reported. Although a craniectomy for total excision followed by cranioplasty by resin was common, in cases of children, cyst removal with titanium plate application would be an alterative. SBC increasing in size after head injury is extremely rare, but clinicians may need to be aware of cystic skull bone tumors increasing in size after head injury. PMID:22728540

  7. Decreased Rate of Evolution in Y Chromosome STR Loci of Increased Size of the Repeat Unit

    PubMed Central

    Järve, Mari; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Rootsi, Siiri; Help, Hela; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Kivisild, Toomas; Sanchez, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Polymorphic Y chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) have been widely used in population genetic and evolutionary studies. Compared to di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats, STRs with longer repeat units occur more rarely and are far less commonly used. Principal Findings In order to study the evolutionary dynamics of STRs according to repeat unit size, we analysed variation at 24 Y chromosome repeat loci: 1 tri-, 14 tetra-, 7 penta-, and 2 hexanucleotide loci. According to our results, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats have approximately two times lower repeat variance and diversity than tri- and tetranucleotide repeats, indicating that their mutation rate is about half of that of tri- and tetranucleotide repeats. Thus, STR markers with longer repeat units are more robust in distinguishing Y chromosome haplogroups and, in some cases, phylogenetic splits within established haplogroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Y chromosome STRs of increased repeat unit size have a lower rate of evolution, which has significant relevance in population genetic and evolutionary studies. PMID:19789645

  8. The phylogenetic structure of plant-pollinator networks increases with habitat size and isolation.

    PubMed

    Aizen, Marcelo A; Gleiser, Gabriela; Sabatino, Malena; Gilarranz, Luis J; Bascompte, Jordi; Verdú, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Similarity among species in traits related to ecological interactions is frequently associated with common ancestry. Thus, closely related species usually interact with ecologically similar partners, which can be reinforced by diverse co-evolutionary processes. The effect of habitat fragmentation on the phylogenetic signal in interspecific interactions and correspondence between plant and animal phylogenies is, however, unknown. Here, we address to what extent phylogenetic signal and co-phylogenetic congruence of plant-animal interactions depend on habitat size and isolation by analysing the phylogenetic structure of 12 pollination webs from isolated Pampean hills. Phylogenetic signal in interspecific interactions differed among webs, being stronger for flower-visiting insects than plants. Phylogenetic signal and overall co-phylogenetic congruence increased independently with hill size and isolation. We propose that habitat fragmentation would erode the phylogenetic structure of interaction webs. A decrease in phylogenetic signal and co-phylogenetic correspondence in plant-pollinator interactions could be associated with less reliable mutualism and erratic co-evolutionary change.

  9. Organelle size control - increasing vacuole content activates SNAREs to augment organelle volume through homotypic fusion.

    PubMed

    Desfougères, Yann; Neumann, Heinz; Mayer, Andreas

    2016-07-15

    Cells control the size of their compartments relative to cell volume, but there is also size control within each organelle. Yeast vacuoles neither burst nor do they collapse into a ruffled morphology, indicating that the volume of the organellar envelope is adjusted to the amount of content. It is poorly understood how this adjustment is achieved. We show that the accumulating content of yeast vacuoles activates fusion of other vacuoles, thus increasing the volume-to-surface ratio. Synthesis of the dominant compound stored inside vacuoles, polyphosphate, stimulates binding of the chaperone Sec18/NSF to vacuolar SNAREs, which activates them and triggers fusion. SNAREs can only be activated by lumenal, not cytosolic, polyphosphate (polyP). Control of lumenal polyP over SNARE activation in the cytosol requires the cytosolic cyclin-dependent kinase Pho80-Pho85 and the R-SNARE Nyv1. These results suggest that cells can adapt the volume of vacuoles to their content through feedback from the vacuole lumen to the SNAREs on the cytosolic surface of the organelle.

  10. Increase in Growth Cone Size Correlates with Decrease in Neurite Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Several important discoveries in growth cone cell biology were made possible by the use of growth cones derived from cultured Aplysia bag cell neurons, including the characterization of the organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. The majority of these Aplysia studies focused on large growth cones induced by poly-L-lysine substrates at early stages in cell culture. Under these conditions, the growth cones are in a steady state with very little net advancement. Here, we offer a comprehensive cellular analysis of the motile behavior of Aplysia growth cones in culture beyond this pausing state. We found that average growth cone size decreased with cell culture time whereas average growth rate increased. This inverse correlation of growth rate and growth cone size was due to the occurrence of large growth cones with a peripheral domain larger than 100 μm2. The large pausing growth cones had central domains that were less consistently aligned with the direction of growth and could be converted into smaller, faster-growing growth cones by addition of a three-dimensional collagen gel. We conclude that the significant lateral expansion of lamellipodia and filopodia as observed during these culture conditions has a negative effect on neurite growth. PMID:27274874

  11. Effects of increasing size and changing europium activator concentration in KCaI3 scintillator crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsey, Adam C.; Zhuravleva, Mariya; Wu, Yuntao; Stand, Luis; Loyd, Matthew; Gokhale, Sasmit; Koschan, Merry; Melcher, Charles L.

    2016-09-01

    KCaI3:Eu crystals have been identified as very promising for use in spectroscopic detector applications related to nuclear nonproliferation and domestic security efforts. Initial studies have shown for small crystals a few mm3 in size with 3% europium dopant concentration, a high light yield of >70,000 ph/MeV and energy resolution of ≈3% at 662 keV is attainable which is comparable with the highest performance scintillators discovered. In this work, single crystals of KCaI3 with a range of Eu2+ doping between 0 and 5 at% substituting for Ca2+ were grown at 22 mm diameter and their performance for gamma-ray spectroscopy studied. Comparisons among crystals approximately Ø22 mm×22 mm (8.4 cm3 or ≈0.5 in3) provide a more accurate understanding of how scintillation performance changes with Eu doping and increased crystal size. KCaI3 in the undoped form is shown to be a highly efficient intrinsic scintillator with a defect-related emission at 404 nm which coexists with the Eu2+ 5d-4f emission in low dopant concentrations and is completely re-absorbed in more heavily doped crystals. For larger crystals, effects from self-absorption due to Eu activation become more evident by a near doubling of decay time for 0.5 in3 crystals as the activator is increased from 0.5 to 5.0 at% Eu. Comparisons of pulse-height spectra obtained for Ø22 mm×22 mm cylinders with varying Eu concentration suggests best performance is achieved using lower Eu additions closer to 0.5-1.0 at%. Using a modified crystal packaging featuring an offset reflector geometry, 0.5 in3 crystals of KCaI3:Eu can attain under 4% energy resolution at 662 keV.

  12. When bigger is not better: intraspecific competition for pollination increases with population size in invasive milkweeds.

    PubMed

    Ward, Megan; Johnson, Steven D; Zalucki, Myron P

    2013-04-01

    One of the essential requirements for an introduced plant species to become invasive is an ability to reproduce outside the native range, particularly when initial populations are small. If a reproductive Allee effect is operating, plants in small populations will have reduced reproductive success relative to plants in larger populations. Alternatively, if plants in small populations experience less competition for pollination than those in large populations, they may actually have higher levels of reproductive success than plants in large populations. To resolve this uncertainty, we investigated how the per capita fecundity of plants was affected by population size in three invasive milkweed species. Field surveys of seed production in natural populations of different sizes but similar densities were conducted for three pollinator-dependent invasive species, namely Asclepias curassavica, Gomphocarpus fruticosus and G. physocarpus. Additionally, supplemental hand-pollinations were performed in small and large populations in order to determine whether reproductive output was limited by pollinator activity in these populations. Reproductive Allee effects were not detected in any of the study species. Instead, plants in small populations exhibited remarkably high levels of reproductive output compared to those in large populations. Increased fruit production following supplemental hand-pollinations suggested that the lower reproductive output of naturally pollinated plants in large populations is a consequence of pollen limitation rather than limitation due to abiotic resources. This is consistent with increased intraspecific competition for pollination amongst plants in large populations. It is likely that the invasion of these milkweed species in Australia has been enhanced because plants in small founding populations experience less intraspecific competition for pollinators than those in large populations, and thus have the ability to produce copious amounts of

  13. Increased bone mineral content and bone size in the femoral neck of men with hip osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Arokoski, J; Arokoski, M; Jurvelin, J; Helminen, H; Niemitukia, L; Kroger, H

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Even though clinical findings support the idea that hip osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased bone mineral density (BMD), the subject remains controversial. This study was therefore initiated to investigate the relation between the severity of hip OA and femoral and calcaneal BMD. Methods: On the basis of the American College of Rheumatology criteria on classification of OA of the hip, 27 men (aged 47–64 years) with unilateral or bilateral hip OA and 30 age matched randomly selected healthy men were studied. Plain radiographs were graded using Li's scale from 0 (no OA) to 4 (severe OA). According to the side of the highest radiographic score from the patients with clinical hip OA, 29.6% had grade 1, 29.6% grade 2, and 40.8% grade 3 OA. Bone mineral content (BMC), areal BMD (BMDareal), and bone dimensions (area and width) were measured by dual x ray absorptiometry at the proximal femur. BMDareal of the calcaneus was measured from the central area of the bone. Volumetric measurements from magnetic resonance images of the femoral neck were used to create a BMD measure that was corrected for the femoral neck volume (BMDmri). Results: There were no differences in weight, or body mass index between the study groups. There were no significant BMDareal differences in any of the subregions of the proximal femur (femoral neck and trochanter) or calcaneus between the OA and control groups. Neither did the BMDmri of the femoral neck differ between the groups. However, the BMC of the femoral neck was 18% higher (p<0.01) in patients with OA than in controls. Similarly femoral neck bone width and volume were 9% and 18% respectively higher (p<0.001) in patients with OA. Conclusions: The results suggest that men with hip OA have larger femoral neck size and consequently higher BMC than healthy controls matched for age and sex. There is no significant difference in femoral neck BMD (BMDareal or BMDmri) between the groups. Furthermore, increased BMDareal was

  14. Survival and population size of a resident bird species are declining as temperature increases.

    PubMed

    Santisteban, Leonard; Benkman, Craig W; Fetz, Trevor; Smith, Julie W

    2012-03-01

    1. A large number of migratory bird species appear to be declining as the result of climate change, but whether resident bird species have or will be adversely affected by climate change is less clear. We focus on the South Hills crossbill (Loxia curvirostra complex), which is endemic to about 70 km(2) of Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta latifolia) forest in southern Idaho, USA. 2. Our results indicate that the South Hills crossbill has declined by over 60% between 2003 and 2008, and that decreasing adult survival drives this population decline. 3. We evaluated the relative support for multiple hypotheses linking crossbill survival to climate, an ectoparasitic mite (scaly-leg mites Knemidokoptes jamaicensis), and the recent emergence of West Nile virus. Changes in adult apparent survival rate were closely associated with average spring and annual temperatures, and with high temperatures (≥32 °C) during summer, which have increased during the last decade. In contrast, there was little evidence that scaly-leg mites or West Nile virus contributed to recent declines in adult survival. 4. The most probable mechanism causing the decline in adult survival and population size is a decrease in the availability of their primary food resource, seeds in serotinous pine cones. Cone production has declined with increasing annual temperatures, and these cones appear to be prematurely opening owing to increasingly hot summer conditions releasing their seeds and reducing the carrying capacity for crossbills later in the year. 5. In light of regional climate change forecasts, which include an increase in both annual temperature and hot days (>32 °C), and the likely disappearance of lodgepole pine from southern Idaho by the end of this century, additional research is needed to determine how to maintain lodgepole pine forests and their supply of seeds to conserve one of the few bird species endemic to the continental United States.

  15. Survival and population size of a resident bird species are declining as temperature increases.

    PubMed

    Santisteban, Leonard; Benkman, Craig W; Fetz, Trevor; Smith, Julie W

    2012-03-01

    1. A large number of migratory bird species appear to be declining as the result of climate change, but whether resident bird species have or will be adversely affected by climate change is less clear. We focus on the South Hills crossbill (Loxia curvirostra complex), which is endemic to about 70 km(2) of Rocky Mountain lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta latifolia) forest in southern Idaho, USA. 2. Our results indicate that the South Hills crossbill has declined by over 60% between 2003 and 2008, and that decreasing adult survival drives this population decline. 3. We evaluated the relative support for multiple hypotheses linking crossbill survival to climate, an ectoparasitic mite (scaly-leg mites Knemidokoptes jamaicensis), and the recent emergence of West Nile virus. Changes in adult apparent survival rate were closely associated with average spring and annual temperatures, and with high temperatures (≥32 °C) during summer, which have increased during the last decade. In contrast, there was little evidence that scaly-leg mites or West Nile virus contributed to recent declines in adult survival. 4. The most probable mechanism causing the decline in adult survival and population size is a decrease in the availability of their primary food resource, seeds in serotinous pine cones. Cone production has declined with increasing annual temperatures, and these cones appear to be prematurely opening owing to increasingly hot summer conditions releasing their seeds and reducing the carrying capacity for crossbills later in the year. 5. In light of regional climate change forecasts, which include an increase in both annual temperature and hot days (>32 °C), and the likely disappearance of lodgepole pine from southern Idaho by the end of this century, additional research is needed to determine how to maintain lodgepole pine forests and their supply of seeds to conserve one of the few bird species endemic to the continental United States. PMID:22010811

  16. Territory Tenure Increases with Repertoire Size in Brownish-Flanked Bush Warbler

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Canwei; Wei, Chentao; Zhang, Yanyun

    2015-01-01

    Song repertoire size is often cited as a classic example of a secondary sexual trait in birds. Models of sexual selection and empirical tests of their predictions have often related secondary sexual traits to longevity. However, the relationship between repertoire size and longevity is unclear. Using capture-mark-recapture studies in two populations of the brownish-flanked bush warbler Cettia fortipes, we found that males with a repertoire size of three maintained territory tenure for a longer duration than did males with a repertoire size of two. These results provide evidence that even a minimal difference in repertoire size can serve as a potential signal of territory tenure capability. PMID:25822524

  17. Maintained cocaine self-administration is determined by quantal responses: implications for the measurement of antagonist potency.

    PubMed

    Norman, Andrew B; Tabet, Michael R; Norman, Mantana K; Tsibulsky, Vladimir L

    2014-02-01

    The change in frequency of cocaine self-administration as a function of the unit dose is widely assumed to represent a graded pharmacodynamic response. Alternatively, a pharmacological theory states that during maintained self-administration, a quantal response occurs at a minimum maintained cocaine concentration (satiety threshold). Rats self-administered cocaine at unit doses spanning an 8-fold range from 0.75 to 6 µmol/kg. Despite an approximately 7-fold difference in the interinjection intervals, there were no differences in the plasma cocaine concentration at the time of lever press across this range of unit doses, consistent with the satiety threshold representing an equiactive cocaine concentration. Because self-administration always occurs when cocaine concentrations decline back to the satiety threshold, this behavior represents a process of automatic back titration of equiactive agonist concentrations. Therefore, the lower frequency of self-administration at higher unit doses is caused by an increase in the duration of the cocaine-induced satiety response, and the graded dose-frequency relationship is due to cocaine pharmacokinetics. After the interinjection intervals at a particular unit dose were stable, rats were injected with the competitive D₁-like dopamine receptor antagonist R-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine (SCH23390; 15 nmol/kg intravenously) and the session continued. At all cocaine unit doses, SCH23390 accelerated self-administration with a concomitant increase in the calculated satiety threshold, and these equiactive cocaine concentration ratios were independent of the cocaine unit dose. Therefore, the measurement of antagonist potency requires only a single unit dose of cocaine, selected on the basis of convenience, and using multiple cocaine unit doses is redundant. PMID:24307200

  18. Somatostatin analogue, octreotide, reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in insulin-dependent diabetes

    SciTech Connect

    Serri, O.; Beauregard, H.; Brazeau, P.; Abribat, T.; Lambert, J.; Harris, A.; Vachon, L. Sandoz Canada Inc., Dorval, Quebec )

    1991-02-20

    To determine whether treatment with a somatostatin analogue can reduce kidney hyperfiltration and hypertrophy in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, the authors studied 11 patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and glomerular hyperfiltration. The patients were assigned randomly to receive continuous subcutaneous infusion of either octreotide, 300 {mu}g/24 h (five patients) or placebo (six patients) for 12 weeks. At baseline, mean glomerular filtration rate and mean total kidney volume were not significantly different in the two groups. However, after 12 weeks of treatment, the mean glomerular filtration rate was significantly lower in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Furthermore, the mean total kidney volume was significantly lower after treatment in the octreotide group than in the placebo group. Glycemic control did not change significantly in either group. They conclude that subcutaneous infusion of octreotide for 12 weeks reduces increased glomerular filtration rate and kidney size in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus despite the fact that glycemic control remains unchanged.

  19. Enhanced Sucrose Loading Improves Rice Yield by Increasing Grain Size1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liang; Lu, Qingtao

    2015-01-01

    Yield in cereals is a function of grain number and size. Sucrose (Suc), the main carbohydrate product of photosynthesis in higher plants, is transported long distances from source leaves to sink organs such as seeds and roots. Here, we report that transgenic rice plants (Oryza sativa) expressing the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) phloem-specific Suc transporter (AtSUC2), which loads Suc into the phloem under control of the phloem protein2 promoter (pPP2), showed an increase in grain yield of up to 16% relative to wild-type plants in field trials. Compared with wild-type plants, pPP2::AtSUC2 plants had larger spikelet hulls and larger and heavier grains. Grain filling was accelerated in the transgenic plants, and more photoassimilate was transported from the leaves to the grain. In addition, microarray analyses revealed that carbohydrate, amino acid, and lipid metabolism was enhanced in the leaves and grain of pPP2::AtSUC2 plants. Thus, enhancing Suc loading represents a promising strategy to improve rice yield to feed the global population. PMID:26504138

  20. Increased brain size in mammals is associated with size variations in gene families with cell signalling, chemotaxis and immune-related functions.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Urrutia, Araxi O; Gutiérrez, Humberto

    2014-01-22

    Genomic determinants underlying increased encephalization across mammalian lineages are unknown. Whole genome comparisons have revealed large and frequent changes in the size of gene families, and it has been proposed that these variations could play a major role in shaping morphological and physiological differences among species. Using a genome-wide comparative approach, we examined changes in gene family size (GFS) and degree of encephalization in 39 fully sequenced mammalian species and found a significant over-representation of GFS variations in line with increased encephalization in mammals. We found that this relationship is not accounted for by known correlates of brain size such as maximum lifespan or body size and is not explained by phylogenetic relatedness. Genes involved in chemotaxis, immune regulation and cell signalling-related functions are significantly over-represented among those gene families most highly correlated with encephalization. Genes within these families are prominently expressed in the human brain, particularly the cortex, and organized in co-expression modules that display distinct temporal patterns of expression in the developing cortex. Our results suggest that changes in GFS associated with encephalization represent an evolutionary response to the specific functional requirements underlying increased brain size in mammals.

  1. Anomalous increase in carbon capacitance at pore sizes less than 1 nanometer.

    PubMed

    Chmiola, J; Yushin, G; Gogotsi, Y; Portet, C; Simon, P; Taberna, P L

    2006-09-22

    Carbon supercapacitors, which are energy storage devices that use ion adsorption on the surface of highly porous materials to store charge, have numerous advantages over other power-source technologies, but could realize further gains if their electrodes were properly optimized. Studying the effect of the pore size on capacitance could potentially improve performance by maximizing the electrode surface area accessible to electrolyte ions, but until recently, no studies had addressed the lower size limit of accessible pores. Using carbide-derived carbon, we generated pores with average sizes from 0.6 to 2.25 nanometer and studied double-layer capacitance in an organic electrolyte. The results challenge the long-held axiom that pores smaller than the size of solvated electrolyte ions are incapable of contributing to charge storage.

  2. Bigger size and defatting of bone chips will increase cup stability.

    PubMed

    Ullmark, G

    2000-01-01

    Morcellised bone allograft in an in vitro model was used to test the tendency towards cup rotation using small or larger fragment sizes of an impacted graft bed and different fat contents. A cup cemented on an impacted graft bed of larger sized bone chips from the Howex bone mill containing natural marrow fat was loaded eccentrically until the cup rotated. This required 3450 N. The same chips impacted in the same way, but defatted with warm saline solution required 7000 N for rotation. The smaller sized bone chips from the Tracer bone mill defatted in a similar manner required only 1950 N for cup rotation. The conclusion was that larger sized chips, partly defatted, prevent rotation of a cup cemented on a graft bed.

  3. Ostracod body size trends do not follow either Bergmann's rule or Cope's rule during periods of constant temperature increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Seshadri, P.; Amin, V.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Over time, organisms have adapted to changing environments by evolving to be larger or smaller. Scientists have described body-size trends using two generalized theories. Bergmann's rule states that body size is inversely related to temperature, and Cope's rule establishes an increase over time. Cope's rule has been hypothesized as a temporal manifestation of Bergmann's rule, as the temperature of the Earth has consistently decreased over time and mean body size has increased. However, during times of constant temperature increase, Bergmann's rule and Cope's rule predict opposite effects on body size. Our goal was to clarify this relationship using both accessible proxies of historic temperature - atmospheric CO2 levels and paleo-latitude. We measured ostracod lengths throughout the Paleozoic and Mesozoic eras (using the Catalogue of Ostracoda) and utilized ostracod latitudinal information from the Paleobiology Database. By closely studying body-size trends during four time periods of constant CO2 increase across spectrums of time and latitude, we were able to compare the effects of Cope's and Bergmann's rule. The correlation, p-values, and slopes of each of our graphs showed that there is no clear relationship between body size and each of these rules in times of temperature increase, both latitudinally and temporally. Therefore, both Cope's and Bergmann's rule act on marine ostracods and no rule is dominant, though our results more strongly disprove the latitudinal variation in ostracod size.

  4. Asymmetric forceps increase fighting success among males of similar size in the maritime earwig

    PubMed Central

    Munoz, Nicole E.; Zink, Andrew G.

    2012-01-01

    Extreme asymmetric morphologies are hypothesized to serve an adaptive function that counteracts sexual selection for symmetry. However direct tests of function for asymmetries are lacking, particularly in the context of animal weapons. The weapon of the maritime earwig, Anisolabis maritima, exhibits sizeable variation in the extent of directional asymmetry within and across body sizes, making it an ideal candidate for investigating the function of asymmetry. In this study, we characterized the extent of weapon asymmetry, characterized the manner in which asymmetric weapons are used in contests, staged dyadic contests between males of different size classes and analyzed the correlates of fighting success. In contests between large males, larger individuals won more fights and emerged as the dominant male. In contests between small males, however, weapon asymmetry was more influential in predicting overall fighting success than body size. This result reveals an advantage of asymmetric weaponry among males that are below the mean size in the population. A forceps manipulation experiment suggests that asymmetry may be an indirect, correlate of a morphologically independent factor that affects fighting ability. PMID:22984320

  5. Increasing seed size and quality by manipulating BIG SEEDS 1 in legume species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant organs such as seeds are primary sources of food for both humans and animals. Seed size is one of the major agronomic traits that have been selected in crop plants during their domestication. Legume seeds are a major source of dietary proteins and oils. Here, we report a novel and conserved ro...

  6. Automated thinning increases uniformity of in-row spacing and plant size in romaine lettuce

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low availability and high cost of farm hand labor make automated thinners a faster and cheaper alternative to hand thinning in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). However, the effects of this new technology on uniformity of plant spacing and size as well as crop yield are not proven. Three experiments wer...

  7. Crossing the line: increasing body size in a trans-Wallacean lizard radiation (Cyrtodactylus, Gekkota).

    PubMed

    Oliver, Paul M; Skipwith, Phillip; Lee, Michael S Y

    2014-10-01

    The region between the Asian and Australian continental plates (Wallacea) demarcates the transition between two differentiated regional biotas. Despite this striking pattern, some terrestrial lineages have successfully traversed the marine barriers of Wallacea and subsequently diversified in newly colonized regions. The hypothesis that these dispersals between biogeographic realms are correlated with detectable shifts in evolutionary trajectory has however rarely been tested. Here, we analyse the evolution of body size in a widespread and exceptionally diverse group of gekkotan lizards (Cyrtodactylus), and show that a clade that has dispersed eastwards and radiated in the Australopapuan region appears to have significantly expanded its body size 'envelope' and repeatedly evolved gigantism. This pattern suggests that the biotic composition of the proto-Papuan Archipelago provided a permissive environment in which new colonists were released from evolutionary constraints operating to the west of Wallacea.

  8. Crossing the line: increasing body size in a trans-Wallacean lizard radiation (Cyrtodactylus, Gekkota).

    PubMed

    Oliver, Paul M; Skipwith, Phillip; Lee, Michael S Y

    2014-10-01

    The region between the Asian and Australian continental plates (Wallacea) demarcates the transition between two differentiated regional biotas. Despite this striking pattern, some terrestrial lineages have successfully traversed the marine barriers of Wallacea and subsequently diversified in newly colonized regions. The hypothesis that these dispersals between biogeographic realms are correlated with detectable shifts in evolutionary trajectory has however rarely been tested. Here, we analyse the evolution of body size in a widespread and exceptionally diverse group of gekkotan lizards (Cyrtodactylus), and show that a clade that has dispersed eastwards and radiated in the Australopapuan region appears to have significantly expanded its body size 'envelope' and repeatedly evolved gigantism. This pattern suggests that the biotic composition of the proto-Papuan Archipelago provided a permissive environment in which new colonists were released from evolutionary constraints operating to the west of Wallacea. PMID:25296929

  9. Increased stability and size of a bubble on a superhydrophobic surface.

    PubMed

    Ling, William Yeong Liang; Lu, Gabriel; Ng, Tuck Wah

    2011-04-01

    Computational and theoretical models of millimeter-sized bubbles placed on upright hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces are compared with experimental data here. Although the experimental data for a hydrophobic surface corroborated the computational and theoretical data, the case of a superhydrophobic surface showed the bubbles to be able to contain significantly larger volumes than predicted. This is attributed to the greater ability of the bubble contact line to advance compared with its tendency to detach from the surface because of buoyancy. We surmise that a static model therefore describes only an unstable equilibrium for these bubbles, which unless heavily isolated from external influences are more likely to assume a larger stable size. PMID:21361315

  10. Interaction of temperature and an environmental stressor: Moina macrocopa responds with increased body size, increased lifespan, and increased offspring numbers slightly above its temperature optimum.

    PubMed

    Engert, Antonia; Chakrabarti, Shumon; Saul, Nadine; Bittner, Michal; Menzel, Ralph; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2013-02-01

    For organisms, temperature is one of the most important environmental factors and gains increasing importance due to global warming, since increasing temperatures may pose organisms close to their environmental tolerance limits and, thus, they may become more vulnerable to environmental stressors. We analyzed the temperature-dependence of the water-soluble antioxidant capacity of the cladoceran Moina macrocopa and evaluated its life trait variables with temperature (15, 20, 25, 30°C) and humic substance (HS) concentrations (0, 0.18, 0.36, 0.90, 1.79 mM DOC) as stressors. Temperatures below and above the apparent optimum (20°C) reduced the antioxidative capacity. Additions of HSs increased body length, but decreased mean lifespan at 15 and 20°C. There was no clear HS-effect on offspring numbers at 15, 20, and 30°C. At 25°C with increasing HS-concentration, lifespan was extended and offspring numbers increased tremendously, reaching 250% of the control. Although the applied HS preparation possesses estrogenic and antiandrogenic activities, a xenohormone mechanism does not seem plausible for the reproductive increase, because comparable effects did not occur at other temperatures. A more convincing explanation appears to be the mitohormesis hypothesis which states that a certain increase of reactive oxygen production leads to improved health and longevity and, with Moina, also to increased offspring numbers. Our results suggest that at least with the eurythermic M. macrocopa, a temperature above the optimum can be beneficial for several life trait variables, even when combined with a chemical stressor. Temperatures approximately 10°C above its optimum appear to adversely affect the lifespan and reproduction of M. macrocopa. This indicates that this cladoceran species seems to be able to utilize temperature as an ecological resource in a range slightly above its thermal optimum. PMID:23211326

  11. Increasing zooplankton size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on phytoplankton in the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, L.; Chang, C.; García-Comas, C.; Gong, G.; Hsieh, C.

    2012-12-01

    Body size is one of the fundamental characteristics of organisms linking many ecosystem properties and functions. Recent studies suggest that environmental changes alter the size structure of pelagic food webs; however, ecosystem consequences of such changes remain unclear. Here we tested our main hypothesis that increasing zooplankton size diversity enhances top-down control on phytoplankton in the East China Sea (H1), as well as five conventional hypotheses explaining the top-down control: shallower zooplankton size spectrum enhances the strength of top-down control (H2); nutrient enrichment lessens the strength of top-down control (H3); increasing zooplankton taxonomic diversity enhances the strength of top-down control (H4); increasing fish predation is linked to decreasing the strength of top-down control of zooplankton on phytoplankton (H5); increasing temperature intensifies the strength of top-down control (H6). While the results of our univariate analyses support H1, H2, H3, and H4, more in depth analyses indicate that zooplankton size diversity is the most important factor in determining the strength of top-down control on phytoplankton in East China Sea. Our results suggest a new potential mechanism that increasing predator size diversity enhances the strength of top-down control on prey through diet niche partitioning. This mechanism can be explained by the concept of optimal predator-prey body-mass ratio concept. Suppose each size group of zooplankton predators has its own optimal phytoplankton prey size, increasing size diversity of zooplankton would promote diet niche partitioning of predators and thus elevates the top-down control.Fig. 1 Scatter plots the relationship between zooplankton/phytoplankton biomass ratio versus (A) zooplankton size diversity, (B) slope of zooplankton size spectrum, (C) Zoolankton Shannon diversity, (D) NO3, (E) PO4, (F) SiO3, (G) water temperature, and (H) fish larvae density in the East China Sea. Table 1. Results of the

  12. Measurement of quantal secretion induced by ouabain and its correlation with depletion of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Haimann, C; Torri-Tarelli, F; Fesce, R; Ceccarelli, B

    1985-11-01

    Ouabain (0.1 and 0.05 mM) was applied to frog cutaneous pectoris nerve-muscle preparations bathed in modified Ringer's solution containing either 1.8 mM Ca2+ (and 4 mM Mg2+) or no added Ca2+ (4 mM Mg2+ and 1 mM EGTA). During the intense quantal release of acetylcholine (ACh) induced by ouabain, the parameters of the miniature endplate potentials (mepps) were deduced from the variance, skew, and power spectra of the endplate recordings by applying a recently described modification of classical fluctuation analysis. Often the high frequency of mepps is not stationary; therefore, the signal was high-pass filtered (time constant of the resistance-capacitance filter of 2 ms) to remove the errors introduced by nonstationarity. When ouabain was applied in the presence of Ca2+, mepp frequency started to rise exponentially after a lag of 1.5-2 h, reached an average peak frequency of 1,300/s in approximately 30 min, and then suddenly subsided to low level (10/s). In Ca2+-free solution, after a shorter lag (1-1.5 h), mepp frequency rose to peak rate of 700/s in approximately 20 min and then gradually subsided. In spite of the different time course of secretion in the two experimental conditions, the cumulative quantal release was not significantly different (7.4 +/- 1.3 X 10(5) in Ca2+-containing and 8.8 +/- 2.7 X 10(5) in Ca2+-free solutions). 60 min after the peak secretion, the muscles were fixed for observation in the electron microscope. Morphometric analysis on micrographs of neuromuscular junctions revealed in both cases a profound depletion of synaptic vesicles and deep infoldings of presynaptic membrane. This rapid depletion and the lack of uptake of horseradish peroxidase suggest that ouabain impairs the recycling process that tends to conserve the vesicle population during intense secretion of neurotransmitter. The good correlation observed between the reduction in the store of synaptic vesicles and the total number of quanta of ACh secreted in the absence of a

  13. Failure of vitamin A to increase litter size in sows receiving injections at various stages of gestation.

    PubMed

    Pusateri, A E; Diekman, M A; Singleton, W L

    1999-06-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a single injection of vitamin A to increase litter size, 1,375 sows were assigned randomly to 11 treatment groups (125 sows per treatment). Treatments included injection of 1 x 10(6) IU of vitamin A dissolved in corn oil at weaning or on d 0, 2, 6, 10, 13, 19, 30, 70, or 110 after breeding. Sows in the control group were injected with corn oil on corresponding days. A total of 396 sows were removed from the study following treatment or treatment assignment. Therefore, farrowing data were collected for 979 sows. Injection of vitamin A did not influence (P > . 10) total litter size, live litter size, litter weight, pig weight, number of runts, or number of mummies. Mean live litter size was 10.1 +/- .1 for all sows that farrowed in the experiment. Parity group affected total litter size, live litter size, live litter weight, and number stillborn (P < .01) but not pig weight, number of runts, number of mummies, or gestation length (P > . 10). In this study, a single injection of vitamin A at any time from weaning to farrowing did not increase litter size in sows.

  14. Recombination in Streptococcus pneumoniae Lineages Increase with Carriage Duration and Size of the Polysaccharide Capsule

    PubMed Central

    Andam, Cheryl P.; Harris, Simon R.; Cornick, Jennifer E.; Yang, Marie; Bricio-Moreno, Laura; Kamng’ona, Arox W.; French, Neil; Heyderman, Robert S.; Kadioglu, Aras; Everett, Dean B.; Bentley, Stephen D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pneumoniae causes a high burden of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) globally, especially in children from resource-poor settings. Like many bacteria, the pneumococcus can import DNA from other strains or even species by transformation and homologous recombination, which has allowed the pneumococcus to evade clinical interventions such as antibiotics and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs). Pneumococci are enclosed in a complex polysaccharide capsule that determines the serotype; the capsule varies in size and is associated with properties including carriage prevalence and virulence. We determined and quantified the association between capsule and recombination events using genomic data from a diverse collection of serotypes sampled in Malawi. We determined both the amount of variation introduced by recombination relative to mutation (the relative rate) and how many individual recombination events occur per isolate (the frequency). Using univariate analyses, we found an association between both recombination measures and multiple factors associated with the capsule, including duration and prevalence of carriage. Because many capsular factors are correlated, we used multivariate analysis to correct for collinearity. Capsule size and carriage duration remained positively associated with recombination, although with a reduced P value, and this effect may be mediated through some unassayed additional property associated with larger capsules. This work describes an important impact of serotype on recombination that has been previously overlooked. While the details of how this effect is achieved remain to be determined, it may have important consequences for the serotype-specific response to vaccines and other interventions. PMID:27677790

  15. Inorganic and organic mercury chloride toxicity to Coturnix: Sensitivity related to age and quantal assessment of physiologic responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1982-01-01

    The toxicities of mercuric chloride (HgCl(,2)) and methylmercuric chloride (CH(,3)HgCl) were compared for coturnix (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatching to adulthood. Comparisons were based on: (1) Median lethal dosages (LD50) derived by administering single peroral and single intramuscular dosages of mercury, (2) median lethal concentrations (LC50) derived by feeding mercury for 5 days, (3) median toxic concentrations (TC50) derived by feeding mercury 9 weeks and measuring plasma enzyme activity, plasma electrolytes, and other blood constituents, and (4) transient changes of various blood chemistries following a single peroral dose of mercury. Acute peroral and intramuscular LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl increased by two- to threefold for coturnix chicks from hatching to 4 weeks of age. Concomitantly, the LC50s also increased, but the important difference between test procedures was that with both single dose routes of exposure the toxicity ratios, i.e., HgCl(,2)/CH(,3)HgCl, at each age were about 2 to 2.5 compared to about 100 for the LC50s. For example, at 2 weeks of age the peroral LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl were 42 and 18 mg/kg; the dietary LC50s were 5086 and 47 ppm for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl. The 9 week feeding trial was not associated with gross effects from either HgCl(,2) at 0.5 to 32 ppm or CH(,3)HgCl at 0.125 to 8 ppm. However, subtle responses were detected for the plasma enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase and could be quantified by probit analysis. This quantal procedure was based on establishment of a normal value for each enzyme and classing outliers as respondents. A 'hazard index' based on the TC50 for an enzyme divided by the LD50 or LC50 was introduced. The single oral dosages of HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl showed that ratios of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and orinthine carbamoyl transferase for the liver and kidneys of adult coturnix were opposite from

  16. Inorganic and organic mercury chloride toxicity to Coturnix: sensitivity related to age and quantal assessment of physiologic responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, E.F.

    1981-01-01

    The toxicities of mercuric chloride (HgCl(,2)) and methylmercuric chloride (CH(,3)HgCl) were compared for coturnix (Coturnix coturnix japonica) from hatching to adulthood. Comparisons were based on: (1) Median lethal dosages (LD50) derived by administering single peroral and single intramuscular dosages of mercury, (2) median lethal concentrations (LC50) derived by feeding mercury for 5 days, (3) median toxic concentrations (TC50) derived by feeding mercury 9 weeks and measuring plasma enzyme activity, plasma electrolytes, and other blood constituents, and (4) transient changes of various blood chemistries following a single peroral dose of mercury. Acute peroral and intramuscular LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl increased by two- to threefold for coturnix chicks from hatching to 4 weeks of age. Concomitantly, the LC50s also increased, but the important difference between test procedures was that with both single dose routes of exposure the toxicity ratios, i.e., HgCl(,2)/CH(,3)HgCl, at each age were about 2 to 2.5 compared to about 100 for the LC50s. For example, at 2 weeks of age the peroral LD50s for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl were 42 and 18 mg/kg; the dietary LC50s were 5086 and 47 ppm for HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl. The 9 week feeding trial was not associated with gross effects from either HgCl(,2) at 0.5 to 32 ppm or CH(,3)HgCl at 0.125 to 8 ppm. However, subtle responses were detected for the plasma enzymes aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and ornithine carbamoyl transferase and could be quantified by probit analysis. This quantal procedure was based on establishment of a normal value for each enzyme and classing outliers as respondents. A 'hazard index' based on the TC50 for an enzyme divided by the LD50 or LC50 was introduced. The single oral dosages of HgCl(,2) and CH(,3)HgCl showed that ratios of alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and orinthine carbamoyl transferase for the liver and kidneys of adult coturnix were opposite from

  17. Amelioration of insulin resistance by rosiglitazone is associated with increased adipose cell size in obese type 2 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Eliasson, Bjorn; Smith, Ulf; Mullen, Shawn; Cushman, Samuel W; Sherman, Arthur S; Yang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Early studies reported that the size of adipose cells positively correlates with insulin resistance, but recent evidence suggests that the relationship between adipose cell size and insulin resistance is more complex. We previously reported that among BMI-matched moderately obese subjects who were either insulin sensitive or resistant insulin resistance correlated with the proportion of small adipose cells, rather than the size of the large adipose cells, whereas the size of large adipose cells was found to be a predictor of insulin resistance in the first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic (T2D) patients. The relationship between adipose cellularity and insulin resistance thus appears to depend on the metabolic state of the individual. We did a longitudinal study with T2D patients treated with the insulin-sensitizer rosiglitazone to test the hypothesis that improved insulin sensitivity is associated with increased adipocyte size. Eleven T2D patients were recruited and treated with rosiglitazone for 90 days. Blood samples and needle biopsies of abdominal subcutaneous fat were taken at six time points and analyzed for cell size distributions. Rosiglitazone treatment ameliorated insulin resistance as evidenced by significantly decreased fasting plasma glucose and increased index of insulin sensitivity, QUICKI. In association with this, we found significantly increased size of the large adipose cells and, with a weaker effect, increased proportion of small adipose cells. We conclude rosiglitazone treatment both enlarges existing large adipose cells and recruits new small adipose cells in T2D patients, improving fat storage capacity in adipose tissue and thus systemic insulin sensitivity.

  18. Increased silver activity for direct propylene epoxidation via subnanometer size effects.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y; Mehmood, F; Lee, S; Greeley, J; Lee, B; Seifert, S; Winans, R E; Elam, J W; Meyer, R J; Redfern, P C; Teschner, D; Schlögl, R; Pellin, M J; Curtiss, L A; Vajda, S

    2010-04-01

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag3 clusters and approximately 3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation. PMID:20378815

  19. Increased Silver Activity for Direct Propylene Epoxidation via Subnanometer Size Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, Faisal; Lee, Sang Soo; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Lee, Byeongdu; Seifert, Soenke; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. W.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, Paul C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, Robert; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Vajda, S.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag3 clusters and ~3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  20. Increased silver activity for direct propylene epoxidation via subnanometer size effects.

    SciTech Connect

    Lei, Y.; Mehmood, F.; Lee, S.; Greeley, J. P.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. E.; Elam, J. E.; Meyer, R. J.; Redfern, P. C.; Teschner, D.; Schlogl, R.; Pellin, M. J.; Curtiss, L. A.; Vajda, S.; Univ. of Illinois at Chicago; Fritz-Haber Inst. der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft; Yale Univ.

    2010-04-09

    Production of the industrial chemical propylene oxide is energy-intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with direct propylene epoxidation by molecular oxygen have not resolved these problems because of substantial formation of carbon dioxide. We found that unpromoted, size-selected Ag{sub 3} clusters and {approx}3.5-nanometer Ag nanoparticles on alumina supports can catalyze this reaction with only a negligible amount of carbon dioxide formation and with high activity at low temperatures. Density functional calculations show that, relative to extended silver surfaces, oxidized silver trimers are more active and selective for epoxidation because of the open-shell nature of their electronic structure. The results suggest that new architectures based on ultrasmall silver particles may provide highly efficient catalysts for propylene epoxidation.

  1. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations.

  2. Quantal density-functional theory in the presence of a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Tao; Pan Xiaoyin; Sahni, Viraht

    2011-04-15

    We generalize the quantal density-functional theory (QDFT) of electrons in the presence of an external electrostatic field E(r)=-{nabla}v(r) to include an external magnetostatic field B(r)={nabla}xA(r), where (v(r),A(r)) are the respective scalar and vector potentials. The generalized QDFT, valid for nondegenerate ground and excited states, is the mapping from the interacting system of electrons to a model of noninteracting fermions with the same density {rho}(r) and physical current density j(r), and from which the total energy can be obtained. The properties ({rho}(r),j(r)) constitute the basic quantum-mechanical variables because, as proved previously, for a nondegenerate ground state they uniquely determine the potentials (v(r),A(r)). The mapping to the noninteracting system is arbitrary in that the model fermions may be either in their ground or excited state. The theory is explicated by application to a ground state of the exactly solvable (two-dimensional) Hooke's atom in a magnetic field, with the mapping being to a model system also in its ground state. The majority of properties of the model are obtained in closed analytical or semianalytical form. A comparison with the corresponding mapping from a ground state of the (three-dimensional) Hooke's atom in the absence of a magnetic field is also made.

  3. The analysis of dose-response curve from bioassays with quantal response: Deterministic or statistical approaches?

    PubMed

    Mougabure-Cueto, G; Sfara, V

    2016-04-25

    Dose-response relations can be obtained from systems at any structural level of biological matter, from the molecular to the organismic level. There are two types of approaches for analyzing dose-response curves: a deterministic approach, based on the law of mass action, and a statistical approach, based on the assumed probabilities distribution of phenotypic characters. Models based on the law of mass action have been proposed to analyze dose-response relations across the entire range of biological systems. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the principles that determine the dose-response relations. Dose-response curves of simple systems are the result of chemical interactions between reacting molecules, and therefore are supported by the law of mass action. In consequence, the shape of these curves is perfectly sustained by physicochemical features. However, dose-response curves of bioassays with quantal response are not explained by the simple collision of molecules but by phenotypic variations among individuals and can be interpreted as individual tolerances. The expression of tolerance is the result of many genetic and environmental factors and thus can be considered a random variable. In consequence, the shape of its associated dose-response curve has no physicochemical bearings; instead, they are originated from random biological variations. Due to the randomness of tolerance there is no reason to use deterministic equations for its analysis; on the contrary, statistical models are the appropriate tools for analyzing these dose-response relations. PMID:26952004

  4. Wave Function Arbitrariness of Noninteracting Fermion Model in Quantal Density Functional Theory^1(QDFT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamet, Marlina; Sahni, Viraht

    2006-03-01

    In the QDFT mapping from a ground or excited state of the interacting system to one of noninteracting fermions in a particular excited state with equivalent density, there is an arbitrariness in the wave function of the model system. For example, in the case of a two-electron atom, the mapping to the excited singlet 2^1S state of the model system, there are three wave functions that lead to the same density: two single Slater determinants of the orbitals that are eigen functions of only Sz, and a linear combination of Slater determinants of these orbitals that is an eigen function of both Sz and S^2. Neither of the wave functions is more appropriate than the other, since all three wave functions deliver the same density. However, based on the choice of wave function, the structure of the corresponding Fermi and Coulomb holes, and therefore the values of the resulting Pauli and Coulomb correlation energies, will differ. Their sum, the Fermi-Coulomb holes, and the Pauli-Coulomb energy, remains unchanged. The wave function arbitrariness will be demonstrated via the Hooke's atom.1 Quantal Density Functional Theory, V. Sahni (Springer-Verlag, 2004).

  5. Surface modification of carbon fibers by a polyether sulfone emulsion sizing for increased interfacial adhesion with polyether sulfone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Haojie; Zhang, Shouchun; Lu, Chunxiang

    2014-10-01

    Interests on carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites are growing rapidly, but the challenges with poor interfacial adhesion have slowed their adoption. In this work, a polyether sulfone (PES) emulsion sizing was prepared successfully for increased interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. To obtain a high-quality PES emulsion sizing, the key factor, emulsifier concentration, was studied by dynamic light scattering technique. The results demonstrated that the suitable weight ratio of PES to emulsifier was 8:3, and the resulting PES emulsion sizing had an average particle diameter of 117 nm and Zeta potential of -52.6 mV. After sizing, the surface oxygen-containing functional groups, free energy and wettability of carbon fibers increased significantly, which were advantageous to promote molecular-level contact between carbon fiber and PES. Finally, short beam shear tests were performed to evaluate the interfacial adhesion of carbon fiber/PES composites. The results indicated that PES emulsion sizing played a critical role for the enhanced interfacial adhesion in carbon fiber/PES composites, and a 26% increase of interlaminar shear strength was achieved, because of the improved fiber surface wettability and interfacial compatibility between carbon fiber and PES.

  6. Reduced salivary gland size and increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells in DLK1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Gallastegui, P; Luzuriaga, J; Aurrekoetxea, M; Baladrón, V; Ruiz-Hidalgo, M J; García-Ramírez, J J; Laborda, J; Unda, F; Ibarretxe, G

    2016-06-01

    DLK1 (PREF1, pG2, or FA1) is a transmembrane and secreted protein containing epidermal growth factor-like repeats. Dlk1 expression is abundant in many tissues during embryonic and fetal development and is believed to play an important role in the regulation of tissue differentiation and fetal growth. After birth, Dlk1 expression is abolished in most tissues but is possibly reactivated to regulate stem cell activation and responses to injury. We have recently reported that DLK1 regulates many aspects of salivary gland organogenesis. Here, we have extended our studies of the salivary gland phenotype of Dlk1 knock-out mice. We have observed that salivary glands are smaller and weigh significantly less in both Dlk1 knock-out males and females compared with gender and age-matched wild-type mice and regardless of the natural sexual dimorphism in rodent salivary glands. This reduced size correlates with a reduced capacity of Dlk1-deficient mice to secrete saliva after stimulation with pilocarpine. However, histological and ultrastructural analyses of both adult and developing salivary gland tissues have revealed no defects in Dlk1 ((-/-)) mice, indicating that genetic compensation accounts for the relatively mild salivary phenotype in these animals. Finally, despite their lack of severe anomalies, we have found that salivary glands from Dlk1-deficient mice present a higher amount of CK14-positive epithelial progenitors at various developmental stages, suggesting a role for DLK1 in the regulation of salivary epithelial stem cell balance.

  7. Male reproductive success increases with alliance size in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus).

    PubMed

    Wiszniewski, Joanna; Corrigan, Shannon; Beheregaray, Luciano B; Möller, Luciana M

    2012-03-01

    1. Determining the extent of variation in male mating strategies and reproductive success is necessary to understand the fitness benefits of social and cooperative behaviour. 2. This study assesses the reproductive success of male Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins in a small embayment population where different behavioural strategies of males have previously been identified. Parentage for 44 sampled calves was examined using 23 microsatellite loci and one mitochondrial DNA marker. Our candidate parent pool of 70 males and 64 females contained individuals sampled from both the embayment and adjacent coastal populations. 3. A moderate level of polygyny was detected in our sample. We assigned paternity of 23 calves to 12 males at the strict 95% confidence level and an additional nine calves to two males at the 80% confidence level. The majority (92%) of successful males were identified as residents to the embayment, and 46% of offspring were located within the same social group or community as their father. 4. Our results suggest that the size of alliances was the best predictor of reproductive success for males in this population, while the strength of association among allied males, alliance stability and male ranging patterns had little influence. In line with predictions for male alliances formed between unrelated individuals, we found that reproductive skew within alliances was not large. 5. Together, our genetic and behavioural analyses demonstrate that alliance formation between male dolphins is a successful strategy to enhance reproductive output.

  8. Hindlimb muscle fibre size and glycogen stores in bank voles with increased aerobic exercise metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jaromin, Ewa; Wyszkowska, Julia; Labecka, Anna Maria; Sadowska, Edyta Teresa; Koteja, Paweł

    2016-02-01

    To test hypotheses concerning physiological factors limiting the rate of aerobic exercise metabolism, we used a unique experimental evolution model: lines of bank voles selected for high swim-induced aerobic metabolism (A) and unselected, control lines (C). We investigated putative adaptations that result in the increased performance of the hindlimb muscle (gastrocnemius joined with plantaris). The body mass-adjusted muscle mass was higher in A-lines (0.093 g) than in C-lines (0.083 g; P=0.01). However, selection did not affect mean muscle fibre cross-sectional area (P=0.34) or glycogen content assessed with a histochemical periodic acid-Schiff reaction (PAS; P=0.82). The results suggest that the increased aerobic performance is achieved by an increase of total muscle mass, without major qualitative changes in the muscle fibre architecture. However, such a conclusion should be treated with caution, because other modifications, such as increased density of capillaries or mitochondria, could occur. PMID:26685167

  9. Investigating the Efficacy of a Preschool Vocabulary Intervention Designed to Increase Vocabulary Size and Conceptual Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Julie C.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation study investigated the efficacy of a supplementary preschool embedded multimedia curriculum that was designed to increase one type of conceptual knowledge: taxonomic categories. Named the World of Words (WOW), this curriculum focused on teaching the properties and concepts associated with seven taxonomic categories and providing…

  10. Exploring the Relationship between Receptive and Productive Vocabulary Sizes and Their Increased Use by Azerbaijani English Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hajiyeva, Konul

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on the results of two studies on receptive and productive vocabulary knowledge of first-year English majors in an English-medium degree programme. The aim of the study is to answer these research questions: (1) to what extent do the receptive and productive vocabulary sizes of English majors increase after a year of…

  11. Reduced salivary gland size and increased presence of epithelial progenitor cells in DLK1-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    García-Gallastegui, P; Luzuriaga, J; Aurrekoetxea, M; Baladrón, V; Ruiz-Hidalgo, M J; García-Ramírez, J J; Laborda, J; Unda, F; Ibarretxe, G

    2016-06-01

    DLK1 (PREF1, pG2, or FA1) is a transmembrane and secreted protein containing epidermal growth factor-like repeats. Dlk1 expression is abundant in many tissues during embryonic and fetal development and is believed to play an important role in the regulation of tissue differentiation and fetal growth. After birth, Dlk1 expression is abolished in most tissues but is possibly reactivated to regulate stem cell activation and responses to injury. We have recently reported that DLK1 regulates many aspects of salivary gland organogenesis. Here, we have extended our studies of the salivary gland phenotype of Dlk1 knock-out mice. We have observed that salivary glands are smaller and weigh significantly less in both Dlk1 knock-out males and females compared with gender and age-matched wild-type mice and regardless of the natural sexual dimorphism in rodent salivary glands. This reduced size correlates with a reduced capacity of Dlk1-deficient mice to secrete saliva after stimulation with pilocarpine. However, histological and ultrastructural analyses of both adult and developing salivary gland tissues have revealed no defects in Dlk1 ((-/-)) mice, indicating that genetic compensation accounts for the relatively mild salivary phenotype in these animals. Finally, despite their lack of severe anomalies, we have found that salivary glands from Dlk1-deficient mice present a higher amount of CK14-positive epithelial progenitors at various developmental stages, suggesting a role for DLK1 in the regulation of salivary epithelial stem cell balance. PMID:26711912

  12. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A D; Rhile, Erika C; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S

    2009-03-31

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915-1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated. PMID:19307561

  13. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Jonathan A D; Rhile, Erika C; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S

    2009-03-31

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915-1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated.

  14. An intertidal snail shows a dramatic size increase over the past century

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jonathan A. D.; Rhile, Erika C.; Liu, Harrison; Petraitis, Peter S.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the shell architecture of marine snails enhance defenses and greatly improve survival against predators. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, shorter and thicker shells have been reported for several species following the introduction of predatory Carcinus maenas crabs early in the 20th century. But we report that the shell lengths of Nucella lapillus actually increased by an average of 22.6% over the past century, with no evidence of shell thickening after correcting for shell length. The increases in shell length were greatest on sheltered shores, highlighting the interaction between wave exposure and the sampling period. Comparisons were based on archived shells collected in 1915–1922 from sites that were resampled in 2007. N. lapillus is an important member of North Atlantic marine ecosystems, and our results suggest that the impacts of historical changes in species' key morphological traits on marine ecosystems remain underappreciated. PMID:19307561

  15. The ectopic expression of the wheat Puroindoline genes increase germ size and seed oil content in transgenic corn.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinrui; Martin, John M; Beecher, Brian; Lu, Chaofu; Hannah, L Curtis; Wall, Michael L; Altosaar, Illimar; Giroux, Michael J

    2010-11-01

    Plant oil content and composition improvement is a major goal of plant breeding and biotechnology. The Puroindoline a and b (PINA and PINB) proteins together control whether wheat seeds are soft or hard textured and share a similar structure to that of plant non-specific lipid-transfer proteins. Here we transformed corn (Zea mays L.) with the wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) puroindoline genes (Pina and Pinb) to assess their effects upon seed oil content and quality. Pina and Pinb coding sequences were introduced into corn under the control of a corn Ubiquitin promoter. Three Pina/Pinb expression positive transgenic events were evaluated over two growing seasons. The results showed that Pin expression increased germ size significantly without negatively impacting seed size. Germ yield increased 33.8% while total seed oil content was increased by 25.23%. Seed oil content increases were primarily the result of increased germ size. This work indicates that higher oil content corn hybrids having increased food or feed value could be produced via puroindoline expression.

  16. Genetic factors associated with population size may increase extinction risks and decrease colonization potential in a keystone tropical pine

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Rafael F; Trujillo-Argueta, Sonia; Sánchez-Vargas, Nahúm; Newton, Adrian C

    2011-01-01

    Pioneer species are essential for forest regeneration and ecosystem resilience. Pinus chiapensis is an endangered pioneer key species for tropical montane cloud forest regeneration in Mesoamerica. Human activities have severely reduced some P. chiapensis populations, which exhibited a small or null colonization potential suggesting the involvement of genetic factors associated with small populations. We explored the relationships between (i) population genetic diversity (allozymes) and population size, including sampling size effects, (ii) fitness estimates associated with colonization potential (seed viability and seedling performance) in a common environment and population size, and (iii) fitness estimates and observed heterozygosity in populations with sizes spanning five orders of magnitude. All the estimates of genetic diversity and fitness increased significantly with population size. Low fitness was detected in progenies of small populations of disturbed and undisturbed habitats. Progenies with the lowest observed heterozygosity displayed the lowest fitness estimates, which, in turn, increased with heterozygosity, but seed viability peaked at intermediate heterozygosity values suggesting inbreeding and outbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression appears to be the most immediate genetic factor in population decline. Conservation efforts should try to maintain large and genetically diverse populations, enhance gene flow by restoring connectivity between adjacent populations, and avoid genetically distant individuals. PMID:25568006

  17. Increase of Cloud Droplet Size with Aerosol Optical Depth: An Observational and Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Tianle; Li, Zhanqing; Zhang, Renyi; Fan, Jiwen

    2008-02-21

    Cloud droplet effective radius (DER) is generally negatively correlated with aerosol optical depth (AOD) as a proxy of cloud condensation nuclei. In this study, cases of positive correlation were found over certain portions of the world by analyzing the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite products, together with a general finding that DER may increase or decrease with aerosol loading depending on environmental conditions. The slope of the correlation between DER and AOD is driven primarily by water vapor amount, which explains 70% of the variance in our study. Various potential artifacts that may cause the positive relation are investigated including water vapor swelling, partially cloudy, atmospheric dynamics, cloud three-dimensional (3-D) and surface influence effects. None seems to be the primary cause for the observed phenomenon, although a certain degree of influence exists for some of the factors. Analyses are conducted over seven regions around the world representing different types of aerosols and clouds. Only two regions show positive dependence of DER on AOD, near coasts of the Gulf of Mexico and South China Sea, which implies physical processes may at work. Using a 2-D spectral-bin microphysics Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) which incorporated a reformulation of the Köhler theory, two possible physical mechanisms are hypothesized. They are related to the effects of slightly soluble organics (SSO) particles and giant CCNs. Model simulations show a positive correlation between DER and AOD, due to a decrease in activated aerosols with an increasing SSO content. Addition of a few giant CCNs also increases the DER. Further investigations are needed to fully understand and clarify the observed phenomenon.

  18. Alternative reproductive tactics increase effective population size and decrease inbreeding in wild Atlantic salmon

    PubMed Central

    Perrier, Charles; Normandeau, Éric; Dionne, Mélanie; Richard, Antoine; Bernatchez, Louis

    2014-01-01

    While nonanadromous males (stream-resident and/or mature male parr) contribute to reproduction in anadromous salmonids, little is known about their impacts on key population genetic parameters. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Atlantic salmon mature male parr to the effective number of breeders (Nb) using both demographic (variance in reproductive success) and genetic (linkage disequilibrium) methods, the number of alleles, and the relatedness among breeders. We used a recently published pedigree reconstruction of a wild anadromous Atlantic salmon population in which 2548 fry born in 2010 were assigned parentage to 144 anadromous female and 101 anadromous females that returned to the river to spawn in 2009 and to 462 mature male parr. Demographic and genetic methods revealed that mature male parr increased population Nb by 1.79 and 1.85 times, respectively. Moreover, mature male parr boosted the number of alleles found among progenies. Finally, mature male parr were in average less related to anadromous females than were anadromous males, likely because of asynchronous sexual maturation between mature male parr and anadromous fish of a given cohort. By increasing Nb and allelic richness, and by decreasing inbreeding, the reproductive contribution of mature male parr has important evolutionary and conservation implications for declining Atlantic salmon populations. PMID:25553070

  19. Alternative reproductive tactics increase effective population size and decrease inbreeding in wild Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Perrier, Charles; Normandeau, Éric; Dionne, Mélanie; Richard, Antoine; Bernatchez, Louis

    2014-11-01

    While nonanadromous males (stream-resident and/or mature male parr) contribute to reproduction in anadromous salmonids, little is known about their impacts on key population genetic parameters. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Atlantic salmon mature male parr to the effective number of breeders (Nb) using both demographic (variance in reproductive success) and genetic (linkage disequilibrium) methods, the number of alleles, and the relatedness among breeders. We used a recently published pedigree reconstruction of a wild anadromous Atlantic salmon population in which 2548 fry born in 2010 were assigned parentage to 144 anadromous female and 101 anadromous females that returned to the river to spawn in 2009 and to 462 mature male parr. Demographic and genetic methods revealed that mature male parr increased population Nb by 1.79 and 1.85 times, respectively. Moreover, mature male parr boosted the number of alleles found among progenies. Finally, mature male parr were in average less related to anadromous females than were anadromous males, likely because of asynchronous sexual maturation between mature male parr and anadromous fish of a given cohort. By increasing Nb and allelic richness, and by decreasing inbreeding, the reproductive contribution of mature male parr has important evolutionary and conservation implications for declining Atlantic salmon populations.

  20. Testing for Depéret's Rule (Body Size Increase) in Mammals using Combined Extinct and Extant Data

    PubMed Central

    Bokma, Folmer; Godinot, Marc; Maridet, Olivier; Ladevèze, Sandrine; Costeur, Loïc; Solé, Floréal; Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Peigné, Stéphane; Jacques, Florian; Laurin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not evolutionary lineages in general show a tendency to increase in body size has often been discussed. This tendency has been dubbed “Cope's rule” but because Cope never hypothesized it, we suggest renaming it after Depéret, who formulated it clearly in 1907. Depéret's rule has traditionally been studied using fossil data, but more recently a number of studies have used present-day species. While several paleontological studies of Cenozoic placental mammals have found support for increasing body size, most studies of extant placentals have failed to detect such a trend. Here, we present a method to combine information from present-day species with fossil data in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. We apply the method to body mass estimates of a large number of extant and extinct mammal species, and find strong support for Depéret's rule. The tendency for size increase appears to be driven not by evolution toward larger size in established species, but by processes related to the emergence of new species. Our analysis shows that complementary data from extant and extinct species can greatly improve inference of macroevolutionary processes. PMID:26508768

  1. Testing for Depéret's Rule (Body Size Increase) in Mammals using Combined Extinct and Extant Data.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Folmer; Godinot, Marc; Maridet, Olivier; Ladevèze, Sandrine; Costeur, Loïc; Solé, Floréal; Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Peigné, Stéphane; Jacques, Florian; Laurin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not evolutionary lineages in general show a tendency to increase in body size has often been discussed. This tendency has been dubbed "Cope's rule" but because Cope never hypothesized it, we suggest renaming it after Depéret, who formulated it clearly in 1907. Depéret's rule has traditionally been studied using fossil data, but more recently a number of studies have used present-day species. While several paleontological studies of Cenozoic placental mammals have found support for increasing body size, most studies of extant placentals have failed to detect such a trend. Here, we present a method to combine information from present-day species with fossil data in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. We apply the method to body mass estimates of a large number of extant and extinct mammal species, and find strong support for Depéret's rule. The tendency for size increase appears to be driven not by evolution toward larger size in established species, but by processes related to the emergence of new species. Our analysis shows that complementary data from extant and extinct species can greatly improve inference of macroevolutionary processes. PMID:26508768

  2. Testing for Depéret's Rule (Body Size Increase) in Mammals using Combined Extinct and Extant Data.

    PubMed

    Bokma, Folmer; Godinot, Marc; Maridet, Olivier; Ladevèze, Sandrine; Costeur, Loïc; Solé, Floréal; Gheerbrant, Emmanuel; Peigné, Stéphane; Jacques, Florian; Laurin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Whether or not evolutionary lineages in general show a tendency to increase in body size has often been discussed. This tendency has been dubbed "Cope's rule" but because Cope never hypothesized it, we suggest renaming it after Depéret, who formulated it clearly in 1907. Depéret's rule has traditionally been studied using fossil data, but more recently a number of studies have used present-day species. While several paleontological studies of Cenozoic placental mammals have found support for increasing body size, most studies of extant placentals have failed to detect such a trend. Here, we present a method to combine information from present-day species with fossil data in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. We apply the method to body mass estimates of a large number of extant and extinct mammal species, and find strong support for Depéret's rule. The tendency for size increase appears to be driven not by evolution toward larger size in established species, but by processes related to the emergence of new species. Our analysis shows that complementary data from extant and extinct species can greatly improve inference of macroevolutionary processes.

  3. Cryptococcus neoformans responds to mannitol by increasing capsule size in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Allan Jefferson; Frases, Susana; Cordero, Radamés J B; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D

    2010-06-01

    The polysaccharide capsule of the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is its main virulence factor. In this study, we determined the effects of mannitol and glucose on the capsule and exopolysaccharide production. Growth in mannitol significantly increased capsular volume compared with cultivation in glucose. However, cells grown in glucose concentrations higher than 62.5 mM produced more exopolysaccharide than cells grown in mannitol. The fibre lengths and glycosyl composition of capsular polysaccharide from yeast grown in mannitol was structurally different from that of yeast grown in glucose. Furthermore, mannitol treatment of mice infected intratracheally with C. neoformans resulted in fungal cells with significantly larger capsules and the mice had reduced fungal dissemination to the brain. Our results demonstrate the capacity of carbohydrate source and concentration to modify the expression of a major virulence factor of C. neoformans. These findings may impact the clinical management of cryptococcosis.

  4. Cryptococcus neoformans responds to mannitol by increasing capsule size in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Allan Jefferson; Frases, Susana; Cordero, Radamés J. B.; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Casadevall, Arturo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2010-01-01

    The polysaccharide capsule of the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is its main virulence factor. In this study, we determined the effects of mannitol and glucose on the capsule and exopolysaccharide production. Growth in mannitol significantly increased capsular volume compared to cultivation in glucose. However, cells grown in glucose concentrations higher than 62.5mM produced more exopolysaccharide than cells grown in mannitol. The fiber lengths and glycosyl composition of capsular polysaccharide from yeast grown in mannitol was structurally different from that of yeast grown in glucose. Furthermore, mannitol treatment of mice infected intratracheally with C. neoformans resulted in fungal cells with significantly larger capsules and the mice had reduced fungal dissemination to the brain. Our results demonstrate the capacity of carbohydrate source and concentration to modify the expression of a major virulence factor of C. neoformans. These findings may impact the clinical management of cryptococcosis. PMID:20070311

  5. Menopausal hormone therapy and breast cancer: what is the true size of the increased risk?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael E; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Wright, Lauren; McFadden, Emily; Griffin, James; Thomas, Dawn; Hemming, Jane; Wright, Karen; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Background: Menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) increases breast cancer risk; however, most cohort studies omit MHT use after enrolment and many infer menopausal age. Methods: We used information from serial questionnaires from the UK Generations Study cohort to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for breast cancer among post-menopausal women with known menopausal age, and examined biases induced when not updating data on MHT use and including women with inferred menopausal age. Results: Among women recruited in 2003–2009, at 6 years of follow-up, 58 148 had reached menopause and 96% had completed a follow-up questionnaire. Among 39 183 women with known menopausal age, 775 developed breast cancer, and the HR in relation to current oestrogen plus progestogen MHT use (based on 52 current oestrogen plus progestogen MHT users in breast cancer cases) relative to those with no previous MHT use was 2.74 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.05–3.65) for a median duration of 5.4 years of current use, reaching 3.27 (95% CI: 1.53–6.99) at 15+ years of use. The excess HR was underestimated by 53% if oestrogen plus progestogen MHT use was not updated after recruitment, 13% if women with uncertain menopausal age were included, and 59% if both applied. The HR for oestrogen-only MHT was not increased (HR=1.00; 95% CI: 0.66–1.54). Conclusions: Lack of updating MHT status through follow-up and inclusion of women with inferred menopausal age is likely to result in substantial underestimation of the excess relative risks for oestrogen plus progestogen MHT use in studies with long follow-up, limited updating of exposures, and changing or short durations of use. PMID:27467055

  6. Scaling of metabolism in Helix aspersa snails: changes through ontogeny and response to selection for increased size.

    PubMed

    Czarnołeski, Marcin; Kozłowski, Jan; Dumiot, Guillaume; Bonnet, Jean-Claude; Mallard, Jacques; Dupont-Nivet, Mathilde

    2008-02-01

    Though many are convinced otherwise, variability of the size-scaling of metabolism is widespread in nature, and the factors driving that remain unknown. Here we test a hypothesis that the increased expenditure associated with faster growth increases metabolic scaling. We compare metabolic scaling in the fast- and slow-growth phases of ontogeny of Helix aspersa snails artificially selected or not selected for increased adult size. The selected line evolved larger egg and adult sizes and a faster size-specific growth rate, without a change in the developmental rate. Both lines had comparable food consumption but the selected snails grew more efficiently and had lower metabolism early in ontogeny. Attainment of lower metabolism was accompanied by decreased shell production, indicating that the increased growth was fuelled partly at the expense of shell production. As predicted, the scaling of oxygen consumption with body mass was isometric or nearly isometric in the fast-growing (early) ontogenetic stage, and it became negatively allometric in the slow-growing (late) stage; metabolic scaling tended to be steeper in selected (fast-growing) than in control (slow-growing) snails; this difference disappeared later in ontogeny. Differences in metabolic scaling were not related to shifts in the scaling of metabolically inert shell. Our results support the view that changes in metabolic scaling through ontogeny and the variability of metabolic scaling between organisms can be affected by differential growth rates. We stress that future approaches to this phenomenon should consider the metabolic effects of cell size changes which underlie shifts in the growth pattern.

  7. Testosterone increases repertoire size in an open-ended learner: an experimental study using adult male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Van Hout, Alain J-M; Pinxten, Rianne; Darras, Veerle M; Eens, Marcel

    2012-11-01

    Song in songbirds is a learned secondary sexual behavior, first acquired during a sensitive phase of juvenile development, which is affected by hormones such as testosterone (T). While the latter has received much attention, the potential involvement of T in the adult repertoire changes observed in a number of species is much less understood. Yet, this may prove essential to understand the role of song as a sexually selected trait. We therefore performed a T-implantation experiment during the non-breeding season (when T is basal), using adult male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), a songbird species in which song repertoire size (and composition) changes seasonally and increases with age. Repertoire size increased rapidly in T-males, but not in control males, indicating a role for T in repertoire size changes. This increase resulted from a lower proportion of dropped song types in T-males than in control males, while the proportion of added song types did not differ between both groups. Interestingly, the observed repertoire turnover (adding and removing song types from the repertoire) in both groups, suggests that elevated plasma T levels were not essential for changes in repertoire composition (contrary to repertoire size). Finally, T-males (but not control males) significantly increased their song rate, while neither group showed a significant change in their song bout length and phrase repetition rate. Taken together, our results suggest a role for T in adult song learning and provide new insights into the information content of repertoire size and song bout length as sexually selected traits. PMID:23036784

  8. Extinction reverses olfactory fear-conditioned increases in neuron number and glomerular size.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Filomene G; Dias, Brian G; Ressler, Kerry J

    2015-10-13

    Although much work has investigated the contribution of brain regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and prefrontal cortex to the processing of fear learning and memory, fewer studies have examined the role of sensory systems, in particular the olfactory system, in the detection and perception of cues involved in learning and memory. The primary sensory receptive field maps of the olfactory system are exquisitely organized and respond dynamically to cues in the environment, remaining plastic from development through adulthood. We have previously demonstrated that olfactory fear conditioning leads to increased odorant-specific receptor representation in the main olfactory epithelium and in glomeruli within the olfactory bulb. We now demonstrate that olfactory extinction training specific to the conditioned odor stimulus reverses the conditioning-associated freezing behavior and odor learning-induced structural changes in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb in an odorant ligand-specific manner. These data suggest that learning-induced freezing behavior, structural alterations, and enhanced neural sensory representation can be reversed in adult mice following extinction training.

  9. Symbiotic bacteria contribute to increasing the population size of a freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Tsukada, Koji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    The filter-feeding crustacean Daphnia is a key organism in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we report the effect of symbiotic bacteria on ecologically important life history traits, such as population dynamics and longevity, in Daphnia magna. By disinfection of the daphniid embryos with glutaraldehyde, aposymbiotic daphniids were prepared and cultured under bacteria-free conditions. Removal of bacteria from the daphniids was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The population of aposymbiotic daphniids was reduced 10-folds compared with that of the control daphniids. Importantly, re-infection with symbiotic bacteria caused daphniids to regain bacteria and increase their fecundity to the level of the control daphniids, suggesting that symbiotic bacteria regulate Daphnia fecundity. To identify the species of symbiotic bacteria, 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in daphniids were sequenced. This revealed that 50% of sequences belonged to the Limnohabitans sp. of the Betaproteobacteria class and that the diversity of bacterial taxa was relatively low. These results suggested that symbiotic bacteria have a beneficial effect on D. magna, and that aposymbiotic Daphnia are useful tools in understanding the role of symbiotic bacteria in the environmental responses and evolution of their hosts.

  10. Anabolic steroids activate calcineurin-NFAT signaling and thereby increase myotube size and reduce denervation atrophy.

    PubMed

    Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Wu, Yong; Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgens have been shown to reduce muscle loss due to immobilization, paralysis and many other medical conditions, but the molecular basis for these actions is poorly understood. We have recently demonstrated that nandrolone, a synthetic androgen, slows muscle atrophy after nerve transection associated with down-regulation of regulator of calcineurin 2 (RCAN2), a calcineurin inhibitor, suggesting a possible role of calcineurin-NFAT signaling. To test this possibility, rat gastrocnemius muscle was analyzed at 56 days after denervation. In denervated muscle, calcineurin activity declined and NFATc4 was excluded from the nucleus and these effects were reversed by nandrolone. Similarly, nandrolone increased calcineurin activity and nuclear NFATc4 levels in cultured L6 myotubes. Nandrolone also induced cell hypertrophy that was blocked by cyclosporin A or overexpression of RCAN2. Finally protection against denervation atrophy by nandrolone in rats was blocked by cyclosporin A. These results demonstrate for the first time that nandrolone activates calcineurin-NFAT signaling, and that such signaling is important in nandrolone-induced cell hypertrophy and protection against paralysis-induced muscle atrophy.

  11. Bed disturbance via foraging fish increases bedload transport during subsequent high flows and is controlled by fish size and species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pledger, A. G.; Rice, S. P.; Millett, J.

    2016-01-01

    Benthic foraging by fish can modify the nature and rates of fine sediment accrual and the structure and topography of coarse-grained fluvial substrates, with the potential to alter bed material characteristics, particle entrainment thresholds, and bedload transport fluxes. However, knowledge of what controls the nature, extent, and intensity of benthic foraging and the consequent influence of these controls on geomorphic impact remain rudimentary. An ex-situ experiment utilising Barbel Barbus barbus and Chub Leuciscus cephalus extended previous work by considering the role of fish size and species as controls of sediment disturbance by foraging and the implications for bed material characteristics and bedload transport. In a laboratory flume, changes in bed microtopography and structure were measured when a water-worked bed of 5.6-22.6 mm gravels was exposed to four size classes of Barbel (4-5″, 5-6″, 6-8″, 8-10″ in length) and a single size class of Chub (8-10″). In line with other studies that have investigated animal size as a control of zoogeomorphic agency, increasing the size of Barbel had a significant effect on measured disturbance and transport metrics. Specifically, the area of disturbed substrate, foraging depth, and the fish's impact on microtopographic roughness and imbrication all increased as a function of fish size. In a comparison of the foraging effects of like-sized Barbel and Chub, 8-10″ in length, Barbel foraged a larger area of the test bed and had a greater impact on microtopographic roughness and sediment structure. Relative to water-worked beds that were not foraged, bed conditioning by both species was associated with increased bedload transport during the subsequent application of high flows. However, the bedload flux after foraging by Barbel, which is a specialist benthivore, was 150% higher than that following foraging by Chub, which feed opportunistically from the bed, and the total transported mass of sediment was 98

  12. Recovery of Aging-Related Size Increase of Skin Epithelial Cells: In vivo Mouse and In vitro Human Study

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20–40% for cells of older passage (6–8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin. PMID:25807526

  13. Awns reduce grain number to increase grain size and harvestable yield in irrigated and rainfed spring wheat

    PubMed Central

    Rebetzke, G. J.; Bonnett, D. G.; Reynolds, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Genotypic variation in ear morphology is linked to differences in photosynthetic potential to influence grain yield in winter cereals. Awns contribute to photosynthesis, particularly under water-limited conditions when canopy assimilation is restricted. We assessed performance of up to 45 backcross-derived, awned–awnletted NILs representing four diverse genetic backgrounds in 25 irrigated or rainfed, and droughted environments in Australia and Mexico. Mean environment grain yields were wide-ranging (1.38–7.93 t ha−1) with vegetative and maturity biomass, plant height, anthesis date, spike number, and harvest index all similar (P >0.05) for awned and awnletted NILs. Overall, grain yields of awned–awnletted sister-NILs were equivalent, irrespective of yield potential and genetic background. Awnletted wheats produced significantly more grains per unit area (+4%) and per spike (+5%) reflecting more fertile spikelets and grains in tertiary florets. Increases in grain number were compensated for by significant reductions in grain size (–5%) and increased frequency (+0.8%) of small, shrivelled grains (‘screenings’) to reduce seed-lot quality of awnletted NILs. Post-anthesis canopies of awnletted NILs were marginally warmer over all environments (+0.27 °C) but were not different and were sometimes cooler than awned NILs at cooler air temperatures. Awns develop early and represented up to 40% of total spikelet biomass prior to ear emergence. We hypothesize that the allocation of assimilate to large and rapidly developing awns decreases spikelet number and floret fertility to reduce grain number, particularly in distal florets. Individual grain size is increased to reduce screenings and to increase test weight and milling quality, particularly in droughted environments. Despite the average reduction in grain size, awnless lines could be identified that combined higher grain yield with larger grain size, increased grain protein concentration, and reduced

  14. Increased Selection Response in Larger Populations. I. Selection for Wing-Tip Height in Drosophila Melanogaster at Three Population Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. E.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of population size on selection response was investigated with replicated selection lines of 40, 200 and 1000 selected parents, using Drosophila melanogaster homozygous for the mutant raised. Selection for increased wing-tip height was carried out for 55 generations, with an average selection intensity of 0.6 standard deviation. The rank order of responses in the seven individual lines was significantly in order of population size, and the variance of response among lines showed a significant effect of population size. The final mean responses (selected - controls, +/- standard errors) in the three treatments, in order of increasing population size, were 8.6 +/- 1.8 mils (three small lines), 15.1 +/- 1.3 mils (two medium lines), and 19.8 +/- 1.5 mils (two large lines). The differences between treatments seem to have emerged too rapidly to be the result of mutations, and are probably due mainly to the utilization of existing variation with greater efficiency by selection in larger populations. PMID:2116358

  15. Rheotaxis performance increases with group size in a coupled phase model with sensory noise. The effects of noise and group size on rheotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chicoli, A.; Bak-Coleman, J.; Coombs, S.; Paley, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    Many fish exhibit rheotaxis, a behavior in which fish orient themselves relative to flow. Rheotaxis confers many benefits, including energetic cost savings and interception of drifting prey. Despite the fact that most species of fish school during at least some portion of their life, little is known about the importance of rheotactic behavior to schooling fish and, conversely, how the presence of nearby conspecifics affects rheotactic behavior. Understanding how rheotaxis is modified by social factors is thus of ecological importance. Here we present a mathematical model in the form of an all-to-all, coupled-oscillator framework over the non-Euclidean space of fish orientations to model group rheotactic behavior. Individuals in the model measure the orientation of their neighbors and the flow direction relative to their own orientation. These measures are corrupted by sensory noise. We study the effect of sensory noise and group size on internal (i.e., within the school) and external (i.e., with the flow) disagreement in orientation. We find that under noisy environmental conditions, increased group size improves rheotaxis. Results of this study have implications for understanding animal behavior, as well as for potential applications in bio-inspired engineering.

  16. Enhanced magnetic resonance imaging and staining of cancer cells using ferrimagnetic H-ferritin nanoparticles with increasing core size

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yao; Cao, Changqian; He, Xiaoqing; Yang, Caiyun; Tian, Lanxiang; Zhu, Rixiang; Pan, Yongxin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study is to demonstrate the nanoscale size effect of ferrimagnetic H-ferritin (M-HFn) nanoparticles on magnetic properties, relaxivity, enzyme mimetic activities, and application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunohistochemical staining of cancer cells. Materials and methods M-HFn nanoparticles with different sizes of magnetite cores in the range of 2.7–5.3 nm were synthesized through loading different amounts of iron into recombinant human H chain ferritin (HFn) shells. Core size, crystallinity, and magnetic properties of those M-HFn nanoparticles were analyzed by transmission electron microscope and low-temperature magnetic measurements. The MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were incubated with synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles for 24 hours in Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium. In vitro MRI of cell pellets after M-HFn labeling was performed at 7 T. Iron uptake of cells was analyzed by Prussian blue staining and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Immunohistochemical staining by using the peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles was carried out on MDA-MB-231 tumor tissue paraffin sections. Results The saturation magnetization (Ms), relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of synthesized M-HFn nanoparticles were monotonously increased with the size of ferrimagnetic cores. The M-HFn nanoparticles with the largest core size of 5.3 nm exhibit the strongest saturation magnetization, the highest peroxidase activity in immunohistochemical staining, and the highest r2 of 321 mM−1 s−1, allowing to detect MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells as low as 104 cells mL−1. Conclusion The magnetic properties, relaxivity, and peroxidase-like activity of M-HFn nanoparticles are size dependent, which indicates that M-HFn nanoparticles with larger magnetite core can significantly enhance performance in MRI and staining of cancer cells. PMID:25878496

  17. Nutrient reserves may allow for genome size increase: evidence from comparison of geophytes and their sister non-geophytic relatives

    PubMed Central

    Veselý, Pavel; Bureš, Petr; Šmarda, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims The genome size of an organism is determined by its capacity to tolerate genome expansion, given the species' life strategy and the limits of a particular environment, and the ability for retrotransposon suppression and/or removal. In some giant-genomed bulb geophytes, this tolerance is explained by their ability to pre-divide cells in the dormant stages or by the selective advantage of larger cells in the rapid growth of their fleshy body. In this study, a test shows that the tendency for genome size expansion is a more universal feature of geophytes, and is a subject in need of more general consideration. Methods Differences in monoploid genome sizes were compared using standardized phylogenetically independent contrasts in 47 sister pairs of geophytic and non-geophytic taxa sampled across all the angiosperms. The genome sizes of 96 species were adopted from the literature and 53 species were newly measured using flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. Key Results The geophytes showed increased genome sizes compared with their non-geophytic relatives, regardless of the storage organ type and regardless of whether or not vernal geophytes, polyploids or annuals were included in the analyses. Conclusions The universal tendency of geophytes to possess a higher genome size suggests the presence of a universal mechanism allowing for genome expansion. It is assumed that this is primarily due to the nutrient and energetic independence of geophytes perhaps allowing continuous synthesis of DNA, which is known to proceed in the extreme cases of vernal geophytes even in dormant stages. This independence may also be assumed as a reason for allowing large genomes in some parasitic plants, as well as the nutrient limitation of small genomes of carnivorous plants. PMID:23960044

  18. Enhanced Stomatal Conductance by a Spontaneous Arabidopsis Tetraploid, Me-0, Results from Increased Stomatal Size and Greater Stomatal Aperture.

    PubMed

    Monda, Keina; Araki, Hiromitsu; Kuhara, Satoru; Ishigaki, Genki; Akashi, Ryo; Negi, Juntaro; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Sho; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Goto, Nobuharu; Iba, Koh

    2016-03-01

    The rate of gas exchange in plants is regulated mainly by stomatal size and density. Generally, higher densities of smaller stomata are advantageous for gas exchange; however, it is unclear what the effect of an extraordinary change in stomatal size might have on a plant's gas-exchange capacity. We investigated the stomatal responses to CO2 concentration changes among 374 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes and discovered that Mechtshausen (Me-0), a natural tetraploid ecotype, has significantly larger stomata and can achieve a high stomatal conductance. We surmised that the cause of the increased stomatal conductance is tetraploidization; however, the stomatal conductance of another tetraploid accession, tetraploid Columbia (Col), was not as high as that in Me-0. One difference between these two accessions was the size of their stomatal apertures. Analyses of abscisic acid sensitivity, ion balance, and gene expression profiles suggested that physiological or genetic factors restrict the stomatal opening in tetraploid Col but not in Me-0. Our results show that Me-0 overcomes the handicap of stomatal opening that is typical for tetraploids and achieves higher stomatal conductance compared with the closely related tetraploid Col on account of larger stomatal apertures. This study provides evidence for whether larger stomatal size in tetraploids of higher plants can improve stomatal conductance. PMID:26754665

  19. An ex vivo study on radiofrequency tissue ablation: increased lesion size by using an "expandable-wet" electrode.

    PubMed

    Miao, Y; Ni, Y; Yu, J; Zhang, H; Baert, A; Marchal, G

    2001-01-01

    The present comparative study was conducted to validate a newly developed "expandable-wet" electrode for an increased lesion size of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on excised beef liver. The expandable-wet electrode, which allows interstitial hypertonic saline infusion through retractable curved needles, was compared with "expanded-dry" and "unexpanded-wet" electrodes for RFA lesion size and other parameters. A total of 120 lesions were created under 50 W (groups A-C) and 90 W (groups A'-C') power control mode for 10 min at each ablation site with the following groups: group A and A' of expanded-dry electrode (needles deployed but saline uninfused); group B and B' of unexpanded-wet electrode (saline infused but needle undeployed); and group C and C' of expanded-wet electrode (needles deployed and saline infused). Together with lower impedance and higher power output, the lesion size in group C (5.3+/-0.4 cm) and C' (6.0+/-1.0 cm) were significantly larger (P<0.01) than that in group A (3.3+/-0.3 cm) and A' (2.0+/-0.2 cm), and group B (3.8+/-1.0 cm) and B' (2.6+/-0.4 cm). The RFA lesion size can be significantly enlarged when the expandable electrode is complemented with interstitial hypertonic saline infusion. This design may improve the efficacy of RF tumor ablation.

  20. Increase of larger-sized islets in C57/black mice during the long-term space flight.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proshchina, Alexandra; Krivova, Yulia

    groups are of unequal size. The P-value was considered significant if less than 0.05. The islets in all three groups have a typical for murine pancreas architecture. The insulin-containing cells occupied the central position in pancreatic islets and the glucagon-containing cells were localized at the periphery. Histomorphometric analyses revealed significant increase of islets size in flight group compared with vivarium ground control. Moreover, the islets in group of the delayed synchronous ground control were significant larger then in group of vivarium control. No significant differences were found in islet size between flight and delayed synchronous ground control groups, but analyses indicated the increase of larger-sized islets in mice of flight group compared with synchronous control. Thus the mean islets size correlated with the body weight. The literature data indicates that similar changes are also observed in mice under conditions of an increased demand for insulin such as pregnancy, obesity, diabetes etc. According to the literature data, the researches of activity of pancreas have shown the increase of pancreatic hormones (insulin and C-peptide) in blood of astronauts in the early period after completion of space flights of various durations. In our study, the increase of islets size occurred not only in mice from flight group, but also in synchronous ground control. For this group, the live conditions imitated those of flight group without the factors of spaceflight such as microgravity. Therefore, we supposed that the hypokinesia play an important role in alteration of islets size. Thus, our data confirms the hypothesis of association microgravity and its experimental paradigms with manifestations similar to those of physical inactivity and diabetes.

  1. Increased Selection Response in Larger Populations. II. Selection for Ethanol Vapor Resistance in Drosophila Melanogaster at Two Population Sizes

    PubMed Central

    Weber, K. E.; Diggins, L. T.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of large population size on selection response was investigated using Drosophila melanogaster, with four ``small'' lines of 160 selected parents/generation compared to two ``large'' lines of 1600 selected parents/generation. All lines were selected under similar conditions at a selection intensity of approximately 0.55 standard deviations, for 65 generations, for increased ethanol vapor resistance (measured in minutes required to become anesthetized). Two unselected control lines of 320 parents/generation were also maintained. A significant effect of population size was found. The final treatment means and standard errors were: 27.91 +/- 1.28 min (two ``large'' lines); 19.40 +/- 1.54 min (four ``small'' lines); and 4.98 +/- 0.35 min (two control lines). To estimate the mutation rate for the trait, two isogenic lines of about 400 selected parents were selected for 29 generations. The mean increase in additive genetic variance per generation was 0.0009 times the initial environmental variance of the outbred lines. This is comparable to other reported mutation rates. Mutation can explain part of the difference in evolved resistance between treatments, but it appears that even at rather large population sizes, a large difference in long-term response can be obtained in larger outbred lines, from more complete utilization of the initial genetic variation. PMID:2116359

  2. Does the invasive Lupinus polyphyllus increase pollinator visitation to a native herb through effects on pollinator population sizes?

    PubMed

    Jakobsson, Anna; Padrón, Benigno

    2014-01-01

    Invasive plants may compete with native species for abiotic factors as light, space and nutrients, and have also been shown to affect native pollination interactions. Studies have mainly focused on how invasive plants affect pollinator behaviour, i.e. attraction of pollinators to or away from native flowers. However, when an invasive plant provides resources utilized by native pollinators this could increase pollinator population sizes and thereby pollination success in natives. Effects mediated through changes in pollinator population sizes have been largely ignored in previous studies, and the dominance of negative interactions suggested by meta-analyses may therefore be biased. We investigated the impact of the invasive Lupinus polyphyllus on pollination in the native Lotus corniculatus using a study design comparing invaded and uninvaded sites before and after the flowering period of the invasive. We monitored wild bee abundance in transects, and visit rate and seed production of potted Lotus plants. Bumblebee abundance increased 3.9 times in invaded sites during the study period, whereas it was unaltered in uninvaded sites. Total visit rate per Lotus plant increased 2.1 times in invaded sites and decreased 4.4 times in uninvaded sites. No corresponding change in seed production of Lotus was found. The increase in visit rate to Lotus was driven by an increase in solitary bee visitation, whereas mainly bumblebees were observed to visit the invasive Lupinus. The mechanism by which the invasive increases pollinator visit rates to Lotus could be increased availability of other flower resources for solitary bees when bumblebees forage on Lupinus.

  3. Demographic population model for American shad: will access to additional habitat upstream of dams increase population sizes?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, Julianne E.; Hightower, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    American shad Alosa sapidissima are in decline in their native range, and modeling possible management scenarios could help guide their restoration. We developed a density-dependent, deterministic, stage-based matrix model to predict the population-level results of transporting American shad to suitable spawning habitat upstream of dams on the Roanoke River, North Carolina and Virginia. We used data on sonic-tagged adult American shad and oxytetracycline-marked American shad fry both above and below dams on the Roanoke River with information from other systems to estimate a starting population size and vital rates. We modeled the adult female population over 30 years under plausible scenarios of adult transport, effective fecundity (egg production), and survival of adults (i.e., to return to spawn the next year) and juveniles (from spawned egg to age 1). We also evaluated the potential effects of increased survival for adults and juveniles. The adult female population size in the Roanoke River was estimated to be 5,224. With no transport, the model predicted a slow population increase over the next 30 years. Predicted population increases were highest when survival was improved during the first year of life. Transport was predicted to benefit the population only if high rates of effective fecundity and juvenile survival could be achieved. Currently, transported adults and young are less likely to successfully out-migrate than individuals below the dams, and the estimated adult population size is much smaller than either of two assumed values of carrying capacity for the lower river; therefore, transport is not predicted to help restore the stock under present conditions. Research on survival rates, density-dependent processes, and the impacts of structures to increase out-migration success would improve evaluation of the potential benefits of access to additional spawning habitat for American shad.

  4. Large and abundant flowers increase indirect costs of corollas: a study of coflowering sympatric Mediterranean species of contrasting flower size.

    PubMed

    Teixido, Alberto L; Valladares, Fernando

    2013-09-01

    Large floral displays receive more pollinator visits but involve higher production and maintenance costs. This can result in indirect costs which may negatively affect functions like reproductive output. In this study, we explored the relationship between floral display and indirect costs in two pairs of coflowering sympatric Mediterranean Cistus of contrasting flower size. We hypothesized that: (1) corolla production entails direct costs in dry mass, N and P, (2) corollas entail significant indirect costs in terms of fruit set and seed production, (3) indirect costs increase with floral display, (4) indirect costs are greater in larger-flowered sympatric species, and (5) local climatic conditions influence indirect costs. We compared fruit set and seed production of petal-removed flowers and unmanipulated control flowers and evaluated the influence of mean flower number and mean flower size on relative fruit and seed gain of petal-removed and control flowers. Fruit set and seed production were significantly higher in petal-removed flowers in all the studied species. A positive relationship was found between relative fruit gain and mean individual flower size within species. In one pair of species, fruit gain was higher in the large-flowered species, as was the correlation between fruit gain and mean number of open flowers. In the other pair, the correlation between fruit gain and mean flower size was also higher in the large-flowered species. These results reveal that Mediterranean environments impose significant constraints on floral display, counteracting advantages of large flowers from the pollination point of view with increased indirect costs of such flowers.

  5. Fish oil increases raft size and membrane order of B cells accompanied by differential effects on function.

    PubMed

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Melton, Mark; Williams, Justin; Wassall, Stephen R; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-04-01

    Fish oil (FO) targets lipid microdomain organization to suppress T-cell and macrophage function; however, little is known about this relationship with B cells, especially at the animal level. We previously established that a high FO dose diminished mouse B-cell lipid raft microdomain clustering induced by cross-linking GM1. To establish relevance, here we tested a FO dose modeling human intake on B-cell raft organization relative to a control. Biochemical analysis revealed more docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporated into phosphatidylcholines than phosphatidylethanolamines of detergent-resistant membranes, consistent with supporting studies with model membranes. Subsequent imaging experiments demonstrated that FO increased raft size, GM1 expression, and membrane order upon cross-linking GM1 relative to no cross-linking. Comparative in vitro studies showed some biochemical differences from in vivo measurements but overall revealed that DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), increased membrane order. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that disrupting rafts with FO would suppress B-cell responses ex vivo. FO enhanced LPS-induced B-cell activation but suppressed B-cell stimulation of transgenic naive CD4(+) T cells. Altogether, our studies with B cells support an emerging model that FO increases raft size and membrane order accompanied by functional changes; furthermore, the results highlight differences in EPA and DHA bioactivity.

  6. Fish oil increases raft size and membrane order of B cells accompanied by differential effects on function[S

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Melton, Mark; Williams, Justin; Wassall, Stephen R.; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-01-01

    Fish oil (FO) targets lipid microdomain organization to suppress T-cell and macrophage function; however, little is known about this relationship with B cells, especially at the animal level. We previously established that a high FO dose diminished mouse B-cell lipid raft microdomain clustering induced by cross-linking GM1. To establish relevance, here we tested a FO dose modeling human intake on B-cell raft organization relative to a control. Biochemical analysis revealed more docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporated into phosphatidylcholines than phosphatidylethanolamines of detergent-resistant membranes, consistent with supporting studies with model membranes. Subsequent imaging experiments demonstrated that FO increased raft size, GM1 expression, and membrane order upon cross-linking GM1 relative to no cross-linking. Comparative in vitro studies showed some biochemical differences from in vivo measurements but overall revealed that DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), increased membrane order. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that disrupting rafts with FO would suppress B-cell responses ex vivo. FO enhanced LPS-induced B-cell activation but suppressed B-cell stimulation of transgenic naive CD4+ T cells. Altogether, our studies with B cells support an emerging model that FO increases raft size and membrane order accompanied by functional changes; furthermore, the results highlight differences in EPA and DHA bioactivity. PMID:22315394

  7. Combination of PLR, MLR, MWR, and Tumor Size Could Significantly Increase the Prognostic Value for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Tian, Yangzi; Liu, Shushang; Zheng, Gaozan; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Guanghui; Guo, Man; Lian, Xiao; Fan, Daiming; Zhang, Hongwei

    2016-04-01

    combination of tumor size, MLR, PLR, and MWR could further increase the predictive value of prognosis of GISTs. PMID:27057867

  8. MicroCT and microMRI imaging of a prenatal mouse model of increased brain size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, Elisabeth K. N.; Stock, Stuart R.; Taketo, Makoto M.; Chenn, Anjen; Ravosa, Matthew J.

    2008-08-01

    There are surprisingly few experimental models of neural growth and cranial integration. This and the dearth of information regarding fetal brain development detract from a mechanistic understanding of cranial integration and its relevance to the patterning of skull form, specifically the role of encephalization on basicranial flexion. To address this shortcoming, our research uses transgenic mice expressing a stabilized form of β-catenin to isolate the effects of relative brain size on craniofacial development. These mice develop highly enlarged brains due to an increase in neural precursors, and differences between transgenic and wild-type mice are predicted to result solely from variation in brain size. Comparisons of wild-type and transgenic mice at several prenatal ages were performed using microCT (Scanco Medical MicroCT 40) and microMRI (Avance 600 WB MR spectrometer). Statistical analyses show that the larger brain of the transgenic mice is associated with a larger neurocranium and an altered basicranial morphology. However, body size and postcranial ossification do not seem to be affected by the transgene. Comparisons of the rate of postcranial and cranial ossification using microCT also point to an unexpected effect of neural growth on skull development: increased fetal encephalization may result in a compensatory decrease in the level of cranial ossification. Therefore, if other life history factors are held constant, the ontogeny of a metabolically costly structure such as a brain may occur at the expense of other cranial structures. These analyses indicate the benefits of a multifactorial approach to cranial integration using a mouse model.

  9. Genetic deletion of mouse platelet glycoprotein Ibbeta produces a Bernard-Soulier phenotype with increased alpha-granule size.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kazunobu; Martinez, Constantino; Russell, Susan; Nurden, Paquita; Nurden, Alan; Fiering, Steven; Ware, Jerry

    2004-10-15

    Here we report the characterization of a mouse model of the Bernard-Soulier syndrome generated by a targeted disruption of the gene encoding the glycoprotein (GP) Ibbeta subunit of the GP Ib-IX complex. Similar to a Bernard-Soulier model generated by disruption of the mouse GP Ibalpha subunit, GP Ibbeta(Null) mice display macrothrombocytopenia and a severe bleeding phenotype. When examined by transmission electron microscopy, the large platelets produced by a GP Ibbeta(Null) genotype revealed alpha-granules with increased size as compared with the alpha-granules from control mouse platelets. Data are presented linking the overexpression of a septin protein, SEPT5, to the presence of larger alpha-granules in the GP Ibbeta(Null) platelet. The SEPT5 gene resides approximately 250 nucleotides 5' to the GP Ibbeta gene and has been associated with modulating exocytosis from neurons and platelets as part of a presynaptic protein complex. Fusion mRNA transcripts present in megakaryocytes can contain both the SEPT5 and GP Ibbeta coding sequences as a result in an imperfect polyadenylation signal within the 3' end of both the human and mouse SEPT5 genes. We observed a 2- to 3-fold increase in SEPT5 protein levels in platelets from GP Ibbeta(Null) mice. These results implicate SEPT5 levels in the maintenance of normal alpha-granule size and may explain the variant granules associated with human GP Ibbeta mutations and the Bernard-Soulier syndrome.

  10. Preharvest application of oxalic acid increased fruit size, bioactive compounds, and antioxidant capacity in sweet cherry cultivars (Prunus avium L.).

    PubMed

    Martínez-Esplá, Alejandra; Zapata, Pedro Javier; Valero, Daniel; García-Viguera, Cristina; Castillo, Salvador; Serrano, María

    2014-04-16

    Trees of 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late' sweet cherry cultivars (Prunus avium L.) were treated with oxalic acid (OA) at 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mM at 98, 112, and 126 days after full blossom. Results showed that all treatments increased fruit size at harvest, manifested by higher fruit volume and weight in cherries from treated trees than from controls, the higher effect being found with 2.0 mM OA (18 and 30% higher weight for 'Sweet Heart' and 'Sweet Late', respectively). Other quality parameters, such as color and firmness, were also increased by OA treatments, although no significant differences were found in total soluble solids or total acidity, showing that OA treatments did not affect the on-tree ripening process of sweet cherry. However, the increases in total anthocyanins, total phenolics, and antioxidant activity associated with the ripening process were higher in treated than in control cherries, leading to fruit with high bioactive compounds and antioxidant potential at commercial harvest (≅45% more anthocyanins and ≅20% more total phenolics). In addition, individual anthocyanins, flavonols, and chlorogenic acid derivatives were also increased by OA treatment. Thus, OA preharvest treatments could be an efficient and natural way to increase the quality and functional properties of sweet cherries. PMID:24684635

  11. Increase in ceramide level after application of various sizes of sphingomyelin liposomes to a cultured human skin model.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Y; Jinno, M; Todo, H; Kon, T; Sugibayashi, K; Hashimoto, F

    2011-01-01

    Sphingomyelin-based liposomes (SPM-L) that were sized (or not) by extrusion through a filter with pores of 100, 200, or 400 nm were applied to a three-dimensional cultured human skin model in order to evaluate which size of SPM-L was most effective at increasing its ceramide level. The diameters of the SPM-L in PBS were 102.7, 181.0, 224.0, and 380.1 nm. The diameters of the liposomes in the culture medium were 117.5, 199.2, 242.1, and 749.8 nm. The diameter of the small liposomes (<200 nm in diameter) did not change much, at least for 7 days. SPM-L in saline or culture medium were applied to the basal layer side or stratum corneum side of the cultured skin model, and ceramide II, III, V, and VI were then extracted from it. The extracted ceramide molecules were separated by HPTLC, and the concentration of each type of ceramide was quantified using a densitometer. When the small SPM-L (110 or 190 nm in diameter) were applied to the basal layer side, the levels of ceramide III and V were increased. When they were applied to the stratum corneum side, the levels of ceramide II, III, V, and VI were significantly increased compared to those of the PBS group, especially after the application of the small SPM-L (110 nm in diameter). Thus, the application of small SPM-L was useful for increasing the ceramide II, III, V, and VI levels of a cultured human skin model.

  12. Mineral particle size in children with osteogenesis imperfecta type I is not increased independently of specific collagen mutations.

    PubMed

    Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Schmidt, Ingo; Roschger, Paul; Glorieux, Francis H; Klaushofer, Klaus; Fratzl, Peter; Rauch, Frank; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I represents the mildest form of OI and is usually caused by two classes of autosomal dominant mutations in collagen type I: haploinsufficiency leading to a reduced quantity of structurally normal collagen (quantitative mutation), or sequence abnormalities generating structurally aberrant collagen chains (qualitative mutation). An abnormally high bone matrix mineralization has been observed in all OI cases investigated so far, independently of mutation type. This raises the question whether the increased amount of mineral is due to mineral particles growing to larger sizes or to a higher number of more densely packed particles. For this reason, we revisit the problem by investigating the mineral particle size in cancellous bone from two subsets of the previously analyzed biopsies (patient's age: 2-4.2 and 7.6-11years) comparing OI quantitative mutations (n=5), OI qualitative mutations (n=5) and controls (n=6). We used a combined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) setup with a beam diameter of 10μm of synchrotron radiation, which allows the determination of mineral particle characteristics in 10μm thick sections at the same positions where the matrix mineralization density was previously determined. The thickness parameter of mineral particles (T) was obtained from SAXS data and the mineral volume fraction was calculated from the mean calcium content of the bone matrix determined by quantitative back-scattered electron imaging (qBEI). The combination of these two quantities allowed calculating the true particle width (W) of the plate-like mineral crystals. T was larger in the older than in the younger age-group independently of genotype (p<0.004) and was larger in the controls than in each OI group. The qBEI results showed that the mineral volume fraction increased from 32.45wt.% in controls to 36.44wt.% in both OI groups (corresponding to a 12% increase in relative terms). Combining these

  13. Diabetes Increases Cryoinjury Size with Associated Effects on Cx43 Gap Junction Function and Phosphorylation in the Mouse Heart.

    PubMed

    Palatinus, Joseph A; Gourdie, Robert G

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients develop larger myocardial infarctions and have an increased risk of death following a heart attack. The poor response to myocardial injury in the diabetic heart is likely related to the many metabolic derangements from diabetes that create a poor substrate in general for wound healing, response to injury and infection. Studies in rodents have implicated a role for the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in regulating the injury response in diabetic skin wounds. In this study, we sought to determine whether diabetes alters Cx43 molecular interactions or intracellular communication in the cryoinjured STZ type I diabetic mouse heart. We found that epicardial cryoinjury size is increased in diabetic mice and this increase is prevented by preinjury insulin administration. Consistent with these findings, we found that intercellular coupling via gap junctions is decreased after insulin administration in diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This decrease in coupling is associated with a concomitant increase in phosphorylation of Cx43 at serine 368, a residue known to decrease channel conductance. Taken together, our results suggest that insulin regulates both gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and injury propagation in the mouse heart. PMID:27034963

  14. Diabetes Increases Cryoinjury Size with Associated Effects on Cx43 Gap Junction Function and Phosphorylation in the Mouse Heart

    PubMed Central

    Palatinus, Joseph A.; Gourdie, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic patients develop larger myocardial infarctions and have an increased risk of death following a heart attack. The poor response to myocardial injury in the diabetic heart is likely related to the many metabolic derangements from diabetes that create a poor substrate in general for wound healing, response to injury and infection. Studies in rodents have implicated a role for the gap junction protein connexin 43 (Cx43) in regulating the injury response in diabetic skin wounds. In this study, we sought to determine whether diabetes alters Cx43 molecular interactions or intracellular communication in the cryoinjured STZ type I diabetic mouse heart. We found that epicardial cryoinjury size is increased in diabetic mice and this increase is prevented by preinjury insulin administration. Consistent with these findings, we found that intercellular coupling via gap junctions is decreased after insulin administration in diabetic and nondiabetic mice. This decrease in coupling is associated with a concomitant increase in phosphorylation of Cx43 at serine 368, a residue known to decrease channel conductance. Taken together, our results suggest that insulin regulates both gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and injury propagation in the mouse heart. PMID:27034963

  15. Increasing sample size in prospective birth cohorts: back-extrapolating prenatal levels of persistent organic pollutants in newly enrolled children.

    PubMed

    Verner, Marc-André; Gaspar, Fraser W; Chevrier, Jonathan; Gunier, Robert B; Sjödin, Andreas; Bradman, Asa; Eskenazi, Brenda

    2015-03-17

    Study sample size in prospective birth cohorts of prenatal exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs) is limited by costs and logistics of follow-up. Increasing sample size at the time of health assessment would be beneficial if predictive tools could reliably back-extrapolate prenatal levels in newly enrolled children. We evaluated the performance of three approaches to back-extrapolate prenatal levels of p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and four polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners from maternal and/or child levels 9 years after delivery: a pharmacokinetic model and predictive models using deletion/substitution/addition or Super Learner algorithms. Model performance was assessed using the root mean squared error (RMSE), R2, and slope and intercept of the back-extrapolated versus measured levels. Super Learner outperformed the other approaches with RMSEs of 0.10 to 0.31, R2s of 0.58 to 0.97, slopes of 0.42 to 0.93 and intercepts of 0.08 to 0.60. Typically, models performed better for p,p'-DDT/E than PBDE congeners. The pharmacokinetic model performed well when back-extrapolating prenatal levels from maternal levels for compounds with longer half-lives like p,p'-DDE and BDE-153. Results demonstrate the ability to reliably back-extrapolate prenatal POP levels from levels 9 years after delivery, with Super Learner performing best based on our fit criteria. PMID:25698216

  16. A natural antipredation experiment: predator control and reduced sea ice increases colony size in a long-lived duck.

    PubMed

    Hanssen, Sveinn A; Moe, Børge; Bårdsen, Bård-Jørgen; Hanssen, Frank; Gabrielsen, Geir W

    2013-09-01

    Anthropogenic impact on the environment and wildlife are multifaceted and far-reaching. On a smaller scale, controlling for predators has been increasing the yield from local natural prey resources. Globally, human-induced global warming is expected to impose severe negative effects on ecosystems, an effect that is expected to be even more pronounced in the scarcely populated northern latitudes. The clearest indication of a changing Arctic climate is an increase in both air and ocean temperatures leading to reduced sea ice distribution. Population viability is for long-lived species dependent on adult survival and recruitment. Predation is the main mortality cause in many bird populations, and egg predation is considered the main cause of reproductive failure in many birds. To assess the effect of predation and climate, we compared population time series from a natural experiment where a trapper/down collector has been licensed to actively protect breeding common eiders Somateria mollissima (a large seaduck) by shooting/chasing egg predators, with time series from another eider colony located within a nature reserve with no manipulation of egg predators. We found that actively limiting predator activity led to an increase in the population growth rate and carrying capacity with a factor of 3-4 compared to that found in the control population. We also found that population numbers were higher in years with reduced concentration of spring sea ice. We conclude that there was a large positive impact of human limitation of egg predators, and that this lead to higher population growth rate and a large increase in size of the breeding colony. We also report a positive effect of warming climate in the high arctic as reduced sea-ice concentrations was associated with higher numbers of breeding birds.

  17. Transgenic tobacco overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA synthase 1 shows increased plant growth, pod size and seed yield.

    PubMed

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  18. Transgenic Tobacco Overexpressing Brassica juncea HMG-CoA Synthase 1 Shows Increased Plant Growth, Pod Size and Seed Yield

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Pan; Wang, Hui; Wang, Mingfu; Hsiao, An-Shan; Bach, Thomas J.; Chye, Mee-Len

    2014-01-01

    Seeds are very important not only in the life cycle of the plant but they represent food sources for man and animals. We report herein a mutant of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase (HMGS), the second enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway that can improve seed yield when overexpressed in a phylogenetically distant species. In Brassica juncea, the characterisation of four isogenes encoding HMGS has been previously reported. Enzyme kinetics on recombinant wild-type (wt) and mutant BjHMGS1 had revealed that S359A displayed a 10-fold higher enzyme activity. The overexpression of wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 in Arabidopsis had up-regulated several genes in sterol biosynthesis, increasing sterol content. To quickly assess the effects of BjHMGS1 overexpression in a phylogenetically more distant species beyond the Brassicaceae, wt and mutant (S359A) BjHMGS1 were expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Xanthi) of the family Solanaceae. New observations on tobacco OEs not previously reported for Arabidopsis OEs included: (i) phenotypic changes in enhanced plant growth, pod size and seed yield (more significant in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1) in comparison to vector-transformed tobacco, (ii) higher NtSQS expression and sterol content in OE-S359A than OE-wtBjHMGS1 corresponding to greater increase in growth and seed yield, and (iii) induction of NtIPPI2 and NtGGPPS2 and downregulation of NtIPPI1, NtGGPPS1, NtGGPPS3 and NtGGPPS4. Resembling Arabidopsis HMGS-OEs, tobacco HMGS-OEs displayed an enhanced expression of NtHMGR1, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Overall, increased growth, pod size and seed yield in tobacco HMGS-OEs were attributed to the up-regulation of native NtHMGR1, NtIPPI2, NtSQS, NtSMT1-2, NtSMT2-1, NtSMT2-2 and NtCYP85A1. Hence, S359A has potential in agriculture not only in improving phytosterol content but also seed yield, which may be desirable in food crops. This work further demonstrates HMGS function in plant reproduction

  19. Closed head experimental traumatic brain injury increases size and bone volume of callus in mice with concomitant tibial fracture

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rhys D; Grills, Brian L; Church, Jarrod E; Walsh, Nicole C; McDonald, Aaron C; Agoston, Denes V; Sun, Mujun; O’Brien, Terence J; Shultz, Sandy R; McDonald, Stuart J

    2016-01-01

    Concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI) and long bone fracture are commonly observed in multitrauma and polytrauma. Despite clinical observations of enhanced bone healing in patients with TBI, the relationship between TBI and fracture healing remains poorly understood, with clinical data limited by the presence of several confounding variables. Here we developed a novel trauma model featuring closed-skull weight-drop TBI and concomitant tibial fracture in order to investigate the effect of TBI on fracture healing. Male mice were assigned into Fracture + Sham TBI (FX) or Fracture + TBI (MULTI) groups and sacrificed at 21 and 35 days post-injury for analysis of healing fractures by micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry. μCT analysis revealed calluses from MULTI mice had a greater bone and total tissue volume, and displayed higher mean polar moment of inertia when compared to calluses from FX mice at 21 days post-injury. Histomorphometric results demonstrated an increased amount of trabecular bone in MULTI calluses at 21 days post-injury. These findings indicate that closed head TBI results in calluses that are larger in size and have an increased bone volume, which is consistent with the notion that TBI induces the formation of a more robust callus. PMID:27682431

  20. L-Phosphinothricin modulation of inwardly rectifying K(+) channels increased excitability in striatal medium-sized spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Domingos, Laetitia; Desrus, Agnès; Même, Sandra; Même, William

    2016-07-01

    Phosphinotricin (L-PPT) is the active compound of a broad-spectrum herbicide. Acute poisoning with L-PPT has various clinical manifestations, including seizures and convulsions. However, the exact mechanism of L-PPT toxicity remains unclear. The present study addressed the role of L-PPT, in the excitability of striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs). In whole-cell current-clamp experiments, L-PPT increased the input resistance (Ri), decreased the rheobase and increased the firing frequency of action potentials. In voltage-clamp experiments, L-PPT inhibited the inward-rectifying potassium (Kir) currents. Finally, the effects of L-PPT mimicked the inhibition of Kir channels with Ba(2+) on neuronal excitability. Altogether, these results suggest that the herbicide L-PPT is a modulator of Kir channels in MSNs. Thereby, Kir channels are potent regulators of the excitability of MSNs and reduced open probability of these channels would generate a powerful upregulation of neuronal output. This effect may represent a possible mechanism for L-PPT dependent neuronal toxicity. PMID:27136897

  1. Disappearance of 19P/Borrelly's Silicate Feature in 2001 Apparition Is Attributed to Increase in Grain Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooden, D. H.; Woodward, C. E.; Harker, D. E.

    2003-05-01

    We report on observations and analysis of HIFOGS 10 \\micron \\ spectrophotometry of short period comet 19P/Borrelly on 2003 October 13, 15 UT at the NASA IRTF. 19P/Borrelly is one of two short period comets, comet 4P/Faye being the other, to have a silicate feature detected (Hanner et al. 1996, Icarus, 124, 344). During Borrelly.s perihelion passage in 1994 December, a silicate feature was present with a flux-to-continuum ratio of 0.25. Two apparitions later in 2003 October, the silicate feature is absent. Thermal emission modeling (cf. Harker et al. 2002, ApJ, 580, 579) using amorphous olivine and amorphous carbon shows that a slight increase in grain size accounts for the disappearance of the silicate feature. Analysis of 19P/Borrelly suggests grain size, and not the absence of olivine minerals, may be responsible for the absence of silicate features in most short period comets. 19P/Borrelly is one of the more active short period comets. However, short period comets as a family are less active than long period comets. Short period comets probably originated in the Kuiper Belt and suffered collisions while in residence in the outer solar system. Upon evolution into orbits that take them through the inner solar system, the surfaces of short period comets are exposed to sunlight through their many perihelion passages. This is in contrast to long period comets which probably originated near Jupiter and were expelled to the Oort cloud where they have existed and been exposed to cosmic ray processing. By studying the grain properties in short period comets and comparing to long period comets, we compare the effects on the grain populations of different parent body evolution histories. Upcoming opportunities to study short and long period comets will be advertised. This research is supported in part by an NSF Grant to the University of Minnesota.

  2. Slip-weakening zone sizes at nucleation of catastrophic subaerial and submarine landslides by gradually increasing pore pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Rice, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    We address the nucleation of dynamic landslide rupture in response to gradual pore pressure increases. Nucleation marks the onset of acceleration of the overlying slope mass due to the suddenly rapid enlargement of a sub-surface zone of shear failure, previously deforming quasi-statically. We model that zone as a planar surface undergoing initially linear slip-weakening frictional failure within a bordering linear-elastic medium. The results are also relevant to earthquake nucleation. The sub-surface rupture zone considered runs parallel to the free surface of a uniform slope, under a 2D plane-strain deformation state. We show results for ruptures with friction coefficients following linear slip weakening (i.e., the residual friction is not yet reached). For spatially broad increases in pore pressure, the nucleation length depends on a ratio of depth to a cohesive zone length scale. In the very broad-increase limit, a direct numerical solution for nucleation lengths compares well with solutions to a corresponding eigenvalue problem (similar to Uenishi and Rice [JGR '03]), in which spatial variations in normal stress are neglected. We estimate nucleation lengths for subaerial and submarine conditions using data [e.g., Bishop et al., Géotech. '71; Stark et al., JGGE '05] from ring-shear tests on sediments (peak friction fp = 0.5, frictional slip-weakening rate within the range w = -df/d(slip) = 0.1/cm-1/cm). We assume that only pre-stresses, and not material properties, vary with depth. With such fp and w, we find for a range of subsurface depths and shear moduli μ that nucleation lengths are typically several hundred meters long for shallow undersea slopes, and up to an order of magnitude less for steeper slopes on the Earth's surface. In the submarine case, this puts nucleation lengths in a size range comparable to observed pore-pressure-generated seafloor disturbances as pockmarks [e.g., Gay et al., MG '06].

  3. Warring arthropod societies: Social spider colonies can delay annihilation by predatory ants via reduced apparency and increased group size.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Carl N; Wright, Colin M; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2015-10-01

    Sociality provides individuals with benefits via collective foraging and anti-predator defense. One of the costs of living in large groups, however, is increased apparency to natural enemies. Here, we test how the individual-level and collective traits of spider societies can increase the risk of discovery and death by predatory ants. We transplanted colonies of the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola into a habitat dense with one of their top predators, the pugnacious ant Anoplolepis custodiens. With three different experiments, we test how colony-wide survivorship in a predator-dense habitat can be altered by colony apparency (i.e., the presence of a capture web), group size, and group composition (i.e., the proportion of bold and shy personality types present). We also test how spiders' social context (i.e., living solitarily vs. among conspecifics) modifies their behaviour toward ants in their capture web. Colonies with capture webs intact were discovered by predatory ants on average 25% faster than colonies with the capture web removed, and all discovered colonies eventually collapsed and succumbed to predation. However, the lag time from discovery by ants to colony collapse was greater for colonies containing more individuals. The composition of individual personality types in the group had no influence on survivorship. Spiders in a social group were more likely to approach ants caught in their web than were isolated spiders. Isolated spiders were more likely to attack a safe prey item (a moth) than they were to attack ants and were more likely to retreat from ants after contact than they were after contact with moths. Together, our data suggest that the physical structures produced by large animal societies can increase their apparency to natural enemies, though larger groups can facilitate a longer lag time between discovery and demise. Lastly, the interaction between spiders and predatory ants seems to depend on the social context in which spiders reside

  4. Warring arthropod societies: Social spider colonies can delay annihilation by predatory ants via reduced apparency and increased group size.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Carl N; Wright, Colin M; Pruitt, Jonathan N

    2015-10-01

    Sociality provides individuals with benefits via collective foraging and anti-predator defense. One of the costs of living in large groups, however, is increased apparency to natural enemies. Here, we test how the individual-level and collective traits of spider societies can increase the risk of discovery and death by predatory ants. We transplanted colonies of the social spider Stegodyphus dumicola into a habitat dense with one of their top predators, the pugnacious ant Anoplolepis custodiens. With three different experiments, we test how colony-wide survivorship in a predator-dense habitat can be altered by colony apparency (i.e., the presence of a capture web), group size, and group composition (i.e., the proportion of bold and shy personality types present). We also test how spiders' social context (i.e., living solitarily vs. among conspecifics) modifies their behaviour toward ants in their capture web. Colonies with capture webs intact were discovered by predatory ants on average 25% faster than colonies with the capture web removed, and all discovered colonies eventually collapsed and succumbed to predation. However, the lag time from discovery by ants to colony collapse was greater for colonies containing more individuals. The composition of individual personality types in the group had no influence on survivorship. Spiders in a social group were more likely to approach ants caught in their web than were isolated spiders. Isolated spiders were more likely to attack a safe prey item (a moth) than they were to attack ants and were more likely to retreat from ants after contact than they were after contact with moths. Together, our data suggest that the physical structures produced by large animal societies can increase their apparency to natural enemies, though larger groups can facilitate a longer lag time between discovery and demise. Lastly, the interaction between spiders and predatory ants seems to depend on the social context in which spiders reside.

  5. Neurofilament architecture combines structural principles of intermediate filaments with carboxy-terminal extensions increasing in size between triplet proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, N; Kaufmann, E; Fischer, S; Plessmann, U; Weber, K

    1983-01-01

    Mammalian neurofilament triplet proteins (68 K, 160 K and 200 K) have been correlated by a biochemical, immunological and protein chemical study. The 160 K and 200 K triplet proteins are intermediate filament proteins in their own right, since they reveal the alpha-helical coiled-coil rod domain analyzed in detail for the 68 K protein. Triplet proteins display two distinct arrays. Their amino-terminal region built analogously to non-neuronal intermediate filament proteins should allow a co-polymerization process via the interaction of coiled-coil domains. The extra mass of all triplet proteins is allocated to carboxy-terminally located extensions of increasing size and unique amino acid sequences. These may provide highly charged scaffolds suitable for interactions with other neuronal components. Such a domain of 68 K reveals, in sequence analysis, 47 glutamic acids within 106 residues. The epitope recognized by a monoclonal antibody reacting probably with all intermediate filament proteins has been mapped. It is located within the last 20 residues of the rods, where six distinct intermediate filament proteins point to a consensus sequence. Images Fig. 1. PMID:10872323

  6. Exclusion of introduced deer increases size and seed production success in an island-endemic plant species.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Tyler M; Catalano, Amy E

    2016-01-01

    The presence of extra-local invaders, such as the southern California mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) on Santa Catalina Island, may contribute to more selective and insidious effects within the unique ecosystems that have evolved in their absence. Studies at the species level may detect effects not noticed in broader, community level vegetation monitoring or help tease apart differences in the level of effect among the various ecological components of an invaded system. In this initial study, we measured the impacts of herbivory by mule deer, a species native to analogous habitats on the adjacent mainland, on size and seed production success for Crocanthemum greenei (island rush-rose), a federally listed sub-shrub that is not present on mainland California. We found deer exclusion resulted in an overall increase in stem measurement of 18.8 cm. Exclosure populations exhibited complete seed production success, whereas control populations showed significantly reduced success and exhibited complete failure within 58% of populations. These results show that the introduced mule deer on Santa Catalina Island are negatively affecting a federally threatened plant species. This strongly implies that the current deer management strategy is insufficient, if one of its goals is biodiversity and endemic species conservation. PMID:26843937

  7. Excess Salt Increases Infarct Size Produced by Photothrombotic Distal Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hiroshi; Nabika, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral circulation is known to be vulnerable to high salt loading. However, no study has investigated the effects of excess salt on focal ischemic brain injury. After 14 days of salt loading (0.9% saline) or water, spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) were subjected to photothrombotic middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), and infarct volume was determined at 48 h after MCAO: albumin and hemoglobin contents in discrete brain regions were also determined in SHR. Salt loading did not affect blood pressure levels in SHR and WKY. After MCAO, regional cerebral blood flow (CBF), determined with two ways of laser-Doppler flowmetry (one-point measurement or manual scanning), was more steeply decreased in the salt-loaded group than in the control group. In SHR/Izm, infarct volume in the salt-loaded group was 112±27 mm3, which was significantly larger than 77±12 mm3 in the control group (p = 0.002), while the extents of blood-brain barrier disruption (brain albumin and hemoglobin levels) were not affected by excess salt. In WKY, salt loading did not significantly increase infarct size. These results show the detrimental effects of salt loading on intra-ischemic CBF and subsequent brain infarction produced by phototrhombotic MCAO in hypertensive rats. PMID:24816928

  8. Spermidine Suppresses Age-Associated Memory Impairment by Preventing Adverse Increase of Presynaptic Active Zone Size and Release

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Varun K.; Pech, Ulrike; Fulterer, Andreas; Ender, Anatoli; Mauermann, Stephan F.; Andlauer, Till F. M.; Beuschel, Christine; Thriene, Kerstin; Quentin, Christine; Schwärzel, Martin; Mielke, Thorsten; Madeo, Frank; Dengjel, Joern; Fiala, André; Sigrist, Stephan J.

    2016-01-01

    Memories are assumed to be formed by sets of synapses changing their structural or functional performance. The efficacy of forming new memories declines with advancing age, but the synaptic changes underlying age-induced memory impairment remain poorly understood. Recently, we found spermidine feeding to specifically suppress age-dependent impairments in forming olfactory memories, providing a mean to search for synaptic changes involved in age-dependent memory impairment. Here, we show that a specific synaptic compartment, the presynaptic active zone (AZ), increases the size of its ultrastructural elaboration and releases significantly more synaptic vesicles with advancing age. These age-induced AZ changes, however, were fully suppressed by spermidine feeding. A genetically enforced enlargement of AZ scaffolds (four gene-copies of BRP) impaired memory formation in young animals. Thus, in the Drosophila nervous system, aging AZs seem to steer towards the upper limit of their operational range, limiting synaptic plasticity and contributing to impairment of memory formation. Spermidine feeding suppresses age-dependent memory impairment by counteracting these age-dependent changes directly at the synapse. PMID:27684064

  9. Exclusion of introduced deer increases size and seed production success in an island-endemic plant species.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, Tyler M; Catalano, Amy E

    2016-01-01

    The presence of extra-local invaders, such as the southern California mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) on Santa Catalina Island, may contribute to more selective and insidious effects within the unique ecosystems that have evolved in their absence. Studies at the species level may detect effects not noticed in broader, community level vegetation monitoring or help tease apart differences in the level of effect among the various ecological components of an invaded system. In this initial study, we measured the impacts of herbivory by mule deer, a species native to analogous habitats on the adjacent mainland, on size and seed production success for Crocanthemum greenei (island rush-rose), a federally listed sub-shrub that is not present on mainland California. We found deer exclusion resulted in an overall increase in stem measurement of 18.8 cm. Exclosure populations exhibited complete seed production success, whereas control populations showed significantly reduced success and exhibited complete failure within 58% of populations. These results show that the introduced mule deer on Santa Catalina Island are negatively affecting a federally threatened plant species. This strongly implies that the current deer management strategy is insufficient, if one of its goals is biodiversity and endemic species conservation.

  10. Leaf litter leachates have the potential to increase lifespan, body size, and offspring numbers in a clone of Moina macrocopa.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sylva; Timofeyev, Maxim A; Putschew, Anke; Saul, Nadine; Menzel, Ralph; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2012-03-01

    Leaf litter processing is one major pathway of the global organic carbon cycle. During this process, a variety of small reactive organic compounds are released and transported to the aquatic environment, and may directly impact aquatic organisms as natural xenobiotics. We hypothesize that different forest stockings produce different leachate qualities, which in turn, stress the aquatic communities and, eventually, separate sensitive from tolerant species. Particularly, leachates from coniferous trees are suspected to have strongly adverse impacts on sensitive species. We exposed individuals of a clone of the model organism, Moina macrocopa, to comparable concentrations (approximately 2mM) of litter leachates of Norway spruce, Picea abies, Colorado blue spruce, Picea pungens, black poplar, Populus nigra, and sessile oak, Quercus petraea. The animals were fed ad libitum. The following life trait variables were recorded: growth, lifespan, and lifetime offspring. To identify, whether or not exposure to litter leachates provokes an internal oxidative stress in the exposed animals we measured the superoxide anion radical scavenging capacity via photoluminescence. Except of P. abies, exposure to the leachates reduced this antioxidant capacity by approximately 50%. Leachate exposures, except that of Quercus, increased body size and extended lifespan; furthermore, particularly the leachates of both Picea species significantly increased the offspring numbers. This unexpected behavior of exposed Moina may be based on food supplements (e.g., high carbohydrate contents) in the leachates or on yet to be identified regulatory pathways of energy allocation. Overall, our results suggest that the potentially adverse effects of litter leachates can be overruled by either bacterial-growth supporting fractions in the leachates or an internal compensation mechanism in the Moina individuals. PMID:22115468

  11. Stochastic, weighted hit size theory of cellular radiobiological action

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Varma, M.N.

    1982-01-01

    A stochastic theory that appears to account well for the observed responses of cell populations exposed in radiation fields of different qualities and for different durations of exposure is described. The theory appears to explain well most cellular radiobiological phenomena observed in at least autonomous cell systems, argues for the use of fluence rate (phi) instead of absorbed dose for quantification of the amount of radiation involved in low level radiation exposure. With or without invoking the cell sensitivity function, the conceptual improvement would be substantial. The approach suggested also shows that the absorbed dose-cell response functions currently employed do not reflect the spectrum of cell sensitivities to increasing cell doses of a single agent, nor can RBE represent the potency ratio for different agents that can produce similar quantal responses. Thus, for accurate comparison of cell sensitivities among different cells in the same individual, or between the cells in different kinds of individuals, it is necessary to quantify cell sensitivity in terms of the hit size weighting or cell sensitivity function introduced here. Similarly, this function should be employed to evaluate the relative potency of radiation and other radiomimetic chemical or physical agents.

  12. Development of an in vitro quantal assay in primary cell cultures for a non-occluded baculo-like virus of penaeid shrimp.

    PubMed

    Tapay, L M; Lu, Y; Gose, R B; Nadala, E C; Brock, J A; Loh, P C

    1997-02-01

    An in vitro quantal assay (TCID50) for a non-occluded baculo-like virus isolate from naturally infected Penaeus japonicus obtained from China and experimentally infected P. stylirostris was developed using primary shrimp lymphoid cell cultures in Primaria 24-well tissue culture plates. The virus caused cytopathogenic effect (CPE) in the cell cultures as early as 2 day post-infection (p.i.). Initially, the cells rounded up and finally detached from the culture vessel as the infection progressed. At the present time, there is no established quantitative in vitro cell culture protocol for the assay of this baculo-like virus which has been reported by our laboratory to be highly pathogenic for P. stylirostris and P. vannamei, the two species of penaeid shrimp commercially cultured in Hawaii and the Western hemisphere. This quantal assay thus provides a simple and convenient method for the detection and assay of infectious virus in cultured penaeid shrimp.

  13. Quantal release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores by InsP3: tests of the concept of control of Ca2+ release by intraluminal Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Tregear, R T; Dawson, A P; Irvine, R F

    1991-03-22

    A possible mechanism for the generation of 'quantal' release of intracellular Ca2+ by InsP3 (Muallem et al., J. biol. Chem. 264, 205-212 (1989)) has been put forward in which intraluminal Ca2+ levels modulate InsP3 receptor structure (Irvine, FEBS Lett. 263, 5-9 (1990)). Here we have modelled such a steady-state mechanism, with an InsP3-sensitive store plus an InsP3-insensitive one, to test its ability to mimic published data. We have also performed experiments on InsP3-stimulated rat liver microsomes to test whether the model is consistent with one-way Ca2+ fluxes at a steady state. The model can simulate quantal release, in that InsP3 produces a release of part of the stored Ca2+ which is initially rapid relative to the one-way flux. In the original form of the model, in which InsP3-modulated Ca2+ binding to the intraluminal site opens the Ca2+ channel, the range of InsP3 concentrations needed to release Ca2+ is greater than that observed. When the model is changed so that Ca2(+)-modulated InsP3 binding opens the channels, the effective InsP3 range is shortened, but the quantal release effect is reduced. Other published data on one-way fluxes, and our own data on microsomes, can be simulated when leakage from the InsP3-insensitive store is adjusted to fit the observations; these data therefore do not test the existence of a steady state in the InsP3-sensitive store. We conclude that sensitivity of Ca2+ release to intraluminal Ca2+ provides a steady-state explanation of most, but not all, current quantal release observations.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1675803

  14. When larger brains do not have more neurons: increased numbers of cells are compensated by decreased average cell size across mouse individuals

    PubMed Central

    Herculano-Houzel, Suzana; Messeder, Débora J.; Fonseca-Azevedo, Karina; Pantoja, Nilma A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a strong trend toward increased brain size in mammalian evolution, with larger brains composed of more and larger neurons than smaller brains across species within each mammalian order. Does the evolution of increased numbers of brain neurons, and thus larger brain size, occur simply through the selection of individuals with more and larger neurons, and thus larger brains, within a population? That is, do individuals with larger brains also have more, and larger, neurons than individuals with smaller brains, such that allometric relationships across species are simply an extension of intraspecific scaling? Here we show that this is not the case across adult male mice of a similar age. Rather, increased numbers of neurons across individuals are accompanied by increased numbers of other cells and smaller average cell size of both types, in a trade-off that explains how increased brain mass does not necessarily ensue. Fundamental regulatory mechanisms thus must exist that tie numbers of neurons to numbers of other cells and to average cell size within individual brains. Finally, our results indicate that changes in brain size in evolution are not an extension of individual variation in numbers of neurons, but rather occur through step changes that must simultaneously increase numbers of neurons and cause cell size to increase, rather than decrease. PMID:26082686

  15. Two-phase increase in the maximum size of life over 3.5 billion years reflects biological innovation and environmental opportunity

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Jonathan L.; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Finnegan, Seth; Kowalewski, Michał; Krause, Richard A.; Lyons, S. Kathleen; McClain, Craig R.; McShea, Daniel W.; Novack-Gottshall, Philip M.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stempien, Jennifer A.; Wang, Steve C.

    2009-01-01

    The maximum size of organisms has increased enormously since the initial appearance of life >3.5 billion years ago (Gya), but the pattern and timing of this size increase is poorly known. Consequently, controls underlying the size spectrum of the global biota have been difficult to evaluate. Our period-level compilation of the largest known fossil organisms demonstrates that maximum size increased by 16 orders of magnitude since life first appeared in the fossil record. The great majority of the increase is accounted for by 2 discrete steps of approximately equal magnitude: the first in the middle of the Paleoproterozoic Era (≈1.9 Gya) and the second during the late Neoproterozoic and early Paleozoic eras (0.6–0.45 Gya). Each size step required a major innovation in organismal complexity—first the eukaryotic cell and later eukaryotic multicellularity. These size steps coincide with, or slightly postdate, increases in the concentration of atmospheric oxygen, suggesting latent evolutionary potential was realized soon after environmental limitations were removed. PMID:19106296

  16. Quantal Study of the Exchange Reaction for N + N2 using an ab initio Potential Energy Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Partridge, Harry; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The N + N2 exchange rate is calculated using a time-dependent quantum dynamics method on a newly determined ab initio potential energy surface (PES) for the ground A" state. This ab initio PES shows a double barrier feature in the interaction region with the barrier height at 47.2 kcal/mol, and a shallow well between these two barriers, with the minimum at 43.7 kcal/mol. A quantum dynamics wave packet calculation has been carried out using the fitted PES to compute the cumulative reaction probability for the exchange reaction of N + N2(J=O). The J - K shift method is then employed to obtain the rate constant for this reaction. The calculated rate constant is compared with experimental data and a recent quasi-classical calculation using a LEPS PES. Significant differences are found between the present and quasiclassical results. The present rate calculation is the first accurate 3D quantal dynamics study for N + N2 reaction system and the ab initio PES reported here is the first such surface for N3.

  17. Development of a cell culture method for quantal assay of strain I-2 of Newcastle disease virus.

    PubMed

    Wambura, P; Meers, J; Spradbrow, P

    2006-08-01

    Repeated titrations of strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) are more conveniently undertaken in cell cultures rather than in embryonated eggs. This is relatively easy with mesogenic and velogenic strains that are cytopathic to various cell lines, but is difficult with avirulent Australian isolates that are poorly cytopathic. Strain V4 for example has been shown to be pathogenic iin vitro only to of chicken embryo liver cells. Strain I-2 was reported to produce cytopathic effect (CPE) on chicken embryo kidney (CEK) cells. The present studies confirmed this observation and developed a quantal assay. CEK cells infected with strain I-2 developed CPE characterized by degeneration, rounding, granularity and vacuolation, and the formation of synctia. End points were readily established by microscopic examination of fixed and stained cells. In virus infectivity studies on strain I-2, where multiple titrations are required and where large numbers of samples are used, titration using CEK cell grown in microtitre plates is recommended. Such studies may not be feasible in embryonated eggs.

  18. Expression of long-term plasticity at individual synapses in hippocampus is graded, bidirectional, and mainly presynaptic: optical quantal analysis.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Ryosuke; Hu, Yi-Ling; Hamilton, David; Fine, Alan

    2009-04-30

    Key aspects of the expression of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) remain unresolved despite decades of investigation. Alterations in postsynaptic glutamate receptors are believed to contribute to the expression of various forms of LTP and LTD, but the relative importance of presynaptic mechanisms is controversial. In addition, while aggregate synaptic input to a cell can undergo sequential and graded (incremental) LTP and LTD, it has been suggested that individual synapses may only support binary changes between initial and modified levels of strength. We have addressed these issues by combining electrophysiological methods with two-photon optical quantal analysis of plasticity at individual active (non-silent) Schaffer collateral synapses on CA1 pyramidal neurons in acute slices of hippocampus from adolescent rats. We find that these synapses sustain graded, bidirectional long-term plasticity. Remarkably, changes in potency are small and insignificant; long-term plasticity at these synapses is expressed overwhelmingly via presynaptic changes in reliability of transmitter release.

  19. Mechanisms of calcium influx into hippocampal spines: heterogeneity among spines, coincidence detection by NMDA receptors, and optical quantal analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuste, R; Majewska, A; Cash, S S; Denk, W

    1999-03-15

    Dendritic spines receive most excitatory inputs in the vertebrate brain, but their function is still poorly understood. Using two-photon calcium imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices, we investigated the mechanisms by which calcium enters into individual spines in the stratum radiatum. We find three different pathways for calcium influx: high-threshold voltage-sensitive calcium channels, NMDA receptors, and an APV-resistant influx consistent with calcium-permeable AMPA or kainate receptors. These pathways vary among different populations of spines and are engaged under different stimulation conditions, with peak calcium concentrations reaching >10 microM. Furthermore, as a result of the biophysical properties of the NMDA receptor, the calcium dynamics of spines are exquisitely sensitive to the temporal coincidence of the input and output of the neuron. Our results confirm that individual spines are chemical compartments that can perform coincidence detection. Finally, we demonstrate that functional studies and optical quantal analysis of single, identified synapses is feasible in mammalian CNS neurons in brain slices.

  20. Red Sea coral reef trajectories over 2 decades suggest increasing community homogenization and decline in coral size.

    PubMed

    Riegl, Bernhard M; Bruckner, Andrew W; Rowlands, Gwilym P; Purkis, Sam J; Renaud, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Three independent line intercept transect surveys on northern Red Sea reef slopes conducted in 1988/9 and 1997/8 in Egypt and from 2006-9 in Saudi Arabia were used to compare community patterns and coral size. Coral communities showed scale-dependent variability, highest at fine spatial and taxonomic scale (species-specific within and among reef patterns). At coarser scale (generic pattern across regions), patterns were more uniform (regionally consistent generic dominance on differently exposed reef slopes and at different depths). Neither fine- nor coarse-scale patterns aligned along the sampled 1700 km latitudinal gradient. Thus, a latitudinal gradient that had been described earlier from comparable datasets, separating the Red Sea into three faunistic zones, was no longer apparent. This may indicate subtle changes in species distributions. Coral size, measured as corrected average intercept of corals in transects, had decreased from 1997 to 2009, after having remained constant from 1988 to 1997. Recruitment had remained stable (∼12 juvenile corals per m(2)). Size distributions had not changed significantly but large corals had declined over 20 years. Thus, data from a wide range of sites taken over two decades support claims by others that climate change is indeed beginning to show clear effects on Red Sea reefs.

  1. Phenotypic selection to increase floral scent emission, but not flower size or colour in bee-pollinated Penstemon digitalis.

    PubMed

    Parachnowitsch, Amy L; Raguso, Robert A; Kessler, André

    2012-08-01

    Fragrance is a putatively important character in the evolution of flowering plants, but natural selection on scent is rarely studied and thus poorly understood. We characterized floral scent composition and emission in a common garden of Penstemon digitalis from three nearby source populations. We measured phenotypic selection on scent as well as floral traits more frequently examined, such as floral phenology, display size, corolla pigment, and inflorescence height. Scent differed among populations in a common garden, underscoring the potential for scent to be shaped by differential selection pressures. Phenotypic selection on flower number and display size was strong. However, selection favoured scent rather than flower size or colour, suggesting that smelling stronger benefits reproductive success in P. digitalis. Linalool was a direct target of selection and its high frequency in floral-scent bouquets suggests that further studies of both pollinator- and antagonist-mediated selection on this compound would further our understanding of scent evolution. Our results indicate that chemical dimensions of floral display are just as likely as other components to experience selective pressure in a nonspecialized flowering herb. Therefore, studies that integrate visual and chemical floral traits should better reflect the true nature of floral evolutionary ecology.

  2. Red Sea Coral Reef Trajectories over 2 Decades Suggest Increasing Community Homogenization and Decline in Coral Size

    PubMed Central

    Riegl, Bernhard M.; Bruckner, Andrew W.; Rowlands, Gwilym P.; Purkis, Sam J.; Renaud, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Three independent line intercept transect surveys on northern Red Sea reef slopes conducted in 1988/9 and 1997/8 in Egypt and from 2006–9 in Saudi Arabia were used to compare community patterns and coral size. Coral communities showed scale-dependent variability, highest at fine spatial and taxonomic scale (species-specific within and among reef patterns). At coarser scale (generic pattern across regions), patterns were more uniform (regionally consistent generic dominance on differently exposed reef slopes and at different depths). Neither fine- nor coarse-scale patterns aligned along the sampled 1700 km latitudinal gradient. Thus, a latitudinal gradient that had been described earlier from comparable datasets, separating the Red Sea into three faunistic zones, was no longer apparent. This may indicate subtle changes in species distributions. Coral size, measured as corrected average intercept of corals in transects, had decreased from 1997 to 2009, after having remained constant from 1988 to 1997. Recruitment had remained stable (∼12 juvenile corals per m2). Size distributions had not changed significantly but large corals had declined over 20 years. Thus, data from a wide range of sites taken over two decades support claims by others that climate change is indeed beginning to show clear effects on Red Sea reefs. PMID:22693620

  3. An Asymmetric Increase in Inhibitory Synapse Number Underlies the Development of a Direction Selective Circuit in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Morrie, Ryan D; Feller, Marla B

    2015-06-24

    Neural circuits rely upon a precise wiring of their component neurons to perform meaningful computations. To compute the direction of motion in the visual scene, the direction selective circuit in the mouse retina depends on an asymmetry in the inhibitory neurotransmission from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) to direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). Specifically, depolarization of a SAC on the null side of a DSGC causes a threefold greater unitary inhibitory conductance than depolarization of a SAC on the preferred side. This asymmetry emerges during the second postnatal week of development, but its basis remains unknown. To determine the source of this asymmetry in inhibitory conductance, we conducted paired recordings between SACs and DSGCs at the beginning and end of the second postnatal week. We replaced calcium with strontium to promote asynchronous neurotransmitter release and produce quantal events. During the second postnatal week the quantal frequency but not the quantal amplitude of synaptic events increased more than threefold for null-side SAC-DSGC pairs but remained constant for preferred-side pairs. In addition, paired-pulse depression did not differ between SACs located on the null and preferred sides of DSGCs, indicating that all inhibitory SAC synapses onto a DSGC exhibit the same probability of release. Thus, the higher quantal frequency seen in null-side pairs results from a greater number of inhibitory synapses, revealing that an asymmetry in synapse number between SACs and DSGCs underlies the development of an essential component in the retina's direction selective circuit.

  4. An Asymmetric Increase in Inhibitory Synapse Number Underlies the Development of a Direction Selective Circuit in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Morrie, Ryan D.

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuits rely upon a precise wiring of their component neurons to perform meaningful computations. To compute the direction of motion in the visual scene, the direction selective circuit in the mouse retina depends on an asymmetry in the inhibitory neurotransmission from starburst amacrine cells (SACs) to direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs). Specifically, depolarization of a SAC on the null side of a DSGC causes a threefold greater unitary inhibitory conductance than depolarization of a SAC on the preferred side. This asymmetry emerges during the second postnatal week of development, but its basis remains unknown. To determine the source of this asymmetry in inhibitory conductance, we conducted paired recordings between SACs and DSGCs at the beginning and end of the second postnatal week. We replaced calcium with strontium to promote asynchronous neurotransmitter release and produce quantal events. During the second postnatal week the quantal frequency but not the quantal amplitude of synaptic events increased more than threefold for null-side SAC-DSGC pairs but remained constant for preferred-side pairs. In addition, paired-pulse depression did not differ between SACs located on the null and preferred sides of DSGCs, indicating that all inhibitory SAC synapses onto a DSGC exhibit the same probability of release. Thus, the higher quantal frequency seen in null-side pairs results from a greater number of inhibitory synapses, revealing that an asymmetry in synapse number between SACs and DSGCs underlies the development of an essential component in the retina's direction selective circuit. PMID:26109653

  5. Histomorphology of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) pancreas and association of increasing islet β-cell size with chronic hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Colegrove, Kathleen M; Venn-Watson, Stephanie

    2015-04-01

    Bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) can develop metabolic states mimicking prediabetes, including hyperinsulinemia, hyperlipidemia, elevated glucose, and fatty liver disease. Little is known, however, about dolphin pancreatic histomorphology. Distribution and area of islets, α, β, and δ cells were evaluated in pancreatic tissue from 22 dolphins (mean age 25.7years, range 0-51). Associations of these measurements were evaluated by sex, age, percent high glucose and lipids during the last year of life, and presence or absence of fatty liver disease and islet cell vacuolation. The most common pancreatic lesions identified were exocrine pancreas fibrosis (63.6%) and mild islet cell vacuolation (47.4%); there was no evidence of insulitis or amyloid deposition, changes commonly associated with type 2 diabetes. Dolphin islet architecture appears to be most similar to the pig, where α and β cells are localized to the central or periphery of the islet, respectively, or are well dispersed throughout the islet. Unlike pigs, large islets (greater than 10,000μm(2)) were common in dolphins, similar to that found in humans. A positive linear association was identified between dolphin age and islet area average, supporting a compensatory response similar to other species. The strongest finding in this study was a positive linear association between islet size, specifically β-cells, and percent blood samples with high cholesterol (greater than 280mg/dl, R(2)=0.57). This study is the most comprehensive assessment of the dolphin pancreas to date and may help direct future studies, including associations between chronic hypercholesterolemia and β-cell size.

  6. Planning and Delivering Instruction with Increasing Class Sizes in Educational Administration Program Coursework: Modeling Leadership Skills for New Professors Transitioning from K-12 Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stebbins, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Increased class sizes and advising responsibilities are the new realities in California's graduate programs of Educational Administration. In order to effectively meet new challenges, professors must make adjustments in venue, plan meticulously, utilize technology, distribute leadership, and implement alternative grading systems. This is a…

  7. Increased arterial wall stiffness and thickness in medium-sized arteries in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, T; Neubauer, B

    1988-01-01

    By means of ultrasonography, arterial wall stiffness, arterial wall thickness, and the elastic modulus of the common femoral artery were estimated in a group of 19 young insulin-dependent diabetics. The ultrasound technique for determination of these parameters is described as well as the echo-anatomy of the arterial wall. In accordance with a previous investigation a significant rise in arterial wall stiffness was found. Furthermore, there was a highly significant correlation between the stiffness and the thickness of the arterial wall. The elastic modulus also correlated to the stiffness. It is concluded that the diabetic macroangiopathy is characterized by an increased stiffness of the arterial wall caused by increased thickness as well as by progressive alterations of the elastic characteristics of the wall tissue. Possible pathogenetic reasons are discussed.

  8. Electromagnetic Transponders Indicate Prostate Size Increase Followed by Decrease During the Course of External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Benjamin L.; Butler, Wayne M.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Kurko, Brian S.; Reed, Joshua L.; Murray, Brian C.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: Real-time image guidance enables more accurate radiation therapy by tracking target movement. This study used transponder positions to monitor changes in prostate volume that may be a source of dosimetric and target inaccuracy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four men with biopsy-proven T1c-T3a prostate cancer each had three electromagnetic transponders implanted transperineally. Their coordinates were recorded by the Calypso system, and the perimeter of the triangle formed by the transponders was used to calculate prostate volumes at sequential time points throughout the course of radiation therapy to a dose of 81 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions. Results: There was a significant decrease in mean prostate volume of 10.9% from the first to the final day of radiation therapy. The volume loss did not occur monotonically but increased in most patients (75%) during the first several weeks to a median maximum on Day 7. The volume increased by a mean of 6.1% before decreasing by a mean maximum difference of 18.4% to nadir (p < 0.001 for both increase and decrease). Glandular shrinkage was asymmetric, with the apex to right base dimension varying more than twice that of the lateral dimension. For all dimensions, the mean change was <0.5 cm. Conclusion: Real-time transponder positions indicated a volume increase during the initial days of radiation therapy and then significant and asymmetric shrinkage by the final day. Understanding and tracking volume fluctuations of the prostate during radiation therapy can help real-time imaging technology perform to its fullest potential.

  9. Metabolic engineering of the purine biosynthetic pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum results in increased intracellular pool sizes of IMP and hypoxanthine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Purine nucleotides exhibit various functions in cellular metabolism. Besides serving as building blocks for nucleic acid synthesis, they participate in signaling pathways and energy metabolism. Further, IMP and GMP represent industrially relevant biotechnological products used as flavor enhancing additives in food industry. Therefore, this work aimed towards the accumulation of IMP applying targeted genetic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum. Results Blocking of the degrading reactions towards AMP and GMP lead to a 45-fold increased intracellular IMP pool of 22 μmol gCDW-1. Deletion of the pgi gene encoding glucose 6-phosphate isomerase in combination with the deactivated AMP and GMP generating reactions, however, resulted in significantly decreased IMP pools (13 μmol gCDW-1). Targeted metabolite profiling of the purine biosynthetic pathway further revealed a metabolite shift towards the formation of the corresponding nucleobase hypoxanthine (102 μmol gCDW-1) derived from IMP degradation. Conclusions The purine biosynthetic pathway is strongly interconnected with various parts of the central metabolism and therefore tightly controlled. However, deleting degrading reactions from IMP to AMP and GMP significantly increased intracellular IMP levels. Due to the complexity of this pathway further degradation from IMP to the corresponding nucleobase drastically increased suggesting additional targets for future strain optimization. PMID:23092390

  10. Scaling down the size and increasing the throughput of glycosyltransferase assays: activity changes on stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Shilpa A; Chandrasekaran, E V; Matta, Khushi L; Parikh, Abhirath; Tzanakakis, Emmanuel S; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2012-06-15

    Glycosyltransferases (glycoTs) catalyze the transfer of monosaccharides from nucleotide-sugars to carbohydrate-, lipid-, and protein-based acceptors. We examined strategies to scale down and increase the throughput of glycoT enzymatic assays because traditional methods require large reaction volumes and complex chromatography. Approaches tested used (i) microarray pin printing, an appropriate method when glycoT activity was high; (ii) microwells and microcentrifuge tubes, a suitable method for studies with cell lysates when enzyme activity was moderate; and (iii) C(18) pipette tips and solvent extraction, a method that enriched reaction product when the extent of reaction was low. In all cases, reverse-phase thin layer chromatography (RP-TLC) coupled with phosphorimaging quantified the reaction rate. Studies with mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) demonstrated an increase in overall β(1,3)galactosyltransferase and α(2,3)sialyltransferase activity and a decrease in α(1,3)fucosyltransferases when these cells differentiate toward cardiomyocytes. Enzymatic and lectin binding data suggest a transition from Lewis(x)-type structures in mESCs to sialylated Galβ1,3GalNAc-type glycans on differentiation, with more prominent changes in enzyme activity occurring at later stages when embryoid bodies differentiated toward cardiomyocytes. Overall, simple, rapid, quantitative, and scalable glycoT activity analysis methods are presented. These use a range of natural and synthetic acceptors for the analysis of complex biological specimens that have limited availability.

  11. Increase in body size is correlated to warmer winters in a passerine bird as inferred from time series data

    PubMed Central

    Björklund, Mats; Borras, Antoni; Cabrera, Josep; Senar, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is expected to affect natural populations in many ways. One way of getting an understanding of the effects of a changing climate is to analyze time series of natural populations. Therefore, we analyzed time series of 25 and 20 years, respectively, in two populations of the citril finch (Carduelis citrinella) to understand the background of a dramatic increase in wing length in this species over this period, ranging between 1.3 and 2.9 phenotypic standard deviations. We found that the increase in wing length is closely correlated to warmer winters and in one case to rain in relation to temperature in the summer. In order to understand the process of change, we implemented seven simulation models, ranging from two nonadaptive models (drift and sampling), and five adaptive models with selection and/or phenotypic plasticity involved and tested these models against the time series of males and females from the two population separately. The nonadaptive models were rejected in each case, but the results were mixed when it comes to the adaptive models. The difference in fit of the models was sometimes not significant indicating that the models were not different enough. In conclusion, the dramatic change in mean wing length can best be explained as an adaptive response to a changing climate. PMID:25628864

  12. Promotion of cooperation due to diversity of players in the spatial public goods game with increasing neighborhood size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Cheng-jie; Sun, Shi-wen; Wang, Li; Ding, Shuai; Wang, Juan; Xia, Cheng-yi

    2014-07-01

    It is well-known that individual diversity is a typical feature within the collective population. To model this kind of characteristics, we propose an evolutionary model of public goods game with two types of players (named as A and B), where players are located on the sites of a square lattice satisfying the periodic boundary conditions. The evolution of the strategy distribution is governed by iterated strategy adoption from a randomly selected neighbor with a probability, which not only depends on the payoff difference between players, but also on the type of the neighbor. For B-type agents, we pose a pre-factor (0increased from 4 to 24. Within a range of the portion of A-type influential players, the inhomogeneous teaching activity in strategy transfer yields a relevant increase (dependent on w) in the density of cooperators characterizing the promotion of cooperation. Current findings are of utmost importance for us to understand the evolution of cooperation under many real-world circumstances, such as the natural, biological, economic and even social systems.

  13. TP53 copy number expansion is associated with the evolution of increased body size and an enhanced DNA damage response in elephants

    PubMed Central

    Sulak, Michael; Fong, Lindsey; Mika, Katelyn; Chigurupati, Sravanthi; Yon, Lisa; Mongan, Nigel P; Emes, Richard D; Lynch, Vincent J

    2016-01-01

    A major constraint on the evolution of large body sizes in animals is an increased risk of developing cancer. There is no correlation, however, between body size and cancer risk. This lack of correlation is often referred to as 'Peto's Paradox'. Here, we show that the elephant genome encodes 20 copies of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 and that the increase in TP53 copy number occurred coincident with the evolution of large body sizes, the evolution of extreme sensitivity to genotoxic stress, and a hyperactive TP53 signaling pathway in the elephant (Proboscidean) lineage. Furthermore, we show that several of the TP53 retrogenes (TP53RTGs) are transcribed and likely translated. While TP53RTGs do not appear to directly function as transcription factors, they do contribute to the enhanced sensitivity of elephant cells to DNA damage and the induction of apoptosis by regulating activity of the TP53 signaling pathway. These results suggest that an increase in the copy number of TP53 may have played a direct role in the evolution of very large body sizes and the resolution of Peto's paradox in Proboscideans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11994.001 PMID:27642012

  14. Melatonin treatment of pre-veraison grape berries to increase size and synchronicity of berries and modify wine aroma components.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jiang-Fei; Xu, Teng-Fei; Song, Chang-Zheng; Yu, Yong; Hu, Fan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Zhen-Wen; Xi, Zhu-Mei

    2015-10-15

    A comprehensive investigation was carried out to determine the effect of exogenous melatonin treatment of pre-veraison grapes on grape berries and its wines. Two melatonin treatments of pre-veraison grape berries increased the weight of the berries by approximately 6.6%. Meanwhile, this melatonin treatment could be beneficial in the reduction of underripe and overripe fruits and in enhancing the synchronicity of the berries. In addition, there were significant differences in the volatile compound composition between the wine produced from the melatonin-treated berries and the wines made from untreated berries. The wine from melatonin-treated pre-veraison grape berries had stronger fruity, spicy, and sweet sensory properties, compared to the wines made from untreated berries. Prolonging the treatment through repeated applications can enhance these effects and under different seasonal conditions, more pronounced effects on the grape quality and wine properties can be observed.

  15. Prenatal Exposure to Autism-Specific Maternal Autoantibodies Alters Proliferation of Cortical Neural Precursor Cells, Enlarges Brain, and Increases Neuronal Size in Adult Animals.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cerdeño, Verónica; Camacho, Jasmin; Fox, Elizabeth; Miller, Elaine; Ariza, Jeanelle; Kienzle, Devon; Plank, Kaela; Noctor, Stephen C; Van de Water, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) affect up to 1 in 68 children. Autism-specific autoantibodies directed against fetal brain proteins have been found exclusively in a subpopulation of mothers whose children were diagnosed with ASD or maternal autoantibody-related autism. We tested the impact of autoantibodies on brain development in mice by transferring human antigen-specific IgG directly into the cerebral ventricles of embryonic mice during cortical neurogenesis. We show that autoantibodies recognize radial glial cells during development. We also show that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies increased stem cell proliferation in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the embryonic neocortex, increased adult brain size and weight, and increased the size of adult cortical neurons. We propose that prenatal exposure to autism-specific maternal autoantibodies directly affects radial glial cell development and presents a viable pathologic mechanism for the maternal autoantibody-related prenatal ASD risk factor.

  16. Changes in electrical properties and quantal current during growth of identified muscle fibres in the crayfish.

    PubMed Central

    Lnenicka, G A; Mellon, D

    1983-01-01

    The muscle fibre electrical properties, miniature excitatory junctional current (m.e.j.c.) and miniature excitatory junctional potential (m.e.j.p.) were studied during growth of an identified crayfish muscle fibre from a diameter of 20 to 400 microns. The specific membrane resistance (Rm), and the specific internal resistance (Ri), of the muscle fibre were independent of fibre diameter (d) during growth. The current-voltage relation has a similar shape in large and small fibres, indicating that voltage dependence of Rm does not change during growth. The input resistance (R0) was approximately proportional to d-1.5, as predicted theoretically. The specific membrane capacitance (Cm) and the membrane time constant (Tm) increased linearly with fibre diameter, apparently as a result of the contribution of the tubular capacitance to Cm. The decrease in R0 and the increase in Tm should have resulted in a 90-fold decrease in m.e.j.p. amplitude during growth of the fibre from a diameter of 20 to 240 microns. However, m.e.j.p. amplitude was found to decrease only 21-fold. This discrepancy was shown to result from an increase in m.e.j.c. amplitude and duration during growth. There was 2.9-fold increase in m.e.j.c. amplitude and a 2.7-fold increase in m.e.j.c. duration over the range of muscle fibre growth studied. This increase in the m.e.j.c. apparently results from an increase in the magnitude and duration of the synaptic conductance change produced by a quantum of transmitter. Throughout the range of muscle fibre diameters studied, the muscle fibre effective input impedance for the m.e.j.c. was 17-19% of R0. This is due to the relatively large Cm and the short duration of the m.e.j.c. PMID:6663501

  17. T cells translate individual, quantal activation into collective, analog cytokine responses via time-integrated feedbacks

    PubMed Central

    Tkach, Karen E; Barik, Debashis; Voisinne, Guillaume; Malandro, Nicole; Hathorn, Matthew M; Cotari, Jesse W; Vogel, Robert; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd; Krichevsky, Oleg; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    Variability within isogenic T cell populations yields heterogeneous ‘local’ signaling responses to shared antigenic stimuli, but responding clones may communicate ‘global’ antigen load through paracrine messengers, such as cytokines. Such coordination of individual cell responses within multicellular populations is critical for accurate collective reactions to shared environmental cues. However, cytokine production may saturate as a function of antigen input, or be dominated by the precursor frequency of antigen-specific T cells. Surprisingly, we found that T cells scale their collective output of IL-2 to total antigen input over a large dynamic range, independently of population size. Through experimental quantitation and computational modeling, we demonstrate that this scaling is enforced by an inhibitory cross-talk between antigen and IL-2 signaling, and a nonlinear acceleration of IL-2 secretion per cell. Our study reveals how time-integration of these regulatory loops within individual cell signaling generates scaled collective responses and can be leveraged for immune monitoring. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01944.001 PMID:24719192

  18. Ecosystem size structure response to 21st century climate projection: large fish abundance decreases in the central North Pacific and increases in the California Current.

    PubMed

    Woodworth-Jefcoats, Phoebe A; Polovina, Jeffrey J; Dunne, John P; Blanchard, Julia L

    2013-03-01

    Output from an earth system model is paired with a size-based food web model to investigate the effects of climate change on the abundance of large fish over the 21st century. The earth system model, forced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special report on emission scenario A2, combines a coupled climate model with a biogeochemical model including major nutrients, three phytoplankton functional groups, and zooplankton grazing. The size-based food web model includes linkages between two size-structured pelagic communities: primary producers and consumers. Our investigation focuses on seven sites in the North Pacific, each highlighting a specific aspect of projected climate change, and includes top-down ecosystem depletion through fishing. We project declines in large fish abundance ranging from 0 to 75.8% in the central North Pacific and increases of up to 43.0% in the California Current (CC) region over the 21st century in response to change in phytoplankton size structure and direct physiological effects. We find that fish abundance is especially sensitive to projected changes in large phytoplankton density and our model projects changes in the abundance of large fish being of the same order of magnitude as changes in the abundance of large phytoplankton. Thus, studies that address only climate-induced impacts to primary production without including changes to phytoplankton size structure may not adequately project ecosystem responses.

  19. Subtle increases in heart size persist into adulthood in growth restricted babies: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, Clare; Skilton, Michael R; Ruohonen, Saku; Juonala, Markus; Viikari, Jorma S A; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Laitinen, Tomi; Celermajer, David S; Raitakari, Olli T

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives Impaired fetal growth is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in adulthood. We sought to determine whether adults born with intrauterine growth restriction have primary maladaptive changes in cardiac structure. Methods Study participants were adults (34–49 years) who attended the 31-year follow-up of the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (longitudinal cohort). Transthoracic echocardiograms and demographic and cardiovascular risk surveys were completed for 157 adults born small for gestational age (SGA, birth weight <10th population centile) and 627 born average for gestational age (average for gestational age (AGA), birth weight 50th–90th population centile). Results Those born growth restricted had subtly enlarged hearts with indexed left ventricular (LV) end-systolic and end-diastolic diameters slightly greater in the SGA individuals than the AGA group (LVESD 18.7 mm/m2 SGA vs 18.1 mm/m2 AGA, p<0.01; LVEDD 27.5 mm/m2 SGA vs 26.6 mm/m2 AGA, p<0.01); LV base-to-apex length (47.4 mm/m2 SGA vs 46.0 mm/m2 AGA, p<0.01); LV basal diameter (26.4 mm/m2 SGA vs 25.7 mm/m2 AGA, p<0.01); and right ventricular base-to-apex length (40.1 mm/m2 SGA vs 39.2 mm/m2 AGA, p=0.02). LV stroke volume was greater in those born AGA (74.5 mL SGA vs 78.8 mL AGA, p<0.01), with no significant difference in cardiac output (5 L/min SGA vs 5.2 L/min AGA, p=0.06), heart rate, diastolic indices or sphericity index. Conclusions Adults born SGA have some statistically significant but subtle changes in cardiac structure and function, which are less marked than have been described in childhood, and are unlikely to play a pathogenic role in their elevated cardiovascular risk. PMID:26339495

  20. Does increasing the size of bi-weekly samples of records influence results when using the Global Trigger Tool? An observational study of retrospective record reviews of two different sample sizes

    PubMed Central

    Mevik, Kjersti; Griffin, Frances A; Hansen, Tonje E; Deilkås, Ellen T; Vonen, Barthold

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the impact of increasing sample of records reviewed bi-weekly with the Global Trigger Tool method to identify adverse events in hospitalised patients. Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A Norwegian 524-bed general hospital trust. Participants 1920 medical records selected from 1 January to 31 December 2010. Primary outcomes Rate, type and severity of adverse events identified in two different samples sizes of records selected as 10 and 70 records, bi-weekly. Results In the large sample, 1.45 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.97) times more adverse events per 1000 patient days (39.3 adverse events/1000 patient days) were identified than in the small sample (27.2 adverse events/1000 patient days). Hospital-acquired infections were the most common category of adverse events in both the samples, and the distributions of the other categories of adverse events did not differ significantly between the samples. The distribution of severity level of adverse events did not differ between the samples. Conclusions The findings suggest that while the distribution of categories and severity are not dependent on the sample size, the rate of adverse events is. Further studies are needed to conclude if the optimal sample size may need to be adjusted based on the hospital size in order to detect a more accurate rate of adverse events. PMID:27113238

  1. Increase in maturation size after the closure of a high seas gillnet fishery on hatchery-reared chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta

    PubMed Central

    Fukuwaka, Masa-aki; Morita, Kentaro

    2008-01-01

    Gillnet fisheries are strongly size-selective and seem to produce changes in size at maturity for exploited fishes. After Word War II, large-scale gillnet fisheries targeted Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) in the high seas area of the North Pacific and the Bering Sea, but these fisheries were closed in 1993. To assess the effects of this high seas gillnet fishery (and its closing) on size at maturity, we examined long-term trends in size at 50% probability of maturing (L50) for chum salmon (O. keta) from three populations in Hokkaido, Japan. The L50 trends were statistically different among rivers, but showed similar temporal patterns with decreases in the 1970s and early 1980s and increases after the 1985 brood year. While fishery-induced evolution seemed largely responsible for this temporal change in L50 during the fishing period, natural selection and phenotypic plasticity induced by environmental changes could contribute to the increases in L50 after the relaxation of fishing pressure. PMID:25567638

  2. Regulation of quantal transmitter secretion by ATP and protein kinases at developing neuromuscular synapses.

    PubMed

    Fu, W M; Chen, Y H; Lee, K F; Liou, J C

    1997-04-01

    The effects of endogenously released ATP on the maturation of developing neuromuscular synapses were investigated in Xenopus nerve-muscle co-cultures. The potentiating action of ATP (1 mM) on spontaneous acetylcholine release was inhibited by P2-purinoceptor antagonists suramin (0.3 mM) and reactive blue 2 (RB-2, 3 microM) in day 1 cultures. Bath application of suramin (10 microM) or RB-2 in day 1 cultures and prolonged treatment for 2 days dramatically decreased the amplitude of both spontaneous synaptic currents (SSCs) and evoked synaptic currents (ESCs) in the same cultures on day 3. Chronic treatment with 8-cyclopentyltheophylline (4 microM) or 6-cyano-2,3-dihydroxy-7-nitroquinoxaline (CNQX, 10 microM), P1-purinoceptor and glutamate receptor antagonists respectively, did not exert such an inhibitory effect. Chronic treatment with suramin or RB-2 for 2 days had no significant effect on the amplitude of either iontophoretic acetylcholine-induced whole-cell currents or single acetylcholine channel measurements in 3-day-old cultured myocytes. In addition, prolonged treatment for 2 days with various kinase inhibitors such as H-8 (10 microM), KN-62 (5 microM) and H-7 (10 microM) also decreased the amplitudes of both spontaneous and evoked synaptic currents in natural synapses, but not those of iontophoretic acetylcholine-induced currents. Furthermore, suramin and these protein kinase inhibitors also decreased the amplitude of spontaneous synaptic currents in manipulated synapses of 'vacated' nerve terminals. The results suggest that endogenously released ATP, acting in concert with various protein kinases, is involved in the maintenance and/or development of the quantum size of synaptic vesicles at embryonic neuromuscular synapses. PMID:9153574

  3. Optical quantal analysis reveals a presynaptic component of LTP at hippocampal Schaffer-associational synapses.

    PubMed

    Emptage, Nigel J; Reid, Christopher A; Fine, Alan; Bliss, Timothy V P

    2003-06-01

    The mechanisms by which long-term potentiation (LTP) is expressed are controversial, with evidence for both presynaptic and postsynaptic involvement. We have used confocal microscopy and Ca(2+)-sensitive dyes to study LTP at individual visualized synapses. Synaptically evoked Ca(2+) transients were imaged in distal dendritic spines of pyramidal cells in cultured hippocampal slices, before and after the induction of LTP. At most synapses, from as early as 10 min to at least 60 min after induction, LTP was associated with an increase in the probability of a single stimulus evoking a postsynaptic Ca(2+) response. These observations provide compelling evidence of a presynaptic component to the expression of early LTP at Schaffer-associational synapses. In most cases, the store-dependent evoked Ca(2+) transient in the spine was also increased after induction, a novel postsynaptic aspect of LTP.

  4. State-dependent mechanisms of LTP expression revealed by optical quantal analysis.

    PubMed

    Ward, Bonnie; McGuinness, Lindsay; Akerman, Colin J; Fine, Alan; Bliss, Tim V P; Emptage, Nigel J

    2006-11-22

    The expression mechanism of long-term potentiation (LTP) remains controversial. Here we combine electrophysiology and Ca(2+) imaging to examine the role of silent synapses in LTP expression. Induction of LTP fails to change p(r) at these synapses but instead mediates an unmasking process that is sensitive to the inhibition of postsynaptic membrane fusion. Once unmasked, however, further potentiation of formerly silent synapses leads to an increase in p(r). The state of the synapse thus determines how LTP is expressed.

  5. Synaptic vesicle exocytosis captured by quick freezing and correlated with quantal transmitter release

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of a machine that freezes biological tissues by contact with a cold metal block, which incorporates a timing circuit that stimulates frog neuromuscular junctions in the last few milliseconds before thay are frozen. We show freeze-fracture replicas of nerve terminals frozen during transmitter discharge, which display synpatic vesicles caught in the act of exocytosis. We use 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) to increase the number of transmitter quanta discharged with each nerve impulse, and show that the number of exocytotic vesicles caught by quick-freezing increases commensurately, indicating that one vesicle undergoes exocytosis for each quantum that is discharged. We perform statistical analyses on the spatial distribution of synaptic vesicle discharge sites along the "active zones" that mark the secretory regions of these nerves, and show that individual vesicles fuse with the plasma membrane independent of one another, as expected from physiological demonstrations that quanta are discharged independently. Thus, the utility of quick- freezing as a technique to capture biological processes as evanescent as synaptic transmission has been established. An appendix describes a new capacitance method to measure freezing rates, which shows that the "temporal resolution" of our quick-freezing technique is 2 ms or better. PMID:38256

  6. Dietary n-3 fatty acids increase spleen size and postendotoxin circulating TNF in mice; role of macrophages, macrophage precursors, and colony-stimulating factor-1.

    PubMed

    Blok, W L; de Bruijn, M F; Leenen, P J; Eling, W M; van Rooijen, N; Stanley, E R; Buurman, W A; van der Meer, J W

    1996-12-15

    In experimental studies in mice, dietary supplementation with n-3 fatty acids (FA) alleviates inflammation and increases resistance to infection. Nevertheless, TNF production capacity was found to be increased in n-3 FA-fed mice. We previously found increased relative spleen weights in n-3 FA-fed mice. In this study, the nature of this increased spleen size was further investigated. Spleen cellularity was increased significantly in mice fed n-3 FA (fish oil 15% w/w), compared with controls fed corn oil (15%) or normal lab chow (p < 0.05). Experiments with T cell-deficient nude mice and experiments using macrophage depletion through liposomal dichloromethylene-biphosphonate revealed that the increase in spleen cellularity is T cell independent and largely due to macrophage accumulation in the spleen. Accumulation of marginal zone and red pulp macrophages was histologically and immunohistochemically confirmed. n-3 FA induced peripheral blood monocytosis and an aspecific increase in bone marrow cellularity. Postendotoxin circulating TNF concentrations were increased significantly in n-3 FA-fed mice compared with controls. Splenectomy did not abolish this increase in circulating TNF. However, after macrophage depletion through liposomal dichloromethylene-biphosphonate, circulating TNF was not detectable after endotoxin challenge. Circulating concentrations of CSF-1 did not differ between the various experimental groups. It is suggested that the cellular changes observed relate to increased constitutive production of TNF.

  7. Dark respiration rate increases with plant size in saplings of three temperate tree species despite decreasing tissue nitrogen and nonstructural carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Machado, José-Luis; Reich, Peter B

    2006-07-01

    In shaded environments, minimizing dark respiration during growth could be an important aspect of maintaining a positive whole-plant net carbon balance. Changes with plant size in both biomass distribution to different tissue types and mass-specific respiration rates (R(d)) of those tissues would have an impact on whole-plant respiration. In this paper, we evaluated size-related variation in R(d), biomass distribution, and nitrogen (N) and total nonstructural carbohydrate (TNC) concentrations of leaves, stems and roots of three cold-temperate tree species (Abies balsamea (L.) Mill, Acer rubrum L. and Pinus strobus L.) in a forest understory. We sampled individuals varying in age (6 to 24 years old) and in size (from 2 to 500 g dry mass), and growing across a range of irradiances (from 1 to 13% of full sun) in northern Minnesota, USA. Within each species, we found small changes in R(d), N and TNC when comparing plants growing across this range of light availability. Consistent with our hypotheses, as plants grew larger, whole-plant N and TNC concentrations in all species declined as a result of a combination of changes in tissue N and shifts in biomass distribution patterns. However, contrary to our hypotheses, whole-plant and tissue R(d) increased with plant size in the three species.

  8. Enhanced Stomatal Conductance by a Spontaneous Arabidopsis Tetraploid, Me-0, Results from Increased Stomatal Size and Greater Stomatal Aperture1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Monda, Keina; Araki, Hiromitsu; Kuhara, Satoru; Ishigaki, Genki; Akashi, Ryo; Negi, Juntaro; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Sho; Hashimoto-Sugimoto, Mimi; Goto, Nobuharu; Iba, Koh

    2016-01-01

    The rate of gas exchange in plants is regulated mainly by stomatal size and density. Generally, higher densities of smaller stomata are advantageous for gas exchange; however, it is unclear what the effect of an extraordinary change in stomatal size might have on a plant’s gas-exchange capacity. We investigated the stomatal responses to CO2 concentration changes among 374 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ecotypes and discovered that Mechtshausen (Me-0), a natural tetraploid ecotype, has significantly larger stomata and can achieve a high stomatal conductance. We surmised that the cause of the increased stomatal conductance is tetraploidization; however, the stomatal conductance of another tetraploid accession, tetraploid Columbia (Col), was not as high as that in Me-0. One difference between these two accessions was the size of their stomatal apertures. Analyses of abscisic acid sensitivity, ion balance, and gene expression profiles suggested that physiological or genetic factors restrict the stomatal opening in tetraploid Col but not in Me-0. Our results show that Me-0 overcomes the handicap of stomatal opening that is typical for tetraploids and achieves higher stomatal conductance compared with the closely related tetraploid Col on account of larger stomatal apertures. This study provides evidence for whether larger stomatal size in tetraploids of higher plants can improve stomatal conductance. PMID:26754665

  9. Increased sedimentation rates and grain sizes 2-4 Myr ago due to the influence of climate change on erosion rates.

    PubMed

    Peizhen, Z; Molnar, P; Downs, W R

    2001-04-19

    Around the globe, and in a variety of settings including active and inactive mountain belts, increases in sedimentation rates as well as in grain sizes of sediments were recorded at approximately 2-4 Myr ago, implying increased erosion rates. A change in climate represents the only process that is globally synchronous and can potentially account for the widespread increase in erosion and sedimentation, but no single process-like a lowering of sea levels or expanded glaciation-can explain increases in sedimentation in all environments, encompassing continental margins and interiors, and tropical as well as higher latitudes. We suggest that climate affected erosion mainly by the transition from a period of climate stability, in which landscapes had attained equilibrium configurations, to a time of frequent and abrupt changes in temperature, precipitation and vegetation, which prevented fluvial and glacial systems from establishing equilibrium states.

  10. Intestinal and peritoneal mast cells differ in kinetics of quantal release.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Acosta, Jorge; Ales, Eva; Flores, Juan A

    2016-01-15

    5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT, serotonin) storage and release in mast cell (MC) secretory granules (SG) are dependent on serglycin proteoglycans (PG). This notion is based on the studies of MC of the connective tissue subtype that predominantly contain PG of the heparin type, whereas intestinal mucosal MC, which contain predominantly chondroitin sulfate, have been poorly explored. In the present study, we addressed the possibility that PG contents may differently affect the storage and release of preformed mediators in these two MC subclasses and explain in part their different functional properties. Rat peritoneal (PMC) and intestinal mast cells (IMC) were isolated and purified using a percoll gradient, and the efflux of 5-HT from each SG was measured by amperometric detection. IMC exhibited a ∼34% reduction in the release of 5-HT compared with PMC because of a lower number of exocytotic events, rather than a lower secretion per single exocytotic event. Amperometric spikes from IMC exhibited a slower decay phase and increased half-width but a similar ascending phase and foot parameters, indicating that the fusion pore kinetics are comparable in both MC subclasses. We conclude that both PG subtypes are equally efficient systems, directly involved in serotonin accumulation, and play a crucial role in regulating the kinetics of exocytosis from SG, providing specific secretory properties for the two cellular subtypes. PMID:26692491

  11. Intestinal and peritoneal mast cells differ in kinetics of quantal release.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Acosta, Jorge; Ales, Eva; Flores, Juan A

    2016-01-15

    5-hydroxytriptamine (5-HT, serotonin) storage and release in mast cell (MC) secretory granules (SG) are dependent on serglycin proteoglycans (PG). This notion is based on the studies of MC of the connective tissue subtype that predominantly contain PG of the heparin type, whereas intestinal mucosal MC, which contain predominantly chondroitin sulfate, have been poorly explored. In the present study, we addressed the possibility that PG contents may differently affect the storage and release of preformed mediators in these two MC subclasses and explain in part their different functional properties. Rat peritoneal (PMC) and intestinal mast cells (IMC) were isolated and purified using a percoll gradient, and the efflux of 5-HT from each SG was measured by amperometric detection. IMC exhibited a ∼34% reduction in the release of 5-HT compared with PMC because of a lower number of exocytotic events, rather than a lower secretion per single exocytotic event. Amperometric spikes from IMC exhibited a slower decay phase and increased half-width but a similar ascending phase and foot parameters, indicating that the fusion pore kinetics are comparable in both MC subclasses. We conclude that both PG subtypes are equally efficient systems, directly involved in serotonin accumulation, and play a crucial role in regulating the kinetics of exocytosis from SG, providing specific secretory properties for the two cellular subtypes.

  12. The quantal source of area supralinearity of flash responses in Limulus photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The time integrals of the responses of dark-adapted Limulus ventral photoreceptors to flashes exhibit a supralinear dependence on intensity at intermediate intensities. By decomposing the responses into their elementary single-photon components ("bumps"), we are able to calculate the overall quantum efficiency and to display the time courses of the bump amplitude and rate of appearance. Since the time course of the flash response is not slow compared with that of the bump, it was necessary, in order to carry out the decomposition, to develop a new technique for noise analysis of dynamic signals. This new technique should have wide applications. Our main finding is that the supralinearity of the flash responses corresponds to an increase in bump amplitude, with little change in bump duration or quantum efficiency. The time courses of the bump rate and of the change in bump amplitude are peaked and have widths similar to that of the response itself. The peaks of the time courses of the bump rate and amplitude displayed against the starting times of the bumps do not coincide and occur approximately 80 and approximately 40 ms, respectively, before the peak of the response. The time from the start of a bump to its centroid is approximately 70 ms, which means that the time at which the bump centroid reaches its maximum follows the response peak by 30 ms. These results impose constraints on possible mechanisms for the amplitude enhancement. PMID:3418317

  13. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light. PMID:27445779

  14. Random Photon Absorption Model Elucidates How Early Gain Control in Fly Photoreceptors Arises from Quantal Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhuoyi; Zhou, Yu; Juusola, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Many diurnal photoreceptors encode vast real-world light changes effectively, but how this performance originates from photon sampling is unclear. A 4-module biophysically-realistic fly photoreceptor model, in which information capture is limited by the number of its sampling units (microvilli) and their photon-hit recovery time (refractoriness), can accurately simulate real recordings and their information content. However, sublinear summation in quantum bump production (quantum-gain-nonlinearity) may also cause adaptation by reducing the bump/photon gain when multiple photons hit the same microvillus simultaneously. Here, we use a Random Photon Absorption Model (RandPAM), which is the 1st module of the 4-module fly photoreceptor model, to quantify the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation. We show how quantum-gain-nonlinearity already results from photon sampling alone. In the extreme case, when two or more simultaneous photon-hits reduce to a single sublinear value, quantum-gain-nonlinearity is preset before the phototransduction reactions adapt the quantum bump waveform. However, the contribution of quantum-gain-nonlinearity in light adaptation depends upon the likelihood of multi-photon-hits, which is strictly determined by the number of microvilli and light intensity. Specifically, its contribution to light-adaptation is marginal (≤ 1%) in fly photoreceptors with many thousands of microvilli, because the probability of simultaneous multi-photon-hits on any one microvillus is low even during daylight conditions. However, in cells with fewer sampling units, the impact of quantum-gain-nonlinearity increases with brightening light. PMID:27445779

  15. Characterization of an insertion sequence-like element, ISBlo15, identified in a size-increased cryptic plasmid pBK283 in Bifidobacterium longum BK28.

    PubMed

    Fukiya, Satoru; Sugiyama, Tomohiko; Kano, Yasunobu; Yokota, Atsushi

    2010-08-01

    The characteristics of mobile genetic elements in bifidobacteria are not well understood. We characterized an insertion sequence-like element of the IS200/IS605 family found in a size-increased cryptic plasmid in Bifidobacterium longum. During a plasmid profile analysis of B. longum BK strains, we encountered a 6.5-kbp cryptic plasmid pBK283 in B. longum BK28, the size of which has not been identified in bifidobacteria. Nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that an insertion sequence-like element was inserted into the 5.0-kbp pKJ50-like plasmid and resulted in a size increase of pBK283. The element, named ISBlo15, was 1593 bp in length and contained a single ORF encoding a putative transposase, which is similar to the transposase OrfB encoded by IS200/IS605 family elements. Several sequence characteristics, including conserved transposase motifs in OrfB and terminal palindromic sequences that differ from the typical terminal inverted repeats, strongly suggested that ISBlo15 is a member of the IS200/IS605 family. Sequences similar to ISBlo15 were widely distributed among the nine Bifidobacterium species tested, and those of highly homologous sequences were detected only in Bifidobacterium gallicum JCM8224(T).

  16. Increased size of solid organs in patients with Chuvash polycythemia and in mice with altered expression of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Donghoon; Okhotin, David V; Kim, Bumjun; Okhotina, Yulia; Okhotin, Daniel J; Miasnikova, Galina Y; Sergueeva, Adelina I; Polyakova, Lydia A; Maslow, Alexei; Lee, Yonggu; Semenza, Gregg L; Prchal, Josef T; Gordeuk, Victor R

    2010-05-01

    Chuvash polycythemia, the first hereditary disease associated with dysregulated oxygen-sensing to be recognized, is characterized by a homozygous germ-line loss-of-function mutation of the VHL gene (VHL(R200W)) resulting in elevated hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha and HIF-2alpha levels, increased red cell mass and propensity to thrombosis. Organ volume is determined by the size and number of cells, and the underlying molecular control mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Work from several groups has demonstrated that the proliferation of cells is regulated in opposite directions by HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha. HIF-1alpha inhibits cell proliferation by displacing MYC from the promoter of the gene encoding the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21(Cip1), thereby inducing its expression. In contrast, HIF-2alpha promotes MYC activity and cell proliferation. Here we report that the volumes of liver, spleen, and kidneys relative to body mass were larger in 30 individuals with Chuvash polycythemia than in 30 matched Chuvash controls. In Hif1a(+/-) mice, which are heterozygous for a null (knockout) allele at the locus encoding HIF-1alpha, hepatic HIF-2alpha mRNA was increased (2-fold) and the mass of the liver was increased, compared with wild-type littermates, without significant difference in cell volume. Hepatic p21(Cip1) mRNA levels were 9.5-fold lower in Hif1a(+/-) mice compared with wild-type littermates. These data suggest that, in addition to increased red cell mass, the sizes of liver, spleen, and kidneys are increased in Chuvash polycythemia. At least in the liver, this phenotype may result from increased HIF-2alpha and decreased p21(Cip1) levels leading to increased hepatocyte proliferation. PMID:20140661

  17. Fully quantal calculation of H2 translation-rotation states in (H2)4@5(12)6(4) clathrate sII inclusion compounds.

    PubMed

    Felker, Peter M

    2013-05-01

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H2)4@5(12)6(4) and (o-D2)4@5(12)6(4) hydrate clathrate sII inclusion compounds have been computed by nuclear-orbital/configuration-interaction methods. The model of these compounds in a rigid, high-symmetry 5(12)6(4) cage is treated in detail. The low-energy TR level structures of both isotopomers within this model are found to consist of states that can be readily described in terms of a small number of single-H2 and double-H2 excitation modes. The use of the high-symmetry results to facilitate the calculation and interpretation of (p-H2)4 and (o-D2)4 TR states in low-symmetry physically realizable 5(12)6(4) cages is also reported.

  18. Graded recruitment and inactivation of single InsP3 receptor Ca2+-release channels: implications for quantal [corrected] Ca2+release.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Lucian; Cheung, King-Ho; Vais, Horia; Mak, Don-On Daniel; White, Carl; Foskett, J Kevin

    2006-06-15

    Modulation of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) by receptor-mediated generation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) and activation of its receptor (InsP3R), a Ca2+-release channel in the endoplasmic reticulum, is a ubiquitous signalling mechanism. A fundamental aspect of InsP3-mediated signalling is the graded release of Ca2+ in response to incremental levels of stimuli. Ca2+ release has a transient fast phase, whose rate is proportional to [InsP3], followed by a much slower one even in constant [InsP3]. Many schemes have been proposed to account for quantal Ca2+ release, including the presence of heterogeneous channels and Ca2+ stores with various mechanisms of release termination. Here, we demonstrate that mechanisms intrinsic to the single InsP3R channel can account for quantal Ca2+ release. Patch-clamp electrophysiology of isolated insect Sf9 cell nuclei revealed a consistent and high probability of detecting functional endogenous InsP3R channels, enabling InsP3-induced channel inactivation to be identified as an inevitable consequence of activation, and allowing the average number of activated channels in the membrane patch (N(A)) to be accurately quantified. InsP3-activated channels invariably inactivated, with average duration of channel activity reduced by high [Ca2+]i and suboptimal [InsP3]. Unexpectedly, N(A) was found to be a graded function of both [Ca2+]i and [InsP3]. A qualitative model involving Ca2+-induced InsP3R sequestration and inactivation can account for these observations. These results suggest that apparent heterogeneous ligand sensitivity can be generated in a homogeneous population of InsP3R channels, providing a mechanism for graded Ca2+ release that is intrinsic to the InsP3R Ca2+ release channel itself.

  19. A Splenic Epithelial Cyst: Increased Size, Exacerbation of Symptoms, and Elevated Levels of Serum Carcinogenic Antigen 19-9 after 6-year Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Toru; Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki; Sugiura, Teichi; Sasaki, Keiko; Ito, Hiroaki; Hotta, Kinichi; Imai, Kenichiro; Tanaka, Masaki; Kakushima, Naomi; Ono, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man, who had presented with a large cyst between the pancreatic tail and splenic hilum 6 years previously, was referred to our hospital with exacerbation of abdominal distention. Computed tomography revealed a well-demarcated, unilocular cyst, with a beak sign for the pancreas, without wall thickening or nodules suggestive of a non-neoplastic cyst. Compared with 6 years previously, the cyst had increased in size from 14.7 cm to 19.5 cm, and the serum carcinogenic antigen 19-9 level had increased from 635 U/mL to 1,918 U/mL. To prevent spontaneous rupture, laparotomy was performed, and the cyst was pathologically diagnosed as a splenic epithelial cyst. PMID:27629958

  20. Increase of Si0.5Ge0.5 Bulk Single Crystal Size as Substrates for Strained Ge Epitaxial Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Kyoichi; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Arai, Yasutomo; Taguchi, Keisuke; Tomioka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Ryota; Yoda, Shinichi

    2013-04-01

    Compositionally uniform 2 and 10 mm diameter Si0.5Ge0.5 bulk crystals have been grown by the traveling liquidus-zone (TLZ) method. The TLZ method requires diffusion controlled mass transport in a melt and crystal size was limited for suppressing convection in a melt. For substrate use, however, larger diameter crystals are required. Increase of crystal diameter was challenged in spite of the concern that compositional homogeneity of grown crystals might be degraded due to faster convective flow in a larger diameter melt. As a result, however, increase of crystal diameter was possible up to 30 mm although single crystal length was limited to 5 mm. Si0.55Ge0.45 and Si0.6Ge0.4 bulk crystals with 30 mm diameter showed excellent compositional homogeneity and high crystallinity without mosaicity.

  1. Concentration and size distribution of particulate oxalate in marine and coastal atmospheres - Implication for the increased importance of oxalate in nanometer atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Tianfeng; Li, Kai; Zhu, Yujiao; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong

    2016-10-01

    In literature, particulate oxalate has been widely studied in the total suspended particles (TSP), particles <10 μm or 2.5 μm (PM10 and PM2.5) and size-segregated particles >100 nm. In this article, we measured oxalate's concentrations in size-segregated atmospheric particles down to 10 nm or 56 nm during eight campaigns performed at a semi-urban coastal site, over the marginal seas of China and from the marginal seas to the northwest Pacific Ocean (NWPO) in 2012-2015. When the sum of the oxalate's concentration in particles <10 μm was used for intercomparison, the lowest average values of 0.05-0.06 μg m-3 were observed during the two campaigns performed at NWPO. The highest average value of 0.38 μg m-3 was observed at the coastal site during a heavy pollution event. Mode analysis results of particulate oxalate and the correlation between oxalate and sulfate suggested that the elevated concentrations of oxalate in PM10 were mainly related to enhanced in-cloud formation of oxalate via anthropogenic precursors. Size distribution data in the total of 136 sets of samples also showed approximately 80% of particulate oxalate's mass existing in atmospheric particles >100 nm. Consistent with previous studies, particulate oxalate in particles >100 nm was a negligible ionic component when comparing to particulate SO42- in the same size range. However, the mole ratios of oxalate/sulfate in particles <100 nm were generally increased by 1-2 orders of magnitude. In approximately 30% of the samples, the mole ratios in atmospheric particles <56 nm were larger than 0.5. Moreover, during Campaign 5, the oxalate's concentrations in <56 nm particles were substantially increased on the days in presence of new particle formation events. These results strongly imply the importance of oxalate in nanometer atmospheric particles, but not in >100 nm atmospheric particles such as PM2.5, PM10, TSP, etc.

  2. The Relationship of the Increase in the 'Time of the Earth Day,' from 18 Hours to 24 Hours, to the Increase in the Size of the Earth, Using the Laws of the Conservation of Momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cimorelli, S. A.; Samuels, C.

    2010-12-01

    There are three articles, by others, which discuss the increase in the Earth's day, from 18 hours to 24 hours, over a period of time of about a billion years. One article refers to Striations in the Substructure of Coral, C.T. Scrutton, et al, 1965. Another article refers to the Laws of the Conservation of Momentum, as related to the relationship of the Earth and the Moon, the lunar tides, the reduction of the Earth year from 481 days to our present 365.25 days, and an increase in the lunar orbit time from 20 days to 28 days. The third article is based on the dates of tidal sediment deposits, tidalites, C. P. Sonett, et al, in the late 1980's. In this paper, we explain how the Earth's Day could have increased from 18 hours to 24 hours, as related to the Laws of Conservation of Momentum (L). Wherein we use the simple formulation from the Law of the Conservation of Angular Momentum, L=Iω, in which I=Moment of Inertia and ω=Angular Velocity; for which we assume the earth to be a perfect sphere, for which I=0.4MR2, where M and R are the Mass and radius of the earth, respectively. We evaluate the radius of the earth over a time period of several billion years, during which time the earth's angular momentum, L=Iω, is conserved. In this formulation, we show a growth in the size of the earth; and present a curve, using just three points in time, which indicates that the rate of growth is increasing over time. The first point is from about 4.5 billion years ago, the second point is from about 1 billion years ago, and the third point represents present day, with an average growth of about 1mm per year. Although evidence has been presented, by others, showing circumferential growth at the Red Sea and in the Atlantic Ocean, at about 1.5cm per year, total. However, no proof of reduction in the size of the Earth has been shown to occur in the Pacific, or anywhere else, including in references to subduction. Some might say that the subduction is occurring at the rim of the

  3. Deletion of Mbtps1 (Pcsk8, S1p, Ski-1) Gene in Osteocytes Stimulates Soleus Muscle Regeneration and Increased Size and Contractile Force with Age.

    PubMed

    Gorski, Jeff P; Huffman, Nichole T; Vallejo, Julian; Brotto, Leticia; Chittur, Sridar V; Breggia, Anne; Stern, Amber; Huang, Jian; Mo, Chenglin; Seidah, Nabil G; Bonewald, Lynda; Brotto, Marco

    2016-02-26

    Conditional deletion of Mbtps1 (cKO) protease in bone osteocytes leads to an age-related increase in mass (12%) and in contractile force (30%) in adult slow twitch soleus muscles (SOL) with no effect on fast twitch extensor digitorum longus muscles. Surprisingly, bone from 10-12-month-old cKO animals was indistinguishable from controls in size, density, and morphology except for a 25% increase in stiffness. cKO SOL exhibited increased expression of Pax7, Myog, Myod1, Notch, and Myh3 and 6-fold more centralized nuclei, characteristics of postnatal regenerating muscle, but only in type I myosin heavy chain-expressing cells. Increased expression of gene pathways mediating EGF receptor signaling, circadian exercise, striated muscle contraction, and lipid and carbohydrate oxidative metabolism were also observed in cKO SOL. This muscle phenotype was not observed in 3-month-old mice. Although Mbtps1 mRNA and protein expression was reduced in cKO bone osteocytes, no differences in Mbtps1 or cre recombinase expression were observed in cKO SOL, explaining this age-related phenotype. Understanding bone-muscle cross-talk may provide a fresh and novel approach to prevention and treatment of age-related muscle loss. PMID:26719336

  4. Nicotine enhancement of dopamine release by a calcium-dependent increase in the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Turner, Timothy J

    2004-12-15

    A major factor underlying compulsive tobacco use is nicotine-induced modulation of dopamine release in the mesolimbic reward pathway (Wise and Rompre, 1989). An established biochemical mechanism for nicotine-enhanced dopamine release is by activating presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) (Wonnacott, 1997). Prolonged application of 10(-7) to 10(-5) m nicotine to striatal synaptosomes promoted a sustained efflux of [3H]dopamine. This nicotine effect was mediated by non-alpha7 nAChRs, because it was blocked by 5 mum mecamylamine but was resistant to 100 nm alpha-bungarotoxin (alphaBgTx). Dopamine release was diminished by omitting Na+ or by applying peptide calcium channel blockers, indicating that nAChRs trigger release by depolarizing the nerve terminals. However, because alpha7 receptors rapidly desensitize in the continuous presence of agonists, a repetitive stimulation protocol was used to evaluate the possible significance of desensitization. This protocol produced a transient increase in [3H]dopamine released by depolarization and a significant increase in the response to hypertonic solutions that measure the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of synaptic vesicles. The nicotine-induced increase in the size of the readily releasable pool was blocked by alphaBgTx and by the calmodulin antagonist calmidazolium, suggesting that Ca2+ entry through alpha7 nAChRs specifically enhances synaptic vesicle mobilization at dopamine terminals. Thus, nicotine enhances dopamine release by two complementary actions mediated by discrete nAChR subtypes and suggest that the alpha7 nAChR-mediated pathway is tightly and specifically coupled to refilling of the RRP of vesicles in dopamine terminals.

  5. Environmentally-relevant concentrations of atrazine induce non-monotonic acceleration of developmental rate and increased size at metamorphosis in Rhinella arenarum tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Brodeur, Julie C; Sassone, Alina; Hermida, Gladys N; Codugnello, Nadia

    2013-06-01

    Despite of the various studies reporting on the subject, anticipating the impacts of the widely-used herbicide atrazine on anuran tadpoles metamorphosis remains complex as increases or decreases of larval period duration are almost as frequently reported as an absence of effect. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of environmentally-relevant concentrations of atrazine (0.1, 1, 10, 100, and 1000μg/L) on the timings of metamorphosis and body size at metamorphosis in the common South American toad, Rhinella arenarum (Anura: bufonidae). None of the atrazine concentrations tested significantly altered survival. Low atrazine concentrations in the range of 1-100μg/L were found to accelerate developmental rate in a non-monotonic U-shaped concentration-response relationship. This observed acceleration of the metamorphic process occurred entirely between stages 25 and 39; treated tadpoles proceeding through metamorphosis as control animals beyond this point. Together with proceeding through metamorphosis at a faster rate, tadpoles exposed to atrazine concentrations in the range of 1-100μg/L furthermore transformed into significantly larger metamorphs than controls, the concentration-response curve taking the form of an inverted U in this case. The no observed effect concentration (NOEC) was 0.1μg atrazine/L for both size at metamorphosis and timings of metamorphosis. Tadpoles exposed to 100μg/L 17β-estradiol presented the exact same alterations of developmental rate and body size as those treated with 1, 10 and 100μg/L of atrazine. Elements of the experimental design that facilitated the detection of alterations of metamorphosis at low concentrations of atrazine are discussed, together with the ecological significance of those findings.

  6. Differences in pup birth weight, pup variability within litters, and dam weight of mice selected for alternative criteria to increase litter size.

    PubMed

    van Engelen, M A; Nielsen, M K; Ribeiro, E L

    1995-07-01

    Selection for litter size had been practiced for 21 generations and relaxed selection for 13 generations in mice. Three replicates were used with four selection criteria: index of components (ovulation rate and ova success), uterine capacity, litter size, and an unselected control. Especially with selection for litter size and the index relative to the control, number of pups born had increased, and differences also occurred in mating weight. Dams of the three replicates and their litters were used to evaluate the effects of accumulated selection on pup birth weight, variability in weight of littermates, and dam's weight at mating and after littering. Total number born, number born alive, number of males, and number of females were also recorded and studied. Mean pup birth weight did not differ among the criteria; however, variability among littermates in pup weight tended to differ among criteria of selection. Regressions for pup weight and within-litter standard deviation of pup weight on number born were small and negative but significant (P < .001). The distribution of pup weight within litter was normal for 77.2% of the litters, with no differences among the criteria. The difference between weight of male and weight of female pups was significant (P < .001); overall males were 2.5% heavier than females. There was a difference (P < .02) among criteria in mating weight and littering weight; however, the maternal weight gain between mating and littering was not different among criteria. Number born differed (P < .003) among the criteria, but there was no significant difference among criteria in numbers of males and females.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Tree size and light availability increase photochemical instead of non-photochemical capacities of Nothofagus nitida trees growing in an evergreen temperate rain forest.

    PubMed

    Coopman, Rafael E; Briceño, Verónica F; Corcuera, Luis J; Reyes-Díaz, Marjorie; Alvarez, Daniela; Sáez, Katherine; García-Plazaola, José I; Alberdi, Miren; Bravo, León A

    2011-10-01

    Nothofagus nitida (Phil.) Krasser (Nothofagaceae) regenerates under the canopy in microsites protected from high light. Nonetheless, it is common to find older saplings in clear areas and adults as emergent trees of the Chilean evergreen forest. We hypothesized that this shade to sun transition in N. nitida is supported by an increase in photochemical and non-photochemical energy dissipation capacities of both photosystems in parallel with the increase in plant size and light availability. To dissect the relative contribution of light environment and plant developmental stage to these physiological responses, the photosynthetic performance of both photosystems was studied from the morpho-anatomical to the biochemical level in current-year leaves of N. nitida plants of different heights (ranging from 0.1 to 7 m) growing under contrasting light environments (integrated quantum flux (IQF) 5-40 mol m(-2). Tree height (TH) and light environment (IQF) independently increased the saturated electron transport rates of both photosystems, as well as leaf and palisade thickness, but non-photochemical energy flux, photoinhibition susceptibility, state transition capacity, and the contents of D1 and PsbS proteins were not affected by IQF and TH. Spongy mesophyll thickness and palisade cell diameter decreased with IQF and TH. A(max), light compensation and saturation points, Rubisco and nitrogen content (area basis) only increased with light environment (IQF), whereas dark respiration (R(d)) decreased slightly and relative chlorophyll content was higher in taller trees. Overall, the independent effects of more illuminated environment and tree height mainly increased the photochemical instead of the non-photochemical energy flux. Regardless of the photochemical increase with TH, carbon assimilation only significantly improved with higher IQF. Therefore it seems that mainly acclimation to the light environment supports the phenotypic transition of N. nitida from shade to

  8. Net Metering Policy Development and Distributed Solar Generation in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.; Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

    2009-12-01

    The goal of the Minnesota net metering policy is to give the maximum possible encouragement to distributed generation assets, especially solar electric systems (MN 2008). However, according to a published set of best practices (NNEC 2008) that prioritize the maximum development of solar markets within states, the Minnesota policy does not incorporate many of the important best practices that may help other states transform their solar energy markets and increase the amount of grid-connected distributed solar generation assets. Reasons cited include the low system size limit of 40kW (the best practices document recommends a 2 MW limit) and a lack of language protecting generators from additional utility fees. This study was conducted to compare Minnesota's policies to national best practices. It provides an overview of the current Minnesota policy in the context of these best practices and other jurisdictions' net metering policies, as well as a qualitative assessment of the impacts of raising the system size cap within the policy based on the experiences of other states.

  9. Knockout of the abundant Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal membrane protein TvHMP23 increases hydrogenosome size but induces no compensatory up-regulation of paralogous copies.

    PubMed

    Brás, Xavier Pereira; Zimorski, Verena; Bolte, Kathrin; Maier, Uwe-G; Martin, William F; Gould, Sven B

    2013-05-01

    The Trichomonas vaginalis genome encodes up to 60000 genes, many of which stem from genome duplication events. Paralogous copies thus accompany most T. vaginalis genes, a phenomenon that limits genetic manipulation. We characterized one of the parasite's most abundant hydrogenosomal membrane proteins, TvHMP23, which is phylogenetically distinct from canonical metabolite carriers, and which localizes to the inner hydrogenosomal membrane as shown through sub-organellar fractionation and protease protection assays. Knockout of Tvhmp23 through insertion of the selectable neomycin marker led to a size increase of hydrogenosomes, the first knockout-induced phenotypes reported for Trichomonas, but no growth impairment. The transcriptional response of its four paralogous copies then analyzed revealed that they are not up-regulated, and hence do not compensate for the Tvhmp23 knockout. PMID:23499435

  10. Physiological adaptations to reproduction. I. Experimentally increasing litter size enhances aspects of antioxidant defence but does not cause oxidative damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Garratt, Michael; Pichaud, Nicolas; King, Edith D Aloise; Brooks, Robert C

    2013-08-01

    Life history theory suggests that investment in reproduction can trade off against growth, longevity and both reproduction and performance later in life. One possible reason for this trade-off is that reproduction directly causes somatic damage. Oxidative stress, an overproduction of reactive oxygen species in relation to cellular defences, can correlate with reproductive investment and has been implicated as a pathway leading to senescence. This has led to the suggestion that this aspect of physiology could be an important mechanism underlying the trade-off between reproduction and lifespan. We manipulated female reproductive investment to test whether oxidative stress increases with reproduction in mice. Each female's pups were cross-fostered to produce litters of either two or eight, representing low and high levels of reproductive investment for wild mice. No differences were observed between reproductive groups at peak lactation for several markers of oxidative stress in the heart and gastrocnemius muscle. Surprisingly, oxidative damage to proteins was lower in the livers of females with a litter size of eight than in females with two pups or non-reproductive control females. While protein oxidation decreased, activity levels of the antioxidant enzyme superoxide dismutase increased in the liver, suggesting this may be one pathway used to protect against oxidative stress. Our results highlight the need for caution when interpreting correlative relationships and suggest that oxidative stress does not increase with enhanced reproductive effort during lactation.

  11. Increased excitability of medium-sized dorsal root ganglion neurons by prolonged interleukin-1β exposure is K+ channel dependent and reversible

    PubMed Central

    Stemkowski, Patrick L; Noh, Myung-chul; Chen, Yishen; Smith, Peter A

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constriction injury of rat sciatic nerve promotes signs of neuropathic pain. This is associated with an increase in the level of interleukin 1β (IL-1β) in primary afferents that peaks at 7 days. This initial cytokine exposure has been proposed to trigger an enduring alteration in neuronal phenotype that underlies chronic hyper-excitability in sensory nerves, which initiates and maintains chronic neuropathic pain. We have shown previously that 5–6 days of exposure of rat dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) to 100 pm IL-1β increases the excitability of medium-sized neurons. We have now found using whole-cell recording that this increased excitability reverts to control levels within 3–4 days of cytokine removal. The effects of IL-1β were dominated by changes in K+ currents. Thus, the amplitudes of A-current, delayed rectifier and Ca2+-sensitive K+ currents were reduced by ∼68%, ∼64% and ∼36%, respectively. Effects of IL-1β on other cation currents were modest by comparison. There was thus a slight decrease in availability of high voltage-activated Ca2+ channel current, a small increase in rates of activation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel current (IH), and a shift in the voltage dependence of activation of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current (TTX-S INa) to more negative potentials. It is unlikely, therefore, that direct interaction of IL-1β with DRG neurons initiates an enduring phenotypic shift in their electrophysiological properties following sciatic nerve injury. Persistent increases in primary afferent excitability following nerve injury may instead depend on altered K+ channel function and on the continued presence of slightly elevated levels IL-1β and other cytokines. PMID:26110238

  12. Chewing activities and particle size of rumen digesta and feces of precision-fed dairy heifers fed different forage levels with increasing levels of distillers grains.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Mena, F X; Lascano, G J; Heinrichs, A J

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 2 differing forage to concentrate ratios (F:C) and various levels of corn dry distillers grain with solubles (DDGS) replacing canola meal in precision-fed dairy heifer rations on chewing behavior, rumen pH and fill, and particle size of rumen contents and feces. A split plot design with F:C as whole plot and DDGS inclusion level as subplot was administered in a 4-period 4 × 4 Latin square. Eight rumen-cannulated Holstein heifers (12.5±0.5 mo of age and 344±15 kg of body weight, respectively) housed in individual stalls were allocated to F:C 50:50 (low forage) or 75:25 [high forage (HF); dry matter basis] and to a sequence of DDGS level (0, 7, 14, and 21%; dry matter basis). Forage was a mix of 50% corn silage and 50% grass hay (dry matter basis). Diets were fed once daily and formulated to provide equal amounts of nutrients and body weight gain. No differences were found for rumen pH between dietary treatments. Time spent eating tended to be longer for HF and was not affected by DDGS inclusion rate. Ruminating time did not differ by F:C, but linearly increased as DDGS increased (422 to 450±21 min/d). Total chewing time tended to be longer for HF and to increase linearly as DDGS increased (553 to 579±33 min/d). Wet rumen digesta weight and volume were greater for HF. Geometric mean particle length of rumen contents was greater for HF 2h prefeeding when analyzed with solubles (particles <0.15 mm). Proportion of rumen solubles decreased as DDGS increased 5h postfeeding. Fecal geometric mean particle length and proportion of particles >1.18 mm increased with increasing levels of DDGS and did not change with F:C. Total chewing time increased by the addition of DDGS and higher F:C. Heifers can compensate for lower physically effective neutral detergent fiber by modifying their chewing behavior. Rumen pH was never at a level that could induce acidosis, and lower eating time at lower F:C was somewhat

  13. Increased HDL Size and Enhanced Apo A-I Catabolic Rates Are Associated With Doxorubicin-Induced Proteinuria in New Zealand White Rabbits.

    PubMed

    López-Olmos, Victoria; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Luna-Luna, María; Flores-Castillo, Cristobal; Martínez-Ramírez, Miriam; Bautista-Pérez, Rocío; Franco, Martha; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Roldán, Francisco-Javier; Aranda-Fraustro, Alberto; Soria-Castro, Elizabeth; Muñoz-Vega, Mónica; Fragoso, José-Manuel; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    The catabolism and structure of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) may be the determining factor of their atheroprotective properties. To better understand the role of the kidney in HDL catabolism, here we characterized HDL subclasses and the catabolic rates of apo A-I in a rabbit model of proteinuria. Proteinuria was induced by intravenous administration of doxorubicin in New Zealand white rabbits (n = 10). HDL size and HDL subclass lipids were assessed by electrophoresis of the isolated lipoproteins. The catabolic rate of HDL-apo A-I was evaluated by exogenous radiolabelling with iodine-131. Doxorubicin induced significant proteinuria after 4 weeks (4.47 ± 0.55 vs. 0.30 ± 0.02 g/L of protein in urine, P < 0.001) associated with increased uremia, creatininemia, and cardiotoxicity. Large HDL2b augmented significantly during proteinuria, whereas small HDL3b and HDL3c decreased compared to basal conditions. HDL2b, HDL2a, and HDL3a subclasses were enriched with triacylglycerols in proteinuric animals as determined by the triacylglycerol-to-phospholipid ratio; the cholesterol content in HDL subclasses remained unchanged. The fractional catabolic rate (FCR) of [(131)I]-apo A-I in the proteinuric rabbits was faster (FCR = 0.036 h(-1)) compared to control rabbits group (FCR = 0.026 h(-1), P < 0.05). Apo E increased and apo A-I decreased in HDL, whereas PON-1 activity increased in proteinuric rabbits. Proteinuria was associated with an increased number of large HDL2b particles and a decreased number of small HDL3b and 3c. Proteinuria was also connected to an alteration in HDL subclass lipids, apolipoprotein content of HDL, high paraoxonase-1 activity, and a rise in the fractional catabolic rate of the [(131)I]-apo A-I.

  14. Impact of Artificial Reservoir Size, Land Use/Land Cover Patterns and Increasing Urbanization on Probable Maximum Precipitation and Flood: The Case of American River Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yigzaw, W. Y.; Hossain, F.

    2013-12-01

    Design of dams considers available historical data for flood frequency analysis. The limitation in this approach is future meteorological and hydrological variability due to land-use and land-cover (LULC) change are not considered. Future flood extremes may change, among other factors, due to strong local atmospheric feedbacks from the reservoir, surrounding LULC change, and urbanization. Probable maximum flood (PMF), which is the key design parameter for a dam, is estimated from probable maximum precipitation (PMP). Given the nonlinearity of the rainfall-runoff process, the key questions that need to be answered are How do reservoir size and/or LULC modify extreme flood patterns, specifically probable maximum flood via climatic modification of PMP? and What is the contribution of urbanization in altering reservoir inflow and PMF? Selecting the American River watershed (ARW) and Folsom Dam as a case study; PMP from the regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) and the distributed variable infiltration capacity (VIC) model are used to simulate PMF. The PMP values are simulated from atmospheric feedbacks for various LULC scenarios (pre-dam, current scenario, non-irrigation, reservoir-double, and different urbanization percentage). Comparison of PMF results for pre-dam and current scenario conditions showed that PMF peak flow can decrease by about 105m3/s, while comparison of current scenario with non-irrigation PMF results showed that irrigation development has increased the PMF by 125m3/s. Comparison of different urbanization percentage shows that a 100% impervious watershed has the potential of generating a flood that is close to design PMF. The design PMP produces an additional 1500m3/s peak flood compared to the actual PMF when the watershed is considered 100% impervious. On the other hand, the reservoir size had virtually no detectable impact on PMP and consequently on PMF results. Where downstream levee capacity is already under designed to handle a dam

  15. Maternal choline supplementation improves spatial mapping and increases basal forebrain cholinergic neuron number and size in aged Ts65Dn mice.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jessica A; Velazquez, Ramon; Kelley, Christy M; Powers, Brian E; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Mufson, Elliott J; Strupp, Barbara J

    2014-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early-onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN) degeneration. The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) improves spatial mapping and protects against BFCN degeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS and AD. During pregnancy and lactation, dams were assigned to either a choline sufficient (1.1g/kg choline chloride) or choline supplemented (5.0g/kg choline chloride) diet. Between 13 and 17months of age, offspring were tested in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) to examine spatial mapping followed by unbiased quantitative morphometry of BFCNs. Spatial mapping was significantly impaired in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice relative to normal disomic (2N) littermates. Additionally, a significantly lower number and density of medial septum (MS) hippocampal projection BFCNs was also found in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice. Notably, MCS significantly improved spatial mapping and increased number, density, and size of MS BFCNs in Ts65Dn offspring. Moreover, the density and number of MS BFCNs correlated significantly with spatial memory proficiency, providing support for a functional relationship between these behavioral and morphometric effects of MCS for trisomic offspring. Thus, increasing maternal choline intake during pregnancy may represent a safe and effective treatment approach for expectant mothers carrying a DS fetus, as well as a possible means of BFCN neuroprotection during aging for the population at large.

  16. Maternal choline supplementation improves spatial mapping and increases basal forebrain cholinergic neuron number and size in aged Ts65Dn mice.

    PubMed

    Ash, Jessica A; Velazquez, Ramon; Kelley, Christy M; Powers, Brian E; Ginsberg, Stephen D; Mufson, Elliott J; Strupp, Barbara J

    2014-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is marked by intellectual disability (ID) and early-onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including basal forebrain cholinergic neuron (BFCN) degeneration. The present study tested the hypothesis that maternal choline supplementation (MCS) improves spatial mapping and protects against BFCN degeneration in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS and AD. During pregnancy and lactation, dams were assigned to either a choline sufficient (1.1g/kg choline chloride) or choline supplemented (5.0g/kg choline chloride) diet. Between 13 and 17months of age, offspring were tested in the radial arm water maze (RAWM) to examine spatial mapping followed by unbiased quantitative morphometry of BFCNs. Spatial mapping was significantly impaired in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice relative to normal disomic (2N) littermates. Additionally, a significantly lower number and density of medial septum (MS) hippocampal projection BFCNs was also found in unsupplemented Ts65Dn mice. Notably, MCS significantly improved spatial mapping and increased number, density, and size of MS BFCNs in Ts65Dn offspring. Moreover, the density and number of MS BFCNs correlated significantly with spatial memory proficiency, providing support for a functional relationship between these behavioral and morphometric effects of MCS for trisomic offspring. Thus, increasing maternal choline intake during pregnancy may represent a safe and effective treatment approach for expectant mothers carrying a DS fetus, as well as a possible means of BFCN neuroprotection during aging for the population at large. PMID:24932939

  17. Daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato for 60 days increased plasma β-carotene concentration but did not increase total body vitamin A pool size in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Kazi M; Brown, Kenneth H; Jamil, Maleka; Peerson, Janet M; Keenan, Alison H; Newman, John W; Haskell, Marjorie J

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the effect of daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSP), with or without added fat, on the vitamin A (VA) status of Bangladeshi women with low initial VA status. Women (n = 30/group) received one of the following for 6 d/wk over 10 wk: 1) 0 μg retinol activity equivalents (RAE)/d as boiled white-fleshed sweet potatoes (WFSP) and a corn oil capsule, 2) 600 μg RAE/d as boiled OFSP and a corn oil capsule, 3) fried OFSP and a corn oil capsule, or 4) boiled WFSP and a retinyl palmitate capsule in addition to their home diets. Plasma concentrations of retinol and β-carotene and total body VA pool size were assessed before and after the 60-d intervention. Initial and final plasma retinol concentrations (mean ± SD) were 0.75 ± 0.18 μmol/L and 0.84 ± 0.19 μmol/L, respectively (P = 0.31); final means did not differ by group. Initial and final plasma β-carotene concentrations were 0.10 ± 00 μmol/L and 0.18 ± 0.09 μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.0001); final mean plasma β-carotene concentrations were higher in groups that received OFSP (P < 0.0001), and final mean plasma β-carotene was marginally higher in the group that received fried OFSP compared with boiled OFSP (P = 0.07). Initial and final total body VA pool sizes were 0.060 ± 0.047 mmol and 0.091 ± 0.070 mmol, respectively (P = 0.05, n = 110) and did not differ by group. Despite an increase in plasma β-carotene concentration, the impact of OFSP on VA status appears to be limited in Bangladeshi women residing in a resource-poor community.

  18. Daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato for 60 days increased plasma β-carotene concentration but did not increase total body vitamin A pool size in Bangladeshi women.

    PubMed

    Jamil, Kazi M; Brown, Kenneth H; Jamil, Maleka; Peerson, Janet M; Keenan, Alison H; Newman, John W; Haskell, Marjorie J

    2012-10-01

    We assessed the effect of daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSP), with or without added fat, on the vitamin A (VA) status of Bangladeshi women with low initial VA status. Women (n = 30/group) received one of the following for 6 d/wk over 10 wk: 1) 0 μg retinol activity equivalents (RAE)/d as boiled white-fleshed sweet potatoes (WFSP) and a corn oil capsule, 2) 600 μg RAE/d as boiled OFSP and a corn oil capsule, 3) fried OFSP and a corn oil capsule, or 4) boiled WFSP and a retinyl palmitate capsule in addition to their home diets. Plasma concentrations of retinol and β-carotene and total body VA pool size were assessed before and after the 60-d intervention. Initial and final plasma retinol concentrations (mean ± SD) were 0.75 ± 0.18 μmol/L and 0.84 ± 0.19 μmol/L, respectively (P = 0.31); final means did not differ by group. Initial and final plasma β-carotene concentrations were 0.10 ± 00 μmol/L and 0.18 ± 0.09 μmol/L, respectively (P < 0.0001); final mean plasma β-carotene concentrations were higher in groups that received OFSP (P < 0.0001), and final mean plasma β-carotene was marginally higher in the group that received fried OFSP compared with boiled OFSP (P = 0.07). Initial and final total body VA pool sizes were 0.060 ± 0.047 mmol and 0.091 ± 0.070 mmol, respectively (P = 0.05, n = 110) and did not differ by group. Despite an increase in plasma β-carotene concentration, the impact of OFSP on VA status appears to be limited in Bangladeshi women residing in a resource-poor community. PMID:22933750

  19. Drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking in mice: increased excitability of medium-sized spiny neurons in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Henley, Sandy M.; Toll, Jeff; Jentsch, James D.; Evans, Christopher J.; Levine, Michael S.; Cepeda, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    To examine the mechanisms of drug relapse, we first established a model for cocaine IVSA (intravenous self-administration) in mice, and subsequently examined electrophysiological alterations of MSNs (medium-sized spiny neurons) in the NAc (nucleus accumbens) before and after acute application of cocaine in slices. Three groups were included: master mice trained by AL (active lever) pressings followed by IV (intravenous) cocaine delivery, yoked mice that received passive IV cocaine administration initiated by paired master mice, and saline controls. MSNs recorded in the NAc shell in master mice exhibited higher membrane input resistances but lower frequencies and smaller amplitudes of sEPSCs (spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents) compared with neurons recorded from saline control mice, whereas cells in the NAc core had higher sEPSCs frequencies and larger amplitudes. Furthermore, sEPSCs in MSNs of the shell compartment displayed longer decay times, suggesting that both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms were involved. After acute re-exposure to a low-dose of cocaine in vitro, an AP (action potential)-dependent, persistent increase in sEPSC frequency was observed in both NAc shell and core MSNs from master, but not yoked or saline control mice. Furthermore, re-exposure to cocaine induced membrane hyperpolarization, but concomitantly increased excitability of MSNs from master mice, as evidenced by increased membrane input resistance, decreased depolarizing current to generate APs, and a more negative Thr (threshold) for firing. These data demonstrate functional differences in NAc MSNs after chronic contingent versus non-contingent IV cocaine administration in mice, as well as synaptic adaptations of MSNs before and after acute re-exposure to cocaine. Reversing these functional alterations in NAc could represent a rational target for the treatment of some reward-related behaviors, including drug addiction. PMID:24000958

  20. Hybridisation is associated with increased fecundity and size in invasive taxa: meta-analytic support for the hybridisation-invasion hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hovick, Stephen M; Whitney, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    The hypothesis that interspecific hybridisation promotes invasiveness has received much recent attention, but tests of the hypothesis can suffer from important limitations. Here, we provide the first systematic review of studies experimentally testing the hybridisation-invasion (H-I) hypothesis in plants, animals and fungi. We identified 72 hybrid systems for which hybridisation has been putatively associated with invasiveness, weediness or range expansion. Within this group, 15 systems (comprising 34 studies) experimentally tested performance of hybrids vs. their parental species and met our other criteria. Both phylogenetic and non-phylogenetic meta-analyses demonstrated that wild hybrids were significantly more fecund and larger than their parental taxa, but did not differ in survival. Resynthesised hybrids (which typically represent earlier generations than do wild hybrids) did not consistently differ from parental species in fecundity, survival or size. Using meta-regression, we found that fecundity increased (but survival decreased) with generation in resynthesised hybrids, suggesting that natural selection can play an important role in shaping hybrid performance – and thus invasiveness – over time. We conclude that the available evidence supports the H-I hypothesis, with the caveat that our results are clearly driven by tests in plants, which are more numerous than tests in animals and fungi. PMID:25234578

  1. The NEDD8 inhibitor MLN4924 increases the size of the nucleolus and activates p53 through the ribosomal-Mdm2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Bailly, A; Perrin, A; Bou Malhab, L J; Pion, E; Larance, M; Nagala, M; Smith, P; O'Donohue, M-F; Gleizes, P-E; Zomerdijk, J; Lamond, A I; Xirodimas, D P

    2016-01-28

    The ubiquitin-like molecule NEDD8 is essential for viability, growth and development, and is a potential target for therapeutic intervention. We found that the small molecule inhibitor of NEDDylation, MLN4924, alters the morphology and increases the surface size of the nucleolus in human and germline cells of Caenorhabditis elegans in the absence of nucleolar fragmentation. SILAC proteomics and monitoring of rRNA production, processing and ribosome profiling shows that MLN4924 changes the composition of the nucleolar proteome but does not inhibit RNA Pol I transcription. Further analysis demonstrates that MLN4924 activates the p53 tumour suppressor through the RPL11/RPL5-Mdm2 pathway, with characteristics of nucleolar stress. The study identifies the nucleolus as a target of inhibitors of NEDDylation and provides a mechanism for p53 activation upon NEDD8 inhibition. It also indicates that targeting the nucleolar proteome without affecting nucleolar transcription initiates the required signalling events for the control of cell cycle regulators.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations : gas phase floppy peptides of increasing size and complexity, in relation with IR-MPD experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2009-03-01

    We present finite temperature DFT-based Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (MD) simulations for the calculation of infrared spectra of complex molecular systems, either in the gas phase or in the condensed phase. We will review the fundamentals of the method, as well as the applicability and originality of finite temperature MD simulations for the purpose of modeling infrared spectra. Illustrations are taken from the infrared spectroscopy of alanine peptides of increasing size and complexity (from dipeptides to an octo-peptide) in the gas phase, in relation with IR-MPD (Infrared Multi Photon Dissociation) experiments : 300-400 K gas-phase action spectroscopy as devised on the CLIO platform at the University of Orsay-France or on the platform developed in the group of L. Snoek at Oxford-UK. A special emphasis on vibrational anharmonicities and how they can be extracted from molecular dynamics simulations will be put forward. Furthermore, band assignments in terms of atomic movements from MD is challenging and we have introduced a general method for obtaining effective normal modes of molecular systems from MD simulations.

  3. Mutation in the protease cleavage site of GDF9 increases ovulation rate and litter size in heterozygous ewes and causes infertility in homozygous ewes.

    PubMed

    Souza, C J H; McNeilly, A S; Benavides, M V; Melo, E O; Moraes, J C F

    2014-10-01

    Litter size (LS) in sheep is determined mainly by ovulation rate (OR). Several polymorphisms have been identified in the growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) gene that result in an increase in OR and prolificacy of sheep. Screening the databank of the Brazilian Sheep Breeders Association for triplet delivery, we identified flocks of prolific Ile de France ewes. After resequencing of GDF9, a point mutation (c.943C>T) was identified, resulting in a non-conservative amino acid change (p.Arg315Cys) in the cleavage site of the propeptide. This new allele was called Vacaria (FecG(v) ). A flock of half-sib ewes was evaluated for OR in the first three breeding seasons, and Vacaria heterozygotes had higher OR (P < 0.001), averaging 2.1 ± 0.1 when compared to 1.2 ± 0.1 in wild-type ewes. The OR was also influenced by age, increasing in the second and third breeding seasons (P < 0.001). In flocks segregating this allele, the LS was higher in mutant sheep (P < 0.001), averaging 1.61 ± 0.07 in heterozygotes and 1.29 ± 0.03 in wild-type ewes. Analysis of homozygote reproductive tract morphology revealed uterine and ovarian hypoplasia. Ovarian follicles continue to develop up to small antral stages, although with abnormal oocyte morphology and altered arrangement of granulosa cells. After the collapse of the oocyte in most follicles, the remaining cells formed clusters that persisted in the ovary. This SNP is useful to improve selection for dam prolificacy and also as a model to investigate GDF9 post-translation processing and the fate of the follicular cells that remain after the oocyte demise.

  4. Dosimetric response of variable-size cavities in photon-irradiated media and the behaviour of the Spencer-Attix cavity integral with increasing Δ.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D; Nahum, Alan E

    2016-04-01

    Cavity theory is fundamental to understanding and predicting dosimeter response. Conventional cavity theories have been shown to be consistent with one another by deriving the electron (+positron) and photon fluence spectra with the FLURZnrc user-code (EGSnrc Monte-Carlo system) in large volumes under quasi-CPE for photon beams of 1 MeV and 10 MeV in three materials (water, aluminium and copper) and then using these fluence spectra to evaluate and then inter-compare the Bragg-Gray, Spencer-Attix and 'large photon' 'cavity integrals'. The behaviour of the 'Spencer-Attix dose' (aka restricted cema), D S-A(▵), in a 1-MeV photon field in water has been investigated for a wide range of values of the cavity-size parameter ▵: D S-A(▵) decreases far below the Monte-Carlo dose (D MC) for ▵ greater than  ≈  30 keV due to secondary electrons with starting energies below ▵ not being 'counted'. We show that for a quasi-scatter-free geometry (D S-A(▵)/D MC) is closely equal to the proportion of energy transferred to Compton electrons with initial (kinetic) energies above ▵, derived from the Klein-Nishina (K-N) differential cross section. (D S-A(▵)/D MC) can be used to estimate the maximum size of a detector behaving as a Bragg-Gray cavity in a photon-irradiated medium as a function of photon-beam quality (under quasi CPE) e.g. a typical air-filled ion chamber is 'Bragg-Gray' at (monoenergetic) beam energies  ⩾260 keV. Finally, by varying the density of a silicon cavity (of 2.26 mm diameter and 2.0 mm thickness) in water, the response of different cavity 'sizes' was simulated; the Monte-Carlo-derived ratio D w/D Si for 6 MV and 15 MV photons varied from very close to the Spencer-Attix value at 'gas' densities, agreed well with Burlin cavity theory as ρ increased, and approached large photon behaviour for ρ  ≈  10 g cm(-3). The estimate of ▵ for the Si cavity was improved by incorporating a Monte-Carlo-derived correction for

  5. Body size and longitudinal body weight changes do not increase mortality in incident peritoneal dialysis patients of the Brazilian peritoneal dialysis multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Fernandes, Natália Maria; Bastos, Marcus Gomes; Franco, Márcia Regina Gianotti; Chaoubah, Alfredo; da Glória Lima, Maria; Divino-Filho, José Carolino; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the roles of body size and longitudinal body weight changes in the survival of incident peritoneal dialysis patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients (n = 1911) older than 18 years of age recruited from 114 dialysis centers (Dec/2004-Oct/2007) and participating in the Brazilian Peritoneal Dialysis Multicenter Cohort Study were included. Clinical and laboratory data were collected monthly (except if the patient received a transplant, recovered renal function, was transferred to hemodialysis, or died). RESULTS: Survival analyses were performed using Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox proportional hazards. Total follow-up was 34 months. The mean age was 59 years (54% female). The weight category percentages were as follows: underweight: 8%; normal: 51%; overweight: 29%; and obese 12%. The multivariate model showed a higher risk of death for a body mass index <18.5 kg/m2, a neutral risk between 25 and 29.9 kg/m2 and a protective effect for an index >30 kg/m2. Patients were divided into five categories according to quintiles of body weight changes during the first year of dialysis: <−3.1%, −3.1 to+0.12%, +0.12 to <+3.1% (reference category), +3.1 to +7.1% and >+7.1%. Patients in the lowest quintile had significantly higher mortality, whereas no negative impact was observed in the other quintiles. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that overweight/obesity and a positive body weight variation during the first year of peritoneal dialysis therapy do not increase mortality in incident dialysis patients in Brazil. PMID:23420157

  6. Dosimetric response of variable-size cavities in photon-irradiated media and the behaviour of the Spencer-Attix cavity integral with increasing Δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sudhir; Deshpande, Deepak D.; Nahum, Alan E.

    2016-04-01

    Cavity theory is fundamental to understanding and predicting dosimeter response. Conventional cavity theories have been shown to be consistent with one another by deriving the electron (+positron) and photon fluence spectra with the FLURZnrc user-code (EGSnrc Monte-Carlo system) in large volumes under quasi-CPE for photon beams of 1 MeV and 10 MeV in three materials (water, aluminium and copper) and then using these fluence spectra to evaluate and then inter-compare the Bragg-Gray, Spencer-Attix and ‘large photon’ ‘cavity integrals’. The behaviour of the ‘Spencer-Attix dose’ (aka restricted cema), D S-A(▵), in a 1-MeV photon field in water has been investigated for a wide range of values of the cavity-size parameter ▵: D S-A(▵) decreases far below the Monte-Carlo dose (D MC) for ▵ greater than  ≈  30 keV due to secondary electrons with starting energies below ▵ not being ‘counted’. We show that for a quasi-scatter-free geometry (D S-A(▵)/D MC) is closely equal to the proportion of energy transferred to Compton electrons with initial (kinetic) energies above ▵, derived from the Klein-Nishina (K-N) differential cross section. (D S-A(▵)/D MC) can be used to estimate the maximum size of a detector behaving as a Bragg-Gray cavity in a photon-irradiated medium as a function of photon-beam quality (under quasi CPE) e.g. a typical air-filled ion chamber is ‘Bragg-Gray’ at (monoenergetic) beam energies  ⩾260 keV. Finally, by varying the density of a silicon cavity (of 2.26 mm diameter and 2.0 mm thickness) in water, the response of different cavity ‘sizes’ was simulated; the Monte-Carlo-derived ratio D w/D Si for 6 MV and 15 MV photons varied from very close to the Spencer-Attix value at ‘gas’ densities, agreed well with Burlin cavity theory as ρ increased, and approached large photon behaviour for ρ  ≈  10 g cm-3. The estimate of ▵ for the Si cavity was improved by incorporating a Monte

  7. Role of Child Weight Status and the Relative Reinforcing Value of Food in Children’s Response to Portion Size Increases

    PubMed Central

    Kral, Tanja V.E.; Remiker, Adriane M.; Strutz, Erin M.; Moore, Reneé H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Food portion size is an important determinant of intake in children. It remains unknown if children’s weight status and relative reinforcing value of food (RRVF) interact with portion size to affect intake. Design and Methods In a randomized crossover design, 25 normal-weight and 25 obese children, ages 8 to 10 years, consumed dinner once a week for 3 weeks. At each dinner, the same meal was served, but the portion size of all foods (chicken nuggets, hash browns, ketchup, green beans, brownies) and a sugar-sweetened beverage (fruit punch) varied across conditions (100%, 150%, 200%). Children’s RRVF was assessed using a behavioral choice task. Results There was a significant main effect of portion size condition (P=0.003) and weight status (P=0.0005) and a non-significant trend for a portion size-by-weight status interaction (P=0.108) on intake. Mean intakes across conditions (100%, 150%, 200%) were 801±57, 964±58, and 873±57 kcal for normal-weight children and 1041±57, 1129±57, and 1210±57 kcal for obese children, respectively. Neither the main effect of RRVF status nor the condition-by-RRVF status interaction was significant (P>0.48). Conclusions Environments that offer large portions of palatable foods affect all children’s intake irrespective of their weight status or how reinforcing they find food to be. PMID:24733645

  8. Daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato with added fat tends to increase total body vitamin A pool size in vitamin A depleted Bangladeshi women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We assessed the affect of daily consumption of orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP), with or without added fat, on the total body vitamin A (VA) pool size of Bangladeshi women with low initial VA status. Women (n=120) received for 60d either 1) 0 µg RAE/d as boiled white-fleshed sweet potatoes (WFSP) ...

  9. Probability of double-strand breaks in genome-sized DNA by {gamma}-ray decreases markedly as the DNA concentration increases

    SciTech Connect

    Shimobayashi, Shunsuke F.; Iwaki, Takafumi; Mori, Toshiaki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2013-05-07

    By use of the single-molecule observation, we count the number of DNA double-strand breaks caused by {gamma}-ray irradiation with genome-sized DNA molecules (166 kbp). We find that P{sub 1}, the number of double-strand breaks (DSBs) per base pair per unit Gy, is nearly inversely proportional to the DNA concentration above a certain threshold DNA concentration. The inverse relationship implies that the total number of DSBs remains essentially constant. We give a theoretical interpretation of our experimental results in terms of attack of reactive species upon DNA molecules, indicating the significance of the characteristics of genome-sized giant DNA as semiflexible polymers for the efficiency of DSBs.

  10. Mutations in bone morphogenetic protein 15 and growth differentiation factor 9 genes are associated with increased litter size in fat-tailed sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Javanmard, Arash; Azadzadeh, N; Esmailizadeh, Ali K

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate association between GDF9 and BMP15 gene polymorphism and litter size in fat-tailed sheep, a total of 97 mature ewes from four breeds (Afshari=19; Baluchi=18; Makui=30 and Mehraban=30) were genotyped for the BMP15 HinfI and GDF9 HhaI polymorphisms by PCR-RFLP technique. The highest and lowest mutant allele frequencies were found in Makui (0.27) and Afshari (0.10) sheep for the BMP15 gene and in Afshari (0.24) and Mehraban (0.18) sheep for the GDF9 gene, respectively. Litter size was significantly influenced by genotype of the ewe for two genes (P < 0.01). Heterozygous genotypes for both loci showed higher litter size than homozygous genotypes (P < 0.01). None of the individuals carried homozygous genotype for both of the GDF9 and BMP15 variants in these breeds. The individuals carrying the mutant allele for one of the investigated candidate gene still showed fertile phenotype. Thus, existence of homozygosity at one of the BMP15 and GDF9 variant is not probably able to block normal hormonal pathway of reproduction in fat-tailed sheep.

  11. Increased size selectivity of Si quantum dots on SiC at low substrate temperatures: An ion-assisted self-organization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, D. H.; Das Arulsamy, A.; Rider, A. E.; Levchenko, I.; Ostrikov, K.

    2010-01-15

    A simple, effective, and innovative approach based on ion-assisted self-organization is proposed to synthesize size-selected Si quantum dots (QDs) on SiC substrates at low substrate temperatures. Using hybrid numerical simulations, the formation of Si QDs through a self-organization approach is investigated by taking into account two distinct cases of Si QD formation using the ionization energy approximation theory, which considers ionized in-fluxes containing Si{sup 3+} and Si{sup 1+} ions in the presence of a microscopic nonuniform electric field induced by a variable surface bias. The results show that the highest percentage of the surface coverage by 1 and 2 nm size-selected QDs was achieved using a bias of -20 V and ions in the lowest charge state, namely, Si{sup 1+} ions in a low substrate temperature range (227-327 deg. C). As low substrate temperatures ({<=}500 deg. C) are desirable from a technological point of view, because (i) low-temperature deposition techniques are compatible with current thin-film Si-based solar cell fabrication and (ii) high processing temperatures can frequently cause damage to other components in electronic devices and destroy the tandem structure of Si QD-based third-generation solar cells, our results are highly relevant to the development of the third-generation all-Si tandem photovoltaic solar cells.

  12. Different-Sized Gold Nanoparticle Activator/Antigen Increases Dendritic Cells Accumulation in Liver-Draining Lymph Nodes and CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qianqian; Zhang, Yulong; Du, Juan; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yong; Fu, Qiuxia; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-02-23

    The lack of efficient antigen and activator delivery systems, as well as the restricted migration of dendritic cells (DCs) to secondary lymph organs, dramatically limits DC-based adoptive immunotherapy. We selected two spherical gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based vehicles of optimal size for activator and antigen delivery. Their combination (termed the NanoAu-Cocktail) was associated with the dual targeting of CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) and an OVA peptide (OVAp) to DC subcellular compartments, inducing enhanced antigen cross-presentation, upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and elevated secretion of T helper1 cytokines. We demonstrated that the intravenously transfused NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs showed dramatically improved in vivo homing ability to lymphoid tissues and were settled in T cell area. Especially, by tissue-distribution analysis, we found that more than 60% of lymphoid tissues-homing DCs accumulated in liver-draining lymph nodes (LLNs). The improved homing ability of NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs was associated with the high expression of chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and rearrangement of the cytoskeletons. In addition, by antigen-specific tetramers detection, NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs were proved able to elicit strong antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, which provided enhanced protection from viral invasions. This study highlights the importance of codelivering antigen/adjuvant using different sized gold nanoparticles to improve DC homing and therapy. PMID:26771692

  13. Use of social network sites and instant messaging does not lead to increased offline social network size, or to emotionally closer relationships with offline network members.

    PubMed

    Pollet, Thomas V; Roberts, Sam G B; Dunbar, Robin I M

    2011-04-01

    The effect of Internet use on social relationships is still a matter of intense debate. This study examined the relationships between use of social media (instant messaging and social network sites), network size, and emotional closeness in a sample of 117 individuals aged 18 to 63 years old. Time spent using social media was associated with a larger number of online social network "friends." However, time spent using social media was not associated with larger offline networks, or feeling emotionally closer to offline network members. Further, those that used social media, as compared to non-users of social media, did not have larger offline networks, and were not emotionally closer to offline network members. These results highlight the importance of considering potential time and cognitive constraints on offline social networks when examining the impact of social media use on social relationships.

  14. A Method to Increase Current Density in a Mono Element Internal Tin Processed Superconductor Utilizing Zr Oxide to Refine Grain Size

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce A. Zeitlin, Eric Gregory

    2008-04-07

    The effect of Oxygen on (Nb1Zr)3Sn multifilament conductors manufactured by the Mono Element Internal Tin (MEIT) process was explored to improve the current density by refining the grain size. This followed work first done by General Electric on the Nb3Sn tape process. Techniques to fabricate the more difficult Nb1Zr composites are described and allowed fabrication of long lengths of .254 mm diameter wire from an 88.9 mm diameter billet. Oxygen was incorporated through the use of SnO2 mixed with tin powder and incorporated into the core. These were compared to samples with Ti+Sn and Cu+Sn cores. Heat treatments covered the range of 700 C to 1000 C. Current density vs. H, grain size, and reaction percentages are provided for the materials tested. The Oxygen gave superior results in the temperature range of 815-1000 C. It also stabilized the filament geometry of the array in comparison to the other additions at the higher temperatures. At 815 C a peak in layer Jc yielded values of 2537 A/mm2 at 12 T and 1353 A/mm2 at 15T, 8-22% and 30-73% greater respectively than 700 C values. Results with Oxygen at high temperature show the possibility of high speed continuous reaction of the composite versus the current batch or react in place methods. In general the Ti additions gave superior results at the lower reaction temperature. Future work is suggested to determine if the 815 C reaction temperature can lead to higher current density in high tin (Nb1Zr+Ox)3Sn conductors. A second technique incorporated oxygen directly into the Nb1Zr rods through heat treatment with Nb2O5 at 1100 C for 100 hours in vacuum prior to extrusion. The majority of the filaments reduced properly in the composite but some local variations in hardness led to breakage at smaller diameters.

  15. Increasing lengths of aftershock zones with depths of moderate-size earthquakes on the San Jacinto Fault suggests triggering of deep creep in the middle crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Peng, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Recent geodetic studies along the San Jacinto Fault (SJF) in southern California revealed a shallower locking depth than the seismogenic depth outlined by microseismicity. This disagreement leads to speculations that creeping episodes drive seismicity in the lower part of the seismogenic zone. Whether deep creep occurs along the SJF holds key information on how fault slips during earthquake cycle and potential seismic hazard imposed to southern California. Here we apply a matched filter technique to 10 M > 4 earthquake sequences along the SJF since 2000 and obtain more complete earthquake catalogues. We then systematic investigate spatio-temporal evolutions of these aftershock sequences. We find anomalously large aftershock zones for earthquakes occurred below the geodetically inferred locking depth (i.e. 11-12 km), while aftershock zones of shallower main shocks are close to expectations from standard scaling relationships. Although we do not observe clear migration of aftershocks, most aftershock zones do expand systematically with logarithmic time since the main shock. All the evidences suggest that aftershocks near or below the locking depth are likely driven by deep creep following the main shock. The presence of a creeping zone below 11-12 km may have significant implications on the maximum sizes of events in this region.

  16. Design Modifications for Increasing the BOM and EOM Power Output and Reducing the Size and Mass of RTG for the Pluto Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Kumar, Vasanth

    1994-06-01

    A companion paper analyzed the effect on source modules for three specific fuel options, and compared the predicted power output with JPL's latest goals for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission. The results showed that a 5-module RTG cannot fully meet JPL's goals with any of the available fuels; and that a 6-module RTG more than meets those goals with Russian fuel, almost meets them with U.S. (Cassini-type) fuel, but still falls far short of meeting them with the depleted fuel from the aged (1982) Galileo spare RTG. The inadequacy of the aged fuel was disappointing,because heat source modules made from it already exist, and their use in PFF could result in substantial cost savings. The present paper describes additional analyses which showed that a six-module RTG with the aged fuel can meet JPL's stipulated power margin with a relatively simple design modification, that a second design modification makes it possible to recover all of the mass and size penalty for going from five to six heat source modules, and that a third modification could raise the EOM power margin to 16%. There are four copies in the file. Cross Reference ESD Files FSC-ESD-217-94-531 (CID #8572)

  17. Design Modifications for Increasing the BOm and EOM Power Output and Reducing the Size and Mass of RTG for the Pluto Mission

    SciTech Connect

    Schock, Alfred; Or, Chuen T; Kumar, Vasanth

    1994-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. A companion paper analyzed the effect on source modules for three specific fuel options, and compared the predicted power output with JPL's latest goals for the Pluto Fast Flyby (PFF) mission. The results showed that a 5-module RTG cannot fully meet JPL's goals with any of the available fuels; and that a 6-module RTG more than meets those goals with Russian fuel, almost meets them with U.S. (Cassini-type) fuel, but still falls far short of meeting them with the depleted fuel from the aged (1982) Galileo spare RTG. The inadequacy of the aged fuel was disappointing,because heat source modules made from it already exist, and their use in PFF could result in substantial cost savings. The present paper describes additional analyses which showed that a six-module RTG with the aged fuel can meet JPL's stipulated power margin with a relatively simple design modification, that a second design modification makes it possible to recover all of the mass and size penalty for going from five to six heat source modules, and that a third modification could raise the EOM power margin to 16%.

  18. Polyether ether ketone implants achieve increased bone fusion when coated with nano-sized hydroxyapatite: a histomorphometric study in rabbit bone

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Pär; Jimbo, Ryo; Naito, Yoshihito; Kjellin, Per; Currie, Fredrik; Wennerberg, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) possesses excellent mechanical properties similar to those of human bone and is considered the best alternative material other than titanium for orthopedic spine and trauma implants. However, the deficient osteogenic properties and the bioinertness of PEEK limit its fields of application. The aim of this study was to limit these drawbacks by coating the surface of PEEK with nano-scaled hydroxyapatite (HA) minerals. In the study, the biological response to PEEK, with and without HA coating, was investigated. Twenty-four screw-like and apically perforated implants in the rabbit femur were histologically evaluated at 3 weeks and 12 weeks after surgery. Twelve of the 24 implants were HA coated (test), and the remaining 12 served as uncoated PEEK controls. At 3 weeks and 12 weeks, the mean bone–implant contact was higher for test compared to control (P<0.05). The bone area inside the threads was comparable in the two groups, but the perforating hole showed more bone area for the HA-coated implants at both healing points (P<0.01). With these results, we conclude that nano-sized HA coating on PEEK implants significantly improved the osteogenic properties, and in a clinical situation this material composition may serve as an implant where a rapid bone fusion is essential. PMID:27103801

  19. Parent, Peer, and Media Influences on Body Image and Strategies to Both Increase and Decrease Body Size among Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Marita P.; Ricciardelli, Lina A.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the nature of body image and body change strategies, as well as sociocultural influences on these variables, among a group of 1,266 adolescents. Findings indicated females were less satisfied with their bodies and were more likely to adopt strategies to lose weight, whereas males were likely to adopt strategies to increase weight and…

  20. Parent, peer, and media influences on body image and strategies to both increase and decrease body size among adolescent boys and girls.

    PubMed

    McCabe, M P; Ricciardelli, L A

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated the nature of body image and body change strategies, as well as the sociocultural influences on these variables, among a group of 1,266 adolescents (622 males, 644 females). In particular, it investigated weight gain and increased muscle, as well as weight loss. It was found that females were less satisfied with their bodies and were more likely to adopt strategies to lose weight, whereas males were more likely to adopt strategies to increase weight and muscle tone. Respondents with higher body mass index (BMI) evidenced greater body dissatisfaction and more weight loss strategies, but there were no differences between BMI groups in weight gain or strategies to increase muscles. Weight gain and strategies to increase muscles were more likely to be undertaken by older adolescents, but there were no grade level differences in weight loss. Media influences to alter weight, as well as feedback from mother, father, and both male and female peers, were greater for females. There were few grade level or BMI differences in regard to any of the sociocultural influences. The importance of these findings in terms of providing a better understanding of factors which may lead to a disturbed body image and body change disorders, particularly among adolescent boys, is discussed.

  1. Downregulation of multiple CDK inhibitor ICK/KRP genes upregulates the E2F pathway and increases cell proliferation, and organ and seed sizes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yan; Cao, Ling; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yongpeng; Shi, Xianzong; Liu, Han; Li, Lixia; Zhang, Zhengli; Fowke, Larry C; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Yongming

    2013-08-01

    The ICK/KRP cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors are important plant cell cycle factors sharing only limited similarity with the metazoan CIP/KIP family of CDK inhibitors. Little is known about the specific functions of different ICK/KRP genes in planta. In this study, we created double and multiple mutants from five single Arabidopsis ICK/KRP T-DNA mutants, and used a set of 20 lines for the functional investigation of the important gene family. There were gradual increases in CDK activity from single to multiple mutants, indicating that ICK/KRPs act as CDK inhibitors under normal physiological conditions in plants. Whereas lower-order mutants showed no morphological phenotypes, the ick1 ick2 ick6 ick7 and ick1 ick2 ick5 ick6 ick7 mutants had a slightly altered leaf shape. The quintuple mutant had larger cotyledons, leaves, petals and seeds than the wild-type control. At the cellular level, the ICK/KRP mutants had more but smaller cells in all the organs examined. These phenotypic effects became more apparent as more ICK/KRPs were downregulated, suggesting that to a large extent ICK/KRPs function in plants redundantly in a dosage-dependent manner. Analyses also revealed increased expression of E2F-dependent genes, and elevated RBR1 as well as an increased level of phospho-RBB1 protein in the quintuple mutant. Thus, downregulation of multiple ICK/KRP genes increases CDK activity, upregulates the E2F pathway and stimulates cell proliferation, resulting in increased cell numbers, and larger organs and seeds. PMID:23647236

  2. Class Size & School Size. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Angela

    2005-01-01

    Class size is one of the most researched and heavily debated topics in American public education. Currently, at least 25 states have initiated class size reduction (CSR) programs. In the past twenty years, several major studies have been conducted which indicate that smaller class sizes produce an increase in student achievement as well as greater…

  3. Increased expression of a nucleolar Nop5/Sik family member in metastatic melanoma cells: evidence for its role in nucleolar sizing and function.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, K; Ito, A; Watabe, K; Koma, Y; Asada, H; Yoshikawa, K; Shinomura, Y; Matsuzawa, Y; Nojima, H; Kitamura, Y

    2001-10-01

    F10 and BL6 cells of B16 mouse melanoma cells are metastatic after intravenous injection, but only BL6 cells can metastasize to lungs after subcutaneous injection. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines were examined, and a greater expression of the Sik-similar protein (Sik-SP) gene was found in BL6 cells. Structurally, Sik-SP belongs to the nucleolar Nop5/Sik family whose members play central roles in ribosome biogenesis; however, the function of Sik-SP has not been examined. Cytology with green fluorescent protein-fused proteins showed that Sik-SP was localized to the nucleolus. To examine whether Sik-SP is involved in ribosome biogenesis, two parameters were measured: magnitude of ribosomal RNA synthesis per nucleus and magnitude of protein production from the same amount of mRNA of an exogenous luciferase gene. Both values and, in addition, nucleolar size were larger in COS-7 monkey kidney cells overexpressing Sik-SP and BL6 cells than in mock-transfected COS-7 and F10 cells, respectively. Sik-SP seemed to promote ribosome biogenesis in the nucleolus. Furthermore, the expression of Sik-SP seemed to confer a greater cell growth response to serum, because such a response was greater in BL6 cells and F10 cells overexpressing Sik-SP than in untreated and mock-transfected F10 cells. Sik-SP may render melanoma cells more competent to survive through augmenting the activity of nucleolus. PMID:11583964

  4. Strength training increases the size of the satellite cell pool in type I and II fibres of chronically painful trapezius muscle in females

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Abigail L; Andersen, Lars L; Frandsen, Ulrik; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While strength training has been shown to be effective in mediating hypertrophy and reducing pain in trapezius myalgia, responses at the cellular level have not previously been studied. This study investigated the potential of strength training targeting the affected muscles (SST, n = 18) and general fitness training (GFT, n = 16) to augment the satellite cell (SC) and macrophage pools in the trapezius muscles of women diagnosed with trapezius myalgia. A group receiving general health information (REF, n = 8) served as a control. Muscle biopsies were collected from the trapezius muscles of the 42 women (age 44 ± 8 years; mean ± SD) before and after the 10 week intervention period and were analysed by immunohistochemistry for SCs, macrophages and myonuclei. The SC content of type I and II fibres was observed to increase significantly from baseline by 65% and 164%, respectively, with SST (P < 0.0001), together with a significant correlation between the baseline number of SCs and the extent of hypertrophy (r = −0.669, P = 0.005). SST also resulted in a 74% enhancement of the trapezius macrophage content (P < 0.01), accompanied by evidence for the presence of an increased number of actively dividing cells (Ki67+) post-SST (P < 0.001). GFT resulted in a significant 23% increase in the SC content of type II fibres, when expressed relative to myonuclear number only (P < 0.05). No changes in the number of myonuclei per fibre or myonuclear domain were detected in any group. These findings provide strong support at the cellular level for the potential of SST to induce a strong myogenic response in this population. PMID:21946848

  5. Highly sensitive detection of quantal dopamine secretion from pheochromocytoma cells using neural microelectrode array electrodeposited with polypyrrole graphene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Xu, Huiren; Song, Yilin; Luo, Jinping; Wei, Wenjing; Xu, Shengwei; Cai, Xinxia

    2015-04-15

    For the measurement of events of dopamine (DA) release as well as the coordinating neurotransmission in the nerve system, a neural microelectrode array (nMEA) electrodeposited directionally with polypyrrole graphene (PG) nanocomposites was fabricated. The deposited graphene significantly increased the surface area of working electrode, which led to the nMEA (with diameter of 20 μm) with excellent selectivity and sensitivity to DA. Furthermore, PG film modification exhibited low detection limit (4 nM, S/N = 3.21), high sensitivity, and good linearity in the presence of ascorbic acid (e.g., 13933.12 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) in the range of 0.8-10 μM). In particular, the nMEA combined with the patch-clamp system was used to detect quantized DA release from pheochromocytoma cells under 100 mM K(+) stimulation. The nMEA that integrates 60 microelectrodes is novel for detecting a large number of samples simultaneously, which has potential for neural communication research.

  6. Quantal radiation from macroscopic rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strutinsky, V.; Plujko, V.

    1988-09-01

    Macroscopic rotation of deformed excited nuclei may under certain conditions be accompanied by radiation of quasi-discrete gamma rays which resemble the cascade of transitions between nuclear rotational states.

  7. Site-specific conjugation of monodispersed DOTA-PEGn to a thiolated diabody reveals the effect of increasing peg size on kidney clearance and tumor uptake with improved 64-copper PET imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Crow, Desiree; Turatti, Fabio; Bading, James R; Anderson, Anne-Line; Poku, Erasmus; Yazaki, Paul J; Carmichael, Jenny; Leong, David; Wheatcroft, David; Wheatcroft, Michael P; Raubitschek, Andrew A; Hudson, Peter J; Colcher, David; Shively, John E

    2011-04-20

    Optimal PET imaging of tumors with radiolabeled engineered antibodies requires, among other parameters, matching blood clearance and tumor uptake with the half-life of the engineered antibody. Although diabodies have favorable molecular sizes (50 kDa) for rapid blood clearance (t(1/2) = 30-60 min) and are bivalent, thereby increasing tumor uptake, they exhibit substantial kidney uptake as their major route of clearance, which is especially evident when they are labeled with the PET isotope (64)Cu (t(1/2) = 12 h). To overcome this drawback, diabodies may be conjugated to PEG, a modification that increases the apparent molecular size of the diabody and reduces kidney uptake without adversely affecting tumor uptake or the tumor to blood ratio. We show here that site-specific attachment of monodispersed PEGn of increasing molecular size (n = 12, 24, and 48) can uniformly increase the apparent molecular size of the PEG-diabody conjugate, decrease kidney uptake, and increase tumor uptake, the latter due to the increased residence time of the conjugate in the blood. Since the monodispersed PEGs were preconjugated to the chelator DOTA, the conjugates were able to bind radiometals such as (111)In and (64)Cu that can be used for SPECT and PET imaging, respectively. To allow conjugation of the DOTA-PEG to the diabody, the DOTA-PEG incorporated a terminal cysteine conjugated to a vinyl sulfone moiety. In order to control the conjugation chemistry, we have engineered a surface thiolated diabody that incorporates two cysteines per monomer (four per diabody). The thiolated diabody was expressed and purified from bacterial fermentation and only needs to be reduced prior to conjugation to the DOTA-PEGn-Cys-VS. This novel imaging agent (a diabody with DOTA-PEG48-Cys-VS attached to introduced thiols) gave up to 80%ID/g of tumor uptake with a tumor to blood ratio (T/B) of 8 at 24 h when radiolabeled with (111)In and 37.9% ID/g of tumor uptake (T/B = 8) at 44 h when radiolabeled with

  8. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas I.

    1985-01-01

    After a brief introduction identifying current issues and trends in research on class size, this brochure reviews five recent studies bearing on the relationship of class size to educational effectiveness. Part 1 is a review of two interrelated and highly controversial "meta-analyses" or statistical integrations of research findings on class size,…

  9. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  10. Incubation of MDCO-216 (ApoA-IMilano/POPC) with Human Serum Potentiates ABCA1-Mediated Cholesterol Efflux Capacity, Generates New Prebeta-1 HDL, and Causes an Increase in HDL Size.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Herman J; Schranz, Dorota B; Asztalos, Bela F; Otvos, James; Jeyarajah, Elias; Drazul-Schrader, Denise; Collins, Heidi L; Adelman, Steven J; Wijngaard, Peter L J

    2014-01-01

    MDCO-216 is a complex of dimeric ApoA-IMilano and palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), previously shown to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden. Here we studied the effect of incubation of human plasma or serum with MDCO-216 on cholesterol efflux capacity from J774 cells, on prebeta-1 high density lipoprotein (prebeta-1 HDL) and on HDL size assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H-NMR). MDCO-216 incubated in buffer containing 4% human serum albumin stimulated both ABCA1-mediated efflux and ABCA1-independent cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages. When incubated with human serum a dose- and time-dependent synergistic increase of the ABCA1-mediated efflux capacity were observed. Using a commercially available ELISA for prebeta-1 HDL, MDCO-216 as such was poorly detected (12-15% of nominal amount of protein). Prebeta-1 HDL was rapidly lost when human plasma alone is incubated at 37°C. In contrast, incubation of human plasma with MDCO-216 at 37°C produced a large amount of new prebeta-1 HDL. Native 2D electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting with an apoA-I antibody, which also detects ApoA-I Milano, confirmed the increase in prebeta-1 HDL upon incubation at 37°C. With the increase of prebeta-1 HDL, the concomitant disappearance of the small alpha-3 and alpha-4 HDL and MDCO-216 and an increase in the large alpha-1 and alpha-2 HDL were observed. Immunoblotting with Mab 17F3 specific for ApoA-I Milano showed the appearance of ApoA-I Milano in alpha-1 and alpha-2, but not in prebeta-1 HDL. (1)H-NMR analysis of plasma incubated with MDCO-216 confirmed rapid disappearance of small-sized HDL particles and increase of medium- and large-sized HDL particles accompanied with a decrease in total HDL particle number. In conclusion, incubation of human plasma or serum with MDCO-216 strongly enhanced ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, caused a strong increase of prebeta-1 HDL, and drastically changed the distribution of HDL subpopulations. Overall, the

  11. Incubation of MDCO-216 (ApoA-IMilano/POPC) with Human Serum Potentiates ABCA1-Mediated Cholesterol Efflux Capacity, Generates New Prebeta-1 HDL, and Causes an Increase in HDL Size

    PubMed Central

    Schranz, Dorota B.; Asztalos, Bela F.; Otvos, James; Drazul-Schrader, Denise; Wijngaard, Peter L. J.

    2014-01-01

    MDCO-216 is a complex of dimeric ApoA-IMilano and palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC), previously shown to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden. Here we studied the effect of incubation of human plasma or serum with MDCO-216 on cholesterol efflux capacity from J774 cells, on prebeta-1 high density lipoprotein (prebeta-1 HDL) and on HDL size assessed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR). MDCO-216 incubated in buffer containing 4% human serum albumin stimulated both ABCA1-mediated efflux and ABCA1-independent cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages. When incubated with human serum a dose- and time-dependent synergistic increase of the ABCA1-mediated efflux capacity were observed. Using a commercially available ELISA for prebeta-1 HDL, MDCO-216 as such was poorly detected (12–15% of nominal amount of protein). Prebeta-1 HDL was rapidly lost when human plasma alone is incubated at 37°C. In contrast, incubation of human plasma with MDCO-216 at 37°C produced a large amount of new prebeta-1 HDL. Native 2D electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting with an apoA-I antibody, which also detects ApoA-I Milano, confirmed the increase in prebeta-1 HDL upon incubation at 37°C. With the increase of prebeta-1 HDL, the concomitant disappearance of the small alpha-3 and alpha-4 HDL and MDCO-216 and an increase in the large alpha-1 and alpha-2 HDL were observed. Immunoblotting with Mab 17F3 specific for ApoA-I Milano showed the appearance of ApoA-I Milano in alpha-1 and alpha-2, but not in prebeta-1 HDL. 1H-NMR analysis of plasma incubated with MDCO-216 confirmed rapid disappearance of small-sized HDL particles and increase of medium- and large-sized HDL particles accompanied with a decrease in total HDL particle number. In conclusion, incubation of human plasma or serum with MDCO-216 strongly enhanced ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, caused a strong increase of prebeta-1 HDL, and drastically changed the distribution of HDL subpopulations. Overall, the results

  12. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease.

  13. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  14. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  15. Size Matters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehring, John

    2004-01-01

    This article describes the immense size of Unity Junior High School in Cicero, Illinois and the opinions of various people regarding its size. The school has more than 2,700 students, seventeen acres, eighty-eight faculty lounges, and ninety-six security cameras. Administrators hope the school--"Cicero's crown jewel," as the school district's Web…

  16. Fully quantal calculation of H{sub 2} translation-rotation states in the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, Peter M.

    2014-11-14

    The quantal translation-rotation (TR) states of the (p-H{sub 2}){sub 2}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate hydrate inclusion compound have been computed. The ten-dimensional problem (in the rigid-cage and rigid-H{sub 2} approximation) is solved by first approximating the H{sub 2} moieties as spherically symmetric and solving for their 6D translational eigenstates. These are then combined with H{sub 2} free rotational states in a product basis that is used to diagonalize the full TR hamiltonian. The computed low-energy eigenstates have translational components that are essentially identical to the 6D translational eigenstates and rotational components that are 99.9% composed of rotationally unexcited H{sub 2} moieties. In other words, TR coupling is minimal for the low-energy states of the species. The low-energy level structure is found to be substantially more congested than that of the more tightly packed (p-H{sub 2}){sub 4}@5{sup 12}6{sup 4} clathrate species. The level structure is also shown to be understandable in terms of a model of (H{sub 2}){sub 2} as a semirigid diatomic species consisting of two spherically symmetric H{sub 2} pseudo-atoms.

  17. Exploring Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among apparently…

  18. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Foucras, Gilles; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2015-12-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host's inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:26658352

  19. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile; Foucras, Gilles; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola

    2015-12-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host's inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway.

  20. A Point Mutation in Suppressor of Cytokine Signalling 2 (Socs2) Increases the Susceptibility to Inflammation of the Mammary Gland while Associated with Higher Body Weight and Size and Higher Milk Production in a Sheep Model

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Rachel; Senin, Pavel; Sarry, Julien; Allain, Charlotte; Tasca, Christian; Ligat, Laeticia; Portes, David; Woloszyn, Florent; Bouchez, Olivier; Tabouret, Guillaume; Lebastard, Mathieu; Caubet, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Mastitis is an infectious disease mainly caused by bacteria invading the mammary gland. Genetic control of susceptibility to mastitis has been widely evidenced in dairy ruminants, but the genetic basis and underlying mechanisms are still largely unknown. We describe the discovery, fine mapping and functional characterization of a genetic variant associated with elevated milk leukocytes count, or SCC, as a proxy for mastitis. After implementing genome-wide association studies, we identified a major QTL associated with SCC on ovine chromosome 3. Fine mapping of the region, using full sequencing with 12X coverage in three animals, provided one strong candidate SNP that mapped to the coding sequence of a highly conserved gene, suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (Socs2). The frequency of the SNP associated with increased SCC was 21.7% and the Socs2 genotype explained 12% of the variance of the trait. The point mutation induces the p.R96C substitution in the SH2 functional domain of SOCS2 i.e. the binding site of the protein to various ligands, as well-established for the growth hormone receptor GHR. Using surface plasmon resonance we showed that the p.R96C point mutation completely abrogates SOCS2 binding affinity for the phosphopeptide of GHR. Additionally, the size, weight and milk production in p.R96C homozygote sheep, were significantly increased by 24%, 18%, and 4.4%, respectively, when compared to wild type sheep, supporting the view that the point mutation causes a loss of SOCS2 functional activity. Altogether these results provide strong evidence for a causal mutation controlling SCC in sheep and highlight the major role of SOCS2 as a tradeoff between the host’s inflammatory response to mammary infections, and body growth and milk production, which are all mediated by the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:26658352

  1. Inequality and City Size*

    PubMed Central

    Baum-Snow, Nathaniel; Pavan, Ronni

    2013-01-01

    Between 1979 and 2007 a strong positive monotonic relationship between wage inequality and city size has developed. This paper investigates the links between this emergent city size inequality premium and the contemporaneous nationwide increase in wage inequality. After controlling for the skill composition of the workforce across cities of different sizes, we show that at least 23 percent of the overall increase in the variance of log hourly wages in the United States from 1979 to 2007 is explained by the more rapid growth in the variance of log wages in larger locations relative to smaller locations. This influence occurred throughout the wage distribution and was most prevalent during the 1990s. More rapid growth in within skill group inequality in larger cities has been by far the most important force driving these city size specific patterns in the data. Differences in the industrial composition of cities of different sizes explain up to one-third of this city size effect. These results suggest an important role for agglomeration economies in generating changes in the wage structure during the study period. PMID:24954958

  2. Platelet size in man.

    PubMed

    Paulus, J M

    1975-09-01

    The shape and parameters of platelet size distributions were studied in 50 normal persons and 97 patients in order to test the proposed thesis that platelet size heterogeneity results mainly from aging in the circulation. This thesis was contradicted (1) by size distributions of age-homogeneous, newly-born cell populations which were lognormal with increased (instead of decreased) dispersion of volumes and (2) by the macrothrombocytosis found in some populations with normal age distribution. For these reasons, thrombocytopoiesis appeared to play the major role in determining platelet size. A model was built in which the volume variation of platelet territories due to megakaryocyte growth and membrane demarcation at each step of maturation was a random proportion of the previous value of the volume. This model explains the lognormal shape of both newborn and circulating platelet size distributions. It also implies that (1) the mean and standard deviation of platelet logvolumes depend on the rates of volume change of the individual platelet territories (growth rate minus demarcation rate) as well as on megakaryocyte maturation time; (2) platelet hyperdestruction causes an increase in the mean and dispersion of the rates of territory volume change; (3) Mediterranean macrothrombocytosis and some hereditary macrothrombocytotic thrombocytopenias or dysthrombocytopoieses reflect a diminished rate of territory demarcation, and (4) platelet size heterogeneity is caused mainly by the variations in territory growth and demarcation and not by aging in the circulation.

  3. Lasers of All Sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcou, Philippe; Forget, Sébastien Robert-Philip, Isabelle

    2015-10-01

    * Introduction * The Laser in All Its Forms * Gas lasers * Dye lasers * Solid-state lasers * Lasers for Every Taste * The rise of lasers * Lasers of all sizes * The colors of the rainbow... and beyond * Shorter and shorter lasers * Increasingly powerful lasers * Lasers: A Universal Tool? * Cutting, welding, and cleaning * Communicating * Treating illnesses * Measuring * Supplying energy? * Entertaining * Understanding * Conclusion

  4. Liver-specific GH receptor gene-disrupted (LiGHRKO) mice have decreased endocrine IGF-I, increased local IGF-I, and altered body size, body composition, and adipokine profiles.

    PubMed

    List, Edward O; Berryman, Darlene E; Funk, Kevin; Jara, Adam; Kelder, Bruce; Wang, Feiya; Stout, Michael B; Zhi, Xu; Sun, Liou; White, Thomas A; LeBrasseur, Nathan K; Pirtskhalava, Tamara; Tchkonia, Tamara; Jensen, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Wenjuan; Masternak, Michal M; Kirkland, James L; Miller, Richard A; Bartke, Andrzej; Kopchick, John J

    2014-05-01

    GH is an important regulator of body growth and composition as well as numerous other metabolic processes. In particular, liver plays a key role in the GH/IGF-I axis, because the majority of circulating "endocrine" IGF-I results from GH-stimulated liver IGF-I production. To develop a better understanding of the role of liver in the overall function of GH, we generated a strain of mice with liver-specific GH receptor (GHR) gene knockout (LiGHRKO mice). LiGHRKO mice had a 90% decrease in circulating IGF-I levels, a 300% increase in circulating GH, and significant changes in IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-1, IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3, IGFBP-5, and IGFBP-7. LiGHRKO mice were smaller than controls, with body length and body weight being significantly decreased in both sexes. Analysis of body composition over time revealed a pattern similar to those found in GH transgenic mice; that is, LiGHRKO mice had a higher percentage of body fat at early ages followed by lower percentage of body fat in adulthood. Local IGF-I mRNA levels were significantly increased in skeletal muscle and select adipose tissue depots. Grip strength was increased in LiGHRKO mice. Finally, circulating levels of leptin, resistin, and adiponectin were increased in LiGHRKO mice. In conclusion, LiGHRKO mice are smaller despite increased local mRNA expression of IGF-I in several tissues, suggesting that liver-derived IGF-I is indeed important for normal body growth. Furthermore, our data suggest that novel GH-dependent cross talk between liver and adipose is important for regulation of adipokines in vivo. PMID:24517230

  5. The Size of Pluto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tholen, David J.

    2014-11-01

    The presence of a thin atmosphere around Pluto prevents the stellar occultation method from probing all the way down to the surface of Pluto. As such, the most accurate method for measuring the size of Pluto is fitting the mutual event photometry from 1985 to 1990. Previous fits solved for not only the size of Pluto, but also the size and orbit of Charon. Since that era, the size and orbit of Charon have been determined independently and more accurately via other means. Stellar occultation measurements have established the diameter of Charon as 1212 km, while the orbit of Charon has been determined via direct images obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope over a period of two decades. By imposing the known values for the size and orbit of Charon on the fits to the mutual event photometry, a new size for Pluto can be derived with considerably fewer free parameters. To perform this fit, the extensive set of mutual event photometry acquired at Mauna Kea Observatory was utilized. A fit to all the data yields a diameter for Pluto of 2317 km. To avoid the question of limb darkening on Pluto and the effect of albedo variation over the surface of Pluto, even fewer free parameters can be solved for by restricting attention to just the superior mutual events, during which Charon was behind Pluto. In this case the diameter of Pluto increases to 2379 km. Work is currently being done to determine how weighting of the data affects the result. The true value will become known in a few months when New Horizons flies past Pluto. These fits also show that there is still room for improvement in the orbit of Charon.

  6. Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

    SciTech Connect

    Schery, Stephen D., Wasiolek, Piotr; Rodgers, John

    1999-06-01

    Improvement in understanding the deposition of ambient dust particles on ECAM (environmental continuous air monitor) filters, reduction of the alpha-particle interference of radon progeny and other radioactive aerosols in different particle size ranges on filters, and development of ECAMs with increased sensitivity under dusty outdoor conditions.

  7. Targeted taste cell-specific overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult taste buds elevates phosphorylated TrkB protein levels in taste cells, increases taste bud size, and promotes gustatory innervation.

    PubMed

    Nosrat, Irina V; Margolskee, Robert F; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2012-05-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most potent neurotrophic factor in the peripheral taste system during embryonic development. It is also expressed in adult taste buds. There is a lack of understanding of the role of BDNF in the adult taste system. To address this, we generated novel transgenic mice in which transgene expression was driven by an α-gustducin promoter coupling BDNF expression to the postnatal expression of gustducin in taste cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly stronger BDNF labeling in taste cells of high BDNF-expressing mouse lines compared with controls. We show that taste buds in these mice are significantly larger and have a larger number of taste cells compared with controls. To examine whether innervation was affected in Gust-BDNF mice, we used antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and ATP receptor P2X3. The total density of general innervation and specifically the gustatory innervation was markedly increased in high BDNF-expressing mice compared with controls. TrkB and NCAM gene expression in laser capture microdissected taste epithelia were significantly up-regulated in these mice. Up-regulation of TrkB transcripts in taste buds and elevated taste cell-specific TrkB phosphorylation in response to increased BDNF levels indicate that BDNF controls the expression and activation of its high affinity receptor in taste cells. This demonstrates a direct taste cell function for BDNF. BDNF also orchestrates and maintains taste bud innervation. We propose that the Gust-BDNF transgenic mouse models can be employed to further dissect the specific roles of BDNF in the adult taste system. PMID:22442142

  8. Size Effect in Continuum Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Wei-Yang; James W. Foulk; Huestis, Edwin M.; Connelly, Kevin; Song, Bo; Yang, Nancy Y. C.

    2008-09-01

    The mechanical properties of some materials (Cu, Ni, Ag, etc.) have been shown to develop strong dependence on the geometric dimensions, resulting in a size effect. Several theories have been proposed to model size effects, but have been based on very few experiments conducted at appropriate scales. Some experimental results implied that size effects are caused by increasing strain gradients and have been used to confirm many strain gradient theories. On the other hand, some recent experiments show that a size effect exists in the absence of strain gradients. This report describes a brief analytical and experimental study trying to clarify the material and experimental issues surrounding the most influential size-effect experiments by Fleck et al (1994). This effort is to understand size effects intended to further develop predictive models.

  9. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size

    PubMed Central

    King, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631–820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835–1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID

  10. Developmental synaptic changes increase the range of integrative capabilities of an identified excitatory neocortical connection.

    PubMed

    Angulo, M C; Staiger, J F; Rossier, J; Audinat, E

    1999-03-01

    Excitatory synaptic transmission between pyramidal cells and fast-spiking (FS) interneurons of layer V of the motor cortex was investigated in acute slices by using paired recordings at 30 degrees C combined with morphological analysis. The presynaptic and postsynaptic properties at these identified central synapses were compared between 3- and 5-week-old rats. At these two postnatal developmental stages, unitary EPSCs were mediated by the activation of AMPA receptors with fast kinetics at a holding potential of -72 mV. The amplitude distribution analysis of the EPSCs indicates that, at both stages, pyramidal-FS connections consisted of multiple functional release sites. The apparent quantal size obtained by decreasing the external calcium ([Ca2+]e) varied from 11 to 29 pA near resting membrane potential. In young rats, pairs of presynaptic action potentials elicited unitary synaptic responses that displayed paired-pulse depression at all tested frequencies. In older animals, inputs from different pyramidal cells onto the same FS interneuron had different paired-pulse response characteristics and, at most of these connections, a switch from depression to facilitation occurred when decreasing the rate of presynaptic stimulation. The balance between facilitation and depression endows pyramidal-FS connections from 5-week-old animals with wide integrative capabilities and confers unique functional properties to each synapse.

  11. Container size influences snack food intake independently of portion size.

    PubMed

    Marchiori, David; Corneille, Olivier; Klein, Olivier

    2012-06-01

    While larger containers have been found to increase food intake, it is unclear whether this effect is driven by container size, portion size, or their combination, as these variables are usually confounded. The study was advertised as examining the effects of snack food consumption on information processing and participants were served M&M's for free consumption in individual cubicles while watching a TV show. Participants were served (1) a medium portion of M&M's in a small (n=30) or (2) in a large container (n=29), or (3) a large portion in a large container (n=29). The larger container increased intake by 129% (199 kcal) despite holding portion size constant, while controlling for different confounding variables. This research suggests that larger containers stimulate food intake over and above their impact on portion size. PMID:22306436

  12. Does Class Size Make a Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Gene V.; Down, A. Graham

    1979-01-01

    Argues that study findings indicate that lowered class size increases student achievement and improves school attitudes. Counter argument indicates there is little educational payoff and great monetary expense in small reductions in class size. (RH)

  13. Size Scaling of Static Friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, O. M.; Manini, Nicola; Tosatti, Erio

    2013-02-01

    Sliding friction across a thin soft lubricant film typically occurs by stick slip, the lubricant fully solidifying at stick, yielding and flowing at slip. The static friction force per unit area preceding slip is known from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to decrease with increasing contact area. That makes the large-size fate of stick slip unclear and unknown; its possible vanishing is important as it would herald smooth sliding with a dramatic drop of kinetic friction at large size. Here we formulate a scaling law of the static friction force, which for a soft lubricant is predicted to decrease as fm+Δf/Aγ for increasing contact area A, with γ>0. Our main finding is that the value of fm, controlling the survival of stick slip at large size, can be evaluated by simulations of comparably small size. MD simulations of soft lubricant sliding are presented, which verify this theory.

  14. On Effect Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J.

    2012-01-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension,…

  15. Sizing up microbes

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, V.K.

    2012-01-01

    The size range of life forms is dictated by basic principles of physics. Large microorganisms, with sizes approaching a millimeter, have compensating features that address the immutable laws of physics. For pathogens, size may impact a range of functions, such as adherence and immune evasion. We review several recent studies on factors impacting, and impacted by, the size of microorganisms. PMID:23117415

  16. Can selection on nest size from nest predation explain the latitudinal gradient in clutch size?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Biancucci, L.; Martin, T.E.

    2010-01-01

    1. Latitudinal variation in clutch sizes of birds is a well described, but poorly understood pattern. Many hypotheses have been proposed, but few have been experimentally tested, and none have been universally accepted by researchers. 2. The nest size hypothesis posits that higher nest predation in the tropics favours selection for smaller nests and thereby constrains clutch size by shrinking available space for eggs and/or nestlings in the nest. We tested this hypothesis with an experiment in a tropical forest and a comparative study between temperate and tropical field sites. 3. Specifically, we tested if: (i) predation increased with nest size; (ii) tropical birds had smaller nests controlled for body size; and (iii) clutch size was explained by nest size controlled for body size. 4. Experimental swapping of nests of different sizes showed that nest predation increased with nest size in the tropical site. Moreover, nest predation rates were higher in species with larger nests in both sites. However, nest size, corrected for body mass and phylogeny, did not differ between sites and was not related to clutch size between sites. 5. Hence, nest predation can exert selection on nest size as predicted by the hypothesis. Nest size increased with adult body mass, such that adult size might indirectly influence reproductive success through effects on nest size and nest predation risk. Ultimately, however, selection from nest predation on nest size does not explain the smaller clutch sizes typical of the tropics.

  17. On effect size.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken; Preacher, Kristopher J

    2012-06-01

    The call for researchers to report and interpret effect sizes and their corresponding confidence intervals has never been stronger. However, there is confusion in the literature on the definition of effect size, and consequently the term is used inconsistently. We propose a definition for effect size, discuss 3 facets of effect size (dimension, measure/index, and value), outline 10 corollaries that follow from our definition, and review ideal qualities of effect sizes. Our definition of effect size is general and subsumes many existing definitions of effect size. We define effect size as a quantitative reflection of the magnitude of some phenomenon that is used for the purpose of addressing a question of interest. Our definition of effect size is purposely more inclusive than the way many have defined and conceptualized effect size, and it is unique with regard to linking effect size to a question of interest. Additionally, we review some important developments in the effect size literature and discuss the importance of accompanying an effect size with an interval estimate that acknowledges the uncertainty with which the population value of the effect size has been estimated. We hope that this article will facilitate discussion and improve the practice of reporting and interpreting effect sizes. PMID:22545595

  18. Numerosity perception after size adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Eckart; Fink, Gereon R.

    2016-01-01

    While some researchers propose the existence of a special numerosity sense, others challenge this view and argue that numerosity is derived from low-level features as density information. Here, we used size adaptation to manipulate the apparent area size of an object set without changing its physical density. After size adaptation, two probe patches were shown, each of which contained a specific numerosity of dots. Subjects were required to report, which probe patch contained more dots. Numerosity perception was compared between conditions where probe patches were adapted to appear smaller or larger. Size adaptation affected numerosity perception in a logarithmic fashion, increasing with the numerosity in the probe patch. No changes in density perception were found after size adaptation. Data suggest that size and density information play only a minor role in the estimation of low numerosities. In stark contrast, high numerosities strongly depend on size and density information. The data reinforce recent claims of separate mechanism for the perception of low and high numerosities. PMID:27650296

  19. Numerosity perception after size adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Eckart; Fink, Gereon R

    2016-01-01

    While some researchers propose the existence of a special numerosity sense, others challenge this view and argue that numerosity is derived from low-level features as density information. Here, we used size adaptation to manipulate the apparent area size of an object set without changing its physical density. After size adaptation, two probe patches were shown, each of which contained a specific numerosity of dots. Subjects were required to report, which probe patch contained more dots. Numerosity perception was compared between conditions where probe patches were adapted to appear smaller or larger. Size adaptation affected numerosity perception in a logarithmic fashion, increasing with the numerosity in the probe patch. No changes in density perception were found after size adaptation. Data suggest that size and density information play only a minor role in the estimation of low numerosities. In stark contrast, high numerosities strongly depend on size and density information. The data reinforce recent claims of separate mechanism for the perception of low and high numerosities. PMID:27650296

  20. Does Class Size Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; Brewer, Dominic J.; Gamoran, Adam; Willms, J. Douglas

    2001-01-01

    Reports on the significance of class size to student learning. Includes an overview of class size in various countries, the importance of teacher adaptability, and the Asian paradox of large classes allied to high test scores. (MM)

  1. Mitochondrial network size scaling in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Rafelski, Susanne M; Viana, Matheus P; Zhang, Yi; Chan, Yee-Hung M; Thorn, Kurt S; Yam, Phoebe; Fung, Jennifer C; Li, Hao; Costa, Luciano da F; Marshall, Wallace F

    2012-11-01

    Mitochondria must grow with the growing cell to ensure proper cellular physiology and inheritance upon division. We measured the physical size of mitochondrial networks in budding yeast and found that mitochondrial network size increased with increasing cell size and that this scaling relation occurred primarily in the bud. The mitochondria-to-cell size ratio continually decreased in aging mothers over successive generations. However, regardless of the mother's age or mitochondrial content, all buds attained the same average ratio. Thus, yeast populations achieve a stable scaling relation between mitochondrial content and cell size despite asymmetry in inheritance.

  2. Portion Size and Obesity123

    PubMed Central

    Livingstone, M. Barbara E.; Pourshahidi, L. Kirsty

    2014-01-01

    Portion size is a key environmental driver of energy intake, and larger-than-appropriate portion sizes could increase the risk of weight gain. Multiple acute, well-controlled laboratory studies, supported by data from free-living settings, demonstrated that portion size has a powerful and proportionate effect on the amount of food consumed. Of particular importance is that bouts of overeating associated with large portions are sustained and not followed by a compensatory reduction in energy intake. The positive effect of portion size on energy intake was demonstrated for different types of foods and beverages, and is particularly pronounced with energy-dense foods. The predisposition to overeat in response to large portions is pervasive and occurs regardless of demographic characteristics, such as socioeconomic status, age, body mass index, and sex. Secular trends toward greater availability of large portions, coupled with value-size pricing, effectively distorted consumption norms and perceptions of what is an appropriate amount to eat. Nevertheless, although a direct causal link between portion size and obesity remains to be established, advice to moderate portion sizes, especially of energy-dense foods, is presently the cornerstone of most weight management advice. Although many strategies have been proposed to counteract the deleterious effects of portion size, there are few data indicating which are likely to be acceptable in the medium- to long term. Further research is urgently needed to establish what types of interventions targeted at portion size are likely to be effective, in what settings, and among which target groups. PMID:25398749

  3. The Classroom: Size versus Density.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, C. Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    Classroom density may be a more important planning consideration than size. The lower middle range for human social distance is 7 feet--not met in most classrooms containing 20 to 25 students. Students need ample space, since crowding causes behavior problems and increased maintenance costs. (Contains 10 references.) (MLH)

  4. Scaling body size fluctuations

    PubMed Central

    Giometto, Andrea; Altermatt, Florian; Carrara, Francesco; Maritan, Amos; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The size of an organism matters for its metabolic, growth, mortality, and other vital rates. Scale-free community size spectra (i.e., size distributions regardless of species) are routinely observed in natural ecosystems and are the product of intra- and interspecies regulation of the relative abundance of organisms of different sizes. Intra- and interspecies distributions of body sizes are thus major determinants of ecosystems’ structure and function. We show experimentally that single-species mass distributions of unicellular eukaryotes covering different phyla exhibit both characteristic sizes and universal features over more than four orders of magnitude in mass. Remarkably, we find that the mean size of a species is sufficient to characterize its size distribution fully and that the latter has a universal form across all species. We show that an analytical physiological model accounts for the observed universality, which can be synthesized in a log-normal form for the intraspecies size distributions. We also propose how ecological and physiological processes should interact to produce scale-invariant community size spectra and discuss the implications of our results on allometric scaling laws involving body mass. PMID:23487793

  5. Group Size Effects in Employment Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillery, Joseph M.; Fugita, Stephen S.

    1975-01-01

    Effects of the number of individuals coacting while taking two standardized motor performance tests were examined. Increases in aptitude scores corresponding to increases in group size were predicted based upon the summation hypothesis of social facilitation theory. Results indicated a group size effect. (Author/BJG)

  6. Family size and economic welfare.

    PubMed

    Espenshade, T J; Kamenske, G; Turchi, B A

    1983-01-01

    Using data from the 1972-1973 Consumer Expenditure Survey, this article examines the effect of variations in family size on such measures of family economic well-being as levels and patterns of spending, earnings and employment, public assistance and the quantity and quality of housing. In general, although overall income rises somewhat with family size, an increase in the number of children appears to reduce the family's standard of living, especially in young families with small children. Current consumption increases as the number of children increases: families with 4 or more children in which the household head is under the age of 35 and has had more than 12 years of education tend to spend 40% more than childless couples of similar age and educational level. Despite the increased spending, per capita consumption falls for all age and education categories. Larger families devote more of their income to necessities and less to luxuries. Among young couples in which the household head has had 9 to 12 years of education, the proportion of income used to buy food rises from 15% if there are no children present to 25% if there are 4 or more. The proportion of food expenditures devoted to meals eaten out also falls steadily as the number of children rises. Although husband's earnings rise with increase in family size, there is a pronounced decline in wife's earnings, particularly in young families that have children under the age of 4. Overall, as the number of children grows, families spend a larger share of their income on current consumption, and per capita income declines. The % of families receiving welfare or food stamps tends to go up as the number of children increases, particularly among younger couples with less education. When the quantity and quality of housing are examined, the average number of rooms in the family dwelling is found to increase with family size.

  7. Cytoskeletal genes regulating brain size.

    PubMed

    Bond, Jacquelyn; Woods, C Geoffrey

    2006-02-01

    One of the most notable trends in human evolution is the dramatic increase in brain size that has occurred in the great ape clade, culminating in humans. Of particular interest is the vast expanse of the cerebral cortex, which is believed to have resulted in our ability to perform higher cognitive functions. Recent investigations of congenital microcephaly in humans have resulted in the identification of several genes that non-redundantly and specifically influence mammalian brain size. These genes appear to affect neural progenitor cell number through microtubular organisation at the centrosome. PMID:16337370

  8. Size structures sensory hierarchy in ocean life

    PubMed Central

    Martens, Erik A.; Wadhwa, Navish; Jacobsen, Nis S.; Lindemann, Christian; Andersen, Ken H.; Visser, André

    2015-01-01

    Survival in aquatic environments requires organisms to have effective means of collecting information from their surroundings through various sensing strategies. In this study, we explore how sensing mode and range depend on body size. We find a hierarchy of sensing modes determined by body size. With increasing body size, a larger battery of modes becomes available (chemosensing, mechanosensing, vision, hearing and echolocation, in that order) while the sensing range also increases. This size-dependent hierarchy and the transitions between primary sensory modes are explained on the grounds of limiting factors set by physiology and the physical laws governing signal generation, transmission and reception. We theoretically predict the body size limits for various sensory modes, which align well with size ranges found in literature. The treatise of all ocean life, from unicellular organisms to whales, demonstrates how body size determines available sensing modes, and thereby acts as a major structuring factor of aquatic life. PMID:26378212

  9. Phylogenetic effective sample size.

    PubMed

    Bartoszek, Krzysztof

    2016-10-21

    In this paper I address the question-how large is a phylogenetic sample? I propose a definition of a phylogenetic effective sample size for Brownian motion and Ornstein-Uhlenbeck processes-the regression effective sample size. I discuss how mutual information can be used to define an effective sample size in the non-normal process case and compare these two definitions to an already present concept of effective sample size (the mean effective sample size). Through a simulation study I find that the AICc is robust if one corrects for the number of species or effective number of species. Lastly I discuss how the concept of the phylogenetic effective sample size can be useful for biodiversity quantification, identification of interesting clades and deciding on the importance of phylogenetic correlations. PMID:27343033

  10. Brain size varies with temperature in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Gillooly, James F; McCoy, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    The tremendous variation in brain size among vertebrates has long been thought to be related to differences in species' metabolic rates. It is thought that species with higher metabolic rates can supply more energy to support the relatively high cost of brain tissue. And yet, while body temperature is known to be a major determinant of metabolic rate, the possible effects of temperature on brain size have scarcely been explored. Thus, here we explore the effects of temperature on brain size among diverse vertebrates (fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals). We find that, after controlling for body size, brain size increases exponentially with temperature in much the same way as metabolic rate. These results suggest that temperature-dependent changes in aerobic capacity, which have long been known to affect physical performance, similarly affect brain size. The observed temperature-dependence of brain size may explain observed gradients in brain size among both ectotherms and endotherms across broad spatial and temporal scales.

  11. Body size evolution in Titanosauriformes (Sauropoda, Macronaria).

    PubMed

    de Souza, L M; Santucci, R M

    2014-09-01

    Titanosauriformes is a conspicuous and diverse group of sauropod dinosaurs that inhabited almost all land masses during Cretaceous times. Besides the diversity of forms, the clade comprises one of the largest land animals found so far, Argentinosaurus, as well as some of the smallest sauropods known to date, Europasaurus and Magyarosaurus. They are therefore good candidates for studies on body size trends such as the Cope's rule, the tendency towards an increase in body size in an evolutionary lineage. We used statistical methods to assess body size changes under both phylogenetic and nonphylogenetic approaches to identify body size trends in Titanosauriformes. Femoral lengths were collected (or estimated from humeral length) from 46 titanosauriform species and used as a proxy for body size. Our findings show that there is no increase or decrease in titanosauriform body size with age along the Cretaceous and that negative changes in body size are more common than positive ones (although not statistically significant) for most of the titanosauriform subclades (e.g. Saltasaridae, Lithostrotia, Titanosauria and Somphospondyli). Therefore, Cope's rule is not supported in titanosauriform evolution. Finally, we also found a trend towards a decrease of titanosauriform mean body size coupled with an increase in body size standard deviation, both supporting an increase in body size variation towards the end of Cretaceous. PMID:25131432

  12. Portion size: review and framework for interventions

    PubMed Central

    Steenhuis, Ingrid HM; Vermeer, Willemijn M

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity has increased. A strong environmental factor contributing to the obesity epidemic is food portion size. This review of studies into the effects of portion size on energy intake shows that increased food portion sizes lead to increased energy intake levels. Important mechanisms explaining why larger portions are attractive and lead to higher intake levels are value for money and portion distortion. This review also shows that few intervention studies aiming to reverse the negative influence of portion size have been conducted thus far, and the ones that have been conducted show mixed effects. More intervention studies targeted at portion size are urgently needed. Opportunities for further interventions are identified and a framework for portion size interventions is proposed. Opportunities for intervention include those targeted at the individual as well as those targeted at the physical, economic, political and socio-cultural environment. PMID:19698102

  13. Prey size diversity hinders biomass trophic transfer and predator size diversity promotes it in planktonic communities

    PubMed Central

    García-Comas, Carmen; Sastri, Akash R.; Ye, Lin; Chang, Chun-Yi; Lin, Fan-Sian; Su, Min-Sian; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Hsieh, Chih-hao

    2016-01-01

    Body size exerts multiple effects on plankton food-web interactions. However, the influence of size structure on trophic transfer remains poorly quantified in the field. Here, we examine how the size diversity of prey (nano-microplankton) and predators (mesozooplankton) influence trophic transfer efficiency (using biomass ratio as a proxy) in natural marine ecosystems. Our results support previous studies on single trophic levels: transfer efficiency decreases with increasing prey size diversity and is enhanced with greater predator size diversity. We further show that communities with low nano-microplankton size diversity and high mesozooplankton size diversity tend to occur in warmer environments with low nutrient concentrations, thus promoting trophic transfer to higher trophic levels in those conditions. Moreover, we reveal an interactive effect of predator and prey size diversities: the positive effect of predator size diversity becomes influential when prey size diversity is high. Mechanistically, the negative effect of prey size diversity on trophic transfer may be explained by unicellular size-based metabolic constraints as well as trade-offs between growth and predation avoidance with size, whereas increasing predator size diversity may enhance diet niche partitioning and thus promote trophic transfer. These findings provide insights into size-based theories of ecosystem functioning, with implications for ecosystem predictive models. PMID:26865298

  14. Prey size diversity hinders biomass trophic transfer and predator size diversity promotes it in planktonic communities.

    PubMed

    García-Comas, Carmen; Sastri, Akash R; Ye, Lin; Chang, Chun-Yi; Lin, Fan-Sian; Su, Min-Sian; Gong, Gwo-Ching; Hsieh, Chih-Hao

    2016-02-10

    Body size exerts multiple effects on plankton food-web interactions. However, the influence of size structure on trophic transfer remains poorly quantified in the field. Here, we examine how the size diversity of prey (nano-microplankton) and predators (mesozooplankton) influence trophic transfer efficiency (using biomass ratio as a proxy) in natural marine ecosystems. Our results support previous studies on single trophic levels: transfer efficiency decreases with increasing prey size diversity and is enhanced with greater predator size diversity. We further show that communities with low nano-microplankton size diversity and high mesozooplankton size diversity tend to occur in warmer environments with low nutrient concentrations, thus promoting trophic transfer to higher trophic levels in those conditions. Moreover, we reveal an interactive effect of predator and prey size diversities: the positive effect of predator size diversity becomes influential when prey size diversity is high. Mechanistically, the negative effect of prey size diversity on trophic transfer may be explained by unicellular size-based metabolic constraints as well as trade-offs between growth and predation avoidance with size, whereas increasing predator size diversity may enhance diet niche partitioning and thus promote trophic transfer. These findings provide insights into size-based theories of ecosystem functioning, with implications for ecosystem predictive models.

  15. Import and nuclear size

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Fix, Orna

    2012-01-01

    The size of a cell’s nucleus is usually proportional to the size of the cell itself. How are the two linked? The answer lies, at least in part, in the import of one or more cytoplasmic cargoes into the nucleus. PMID:21107417

  16. Particle-Size Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, Glendon W. ); Or, Dani; J.H. Dane and G.C. Topp

    2002-11-01

    Book Chapter describing methods of particle-size analysis for soils. Includes a variety of classification schemes. Standard methods for size distributions using pipet and hydrometer techniques are described. New laser-light scattering and related techniques are discussed. Complete with updated references.

  17. Modeling Raindrop Size

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Roger W.; Kliche, Donna V.; Smith, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Being able to characterize the size of raindrops is useful in a number of fields including meteorology, hydrology, agriculture and telecommunications. Associated with this article are data sets containing surface (i.e. ground-level) measurements of raindrop size from two different instruments and two different geographical locations. Students may…

  18. The Class Size Debate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishel, Lawrence, Ed.; Rothstein, Richard, Ed.

    This collection of papers debates the merits of smaller class sizes and research methods used to evaluate the efficacy of this education reform measure. Four chapters focus on (1) "Understanding the Magnitude and Effect of Class Size on Student Achievement" (Alan B. Krueger), which discusses expenditures per student and economic criterion; (2)…

  19. Thalamic Glutamatergic Afferents into the Rat Basolateral Amygdala Exhibit Increased Presynaptic Glutamate Function Following Withdrawal from Chronic Intermittent Ethanol

    PubMed Central

    Christian, Daniel T; Alexander, Nancy J; Diaz, Marvin R; McCool, Brian A

    2012-01-01

    Amygdala glutamatergic neurotransmission regulates withdrawal induced anxiety-like behaviors following chronic ethanol exposure. The lateral/basolateral amygdala receives multiple glutamatergic projections that contribute to overall amygdala function. Our lab has previously shown that rat cortical (external capsule) afferents express postsynaptic alterations during chronic intermittent ethanol exposure and withdrawal. However, thalamic (internal capsule) afferents also provide crucial glutamatergic input during behavioral conditioning, and they have not been studied in the context of chronic drug exposure. We report here that these thalamic inputs express altered presynaptic function during withdrawal from chronic ethanol exposure. This is characterized by enhanced release probability, as exemplified by altered paired-pulse ratios and decreased failure rates of unitary events, and increased concentrations of synaptic glutamate. Quantal analysis further implicates a withdrawal-dependent enhancement of the readily-releasable pool of vesicles as a probable mechanism. These functional alterations are accompanied by increased expression of vesicle associated protein markers. These data demonstrate that chronic ethanol modulation of glutamate neurotransmission in the rat lateral/basolateral amygdala is afferent-specific. Further, presynaptic regulation of lateral/basolateral amygdala thalamic inputs by chronic ethanol may be a novel neurobiological mechanism contributing to the increased anxiety-like behaviors that characterize withdrawal. PMID:22982568

  20. Cell-Size Control

    PubMed Central

    Amodeo, Amanda A.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    Cells of a given type maintain a characteristic cell size to function efficiently in their ecological or organismal context. They achieve this through the regulation of growth rates or by actively sensing size and coupling this signal to cell division. We focus this review on potential size-sensing mechanisms, including geometric, external cue, and titration mechanisms. Mechanisms that titrate proteins against DNA are of particular interest because they are consistent with the robust correlation of DNA content and cell size. We review the literature, which suggests that titration mechanisms may underlie cell-size sensing in Xenopus embryos, budding yeast, and Escherichia coli, whereas alternative mechanisms may function in fission yeast. PMID:26254313

  1. Network Structure and City Size

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, David

    2012-01-01

    Network structure varies across cities. This variation may yield important knowledge about how the internal structure of the city affects its performance. This paper systematically compares a set of surface transportation network structure variables (connectivity, hierarchy, circuity, treeness, entropy, accessibility) across the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States. A set of scaling parameters are discovered to show how network size and structure vary with city size. These results suggest that larger cities are physically more inter-connected. Hypotheses are presented as to why this might obtain. This paper then consistently measures and ranks access to jobs across 50 US metropolitan areas. It uses that accessibility measure, along with network structure variables and city size to help explain journey-to-work time and auto mode share in those cities. A 1 percent increase in accessibility reduces average metropolitan commute times by about 90 seconds each way. A 1 percent increase in network connectivity reduces commute time by 0.1 percent. A 1 percent increase in accessibility results in a 0.0575 percent drop in auto mode share, while a 1 percent increase in treeness reduces auto mode share by 0.061 percent. Use of accessibility and network structure measures is important for planning and evaluating the performance of network investments and land use changes. PMID:22253764

  2. Size-energy relationships in ecological communities.

    PubMed

    Sewall, Brent J; Freestone, Amy L; Hawes, Joseph E; Andriamanarina, Ernest

    2013-01-01

    Hypotheses that relate body size to energy use are of particular interest in community ecology and macroecology because of their potential to facilitate quantitative predictions about species interactions and to clarify complex ecological patterns. One prominent size-energy hypothesis, the energetic equivalence hypothesis, proposes that energy use from shared, limiting resources by populations or size classes of foragers will be independent of body size. Alternative hypotheses propose that energy use will increase with body size, decrease with body size, or peak at an intermediate body size. Despite extensive study, however, size-energy hypotheses remain controversial, due to a lack of directly-measured data on energy use, a tendency to confound distinct scaling relationships, and insufficient attention to the ecological contexts in which predicted relationships are likely to occur. Our goal, therefore, was to directly evaluate size-energy hypotheses while clarifying how results would differ with alternate methods and assumptions. We comprehensively tested size-energy hypotheses in a vertebrate frugivore guild in a tropical forest in Madagascar. Our test of size-energy hypotheses, which is the first to examine energy intake directly, was consistent with the energetic equivalence hypothesis. This finding corresponds with predictions of metabolic theory and models of energy distribution in ecological communities, which imply that body size does not confer an advantage in competition for energy among populations or size classes of foragers. This result was robust to different assumptions about energy regulation. Our results from direct energy measurement, however, contrasted with those obtained with conventional methods of indirect inference from size-density relationships, suggesting that size-density relationships do not provide an appropriate proxy for size-energy relationships as has commonly been assumed. Our research also provides insights into mechanisms

  3. Adaptive evolution toward larger size in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Joanna; Meade, Andrew; Pagel, Mark; Venditti, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The notion that large body size confers some intrinsic advantage to biological species has been debated for centuries. Using a phylogenetic statistical approach that allows the rate of body size evolution to vary across a phylogeny, we find a long-term directional bias toward increasing size in the mammals. This pattern holds separately in 10 of 11 orders for which sufficient data are available and arises from a tendency for accelerated rates of evolution to produce increases, but not decreases, in size. On a branch-by-branch basis, increases in body size have been more than twice as likely as decreases, yielding what amounts to millions and millions of years of rapid and repeated increases in size away from the small ancestral mammal. These results are the first evidence, to our knowledge, from extant species that are compatible with Cope’s rule: the pattern of body size increase through time observed in the mammalian fossil record. We show that this pattern is unlikely to be explained by several nonadaptive mechanisms for increasing size and most likely represents repeated responses to new selective circumstances. By demonstrating that it is possible to uncover ancient evolutionary trends from a combination of a phylogeny and appropriate statistical models, we illustrate how data from extant species can complement paleontological accounts of evolutionary history, opening up new avenues of investigation for both. PMID:25848031

  4. Attention modulates visual size adaptation.

    PubMed

    Kreutzer, Sylvia; Fink, Gereon R; Weidner, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    The current study determined in healthy subjects (n = 16) whether size adaptation occurs at early, i.e., preattentive, levels of processing or whether higher cognitive processes such as attention can modulate the illusion. To investigate this issue, bottom-up stimulation was kept constant across conditions by using a single adaptation display containing both small and large adapter stimuli. Subjects' attention was directed to either the large or small adapter stimulus by means of a luminance detection task. When attention was directed toward the small as compared to the large adapter, the perceived size of the subsequent target was significantly increased. Data suggest that different size adaptation effects can be induced by one and the same stimulus depending on the current allocation of attention. This indicates that size adaptation is subject to attentional modulation. These findings are in line with previous research showing that transient as well as sustained attention modulates visual features, such as contrast sensitivity and spatial frequency, and influences adaptation in other contexts, such as motion adaptation (Alais & Blake, 1999; Lankheet & Verstraten, 1995). Based on a recently suggested model (Pooresmaeili, Arrighi, Biagi, & Morrone, 2013), according to which perceptual adaptation is based on local excitation and inhibition in V1, we conclude that guiding attention can boost these local processes in one or the other direction by increasing the weight of the attended adapter. In sum, perceptual adaptation, although reflected in changes of neural activity at early levels (as shown in the aforementioned study), is nevertheless subject to higher-order modulation.

  5. Intercomparison of 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS 3321): uncertainties in particle sizing and number size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeifer, Sascha; Müller, Thomas; Weinhold, Kay; Zikova, Nadezda; Martins dos Santos, Sebastiao; Marinoni, Angela; Bischof, Oliver F.; Kykal, Carsten; Ries, Ludwig; Meinhardt, Frank; Aalto, Pasi; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Wiedensohler, Alfred

    2016-04-01

    Aerodynamic particle size spectrometers are a well-established method to measure number size distributions of coarse mode particles in the atmosphere. Quality assurance is essential for atmospheric observational aerosol networks to obtain comparable results with known uncertainties. In a laboratory study within the framework of ACTRIS (Aerosols, Clouds, and Trace gases Research Infrastructure Network), 15 aerodynamic particle size spectrometers (APS model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN, USA) were compared with a focus on flow rates, particle sizing, and the unit-to-unit variability of the particle number size distribution. Flow rate deviations were relatively small (within a few percent), while the sizing accuracy was found to be within 10 % compared to polystyrene latex (PSL) reference particles. The unit-to-unit variability in terms of the particle number size distribution during this study was within 10 % to 20 % for particles in the range of 0.9 up to 3 µm, which is acceptable for atmospheric measurements. For particles smaller than that, the variability increased up to 60 %, probably caused by differences in the counting efficiencies of individual units. Number size distribution data for particles smaller than 0.9 µm in aerodynamic diameter should only be used with caution. For particles larger than 3 µm, the unit-to-unit variability increased as well. A possible reason is an insufficient sizing accuracy in combination with a steeply sloping particle number size distribution and the increasing uncertainty due to decreasing counting. Particularly this uncertainty of the particle number size distribution must be considered if higher moments of the size distribution such as the particle volume or mass are calculated, which require the conversion of the aerodynamic diameter measured to a volume equivalent diameter. In order to perform a quantitative quality assurance, a traceable reference method for the particle number concentration in the size range 0.5-3 µm

  6. Effective Population Sizes with Multiple Paternity

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, D. W.; Chesser, R. K.

    1994-01-01

    While the concept of effective population size is of obvious applicability to many questions in population genetics and conservation biology, its utility has suffered due to a lack of agreement among its various formulations. Often, mathematical formulations for effective sizes apply restrictive assumptions that limit their applicability. Herein, expressions for effective sizes of populations that account for mating tactics, biases in sex ratios, and differential dispersal rates (among other parameters) are developed. Of primary interest is the influence of multiple paternity on the maintenance of genetic variation in a population. In addition to the standard inbreeding and variance effective sizes, intragroup (coancestral) and intergroup effective sizes also are developed. Expressions for effective sizes are developed for the beginning of nonrandom gene exchanges (initial effective sizes), the transition of gene correlations (instantaneous effective sizes), and the steady-state (asymptotic effective size). Results indicate that systems of mating that incorporate more than one male mate per female increase all effective sizes above those expected from polygyny and monogamy. Instantaneous and asymptotic sizes can be expressed relative to the fixation indices. The parameters presented herein can be utilized in models of effective sizes for the study of evolutionary biology and conservation genetics. PMID:7982568

  7. Does size matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Carreras, B. A.; Newman, D. E.; Dobson, Ian

    2014-06-15

    Failures of the complex infrastructures society depends on having enormous human and economic cost that poses the question: Are there ways to optimize these systems to reduce the risks of failure? A dynamic model of one such system, the power transmission grid, is used to investigate the risk from failure as a function of the system size. It is found that there appears to be optimal sizes for such networks where the risk of failure is balanced by the benefit given by the size.

  8. Is the myonuclear domain size fixed?

    PubMed

    Van der Meer, S F T; Jaspers, R T; Degens, H

    2011-12-01

    It has been suggested that the number of myonuclei in a muscle fibre changes in proportion to the change in fibre size, resulting in a constant myonuclear domain size, defined as the cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus. The myonuclear domain size varies, however, between fibre types and is inversely related with the oxidative capacity of a fibre. Overall, the observations of an increase in myonuclear domain size during both maturational growth and overload-induced hypertrophy, and the decrease in myonuclear domain size during disuse- and ageing-associated muscle atrophy suggest that the concept of a constant myonuclear domain size needs to be treated cautiously. It also suggests that only when the myonuclear domain size exceeds a certain threshold during growth or overload-induced hypertrophy acquisition of new myonuclei is required for further fibre hypertrophy. PMID:22130137

  9. GAIA measurements of asteroid sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dell'Oro, A.; Cellino, A.

    Observations of Main Belt asteroids by GAIA will produce direct measurements of their angular sizes for a significant sample of the population. A comprehensive set of simulations are currently being performed. They are based on a numerical model specifically developed to simulate the signal that GAIA will receive from asteroids in a large variety of cases. An investigation of the predicted performances of the on-board instrumentation, as currently proposed, is in progress. The simulations take into account all the relevant physical quantities that will play a role in determining the resulting signal, including the apparent angular size of the objects, the possible range of motion in the CCD frames, and photon statistics noise. An analysis of the accuracy of size measurements as a function of apparent magnitude is presented. In spite of the fact that asteroid images will generally cover only small numbers of pixels in the CCD detector and the typical angular sizes of the objects will be generally comparable with the instrumental PSF width, the simulations indicate that relevant information can be extracted from the data in a rather large range of observing conditions. In particular, it turns out that Main Belt asteroids with diameters larger than 30 km will be measured with an accuracy equal or better than 10 %, at least once during the mission operational lifetime. The number of these objects is currently estimated to be of the order of 1000. Below 20 km, no accurate size measurement will be obtained. Simulations have been performed also to investigate the change in expected performances by varying the size of the read-out window of the CCD, in order to determine the best trade-off between the number of read-out pixels and the effect of increasing noise. The proposed 6-pixel width for the faint objects provides an excellent compromise for the purposes of asteroid observations.

  10. The size of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kanamori, H.

    1980-01-01

    How we should measure the size of an earthquake has been historically a very important, as well as a very difficult, seismological problem. For example, figure 1 shows the loss of life caused by earthquakes in recent times and clearly demonstrates that 1976 was the worst year for earthquake casualties in the 20th century. However, the damage caused by an earthquake is due not only to its physical size but also to other factors such as where and when it occurs; thus, figure 1 is not necessarily an accurate measure of the "size" of earthquakes in 1976. the point is that the physical process underlying an earthquake is highly complex; we therefore cannot express every detail of an earthquake by a simple straightforward parameter. Indeed, it would be very convenient if we could find a single number that represents the overall physical size of an earthquake. This was in fact the concept behind the Richter magnitude scale introduced in 1935. 

  11. Particle Size Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barth, Howard G.; Sun, Shao-Tang

    1989-01-01

    Presents a review of research focusing on scattering, elution techniques, electrozone sensing, filtration, centrifugation, comparison of techniques, data analysis, and particle size standards. The review covers the period 1986-1988. (MVL)

  12. Exploring Planet Sizes

    NASA Video Gallery

    This lesson combines a series of activities to compare models of the size of Earth to other planets and the distances to other planets. Activities highlight space missions to other planets in our s...

  13. Paper Sizes and Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2007-01-01

    Reams of paper come in a standardised system of related sheet sizes. Most people are familiar with the international paper sizes A4, A3 and B4, but there are others. The ratio of the sides of any sheet in the series is such that if the paper is cut or folded in half on itself then the ratio of the sides remains unchanged. Due to this property of…

  14. Structural effect of size on interracial friendship

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Siwei; Xie, Yu

    2013-01-01

    Social contexts exert structural effects on individuals’ social relationships, including interracial friendships. In this study, we posit that, net of group composition, total context size has a distinct effect on interracial friendship. Under the assumptions of (i) maximization of preference in choosing a friend, (ii) multidimensionality of preference, and (iii) preference for same-race friends, we conducted analyses using microsimulation that yielded three main findings. First, increased context size decreases the likelihood of forming an interracial friendship. Second, the size effect increases with the number of preference dimensions. Third, the size effect is diluted by noise, i.e., the random component affecting friendship formation. Analysis of actual friendship data among 4,745 American high school students yielded results consistent with the main conclusion that increased context size promotes racial segregation and discourages interracial friendship. PMID:23589848

  15. Structural effect of size on interracial friendship.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Siwei; Xie, Yu

    2013-04-30

    Social contexts exert structural effects on individuals' social relationships, including interracial friendships. In this study, we posit that, net of group composition, total context size has a distinct effect on interracial friendship. Under the assumptions of (i) maximization of preference in choosing a friend, (ii) multidimensionality of preference, and (iii) preference for same-race friends, we conducted analyses using microsimulation that yielded three main findings. First, increased context size decreases the likelihood of forming an interracial friendship. Second, the size effect increases with the number of preference dimensions. Third, the size effect is diluted by noise, i.e., the random component affecting friendship formation. Analysis of actual friendship data among 4,745 American high school students yielded results consistent with the main conclusion that increased context size promotes racial segregation and discourages interracial friendship.

  16. Economic development and family size.

    PubMed

    Rios, R J

    1991-01-01

    The demographic transition in Latin America has resulted in increased family size rather than the Western European model of reduced family size. In 1905, both fertility and mortality were high in Latin America, but mortality declined more rapidly in Latin America than in Europe. In 1905, the crude birth rate for 15 selected countries averaged 44/1000 population. Western fertility at a comparable transition point was much lower at 30/1000. Between 1905 and 1960, fertility declines were evident in Uruguay, Argentina, Cuba, and Chile. Between 1960 and 1985, fertility declines appeared in Costa Rica, Panama, Brazil, and Colombia. Fertility declines were smaller in the other Latin American countries. Crude birth rates declined markedly by 1985 but may overestimate fertility decline, which is more accurately measured by standardized birth rates. Fertility decline was evident in Argentina, Chile, and Costa Rica for standardized birth rates, survivorship ratio, and births surviving past the age of 15 years. Theoretically, families are expected to reduce family size when survivorship is assured; when mortality is 25%, only four children need be planned instead of six when mortality is 50%. A result of falling mortality is a cheaper cost of producing children, which may stimulate parents to raise bigger families. Western fertility decline has been attributed to mortality decline, urbanization, increased female labor force participation, rising wages, and more efficient contraception. Comparable economic development in Latin America has not resulted in large enough changes to encourage family size limitation. A table of fertility and economic indicators for selected countries in Latin America and Europe reflects the inverse relationship between income growth, urban growth, and growth in female educational status and fertility. The regression equation explains 60% of the variation in fertility rates among Latin American countries. Explanatory power increases to 75% when female

  17. Automated measurement of diatom size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spaulding, Sarah A.; Jewson, David H.; Bixby, Rebecca J.; Nelson, Harry; McKnight, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Size analysis of diatom populations has not been widely considered, but it is a potentially powerful tool for understanding diatom life histories, population dynamics, and phylogenetic relationships. However, measuring cell dimensions on a light microscope is a time-consuming process. An alternative technique has been developed using digital flow cytometry on a FlowCAM® (Fluid Imaging Technologies) to capture hundreds, or even thousands, of images of a chosen taxon from a single sample in a matter of minutes. Up to 30 morphological measures may be quantified through post-processing of the high resolution images. We evaluated FlowCAM size measurements, comparing them against measurements from a light microscope. We found good agreement between measurement of apical cell length in species with elongated, straight valves, including small Achnanthidium minutissimum (11-21 µm) and largeDidymosphenia geminata (87–137 µm) forms. However, a taxon with curved cells, Hannaea baicalensis (37–96 µm), showed differences of ~ 4 µm between the two methods. Discrepancies appear to be influenced by the choice of feret or geodesic measurement for asymmetric cells. We describe the operating conditions necessary for analysis of size distributions and present suggestions for optimal instrument conditions for size analysis of diatom samples using the FlowCAM. The increased speed of data acquisition through use of imaging flow cytometers like the FlowCAM is an essential step for advancing studies of diatom populations.

  18. Structure Size Enhanced Histogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Kirschner, Matthias

    Direct volume visualization requires the definition of transfer functions (TFs) for the assignment of opacity and color. Multi-dimensional TFs are based on at least two image properties, and are specified by means of 2D histograms. In this work we propose a new type of a 2D histogram which combines gray value with information about the size of the structures. This structure size enhanced (SSE) histogram is an intuitive approach for representing anatomical features. Clinicians — the users we are focusing on — are much more familiar with selecting features by their size than by their gradient magnitude value. As a proof of concept, we employ the SSE histogram for the definition of two-dimensional TFs for the visualization of 3D MRI and CT image data.

  19. Biofuel Manufacturing from Woody Biomass: Effects of Sieve Size Used in Biomass Size Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T. W.; Pei, Z. J.; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes. PMID:22665985

  20. Biofuel manufacturing from woody biomass: effects of sieve size used in biomass size reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Song, Xiaoxu; Deines, T W; Pei, Z J; Wang, Donghai

    2012-01-01

    Size reduction is the first step for manufacturing biofuels from woody biomass. It is usually performed using milling machines and the particle size is controlled by the size of the sieve installed on a milling machine. There are reported studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in milling of woody biomass. These studies show that energy consumption increased dramatically as sieve size became smaller. However, in these studies, the sugar yield (proportional to biofuel yield) in hydrolysis of the milled woody biomass was not measured. The lack of comprehensive studies about the effects of sieve size on energy consumption in biomass milling and sugar yield in hydrolysis process makes it difficult to decide which sieve size should be selected in order to minimize the energy consumption in size reduction and maximize the sugar yield in hydrolysis. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. In this paper, knife milling of poplar wood was conducted using sieves of three sizes (1, 2, and 4 mm). Results show that, as sieve size increased, energy consumption in knife milling decreased and sugar yield in hydrolysis increased in the tested range of particle sizes.

  1. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications.

  2. Strong crystal size effect on deformation twinning.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Shan, Zhi-Wei; Li, Ju; Huang, Xiaoxu; Xiao, Lin; Sun, Jun; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-21

    Deformation twinning in crystals is a highly coherent inelastic shearing process that controls the mechanical behaviour of many materials, but its origin and spatio-temporal features are shrouded in mystery. Using micro-compression and in situ nano-compression experiments, here we find that the stress required for deformation twinning increases drastically with decreasing sample size of a titanium alloy single crystal, until the sample size is reduced to one micrometre, below which the deformation twinning is entirely replaced by less correlated, ordinary dislocation plasticity. Accompanying the transition in deformation mechanism, the maximum flow stress of the submicrometre-sized pillars was observed to saturate at a value close to titanium's ideal strength. We develop a 'stimulated slip' model to explain the strong size dependence of deformation twinning. The sample size in transition is relatively large and easily accessible in experiments, making our understanding of size dependence relevant for applications. PMID:20090749

  3. Marine reserves: size and age do matter.

    PubMed

    Claudet, Joachim; Osenberg, Craig W; Benedetti-Cecchi, Lisandro; Domenici, Paolo; García-Charton, José-Antonio; Pérez-Ruzafa, Angel; Badalamenti, Fabio; Bayle-Sempere, Just; Brito, Alberto; Bulleri, Fabio; Culioli, Jean-Michel; Dimech, Mark; Falcón, Jesús M; Guala, Ivan; Milazzo, Marco; Sánchez-Meca, Julio; Somerfield, Paul J; Stobart, Ben; Vandeperre, Frédéric; Valle, Carlos; Planes, Serge

    2008-05-01

    Marine reserves are widely used throughout the world to prevent overfishing and conserve biodiversity, but uncertainties remain about their optimal design. The effects of marine reserves are heterogeneous. Despite theoretical findings, empirical studies have previously found no effect of size on the effectiveness of marine reserves in protecting commercial fish stocks. Using 58 datasets from 19 European marine reserves, we show that reserve size and age do matter: Increasing the size of the no-take zone increases the density of commercial fishes within the reserve compared with outside; whereas the size of the buffer zone has the opposite effect. Moreover, positive effects of marine reserve on commercial fish species and species richness are linked to the time elapsed since the establishment of the protection scheme. The reserve size-dependency of the response to protection has strong implications for the spatial management of coastal areas because marine reserves are used for spatial zoning.

  4. Preference for newspaper size.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Steve N H; Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S

    2014-05-01

    The past few years has seen a change in the size of newspapers, with publishers moving to a smaller size format. Five 'standard' newspaper sizes are used in different countries: Broadsheet, Rhensch, Tabloid, Tall Tabloid and Berliner. These papers vary in both width and height of pages and hence there are implications for human reading comfort, which may be dependent on reading location such as on a lounge chair or on a train. Experiments were carried out to determine preferences for the different sizes and to relate these preferences to the geometric characteristics of the newspapers. For both comfortable and cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, the rank order of preference for paper types was, from least to most-preferred, Broadsheet, Rhensch, Berliner, Tall Tabloid and Tabloid. Preferences were much stronger when determined in cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, where most comparisons were significantly different. There was good correlation between participant ratings on several scales and preference, where most factors were related to comfort of holding and controlling the paper. PMID:23987982

  5. Preference for newspaper size.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Steve N H; Hoffmann, Errol R; Chan, Alan H S

    2014-05-01

    The past few years has seen a change in the size of newspapers, with publishers moving to a smaller size format. Five 'standard' newspaper sizes are used in different countries: Broadsheet, Rhensch, Tabloid, Tall Tabloid and Berliner. These papers vary in both width and height of pages and hence there are implications for human reading comfort, which may be dependent on reading location such as on a lounge chair or on a train. Experiments were carried out to determine preferences for the different sizes and to relate these preferences to the geometric characteristics of the newspapers. For both comfortable and cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, the rank order of preference for paper types was, from least to most-preferred, Broadsheet, Rhensch, Berliner, Tall Tabloid and Tabloid. Preferences were much stronger when determined in cramped/uncomfortable reading conditions, where most comparisons were significantly different. There was good correlation between participant ratings on several scales and preference, where most factors were related to comfort of holding and controlling the paper.

  6. Financing Class Size Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achilles, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Class size reduction has been shown to, among other things, improve academic achievement for all students and particularly for low-income and minority students. With the No Child Left Behind Act's heavy emphasis on scientifically based research, adequate yearly progress, and disaggregated results, one wonders why all children aren't enrolled in…

  7. Sizing Up What Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCluskey, Neal

    "Smaller is better" is often the mantra of school leaders with regard to class size, while the benefits of smaller schools are ignored. Benefits of small classes seem obvious--teachers with fewer students could devote more time to each student. Conducted in 1985-89, Tennessee's Project STAR (Student/Teacher Achievement Ratio) found that students…

  8. Space Station Energy Sizing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    A general schematic for a space station power system is described. The major items of interest in the power system are the solar array, transfer devices, energy storage, and conversion equipment. Each item will have losses associated with it and must be utilized in any sizing study, and can be used as a checklist for itemizing the various system components.

  9. Adaptive size modification by dominant female meerkats.

    PubMed

    Russell, Andrew F; Carlson, Anne A; McIlrath, Grant M; Jordan, Neil R; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2004-07-01

    In species of cooperative insects that live in large groups, selection for increased fecundity has led to the evolution of an increased body size among female reproductives, but whether this is also true of cooperative vertebrates is unknown. Among vertebrates, morphological modification of female breeders has only been documented in a single species; in naked mole rats (Heterocephalus glaber), acquisition of alpha status is associated with a significant increase in body size through an elongation of the lumbar vertebrae. Here we provide evidence of morphological modification among breeding females of a cooperative carnivore, the meerkat (Suricata suricatta), and demonstrate that this modification is likely to be adaptive. The same female meerkats were significantly larger when they were dominant than when they were subordinate. This increased body size was not explained by differences in age, foraging efficiency, or investment in offspring care, but may have arisen, in part, through increased levels of hormone that govern bone growth. Increases in body size are likely to result in fitness benefits, for large females delivered larger litters and had heavier offspring, both of which are known to correlate positively with measures of breeding success in meerkats. Our results suggest that the acquisition of alpha status in female meerkats is associated with an adaptive increase in body size and hence that morphological modification of female vertebrates may be more widespread than has been previously supposed.

  10. Adaptive size modification by dominant female meerkats.

    PubMed

    Russell, Andrew F; Carlson, Anne A; McIlrath, Grant M; Jordan, Neil R; Clutton-Brock, Tim

    2004-07-01

    In species of cooperative insects that live in large groups, selection for increased fecundity has led to the evolution of an increased body size among female reproductives, but whether this is also true of cooperative vertebrates is unknown. Among vertebrates, morphological modification of female breeders has only been documented in a single species; in naked mole rats (Heterocephalus glaber), acquisition of alpha status is associated with a significant increase in body size through an elongation of the lumbar vertebrae. Here we provide evidence of morphological modification among breeding females of a cooperative carnivore, the meerkat (Suricata suricatta), and demonstrate that this modification is likely to be adaptive. The same female meerkats were significantly larger when they were dominant than when they were subordinate. This increased body size was not explained by differences in age, foraging efficiency, or investment in offspring care, but may have arisen, in part, through increased levels of hormone that govern bone growth. Increases in body size are likely to result in fitness benefits, for large females delivered larger litters and had heavier offspring, both of which are known to correlate positively with measures of breeding success in meerkats. Our results suggest that the acquisition of alpha status in female meerkats is associated with an adaptive increase in body size and hence that morphological modification of female vertebrates may be more widespread than has been previously supposed. PMID:15341161

  11. Obesity and Body Size Preferences of Jordanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madanat, Hala; Hawks, Steven R.; Angeles, Heidi N.

    2011-01-01

    The nutrition transition is associated with increased obesity rates and increased desire to be thin. This study evaluates the relationship between actual body size and desired body size among a representative sample of 800 Jordanian women. Using Stunkard's body silhouettes, women were asked to identify their current and ideal body sizes, healthy…

  12. Size and scaling in human evolution.

    PubMed

    Pilbeam, D; Gould, S J

    1974-12-01

    Our general conclusion is simply stated: many lineages display phyletic size increase; allometric changes almost always accompany increase in body size. We cannot judge adaptation until we separate such changes into those required by increasing size and those serving as special adaptations to changing environments. In our view, the three australopithecines are, in a number of features, scaled variants of the "same" animal. In these characters, A. africanus is no more "advanced" than the larger, more robust forms. The one early hominid to show a significant departure from this adaptive pattern toward later hominids-cranially, dentally, and postcranially-is H. habilis from East Africa. The australopithecines, one of which was probably a precursor of the Homolineage, were apparently a successful group of basically vegetarian hominids, more advanced behaviorally than apes (87), but not hunter-gatherers. The fossil hominids of Africa fall into two major groupings. One probable lineage, the australopithecines, apparently became extinct without issue; the other evolved to modern man. Both groups displayed steady increase in body size. We consider quantitatively two key characters of the hominid skull: cranial capacity and cheek tooth size. The variables are allometrically related to body size in both lineages. In australopithecines, the manner of relative growth neatly meets the predictions for functional equivalence over a wide range of sizes (negative allometry of cranial capacity with a slope against body weight of 0.2 to 0.4 and positive allometry of postcanine area with a slope near 0.75). In the A. africanus to H. sapiens lineage, cranial capacity increases with positive allometry (slope 1.73) while cheek teeth decrease absolutely (slope - 0.725). Clearly, these are special adaptations unrelated to the physical requirements of increasing body size. We examined qualitatively other features, which also seem to vary allometrically. Of course, many characters should be

  13. Births and cohort size.

    PubMed

    de Beer, J

    1991-01-01

    Ahlburg (1983, 1986) tested a simple version of Easterlin's relative-cohort-size model of fertility on the basis of U.S. and Canadian post-war data. His conclusion was that the Easterlin model fits the data very well and can therefore be used for calculating forecasts. However, the model he estimated is oversimplified. In this paper an alternative specification is presented. The model is applied to Dutch fertility data. The Easterlin effect is found to affect the movement of births in the Netherlands during the period 1950-85, but a declining long-term trend in average family size proves far more important in explaining post-war births. The model forecasts a rise of births until 2000.

  14. Size and position matter.

    PubMed

    Warren, Graham

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine emphasizes the progress made in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underpin the vesicular movement of cargo through the exocytic and endocytic pathways. Attention now focuses on those mechanisms that govern the relative size and position of the many different membrane-bound compartments. These homeostatic mechanisms are discussed in this issue of Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology and must be integrated so as to satisfy the needs of the cell and the organism.

  15. Coal-Sizing Auger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Aft end of auger, like forward, face-piercing end, equipped with hard cutting bits such as diamonds. As auger breaks face, pulls broken coal lumps into jaws and forces them into hardened throat section. There, cutting bits chew up lumps: Clearance between throat and auger shaft sets maximum size for coal particles that pass through. Auger motion pushes coal particles into mixing chamber, where paddles combine them with water.

  16. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  17. Biofunctional Understanding and Judgment of Size

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zheng; Lee, Yang; Yuan, Zheng

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that the meaningfulness of the material increases judged size, whereas symmetry decreases size judgments. These findings have been interpreted in terms of information processing, with a greater quantity of information leading to a judgment of larger size. An alternative view based on biofunctional understanding theory emphasizes the quality of affordance-triggered biological activity as reported and observed in attitudes toward playing sports, effortless understanding, knowledge-in-action, meditative wisdom, and body–mind cycle of adaptation. This alternative implies that affordance biofunctional activity is naturally size-diminishinging as it moves toward coherence and size-expanding as it moves away from coherence influencing judgments of size accordingly. Here we tested this hypothesis in the realm of sensorimotor integration. Our first experiment showed that phonologically unpronounced or symmetric symbols elicit smaller size judgments than phonologically pronounced and asymmetric symbols. Next, we manipulated the quantity of meaning with the affordance (possibilities for biofunctional activity) orthogonally in a second experiment; results indicated that meaning affects size judgments only in the absence of phonological information. We conclude that the biofunctional activity affordance may be responsible for observed differences in size judgment. PMID:27047438

  18. Increasing point-count duration increases standard error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, W.P.; Twedt, D.J.; Hamel, P.B.; Ford, R.P.; Wiedenfeld, D.A.; Cooper, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    We examined data from point counts of varying duration in bottomland forests of west Tennessee and the Mississippi Alluvial Valley to determine if counting interval influenced sampling efficiency. Estimates of standard error increased as point count duration increased both for cumulative number of individuals and species in both locations. Although point counts appear to yield data with standard errors proportional to means, a square root transformation of the data may stabilize the variance. Using long (>10 min) point counts may reduce sample size and increase sampling error, both of which diminish statistical power and thereby the ability to detect meaningful changes in avian populations.

  19. Mud/gas separator sizing and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, G.R. )

    1991-12-01

    Recent wellsite disasters have led to an increased emphasis on properly sized mud/gas separators. This paper reviews and analyzes existing mud/gas separator technology and recommends separator configuration, components, design considerations, and a sizing procedure. A simple method of evaluating mud/gas separation within the separator vessel has been developed as a basis for the sizing procedure. A mud/gas separator sizing worksheet will assist drilling personnel with the sizing calculations. The worksheet provides a quick and easy evaluation of most mud/gas separators for a specific well application. A brief discussion of other mud/gas separator considerations is provided, including separator components, testing, materials, and oil-based-mud considerations.

  20. Problem size, parallel architecture and optimal speedup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Willard, Frank H.

    1987-01-01

    The communication and synchronization overhead inherent in parallel processing can lead to situations where adding processors to the solution method actually increases execution time. Problem type, problem size, and architecture type all affect the optimal number of processors to employ. The numerical solution of an elliptic partial differential equation is examined in order to study the relationship between problem size and architecture. The equation's domain is discretized into n sup 2 grid points which are divided into partitions and mapped onto the individual processor memories. The relationships between grid size, stencil type, partitioning strategy, processor execution time, and communication network type are analytically quantified. In so doing, the optimal number of processors was determined to assign to the solution, and identified (1) the smallest grid size which fully benefits from using all available processors, (2) the leverage on performance given by increasing processor speed or communication network speed, and (3) the suitability of various architectures for large numerical problems.

  1. Problem size, parallel architecture, and optimal speedup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.; Willard, Frank H.

    1988-01-01

    The communication and synchronization overhead inherent in parallel processing can lead to situations where adding processors to the solution method actually increases execution time. Problem type, problem size, and architecture type all affect the optimal number of processors to employ. The numerical solution of an elliptic partial differential equation is examined in order to study the relationship between problem size and architecture. The equation's domain is discretized into n sup 2 grid points which are divided into partitions and mapped onto the individual processor memories. The relationships between grid size, stencil type, partitioning strategy, processor execution time, and communication network type are analytically quantified. In so doing, the optimal number of processors was determined to assign to the solution, and identified (1) the smallest grid size which fully benefits from using all available processors, (2) the leverage on performance given by increasing processor speed or communication network speed, and (3) the suitability of various architectures for large numerical problems.

  2. Demographic cycles, cohort size, and earnings.

    PubMed

    Berger, M C

    1989-05-01

    This article examines whether position in the demographic cycle is an important factor in determining earnings and earnings growth. Earnings equations for white males are estimated by using March Current Population Survey data. Position in the demographic cycle is captured by including both measures of own cohort size and the size of surrounding cohorts in the estimated earnings equations. Position in the demographic cycle matters. Increases in own cohort size lead to flatter earnings profiles, whereas increases in the size of surrounding cohorts are associated with steeper earnings profiles. The net effect is that those who enter the labor market before or after the peak of the demographic cycle start out with lower earnings but experience faster earnings growth. This pattern is uniform across all schooling groups: high school dropouts, high school graduates, those with some college, and college graduates.

  3. Population size, distribution and growth in Iran.

    PubMed

    Kamiar, M

    1985-01-01

    The author examines population size, distribution, and growth in Iran using data for 1966, 1976 census data, and some historical data for the nineteenth century. "This paper discusses changes in the size of population through time, population distribution, and regional patterns of population growth of the 23 provinces. It has been argued in this paper that because of a large family size norm as a religious duty to increase the numbers of the Islamic faith, early age at marriage, especially among females, common practice of polygamy, and the war with Iraq, population will grow even faster. It is concluded that population policy must be integrated into the national development plans."

  4. Economies of Size in Production Agriculture.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Michael

    2009-07-01

    Economies of size refer to the ability of a farm to lower costs of production by increasing production. Agriculture production displays an L-shaped average cost curve where costs are lower initially but reach a point where no further gains are achieved. Spreading fixed costs, bulk purchases, and marketing power are cited as reasons for economies of size. Labor-reducing technologies may be the primary reason. Most studies do not include the external costs from prophylactic antibiotic use, impact on rural communities, and environmental damage associated with large-scale production. These can contribute to the economies of size.

  5. Engineered nanoparticles interacting with cells: size matters

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid advancement of nanoscience and nanotechnology, detailed knowledge of interactions between engineered nanomaterials and cells, tissues and organisms has become increasingly important, especially in regard to possible hazards to human health. This review intends to give an overview of current research on nano-bio interactions, with a focus on the effects of NP size on their interactions with live cells. We summarize common techniques to characterize NP size, highlight recent work on the impact of NP size on active and passive cellular internalization and intracellular localization. Cytotoxic effects are also discussed. PMID:24491160

  6. Density-dependent effects on growth, body size, and clutch size in black brant

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sedinger, J.S.; Lindberg, M.S.; Person, B.T.; Eichholz, M.W.; Herzog, M.P.; Flint, P.L.

    1998-01-01

    We documented gosling size in late summer, adult body size, and clutch size of known-age Black Brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) females nesting on the Tutakoke River colony between 1986 and 1995. During this period, the colony increased from 1,100 to >5,000 nesting pairs. Gosling mass at 30 days of age declined from 764 ?? SE of 13 g and 723 ?? 15 g for males and females, respectively, in the 1986 cohort, to 665 ?? 18 g and 579 ?? 18 g in the 1994 cohort. Gosling size was directly negatively correlated with number of Black Brant broods. We detected no trend in adult body size for individuals from these cohorts; in fact, adults from the 1992 and 1994 cohorts had the largest overall masses. Clutch size increased with age from 3.4 eggs for 2-year-old females to 4.4 eggs for 5-year-old females. Clutch size declined during the study by 0.20 (3-year-old females) to 0.45 (2-year-old females) eggs. Clutch size did not decline between the 1986 and 1990 cohorts for females that were >5 years old. Our results for clutch size and gosling size are similar to those recorded for Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens). Our failure to detect a trend in adult body size, however, differs from the response of other geese to increasing population density. We interpret this difference in effects of density on adult size between Black Brant and other geese as an indication of stronger selection against the smallest individuals in Black Brant relative to other species of geese.

  7. Will Fiction Classification Schemes Increase Use?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Sharon L.

    1988-01-01

    A study of genre fiction classification used circulation data and a patron questionnaire to test whether physically separating fiction into categories will increase use; marking spines with category labels will increase use; use of classified fiction will increase with library size; and classification will increase the number of different books…

  8. Cell size control in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Jonathan J.; Ewald, Jennifer C.; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cell size is an important adaptive trait that influences nearly all aspects of cellular physiology. Despite extensive characterization of the cell cycle regulatory network, the molecular mechanismscoupling growth to division, and thereby controlling cell size, have remained elusive. Recent workin yeast has reinvigorated the size control field and suggested provocative mechanisms forthe distinct functions of setting and sensing cell size. Further examination of size sensing models based on spatial gradients and molecular titration, coupled with elucidation of the pathways responsible for nutrient-modulated target size, may reveal the fundamental principles of eukaryotic cell size control. PMID:22575477

  9. Specialization and group size: brain and behavioural correlates of colony size in ants lacking morphological castes

    PubMed Central

    Amador-Vargas, Sabrina; Gronenberg, Wulfila; Wcislo, William T.; Mueller, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Group size in both multicellular organisms and animal societies can correlate with the degree of division of labour. For ants, the task specialization hypothesis (TSH) proposes that increased behavioural specialization enabled by larger group size corresponds to anatomical specialization of worker brains. Alternatively, the social brain hypothesis proposes that increased levels of social stimuli in larger colonies lead to enlarged brain regions in all workers, regardless of their task specialization. We tested these hypotheses in acacia ants (Pseudomyrmex spinicola), which exhibit behavioural but not morphological task specialization. In wild colonies, we marked, followed and tested ant workers involved in foraging tasks on the leaves (leaf-ants) and in defensive tasks on the host tree trunk (trunk-ants). Task specialization increased with colony size, especially in defensive tasks. The relationship between colony size and brain region volume was task-dependent, supporting the TSH. Specifically, as colony size increased, the relative size of regions within the mushroom bodies of the brain decreased in trunk-ants but increased in leaf-ants; those regions play important roles in learning and memory. Our findings suggest that workers specialized in defence may have reduced learning abilities relative to leaf-ants; these inferences remain to be tested. In societies with monomorphic workers, brain polymorphism enhanced by group size could be a mechanism by which division of labour is achieved. PMID:25567649

  10. Specialization and group size: brain and behavioural correlates of colony size in ants lacking morphological castes.

    PubMed

    Amador-Vargas, Sabrina; Gronenberg, Wulfila; Wcislo, William T; Mueller, Ulrich

    2015-02-22

    Group size in both multicellular organisms and animal societies can correlate with the degree of division of labour. For ants, the task specialization hypothesis (TSH) proposes that increased behavioural specialization enabled by larger group size corresponds to anatomical specialization of worker brains. Alternatively, the social brain hypothesis proposes that increased levels of social stimuli in larger colonies lead to enlarged brain regions in all workers, regardless of their task specialization. We tested these hypotheses in acacia ants (Pseudomyrmex spinicola), which exhibit behavioural but not morphological task specialization. In wild colonies, we marked, followed and tested ant workers involved in foraging tasks on the leaves (leaf-ants) and in defensive tasks on the host tree trunk (trunk-ants). Task specialization increased with colony size, especially in defensive tasks. The relationship between colony size and brain region volume was task-dependent, supporting the TSH. Specifically, as colony size increased, the relative size of regions within the mushroom bodies of the brain decreased in trunk-ants but increased in leaf-ants; those regions play important roles in learning and memory. Our findings suggest that workers specialized in defence may have reduced learning abilities relative to leaf-ants; these inferences remain to be tested. In societies with monomorphic workers, brain polymorphism enhanced by group size could be a mechanism by which division of labour is achieved.

  11. A constant size extension drives bacterial cell size homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Manuel; Surovtsev, Ivan V.; Kato, Setsu; Paintdakhi, Ahmad; Beltran, Bruno; Ebmeier, Sarah E.; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Cell size control is an intrinsic feature of the cell cycle. In bacteria, cell growth and division are thought to be coupled through a cell size threshold. Here, we provide direct experimental evidence disproving the critical size paradigm. Instead, we show through single-cell microscopy and modeling that the evolutionarily distant bacteria Escherichia coli and Caulobacter crescentus achieve cell size homeostasis by growing on average the same amount between divisions, irrespective of cell length at birth. This simple mechanism provides a remarkably robust cell size control without the need of being precise, abating size deviations exponentially within a few generations. This size homeostasis mechanism is broadly applicable for symmetric and asymmetric divisions as well as for different growth rates. Furthermore, our data suggest that constant size extension is implemented at or close to division. Altogether, our findings provide fundamentally distinct governing principles for cell size and cell cycle control in bacteria. PMID:25480302

  12. Sample-size requirements for evaluating population size structure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vokoun, J.C.; Rabeni, C.F.; Stanovick, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    A method with an accompanying computer program is described to estimate the number of individuals needed to construct a sample length-frequency with a given accuracy and precision. First, a reference length-frequency assumed to be accurate for a particular sampling gear and collection strategy was constructed. Bootstrap procedures created length-frequencies with increasing sample size that were randomly chosen from the reference data and then were compared with the reference length-frequency by calculating the mean squared difference. Outputs from two species collected with different gears and an artificial even length-frequency are used to describe the characteristics of the method. The relations between the number of individuals used to construct a length-frequency and the similarity to the reference length-frequency followed a negative exponential distribution and showed the importance of using 300-400 individuals whenever possible.

  13. Rover Wheel Sizes (Isometric)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars rovers keep getting bigger. This photo provides a comparison of the wheel sizes for three generations of them. The first rover on Mars was Sojourner, on the Mars Pathfinder mission launched in 1996. It was small and didn't go far. The Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, launched in 2003, are bigger and have driven many times farther than expected. The Mars Science Laboratory, in development for a 200 launch, represents another leap in capability. It will carry its onboard chemistry laboratory long distances.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, built Sojourner, Spirit and Opportunity, and is building the Mars Science Laboratory. It has managed these missions for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington.

  14. Hail Size Distribution Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    A 3-D weather radar visualization software program was developed and implemented as part of an experimental Launch Pad 39 Hail Monitor System. 3DRadPlot, a radar plotting program, is one of several software modules that form building blocks of the hail data processing and analysis system (the complete software processing system under development). The spatial and temporal mapping algorithms were originally developed through research at the University of Central Florida, funded by NASA s Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM), where the goal was to merge National Weather Service (NWS) Next-Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) volume reflectivity data with drop size distribution data acquired from a cluster of raindrop disdrometers. In this current work, we adapted these algorithms to process data from a cluster of hail disdrometers positioned around Launch Pads 39A or 39B, along with the corresponding NWS radar data. Radar data from all NWS NEXRAD sites is archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). That data can be readily accessed at . 3DRadPlot plots Level III reflectivity data at four scan elevations (this software is available at Open Channel Software, ). By using spatial and temporal interpolation/extrapolation based on hydrometeor fall dynamics, we can merge the hail disdrometer array data coupled with local Weather Surveillance Radar-1988, Doppler (WSR-88D) radial velocity and reflectivity data into a 4-D (3-D space and time) picture of hail size distributions. Hail flux maps can then be generated and used for damage prediction and assessment over specific surfaces corresponding to structures within the disdrometer array volume. Immediately following a hail storm, specific damage areas and degree of damage can be identified for inspection crews.

  15. Biostatistics Series Module 5: Determining Sample Size.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Determining the appropriate sample size for a study, whatever be its type, is a fundamental aspect of biomedical research. An adequate sample ensures that the study will yield reliable information, regardless of whether the data ultimately suggests a clinically important difference between the interventions or elements being studied. The probability of Type 1 and Type 2 errors, the expected variance in the sample and the effect size are the essential determinants of sample size in interventional studies. Any method for deriving a conclusion from experimental data carries with it some risk of drawing a false conclusion. Two types of false conclusion may occur, called Type 1 and Type 2 errors, whose probabilities are denoted by the symbols σ and β. A Type 1 error occurs when one concludes that a difference exists between the groups being compared when, in reality, it does not. This is akin to a false positive result. A Type 2 error occurs when one concludes that difference does not exist when, in reality, a difference does exist, and it is equal to or larger than the effect size defined by the alternative to the null hypothesis. This may be viewed as a false negative result. When considering the risk of Type 2 error, it is more intuitive to think in terms of power of the study or (1 - β). Power denotes the probability of detecting a difference when a difference does exist between the groups being compared. Smaller α or larger power will increase sample size. Conventional acceptable values for power and α are 80% or above and 5% or below, respectively, when calculating sample size. Increasing variance in the sample tends to increase the sample size required to achieve a given power level. The effect size is the smallest clinically important difference that is sought to be detected and, rather than statistical convention, is a matter of past experience and clinical judgment. Larger samples are required if smaller differences are to be detected. Although the

  16. Biostatistics Series Module 5: Determining Sample Size.

    PubMed

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Determining the appropriate sample size for a study, whatever be its type, is a fundamental aspect of biomedical research. An adequate sample ensures that the study will yield reliable information, regardless of whether the data ultimately suggests a clinically important difference between the interventions or elements being studied. The probability of Type 1 and Type 2 errors, the expected variance in the sample and the effect size are the essential determinants of sample size in interventional studies. Any method for deriving a conclusion from experimental data carries with it some risk of drawing a false conclusion. Two types of false conclusion may occur, called Type 1 and Type 2 errors, whose probabilities are denoted by the symbols σ and β. A Type 1 error occurs when one concludes that a difference exists between the groups being compared when, in reality, it does not. This is akin to a false positive result. A Type 2 error occurs when one concludes that difference does not exist when, in reality, a difference does exist, and it is equal to or larger than the effect size defined by the alternative to the null hypothesis. This may be viewed as a false negative result. When considering the risk of Type 2 error, it is more intuitive to think in terms of power of the study or (1 - β). Power denotes the probability of detecting a difference when a difference does exist between the groups being compared. Smaller α or larger power will increase sample size. Conventional acceptable values for power and α are 80% or above and 5% or below, respectively, when calculating sample size. Increasing variance in the sample tends to increase the sample size required to achieve a given power level. The effect size is the smallest clinically important difference that is sought to be detected and, rather than statistical convention, is a matter of past experience and clinical judgment. Larger samples are required if smaller differences are to be detected. Although the

  17. Biostatistics Series Module 5: Determining Sample Size

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Determining the appropriate sample size for a study, whatever be its type, is a fundamental aspect of biomedical research. An adequate sample ensures that the study will yield reliable information, regardless of whether the data ultimately suggests a clinically important difference between the interventions or elements being studied. The probability of Type 1 and Type 2 errors, the expected variance in the sample and the effect size are the essential determinants of sample size in interventional studies. Any method for deriving a conclusion from experimental data carries with it some risk of drawing a false conclusion. Two types of false conclusion may occur, called Type 1 and Type 2 errors, whose probabilities are denoted by the symbols σ and β. A Type 1 error occurs when one concludes that a difference exists between the groups being compared when, in reality, it does not. This is akin to a false positive result. A Type 2 error occurs when one concludes that difference does not exist when, in reality, a difference does exist, and it is equal to or larger than the effect size defined by the alternative to the null hypothesis. This may be viewed as a false negative result. When considering the risk of Type 2 error, it is more intuitive to think in terms of power of the study or (1 − β). Power denotes the probability of detecting a difference when a difference does exist between the groups being compared. Smaller α or larger power will increase sample size. Conventional acceptable values for power and α are 80% or above and 5% or below, respectively, when calculating sample size. Increasing variance in the sample tends to increase the sample size required to achieve a given power level. The effect size is the smallest clinically important difference that is sought to be detected and, rather than statistical convention, is a matter of past experience and clinical judgment. Larger samples are required if smaller differences are to be detected. Although the

  18. Biostatistics Series Module 5: Determining Sample Size

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Avijit; Gogtay, Nithya

    2016-01-01

    Determining the appropriate sample size for a study, whatever be its type, is a fundamental aspect of biomedical research. An adequate sample ensures that the study will yield reliable information, regardless of whether the data ultimately suggests a clinically important difference between the interventions or elements being studied. The probability of Type 1 and Type 2 errors, the expected variance in the sample and the effect size are the essential determinants of sample size in interventional studies. Any method for deriving a conclusion from experimental data carries with it some risk of drawing a false conclusion. Two types of false conclusion may occur, called Type 1 and Type 2 errors, whose probabilities are denoted by the symbols σ and β. A Type 1 error occurs when one concludes that a difference exists between the groups being compared when, in reality, it does not. This is akin to a false positive result. A Type 2 error occurs when one concludes that difference does not exist when, in reality, a difference does exist, and it is equal to or larger than the effect size defined by the alternative to the null hypothesis. This may be viewed as a false negative result. When considering the risk of Type 2 error, it is more intuitive to think in terms of power of the study or (1 − β). Power denotes the probability of detecting a difference when a difference does exist between the groups being compared. Smaller α or larger power will increase sample size. Conventional acceptable values for power and α are 80% or above and 5% or below, respectively, when calculating sample size. Increasing variance in the sample tends to increase the sample size required to achieve a given power level. The effect size is the smallest clinically important difference that is sought to be detected and, rather than statistical convention, is a matter of past experience and clinical judgment. Larger samples are required if smaller differences are to be detected. Although the

  19. Sneaker Males Affect Fighter Male Body Size and Sexual Size Dimorphism in Salmon.

    PubMed

    Weir, Laura K; Kindsvater, Holly K; Young, Kyle A; Reynolds, John D

    2016-08-01

    Large male body size is typically favored by directional sexual selection through competition for mates. However, alternative male life-history phenotypes, such as "sneakers," should decrease the strength of sexual selection acting on body size of large "fighter" males. We tested this prediction with salmon species; in southern populations, where sneakers are common, fighter males should be smaller than in northern populations, where sneakers are rare, leading to geographical clines in sexual size dimorphism (SSD). Consistent with our prediction, fighter male body size and SSD (fighter male∶female size) increase with latitude in species with sneaker males (Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou) but not in species without sneakers (chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta and pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). This is the first evidence that sneaker males affect SSD across populations and species, and it suggests that alternative male mating strategies may shape the evolution of body size. PMID:27420790

  20. Sneaker Males Affect Fighter Male Body Size and Sexual Size Dimorphism in Salmon.

    PubMed

    Weir, Laura K; Kindsvater, Holly K; Young, Kyle A; Reynolds, John D

    2016-08-01

    Large male body size is typically favored by directional sexual selection through competition for mates. However, alternative male life-history phenotypes, such as "sneakers," should decrease the strength of sexual selection acting on body size of large "fighter" males. We tested this prediction with salmon species; in southern populations, where sneakers are common, fighter males should be smaller than in northern populations, where sneakers are rare, leading to geographical clines in sexual size dimorphism (SSD). Consistent with our prediction, fighter male body size and SSD (fighter male∶female size) increase with latitude in species with sneaker males (Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and masu salmon Oncorhynchus masou) but not in species without sneakers (chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta and pink salmon Oncorhynchus gorbuscha). This is the first evidence that sneaker males affect SSD across populations and species, and it suggests that alternative male mating strategies may shape the evolution of body size.

  1. Femtosecond laser-induced size reduction of carbon nanodots in solution: Effect of laser fluence, spot size, and irradiation time

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Vanthan; Yan, Lihe Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2015-02-28

    Photoluminescent carbon nanodots (C-dots) with size tunability and uniformity were fabricated in polyethylene glycol (PEG{sub 200N}) solution using femtosecond laser ablation method. The size distributions and photoluminescence (PL) properties of C-dots are well controlled by adjusting the combined parameters of laser fluence, spot size, and irradiation time. The size reduction efficiency of the C-dots progressively increases with decreasing laser fluence and spot size. The optimal PL spectra are red-shifted and the quantum yields decrease with the increase in C-dots size, which could be attributed to the more complex surface functional groups attached on C-dots induced at higher laser fluence and larger spot size. Moreover, an increase in irradiation time leads to a decrease in size of C-dots, but long-time irradiation will result in the generation of complex functional groups on C-dots, subsequently the PL spectra are red-shifted.

  2. Particle size distribution and particle size-related crystalline silica content in granite quarry dust.

    PubMed

    Sirianni, Greg; Hosgood, Howard Dean; Slade, Martin D; Borak, Jonathan

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies indicate that the relationship between empirically derived particle counts, particle mass determinations, and particle size-related silica content are not constant within mines or across mine work tasks. To better understand the variability of particle size distributions and variations in silica content by particle size in a granite quarry, exposure surveys were conducted with side-by-side arrays of four closed face cassettes, four cyclones, four personal environmental monitors, and a real-time particle counter. In general, the proportion of silica increased as collected particulate size increased, but samples varied in an inconstant way. Significant differences in particle size distributions were seen depending on the extent of ventilation and the nature and activity of work performed. Such variability raises concerns about the adequacy of silica exposure assessments based on only limited numbers of samples or short-term samples.

  3. Spatiotemporal relationship between adult census size and genetic population size across a wide population size gradient.

    PubMed

    Bernos, Thaїs A; Fraser, Dylan J

    2016-09-01

    Adult census population size (N) and effective number of breeders (Nb ) are highly relevant for designing effective conservation strategies. Both parameters are often challenging to quantify, however, making it of interest to determine whether one parameter can be generalized from the other. Yet, the spatiotemporal relationship between N and Nb has not been well characterized empirically in many taxa. We analysed this relationship for 5-7 consecutive years in twelve brook trout populations varying greatly in N (49-10032) and Nb (3-567) and identified major environmental variables affecting the two parameters. N or habitat size alone explained 47-57% of the variance in Nb , and Nb was strongly correlated with effective population size. The ratio Nb /N ranged from 0.01 to 0.45 and increased at small N or following an annual decrease in N, suggesting density-dependent constraints on Nb . We found no evidence for a consistent, directional difference between variability in Nb and/or Nb /N among small and large populations; however, small populations had more varying temporal variability in Nb /N ratios than large populations. Finally, Nb and Nb /N were 2.5- and 2.3-fold more variable among populations than temporally within populations. Our results demonstrate a clear linkage between demographic and evolutionary parameters, suggesting that Nb could be used to approximate N (or vice versa) in natural populations. Nevertheless, using one variable to infer the other to monitor trends within populations is less recommended, perhaps even less so in small populations given their less predictable Nb vs. N dynamics. PMID:27483203

  4. Effect Sizes, Confidence Intervals, and Confidence Intervals for Effect Sizes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The present article provides a primer on (a) effect sizes, (b) confidence intervals, and (c) confidence intervals for effect sizes. Additionally, various admonitions for reformed statistical practice are presented. For example, a very important implication of the realization that there are dozens of effect size statistics is that "authors must…

  5. Sizing of Microdrops

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, I

    2003-10-22

    Several techniques for determining the size of small fluid microdrops with diameter ranging from 5 {micro}m to 30 {micro}m have been developed and evaluated using an automated variation on the Millikan oil drop experiment. The average diameter of a large sample of monodisperse fluid drops was determined by measuring their terminal velocity in air, or if charged, their motion under the influence of an electric field, as well as by measurement of the magnitude of their Brownian motion. The diameter of individual drops was determined optically, by direct observation using an imaging system based on a coupled device (CCD) camera. The technique used to analyze the image data is based on a best fit technique taking the point spread function (PSF) of the lens into account, and yield results accurate to 1% (based on a single image) without the need for any collaboration. By combining this technique with terminal velocity measurements, the density of the fluid can be determined to similar accuracy.

  6. Size reduction machine

    SciTech Connect

    Fricke, V.

    1999-12-15

    The Size Reduction Machine (SRM) is a mobile platform capable of shearing various shapes and types of metal components at a variety of elevations. This shearing activity can be performed without direct physical movement and placement of the shear head by the operator. The base unit is manually moved and roughly aligned to each cut location. The base contains the electronics: hydraulic pumps, servos, and actuators needed to move the shear-positioning arm. The movable arm allows the shear head to have six axes of movement and to cut to within 4 inches of a wall surface. The unit has a slick electrostatic capture coating to assist in external decontamination. Internal contamination of the unit is controlled by a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter on the cooling inlet fan. The unit is compact enough to access areas through a 36-inch standard door opening. This paper is an Innovative Technology Summary Report designed to provide potential users with the information they need to quickly determine if a technology would apply to a particular environmental management problem. They also are designed for readers who may recommend that a technology be considered by prospective users.

  7. The role of cAMP in synaptic homeostasis in response to environmental temperature challenges and hyperexcitability mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis is the ability of physiological systems to regain functional balance following environment or experimental insults and synaptic homeostasis has been demonstrated in various species following genetic or pharmacological disruptions. Among environmental challenges, homeostatic responses to temperature extremes are critical to animal survival under natural conditions. We previously reported that axon terminal arborization in Drosophila larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) is enhanced at elevated temperatures; however, the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs) remains unaltered despite the increase in synaptic bouton numbers. Here we determine the cellular basis of this homeostatic adjustment in larvae reared at high temperature (HT, 29°C). We found that synaptic current focally recorded from individual synaptic boutons was unaffected by rearing temperature (<15°C to >30°C). However, HT rearing decreased the quantal size (amplitude of spontaneous miniature EJPs, or mEJPs), which compensates for the increased number of synaptic releasing sites to retain a normal EJP size. The quantal size decrease is accounted for by a decrease in input resistance of the postsynaptic muscle fiber, indicating an increase in membrane area that matches the synaptic growth at HT. Interestingly, a mutation in rutabaga (rut) encoding adenylyl cyclase (AC) exhibited no obvious changes in quantal size or input resistance of postsynaptic muscle cells after HT rearing, suggesting an important role for rut AC in temperature-induced synaptic homeostasis in Drosophila. This extends our previous finding of rut-dependent synaptic homeostasis in hyperexcitable mutants, e.g., slowpoke (slo). In slo larvae, the lack of BK channel function is partially ameliorated by upregulation of presynaptic Shaker (Sh) IA current to limit excessive transmitter release in addition to postsynaptic glutamate receptor recomposition that reduces the quantal size. PMID:25698925

  8. Exciton size and quantum transport in nanoplatelets

    SciTech Connect

    Pelzer, Kenley M. Gray, Stephen K.; Darling, Seth B.; Schaller, Richard D.

    2015-12-14

    Two-dimensional nanoplatelets (NPLs) are an exciting class of materials with promising optical and energy transport properties. The possibility of efficient energy transport between nanoplatelets raises questions regarding the nature of energy transfer in these thin, laterally extended systems. A challenge in understanding exciton transport is the uncertainty regarding the size of the exciton. Depending on the material and defects in the nanoplatelet, an exciton could plausibly extend over an entire plate or localize to a small region. The variation in possible exciton sizes raises the question how exciton size impacts the efficiency of transport between nanoplatelet structures. Here, we explore this issue using a quantum master equation approach. This method goes beyond the assumptions of Förster theory to allow for quantum mechanical effects that could increase energy transfer efficiency. The model is extremely flexible in describing different systems, allowing us to test the effect of varying the spatial extent of the exciton. We first discuss qualitative aspects of the relationship between exciton size and transport and then conduct simulations of exciton transport between NPLs for a range of exciton sizes and environmental conditions. Our results reveal that exciton size has a strong effect on energy transfer efficiency and suggest that manipulation of exciton size may be useful in designing NPLs for energy transport.

  9. Size distributions of chemically synthesized Ag nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thøgersen, Annett; Bonsak, Jack; Fosli, Carl Huseby; Muntingh, Georg

    2011-08-01

    Silver nanocrystals made by a chemical reduction of silver salts (AgNO3) by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) were studied using transmission electron microscopy and light scattering simulations. For various AgNO3/NaBH4 molar ratios, the size distributions of the nanocrystals were found to be approximately log-normal. In addition, a linear relation was found between the mean nanocrystal size and the molar ratio. In order to relate the size distribution of Ag nanocrystals of the various molar ratios to the scattering properties of Ag nanocrystals in solar cell devices, light scattering simulations of Ag nanocrystals in Si, SiO2, SiN, and Al2O3 matrices were carried out using MiePlot. These light scattering spectra for the individual nanocrystal sizes were combined into light scattering spectra for the fitted size distributions. The evolution of these scattering spectra with respect to an increasing mean nanocrystal size was then studied. From these findings, it is possible to find the molar ratio for which the corresponding nanocrystal size distribution has maximum scattering at a particular wavelength in the desired matrix.

  10. Sizing Up Social Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jerold

    2010-01-01

    Most people are aware of the increasing importance of social media to institutional advancement, and many colleges and universities have started investing resources in these media. The next step is to measure the impact of social media on the institution and evaluate the success of one's efforts. Every advancement leader should understand how…

  11. 78 FR 36083 - Small Business Size Standards; Educational Services; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ..., effective October 24, 2012, increased small business size standards for nine industries in North American... Technical and Trade Schools, within that Sector. However, the Job Corps Centers exception and its size... Centers exception under NAICS 611519 and its $35.5 million size standard. DATES: Effective June 17,...

  12. Optimal Dendrimer Size for Efficient Photoexcitations Funneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychaudhuri, Subhadip; Shapir, Yonathan; Chernyak, Vladimir; Mukamel, Shaul

    2001-03-01

    Extended dendrimers may be utilized as artificial antennae for light harvesting. The Mean First Passage Time (MFPT) for a diffusing photoexcitaion to reach the active center in the realistic nonlinear potential of phenylacetylene dendrimers (S. Tretiak et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4656(1998)) is studied. The MFPT increases linearly with the dendrimer size upto a certain extent, but crosses over to an exponential growth once the molecule's size exceeds that value. This yields a temperature dependent optimal size for efficient light harvesting (S. Raychaudhuri et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 282(2000)). The effect of disorder, due to slow solvent fluctuations, also slows down the excitons beyond the same optimal molecular size. For systems with high production of excitons, their mutual annihilation by radiationless processes is included in the simulations.

  13. Sizing Up the Situation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Hailstorm damage to the Space Shuttle's External Tank inspired a NASA innovation with extensive photography applications. In order to measure the defects caused by the storm, Kennedy Space Center used telephoto lenses to zoom in on the tank and view the damage clearly. However, since there was no reference object in the image, the engineers could not determine the scale of the damage. In photographic situations similar to this, an object, such as a ruler, is placed within the field of view. This allows a person to look at a photograph and have a visual indication of the scale of the objects in it. In the External Tank situation, however, this procedure was not possible. As a solution, Kennedy developed the Scaling and Measurement Device for Photographic Images, which provides a non-intrusive means of adding a scale to a photograph. In addition to meeting Kennedy's needs, scaling images is extremely important in crime and accident scene investigations, oil and chemical tank monitoring, and aerial photography. The innovation consists of a tool that attaches directly to a camera or charge coupled device using a standard screw. Two lasers fitted to the device provide parallel beams that are set 1 inch apart. These lasers enable the device to project a pattern into the field of view. When a photograph is taken, the image of the laser pattern appears, along with the image of the object under investigation, allowing the viewer quantifiable information as to the size of the object. The laser beams are accurate to approximately 200 feet. Windows-based software was developed to work with the scaling device tool. The software provides further techniques to measure objects in photographs and digital images. By using the software, any object in the image can be measured diagonally, vertically, and horizontally. The device and its software enable the user to determine two-dimensional measurements within a photograph.

  14. Cell size versus body size in geophilomorph centipedes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretto, Marco; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Variation in animal body size is the result of a complex interplay between variation in cell number and cell size, but the latter has seldom been considered in wide-ranging comparative studies, although distinct patterns of variation have been described in the evolution of different lineages. We investigated the correlation between epidermal cell size and body size in a sample of 29 geophilomorph centipede species, representative of a wide range of body sizes, from 6 mm dwarf species to gigantic species more than 200 mm long, exploiting the marks of epidermal cells on the overlying cuticle in the form of micro-sculptures called scutes. We found conspicuous and significant variation in average scute area, both between suprageneric taxa and between genera, while the within-species range of variation is comparatively small. This supports the view that the average epidermal cell size is to some extent taxon specific. However, regression analyses show that neither body size nor the number of leg-bearing segments explain this variation, which suggests that cell size is not an usual target of change for body size evolution in this group of arthropods, although there is evidence of its correlation with other morphological variables, like cuticle thickness. Scute sizes of miniaturized geophilomorph species are well within the range of the lineage to which the species belong, suggesting recent evolutionary transitions to smaller body size.

  15. Cell size versus body size in geophilomorph centipedes.

    PubMed

    Moretto, Marco; Minelli, Alessandro; Fusco, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Variation in animal body size is the result of a complex interplay between variation in cell number and cell size, but the latter has seldom been considered in wide-ranging comparative studies, although distinct patterns of variation have been described in the evolution of different lineages. We investigated the correlation between epidermal cell size and body size in a sample of 29 geophilomorph centipede species, representative of a wide range of body sizes, from 6 mm dwarf species to gigantic species more than 200 mm long, exploiting the marks of epidermal cells on the overlying cuticle in the form of micro-sculptures called scutes. We found conspicuous and significant variation in average scute area, both between suprageneric taxa and between genera, while the within-species range of variation is comparatively small. This supports the view that the average epidermal cell size is to some extent taxon specific. However, regression analyses show that neither body size nor the number of leg-bearing segments explain this variation, which suggests that cell size is not an usual target of change for body size evolution in this group of arthropods, although there is evidence of its correlation with other morphological variables, like cuticle thickness. Scute sizes of miniaturized geophilomorph species are well within the range of the lineage to which the species belong, suggesting recent evolutionary transitions to smaller body size. PMID:25809818

  16. Calculating body frame size (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... boned category. Determining frame size: To determine the body frame size, measure the wrist with a tape measure and use the following chart to determine whether the person is small, medium, or large boned. Women: Height under 5'2" Small = wrist size less ...

  17. Visual exposure to large and small portion sizes and perceptions of portion size normality: Three experimental studies

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Eric; Oldham, Melissa; Cuckson, Imogen; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M.; Rogers, Peter J.; Hardman, Charlotte A.

    2016-01-01

    Portion sizes of many foods have increased in recent times. In three studies we examined the effect that repeated visual exposure to larger versus smaller food portion sizes has on perceptions of what constitutes a normal-sized food portion and measures of portion size selection. In studies 1 and 2 participants were visually exposed to images of large or small portions of spaghetti bolognese, before making evaluations about an image of an intermediate sized portion of the same food. In study 3 participants were exposed to images of large or small portions of a snack food before selecting a portion size of snack food to consume. Across the three studies, visual exposure to larger as opposed to smaller portion sizes resulted in participants considering a normal portion of food to be larger than a reference intermediate sized portion. In studies 1 and 2 visual exposure to larger portion sizes also increased the size of self-reported ideal meal size. In study 3 visual exposure to larger portion sizes of a snack food did not affect how much of that food participants subsequently served themselves and ate. Visual exposure to larger portion sizes may adjust visual perceptions of what constitutes a ‘normal’ sized portion. However, we did not find evidence that visual exposure to larger portions altered snack food intake. PMID:26702602

  18. Size-dependent melting of Bi nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, E. A.; Efremov, M. Yu.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Allen, L. H.

    2005-02-01

    Nanocalorimetry was used to investigate the melting of Bi nanoparticles. The particles were formed by evaporating Bi onto a silicon nitride substrate, which was then heated. The particles self-assemble into truncated spherical particles. Below 5-nm average film thickness, mean particle sizes increased linearly with deposition thickness but increased rapidly for 10-nm-thick films. As expected, small particles were found to exhibit size-dependent melting temperatures less than the bulk melting temperature (e.g., ΔT =67K for a 3-nm radius particle). The measured melting temperatures for particles below ˜7nm in radius, however, were ˜50K above the value predicted by the homogeneous melting model. We discuss this discrepancy in terms of a possible size-dependent crystal structure change and the superheating of the solid phase.

  19. Chainsaw size for delimbing.

    PubMed

    Parker, R; Sullman, M; Kirk, P; Ford, D

    1999-07-01

    New Zealand loggers commonly use chainsaws weighing up to 10 kg. Chainsaw work is both physically arduous and potentially dangerous. A contributing factor to the high injury rate of loggers could be the high physiological and biomechanical load of chainsaw work. This study investigated the comparative cardiovascular strain imposed on 11 chainsaw operators when delimbing (cutting branches) with chainsaws of small, medium and large capacity under controlled conditions. Chainsaw operator cardiovascular strain increased with greater chainsaw weight and was associated with two chainsaw operator anthropometric dimensions (arm length and bent elbow height).

  20. The pack size effect: Influence on consumer perceptions of portion sizes.

    PubMed

    Hieke, Sophie; Palascha, Aikaterini; Jola, Corinne; Wills, Josephine; Raats, Monique M

    2016-01-01

    Larger portions as well as larger packs can lead to larger prospective consumption estimates, larger servings and increased consumption, described as 'portion-size effects' and 'pack size effects'. Although related, the effects of pack sizes on portion estimates have received less attention. While it is not possible to generalize consumer behaviour across cultures, external cues taken from pack size may affect us all. We thus examined whether pack sizes influence portion size estimates across cultures, leading to a general 'pack size effect'. We compared portion size estimates based on digital presentations of different product pack sizes of solid and liquid products. The study with 13,177 participants across six European countries consisted of three parts. Parts 1 and 2 asked participants to indicate the number of portions present in a combined photographic and text-based description of different pack sizes. The estimated portion size was calculated as the quotient of the content weight or volume of the food presented and the number of stated portions. In Part 3, participants stated the number of food items that make up a portion when presented with packs of food containing either a small or a large number of items. The estimated portion size was calculated as the item weight times the item number. For all three parts and across all countries, we found that participants' portion estimates were based on larger portions for larger packs compared to smaller packs (Part 1 and 2) as well as more items to make up a portion (Part 3); hence, portions were stated to be larger in all cases. Considering that the larger estimated portions are likely to be consumed, there are implications for energy intake and weight status.

  1. Common determinants of body size and eye size in chickens from an advanced intercross line.

    PubMed

    Prashar, Ankush; Hocking, Paul M; Erichsen, Jonathan T; Fan, Qiao; Saw, Seang Mei; Guggenheim, Jeremy A

    2009-06-15

    Myopia development is characterised by an increased axial eye length. Therefore, identifying factors that influence eye size may provide new insights into the aetiology of myopia. In humans, axial length is positively correlated to height and weight, and in mice, eye weight is positively correlated with body weight. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between eye size and body size in chickens from a genetic cross in which alleles with major effects on eye and body size were segregating. Chickens from a cross between a layer line (small body size and eye size) and a broiler line (large body and eye size) were interbred for 10 generations so that alleles for eye and body size would have the chance to segregate independently. At 3 weeks of age, 510 chicks were assessed using in vivo high resolution A-scan ultrasonography and keratometry. Equatorial eye diameter and eye weight were measured after enucleation. The variations in eye size parameters that could be explained by body weight (BW), body length (BL), head width (HW) and sex were examined using multiple linear regression. It was found that BW, BL and HW and sex together predicted 51-56% of the variation in eye weight, axial length, corneal radius, and equatorial eye diameter. By contrast, the same variables predicted only 22% of the variation in lens thickness. After adjusting for sex, the three body size parameters predicted 45-49% of the variation in eye weight, axial length, corneal radius, and eye diameter, but only 0.4% of the variation in lens thickness. In conclusion, about half of the variation in eye size in the chickens of this broiler-layer advanced intercross line is likely to be determined by pleiotropic genes that also influence body size. Thus, mapping the quantitative trait loci (QTL) that determine body size may be useful in understanding the genetic determination of eye size (a logical inference of this result is that the 20 or more genetic variants that have recently

  2. Reducing Class Size Leads to Individualized Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahorik, John A.

    1999-01-01

    SAGE is a five-year class-size-reduction program being implemented in 80 Wisconsin schools. A longitudinal, evaluative study is being conducted in 30 SAGE schools. Small classes have three effects leading to increased individualization: fewer discipline problems, greater knowledge of students, and more teacher enthusiasm (using directive methods).…

  3. Effect Sizes in Cluster-Randomized Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Larry V.

    2007-01-01

    Multisite research designs involving cluster randomization are becoming increasingly important in educational and behavioral research. Researchers would like to compute effect size indexes based on the standardized mean difference to compare the results of cluster-randomized studies (and corresponding quasi-experiments) with other studies and to…

  4. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  5. Numerical reconstruction of the quantal event at nicotinic synapses.

    PubMed Central

    Wathey, J C; Nass, M M; Lester, H A

    1979-01-01

    To test our present quantitative knowledge of nicotinic transmission, we reconstruct the postsynaptic conductance change that results after a presynaptic nerve terminal liberates a quantum of acetylcholine (ACh) into the synaptic cleft. The theory assumes that ACh appears suddenly in the cleft and that is subsequent fate is determined by radial diffusion, by enzymatic hydrolysis, and by binding to receptors. Each receptor has one channel and two ACh binding sites; the channel opens when both sites are occupied and the rate-limiting step id the binding and dissociation of the second ACh molecule. The calculations reproduce the experimentally measured growth phase (200 microseconds), peak number of open channels (2,000), and exponential decay phase. The time constant of the decay phase exceeds the channel duration by approximately equal to 20%. The normal event is highly localized: at the peak, two-thirds of the open channels are within an area of 0.15 micrometer 2. This represents 75% of the available channels within this area. The model also simulates voltage and temperature dependence and effects of inactivating esterase and receptors. The calculations show that in the absence of esterase, transmitter is buffered by binding to receptors and the postsynaptic response can be potentiated. PMID:262376

  6. Quantal Time Asymmetry: Mathematical Foundation and Physical Interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Bohm, A.

    2010-07-29

    Time in standard quantum mechanics extends from -{infinity}t{sub 0}(Feynman (1948)). In experiments on single Ba{sup +} ions, Dehmelt and others observed this finite preparation time as the ensemble of onset-times t{sub 0}{sup 1}, t{sub 0}{sup 2},...,t{sub 0}{sup n} of dark periods. How the semigroup time evolution, t{sub 0{identical_to}}0

  7. Benchmark calculations of thermal reaction rates. I - Quantal scattering theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1991-01-01

    The thermal rate coefficient for the prototype reaction H + H2 yields H2 + H with zero total angular momentum is calculated by summing, averaging, and numerically integrating state-to-state reaction probabilities calculated by time-independent quantum-mechanical scattering theory. The results are very carefully converged with respect to all numerical parameters in order to provide high-precision benchmark results for confirming the accuracy of new methods and testing their efficiency.

  8. Probing the classical/quantal boundary using the Stark effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Joseph Frederick

    The boundary between classical physics and quantum physics is examined using the Stark effect on sodium atoms in a constant electric field. Coherent states composed of linear superpositions of the hydrogenic stationary states are created by applying a low amplitude, ˜5 V/cm, nanosecond electric field pulse. The pulse periodically drives the atoms to a realm where many stationary states lie within a very narrow energy range. These coherent superpositions exhibit localized electronic probability densities and therefore qualify as wave packets, time-dependent states for which constructive and destructive interference leads to a localized, moving probability density. Using a cw laser these wave packet states are excited and their attributes are probed in the frequency domain rather than the time domain. Computer simulations are used to show how coherent linear combinations of hydrogenic basis states emulate the orbital motion of a classical particle.

  9. Quantal Description of Atomic Diamagnetism: the Quasi-Landau Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiaoling

    We describe atomic hydrogen diamagnetism within the framework of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. Our theoretical studies have used three descriptions: an adiabatic description, a multichannel quantum defect theory (MQDT) description using an ab initio R-matrix approach, and a model description. The analysis has conclusively demonstrated that the diamagnetic spectrum can be viewed as a perturbed Rydberg spectrum. The adiabatic analysis provides a crude but useful picture to see the overall channel structure and the nature of the perturbing configurations, where the quasi-Landau resonances are the lowest states in each Landau channel which will perturb high Rydberg states in lower Landau channels once the nonadiabatic coupling is turned on. The ab initio calculation of the photoionization spectrum in the field range 10^3 -10^4 Tesla shows that the quasi -Landau resonances are broad interlopers which perturb high Rydberg states converging to the Landau thresholds, forming complex resonances. Also in these calculations, a new partial cross section analysis has been performed to predict the relative electron populations in different Landau channels. The population is found to depend on the azimuthal quantum number and the parity of final states. For photoionization from the hydrogen ground state of final states with m = 1, the electron is predicted to escape predominantly in the higher Landau channels. In contrast, for the final states with m = 0, it escapes in the lower channels. This property is reflected in the shape of autoionizing resonances, which are more like peaks for m = 1, but are more like dips (window resonances) for m = 0. In studying the features of the complex resonances, formed by the quasi-Landau resonances perturbing the high Rydberg states, we developed an analytical description using a model based on three interacting Rydberg channels, identifying the key dynamical quantities which control the appearance of a complex resonance and its evolution with the varying magnetic field. The analysis predicts a ubiquitous occurrence of states with vanishing autoionization width, and of multiple q-reversals associated with perturbing configurations. This description can be used to interpret some features of the observed diamagnetic spectrum of lithium near the zero-field ionization threshold.

  10. Fisher information description of the classical-quantal transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, A. M.; Martín, M. T.; Plastino, A.; Rosso, O. A.

    2011-06-01

    We investigate the classical limit of the dynamics of a semiclassical system that represents the interaction between matter and a given field. The concept of Fisher Information measure ( F) on using as a quantifier of the process, we find that it adequately describes the transition, detecting the most salient details of the changeover. Used in conjunction with other possible information quantifiers, such as the Normalized Shannon Entropy ( H) and the Statistical Complexity ( C) by recourse to appropriate planar representations like the Fisher Entropy ( F×H) and Fisher Complexity ( F×C) planes, one obtains a better visualization of the transition than that provided by just one quantifier by itself. In the evaluation of these Information Theory quantifiers, we used the Bandt and Pompe methodology for the obtention of the corresponding probability distribution.

  11. A computer-assisted instructional program for teaching portion size versus serving size.

    PubMed

    Daggett, Luann M; Rigdon, Katherine L

    2006-01-01

    Obesity is becoming an increasingly important community health threat, accounting for more than 300,000 deaths per year in the United States. The cumulative economic impact of obesity and overeating is enormous. Factors contributing to the problem include eating food away from home, consuming large or excessive quantities of soft drinks and snack foods, and large portion sizes. Discriminating between portion and serving sizes and determining the appropriate number of serving sizes to consume on a daily basis are key to maintaining a healthy diet. The purpose of this project was to create a computer-assisted instructional tool delineating serving size from portion size. The tool can be used by health care professionals to provide direct instruction to individuals or as part of a group approach to healthy eating. PMID:16445362

  12. Exponential Size Distribution of von Willebrand Factor

    PubMed Central

    Lippok, Svenja; Obser, Tobias; Müller, Jochen P.; Stierle, Valentin K.; Benoit, Martin; Budde, Ulrich; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2013-01-01

    Von Willebrand Factor (VWF) is a multimeric protein crucial for hemostasis. Under shear flow, it acts as a mechanosensor responding with a size-dependent globule-stretch transition to increasing shear rates. Here, we quantify for the first time, to our knowledge, the size distribution of recombinant VWF and VWF-eGFP using a multilateral approach that involves quantitative gel analysis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We find an exponentially decaying size distribution of multimers for recombinant VWF as well as for VWF derived from blood samples in accordance with the notion of a step-growth polymerization process during VWF biosynthesis. The distribution is solely described by the extent of polymerization, which was found to be reduced in the case of the pathologically relevant mutant VWF-IIC. The VWF-specific protease ADAMTS13 systematically shifts the VWF size distribution toward smaller sizes. This dynamic evolution is monitored using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and compared to a computer simulation of a random cleavage process relating ADAMTS13 concentration to the degree of VWF breakdown. Quantitative assessment of VWF size distribution in terms of an exponential might prove to be useful both as a valuable biophysical characterization and as a possible disease indicator for clinical applications. PMID:24010664

  13. Larger than Life: Humans' Nonverbal Status Cues Alter Perceived Size

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, Abigail A.; Yu, Henry H.; Schechter, Julia C.; Blair, R. J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Social dominance and physical size are closely linked. Nonverbal dominance displays in many non-human species are known to increase the displayer's apparent size. Humans also employ a variety of nonverbal cues that increase apparent status, but it is not yet known whether these cues function via a similar mechanism: by increasing the displayer's apparent size. Methodology/Principal Finding We generated stimuli in which actors displayed high status, neutral, or low status cues that were drawn from the findings of a recent meta-analysis. We then conducted four studies that indicated that nonverbal cues that increase apparent status do so by increasing the perceived size of the displayer. Experiment 1 demonstrated that nonverbal status cues affect perceivers' judgments of physical size. The results of Experiment 2 showed that altering simple perceptual cues can affect judgments of both size and perceived status. Experiment 3 used objective measurements to demonstrate that status cues change targets' apparent size in the two-dimensional plane visible to a perceiver, and Experiment 4 showed that changes in perceived size mediate changes in perceived status, and that the cue most associated with this phenomenon is postural openness. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that nonverbal cues associated with social dominance also affect the perceived size of the displayer. This suggests that certain nonverbal dominance cues in humans may function as they do in other species: by creating the appearance of changes in physical size. PMID:19479082

  14. Sauropod dinosaurs evolved moderately sized genomes unrelated to body size.

    PubMed

    Organ, Chris L; Brusatte, Stephen L; Stein, Koen

    2009-12-22

    Sauropodomorph dinosaurs include the largest land animals to have ever lived, some reaching up to 10 times the mass of an African elephant. Despite their status defining the upper range for body size in land animals, it remains unknown whether sauropodomorphs evolved larger-sized genomes than non-avian theropods, their sister taxon, or whether a relationship exists between genome size and body size in dinosaurs, two questions critical for understanding broad patterns of genome evolution in dinosaurs. Here we report inferences of genome size for 10 sauropodomorph taxa. The estimates are derived from a Bayesian phylogenetic generalized least squares approach that generates posterior distributions of regression models relating genome size to osteocyte lacunae volume in extant tetrapods. We estimate that the average genome size of sauropodomorphs was 2.02 pg (range of species means: 1.77-2.21 pg), a value in the upper range of extant birds (mean = 1.42 pg, range: 0.97-2.16 pg) and near the average for extant non-avian reptiles (mean = 2.24 pg, range: 1.05-5.44 pg). The results suggest that the variation in size and architecture of genomes in extinct dinosaurs was lower than the variation found in mammals. A substantial difference in genome size separates the two major clades within dinosaurs, Ornithischia (large genomes) and Saurischia (moderate to small genomes). We find no relationship between body size and estimated genome size in extinct dinosaurs, which suggests that neutral forces did not dominate the evolution of genome size in this group.

  15. Studying the Body Sizes of Echinoidea during the Mesozoic Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio, E.; Gupta, A.; Panneerselvam, S.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Body size is an important trait that is affected by many factors such as temperature and space, more specifically the distance from the equator. We are studying whether Bergmann's rule or Cope's rule is dominant in the class Echinoidea during the Mesozoic Era. Bergmann's rule states that temperature and body size have an inverse correlation: as temperature decreases, body size increases. Bergmann's rule also states that as the distance from the equator increases, body size increases. The other principle we are studying, Cope's rule, dictates that the overall body size of an organism increases over time. Because CO2 is a greenhouse gas, we used rCO2 as a proxy for paleotemperature. The result from plotting body size against time was that as time progressed, body size tended to increase, supporting Cope's rule. By conducting correlation tests, we found that rCO2 and maximum area had a small, but significant, negative correlation, proving Bergmann's rule, but showing that there are other significant factors affecting the body sizes of Echinoids during this time period. After plotting the sizes against space, we found that these two factors had an inverse correlation during the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods, indicating that as distance from equator increases, size decreases. Cope's rule was supported since the overall trend is an increase in Echinoidea body size; in terms of space, however, Bergmann's rule did not apply to the class Echinoidea because the overall body size of the echinoderm decreased as the distance from equator increased. With this unexpected result, we concluded that there must have been another driving force other than temperature that influenced echinoids during the Mesozoic Era.

  16. Population size and genome size in fishes: a closer look.

    PubMed

    Gregory, T Ryan; Witt, Jonathan D S

    2008-04-01

    The several thousand-fold range in genome size among animals has remained a subject of active research and debate for more than half a century, but no satisfactory explanation has yet been provided. Many one-dimensional models have been postulated, but so far none has been successful in accounting for observed patterns in genome size diversity. The recent model based on differences in effective population size appeared to gain empirical support with a study of genome size and inferred effective population size in fishes, but there were several questionable aspects of the analysis. First, it was based on an assumption that microsatellite heterozygosity indicates long-term effective population size, whereas in actuality these markers evolve quickly and are sensitive to demographic events. Second, it included both ancient polyploids and non-polyploids, the former of which did not gain their current genome sizes through the accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations as required in the model. Third, the analysis neglected the tremendous influence that Pleistocene glaciation bottlenecks had on heterozygosities in freshwater (and far less so, marine) fishes. In sum, it is apparent that genomes reached their current sizes in most fishes long before contemporary microsatellite heterozygosities were shaped, and that ancient polyploidy rather than the accumulation of mildly deleterious transposon insertions in small populations is the dominant factor that has influenced the large end of the range of genome sizes among fishes.

  17. Seed size selection by olive baboons.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Britta Kerstin; Linsenmair, Karl Eduard

    2008-10-01

    Seed size is an important plant fitness trait that can influence several steps between fruiting and the establishment of a plant's offspring. Seed size varies considerably within many plant species, yet the relevance of the trait for intra-specific fruit choice by primates has received little attention. Primates may select certain seed sizes within a species for a number of reasons, e.g. to decrease indigestible seed load or increase pulp intake per fruit. Olive baboons (Papio anubis, Cercopithecidae) are known to select seed size in unripe and mature pods of Parkia biglobosa (Mimosaceae) differentially, so that pods with small seeds, and an intermediate seed number, contribute most to dispersal by baboons. We tested whether olive baboons likewise select for smaller ripe seeds within each of nine additional fruit species whose fruit pulp baboons commonly consume, and for larger seeds in one species in which baboons feed on the seeds. Species differed in fruit type and seed number per fruit. For five of these species, baboons dispersed seeds that were significantly smaller than seeds extracted manually from randomly collected fresh fruits. In contrast, for three species, baboons swallowed seeds that were significantly longer and/or wider than seeds from fresh fruits. In two species, sizes of ingested seeds and seeds from fresh fruits did not differ significantly. Baboons frequently spat out seeds of Drypetes floribunda (Euphorbiaceae) but not those of other plant species having seeds of equal size. Oral processing of D. floribunda seeds depended on seed size: seeds that were spat out were significantly larger and swallowed seeds smaller, than seeds from randomly collected fresh fruits. We argue that seed size selection in baboons is influenced, among other traits, by the amount of pulp rewarded per fruit relative to seed load, which is likely to vary with fruit and seed shape.

  18. Relative cheek-tooth size in Australopithecus.

    PubMed

    McHenry, H M

    1984-07-01

    Until the discovery of Australopithecus afarensis, cheek-tooth megadontia was unequivocally one of the defining characteristics of the australopithecine grade in human evolution along with bipedalism and small brains. This species, however, has an average postcanine area of 757 mm2, which is more like Homo habilis (759 mm2) than A. africanus (856 mm2). But what is its relative cheek-tooth size in comparison to body size? One approach to this question is to compare postcanine tooth area to estimated body weight. By this method all Australopithecus species are megadont: they have cheek teeth 1.7 to 2.3 times larger than modern hominoids of similar body size. The series from A. afarensis to A. africanus to A. robustus to A. boisei shows strong positive allometry indicating increasing megadontia through time. The series from H. habilis to H. erectus to H. sapiens shows strong negative allometry which implies a sharp reduction in the relative size of the posterior teeth. Postcanine megadontia in Australopithecus species can also be demonstrated by comparing tooth size and body size in associated skeletons: A. afarensis (represented by A.L. 288-1) has a cheek-tooth size 2.8 times larger than expected from modern hominoids; A. africanus (Sts 7) and A. robustus (TM 1517) are over twice the expected size. The evolutionary transition from the megadont condition of Australopithecus to the trend of decreasing megadontia seen in the Homo lineage may have occurred between 3.0 and 2.5 m.y. from A. afarensis to H.habilis but other evidence indicates that it is more likely to have occurred between 2.5 to 2.0 m.y. from an A. africanus-like form to H. habilis. PMID:6433716

  19. Grain Size and Morphological Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macmahan, J.; Gallagher, E.; Reniers, A.; Thornton, E.

    2008-12-01

    Grain size on natural beaches has traditionally been assumed to be uniform and modeling efforts assume a single mean grain size for an entire beach environment. Many recent studies contradict this assumption and suggest that sediment grain size on a beach is not homogeneous and that variations in sediment size and supply are important in sediment transport and morphodynamics at all scales. Unfortunately, measuring grain size is difficult, tedious and time consuming. Therefore, in spite of the evidence pointing to the importance of grain size in sediment transport and morphodynamics, many previous studies have been based on only a few field samples. Rubin (2004) introduced a technique for measuring surface grain size in situ in rivers and deeper coastal waters, using a digital camera and auto-correlation of digital images. Using this technique, information about the surface grain size distribution can be obtained quickly and inexpensively. Following Rubin (2004), we have developed a mobile digital imaging system (DIS) for surveying grain size on beaches. The DIS was used during two experiments: RCEX, a rip current experiment in Monterey, CA in April 2007 and Truc Vert '08, a multi-institutional, international experiment, on the Atlantic coast of France in March 2008. Preliminary results suggest that grain size varies spatially with the morphology of beach features and temporally with changes in tide level, wave energy, and morphodynamics. These data are being used to examine the relationship between morphological, sedimentological and hydrodynamic variability.

  20. Effective sizes for subdivided populations

    SciTech Connect

    Chesser, R.K. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA ); Rhodes, O.E. Jr.; Sugg, D.W.; Schnabel, A. )

    1993-12-01

    Many derivations of effective population sizes have been suggested in the literature; however, few account for the breeding structure and none can readily be expanded to subdivided populations. Breeding structures influence gene correlations through their effects on the number of breeding individuals of each sex, the mean number of progeny per female, and the variance in the number of progeny produced by males and females. Additionally, hierarchical structuring in a population is determined by the number of breeding groups and the migration rates of males and females among such groups. This study derives analytical solutions for effective sizes that can be applied to subdivided populations. Parameters that encapsulate breeding structure and subdivision are utilized to derive the traditional inbreeding and variance effective sizes. Also, it is shown that effective sizes can be determined for any hierarchical level of population structure for which gene correlations can accrue. Derivations of effective sizes for the accumulation of gene correlations within breeding groups (coancestral effective size) and among breeding groups (intergroup effective size) are given. The results converge to traditional single population measures when similar assumptions are applied. In particular, inbreeding and intergroup effective sizes are shown to be special cases of the coancestral effective size, and intergroup and variance effective sizes will be equal if the population census remains constant. Instantaneous solutions for effective size, at any time after gene correlation begins to accrue, are given in terms of traditional F statistics or transition equations. All effective sizes are shown to converge upon a common asymptotic value when breeding tactics and migration rates are constant. The asymptotic effective size can be expressed in terms of the fixation indices and the number of breeding groups; however, the rate of approach to the asymptote is dependent upon dispersal rates.

  1. Optical Sizing of Ultrafine Metallic Particles: Retrieval of Particle Size Distribution from Spectral Extinction Measurements.

    PubMed

    Oshchepkov; Sinyuk

    1998-12-01

    The inverse problem of optical sizing of ultrafine metallic particles from the spectral extinction measurements in the visible range is investigated. Solving the inverse problem becomes possible due to the strong size effect which in the framework of classical electrodynamics can be described by the dependence of complex refractive index on the particle size. It is shown that the size effect leads to the considerable increase of information content of spectral extinction data with respect to desired size composition of the particles. This makes it possible to retrieve the size distribution of ultrafine metallic particles with reasonably high accuracy, including the Rayleigh size region. The analysis is performed mainly within the framework of numerical tests by the typical example of ultrafine silver particles in a gelatin matrix. The results in retrieving of size distribution from experimentally measured extinction spectra are also presented. Calculations of spectral extinction coefficient are made by means of Mie theory. In so doing, the dielectric function of particles is modified by using the electron's mean free path limitation model. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. Particle size reduction of propellants by cryocycling

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnery, L.; Griffiths, S.; Lipkin, J.

    1995-05-01

    Repeated exposure of a propellant to liquid nitrogen causes thermal stress gradients within the material resulting in cracking and particle size reduction. This process is termed cryocycling. The authors conducted a feasibility study, combining experiments on both inert and live propellants with three modeling approaches. These models provided optimized cycle times, predicted ultimate particle size, and allowed crack behavior to be explored. Process safety evaluations conducted separately indicated that cryocycling does not increase the sensitivity of the propellants examined. The results of this study suggest that cryocycling is a promising technology for the demilitarization of tactical rocket motors.

  3. Size-dependent thermopower of nickel nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Jaiveer; Kaurav, N.; Okram, Gunadhor S.

    2014-04-24

    Nickel nanoparticles (Ni-NPs) were prepared by thermal decomposition method using Trioctylphosphine (TOP) and Oleylamine (OA). The average particle size (D) estimated from X-ray diffraction (XRD) using Scherrer equation, to be 1-10nm, systematically decreases with increasing concentration of TOP at constant OA concentration. The observed thermopower strongly depends on particle size particularly at low temperatures reaching a very high value of ∼ 10{sup 5} μV/K (at 20 K), and is attributed to the enhanced grain-boundary scattering combined with quantum confinement.

  4. Kinetic narrowing of size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    We present a model that reveals an interesting possibility for narrowing the size distribution of nanostructures when the deterministic growth rate changes its sign from positive to negative at a certain stationary size. Such a behavior occurs in self-catalyzed one-dimensional III-V nanowires and more generally whenever a negative "adsorption-desorption" term in the growth rate is compensated by a positive "diffusion flux." By asymptotically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, we derive an explicit representation for the size distribution that describes either Poissonian broadening or self-regulated narrowing depending on the parameters. We show how the fluctuation-induced spreading of the size distribution can be completely suppressed in systems with size self-stabilization. These results can be used for obtaining size-uniform ensembles of different nanostructures.

  5. Social network size in humans.

    PubMed

    Hill, R A; Dunbar, R I M

    2003-03-01

    This paper examines social network size in contemporary Western society based on the exchange of Christmas cards. Maximum network size averaged 153.5 individuals, with a mean network size of 124.9 for those individuals explicitly contacted; these values are remarkably close to the group size of 150 predicted for humans on the basis of the size of their neocortex. Age, household type, and the relationship to the individual influence network structure, although the proportion of kin remained relatively constant at around 21%. Frequency of contact between network members was primarily determined by two classes of variable: passive factors (distance, work colleague, overseas) and active factors (emotional closeness, genetic relatedness). Controlling for the influence of passive factors on contact rates allowed the hierarchical structure of human social groups to be delimited. These findings suggest that there may be cognitive constraints on network size.

  6. Grain Size and Morphological Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallagher, E. L.; Reniers, A. J.; Macmahan, J. H.; Thornton, E. B.

    2009-12-01

    Grain size on natural beaches has traditionally been assumed to be uniform and modeling efforts assume a single mean grain size for an entire beach environment. Many recent studies contradict this assumption and suggest that sediment grain size on a beach is not homogeneous and that variations in sediment size and supply are important in sediment transport and morphodynamics at all scales. Unfortunately, measuring grain size is tedious and time consuming. Therefore, in spite of the evidence pointing to the importance of grain size in sediment transport and morphodynamics, many previous studies have been based on only a few field samples. Rubin (2004) introduced a technique for measuring surface grain size in situ in rivers and deeper coastal waters, using a digital camera and auto-correlation of digital images. Using this technique, information about the surface grain size distribution can be obtained quickly and inexpensively. Following Rubin (2004), we have developed a mobile digital imaging system (DIS) for surveying grain size on beaches. The DIS was used during three experiments: RCEX and REX, both rip current experiments in Monterey, CA (April 2007 and April 2009) and Truc Vert ’08, a multi-institutional, international experiment, on the Atlantic coast of France in March 2008. In 2007 and 2008 spatial surveys of surface grain size were completed every few days over large (~500x500m) intertidal areas. The 2009 experiment focused on twice-daily sampling of two cross shore lines to examine temporal grain size variability of the intertidal beach. Preliminary results suggest that grain size varies spatially with the morphology of beach features (eg, rip channels and shoals) and temporally with changes in tide level, wave energy, and morphodynamics. These data are being used to examine the relationship between morphological, sedimentological and hydrodynamic variability.

  7. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation. PMID:26074903

  8. Size sensors in bacteria, cell cycle control, and size control.

    PubMed

    Robert, Lydia

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria proliferate by repetitive cycles of cellular growth and division. The progression into the cell cycle is admitted to be under the control of cell size. However, the molecular basis of this regulation is still unclear. Here I will discuss which mechanisms could allow coupling growth and division by sensing size and transmitting this information to the division machinery. Size sensors could act at different stages of the cell cycle. During septum formation, mechanisms controlling the formation of the Z ring, such as MinCD inhibition or Nucleoid Occlusion (NO) could participate in the size-dependence of the division process. In addition or alternatively, the coupling of growth and division may occur indirectly through the control of DNA replication initiation. The relative importance of these different size-sensing mechanisms could depend on the environmental and genetic context. The recent demonstration of an incremental strategy of size control in bacteria, suggests that DnaA-dependent control of replication initiation could be the major size control mechanism limiting cell size variation.

  9. Intron-genome size relationship on a large evolutionary scale.

    PubMed

    Vinogradov, A E

    1999-09-01

    The intron-genome size relationship was studied across a wide evolutionary range (from slime mold and yeast to human and maize), as well as the relationship between genome size and the ratio of intervening/coding sequence size. The average intron size is scaled to genome size with a slope of about one-fourth for the log-transformed values; i.e., on the global scale its increase in evolution is lower than the increase in genome size by four orders of magnitude. There are exceptions to the general trend. In baker's yeast introns are extraordinarily long for its genome size. Tetrapods also have longer introns than expected for their genome sizes. In teleost fish the mean intron size does not differ significantly, notwithstanding the differences in genome size. In contrast to previous reports, avian introns were not found to be significantly shorter than introns of mammals, although avian genomes are smaller than genomes of mammals on average by about a factor of 2.5. The extra-/intragenic ratio of noncoding DNA can be higher in fungi than in animals, notwithstanding the smaller fungal genomes. In vertebrates and invertebrates taken separately, this ratio is increasing as the increase in genome size. Two hypotheses are proposed to explain the variation in the extra-/intragenic ratio of noncoding DNA in organisms with similar numbers of genes: transition (dynamic) and equilibrium (static). According to the transition model, this variation arises with the rapid shift of genome size because the bulk of extragenic DNA can be changed more rapidly than the finely interspersed intron sequences. The equilibrium model assumes that this variation is a result of selective adjustment of genome size with constraints imposed on the intron size due to its putative link to chromatin structure (and constraints of the splicing machinery). PMID:10473779

  10. Depth-size tradeoffs for neural computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siu, Kai-Yeung; Roychowdhury, Vwani P.; Kailath, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    The tradeoffs between the depth (i.e., the time for parallel computation) and the size (i.e., the number of threshold gates) in neural networks are studied. The authors focus the study on the neural computations of symmetric Boolean functions and some arithmetic functions. It is shown that a significant reduction in the size is possible for symmetric functions and some arithmetic functions, at the expense of a small constant increase in depth. In the process, several neural networks which have the minimum size among all the known constructions have been developed. Results on implementing symmetric functions can be used to improve results about arbitrary Boolean functions. In particular, It is shown that any Boolean function can be computed in a depth-3 neural network with O(2n/2) threshold gates; it is also proven that a minimum number of threshold gates are required.

  11. Optimal flexible sample size design with robust power.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanju; Cui, Lu; Yang, Bo

    2016-08-30

    It is well recognized that sample size determination is challenging because of the uncertainty on the treatment effect size. Several remedies are available in the literature. Group sequential designs start with a sample size based on a conservative (smaller) effect size and allow early stop at interim looks. Sample size re-estimation designs start with a sample size based on an optimistic (larger) effect size and allow sample size increase if the observed effect size is smaller than planned. Different opinions favoring one type over the other exist. We propose an optimal approach using an appropriate optimality criterion to select the best design among all the candidate designs. Our results show that (1) for the same type of designs, for example, group sequential designs, there is room for significant improvement through our optimization approach; (2) optimal promising zone designs appear to have no advantages over optimal group sequential designs; and (3) optimal designs with sample size re-estimation deliver the best adaptive performance. We conclude that to deal with the challenge of sample size determination due to effect size uncertainty, an optimal approach can help to select the best design that provides most robust power across the effect size range of interest. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26999385

  12. Cataclasis and processes of particle size reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blenkinsop, Tom G.

    1991-05-01

    The particle size distribution (P.S.D.) of fragmented geological materials is affected by the fragmentation process, initial size distribution, number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. A summary of literature shows that the fractal dimension ( D) of the P.S.D. is increased by the number of fracturing events, energy input, strain, and confining pressure. Cenozoic cataclasis of granite, granodiorites, gneisses and arkose seen in cores from the Cajon Pass drillhole, southern California, produced P.S.D.s with values of D that varied from 1.88 to 3.08. Each rock type has a characteristic and more limited range of D. Areas of dilatant texture and mode I fracture-fillings have low average values (2.32 and 2.37) compared to an average value of 2.67 in shear fracture-fillings D has a good inverse correlation with average particle size. Data from fault rocks in the San Gabriel fault zone, southern California ( Anderson et al., 1983) have been reanalyzed to show that values of D are higher (2.10 5.52) and average particle size is lower than the Cajon Pass samples, but the ranges of values overlap, and the inverse correlation between D and average particle size is extended. Microstructural observations combined with these results suggest that three processes contributed to particle size reduction during cataclasis. The first process of feldspar alteration, which leads to low values of D, has not been previously recognized. The second process is probably constrained comminution ( Sammis et al., 1987), since the average D in shear fracture-fillings is close to the value of 2.58 predicted by this theory. A further stage of particle size reduction is demonstrated by an increase of D with cataclasis. This third process is selective fracture of larger particles, which may also operate during localization and the cataclastic flow-to-faulting transition as observed in experiments. A transition from constrained comminution to selective fracture of

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