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  1. Origin of CD57+ T cells which increase at tumour sites in patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Okada, T; Iiai, T; Kawachi, Y; Moroda, T; Takii, Y; Hatakeyama, K; Abo, T

    1995-01-01

    Human T cells carrying natural killer (NK) markers, CD57 or CD56 antigens, appear to be distinguishable from other T cell subsets in terms of their granular lymphocyte morphology and their numerical increase in patients with AIDS and in recipients of bone marrow transplantation. At the beginning of this study, we observed that CD57+ T cells as well as CD56+ T cells were abundant at tumour sites in many patients with colorectal cancer. Since all these findings for CD57+ T cells are quite similar to those of extrathymic T cells seen in mice, we investigated how CD57+ T cells are distributed to various immune organs in humans. They were found to be present mainly in the bone marrow and liver, but to be completely absent in the thymus. Similar to the case of extrathymic T cells in mice, they were observed to consist of double-negative CD4-8- subsets as well as single-positive subsets (preponderance of CD8+ cells), and to contain a considerable proportion of gamma delta T cells. These features are striking when compared with those of CD57- T cells, which are characterized by an abundance of CD4+ subsets and alpha beta T cells. Not only at tumour sites but also in the peripheral blood, some patients with colorectal cancer displayed elevated levels of CD57+ cells. These results suggest that CD57+ T cells may be of extrathymic origin, possibly originating in the bone marrow and liver, and may be associated with tumour immunity, similar to another extrathymic population of CD56+ T cells in humans. PMID:7554383

  2. Circulating tumour cells: insights into tumour heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Hayes, D F; Paoletti, C

    2013-08-01

    Tumour heterogeneity is a major barrier to cure breast cancer. It can exist between patients with different intrinsic subtypes of breast cancer or within an individual patient with breast cancer. In the latter case, heterogeneity has been observed between different metastatic sites, between metastatic sites and the original primary tumour, and even within a single tumour at either a metastatic or a primary site. Tumour heterogeneity is a function of two separate, although linked, processes. First, genetic instability is a hallmark of malignancy, and results in 'fixed' genetic changes that are almost certainly carried forward through progression of the cancer over time, with increasingly complex additional genetic changes in new metastases as they arise. The second type of heterogeneity is due to differential but 'plastic' expression of various genes important in the biology and response to various therapies. Together, these processes result in highly variable cancers with differential response, and resistance, to both targeted (e.g. endocrine or anti-human epithelial growth receptor type 2 (HER2) agents) and nontargeted therapies (e.g. chemotherapy). Ideally, tumour heterogeneity would be monitored over time, especially in relation to therapeutic strategies. However, biopsies of metastases require invasive and costly procedures, and biopsies of multiple metastases, or serially over time, are impractical. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) represent a potential surrogate for tissue-based cancer and therefore might provide the opportunity to monitor serial changes in tumour biology. Recent advances have enabled accurate and reliable quantification and molecular characterization of CTCs with regard to a number of important biomarkers including oestrogen receptor alpha and HER2. Preliminary data have demonstrated that expression of these markers between CTCs in individual patients with metastatic breast cancer reflects the heterogeneity of the underlying tumours. Future

  3. Anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment increases circulating T helper type 17 cells similarly in different types of inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hull, D N; Williams, R O; Pathan, E; Alzabin, S; Abraham, S; Taylor, P C

    2015-01-01

    We investigated changes in circulating T helper type 17 (Th17) cells following anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from 25 RA, 15 AS and eight PsA patients at baseline 4 and 12 weeks after treatment, and Th17 cell frequencies were analysed using interleukin (IL)-17 enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) and flow cytometry. A significant increase in IL-17-producing cells was observed by ELISPOT in RA and AS patients at 12 weeks. Flow cytometry confirmed significant increases in CD4+IL-17+ cells at 12 weeks in RA and AS and 4 weeks in PsA patients. Anti-TNF treatment increases circulating Th17 cells in three different diseases. PMID:25766640

  4. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  5. LET-painting increases tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours.

    PubMed

    Bassler, Niels; Toftegaard, Jakob; Lühr, Armin; Sørensen, Brita Singers; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Jäkel, Oliver; Mortensen, Lise Saksø; Overgaard, Jens; Petersen, Jørgen B

    2014-01-01

    LET-painting was suggested as a method to overcome tumour hypoxia. In vitro experiments have demonstrated a well-established relationship between the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER) and linear energy transfer (LET), where OER approaches unity for high-LET values. However, high-LET radiation also increases the risk for side effects in normal tissue. LET-painting attempts to restrict high-LET radiation to compartments that are found to be hypoxic, while applying lower LET radiation to normoxic tissues. Methods. Carbon-12 and oxygen-16 ion treatment plans with four fields and with homogeneous dose in the target volume, are applied on an oropharyngeal cancer case with an identified hypoxic entity within the tumour. The target dose is optimised to achieve a tumour control probability (TCP) of 95% when assuming a fully normoxic tissue. Using the same primary particle energy fluence needed for this plan, TCP is recalculated for three cases assuming hypoxia: first, redistributing LET to match the hypoxic structure (LET-painting). Second, plans are recalculated for varying hypoxic tumour volume in order to investigate the threshold volume where TCP can be established. Finally, a slight dose boost (5-20%) is additionally allowed in the hypoxic subvolume to assess its impact on TCP. Results. LET-painting with carbon-12 ions can only achieve tumour control for hypoxic subvolumes smaller than 0.5 cm(3). Using oxygen-16 ions, tumour control can be achieved for tumours with hypoxic subvolumes of up to 1 or 2 cm(3). Tumour control can be achieved for tumours with even larger hypoxic subvolumes, if a slight dose boost is allowed in combination with LET-painting. Conclusion. Our findings clearly indicate that a substantial increase in tumour control can be achieved when applying the LET-painting concept using oxygen-16 ions on hypoxic tumours, ideally with a slight dose boost.

  6. Walker 256 tumour cells increase substance P immunoreactivity locally and modify the properties of the blood-brain barrier during extravasation and brain invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kate M; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Vink, Robert; Nimmo, Alan J; Ghabriel, Mounir N

    2013-01-01

    It is not yet known how tumour cells traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to form brain metastases. Substance P (SP) release is a key component of neurogenic inflammation which has been recently shown to increase the permeability of the BBB following CNS insults, making it a possible candidate as a mediator of tumour cell extravasation into the brain. This study investigated the properties of the BBB in the early stages of tumour cell invasion into the brain, and the possible involvement of SP. Male Wistar rats were injected with Walker 256 breast carcinoma cells via the internal carotid artery and euthanised at 1, 3, 6 and 9 days post tumour inoculation. Culture medium-injected animals served as controls at 1 and 9 days. Evidence of tumour cell extravasation across the BBB was first observed at 3 days post-inoculation, which corresponded with significantly increased albumin (p < 0.05) and SP immunoreactivity (p < 0.01) and significantly reduced endothelial barrier antigen labelling of microvessels when compared to culture medium control animals (p < 0.001). By day 9 after tumour cell inoculation, 100 % of animals developed large intracranial neoplasms that had significantly increased albumin in the peri-tumoral area (p < 0.001). The increased SP immunoreactivity and altered BBB properties at 3 days post-inoculation that coincided with early tumour invasion may be indicative of a mechanism for tumour cell extravasation into the brain. Thus, extravasation of tumour cells into the brain to form cerebral metastases may be a SP-mediated process.

  7. Volume increase and spatial shifts of chromosome territories in nuclei of radiation-induced polyploidizing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Scherthan, Harry; Huna, Anda; González, Paula; Mueller, Patrick; Schmitt, Eberhard; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Hausmann, Michael

    2013-08-30

    The exposure of tumour cells to high doses of ionizing radiation can induce endopolyploidization as an escape route from cell death. This strategy generally results in mitotic catastrophe during the first few days after irradiation. However, some cells escape mitotic catastrophe, polyploidize and attempt to undergo genome reduction and de-polyploidization in order to create new, viable para-diploid tumour cell sub-clones. In search for the consequences of ionizing radiation induced endopolyploidization, genome and chromosome architecture in nuclei of polyploid tumour cells, and sub-nuclei after division of bi- or multi-nucleated cells were investigated during 7 days following irradiation. Polyploidization was induced in p53-function deficient HeLa cells by exposure to 10Gy of X-irradiation. Chromosome territories #1, #4, #12 and centromeres of chromosomes #6, #10, #X were labelled by FISH and analysed for chromosome numbers, volumes and spatial distribution during 7 days post irradiation. The numbers of interphase chromosome territories or centromeres, respectively, the positions of the most peripherally and centrally located chromosome territories, and the territory volumes were compared to non-irradiated controls over this time course. Nuclei with three copies of several chromosomes (#1, #6, #10, #12, #X) were found in the irradiated as well as non-irradiated specimens. From day 2 to day 5 post irradiation, chromosome territories (#1, #4, #12) shifted towards the nuclear periphery and their volumes increased 16- to 25-fold. Consequently, chromosome territories returned towards the nuclear centre during day 6 and 7 post irradiation. In comparison to non-irradiated cells (∼500μm(3)), the nuclear volume of irradiated cells was increased 8-fold (to ∼4000μm(3)) at day 7 post irradiation. Additionally, smaller cell nuclei with an average volume of about ∼255μm(3) were detected on day 7. The data suggest a radiation-induced generation of large intra

  8. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  9. Analysis of tumour cell composition in tumours composed of paired mixtures of mammary tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, B. E.; Miller, F. R.; Wilburn, D. J.; Heppner, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    In order to quantitate the effects of tumour subpopulation interactions, we have devised a method to determine the subpopulation composition of tumours by using paired tumour cell lines able to grow in different selective media. Line 4T07 forms colonies in thioguanine but not in HAT and line 168 forms colonies in HAT but not in thioguanine. An independent technique of determining tumour cell content was used to validate this method: line 168 and 4T07 cells are distinguishable by flow cytometry after staining with propidium iodide for DNA content. Mixtures of cell suspensions prepared from each unmixed tumour, as well as from tumours arising from mixtures of these lines, were analysed by both the colony formation assay and by the DNA content assay. The colony formation assay yielded values in good agreement with the DNA content assay, but was considerably more sensitive in that it was able to quantitate minority subpopulations that constituted less than 10% of the tumour. Both methods revealed that in tumours arising from mixtures, the tumour cells were almost entirely line 4T07, even when the inoculum had contained a high proportion of 168 cells. Since line 168 cells are very tumorigenic per se, these results suggest that line 4T07 cells are capable of interfering with 168 proliferation in mixed tumours, either directly or through a host-mediated mechanism. PMID:3426919

  10. Leydig cell tumours in childhood.

    PubMed

    Mengel, W; Knorr, D

    1983-01-01

    Two cases of Leydig cell tumours in childhood are presented. In one case, delayed diagnosis and operation led to pubertas praecox vera whereas in the other case normal growth and development occurred after early diagnosis and operation. PMID:6878724

  11. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    WINSHIP, AMY LOUISE; RAINCZUK, KATE; TON, AMANDA; DIMITRIADIS, EVA

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1–3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (P<0.0001). Consistently, fibulin-5 protein was also reduced in the tumour epithelial compartment across increasing tumour grades. By contrast, increased protein localisation to the tumour stroma was observed with increasing grade. Knockdown by small interfering RNA in Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro. Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:27347195

  12. Tumour-specific CD4 T cells eradicate melanoma via indirect recognition of tumour-derived antigen.

    PubMed

    Shklovskaya, Elena; Terry, Alexandra M; Guy, Thomas V; Buckley, Adrian; Bolton, Holly A; Zhu, Erhua; Holst, Jeff; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in tumour immunity has been increasingly recognised, with recent reports describing robust CD4 T cell-dependent tumour control in mice whose immune-regulatory mechanisms have been disturbed by irradiation, chemotherapy, immunomodulatory therapy and/or constitutive immunodeficiency. Tumour control in such models has been attributed in large part to direct Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) class II-dependent CD4 T cell killing of tumour cells. To test whether CD4 T cells can eradicate tumours without directly killing tumour cells, we developed an animal model in which tumour-derived antigen could be presented to T-cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD4 T cells by host but not tumour MHC class II molecules. In I-E(+) mice bearing I-E(null) tumours, naive I-E-restricted CD4 T cells proliferated locally in tumour-draining lymph nodes after recognising tumour-derived antigen on migratory dendritic cells. In lymphopaenic but not immunosufficient hosts, CD4 T cells differentiated into polarised T helper type 1 (Th1) cells expressing interferon gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin (IL)-2 but little IL-17, and cleared established tumours. Tumour clearance was enhanced by higher TCR affinity for tumour antigen-MHC class II and was critically dependent on IFNγ, as demonstrated by early tumour escape in animals treated with an IFNγ blocking antibody. Thus, CD4 T cells and IFNγ can control tumour growth without direct T-cell killing of tumour cells, and without requiring additional adaptive immune cells such as CD8 T cells and B cells. Our results support a role for effective CD4 T cell-dependent tumour immunity against MHC class II-negative tumours. PMID:26837456

  13. Isolated, disseminated and circulating tumour cells in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schilling, David; Todenhöfer, Tilman; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Schwentner, Christian; Fehm, Tanja; Stenzl, Arnulf

    2012-08-01

    The loss of single cells from a tumour cell cluster marks an early event in the metastatic process of cancer progression. Although the metastatic cascade in prostate cancer is yet to be fully understood, monitoring circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and quantifying the load of tumour cell dissemination is currently being implemented into routine clinical practice for diagnosing minimal residual disease (MRD), estimating prognosis and monitoring treatment success. Current methods for enrichment of CTCs or disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) and detection of MRD rely on the expression of specific marker genes or proteins that might be altered during the process of tumour cell dissemination, therefore disrupting tumour cell detection. The tumour origin and malignant potential for metastasis of marker-positive cells is not yet clear. Some studies have demonstrated the potential of CTCs or DTCs as prognostic or predictive markers, leading to the increasing implementation of CTC measurement as an end point in clinical trials.

  14. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ; Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A; Brolo, AG

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  15. Cancer Cell Death-Inducing Radiotherapy: Impact on Local Tumour Control, Tumour Cell Proliferation and Induction of Systemic Anti-tumour Immunity.

    PubMed

    Frey, Benjamin; Derer, Anja; Scheithauer, Heike; Wunderlich, Roland; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) predominantly is aimed to induce DNA damage in tumour cells that results in reduction of their clonogenicity and finally in tumour cell death. Adaptation of RT with higher single doses has become necessary and led to a more detailed view on what kind of tumour cell death is induced and which immunological consequences result from it. RT is capable of rendering tumour cells immunogenic by modifying the tumour cell phenotype and the microenvironment. Danger signals are released as well as the senescence-associated secretory phenotype. This results in maturation of dendritic cells and priming of cytotoxic T cells as well as in activation of natural killer cells. However, RT on the other hand can also result in immune suppressive events including apoptosis induction and foster tumour cell proliferation. That's why RT is nowadays increasingly combined with selected immunotherapies. PMID:27558821

  16. The treatment of cranial germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Brandes, A A; Pasetto, L M; Monfardini, S

    2000-08-01

    Germ cell tumours of the central nervous system (CNS) include many subtypes whose response to treatment varies, even though the symptoms and radiological appearances are similar. Five-year survival rates are 96% for germinomas, 100% for mature teratomas, 67% for immature teratomas and 69% for immature teratomas mixed with germinomas; for beta-HCG secreting germinomas the rate is only 38%. Patients with choriocarcinoma, embryonal carcinoma, or yolk sac tumour have the lowest survival rates; patients with germinoma or mature teratoma have longer survival rates. Although a wider resection is associated with a higher rate of survival for patients with non-germinomatous germ cell (NGGC) tumours, to date an aggressive surgical approach has been advocated only for pineal region tumours, but not for hypothalamic/neurohypophyseal tumours. Beside the delayed injury induced by radiotherapy, the late injury induced by chemotherapy is becoming increasingly evident. Cisplatin is considered an indispensable drug, but it may cause renal damage, ototoxicity, peripheral neuropathy and sterility, while etoposide is associated with an excess frequency of second neoplasms. Taking into account all of the published literature, the following therapeutic options are suggested: in pure germinoma tumours (GT) radiotherapy alone will usually ensure adequate control of the disease, and the long-term sequelae may be limited by reducing the dose delivered, as was proposed for germ cell testicular tumours, to 30 Gy to limited fields plus 25-30 Gy to the spinal axis if there is disseminated disease. In cases of recurrence, which should be uncommon, patients may be rescued with both radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In NGGC tumours, the prognosis is more unfavourable and there is often dissemination to the spine at diagnosis; however, the tumour's high chemosensitivity suggests neoadjuvant treatment chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for three cycles followed by consolidation radiotherapy with

  17. Differential screening of a human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library has identified increased transcription of elongation factor EF-1 alpha in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Grant, A G; Flomen, R M; Tizard, M L; Grant, D A

    1992-03-12

    A human pancreatic adenocarcinoma lambda gt11 expression library was differentially screened with mRNA derived from normal and cancerous pancreatic tissues. Five clones preferentially hybridized with pancreatic adenocarcinoma mRNA. cDNA inserts from 4 of these clones were amplified by PCR, labelled with alpha 32P and used in Northern blot analysis against mRNA prepared from a variety of tumour and normal tissues. lambda GER-4 identified a pancreas-associated mRNA (greater than 10 kb) with no homology with known sequences at either the nucleic or amino-acid level. lambda GER-2 identified a 1.7-kb mRNA transcript that was over-expressed in mRNA prepared from pancreas, colon, breast, lung and gastric tumours relative to normal tissues. Sequence analysis and restriction-enzyme mapping showed that this clone was completely homologous with the active form of human elongation factor EF-1 alpha. This high level of EF-1 alpha-mRNA expression in tumour tissues lends support to the increasing evidence that EF-1 alpha is an important regulator of the cell cycle. PMID:1544708

  18. Glutathione S-transferase isoenzymes in human tumours and tumour derived cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, A. D.; Forrester, L. M.; Hayes, J. D.; Wareing, C. J.; Carmichael, J.; Harris, A. L.; Mooghen, M.; Wolf, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that glutathione S-transferases play a role in the intrinsic and acquired resistance of tumours to anticancer drugs. In view of the wide use of tumour cell lines to understand the factors which confer either sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapeutic agents we have determined glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and isozyme composition in nine human cell lines. These data have been compared with the values obtained in solid tumours. In most cases overall GST activity was higher in the tumours than in the cell lines. This was most pronounced for the breast tumour samples relative to MCF7 cell line. The pi class GST subunit was present at similar concentration in the cell lines and the tumours, and in most cases was the most abundant subunit present. The alpha and mu class GST were expressed in most of the cell lines but at much lower concentration than the pi class subunit. Also considerable variability particularly in the expression of the mu subunits was observed. This was also the case for the expression of these subunits in the solid tumour samples. The levels of these GSTs (when expressed) in the solid tumours was invariably higher than that observed in the cell lines. There are therefore several similarities but also some significant differences in GST expression in solid tumours and cell lines. Whether the differences are because expression is lost during the generation of the cell lines or whether it reflects the individuality of human tumours remains to be clearly established. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2789940

  19. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  20. Paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Furqan; Murray, Matthew J; Amatruda, James F; Coleman, Nicholas; Nicholson, James C; Hale, Juliet P; Pashankar, Farzana; Stoneham, Sara J; Poynter, Jenny N; Olson, Thomas A; Billmire, Deborah F; Stark, Daniel; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Frazier, A Lindsay

    2016-04-01

    Management of paediatric extracranial germ-cell tumours carries a unique set of challenges. Germ-cell tumours are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms that present across a wide age range and vary in site, histology, and clinical behaviour. Patients with germ-cell tumours are managed by a diverse array of specialists. Thus, staging, risk stratification, and treatment approaches for germ-cell tumours have evolved disparately along several trajectories. Paediatric germ-cell tumours differ from the adolescent and adult disease in many ways, leading to complexities in applying age-appropriate, evidence-based care. Suboptimal outcomes remain for several groups of patients, including adolescents, and patients with extragonadal tumours, high tumour markers at diagnosis, or platinum-resistant disease. Survivors have significant long-term toxicities. The challenge moving forward will be to translate new insights from molecular studies and collaborative clinical data into improved patient outcomes. Future trials will be characterised by improved risk-stratification systems, biomarkers for response and toxic effects, rational reduction of therapy for low-risk patients and novel approaches for poor-risk patients, and improved international collaboration across paediatric and adult cooperative research groups. PMID:27300675

  1. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  2. Myeloid cells in tumour-immune interactions.

    PubMed

    Kareva, Irina; Berezovskaya, Faina; Castillo-Chavez, Carlos

    2010-07-01

    Despite highly developed specific immune responses, tumour cells often manage to escape recognition by the immune system, continuing to grow uncontrollably. Experimental work suggests that mature myeloid cells may be central to the activation of the specific immune response. Recognition and subsequent control of tumour growth by the cells of the specific immune response depend on the balance between immature (ImC) and mature (MmC) myeloid cells in the body. However, tumour cells produce cytokines that inhibit ImC maturation, altering the balance between ImC and MmC. Hence, the focus of this manuscript is on the study of the potential role of this inhibiting mechanism on tumour growth dynamics. A conceptual predator-prey type model that incorporates the dynamics and interactions of tumour cells, CD8(+) T cells, ImC and MmC is proposed in order to address the role of this mechanism. The prey (tumour) has a defence mechanism (blocking the maturation of ImC) that prevents the predator (immune system) from recognizing it. The model, a four-dimensional nonlinear system of ordinary differential equations, is reduced to a two-dimensional system using time-scale arguments that are tied to the maturation rate of ImC. Analysis shows that the model is capable of supporting biologically reasonable patterns of behaviour depending on the initial conditions. A range of parameters, where healing without external influences can occur, is identified both qualitatively and quantitatively.

  3. Tumours with cancer stem cells: A PDE model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, A; Mancini, A; Primicerio, M

    2016-02-01

    The role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumour growth has received increasing attention in the recent literature. Here we stem from an integro-differential system describing the evolution of a population of CSC and of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells formulated and studied in a previous paper, and we investigate an approximation in which the system reduces to a pair of nonlinear coupled parabolic equation. We prove that the new system is well posed and we examine some general properties. Numerical simulations show more on the qualitative behaviour of the solutions, concerning in particular the so-called tumour paradox, according to which an increase of the mortality rate of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells results asymptotically in a faster growth.

  4. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  5. HDAC Inhibitors Increase NRF2-Signaling in Tumour Cells and Blunt the Efficacy of Co-Adminstered Cytotoxic Agents

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Michael; Campbell, Kathryn H.; MacLeod, A. Kenneth; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Wolf, C. Roland

    2014-01-01

    The NRF2 signalling cascade provides a primary response against electrophilic chemicals and oxidative stress. The activation of NRF2-signaling is anticipated to have adverse clinical consequences; NRF2 is activated in a number of cancers and, additionally, its pharmacological activation by one compound can reduce the toxicity or efficiency of a second agent administered concomitantly. In this work, we have analysed systematically the ability of 152 research, pre-clinical or clinically used drugs to induce an NRF2 response using the MCF7-AREc32 NRF2 reporter. Ten percent of the tested drugs induced an NRF2 response. The NRF2 activators were not restricted to classical cytotoxic alkylating agents but also included a number of emerging anticancer drugs, including an IGF1-R inhibitor (NVP-AEW541), a PIM-1 kinase inhibitor (Pim1 inhibitor 2), a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536) and most strikingly seven of nine tested HDAC inhibitors. These findings were further confirmed by demonstrating NRF2-dependent induction of endogenous AKR genes, biomarkers of NRF2 activity. The ability of HDAC inhibitors to stimulate NRF2-signalling did not diminish their own potency as antitumour agents. However, when used to pre-treat cells, they did reduce the efficacy of acrolein. Taken together, our data suggest that the ability of drugs to stimulate NRF2 activity is common and should be investigated as part of the drug-development process. PMID:25427220

  6. HDAC inhibitors increase NRF2-signaling in tumour cells and blunt the efficacy of co-adminstered cytotoxic agents.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Michael; Campbell, Kathryn H; MacLeod, A Kenneth; McLaughlin, Lesley A; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland

    2014-01-01

    The NRF2 signalling cascade provides a primary response against electrophilic chemicals and oxidative stress. The activation of NRF2-signaling is anticipated to have adverse clinical consequences; NRF2 is activated in a number of cancers and, additionally, its pharmacological activation by one compound can reduce the toxicity or efficiency of a second agent administered concomitantly. In this work, we have analysed systematically the ability of 152 research, pre-clinical or clinically used drugs to induce an NRF2 response using the MCF7-AREc32 NRF2 reporter. Ten percent of the tested drugs induced an NRF2 response. The NRF2 activators were not restricted to classical cytotoxic alkylating agents but also included a number of emerging anticancer drugs, including an IGF1-R inhibitor (NVP-AEW541), a PIM-1 kinase inhibitor (Pim1 inhibitor 2), a PLK1 inhibitor (BI 2536) and most strikingly seven of nine tested HDAC inhibitors. These findings were further confirmed by demonstrating NRF2-dependent induction of endogenous AKR genes, biomarkers of NRF2 activity. The ability of HDAC inhibitors to stimulate NRF2-signalling did not diminish their own potency as antitumour agents. However, when used to pre-treat cells, they did reduce the efficacy of acrolein. Taken together, our data suggest that the ability of drugs to stimulate NRF2 activity is common and should be investigated as part of the drug-development process.

  7. Spatio-temporal cell dynamics in tumour spheroid irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, H.; Bleicher, M.; Meyer-Hermann, M.

    2010-10-01

    Multicellular tumour spheroids are realistic in vitro systems in radiation research that integrate cell-cell interaction and cell cycle control by factors in the medium. The dynamic reaction inside a tumour spheroid triggered by radiation is not well understood. Of special interest is the amount of cell cycle synchronisation which could be triggered by irradiation, since this would allow follow-up irradiations to exploit the increased sensitivity of certain cell cycle phases. In order to investigate these questions we need to support irradiation experiments with mathematical models. In this article a new model is introduced combining the dynamics of tumour growth and irradiation treatments. The tumour spheroid growth is modelled using an agent-based Delaunay/Voronoi hybrid model in which the cells are represented by weighted dynamic vertices. Cell properties like full cell cycle dynamics are included. In order to be able to distinguish between different cell reactions in response to irradiation quality we introduce a probabilistic model for damage dynamics. The overall cell survival from this model is in agreement with predictions from the linear-quadratic model. Our model can describe the growth of avascular tumour spheroids in agreement to experimental results. Using the probabilistic model for irradiation damage dynamics the classic ‘four Rs’ of radiotherapy can be studied in silico. We found a pronounced reactivation of the tumour spheroid in response to irradiation. A majority of the surviving cells is synchronized in their cell cycle progression after irradiation. The cell synchronisation could be actively triggered and should be exploited in an advanced fractionation scheme. Thus it has been demonstrated that our model could be used to understand the dynamics of tumour growth after irradiation and to propose optimized fractionation schemes in cooperation with experimental investigations.

  8. Molecular analysis of circulating tumour cells-biology and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Matthew G; Metcalf, Robert L; Carter, Louise; Brady, Ged; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2014-03-01

    Growing evidence for intratumour heterogeneity informs us that single-site biopsies fall short of revealing the complete genomic landscape of a tumour. With an expanding repertoire of targeted agents entering the clinic, screening tumours for genomic aberrations is increasingly important, as is interrogating the tumours for resistance mechanisms upon disease progression. Multiple biopsies separated spatially and temporally are impractical, uncomfortable for the patient and not without risk. Here, we describe how circulating tumour cells (CTCs), captured from a minimally invasive blood test-and readily amenable to serial sampling-have the potential to inform intratumour heterogeneity and tumour evolution, although it remains to be determined how useful this will be in the clinic. Technologies for detecting and isolating CTCs include the validated CellSearch(®) system, but other technologies are gaining prominence. We also discuss how recent CTC discoveries map to mechanisms of haematological spread, previously described in preclinical models, including evidence for epithelial-mesenchymal transition, collective cell migration and cells with tumour-initiating capacity within the circulation. Advances in single-cell molecular analysis are enhancing our ability to explore mechanisms of metastasis, and the combination of CTC and cell-free DNA assays are anticipated to provide invaluable blood-borne biomarkers for real-time patient monitoring and treatment stratification.

  9. Mast cells, angiogenesis, and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Ribatti, Domenico; Crivellato, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Accumulation of mast cells (MCs) in tumours was described by Ehrlich in his doctoral thesis. Since this early account, ample evidence has been provided highlighting participation of MCs to the inflammatory reaction that occurs in many clinical and experimental tumour settings. MCs are bone marrow-derived tissue-homing leukocytes that are endowed with a panoply of releasable mediators and surface receptors. These cells actively take part to innate and acquired immune reactions as well as to a series of fundamental functions such as angiogenesis, tissue repair, and tissue remodelling. The involvement of MCs in tumour development is debated. Although some evidence suggests that MCs can promote tumourigenesis and tumour progression, there are some clinical sets as well as experimental tumour models in which MCs seem to have functions that favour the host. One of the major issues linking MCs to cancer is the ability of these cells to release potent pro-angiogenic factors. This review will focus on the most recent acquisitions about this intriguing field of research. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mast cells in inflammation.

  10. Promotion of Growth of Tumour Cells in Acutely Inflamed Tissues

    PubMed Central

    van den Brenk, H. A. S.; Stone, M.; Kelly, H.; Orton, C.; Sharpington, C.

    1974-01-01

    Acute inflammatory reactions were induced in rats by the intravenous injection of cellulose sulphate (CS) or an extract of normal rat lung homogenate (LH), or by intraperitoneal injections of Compound 48/80. These treatments greatly increased survival and clonogenic growth in the lungs of rats of intravenously injected allogeneic W-256 and Y-P388 tumour cells. Increase in the dose of intravenously injected CS caused a logarithmic increase in colony forming efficiency (CFE) of tumour cells in the lungs. CFE was not stimulated by the intravenous injection of rats with pharmacological mediators of inflammation (histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and prostaglandins PGE1 and PGF2α) which are released from tissues by agents which induce inflammation. Stimulation of CFE by CS occurred in adrenalectomized rats but was inhibited by treatment of rats with an anti-inflammatory steroid, dexamethasone. CFE was stimulated by CS in tumour immunized rats; the inflammatory state did not prevent the expression of immunity but “rescued” a proportion (approximately 20%) of the injected tumour cells from immunodestruction in the lungs. A higher proportion of tumours grew in the paws of rats when a small number of W-256 cells were injected interdigitally into the acute inflammatory swellings produced by the local injection of paws with LH or CS. CS is a “synthetic heparin” which causes marked prolongation of blood clotting time and also increases fibrinolytic activity of the blood. Anticoagulant treatment of rats with heparin did not affect CFE. Thus, there was no direct correlation between blood clotting time and CFE of blood borne tumour cells in the rat. The mechanisms which may be responsible for the nonspecific growth promoting effects of inflammatory reactions induced by various types of tissue injury on tumour induction and growth are discussed. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:4451630

  11. The role of mesenchymal stem cells in anti-cancer drug resistance and tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Houthuijzen, J M; Daenen, L G M; Roodhart, J M L; Voest, E E

    2012-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that the tumour microenvironment has a very important role in tumour progression and drug resistance. Many different cell types within the tumour stroma have an effect on tumour progression either in a positive or in a negative way. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a distinct population of cells that have been linked with tumour growth. Mesenchymal stem cells can home to tumours where they modulate the immune system and facilitate tumour growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Recent studies have shown that MSCs also have an important role in the resistance to various anti-cancer drugs. This mini-review provides an overview of the functional properties of MSCs in tumour progression and drug resistance. PMID:22596239

  12. Characterization of twenty-five ovarian tumour cell lines that phenocopy primary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Ince, Tan A.; Sousa, Aurea D.; Jones, Michelle A.; Harrell, J. Chuck; Agoston, Elin S.; Krohn, Marit; Selfors, Laura M.; Liu, Wenbin; Chen, Ken; Yong, Mao; Buchwald, Peter; Wang, Bin; Hale, Katherine S.; Cohick, Evan; Sergent, Petra; Witt, Abigail; Kozhekbaeva, Zhanna; Gao, Sizhen; Agoston, Agoston T.; Merritt, Melissa A.; Foster, Rosemary; Rueda, Bo R.; Crum, Christopher P.; Brugge, Joan S.; Mills, Gordon B.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available human tumour cell line panels consist of a small number of lines in each lineage that generally fail to retain the phenotype of the original patient tumour. Here we develop a cell culture medium that enables us to routinely establish cell lines from diverse subtypes of human ovarian cancers with >95% efficiency. Importantly, the 25 new ovarian tumour cell lines described here retain the genomic landscape, histopathology and molecular features of the original tumours. Furthermore, the molecular profile and drug response of these cell lines correlate with distinct groups of primary tumours with different outcomes. Thus, tumour cell lines derived using this methodology represent a significantly improved platform to study human tumour pathophysiology and response to therapy. PMID:26080861

  13. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  14. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells.

  15. Regional tumour glutamine supply affects chromatin and cell identity.

    PubMed

    Højfeldt, Jonas W; Helin, Kristian

    2016-09-28

    Limited perfusion of solid tumours produces a nutrient-deprived tumour core microenvironment. Low glutamine levels in the tumour core are now shown to lead to reduced levels of α-ketoglutarate and decreased histone demethylase activity, thereby promoting a less differentiated and more therapy-resistant state of the tumour cells. PMID:27684506

  16. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuckwell, W.; Bezak, E.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (109 cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy.

  17. Efficient Monte Carlo modelling of individual tumour cell propagation for hypoxic head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Tuckwell, W; Bezak, E; Yeoh, E; Marcu, L

    2008-09-01

    A Monte Carlo tumour model has been developed to simulate tumour cell propagation for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The model aims to eventually provide a radiobiological tool for radiation oncology clinicians to plan patient treatment schedules based on properties of the individual tumour. The inclusion of an oxygen distribution amongst the tumour cells enables the model to incorporate hypoxia and other associated parameters, which affect tumour growth. The object oriented program FORTRAN 95 has been used to create the model algorithm, with Monte Carlo methods being employed to randomly assign many of the cell parameters from probability distributions. Hypoxia has been implemented through random assignment of partial oxygen pressure values to individual cells during tumour growth, based on in vivo Eppendorf probe experimental data. The accumulation of up to 10 million virtual tumour cells in 15 min of computer running time has been achieved. The stem cell percentage and the degree of hypoxia are the parameters which most influence the final tumour growth rate. For a tumour with a doubling time of 40 days, the final stem cell percentage is approximately 1% of the total cell population. The effect of hypoxia on the tumour growth rate is significant. Using a hypoxia induced cell quiescence limit which affects 50% of cells with and oxygen levels less than 1 mm Hg, the tumour doubling time increases to over 200 days and the time of tumour growth for a clinically detectable tumour (10(9) cells) increases from 3 to 8 years. A biologically plausible Monte Carlo model of hypoxic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumour growth has been developed for real time assessment of the effects of multiple biological parameters which impact upon the response of the individual patient to fractionated radiotherapy. PMID:18677039

  18. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer.

  19. Interleukin-6 suppression reduces tumour self-seeding by circulating tumour cells in a human osteosarcoma nude mouse model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinglong; Ma, Qiong; Liu, Tao; Guan, Guofeng; Zhang, Kailiang; Chen, Jiayan; Jia, Nan; Yan, Shiju; Chen, Guanyin; Liu, Shiluan; Jiang, Kuo; Lu, Yao; Wen, Yanhua; Zhao, Haien; Zhou, Yong; Fan, Qingyu; Qiu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Tumour self-seeding by circulating tumour cells (CTCs) enhances tumour progression and recurrence. Previously, we demonstrated that tumour self-seeding by CTCs occurs in osteosarcoma and revealed that interleukin-6 (IL-6) may promote CTC attraction. Here, we investigated the underlying mechanisms of IL-6 in tumour self-seeding by CTCs. IL-6 suppression inhibited in vitro cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. In addition, rhIL-6 activated the Janus-activated kinase/signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal regulated kinase1/2 (MAPK/ERK1/2) pathways in vitro. Both pathways increased cell proliferation, but only the JAK/STAT3 pathway promoted migration. Suppressing IL-6 inhibited in vivo tumour growth and metastasis. IL-6 suppression or JAK/STAT3 pathway inhibition reduced CTC seeding in primary tumours. Collectively, IL-6 promotes tumour self-seeding by CTCs in a nude mouse model. This finding may provide a novel strategy for future therapeutic interventions to prevent osteosarcoma progression and recurrence.

  20. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Thomas M; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Folkes, Lisa K; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M; Hammond, Ester M; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J; Higgins, Geoff S; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  1. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Thomas M.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Folkes, Lisa K.; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M.; Hammond, Ester M.; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  2. Single-cell-based computer simulation of the oxygen-dependent tumour response to irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harting, Christine; Peschke, Peter; Borkenstein, Klaus; Karger, Christian P.

    2007-08-01

    Optimization of treatment plans in radiotherapy requires the knowledge of tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP). Mathematical models may help to obtain quantitative estimates of TCP and NTCP. A single-cell-based computer simulation model is presented, which simulates tumour growth and radiation response on the basis of the response of the constituting cells. The model contains oxic, hypoxic and necrotic tumour cells as well as capillary cells which are considered as sources of a radial oxygen profile. Survival of tumour cells is calculated by the linear quadratic model including the modified response due to the local oxygen concentration. The model additionally includes cell proliferation, hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, apoptosis and resorption of inactivated tumour cells. By selecting different degrees of angiogenesis, the model allows the simulation of oxic as well as hypoxic tumours having distinctly different oxygen distributions. The simulation model showed that poorly oxygenated tumours exhibit an increased radiation tolerance. Inter-tumoural variation of radiosensitivity flattens the dose response curve. This effect is enhanced by proliferation between fractions. Intra-tumoural radiosensitivity variation does not play a significant role. The model may contribute to the mechanistic understanding of the influence of biological tumour parameters on TCP. It can in principle be validated in radiation experiments with experimental tumours.

  3. Brain tumour cells interconnect to a functional and resistant network.

    PubMed

    Osswald, Matthias; Jung, Erik; Sahm, Felix; Solecki, Gergely; Venkataramani, Varun; Blaes, Jonas; Weil, Sophie; Horstmann, Heinz; Wiestler, Benedikt; Syed, Mustafa; Huang, Lulu; Ratliff, Miriam; Karimian Jazi, Kianush; Kurz, Felix T; Schmenger, Torsten; Lemke, Dieter; Gömmel, Miriam; Pauli, Martin; Liao, Yunxiang; Häring, Peter; Pusch, Stefan; Herl, Verena; Steinhäuser, Christian; Krunic, Damir; Jarahian, Mostafa; Miletic, Hrvoje; Berghoff, Anna S; Griesbeck, Oliver; Kalamakis, Georgios; Garaschuk, Olga; Preusser, Matthias; Weiss, Samuel; Liu, Haikun; Heiland, Sabine; Platten, Michael; Huber, Peter E; Kuner, Thomas; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Winkler, Frank

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytic brain tumours, including glioblastomas, are incurable neoplasms characterized by diffusely infiltrative growth. Here we show that many tumour cells in astrocytomas extend ultra-long membrane protrusions, and use these distinct tumour microtubes as routes for brain invasion, proliferation, and to interconnect over long distances. The resulting network allows multicellular communication through microtube-associated gap junctions. When damage to the network occurred, tumour microtubes were used for repair. Moreover, the microtube-connected astrocytoma cells, but not those remaining unconnected throughout tumour progression, were protected from cell death inflicted by radiotherapy. The neuronal growth-associated protein 43 was important for microtube formation and function, and drove microtube-dependent tumour cell invasion, proliferation, interconnection, and radioresistance. Oligodendroglial brain tumours were deficient in this mechanism. In summary, astrocytomas can develop functional multicellular network structures. Disconnection of astrocytoma cells by targeting their tumour microtubes emerges as a new principle to reduce the treatment resistance of this disease.

  4. NK cell depletion diminish tumour-specific B cell responses.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Markus; Tawadros, Samir; Sedlacek, Hans-Harald; Schultze, Joachim L; Berthold, Frank

    2004-05-15

    Natural killer (NK) cells can exercise immediate cytotoxicity against malignant cells and thus far modulate the development of tumour directed T cell immunity. To investigate the impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell immunity mice were immunised with IMR5-75 human neuroblastoma cells with or without prior in vivo NK cell depletion. Flow cytometry analyses gave evidence for an impaired IgG response against the cells immunised with. Dissection of Th1 (IgG2a) and Th2 (IgG1) oriented B cell responses revealed Th1 responses as primarily affected, while Th2 oriented B cell responses as measured by flow cytometry and GD2 ganglioside-specific ELISA were enforced. The data reveal an unexpected impact of NK cells on the development of tumour directed B cell responses. Consequently, NK cell function has also to be taken into account when developing B cell-based cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Cell metabolism, tumour diagnosis and multispectral FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Hauser, C.; Lorenz, S.; Mosch, S.; Rotte, S.; Kessler, M.; Kalinina, S.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence guided diagnosis of tumour tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results are interfering with the outcome. Discrimination between tumour and inflammation could be therefore difficult. Improvement of fluorescence diagnosis through observation of cell metabolism could be the solution, which needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. However, a complex combination of fluorophores give rise to the emission signal. Also in PDD (photodynamic diagnosis) different photosensitizer metabolites contribute to the fluorescence signal. Therefore, the fluorescence decay in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. The discussion will focus on the detection of NADH, FAD and 5-ALA induced porphyrins. With respect to NADH and FAD the discrimination between protein bound and free coenzyme was investigated with multispectral FLIM in normal oral keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells from different origin. The redox ratio, which can be correlated with the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and FAD changed depending on the state of the cells. Most of the investigations were done in monolayer cell cultures. However, in order to get information from a more realistic in vivo situation additionally the chorioallantoismembrane (CAM) of fertilized eggs was used where tumour cells or biopsies were allowed to grow. The results of theses measurements will be discussed as well.

  6. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression. PMID:21521500

  7. Ovarian hilus-cell tumour: a case report.

    PubMed

    Georgiev, T N; Valkov, I M; Dokumov, S I

    1980-01-01

    A case of hilus-cell tumour of the ovary, associated with polycystic ovarian disease is reported. The authors discuss the data from hormonal investigations, the morphological picture and the genesis of the tumour.

  8. MicroRNA Regulation of Brain Tumour Initiating Cells in Central Nervous System Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Thusyanth; Bakhshinyan, David; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K.

    2015-01-01

    CNS tumours occur in both pediatric and adult patients and many of these tumours are associated with poor clinical outcome. Due to a paradigm shift in thinking for the last several years, these tumours are now considered to originate from a small population of stem-like cells within the bulk tumour tissue. These cells, termed as brain tumour initiating cells (BTICs), are perceived to be regulated by microRNAs at the posttranscriptional/translational levels. Proliferation, stemness, differentiation, invasion, angiogenesis, metastasis, apoptosis, and cell cycle constitute some of the significant processes modulated by microRNAs in cancer initiation and progression. Characterization and functional studies on oncogenic or tumour suppressive microRNAs are made possible because of developments in sequencing and microarray techniques. In the current review, we bring recent knowledge of the role of microRNAs in BTIC formation and therapy. Special attention is paid to two highly aggressive and well-characterized brain tumours: gliomas and medulloblastoma. As microRNA seems to be altered in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, “microRNA therapy” may now have potential to improve outcomes for brain tumour patients. In this rapidly evolving field, further understanding of miRNA biology and its contribution towards cancer can be mined for new therapeutic tools. PMID:26064134

  9. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour. PMID:27807495

  10. Pro-tumour activity of interleukin-22 in HPAFII human pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Curd, L M; Favors, S E; Gregg, R K

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-22 is a cytokine involved in inflammatory and wound healing processes that is secreted primarily by T helper type 17 (Th17) cells. IL-22 receptor (IL-22R) expression is limited to epithelial cells of the digestive organs, respiratory tract and skin. Most tumours originating in these sites over-express IL-22R. Interestingly, there is an increase in Th17 frequency within the peripheral blood and tumour microenvironment of advanced cancer patients. Subsequently, IL-17 has been shown to display both pro-tumour and anti-tumour functions. Because many tumours lack expression of the IL-17 receptor, the effects of IL-17 on tumour growth are generated by cells that surround the tumour cells. Like IL-17, high levels of IL-22 have been detected in tumour tissues and the peripheral blood of cancer patients; however, the direct effect of IL-22 on tumour cells has remained largely unknown. In this report, we show that IL-22 stimulated production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-XL in IL-22R-positive HPAFII human pancreatic cancer cells. Additionally, IL-22 augmented HPAFII cell production of immunosuppressive cytokines. We show further that IL-22 activation of HPAFII cells diminished T cell production of interferon (IFN)-γ through the action of IL-10. Strikingly, we show for the first time that IL-22 can fully protect cancer cells from natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity by stimulating tumour production of IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. Our data support the idea that IL-22 may act to promote the pathogenesis of cancers rather than function in anti-tumour immunity. PMID:22471280

  11. Alternatively spliced variants of the cell adhesion molecule CD44 and tumour progression in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Gotley, D. C.; Fawcett, J.; Walsh, M. D.; Reeder, J. A.; Simmons, D. L.; Antalis, T. M.

    1996-01-01

    Increased expression of alternatively spliced variants of the CD44 family of cell adhesion molecules has been associated with tumour metastasis. In the present study, expression of alternatively spliced variants of CD44 and their cellular distribution have been investigated in human colonic tumours and in the corresponding normal mucosa, in addition to benign adenomatous polyps. The expression of CD44 alternatively spliced variants has been correlated with tumour progression according to Dukes' histological stage. CD44 variant expression was determined by immunohistochemisty using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific CD44 variant domains together with RT-PCR analysis of CD44 variant mRNA expression in the same tissue specimens. We demonstrate that as well as being expressed in colonic tumour cells, the full range of CD44 variants, CD44v2-v10, are widely expressed in normal colonic crypt epithelium, predominantly in the crypt base. CD44v6, the epitope which is most commonly associated with tumour progression and metastasis, was not only expressed by many benign colonic tumours, but was expressed as frequently in normal basal crypt epithelium as in malignant colonic tumour cells, and surprisingly, was even absent from some metastatic colorectal tumours. Expression of none of the CD44 variant epitopes was found to be positively correlated with tumour progression or with colorectal tumour metastasis to the liver, results which are inconsistent with a role for CD44 variants as indicators of colonic cancer progression. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8695347

  12. Increased FOXP3 expression in tumour-associated tissues of horses affected with equine sarcoid disease.

    PubMed

    Mählmann, K; Hamza, E; Marti, E; Dolf, G; Klukowska, J; Gerber, V; Koch, C

    2014-12-01

    Recent studies suggest that regulatory T cells (Tregs) are associated with disease severity and progression in papilloma virus induced neoplasia. Bovine papilloma virus (BPV) is recognised as the most important aetiological factor in equine sarcoid (ES) disease. The aim of this study was to compare expression levels of Treg markers and associated cytokines in tissue samples of ES-affected equids with skin samples of healthy control horses. Eleven ES-affected, and 12 healthy horses were included in the study. Expression levels of forkhead box protein 3 (FOXP3), interleukin 10 (IL10), interleukin 4 (IL4) and interferon gamma (IFNG) mRNA in lesional and tumour-distant samples from ES-affected horses, as well as in dermal samples of healthy control horses were measured using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Expression levels were compared between lesional and tumour-distant as well as between tumour-distant and control samples. Furthermore, BPV-1 E5 DNA in samples of ES-affected horses was quantified using quantitative PCR, and possible associations of viral load, disease severity and gene expression levels were evaluated. Expression levels of FOXP3, IL10 and IFNG mRNA and BPV-1 E5 copy numbers were significantly increased in lesional compared to tumour-distant samples. There was no difference in FOXP3 and cytokine expression in tumour-distant samples from ES- compared with control horses. In tumour-distant samples viral load was positively correlated with IL10 expression and severity score. The increased expression of Treg markers in tumour-associated tissues of ES-affected equids indicates a local, Treg-induced immune suppression.

  13. Metastatic colonization potential of primary tumour cells in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tarin, D.; Price, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    A model has been developed for studying the capability of cells from primary murine mammary tumours to establish colonies in distant organs. The model involves the i.v. inoculation of disaggregated tumour cells into autologous and syngeneic recipients. The results show that the metastatic colonization potential of cells from a given tumour is consistent within the animals of an inoculated batch. Also, the findings are uniform in the autologous host and the syngeneic recipients. Tumours vary in their colonization potential and can be classified in 2 main groups designated high and low. These findings indicate that: (i) cells from 37% of mammary tumours can heavily colonize the lungs when inoculated i.v., even though the incidence of metastatic spread of these tumours in the undisturbed animal is almost zero. Thus, the relative infrequency of spontaneous metastasis from murine mammary tumours is not due to inability of the tumour cells to survive and colonize once free in the blood stream; and (ii) the colonization potential of the tumours is an intrinsic property of the tumour cells rather than of the host, whose prior acquaintance with the cells does not seem to confer resistance to colonization. The model presents opportunities for identification of possible differences between tumours of high and low colonization potential, and is being used to study cellular properties which favour colonization of distant organs by comparison of observations in vitro with the behaviour of cells from the same tumour in vivo. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:444412

  14. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  15. The risk of thrombo-embolic events is increased in patients with germ-cell tumours and can be predicted by serum lactate dehydrogenase and body surface area

    PubMed Central

    Piketty, A-C; Fléchon, A; Laplanche, A; Nouyrigat, E; Droz, J-P; Théodore, C; Fizazi, K

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of thrombo-embolic events (TEE) in patients with germ-cell tumours (GCT) who receive cisplatin-based chemotherapy, to compare this risk to that of a matched control group of non-GCT cancer patients, and to identify risk factors of TEE. The rate of TEE during the 6 months following the initiation of chemotherapy was assessed in 100 consecutive patients with GCT and in 100 controls with various neoplasms who were matched on sex and age, and who received first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy during the same period of time at Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. Data were subsequently tested on a validation group of 77 GCT patients treated in Lyon, France. A total of 19 patients (19%) (95% confidence interval (CI): 13–28) and six patients (6%) (95% CI: 3–13) had a TEE in the GCT group and the non-GCT control group, respectively (relative risk (RR): 3.4; P<0.01). Three patients from the GCT group died of pulmonary embolism. In multivariate analysis, two factors had independent predictive value for TEE: a high body surface area (>1.9 m2) (RR: 5 (1.8–13.9)) and an elevated serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (RR: 6.4 (2.3–18.2)). Patients with no risk factor (n=26) and those with at least one risk factor (n=71) had a probability of having a TEE of 4% (95% CI: 1–19) and 26% (95% CI: 17–37), respectively. In the GCT validation set, 10 (13%) patients had a TEE; patients with no risk factor and those with at least one risk factor had a probability of having a TEE of 0 and 17% (95% CI: 10–29), respectively. Patients with GCT are at a higher risk for TEE than patients with non-GCT cancer while on cisplatin-based chemotherapy. This risk can be accurately predicted by serum LDH and body surface area. This predictive index may help to study prospectively the impact of thromboprophylaxis in GCT patients. PMID:16205699

  16. Tumour cells engineered to secrete interleukin-15 augment anti-tumour immune responses in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hazama, S; Noma, T; Wang, F; Iizuka, N; Ogura, Y; Yoshimura, K; Inoguchi, E; Hakozaki, M; Hirose, K; Suzuki, T; Oka, M

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effect of interleukin-15 (IL-15) gene transfer into tumour cells on the host's anti-tumour response. In BALB/c mice IL-15 producing Meth-A cells (Meth-A/IL-15) underwent complete rejection, in a response characterized by massive infiltration of CD4+ T-cells and neutrophils. In contrast, Meth-A cells transfected with vector alone (Meth-A/Neo) grew rapidly. Moreover, rechallenged parental cells also were rejected in association with CD8+ T-cell infiltration. However, in nude mice there was no drastic difference between Meth-A/IL-15 and Meth-A/Neo cells. These results demonstrate that IL-15-secreting tumour cells can stimulate local and systemic T-cell-dependent immunity and therefore may have a potential role in cancer therapy. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10424745

  17. Sox2 expression in breast tumours and activation in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Leis, O; Eguiara, A; Lopez-Arribillaga, E; Alberdi, M J; Hernandez-Garcia, S; Elorriaga, K; Pandiella, A; Rezola, R; Martin, A G

    2012-03-15

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model does not imply that tumours are generated from transformed tissue stem cells. The target of transformation could be a tissue stem cell, a progenitor cell, or a differentiated cell that acquires self-renewal ability. The observation that induced pluripotency reprogramming and cancer are related has lead to the speculation that CSCs may arise through a reprogramming-like mechanism. Expression of pluripotency genes (Oct4, Nanog and Sox2) was tested in breast tumours by immunohistochemistry and it was found that Sox2 is expressed in early stage breast tumours. However, expression of Oct4 or Nanog was not found. Mammosphere formation in culture was used to reveal stem cell properties, where expression of Sox2, but not Oct4 or Nanog, was induced. Over-expression of Sox2 increased mammosphere formation, effect dependent on continuous Sox2 expression; furthermore, Sox2 knockdown prevented mammosphere formation and delayed tumour formation in xenograft tumour initiation models. Induction of Sox2 expression was achieved through activation of the distal enhancer of Sox2 promoter upon sphere formation, the same element that controls Sox2 transcription in pluripotent stem cells. These findings suggest that reactivation of Sox2 represents an early step in breast tumour initiation, explaining tumour heterogeneity by placing the tumour-initiating event in any cell along the axis of mammary differentiation.

  18. Induction of immune cell infiltration into murine SCCVII tumour by photofrin-based photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Krosl, G.; Korbelik, M.; Dougherty, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    Cellular populations in the squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII, growing in C3H/HeN mice given Photofrin, were examined at various time intervals during the photodynamic light treatment and up to 8 h later. Cell populations present within excised tumours were identified by monoclonal antibodies directed against cell type-specific membrane markers using a combination of the indirect immunoperoxidase and Wright staining or by flow cytometry. Photofrin-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) induced dramatic changes in the level of different cellular populations contained in the treated tumour. The most pronounced was a rapid increase in the content of neutrophils, which increased 200-fold within 5 min after the initiation of light treatment. This was followed immediately by an increase in the levels of mast cells, while another type of myeloid cells, most likely monocytes, invaded the tumour between 0 and 2 h after PDT. The examination of cytolysis of in vitro cultured SCCVII tumour cells mediated by macrophages harvested from the SCCVII tumour revealed a pronounced increase in the tumoricidal activity of tumour-associated macrophages isolated at 2 h post PDT. It seems, therefore, that the PDT-induced acute inflammatory infiltration of myeloid cells into the treated tumour is associated with functional activation of immune cells. PMID:7880738

  19. Induction of DT-diaphorase by 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones in human tumour and normal cells and effect on anti-tumour activity of bioreductive agents.

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, G. P.; Leith, M. K.; Wang, X.; Curphey, T. J.; Begleiter, A.

    1998-01-01

    DT-diaphorase is a two-electron-reducing enzyme that is an important activator of bioreductive anti-tumour agents, such as mitomycin C (MMC) and EO9, and is inducible by many compounds, including 1,2-dithiole-3-thiones (D3Ts). We showed previously that D3T selectively increased DT-diaphorase activity in mouse lymphoma cells compared with normal mouse marrow cells, and also increased MMC or EO9 cytotoxic activity in the lymphoma cells with only minor effects in the marrow cells. In this study, we found that D3T significantly increased DT-diaphorase activity in 28 of 38 human tumour cell lines representing ten tissue types with no obvious relationships between the tumour type, or the base level of DT-diaphorase activity, and the ability of D3T to increase the enzyme activity. Induction of DT-diaphorase activity in human tumour cell lines by 12 D3T analogues varied markedly with the D3T structure. D3T also increased DT-diaphorase activity in normal human bone marrow and kidney cells but the increases were small in these cells. In addition, D3T increased the level of enzyme activity in normal human lung cells. Pretreatment of human tumour cells with D3T analogues significantly increased the cytotoxic activity of MMC or EO9 in these cells, and the level of enhancement of anti-tumour activity paralleled the level of DT-diaphorase induction. In contrast, D3T did not effect the toxicity of EO9 in normal kidney cells. These results demonstrate that D3T analogues can increase DT-diaphorase activity in a wide variety of human tumour cells and that this effect can enhance the anti-tumour activity of the bioreductive agents MMC and EO9. PMID:9579829

  20. Tumour cell recruitment of the JB-1 and L 1210 ascites tumour determined directly by double labelling with [14C]- and [3H]-thymidine.

    PubMed

    Maurer-Schultze, B; Kondziella, U; Böswald, M

    1988-07-01

    Tumour cell recruitment of the JB-1 and L 1210 ascites tumour has been demonstrated directly by a double-labelling method with [14C]- and [3H]-thymidine (TdR). After [14C]-labelling of all proliferating tumour cells by multiple injections of [14C]TdR, recruitment of resting cells was stimulated by removal of the majority of tumour cells, i.e. by maximum aspiration of ascitic fluid. The number of recruited resting cells in the remaining tumour that re-enter the cell cycle after stimulation was demonstrated directly by a single injection of [3H]TdR given at different times after stimulation. The increase in the percentage of purely [3H]-labelled cells, i.e. recruited cells, with increasing time after stimulation, shows that recruitment is not a synchronous but a continuous process, the maximum of which occurs earlier in the case of the L 1210 than the JB-1 tumour. This suggests that there seems to be a relationship between the time required for maximum recruitment and the corresponding cell cycle parameters of the unperturbed tumour. There is a transitory increase of the growth fraction to about 100% and a considerable shortening of the cycle time at the maximum of recruitment.

  1. Optical diagnostics of tumour cells at different stages of pathology development

    SciTech Connect

    Shcheglova, L S; Maryakhina, V S; Abramova, L L

    2013-11-30

    The differences in optical and biophysical properties between the cells of mammary gland tumour extracted from tumours of different diameter are described. It is shown that the spectral and spectrokinetic properties of fluorescent probes in the cells extracted from the tumours 1 – 3 cm in diameter are essentially different. Thus, the extinction coefficient of rhodamine 6G gradually increases with the pathology development. At the same time the rate of interaction of the triplet states of molecular probes with the oxygen, diluted in the tumour cells cytoplasm, decreases with the growth of the tumour capsule diameter. The observed regularities can be due to the changes in the cell structure, biochemical and biophysical properties. The reported data may be useful for developing optical methods of diagnostics of biotissue pathological conditions. (optical methods in biology and medicine)

  2. Optical diagnostics of tumour cells at different stages of pathology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglova, L. S.; Abramova, L. L.; Maryakhina, V. S.

    2013-11-01

    The differences in optical and biophysical properties between the cells of mammary gland tumour extracted from tumours of different diameter are described. It is shown that the spectral and spectrokinetic properties of fluorescent probes in the cells extracted from the tumours 1 - 3 cm in diameter are essentially different. Thus, the extinction coefficient of rhodamine 6G gradually increases with the pathology development. At the same time the rate of interaction of the triplet states of molecular probes with the oxygen, diluted in the tumour cells cytoplasm, decreases with the growth of the tumour capsule diameter. The observed regularities can be due to the changes in the cell structure, biochemical and biophysical properties. The reported data may be useful for developing optical methods of diagnostics of biotissue pathological conditions.

  3. Granular cell tumour of the brain and its cellular identity.

    PubMed

    Sakurama, N; Matsukado, Y; Marubayashi, T; Kodama, T

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of cerebral granular cell tumour are reported. In Case 1 the tumour arose from the genu of the corpus callosum, and in Case 2 it was found in the frontotemporoparietal lobes. Biopsy and autopsy specimens were examined with light and electron microscopy, and histochemical characteristics of the granule were analysed. Tumour cells from these two cases showed pleomorphism, but abundant granules in the cytoplasm were the most characteristic feature in these tumours. The granules were not stained by Sudan III and Sudan black, but were eosinophilic. They were PAS positive and not digested by diastase. Okamoto's reaction for glycolipid was positive after treatment by pyridine. They were also positive in Hotchkiss' method for glycolipid modified by Morrison and Hack, following immersion in chloroform and methanol solution. Histochemically, it was thought that granules consisted of glycoprotein. In the electron microscopic study dense bodies, multivesicular bodies, and vacoules were seen in tumour cells, especially in the neoplastic granular cells. It was assumed that the tumour cells originated from astrocytes, because of the cytoplasmic processes of the tumour cells were stained blue with PTAH, and contained microfibres of 80 A width. Gemistocytic astrocytes seen in the periphery of the tumour were also evidence indicating the neoplastic cell origin.

  4. Signet ring cell carcinoma of the eyelid - the monocle tumour.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Anouck Leuba; Heegaard, Steffen; Clemmensen, Ole; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2008-04-01

    We report the clinical and histopathological characteristics of two cases of signet ring cell carcinoma of the eye lids, and discuss the histogenesis of this neoplasm. Two 72-year-old Caucasian males both presented with slowly growing tumours of the eyelids. The tumours were excised and specimens were examined using light- and transmission electron microscopic techniques. Clinically, the tumours infiltrated both eyelids on one side of the face with swelling and periocular inflammation, creating a monocle-like appearance. Extensive clinical work-up excluded periocular metastases. Histopathologically, the tumours were composed of rather bland cells with mainly histiocytoid morphology. A minor proportion had a signet ring cell appearance. The cytoplasmic inclusions giving the signet ring morphology were PAS- and colloidal iron positive. The tumour cells reacted with antibodies against cytokeratins, carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial membrane antigen, gross cystic disease fluid protein-15 and lysozyme. Transmission electron microscopy demonstrated tumour cells containing intracytoplasmic vacuoles lined by microvilli. The tumour cells aggregated in duct-like clusters. A diagnosis of primary signet ring cell carcinoma was made in both cases. Histopathological, immunohistological and ultrastructural findings indicated that the tumours were of sweat gland origin.

  5. Vaccination with epigenetically treated mesothelioma cells induces immunisation and blocks tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Guillot, Flora; Boutin, Benoît; Blanquart, Christophe; Fonteneau, Jean-François; Robard, Myriam; Grégoire, Marc; Pouliquen, Daniel

    2011-07-26

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive tumour associated with poor outcome in patients. Current treatments for MM are of limited efficacy. Our recent findings suggest that epigenetic drugs may induce both cytotoxicity and an immune response against MM cells. Thus, we used a mouse model of MM (AK7) to analyse how epigenetic drugs could modulate MM development in vivo. The treatment of tumour-bearing mice with an epigenetic drug already tested in clinical MM treatments (SAHA/Vorinostat) reduced the tumour mass and induced a moderate lymphocytic infiltration. However, the treatment did not stop tumour development. In order to show the potential effect of this epigenetic drug on tumour immunogenicity, in addition to cell cytotoxicity, we immunised mice either with AK7 cells pre-treated with SAHA, or with one of two cytotoxic drugs (curcumin or selenite), prior to transplantation of live AK7 cells. A specific immune response was observed only in mice immunised with AK7 cells pre-treated with the epigenetic drug (SAHA) and the tumour growth was arrested. An increase in the proportion of CD3+ CD8+ lymphocytes occurred in the peritoneal cavity. We also observed large conglomerates of immune cells in the omentum with clusters of CD8+ T cells, together with lymphocytes directed against residual AK7 cells in the interlobular connective tissue of the pancreas. Our data demonstrate that epigenetic drugs, such as SAHA, can stimulate tumour immunogenicity and improve the recognition of aggressive MM cells by the immune system in vivo. PMID:21619908

  6. Natural cytotoxicity of haemopoietic cell populations against murine lymphoid tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Burton, R. C.; Grail, D.; Warner, N. L.

    1978-01-01

    Homozygous nude and normal mice of 3 strains, BALB/c, CBA and C57BL, were used as sources of nucleated haemopoietic "natural killer" (NK) cells. These killer cells could lyse a wide range of syngeneic and allogeneic lymphoid tumour cell lines in vitro, and it was found that cell suspensions from nude mice were always significantly more active than those from normal mice, and that the most active effector population was a polymorph-enriched peritoneal-exudate cell suspension. Eosinophils did not appear to be involved in the phenomenon, and mononuclear peritoneal-exudate cell suspensions were actually highly inhibitory. Three non-lymphoid tumours, a carcinoma, a fibrosarcoma and a mastocytoma, were totally resistant to in vitro lysis. Although all susceptible tumour cell lines were C-type virus-associated, not all of these tumours were killed by all strain sources of spleen cells, indicating a specificity of killing. PMID:656308

  7. Anti-tumour effect of metformin in canine mammary gland tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Saeki, K; Watanabe, M; Tsuboi, M; Sugano, S; Yoshitake, R; Tanaka, Y; Ong, S M; Saito, T; Matsumoto, K; Fujita, N; Nishimura, R; Nakagawa, T

    2015-08-01

    Metformin is an oral hypoglycaemic drug used in type 2 diabetes. Its pharmacological activity reportedly involves mitochondrial respiratory complex I, and mitochondrial respiratory complex inhibitors have a strong inhibitory effect on the growth of metastatic canine mammary gland tumour (CMGT) cell lines. It is hypothesised that metformin has selective anti-tumour effects on metastatic CMGT cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro effect of metformin on cell growth, production of ATP and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in two CMGT clonal cell lines with different metastatic potential. In addition, transcriptome analysis was used to determine cellular processes disrupted by metformin and in vivo anti-tumour effects were examined in a mouse xenograft model. Metformin inhibited CMGT cell growth in vitro, with the metastatic clone (CHMp-5b) displaying greater sensitivity. ATP depletion and ROS elevation were observed to a similar extent in the metastatic and non-metastatic (CHMp-13a) cell lines after metformin exposure. However, subsequent AMPK activation and mTOR pathway inhibition were prominent only in metformin-insensitive non-metastatic cells. Microarray analysis revealed inhibition of cell cycle progression by metformin treatment in CHMp-5b cells, which was further confirmed by Western blotting and cell cycle analysis. Additionally, metformin significantly suppressed tumour growth in xenografted metastatic CMGT cells. In conclusion, metformin exhibited an anti-tumour effect in metastatic CMGT cells through AMPK-independent cell cycle arrest. Its mechanism of action differed in the non-metastatic clone, where AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition were observed. PMID:25981932

  8. Brain tumour stem cells: possibilities of new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sara G M; Vescovi, Angelo L

    2007-08-01

    Cancers are composed of heterogeneous cell populations, including highly proliferative immature precursors and differentiated cells, which may belong to different lineages. Recent advances in stem cell research have demonstrated the existence of tumour-initiating, cancer stem cells (CSCs) in non-solid and solid tumours. These cells are defined as CSCs because they show functional properties that resemble those of their normal counterpart to a significant extent. This concept applies to CSCs from brain tumours and, particularly, to glioblastoma stem-like cells, which self-renew under clonal conditions and differentiate into neuron- and glia-like cells, and into aberrant cells, with mixed neuronal/astroglia phenotypes. Notably, across serial transplantation into immunodeficient mice, glioblastoma stem-like cells are able to form secondary tumours which are a phenocopy of the human disease. A significant effort is underway to identify both CSC-specific markers and the molecular mechanism that underpin the tumorigenic potential of these cells, for this will have a critical impact on the understanding of the origin of malignant brain tumour and the discovery of new and more specific therapeutic approaches. Lately, the authors have shown that some of the bone morphogenetic proteins can reduce the tumorigenic ability of CSCs in GBMs. This suggests that mechanisms regulating the physiology of normal brain stem cells may be still in place in their cancerous siblings and that this may lead to the development of cures that selectively target the population CSCs found in the patients' tumour mass.

  9. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  10. Tumour-cell-induced endothelial cell necroptosis via death receptor 6 promotes metastasis.

    PubMed

    Strilic, Boris; Yang, Lida; Albarrán-Juárez, Julián; Wachsmuth, Laurens; Han, Kang; Müller, Ulrike C; Pasparakis, Manolis; Offermanns, Stefan

    2016-08-11

    Metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death in humans. It is a complex multistep process during which individual tumour cells spread primarily through the circulatory system to colonize distant organs. Once in the circulation, tumour cells remain vulnerable, and their metastatic potential largely depends on a rapid and efficient way to escape from the blood stream by passing the endothelial barrier. Evidence has been provided that tumour cell extravasation resembles leukocyte transendothelial migration. However, it remains unclear how tumour cells interact with endothelial cells during extravasation and how these processes are regulated on a molecular level. Here we show that human and murine tumour cells induce programmed necrosis (necroptosis) of endothelial cells, which promotes tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. Treatment of mice with the receptor-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase 1 (RIPK1)-inhibitor necrostatin-1 or endothelial-cell-specific deletion of RIPK3 reduced tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis, tumour cell extravasation and metastasis. In contrast, pharmacological caspase inhibition or endothelial-cell-specific loss of caspase-8 promoted these processes. We furthermore show in vitro and in vivo that tumour-cell-induced endothelial necroptosis leading to extravasation and metastasis requires amyloid precursor protein expressed by tumour cells and its receptor, death receptor 6 (DR6), on endothelial cells as the primary mediators of these effects. Our data identify a new mechanism underlying tumour cell extravasation and metastasis, and suggest endothelial DR6-mediated necroptotic signalling pathways as targets for anti-metastatic therapies. PMID:27487218

  11. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine.

    PubMed

    Bhutia, Yangzom D; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-06-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H(+)-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function.

  12. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine

    PubMed Central

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H+-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  13. M2 tumour-associated macrophages contribute to tumour progression via legumain remodelling the extracellular matrix in diffuse large B cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Long; Li, Honghao; Shi, Yuzhi; Wang, Dekun; Gong, Junbo; Xun, Jing; Zhou, Sifan; Xiang, Rong; Tan, Xiaoyue

    2016-01-01

    Effects of M2 tumour-associated macrophages on the pathogenesis of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are still controversial. Our data showed that the number of CD163-positive M2 macrophages correlated negatively with DLBCL prognosis. Macrophage depletion by clodronate liposomes significantly suppressed tumour growth in a xenograft mouse model of DLBCL using OCI-Ly3 cells. Moreover, M2 polarization of macrophages induced legumain expression in U937 cells. Exogenous legumain promoted degradation of fibronectin and collagen I, which was abolished by administration of a legumain inhibitor RR-11a. Overexpression of legumain in Raw 264.7 cells also induced tube formation of endothelial cells in matrigel. In the xenograft mouse model of DLBCL, decreased fibronectin and collagen I, as well as increased legumain expression and angiogenesis were found at the late stage tumours compared with early stage tumours. Co-localization of legumain and fibronectin was observed in the extracellular matrix of tumour tissues. Administration of the legumain inhibitor to the xenograft DLBCL model suppressed tumour growth, angiogenesis and collagen deposition compared with the control. Taken together, our results suggest that M2 tumour-associated macrophages affect degradation of the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis via overexpression of legumain, and therefore play an active role in the progression of DLBCL. PMID:27464733

  14. Phthalocyanine-mediated Photodynamic Treatment of Tumoural and Non-tumoural cell lines.

    PubMed

    Manisova, Barbora; Binder, Svatopluk; Malina, Lukas; Jiravova, Jana; Langova, Katerina; Kolarova, Hana

    2015-07-01

    This study deals with the use of cationic far-red absorbing photosensitizers (λ(max) ~740 nm) from the group of the phthalocyanines, in photodynamic therapy. The photosensitizers differed in their central atom, bearing either hydrogen, zinc or magnesium. These photosensitizers were tested in vitro on the tumour cell line HeLa (cervical cancer) and non-tumour cell line NIH3T3 (mouse fibroblast). The following tests were performed: measurement of reactive oxygen species production, viability testing, Comet assay and cell type detection (apoptotic, necrotic and living cells). The best results were achieved with zinc derivative at relatively low half-maximum inhibitory concentration (0.04 μM) and a total radiation dose of 15 J cm(-2).

  15. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  16. Tumour and immune cell dynamics explain the PSA bounce after prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Offord, Chetan P; Kimura, Go; Kuribayashi, Shigehiko; Takeda, Hayato; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Bozic, Ivana; Nowak, Martin A; Bajzer, Željko; Dingli, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interstitial brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer may be followed by transient increases in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that resolve without therapy. Such PSA bounces may be associated with an improved outcome but often cause alarm in the patient and physician, and have defied explanation. Methods: We developed a mathematical model to capture the interactions between the tumour, radiation and anti-tumour immune response. The model was fitted to data from a large cohort of patients treated exclusively with interstitial brachytherapy. Immunohistological analysis for T-cell infiltration within the same tumours was also performed. Results: Our minimal model captures well the dynamics of the tumour after therapy, and suggests that a strong anti-tumour immune response coupled with the therapeutic effect of radiation on the tumour is responsible for the PSA bounce. Patients who experience a PSA bounce had a higher density of CD3 and CD8 cells within the tumour that likely contribute to the PSA bounce and the overall better outcomes observed. Conclusions: Our observations provide a novel and unifying explanation for the PSA bounce in patients with early prostate cancer and also have implications for the use of immune-based therapies in such patients to improve outcomes. PMID:27404586

  17. Circulating tumour cells and circulating free nucleic acid as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H; Becker, T M; Chua, W; Caixeiro, N J; Ng, W L; Kienzle, N; Tognela, A; Lumba, S; Rasko, J E J; de Souza, P; Spring, K J

    2014-04-28

    The detection of circulating tumour cells or circulating free tumour nucleic acids can potentially guide treatment and inform prognosis in colorectal cancer using minimally invasive "liquid biopsies". Current literature supports the notion that high circulating tumour cell counts or presence of tumour nucleic acid correlate with inferior clinical outcomes for patients, but they are not yet part of routine clinical care. Future research evolves around the examination of the molecular phenotype of circulating tumour cells. The key unanswered areas include differentiating between circulating tumour cell presence and their proliferative capacity and dormancy, identifying tumour heterogeneity and understanding the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

  18. In Silico Analysis of Cell Cycle Synchronisation Effects in Radiotherapy of Tumour Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, Harald; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumour cells show a varying susceptibility to radiation damage as a function of the current cell cycle phase. While this sensitivity is averaged out in an unperturbed tumour due to unsynchronised cell cycle progression, external stimuli such as radiation or drug doses can induce a resynchronisation of the cell cycle and consequently induce a collective development of radiosensitivity in tumours. Although this effect has been regularly described in experiments it is currently not exploited in clinical practice and thus a large potential for optimisation is missed. We present an agent-based model for three-dimensional tumour spheroid growth which has been combined with an irradiation damage and kinetics model. We predict the dynamic response of the overall tumour radiosensitivity to delivered radiation doses and describe corresponding time windows of increased or decreased radiation sensitivity. The degree of cell cycle resynchronisation in response to radiation delivery was identified as a main determinant of the transient periods of low and high radiosensitivity enhancement. A range of selected clinical fractionation schemes is examined and new triggered schedules are tested which aim to maximise the effect of the radiation-induced sensitivity enhancement. We find that the cell cycle resynchronisation can yield a strong increase in therapy effectiveness, if employed correctly. While the individual timing of sensitive periods will depend on the exact cell and radiation types, enhancement is a universal effect which is present in every tumour and accordingly should be the target of experimental investigation. Experimental observables which can be assessed non-invasively and with high spatio-temporal resolution have to be connected to the radiosensitivity enhancement in order to allow for a possible tumour-specific design of highly efficient treatment schedules based on induced cell cycle synchronisation. PMID:24244120

  19. In silico analysis of cell cycle synchronisation effects in radiotherapy of tumour spheroids.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Harald; Hatzikirou, Haralampos; Bleicher, Marcus; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Tumour cells show a varying susceptibility to radiation damage as a function of the current cell cycle phase. While this sensitivity is averaged out in an unperturbed tumour due to unsynchronised cell cycle progression, external stimuli such as radiation or drug doses can induce a resynchronisation of the cell cycle and consequently induce a collective development of radiosensitivity in tumours. Although this effect has been regularly described in experiments it is currently not exploited in clinical practice and thus a large potential for optimisation is missed. We present an agent-based model for three-dimensional tumour spheroid growth which has been combined with an irradiation damage and kinetics model. We predict the dynamic response of the overall tumour radiosensitivity to delivered radiation doses and describe corresponding time windows of increased or decreased radiation sensitivity. The degree of cell cycle resynchronisation in response to radiation delivery was identified as a main determinant of the transient periods of low and high radiosensitivity enhancement. A range of selected clinical fractionation schemes is examined and new triggered schedules are tested which aim to maximise the effect of the radiation-induced sensitivity enhancement. We find that the cell cycle resynchronisation can yield a strong increase in therapy effectiveness, if employed correctly. While the individual timing of sensitive periods will depend on the exact cell and radiation types, enhancement is a universal effect which is present in every tumour and accordingly should be the target of experimental investigation. Experimental observables which can be assessed non-invasively and with high spatio-temporal resolution have to be connected to the radiosensitivity enhancement in order to allow for a possible tumour-specific design of highly efficient treatment schedules based on induced cell cycle synchronisation.

  20. Role of the microtubule-targeting drug vinflunine on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vinflunine (VFL) is a microtubule-targeting drug that suppresses microtubule dynamics, showing anti-metastatic properties both in vitro and in living cancer cells. An increasing body of evidence underlines the influence of the microtubules dynamics on the cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions. E-cadherin is a marker of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a tumour suppressor; its reduced levels in carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis. In this report, we investigate the role of VFL on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells. Methods Human bladder epithelial tumour cell lines HT1376, 5637, SW780, T24 and UMUC3 were used to analyse cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions under VFL treatment. VFL effect on growth inhibition was measured by using a MTT colorimetric cell viability assay. Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy analyses were performed to assess the roles of VFL effect on cell-cell adhesions, epithelial-to-mesenchymal markers and apoptosis. The role of the proteasome in controlling cell-cell adhesion was studied using the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Results We show that VFL induces cell death in bladder cancer cells and activates epithelial differentiation of the remaining living cells, leading to an increase of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion and a reduction of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin or vimentin. Moreover, while E-cadherin is increased, the levels of Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin-ligase for E-cadherin, were significantly reduced in presence of VFL. In 5637, this reduction on Hakai expression was blocked by MG132 proteasome inhibitor, indicating that the proteasome pathway could be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in its degradation. Conclusions Our findings underscore a critical function for VFL in cell-cell adhesions of epithelial bladder tumour cells, suggesting a novel molecular mechanism by which VFL may impact upon EMT and metastasis. PMID:25012153

  1. Microfluidic impedance cytometry of tumour cells in blood.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Daniel; Hollis, Veronica; Morgan, Hywel

    2014-11-01

    The dielectric properties of tumour cells are known to differ from normal blood cells, and this difference can be exploited for label-free separation of cells. Conventional measurement techniques are slow and cannot identify rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a realistic timeframe. We use high throughput single cell microfluidic impedance cytometry to measure the dielectric properties of the MCF7 tumour cell line (representative of CTCs), both as pure populations and mixed with whole blood. The data show that the MCF7 cells have a large membrane capacitance and size, enabling clear discrimination from all other leukocytes. Impedance analysis is used to follow changes in cell viability when cells are kept in suspension, a process which can be understood from modelling time-dependent changes in the dielectric properties (predominantly membrane conductivity) of the cells. Impedance cytometry is used to enumerate low numbers of MCF7 cells spiked into whole blood. Chemical lysis is commonly used to remove the abundant erythrocytes, and it is shown that this process does not alter the MCF7 cell count or change their dielectric properties. Combining impedance cytometry with magnetic bead based antibody enrichment enables MCF7 cells to be detected down to 100 MCF7 cells in 1 ml whole blood, a log 3.5 enrichment and a mean recovery of 92%. Microfluidic impedance cytometry could be easily integrated within complex cell separation systems for identification and enumeration of specific cell types, providing a fast in-line single cell characterisation method.

  2. Oncogenic mTOR signalling recruits myeloid-derived suppressor cells to promote tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Welte, Thomas; Kim, Ik Sun; Tian, Lin; Gao, Xia; Wang, Hai; Li, June; Holdman, Xue B; Herschkowitz, Jason I; Pond, Adam; Xie, Guorui; Kurley, Sarah; Nguyen, Tuan; Liao, Lan; Dobrolecki, Lacey E; Pang, Lan; Mo, Qianxing; Edwards, Dean P; Huang, Shixia; Xin, Li; Xu, Jianming; Li, Yi; Lewis, Michael T; Wang, Tian; Westbrook, Thomas F; Rosen, Jeffrey M; Zhang, Xiang H-F

    2016-06-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) play critical roles in primary and metastatic cancer progression. MDSC regulation is widely variable even among patients harbouring the same type of malignancy, and the mechanisms governing such heterogeneity are largely unknown. Here, integrating human tumour genomics and syngeneic mammary tumour models, we demonstrate that mTOR signalling in cancer cells dictates a mammary tumour's ability to stimulate MDSC accumulation through regulating G-CSF. Inhibiting this pathway or its activators (for example, FGFR) impairs tumour progression, which is partially rescued by restoring MDSCs or G-CSF. Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) exhibit elevated G-CSF. MDSCs reciprocally increase TIC frequency through activating Notch in tumour cells, forming a feedforward loop. Analyses of primary breast cancers and patient-derived xenografts corroborate these mechanisms in patients. These findings establish a non-canonical oncogenic role of mTOR signalling in recruiting pro-tumorigenic MDSCs and show how defined cancer subsets may evolve to promote and depend on a distinct immune microenvironment. PMID:27183469

  3. Circulating tumour cells as tumour biomarkers in melanoma: detection methods and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Khoja, L; Lorigan, P; Dive, C; Keilholz, U; Fusi, A

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells of solid tumour origin detectable in the peripheral blood. Their occurrence is considered a prerequisite step for establishing distant metastases. Metastatic melanoma was the first malignancy in which CTCs were detected and numerous studies have been published on CTC detection in melanoma at various stages of disease. In spite of this, there is no general consensus as to the clinical utility of CTCs in melanoma, largely due to conflicting results from heterogeneous studies and discrepancies in methods of detection between studies. In this review, we examine the possible clinical significance of CTCs in cutaneous, mucosal and ocular melanoma, focusing on detection methods and prognostic value of CTC detection.

  4. Circulating tumour cells as tumour biomarkers in melanoma: detection methods and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Khoja, L; Lorigan, P; Dive, C; Keilholz, U; Fusi, A

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells of solid tumour origin detectable in the peripheral blood. Their occurrence is considered a prerequisite step for establishing distant metastases. Metastatic melanoma was the first malignancy in which CTCs were detected and numerous studies have been published on CTC detection in melanoma at various stages of disease. In spite of this, there is no general consensus as to the clinical utility of CTCs in melanoma, largely due to conflicting results from heterogeneous studies and discrepancies in methods of detection between studies. In this review, we examine the possible clinical significance of CTCs in cutaneous, mucosal and ocular melanoma, focusing on detection methods and prognostic value of CTC detection. PMID:24907634

  5. Milky spots in the greater omentum are predominant sites of local tumour cell proliferation and accumulation in the peritoneal cavity.

    PubMed

    Krist, L F; Kerremans, M; Broekhuis-Fluitsma, D M; Eestermans, I L; Meyer, S; Beelen, R H

    1998-12-01

    The role that milky spots in the greater omentum play in tumour cell spread in the peritoneal cavity is presently not fully understood. To study whether intraperitoneally injected tumour cells appear preferentially in milky spots of the greater omentum and to study the changes in the greater omentum, and especially in the cell population of milky spots after tumour cell infiltration, the following study was performed. A detailed temporal sequences of changes in morphology and cellular composition in milky spots of the greater omentum of Wag/Rij rats 5, 15, 30, 60 min, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24 h, 2, 4, 8 days and 2 and 4 weeks after intraperitoneal administration of 2.0 x 10(6) CC 531 tumour cells was investigated by light microscopy and electron microscopy (pre-embedding labelling). Our data showed that the milky spots in the greater omentum were the sites to which tumour cells migrated preferentially from the peritoneal cavity. The tumour cells infiltrated the milky spots and formed clusters within. The cellular population in milky spots reacted by a very rapid influx of young macrophages during the first hour and an increase of the total number of cells (P < 0.01). After 4 h tumour cells were also located on the greater omentum outside the area of the milky spots. Around these tumour cell deposits, new milky spots are formed, which increased the total number of milky spots. The cells present in milky spots are not capable of reversing the growth of tumours and finally a solid omental cake of tumour cells is formed. PMID:9875673

  6. Circulating tumour cells and circulating nucleic acids as a measure of tumour dissemination in non-metastatic colorectal cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H; Spring, K J; de Souza, P; MacKenzie, S; Bokey, L

    2015-03-01

    There is accumulating evidence for circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and circulating tumour nucleic acids (ctNAs) as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer. Their role in the perioperative setting is evolving. These blood-borne biomarkers can potentially demonstrate tumour dissemination at time of colorectal cancer surgery and estimate the completeness of a surgical resection. CTCs and circulating ctNA levels at time of surgery, and persistent levels post-surgery, may correlate with poorer patient outcomes. These biomarkers can be utilised to refine surgical techniques to minimise tumour dissemination and determine the need for adjuvant therapy.

  7. Leukaemia cell of origin identified by chromatin landscape of bulk tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    George, Joshy; Uyar, Asli; Young, Kira; Kuffler, Lauren; Waldron-Francis, Kaiden; Marquez, Eladio; Ucar, Duygu; Trowbridge, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise identity of a tumour's cell of origin can influence disease prognosis and outcome. Methods to reliably define tumour cell of origin from primary, bulk tumour cell samples has been a challenge. Here we use a well-defined model of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to demonstrate that transforming haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors results in more aggressive AML than transforming committed progenitor cells. Transcriptome profiling reveals a gene expression signature broadly distinguishing stem cell-derived versus progenitor cell-derived AML, including genes involved in immune escape, extravasation and small GTPase signal transduction. However, whole-genome profiling of open chromatin reveals precise and robust biomarkers reflecting each cell of origin tested, from bulk AML tumour cell sampling. We find that bulk AML tumour cells exhibit distinct open chromatin loci that reflect the transformed cell of origin and suggest that open chromatin patterns may be leveraged as prognostic signatures in human AML. PMID:27397025

  8. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  9. Circulating tumour cells-monitoring treatment response in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, David T; Sequist, Lecia V; Lee, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    The availability of new therapeutic options for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has heightened the importance of monitoring and assessing treatment response. Accordingly, there is an unmet clinical need for reliable biomarkers that can be used to guide therapy. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are rare cells that are shed from primary and metastatic tumour deposits into the peripheral circulation, and represent a means of performing noninvasive tumour sampling. Indeed, enumeration of CTCs before and after therapy has shown that CTC burden correlates with prognosis in patients with mCRPC. Moreover, studies have demonstrated the potential of molecular analysis of CTCs in monitoring and predicting response to therapy in patients. This Review describes the challenges associated with monitoring treatment response in mCRPC, and the advancements in CTC-analysis technologies applied to such assessments and, ultimately, guiding prostate cancer treatment.

  10. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base.

  11. Systemic therapy for selected skull base sarcomas: Chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour and solitary fibrous tumour/hemangiopericytoma.

    PubMed

    Colia, Vittoria; Provenzano, Salvatore; Hindi, Nadia; Casali, Paolo G; Stacchiotti, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    This review highlights the data currently available on the activity of systemic therapy in chondrosarcoma, chordoma, giant cell tumour of the bone (GCTB) and solitary fibrous tumour, i.e., four rare sarcomas amongst mesenchymal malignancy arising from the skull base. PMID:27330421

  12. Circulating tumour cells and the epithelial mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H S; Becker, T M; Chua, W; Ng, W L; de Souza, P; Spring, K J

    2014-10-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) hold great potential as liquid biopsies to prognosticate disease and guide treatment in colorectal cancer. However, their emerging role in determining the molecular phenotype of tumour metastasis carries even more promising clinical use in the provision of comprehensive biomarker detection for targeted therapies and determination of drug resistance. The isolation of CTCs is technology dependent, and in the case of epithelial cell adhesion molecule-based platforms, the ability to detect cells that have undergone the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is ineffective. CTCs displaying a mesenchymal phenotype are believed to have an increased metastatic potential. The rarity of CTCs provides another challenge in the enumeration of these cells. The future will likely involve the analysis of individual CTCs at any stage of the EMT in order to provide real-time phenotypic and molecular snapshots capable of tracking the dynamic evolution of tumour progression over time.

  13. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  14. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L.; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  15. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G W; Calicchio, Monica L; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Lehtinen, Maria K; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant Notch signalling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly paediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours, by inducing sustained expression of Notch1, that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signalling. Whole-transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate differentiation. A Shh-driven signalling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from monociliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signalling. Abnormal SHH signalling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting the SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues.

  16. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B.; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P.; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Calicchio, Monica L.; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Notch signaling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly pediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours by inducing sustained expression of Notch1 that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signaling. Whole transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate diffferentiation. A Shh-driven signaling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from mono-ciliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signaling. Abnormal SHH signaling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  17. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G W; Calicchio, Monica L; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J; Lehtinen, Maria K; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-04-01

    Aberrant Notch signalling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly paediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours, by inducing sustained expression of Notch1, that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signalling. Whole-transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate differentiation. A Shh-driven signalling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from monociliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signalling. Abnormal SHH signalling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting the SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  18. NUT protein immunoreactivity in ovarian germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, J F; Charles, A K; Crook, M; Stewart, C J R

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate NUT (nuclear protein in the testis) expression in ovarian germ cell tumours (GCTs). Immunostaining for NUT protein was performed in 10 mature cystic teratomas and in 49 malignant ovarian GCTs including 15 pure dysgerminomas, six dysgerminomas associated with gonadoblastoma, nine yolk sac tumours, 12 immature teratomas, and seven mixed malignant tumours. Only nuclear staining was considered a positive finding although cytoplasmic staining was noted when present. Thirty-seven (76%) malignant GCTs were NUT positive but staining was usually of weak to moderate intensity and observed in a relatively small proportion of neoplastic cells. Staining in immature teratomas and yolk sac tumours was restricted to foci of hepatoid and intestinal/glandular differentiation, where both nuclear and cytoplasmic reactivity were observed. In dysgerminoma associated with gonadoblastoma only the in situ and invasive germ cell elements were NUT positive. Nuclear staining was not seen in benign teratomas. Most malignant ovarian GCTs express NUT protein, albeit focally, and this should be considered when evaluating immunostaining in the differential diagnosis of poorly differentiated malignancies, particularly NUT midline carcinoma. Since NUT protein appears to play a role in normal germ cell maturation it may influence intestinal or hepatoid differentiation within malignant GCTs.

  19. Modelling tumour cell proliferation from vascular structure using tissue decomposition into avascular elements.

    PubMed

    Besenhard, Maximilian O; Jarzabek, Monika; O'Farrell, Alice C; Callanan, John J; Prehn, Jochen Hm; Byrne, Annette T; Huber, Heinrich J

    2016-08-01

    Computer models allow the mechanistically detailed study of tumour proliferation and its dependency on nutrients. However, the computational study of large vascular tumours requires detailed information on the 3-dimensional vessel network and rather high computation times due to complex geometries. This study puts forward the idea of partitioning vascularised tissue into connected avascular elements that can exchange cells and nutrients between each other. Our method is able to rapidly calculate the evolution of proliferating as well as dead and quiescent cells, and hence a proliferative index, from a given amount and distribution of vascularisation of arbitrary complexity. Applying our model, we found that a heterogeneous vessel distribution provoked a higher proliferative index, suggesting increased malignancy, and increased the amount of dead cells compared to a more static tumour environment when a homogenous vessel distribution was assumed. We subsequently demonstrated that under certain amounts of vascularisation, cell proliferation may even increase when vessel density decreases, followed by a subsequent decrease of proliferation. This effect was due to a trade-off between an increase in compensatory proliferation for replacing dead cells and a decrease of cell population due to lack of oxygen supply in lowly vascularised tumours. Findings were illustrated by an ectopic colorectal cancer mouse xenograft model. Our presented approach can be in the future applied to study the effect of cytostatic, cytotoxic and anti-angiogenic chemotherapy and is ideally suited for translational systems biology, where rapid interaction between theory and experiment is essential. PMID:27155046

  20. Employment of synchronized cells and flow microfluorometry in investigations on the JB-1 ascites tumour chalones.

    PubMed

    Bichel, P; Barfod, N M; Jakobsen, A

    1975-11-01

    In most experimental ascites tumours the growth rate decreases with increasing age and cell number. This decrease is caused by a prolongation of the cell cycle and an increasing accumulation of non-cycling cells in resting (or quiescent) G1 and G2 compartments. In cell-free ascitic fluid from the JB-1 ascites tumour in the plateau phase of growth lowmolecular-weight substances have been found which reversibly and specifically arrest JB-1 cells in G1 and G2. The present paper describes an in-vitro model for testing the effect of the humoral growth inhibitors contained in the ascitic fluid. The test system is based on synchronized JB-1 cells analysed by flow-through cytofluorometry. Addition to the synchronous cells of a ultrafiltrate (less than 50000 Daltons) of the JB-1 ascitic fluid was found to induce a complete, but temporary arrest of the cells at the G1-S border.

  1. Multiple Giant Cell Tumours of Tendon Sheath: A Rare Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Pathade, Smita Charandas; Kurpad, Ramkumar; Tauheed, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumours Of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) are the second most frequent soft tissue tumours affecting the hand with an overall incidence of 1 in 50,000 individuals. These tumours are usually localized and solitary, with multiple GCTTS occurring rarely. Multi-centric origin is considered unusual and very few cases of multiple GCTTS have been reported till date. Here, we report a rare case of a 26-year-old female who presented with multiple painless swellings on palmar aspect of little finger of right hand since six months. Clinical diagnosis of Dupuytren’s contracture was given. Intraoperative examination revealed multiple separate nodules, firmly attached to the flexor tendon synovial sheath. Histopathology showed features of GCTTS. PMID:24596760

  2. Multiple giant cell tumours of tendon sheath: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Pathade, Smita Charandas; Kurpad, Ramkumar; Tauheed, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Giant Cell Tumours Of Tendon Sheath (GCTTS) are the second most frequent soft tissue tumours affecting the hand with an overall incidence of 1 in 50,000 individuals. These tumours are usually localized and solitary, with multiple GCTTS occurring rarely. Multi-centric origin is considered unusual and very few cases of multiple GCTTS have been reported till date. Here, we report a rare case of a 26-year-old female who presented with multiple painless swellings on palmar aspect of little finger of right hand since six months. Clinical diagnosis of Dupuytren's contracture was given. Intraoperative examination revealed multiple separate nodules, firmly attached to the flexor tendon synovial sheath. Histopathology showed features of GCTTS.

  3. Primary pulmonary spindle cell tumour (haemangiopericytoma) in a dog.

    PubMed

    Vignoli, M; Buchholz, J; Morandi, F; Laddaga, E; Brunetti, B; Rossi, F; Terragni, R; Sarli, G

    2008-10-01

    Haemangiopericytoma is a soft tissue sarcoma believed to originate from pericytes. These tumours are commonly located on the skin and subcutaneous tissue of dogs and are most commonly found on the limbs. To the authors' knowledge, primary lung haemangiopericytomas have not been previously described in dogs. This case report describes the diagnostic evaluation and treatment of a primary haemangiopericytoma of the lung in a 10-year-old male, neutered, Siberian husky dog. Staging of the tumour was performed using a computed tomography scan of the thorax and a computed tomography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the lesion. Treatment was a right caudal lobectomy from a right lateral approach. No regional lymph node changes were noted on computed tomography or intraoperative assessments. Histopathology confirmed a spindle cell tumour that stained positive for vimentin and negative for desmin and S-100.

  4. Interfering with stem cell-specific gatekeeper functions controls tumour initiation and malignant progression of skin tumours

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Monika; Reuter, Karen; Brylka, Heike; Kraus, Andreas; Schettina, Peter; Niemann, Catherin

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cancer constitutes a major clinical challenge and molecular mechanisms underlying the process of tumour initiation are not well understood. Here we demonstrate that hair follicle bulge stem cells (SCs) give rise to well-differentiated sebaceous tumours and show that SCs are not only crucial in tumour initiation, but are also involved in tumour plasticity and heterogeneity. Our findings reveal that SC-specific expression of mutant Lef1, which mimics mutations found in human sebaceous tumours, drives sebaceous tumour formation. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that mutant Lef1 abolishes p53 activity in SCs. Intriguingly, mutant Lef1 induces DNA damage and interferes with SC-specific gatekeeper functions normally protecting against accumulations of DNA lesions and cell loss. Thus, normal control of SC proliferation is disrupted by mutant Lef1, thereby allowing uncontrolled propagation of tumour-initiating SCs. Collectively, these findings identify underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms of tumour-initiating events in tissue SCs providing a potential target for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25608467

  5. T-cell immunity in the induction and maintenance of a tumour dormant state.

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, V

    2001-08-01

    We conclude from animal tumour model studies that T cell immunity can play an essential role in the induction and maintenance of tumour dormancy. Evidence was found in tumour dormancy situations for active control of proliferating tumour cells by CD8 memory T cells leading to a long-term balance in the bone marrow between low numbers of tumour cells and immunological memory. In breast cancer patients, too, the bone marrow may represent a privileged compartment for tumour dormancy and immunological memory. Upon restimulation with tumour antigen pulsed autologous dendritic cells, bone marrow-derived memory T cells from cancer patients could be shown to exist and to become activated into potent anti-tumour effector cells.

  6. Biosensors for the Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Clotilde; Abal, Miguel; López-López, Rafael; Muinelo-Romay, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the cause of most cancer deaths. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells released from the primary tumour into the bloodstream that are considered the main promoters of metastasis. Therefore, these cells are targets for understanding tumour biology and improving clinical management of the disease. Several techniques have emerged in recent years to isolate, detect, and characterise CTCs. As CTCs are a rare event, their study requires multidisciplinary considerations of both biological and physical properties. In addition, as isolation of viable cells may give further insights into metastatic development, cell recovery must be done with minimal cell damage. The ideal system for CTCs analysis must include maximum efficiency of detection in real time. In this sense, new approaches used to enrich CTCs from clinical samples have provided an important improvement in cell recovery. However, this progress should be accompanied by more efficient strategies of cell quantification. A range of biosensor platforms are being introduced into the technology for CTCs quantification with promising results. This review provides an update on recent progress in CTCs identification using different approaches based on sensor signaling. PMID:24618729

  7. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment. PMID:27509858

  8. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  9. Disseminated and circulating tumour cells and their role in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Čabiňaková, M; Tesařová, P

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic spread of the primary tumour is responsible for the vast majority of cancer-related deaths. Detection of disseminated tumour cells in the bone marrow and circulating tumour cells in the peripheral blood is correlated with early metastatic relapse in breast cancer. Positive detection of disseminated tumour cells was associated with poor overall survival of patients. Current research has been focused on integrating minimal residual disease as a prognostic and predictive tool in the management of breast cancer. Detection of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells is not yet standardized in clinical practice because of using different enrichment and detection methods. Therefore, standardization of the used methods is necessary in the future. Previous achieved findings must be verified in larger prospective multicentre studies. Further characterization of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells will be essential for developing and monitoring the efficacy of new therapeutic concepts. The aim of this review was to provide a short survey of the metastatic cascade and cancer stem cell theory, and data on the molecular and functional characterization of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells. Finally, we discuss the potential clinical impact of disseminated tumour cells/circulating tumour cells and results of several recent studies.

  10. Circulating tumour cells in patients with lung cancer undergoing endobronchial cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Dimple; Rice, Alexandra; Soppa, Gopal; Anikin, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Early diagnosis of lung cancer still poses a major issue, with a large proportion of patients diagnosed at late stages. Therapeutic options and treatment remain limited in these patients. In most cases only palliative therapies are available to alleviate any severe symptoms. Endobronchial cryotherapy (EC) is one form of palliative treatment offered to patients with obstructive airway tumours. Although successful, the impact on circulating tumour cell (CTCs) spread has not been investigated in detail. This study recruited 20 patients awaiting EC treatment. Baseline and post EC blood samples were analysed for presence of CTCs. Results showed an increase in CTCs following EC in 75% of patients. Significant increases were noticeable in some cases. Although EC is a well-accepted modality of treatment to alleviate symptoms, it may lead to an increase in CTCs, which in turn may have implications for tumour dissemination and metastatic spread.

  11. HPV16 E6 Controls the Gap Junction Protein Cx43 in Cervical Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peng; Dong, Li; MacDonald, Alasdair I.; Akbari, Shahrzad; Edward, Michael; Hodgins, Malcolm B.; Johnstone, Scott R.; Graham, Sheila V.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) causes a range of cancers including cervical and head and neck cancers. HPV E6 oncoprotein binds the cell polarity regulator hDlg (human homologue of Drosophila Discs Large). Previously we showed in vitro, and now in vivo, that hDlg also binds Connexin 43 (Cx43), a major component of gap junctions that mediate intercellular transfer of small molecules. In HPV16-positive non-tumour cervical epithelial cells (W12G) Cx43 localised to the plasma membrane, while in W12T tumour cells derived from these, it relocated with hDlg into the cytoplasm. We now provide evidence that E6 regulates this cytoplasmic pool of Cx43. E6 siRNA depletion in W12T cells resulted in restoration of Cx43 and hDlg trafficking to the cell membrane. In C33a HPV-negative cervical tumour cells expressing HPV16 or 18 E6, Cx43 was located primarily in the cytoplasm, but mutation of the 18E6 C-terminal hDlg binding motif resulted in redistribution of Cx43 to the membrane. The data indicate for the first time that increased cytoplasmic E6 levels associated with malignant progression alter Cx43 trafficking and recycling to the membrane and the E6/hDlg interaction may be involved. This suggests a novel E6-associated mechanism for changes in Cx43 trafficking in cervical tumour cells. PMID:26445057

  12. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-01-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4+ T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. PMID:25284464

  13. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations.

    PubMed

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R A

    2015-08-12

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  14. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  15. Beneficial role of overexpression of TFPI-2 on tumour progression in human small cell lung cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Marion; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Blechet, Claire; Guyetant, Serge; Pape, Alain Le; Heuze-Vourc’h, Nathalie; Courty, Yves; Lerondel, Stephanie; Sobilo, Julien; Iochmann, Sophie; Reverdiau, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a potent inhibitor of plasmin, a protease which is involved in tumour progression by activating (MMPs). This therefore makes TFPI-2 a potential inhibitor of invasiveness and the development of metastases. In this study, low levels of TFPI-2 expression were found in 65% of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), the most aggressive type of lung cancer. To study the impact of TFPI-2 in tumour progression, TFPI-2 was overexpressed in NCI-H209 SCLC cells which were orthotopically implanted in nude mice. Investigations showed that TFPI-2 inhibited lung tumour growth. Such inhibition could be explained in vitro by a decrease in tumour cell viability, blockade of G1/S phase cell cycle transition and an increase in apoptosis shown in NCI-H209 cells expressing TFPI-2. We also demonstrated that TFPI-2 upregulation in NCI-H209 cells decreased MMP expression, particularly by downregulating MMP-1 and MMP-3. Moreover, TFPI-2 inhibited phosphorylation of the MAPK signalling pathway proteins involved in the induction of MMP transcripts, among which MMP-1 was predominant in SCLC tissues and was inversely expressed with TFPI-2 in 35% of cases. These results suggest that downregulation of TFPI-2 expression could favour the development of SCLC. PMID:23905012

  16. Germ cell tumour: late recurrence after 43 years.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, S; Beatty, J; Agrawal, S; Christmas, T J; Jameson, C; Huddart, R A

    2011-07-01

    We report the late relapse of a patient following 43 years of surveillance of a germ cell tumour, thought to be a pure seminoma, having undergone yolk sac differentiation. The longest previous recorded time to relapse was 32 years (malignant teratoma with adenocarcinoma de-differentiation).(1) This case report demonstrates a late relapse of a testicular germ cell tumour is possible whatever the initial stage. European Association of Urology guidelines state close and active follow-up is mandatory for at least five years' surveillance due to the high and often late rate of relapse. Furthermore, they also suggest continuing follow-up although it is unclear as to how long this should last.(7)

  17. Involvement of α2- and β2-adrenoceptors on breast cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Piñero, C; Bruzzone, A; Sarappa, MG; Castillo, LF; Lüthy, IA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE β-Adrenoceptors are expressed in human and experimental animal breast cancer cells. However, the effect of the agonists and antagonists reported on cell proliferation and tumour growth was paradoxical, precluding their utilization as possible adjuvant therapy, mainly in the cases of refractory tumours. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH β-Adrenoceptor expression was analysed by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Cell proliferation was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, tumour growth by measuring with a calliper and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation by Western blotting. KEY RESULTS β2-Adrenoceptor expression was confirmed in the mouse and human cells tested. Cell proliferation was increased by adrenaline (by α2-adrenoceptor action) and decreased in every tested cell line by the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline and the β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol. Isoprenaline and salbutamol reduced tumour growth in every tumour tested (mouse C4-HD and CC4-3-HI and human IBH-4, IBH-6 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines growing as xenografts in nude mice). These effects were reversed by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine and the β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol were equally effective in diminishing tumour growth. ERK 1/2 activation analysed in IBH-4 tumours correlated with tumour growth, with the β-adrenoceptor agonists decreasing its activation. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in vitro was mainly mediated by the PKA pathway. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In our experimental models, the β-adrenoceptor agonists inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth, probably mediated by inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. The β-adrenoceptor agonists were as effective as the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine, providing possible novel adjuvant treatments for breast cancer. PMID:22122228

  18. Crosstalk between cancer cells and blood endothelial and lymphatic endothelial cells in tumour and organ microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour and organ microenvironments are crucial for cancer progression and metastasis. Crosstalk between multiple non-malignant cell types in the microenvironments and cancer cells promotes tumour growth and metastasis. Blood and lymphatic endothelial cells (BEC and LEC) are two of the components in the microenvironments. Tumour blood vessels (BV), comprising BEC, serve as conduits for blood supply into the tumour, and are important for tumour growth as well as haematogenous tumour dissemination. Lymphatic vessels (LV), comprising LEC, which are relatively leaky compared with BV, are essential for lymphogenous tumour dissemination. In addition to describing the conventional roles of the BV and LV, we also discuss newly emerging roles of these endothelial cells: their crosstalk with cancer cells via molecules secreted by the BEC and LEC (also called angiocrine and lymphangiocrine factors). This review suggests that BEC and LEC in various microenvironments can be orchestrators of tumour progression and proposes new mechanism-based strategies to discover new therapies to supplement conventional anti-angiogenic and anti-lymphangiogenic therapies. PMID:25634527

  19. POMB/ACE chemotherapy for mediastinal germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Bower, M; Brock, C; Holden, L; Nelstrop, A; Makey, A R; Rustin, G J; Newlands, E S

    1997-05-01

    Mediastinal germ cell tumours (MGCT) are rare and most published series reflect the experiences of individual institutions over many years. Since 1979, we have treated 16 men (12 non-seminomatous germ cell tumours and 4 seminomas) with newly diagnosed primary MGCT with POMB/ACE chemotherapy and elective surgical resection of residual masses. This approach yielded complete remissions in 15/16 (94%) patients. The median follow-up was 6.0 years and no relapses occurred more than 2 years after treatment. The 5 year overall survival in the non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT) is 73% (95% confidence interval 43-90%). One patient with NSGCT developed drug-resistant disease and died without achieving remission and 2 patients died of relapsed disease. In addition, 4 patients with bulky and/or metastatic seminoma were treated with POMB/ACE. One died of treatment-related neutropenic sepsis in complete remission and one died of relapsed disease. Finally, 4 patients (2 NSGCT and 2 seminomas) referred at relapse were treated with POMB/ACE and one was successfully salvaged. The combination of POMB/ACE chemotherapy and surgery is effective management for MGCT producing high long-term survival rates.

  20. Treatment of advanced solid tumours with NSAIDs: Correlation of quantitative monitoring of circulating tumour cells and positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging

    PubMed Central

    Willecke-Hochmuth, Regina; Pachmann, Katharina; Drevs, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The detection and characterisation of tumour-derived circulating epithelial tumor cells (CETCs) or circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been a main focus of basic oncological research over previous years. Numerous studies in the past decade have shown that CTCs are a promising tool for the estimation of the risk for metastatic relapse. The present observational study describes treatment results using tumour imaging and the quantification of CTCs. A group of 14 patients with advanced carcinomas was followed during their anticancer treatments. CTC numbers were serially detected and treatment success was estimated by positron emission tomography-computed tomography. A connection was found between tumour remission and a decreasing CTC count in 83%, a connection between stable disease and stable CTC numbers in 78% and a connection between progressive disease (PD) and an increase in CTC count in 50% of cases. In the patients with PD, an incomplete response was observed affecting the CTCs, but not the solid region of the tumour. As a result of this study, it may be concluded that patients with solid tumours benefit from serial quantification of CTCs in addition to imaging, as this combination of techniques provides a more sensitive result than imaging alone. PMID:27588120

  1. Effect of VEGF receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222548 combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Hess, C; Vuong, V; Hegyi, I; Riesterer, O; Wood, J; Fabbro, D; Glanzmann, C; Bodis, S; Pruschy, M

    2001-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a major target for anti-angiogenesis-based cancer treatment. Here we report the treatment effect of ionizing radiation in combination with the novel orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro and with tumour xenografts in vivo. Combined treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with increasing doses of PTK787/ZK222584 and ionizing radiation abrogated VEGF-dependent proliferation in a dose-dependent way, but inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation was not due to apoptosis induction. In vivo, a combined treatment regimen of PTK787/ZK222584 (4 × 100 mg/kg) during 4 consecutive days in combination with ionizing radiation (4 × 3 Gy) exerted a substantial tumour growth delay for radiation-resistant p53-disfunctional tumour xenografts derived from SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells while each treatment modality alone had only a minimal effect on tumour size and neovascularization. SW480 tumours from animals that received a combined treatment regimen, displayed not only an extended tumour growth delay but also a significant decrease in the number of microvessels in the tumour xenograft. These results support the model of a cooperative antitumoural effect of angiogenesis inhibitor and irradiation and show that the orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 is suitable for combination therapy with irradiation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747347

  2. Chronic stress in mice remodels lymph vasculature to promote tumour cell dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Le, Caroline P.; Nowell, Cameron J.; Kim-Fuchs, Corina; Botteri, Edoardo; Hiller, Jonathan G.; Ismail, Hilmy; Pimentel, Matthew A.; Chai, Ming G.; Karnezis, Tara; Rotmensz, Nicole; Renne, Giuseppe; Gandini, Sara; Pouton, Colin W.; Ferrari, Davide; Möller, Andreas; Stacker, Steven A.; Sloan, Erica K.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress induces signalling from the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and drives cancer progression, although the pathways of tumour cell dissemination are unclear. Here we show that chronic stress restructures lymphatic networks within and around tumours to provide pathways for tumour cell escape. We show that VEGFC derived from tumour cells is required for stress to induce lymphatic remodelling and that this depends on COX2 inflammatory signalling from macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNS signalling blocks the effect of chronic stress on lymphatic remodelling in vivo and reduces lymphatic metastasis in preclinical cancer models and in patients with breast cancer. These findings reveal unanticipated communication between stress-induced neural signalling and inflammation, which regulates tumour lymphatic architecture and lymphogenous tumour cell dissemination. These findings suggest that limiting the effects of SNS signalling to prevent tumour cell dissemination through lymphatic routes may provide a strategy to improve cancer outcomes. PMID:26925549

  3. Thymidylate Synthase Expression Determines Pemetrexed Targets and Resistance Development in Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Buqué, Aitziber; Aresti, Unai; Calvo, Begoña; Sh. Muhialdin, Jangi; Muñoz, Alberto; Carrera, Sergio; Azkona, Eider; Rubio, Itziar; López-Vivanco, Guillermo

    2013-01-01

    Although treatment options for cancer patients are increasing every year, the drug resistance problem remains very present. It is very difficult to find a drug that acts equally on tumours of the same histology as the individual's genetic characteristics often determine the response to treatment. Furthermore, tumours that initially respond to anti-tumour therapy are able to adapt and develop resistance to the drug, while others do not. In addition, this usually implies resistance development to agents to which the cells have not been exposed, a phenomenon called cross-resistance or multidrug resistance. Given this situation, it has been suggested that the most appropriate treatment would be able to act in parallel on multiple pathways constitutively altered in tumour cells. Pemetrexed is a multitargeted antifolate that exerts its activity against folate-dependent enzymes involved in de novo pyrimidine and purine synthesis. It is currently in use in combination with cisplatin against malignant pleural mesothelioma and non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer with favourable results. By real-time RT-PCR gene expression assays and restoration viability assays we demonstrated that Pemetrexed targets folate-dependent enzymes involved in de novo biosynthesis of purines differently depending on the intrinsic genetic characteristics of the tumour. These differences did not, however, interfere either with the initial response to the drug or with the activation of apoptotic pathways. In addition, these genetic fingerprints can differentiate two groups of tumours: those capable of developing resistance to antifolate, and not capable. These results may be useful to employ targets gene expression as resistance markers, a valuable tool for identifying patients likely to receive combination therapy to prevent the development of resistance. PMID:23675481

  4. The role of macrophages in the cytotoxic killing of tumour cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zembala, M.; Ptak, W.; Hanczakowska, Maria

    1973-01-01

    Lymph node and spleen cells from normal mice were cultured for 3 days with polyoma virus-induced tumour, Ehrlich's ascites tumour or leukaemia L 1210 cells. This resulted in in vitro immunization of the lymphocytes, which were then transferred to irradiated target cells labelled with 51Cr. Normal, i.e. non-immune thioglycollate-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were also added to some tubes. Non-immune macrophages mixed with immunized lymphocytes showed a significantly increased ability to destroy tumour cells as compared with macrophages in the absence of immunized lymphocytes. The immunized lymphocytes were almost entirely inactive alone. When the number of macrophages was kept constant the cytotoxicity was dependent on the number of viable immunized lymphocytes placed on the target cells. Immunized lymphocytes, in the presence of macrophages, only exhibited strong killing of the target cells against which they had been immunized; some lysis of `bystander' cells was, however, seen provided specific target cells were present. Macrophage monolayers exposed to immunized lymphocytes upon contact with specific antigen became `armed' and showed a significant cytotoxicity for specific target cells. When immunized lymphocytes and normal macrophages were treated with actinomycin D and puromycin, cytotoxicity was inhibited in the immunized lymphocytes but not in the macrophages. The possible mechanism of normal macrophage cooperation with immunized lymphocytes in the cytotoxic killing reaction is discussed. Results presented in this paper favour the view that immunologically specific cytophilic factor (presumptive cytophilic antibody) is involved in the macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity in the system studied. PMID:4356674

  5. Germ-cell malignant tumours in father and son.

    PubMed Central

    Musa, M. B.

    1975-01-01

    Germ-cell malignant tumours occurred in a man and his son. The father, who had a teratoma of the right testicle removed 24 years ago, is presently alive and well. The son, who had a choriocarcinoma presenting as an abdominal mass, possibly originating in the testicle, died within 7 months of the diagnosis with metastases in the lungs, liver and retroperitoneum. This report documents the third such case of germ-cell neoplasms occurring in father and son. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1168534

  6. The epigenetics of tumour initiation: cancer stem cells and their chromatin.

    PubMed

    Avgustinova, Alexandra; Benitah, Salvador Aznar

    2016-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in various tumours and are defined by their potential to initiate tumours upon transplantation, self-renew and reconstitute tumour heterogeneity. Modifications of the epigenome can favour tumour initiation by affecting genome integrity, DNA repair and tumour cell plasticity. Importantly, an in-depth understanding of the epigenomic alterations underlying neoplastic transformation may open new avenues for chromatin-targeted cancer treatment, as these epigenetic changes could be inherently more amenable to inhibition and reversal than hard-wired genomic alterations. Here we discuss how CSC function is affected by chromatin state and epigenomic instability. PMID:26874045

  7. Chromosomal DNA Replication Pattern in Human Tumour Cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kucheria, Kiran

    1970-01-01

    The present paper deals with the chromosomal DNA replication pattern in human solid tumour cells in vitro. This was studied at the terminal stages of the S-period. All the cell lines of female origin showed a late replicating chromosome in group XX6-12. In cell lines of male origin one of the chromosomes of group 21-22Y was later replicating than the rest of the members of the group. The DNA replication pattern of the autosomes and the sex chromosomes was similar to that of the cultured human leucocytes. The results of the present study show that the DNA replication pattern of the chromosome in neoplastic cells is basically unchanged despite the changes in the chromosome number and morphology. Therefore the abnormal behaviour of the neoplastic cells cannot be related to the changes in the pattern of the chromosomal DNA replication. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 1Fig. 6Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:5475754

  8. High-resolution imaging for the detection and characterisation of circulating tumour cells from patients with oesophageal, hepatocellular, thyroid and ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Dent, Barry M; Ogle, Laura F; O'Donnell, Rachel L; Hayes, Nicholas; Malik, Ujjal; Curtin, Nicola J; Boddy, Alan V; Plummer, E Ruth; Edmondson, Richard J; Reeves, Helen L; May, Felicity E B; Jamieson, David

    2016-01-01

    Interest has increased in the potential role of circulating tumour cells in cancer management. Most cell-based studies have been designed to determine the number of circulating tumour cells in a given volume of blood. Ability to understand the biology of the cancer cells would increase the clinical potential. The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a novel, widely applicable method for detection and characterisation of circulating tumour cells. Cells were imaged with an ImageStream(X) imaging flow cytometer which allows detection of expression of multiple biomarkers on each cell and produces high-resolution images. Depletion of haematopoietic cells was by red cell lysis, leukocyte common antigen CD45 depletion and differential centrifugation. Expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule, cytokeratins, tumour-type-specific biomarkers and CD45 was detected by immunofluorescence. Nuclei were identified with DAPI or DRAQ5 and brightfield images of cells were collected. The method is notable for the dearth of cell damage, recoveries greater than 50%, speed and absence of reliance on the expression of a single biomarker by the tumour cells. The high-quality images obtained ensure confidence in the specificity of the method. Validation of the methodology on samples from patients with oesophageal, hepatocellular, thyroid and ovarian cancers confirms its utility and specificity. Importantly, this adaptable method is applicable to all tumour types including those of nonepithelial origin. The ability to measure simultaneously the expression of multiple biomarkers will facilitate analysis of the cancer cell biology of individual circulating tumour cells.

  9. Characterization of antigen-presenting properties of tumour cells using virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Spierings, D C; Agsteribbe, E; Wilschut, J; Huckriede, A

    2000-04-01

    Immunotherapy of tumours by induction of tumour-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) will only be effective for tumours with a functional antigen processing and presentation machinery. However, many tumours are known to down-regulate expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules and/or to impair antigen processing. It is therefore desirable to evaluate the ability of a given tumour to present antigenic epitopes before developing an immunotherapy protocol. In this study we have used influenza virus as a tool to determine the antigen-presenting capacities of the murine neuroblastoma C1300 cell line NB41A3, a frequently used model for human neuroblastoma. Immunofluorescence analyses revealed low and moderate expression of MHC class I molecules Dd and Kk respectively. Nevertheless, infected NB41 A3 cells were lysed efficiently by influenza-specific CTLs. These results demonstrate that all steps of the antigen-processing pathway function properly in the NB tumour cells, and that the limited MHC class I expression suffices for efficient recognition by CTLs. In addition, lysis of the NB tumour cells shows that the cells are susceptible to CTL-induced apoptosis, a pathway that is often impaired in tumour cells. These characteristics make neuroblastoma a suitable target for immunotherapy. The presented assay allows evaluation of various immunological properties of tumour cells and, thus, represents a valuable tool to assess whether a given tumour will be susceptible to immunotherapy or not.

  10. Therapeutic vaccine generated by electrofusion of dendritic cells and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Kuriyama, H; Shimizu, K; Lee, W; Kjaergaard, J; Parkhurst, M R; Cohen, P A; Shu, S

    2004-01-01

    Immunotherapy with fusion of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells potentially confers the advantages of DC antigen-presenting functionality and a continuous source of unaltered tumour antigens. However, fusion using chemical or viral fusogens has been inefficient. We have recently developed a high throughput electrofusion technique with which very efficient fusion rates (15-54%) were observed in over 300 experiments, using a variety of murine and human tumour cell lines. The fused cells display a mature DC phenotype and express tumour-associated antigens. In two pre-clinical animal models (B16 melanoma transduced with the LacZ gene and the MCA 205 fibrosarcoma), a single vaccination of mice bearing tumours established in the lung, brain and skin resulted in tumour regression and prolongation of life. However, therapeutic efficacy required the administration of adjuvants such as IL-12 and OX-40R mAbs. Effective immunotherapy also required the delivery of fusion cells directly into lymphoid organs (spleen or lymph nodes). Using five defined human T cell lines derived from melanoma patients, allogeneic DCs of HLA-A2, HLA-DR4 and HLA-DR7 haplotypes fused with MART-1, gp100, tyrosinase and TRP-2 expressing 888 mel melanoma cells were analysed for their ability to stimulate specific cytokine (IFN-gamma and GM-CSF) secretion. DC-888 mel hybrids presented all tumour-associated epitopes to both CD4 and CD8 T cell lines in the context of MHC class II and I molecules, respectively. The therapeutic efficacy of a DC-tumour fusion vaccine is now being evaluated for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. PMID:15603192

  11. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype. PMID:24034269

  12. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype.

  13. Effect of anti-glycolytic agents on tumour cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A metabolic change is one of the tumour hallmarks, which has recently attracted a great amount of attention. One of the main metabolic characteristics of tumour cells is a high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in a glycolysis pathway than that in a tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Warburg effect constitutes a fundamental adaptation of tumour cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumour glycolysis may become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we research the effect of potential anticancer agents on tumour cells in vitro. In our study, we found a high sensitivity of tumour cells to anti-glycolityc drugs. In addition, tumour cells are more resistant to the agents studied in comparison with normal cells. We also observed an atypical cooperative interaction of tumour cells in the median lethal dose of drugs. They formed the specific morphological structure of the surviving cells. This behavior is not natural for the culture of tumour cells. Perhaps this is one of the mechanisms of cells' adaptation to the aggressive environment.

  14. Imaging tumour cell heterogeneity following cell transplantation into optically clear immune-deficient zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Moore, John C.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Tenente, Inês M.; Hayes, Madeline N.; Garcia, Elaine G.; Torres Yordán, Nora; Bourque, Caitlin; He, Shuning; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Look, A. Thomas; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancers contain a wide diversity of cell types that are defined by differentiation states, genetic mutations and altered epigenetic programmes that impart functional diversity to individual cells. Elevated tumour cell heterogeneity is linked with progression, therapy resistance and relapse. Yet, imaging of tumour cell heterogeneity and the hallmarks of cancer has been a technical and biological challenge. Here we develop optically clear immune-compromised rag2E450fs (casper) zebrafish for optimized cell transplantation and direct visualization of fluorescently labelled cancer cells at single-cell resolution. Tumour engraftment permits dynamic imaging of neovascularization, niche partitioning of tumour-propagating cells in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, emergence of clonal dominance in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and tumour evolution resulting in elevated growth and metastasis in BRAFV600E-driven melanoma. Cell transplantation approaches using optically clear immune-compromised zebrafish provide unique opportunities to uncover biology underlying cancer and to dynamically visualize cancer processes at single-cell resolution in vivo. PMID:26790525

  15. Cytotoxicity of aniline mustard glucuronide alone or in a combination with glucose in Walker cells in culture and sarcoma-180 tumour bearing animals.

    PubMed

    Deliconstantinos, G; Ramantanis, G; Todorou, D K

    1983-01-01

    The effect of aniline mustard glucuronide (AMG), p-hydroxyaniline mustard (HAM), and aniline mustard (AM), on Walker ascites tumour cells in vitro showed that AM in about 80 times more toxic than its glucuronide but HAM is at least 800 times more toxic. A non toxic dose of AMG became completely lethal to Walker tumour cells in vitro, if bovine liver beta-glucuronidase was added to the incubation medium. Prior treatment of Walker tumour cells in vitro with glucose, increased the breakdown of AMG to HAM within the intact cells, while a non-toxic dose of the glucuronide became completely lethal to cells pretreated with glucose. The administration of AMG in combination with glucose to animals bearing the highly resistant to alkylating agents Sarcoma-180 tumour, increased the toxicity of the glucuronide but produced a slight effect on tumour growth. Glucose administration in Sarcoma-180 and ADJ/PC6 tumour bearing animals did not alter the tumour intracellular pH determined in vivo indirectly from the distribution of the weak non-metabolizable organic acid 5,5-dimethyl-2,4-oxazolinedione (DMO) between intra- and extra-cellular water. The present data suggest that the combination of aniline mustard glucuronide with glucose, could be effective in those tumours which have a high beta-glucuronidase activity and a lower tumour intracellular pH could be induced by glucose.

  16. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  17. Cytological grading of canine cutaneous mast cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Filippo; Sabattini, Silvia; Bettini, Giuliano

    2016-09-01

    A cytological grading for mast cell tumours (MCTs) would be highly desirable, allowing to select the most appropriate therapeutic intervention prior to surgery. This study evaluates the applicability on fine-needle aspirations (FNAs) of the novel Kiupel grading system, based on number of mitoses, multinucleated cells, bizarre nuclei and presence of karyomegaly. Fifty consecutive cases with pre-operative cytological diagnosis were included. In cytological specimens, approximately 1000 cells were evaluated, and the histological grade was assessed on the corresponding resected specimens. On cytology, the above parameters were significantly different between histologically low-grade and high-grade tumours (P < 0.001). The cytograding correctly predicted the histological grade in 47 cases (accuracy, 94%; sensitivity, 84.6%; specificity, 97.3%). Two high-grade MCTs (4%) were not detected on cytology. The cytograding can provide helpful insights to assist clinical decisions in most cases. However, the risk of underestimation in a minority of patients represents a limit to the overall utility of the technique.

  18. Improvement of the separation of tumour cells from peripheral blood cells using magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwalbe, M.; Pachmann, K.; Höffken, K.; Clement, J. H.

    2006-09-01

    Circulating tumour cells are a key challenge in tumour therapy. Numerous approaches are on the way to achieving the elimination of these potential sources of metastasis formation. Antibody-directed magnetic cell sorting is supposed to enrich tumour cells with high selectivity, but low efficiency. The short term application of carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) coated magnetit/maghemit nanoparticles allows the discrimination of tumour cells from leukocytes. In the present work we show that the interaction of CMD nanoparticles is cell-type specific and time dependent. The breast cancer cell line MCF-7 and the CML cell line K-562 are characterized by a rapid and high interaction rate, whereas leukocytes exhibit a decelerated behaviour. The addition of carboxymethyl dextran or glucose stimulated the magnetic labelling of leukocytes. The variation of the degree of substitution of dextran with carboxymethyl groups did not affect the labelling profile of leukocytes and MCF-7 cells. In order to verify the in vitro results, whole blood samples from 13 cancer patients were analysed ex vivo. Incubation of the purified leukocyte fraction with CMD nanoparticles in the presence of low amounts of plasma reduced the overall cell content in the positive fraction. In contrast, the absolute number of residual tumour cells in the positive fraction was 90% of the initial amount.

  19. HMGA2 expression distinguishes between different types of postpubertal testicular germ cell tumour.

    PubMed

    Kloth, Lars; Gottlieb, Andrea; Helmke, Burkhard; Wosniok, Werner; Löning, Thomas; Burchardt, Käte; Belge, Gazanfer; Günther, Kathrin; Bullerdiek, Jörn

    2015-10-01

    The group of postpubertal testicular germ cell tumours encompasses lesions with highly diverse differentiation - seminomas, embryonal carcinomas, yolk sac tumours, teratomas and choriocarcinomas. Heterogeneous differentiation is often present within individual tumours and the correct identification of the components is of clinical relevance. HMGA2 re-expression has been reported in many tumours, including testicular germ cell tumours. This is the first study investigating HMGA2 expression in a representative group of testicular germ cell tumours with the highly sensitive method of quantitative real-time PCR as well as with immunohistochemistry. The expression of HMGA2 and HPRT was measured using quantitative real-time PCR in 59 postpubertal testicular germ cell tumours. Thirty specimens contained only one type of tumour and 29 were mixed neoplasms. With the exception of choriocarcinomas, at least two pure specimens from each subgroup of testicular germ cell tumour were included. In order to validate the quantitative real-time PCR data and gather information about the localisation of the protein, additional immunohistochemical analysis with an antibody specific for HMGA2 was performed in 23 cases. Expression of HMGA2 in testicular germ cell tumours depended on the histological differentiation. Seminomas and embryonal carcinomas showed no or very little expression, whereas yolk sac tumours strongly expressed HMGA2 at the transcriptome as well as the protein level. In teratomas, the expression varied and in choriocarcinomas the expression was moderate. In part, these results contradict data from previous studies but HMGA2 seems to represent a novel marker to assist pathological subtyping of testicular germ cell tumours. The results indicate a critical role in yolk sac tumours and some forms of teratoma. PMID:27499908

  20. Frequent loss of Fas expression and function in human lung tumours with overexpression of FasL in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Viard-Leveugle, Isabelle; Veyrenc, Sylvie; French, Lars E; Brambilla, Christian; Brambilla, Elisabeth

    2003-10-01

    Fas (CD95) and its ligand FasL signal apoptosis and are involved in tissue homeostasis and the elimination of target cells by cytotoxic T cells. Corruption of this signalling pathway in tumour cells, for example by reduced Fas expression or increased FasL expression, can participate in tumour development and immune escape. The present study has analysed Fas/FasL expression and Fas death signalling function in vivo in lung tumour tissues [57 non-small cell lung carcinomas and 64 neuroendocrine lung tumours including small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC)] in comparison with normal lung tissue, and in vitro in neuroendocrine tumour cell lines in comparison with normal human bronchial epithelial cells. The Fas expression score was markedly decreased compared with normal lung tissue in 90% of the 121 lung tumours and was completely lost in 24%. The Fas staining pattern suggested cytoplasmic Fas expression in tumours, whereas membrane expression was observed in normal lung tissue. Loss of Fas at the cell surface was also shown in vitro by FACS analysis of neuroendocrine tumour cell lines and was concomitant with the resistance of tumour cells to FasL-mediated apoptosis according to in vitro cell viability. The lack of cell surface Fas expression in tumour cell lines resulted from the lack of intracellular Fas protein due to impaired Fas gene transcription. The FasL expression score was also decreased in most non-small cell lung carcinomas compared with normal bronchial cells, whereas 91% of SCLCs had higher expression than normal cells. FasL overexpression was related to advanced tumour stage as well as to a Fas/FasL ratio less than 1. It is concluded that a marked decrease in Fas expression may be part of lung tumourigenesis allowing tumour cells to escape from apoptosis. FasL overexpression in the context of Fas down-regulation in SCLC predicts the ability of SCLC cells to induce paracrine killing of Fas-expressing cytotoxic T cells. In lung tumours, Fas restoration may

  1. Cell-cycle distribution of urothelial tumour cells as measured by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Collste, L. G.; Darzynkiewicz, Z.; Traganos, F.; Sharpless, T. K.; Devonec, M.; Claps, M. L.; Whitmore, W. F.; Melamed, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    The fraction of cells in S + G2 + mitosis from 54 urothelial tumours was calculated by flow cytometry after acridine orange (AO) staining of cells obtained by bladder irrigation or biopsy. Fluorescence signals emitted by the AO-stained DNA and RNA of each cell were separated optically and measured for 5,000 cells per specimen. The patients were classified by the histology of their tumours and clinical data into 5 diagnostic categories: NED (no evidence of disease, but history of bladder tumour), 3; papilloma, 8; non-invasive papillary carcinoma, 8; carcinoma in situ, 17 and invasive carcinoma, 18. The fraction of cells with DNA values in S + G2 + M of the cell cycle varied between 7 and 57% of the total, with a wide range within each diagnostic category, but no statistically significant differences between the groups. The proportion of cells in S + G2 + M from an individual tumour was not correlated with histologic grade or clinical behaviour. The possibility that some tumour cells with DNA values above G1 level are quiescent cells arrested at S or G2 is discussed. PMID:526428

  2. Crosstalk between colon cancer cells and macrophages via inflammatory mediators and CD47 promotes tumour cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Juhas, Maria; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-10-01

    Tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) of the M2 phenotype are present in the stroma of many tumours and are frequently associated with the progression of several types of cancer. We investigated the role of M2 macrophages in colon cancer progression and found that human colon cancer tissue had elevated numbers of CD68(+) (macrophage marker) cells and CD206(+) (M2 macrophage marker) cells and increased CD47 expression. To explore potential interplay between colon cancer cells and M2 macrophages, we differentiated the monocyte cell line THP-1 into M1 and M2 macrophages (CD206(high) and Th2 cytokine-secreting cells), respectively. M2 macrophages migrated faster than M1 macrophages towards SW480-conditioned medium. Similarly, M2 macrophage-conditioned medium induced SW480 cell migration and CD47 expression. Factors released by macrophages were involved in this induction. In addition, SW480 cells migrated faster when co-cultured with M2 macrophages. Inhibition of CD47 with blocking antibodies or siRNA significantly reduced the migration of SW480 cells in the presence of M2 macrophages. This effect was further decreased via blocking antibodies against the CD47 ligand signal-regulatory protein α (SIRPα). Additionally, cancer cells also secreted significant levels of IL-10, thereby promoting M2 macrophage differentiation. These findings indicate that a TAM-enriched tumour microenvironment promotes colon cancer cell migration and metastasis.

  3. Conformationally constrained goniofufurone mimics as inhibitors of tumour cells growth: Design, synthesis and SAR study.

    PubMed

    Benedeković, Goran; Francuz, Jovana; Kovačević, Ivana; Popsavin, Mirjana; Zelenović, Bojana Srećo; Kojić, Vesna; Bogdanović, Gordana; Divjaković, Vladimir; Popsavin, Velimir

    2014-07-23

    Synthesis of conformationally restricted (+)-goniofufurone (1) and 7-epi-(+)-goniofufurone (2) analogues, with embedded O-isopropylidene, O-methylidene or cyclic carbonate functions is disclosed starting from d-glucose. A number of potential bioisosteres of 1 and 2 bearing both 5,7-O-methylidene and 4-substituted cinnamoyloxy functions at the C-7 position have also been synthesized. In vitro cytotoxicity of target molecules against a number of human tumour cell lines were recorded and compared with those observed for the parent molecules 1 and 2. Some of the analogues displayed powerful antiproliferative effects on selected human tumour cell lines, but all of them were devoid of any cytotoxicity towards the normal foetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5). A SAR study reveals the structural features of these lactones that may increase their antiproliferative activity. PMID:24929342

  4. Guiding intracortical brain tumour cells to an extracortical cytotoxic hydrogel using aligned polymeric nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anjana; Betancur, Martha; Patel, Gaurangkumar D.; Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Vakharia, Ajit; Pai, S. Balakrishna; Brahma, Barunashish; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, invasive brain tumour with a poor survival rate. Available treatments are ineffective and some tumours remain inoperable because of their size or location. The tumours are known to invade and migrate along white matter tracts and blood vessels. Here, we exploit this characteristic of glioblastoma multiforme by engineering aligned polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanofibres for tumour cells to invade and, hence, guide cells away from the primary tumour site to an extracortical location. This extracortial sink is a cyclopamine drug-conjugated, collagen-based hydrogel. When aligned PCL-nanofibre films in a PCL/polyurethane carrier conduit were inserted in the vicinity of an intracortical human U87MG glioblastoma xenograft, a significant number of human glioblastoma cells migrated along the aligned nanofibre films and underwent apoptosis in the extracortical hydrogel. Tumour volume in the brain was significantly lower following insertion of aligned nanofibre implants compared with the application of smooth fibres or no implants.

  5. Targeting PTPRK-RSPO3 colon tumours promotes differentiation and loss of stem-cell function.

    PubMed

    Storm, Elaine E; Durinck, Steffen; de Sousa e Melo, Felipe; Tremayne, Jarrod; Kljavin, Noelyn; Tan, Christine; Ye, Xiaofen; Chiu, Cecilia; Pham, Thinh; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Bainbridge, Travis; Firestein, Ron; Blackwood, Elizabeth; Metcalfe, Ciara; Stawiski, Eric W; Yauch, Robert L; Wu, Yan; de Sauvage, Frederic J

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains a major unmet medical need, prompting large-scale genomics efforts in the field to identify molecular drivers for which targeted therapies might be developed. We previously reported the identification of recurrent translocations in R-spondin genes present in a subset of colorectal tumours. Here we show that targeting RSPO3 in PTPRK-RSPO3-fusion-positive human tumour xenografts inhibits tumour growth and promotes differentiation. Notably, genes expressed in the stem-cell compartment of the intestine were among those most sensitive to anti-RSPO3 treatment. This observation, combined with functional assays, suggests that a stem-cell compartment drives PTPRK-RSPO3 colorectal tumour growth and indicates that the therapeutic targeting of stem-cell properties within tumours may be a clinically relevant approach for the treatment of colorectal tumours.

  6. Primary Malignant Mixed Germ Cell Tumour with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Mandible; A Rare Entity

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Arun; Parmar, Harshad; Chacko, Rabin

    2015-01-01

    Germ cell Tumours (GCT) are neoplasm derived from germ cells. GCT usually occurs inside the gonads. Extragonadal GCT’s are rare. Most common GCT associated with head and neck region are the teratomas. Of the few teratomas found in the head and neck, malignant transformation of a teratomatous element is very uncommon, and primary bone involvement within the head and neck is even rare. We present a case of primary malignant mixed germ cell Tumour involving the mandible, the present case presented malignant transformation of the epithelial component showing foci of squamous cell carcinoma within the GCT. PMID:26266228

  7. Circulating tumour cells and lung microvascular tumour cell retention in patients with metastatic breast and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Dieter J E; Brouwer, Anja; Van den Eynden, Gert G; Rutten, Annemie; Onstenk, Wendy; Sieuwerts, Anieta M; Van Laere, Steven J; Huget, Philippe; Pauwels, Patrick; Peeters, Marc; Vermeulen, Peter B; Dirix, Luc Y

    2015-01-28

    We have shown that in up to half of the patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC), higher numbers of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are present in the central venous blood (CVB) compared to the peripheral venous blood (PVB), suggesting that the lungs might retain a substantial number of CTCs. Here we report the presence of tumour cell emboli (TCE) in the microvasculature of the lungs in three out of eight patients with MBC and one patient with metastatic cervical carcinoma who had markedly elevated numbers of CTCs in the blood. All these patients suffered from symptomatic dyspnoea not easily attributable to other causes. No TCE were observed in five patients with MBC and elevated CTC counts and three patients with MBC who had low CTC counts (<5/7.5 ml). To investigate whether CTCs derived from CVB or PVB exhibit different transcriptional characteristics that might explain selective CTC retention, paired CTC samples from CVB and PVB of 12 patients with advanced breast cancer were subjected to gene expression analysis of 105 genes. No significant differences in CTC gene expression were observed. Together, these data suggest that potentially clinically relevant CTC retention in the microvasculature of the lung can occur in a subset of patients with advanced metastatic breast and cervical cancer, which seems to be transcriptionally non-selectively.

  8. VIP induces NF-κB1-nuclear localisation through different signalling pathways in human tumour and non-tumour prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Carmena, María J; Bajo, Ana M; Vacas, Eva; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Prieto, Juan C

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is a powerful activator of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Transactivation and nuclear localisation of NF-κB is an index of recurrence in prostate cancer. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exerts similar effects in prostate cancer models involving increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) which are related to NF-κB transactivation. Here we studied differential mechanisms of VIP-induced NF-κB transactivation in non-tumour RWPE-1 and tumour LNCaP and PC3 human prostate epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence studies showed that VIP increases translocation of the p50 subunit of NF-κB1 to the nucleus, an effect that was inhibited by curcumin. The signalling transduction pathways involved are different depending on cell transformation degree. In control cells (RWPE1), the effect is mediated by protein kinase A (PKA) activation and does not implicate extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) pathways whereas the opposite is true in tumour LNCaP and PC3 cells. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) pathway is involved in transformed cells but not in control cells. Curcumin blocks the activating effect of VIP on COX-2 promoter/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production and VEGF expression and secretion. The study incorporates direct observation on COX-2 promoter and suggests that VIP effect on VEGF may be indirectly mediated by PGE2 after being synthesised by COX-2, thus amplifying the initial signal. We show that the signalling involved in VIP effects on VEGF is cAMP/PKA in non-tumour cells and cAMP/EPAC/ERK/PI3K in tumour cells which coincides with pathways mediating p50 nuclear translocation. Thus, VIP appears to use different pathways for NF-κB1 (p50) transactivation in prostate epithelial cells depending on whether they are transformed or not. Transformed cells depend on pro-survival and pro-proliferative signalling pathways

  9. Rapid and quantitative discrimination of tumour cells on tissue slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wei, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er

    2016-06-01

    After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. Currently, tissue slices are immersed in a bioprobe-linked fluorescent reagent for several minutes, washed to remove the unbound reagent, and then observed using a fluorescence microscope. However, the observation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry (SSB) method for avoiding these drawbacks. First, stain reagents were synthesised for the dual modalities of fluorescent and magnetic imaging by combining iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles and the currently used fluorescent reagent. The reagent for the proposed approach was stained using the same procedure as that for the current fluorescent reagent, and tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. Analysing the total intensity of magnetic spots in SSB images enables quantitatively determining the tumour cells of tissue slices. To confirm the magnetic imaging results, a traditional observation methodology entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will benefit future clinical pathology.

  10. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-01-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells. PMID:24979331

  11. CD45 negatively regulates tumour necrosis factor and interleukin-6 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Piercy, Jenny; Petrova, Svetla; Tchilian, Elma Z; Beverley, Peter C L

    2006-06-01

    CD45 is known to regulate signalling through many different surface receptors in diverse haemopoietic cell types. Here we report for the first time that CD45-/- bone marrow dendritic cells (BMDC) are more activated than CD45+/+ cells and that tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) production by BMDC and splenic dendritic cells (sDC), is increased following stimulation via Toll-like receptor (TLR)3 and TLR9. Nuclear factor-kappaB activation, an important downstream consequence of TLR3 and TLR9 signalling, is also increased in CD45-/- BMDC. BMDC of CD45-/- mice also produce more TNF and IL-6 following stimulation with the cytokines TNF and interferon-alpha. These results show that TLR signalling is increased in CD45-/- dendritic cells and imply that CD45 is a negative regulator of TLR and cytokine receptor signalling in dendritic cells. PMID:16771860

  12. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-15

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids.

  13. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids. PMID:7237

  14. Management of Giant Cell Tumour Radius in a Three Year old Child with an Improvised Technique

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay; Gulia, Ashish; Sharma, Seema; Verma, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumours of immature skeleton have a very low incidence and epi-metaphyseal location. We are presenting giant cell tumour distal radius in a skeletally immature patient; an uncontained defect with a large soft tissue component which was managed by wide excision and reconstruction with an improvised technique. PMID:25654002

  15. Benign Leydig cell tumour and germ cell carcinoma in situ in a young man with gynaecomastia.

    PubMed Central

    Fink, R. S.; Mann, M. S.; Hopewell, J. P.; Ginsburg, J.

    1984-01-01

    A 21-year-old man presented with a 16-year history of recurrent pyrexial episodes and a 5-year history of gynaecomastia. Blood and urinary oestrogen levels were elevated and a mass was found in the upper pole of a retractile right testis. After orchidectomy, oestrogen levels fell, gynaecomastia regressed and the pyrexial episodes ceased. Histological examination of the right testis showed a benign Leydig cell tumour in the upper pole and a germinal cell carcinoma in situ in the remaining part of the testis. Thus a potentially lethal condition was detected at an early pre-malignant phase by virtue of a benign, endocrinologically active tumour. This would seem to be the first report of the co-existence of a Leydig cell tumour and germ cell carcinoma in the same testis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:6694953

  16. Methods for detection of circulating tumour cells and their clinical value in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Mikulová, V; Kološtová, K; Zima, T

    2011-01-01

    Currently available analytical methods enable identification, detection and characterization of circulating tumour cells in the peripheral blood and disseminated tumour cells in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients. About 0.01 % of the circulating tumour cells observed in the blood are able to form metastases. Therefore, they could be used for estimation of the risk for metastatic relapse, as a diagnostic tool for patient stratification, early determination of the therapy failure, or potential risk of resistance to the given therapeutic intervention. New therapeutic molecular targets could be identified for management of cancer patients using circulating tumour cell detection. The following review summarizes introduced methods of circulating tumour cell detection and their possible application in clinics.

  17. Diagnostic technologies for circulating tumour cells and exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Issadore, David

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and exosomes are promising circulating biomarkers. They exist in easily accessible blood and carry large diversity of molecular information. As such, they can be easily and repeatedly obtained for minimally invasive cancer diagnosis and monitoring. Because of their intrinsic differences in counts, size and molecular contents, CTCs and exosomes pose unique sets of technical challenges for clinical translation–CTCs are rare whereas exosomes are small. Novel technologies are underway to overcome these specific challenges to fully harness the clinical potential of these circulating biomarkers. Herein, we will overview the characteristics of CTCs and exosomes as valuable circulating biomarkers and their associated technical challenges for clinical adaptation. Specifically, we will describe emerging technologies that have been developed to address these technical obstacles and the unique clinical opportunities enabled by technological innovations. PMID:26604322

  18. Diagnostic technologies for circulating tumour cells and exosomes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Huilin; Chung, Jaehoon; Issadore, David

    2015-11-24

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and exosomes are promising circulating biomarkers. They exist in easily accessible blood and carry large diversity of molecular information. As such, they can be easily and repeatedly obtained for minimally invasive cancer diagnosis and monitoring. Because of their intrinsic differences in counts, size and molecular contents, CTCs and exosomes pose unique sets of technical challenges for clinical translation-CTCs are rare whereas exosomes are small. Novel technologies are underway to overcome these specific challenges to fully harness the clinical potential of these circulating biomarkers. Herein, we will overview the characteristics of CTCs and exosomes as valuable circulating biomarkers and their associated technical challenges for clinical adaptation. Specifically, we will describe emerging technologies that have been developed to address these technical obstacles and the unique clinical opportunities enabled by technological innovations.

  19. The effects of shortening lactoferrin derived peptides against tumour cells, bacteria and normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nannan; Strøm, Morten B; Mekonnen, Seble M; Svendsen, John S; Rekdal, Oystein

    2004-01-01

    A number of shortened derivatives of the lactoferrin model peptide L12, PAWRKAFRWAKRMLKKAA, were designed in order to elucidate the structural basis for antitumour activity of lactoferrin derivatives. Three tumour cell lines were included in the study and toxicity determined by measuring lysis of human red blood cells and fibroblasts. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between antitumour activity and net positive charge, in which a net charge close to +7 was essential for a high antitumour activity. In order to increase the antitumour activity of the shortest peptide with a net charge less than +7, the hydrophobicity had to be increased by adding a bulky Trp residue. None of the peptides were haemolytic, but toxicity against fibroblasts was observed. However, modifications of the peptides had a higher effect on reducing fibroblast toxicity than antitumour activity and thereby resulted in peptides displaying an almost 7-fold selectivity for tumour cells compared with fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coil and the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus was also included in order to compare the structural requirements for antitumour activity with those required for a high antimicrobial activity. The results showed that most of the peptides were highly active against both bacterial strains. Less modification by shortening the peptide sequences was tolerated for maintaining a high antitumour activity and selectivity compared with antimicrobial activity. The order of the amino acid residues and thereby the conformation of the peptides was highly essential for antitumour activity, whereas the antimicrobial activity was hardly influenced by changes in this parameter. Thus, in addition to a certain net positive charge and hydrophobicity, the ability to adopt an amphipathic conformation was a more critical structural parameter for antitumour activity than for antimicrobial activity, and implied that a

  20. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  1. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration

    PubMed Central

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W.; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M.; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C.; Wade, Rebecca C.; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer. PMID:26948869

  2. The HMGB1 protein induces a metabolic type of tumour cell death by blocking aerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Gdynia, Georg; Sauer, Sven W; Kopitz, Jürgen; Fuchs, Dominik; Duglova, Katarina; Ruppert, Thorsten; Miller, Matthias; Pahl, Jens; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Enders, Markus; Mairbäurl, Heimo; Kamiński, Marcin M; Penzel, Roland; Zhang, Christine; Fuller, Jonathan C; Wade, Rebecca C; Benner, Axel; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Brenner, Hermann; Hoffmeister, Michael; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Schirmacher, Peter; Roth, Wilfried

    2016-03-07

    The high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein has a central role in immunological antitumour defense. Here we show that natural killer cell-derived HMGB1 directly eliminates cancer cells by triggering metabolic cell death. HMGB1 allosterically inhibits the tetrameric pyruvate kinase isoform M2, thus blocking glucose-driven aerobic respiration. This results in a rapid metabolic shift forcing cells to rely solely on glycolysis for the maintenance of energy production. Cancer cells can acquire resistance to HMGB1 by increasing glycolysis using the dimeric form of PKM2, and employing glutaminolysis. Consistently, we observe an increase in the expression of a key enzyme of glutaminolysis, malic enzyme 1, in advanced colon cancer. Moreover, pharmaceutical inhibition of glutaminolysis sensitizes tumour cells to HMGB1 providing a basis for a therapeutic strategy for treating cancer.

  3. Multiple RT-PCR markers for the detection of circulating tumour cells of metastatic canine mammary tumours.

    PubMed

    da Costa, A; Kohn, B; Gruber, A D; Klopfleisch, R

    2013-04-01

    In humans, detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) using nucleic acid-based methods such as reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has proven to be of prognostic relevance. However, similar procedures are still lacking in veterinary oncology. To assess the correlation of CTC markers with the metastatic potential of canine mammary tumours, 120 peripheral blood samples from bitches with mammary carcinomas with (group 1) and without (group 2) histological evidence of vascular invasion and/or presence of lymph node metastases and mammary adenomas (group 3) were analyzed. Blood samples were collected in EDTA tubes and RNA was extracted within 48 h. Subsequently, the samples were tested by RT-PCR for a panel of seven CTC mRNA markers. CRYAB was the most sensitive single marker with a sensitivity of 35% and also the most specific marker with a specificity of 100% to detect group 1 blood samples. A multimarker assay combining four genes enhanced the sensitivity up to 77.5%, but decreased the specificity to 80%. CRYAB appeared to be highly specific but only moderately sensitive at detecting blood samples from dogs with metastatic tumours and detection significantly correlated with vascular invasion of primary mammary tumours. However, a multimarker assay of four genes significantly enhanced the sensitivity of the assay and is therefore preferable for CTC detection. PMID:23036177

  4. Efficient and reproducible generation of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, V; Griffiths, R; Hawkins, R E; Gilham, D E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy is showing great promise in the treatment of patients with advanced malignant melanoma. However, the translation of TIL therapy to non-melanoma tumours such as renal cell carcinoma has been less successful with a major constraint being the inability to reproducibly generate TILs from primary and metastatic tumour tissue. Methods: Primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma biopsies were subjected to differential tumour disaggregation methods and procedures that stimulate the specific expansion of TILs tested to determine which reliably generated TIL maintained antitumour specificity. Results: Enzymatic or combined enzymatic/mechanical disaggregation resulted in equivalent numbers of TILs being liberated from renal cell carcinoma biopsies. Following mitogenic activation of the isolated TILs with anti-CD3/anti-CD28-coated paramagnetic beads, successful TIL expansion was achieved in 90% of initiated cultures. The frequency of T-cell recognition of autologous tumours was enhanced when tumours were disaggregated using the GentleMACS enzymatic/mechanical system. Conclusion: TILs can be consistently produced from renal cell carcinoma biopsies maintaining autologous tumour recognition after expansion in vitro. While the method of disaggregation has little impact on the success of TIL growth, methods that preserve the cell surface architecture facilitate TIL recognition of an autologous tumour, which is important in terms of characterising the functionality of the expanded TIL population. PMID:25867267

  5. Microencapsulation of human cells: its effects on growth of normal and tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, S. M.; Hopwood, D.; Newman, E. L.; Cuschieri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth kinetics of established human colorectal tumour cell lines (HT29, HT115 and COLO 320DM) and human diploid fibroblasts (Flow 2002) were studied in conventional culture and in microcapsules formed from alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate membranes. The tumour lines grew rapidly in microcapsules but, in the case of the substrate-adherent lines HT29 and HT115, only after a prolonged lag phase. This phase was reduced by serial passage in microcapsules. The anchorage-independent line COLO 320DM showed no lengthening in lag phase. Microencapsulated fibroblasts underwent negligible growth but remained viable. Some evidence for functional differentiation (microvilli, cell-cell junctions) of the tumour line HT115 within the microcapsules was observed. We conclude that the use of microcapsules provides an alternative system with some advantages for the study of human cancer and its metastases in vitro. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2039691

  6. Inability of tumour cells to elicit the respiratory burst in cytotoxic, activated macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, S M; Hill, H R

    1982-01-01

    Activated macrophages from Corynebacterium parvum-treated mice are cytotoxic to non-antibody-coated tumour cells and have an augmented respiratory burst potential when compared to resident macrophages. We have investigated the possible involvement of the respiratory burst as an effector mechanism in this type of tumour killing. Scavengers of toxic metabolites of oxygen such as catalase, superoxide dismutase, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate, ethanol, and cytochrome c did not inhibit macrophage cytotoxicity in this system. To investigate whether or not neoplastic cells stimulate the macrophage respiratory burst, we exposed activated macrophages to viable tumour cells and monitored macrophage superoxide anion production, chemiluminescence, and hexose monophosphate shunt activity. None of these indicators of the macrophage respiratory burst was stimulated by the tumour cells towards which the macrophages were cytotoxic. The data suggest that the macrophages burst is not utilized as an effector mechanism in the non-antibody-mediated macrophage tumour cytotoxicity reaction. PMID:6277777

  7. Recycling of resting cells in the JB-1 ascites tumour after treatment with 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (ara-C).

    PubMed

    Dombernowsky, P; Bichel, P

    1976-01-01

    Resting cells in tumours present a major problem in cancer chemotherapy. In the plateau phase of grwoth of the murine JB-1 ascites tumour (i.e. 10 days after 2-5 X 10(6) cells i.p.) large fractions of non-cycling cells with G1 and G2 DNA content (Q1 and Q2 cells) are present, and the fate of these resting cells was investigated after treatment with 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ara-C). The experimental work of growth curves, percentage of labelled mitoses curves after continuous labelling with 3H-TdR, and cytophotometric determination of single-cell DNA content in unlabelled tumour cells. Treatment with an i.p. single injection of Ara-C 200 mg/kg in the plateau JB-1 tumour resulted in a significant reduction in the number of tumour cells 1 and 2 days later as compared with untreated controls, while no difference in the number of tumour cells was observed after 3 days. In tumours prelabelled with 3H-TdR 24 hr before Ara-C treatment, a significant decrease in the percentage of labelled mitoses was observed 6-8 hr later followed by a return to the initial value after 12 hr, and a new pronounced fall from 20 hr after Ara-C. The second fall in the percentage of labelled mitoses disappeared when the labelling with 3H-TdR was continued also after Ara-C treatment. Cytophotometry of unlabelled tumour cells prelabelled for 24 hr with 3H-TdR before Ara-C treatment showed 20 hr after Ara-C a pronounced decrease in the fraction of Q1 cells paralleled by an increase in the fraction of unlabelled cells with S DNA content. The results indicate recycling of resting cells first with G2 and later with G1 DNA content, which contribute to the regrowth of the tumours.

  8. Increasing the speed of tumour diagnosis during surgery with selective scanning Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Rowlands, Christopher J.; Varma, Sandeep; Perkins, William; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Pitiot, Alain; Williams, Hywel C.; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-09-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer surgery is ensuring that all tumour cells are removed during surgery, while sparing as much healthy tissue as possible. Histopathology, the gold-standard technique for cancer diagnosis, is often impractical for intra-operative use because of the time-consuming tissue preparation procedures (sectioning and staining). Raman micro-spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can discriminate between tumours and healthy tissues with high accuracy, based entirely on intrinsic chemical differences. However, raster-scanning Raman micro-spectroscopy is a slow imaging technique that typically requires data acquisition times as long as several days for typical tissue samples obtained during surgery (1 × 1 cm2) - in particular when high signal-to-noise ratio spectra are required to ensure accurate diagnosis. In this paper we present two techniques based on selective sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy that can overcome these limitations. In selective sampling, information regarding the spatial features of the tissue, either measured by an alternative optical technique or estimated in real-time from the Raman spectra, can be used to drastically reduce the number of Raman spectra required for diagnosis. These sampling strategies allowed diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma in skin tissue samples excised during Mohs micrographic surgery faster than frozen section histopathology, and two orders of magnitude faster than previous techniques based on raster-scanning Raman microscopy. Further development of these techniques may help during cancer surgery by providing a fast and objective way for surgeons to ensure the complete removal of tumour cells while sparing as much healthy tissue as possible.

  9. DNA cell-cycle analysis of cervical cancer by flow cytometry using simultaneous cytokeratin labelling for identification of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Kimmig, R; Kapsner, T; Spelsberg, H; Untch, M; Hepp, H

    1995-01-01

    DNA ploidy and cell-cycle distribution were determined by flow cytometry in fresh tumour tissue of 53 cervical carcinomas. Epithelial cells were labelled by a fluorescein-isothiocyanate-conjugated cytokeratin antibody (CK6, CK18) to study the influence of contaminating stromal and inflammatory cells on results of cell-cycle analysis of tumour cells. Without identification of cytokeratin-positive cells 30/53 (57%) tumours were found to be DNA-aneuploid compared to 43/53 (81%) after gating for cytokeratin. Only 7 of 15 DNA-multiploid tumours could be detected without cytokeratin staining. In addition, cytokeratin-negative cells, which are found in all tumours, can be used as an internal standard for the calculation of ploidy and for quality control (coefficient of variation, linearity) of each individual sample. Cell-cycle analysis revealed significantly higher S-phase and G2M-phase fractions in cytokeratin-gated compared to ungated samples (13.1% versus 10.0% and 8.0% versus 5.4%; P < 0.001). This difference was more pronounced in DNA-diploid than DNA-aneuploid tumours. In conclusion, about 30% of DNA-aneuploid tumours could only be detected after cytokeratin labelling of epithelial cells. Owing to the identification of cytokeratin-positive cells the influence of non-tumoural cell elements on cell-cycle analysis was reduced markedly. Therefore, in cervical cancer, cytokeratin labelling can optimize both the determination of DNA ploidy and cell-cycle analysis.

  10. Tumour-specific metabolic adaptation to acidosis is coupled to epigenetic stability in osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chano, Tokuhiro; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Sonveaux, Pierre; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic-based metabolism of cancers promotes an acidic microenvironment that is responsible for increased aggressiveness. However, the effects of acidosis on tumour metabolism have been almost unexplored. By using capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed a significant metabolic difference associated with glycolysis repression (dihydroxyacetone phosphate), increase of amino acid catabolism (phosphocreatine and glutamate) and urea cycle enhancement (arginino succinic acid) in osteosarcoma (OS) cells compared with normal fibroblasts. Noteworthy, metabolites associated with chromatin modification, like UDP-glucose and N(8)-acetylspermidine, decreased more in OS cells than in fibroblasts. COBRA assay and acetyl-H3 immunoblotting indicated an epigenetic stability in OS cells than in normal cells, and OS cells were more sensitive to an HDAC inhibitor under acidosis than under neutral pH. Since our data suggest that acidosis promotes a metabolic reprogramming that can contribute to the epigenetic maintenance under acidosis only in tumour cells, the acidic microenvironment should be considered for future therapies. PMID:27186436

  11. Tumour-specific metabolic adaptation to acidosis is coupled to epigenetic stability in osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Chano, Tokuhiro; Avnet, Sofia; Kusuzaki, Katsuyuki; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Sonveaux, Pierre; Rotili, Dante; Mai, Antonello; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The glycolytic-based metabolism of cancers promotes an acidic microenvironment that is responsible for increased aggressiveness. However, the effects of acidosis on tumour metabolism have been almost unexplored. By using capillary electrophoresis with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, we observed a significant metabolic difference associated with glycolysis repression (dihydroxyacetone phosphate), increase of amino acid catabolism (phosphocreatine and glutamate) and urea cycle enhancement (arginino succinic acid) in osteosarcoma (OS) cells compared with normal fibroblasts. Noteworthy, metabolites associated with chromatin modification, like UDP-glucose and N8-acetylspermidine, decreased more in OS cells than in fibroblasts. COBRA assay and acetyl-H3 immunoblotting indicated an epigenetic stability in OS cells than in normal cells, and OS cells were more sensitive to an HDAC inhibitor under acidosis than under neutral pH. Since our data suggest that acidosis promotes a metabolic reprogramming that can contribute to the epigenetic maintenance under acidosis only in tumour cells, the acidic microenvironment should be considered for future therapies. PMID:27186436

  12. On the differential diagnosis of clear cell tumours of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Eversole, L R

    1993-07-01

    Clear cell tumours, both benign and malignant, derive from a diverse group of epithelial cell types including renal epithelium, keratinising epithelium, cutaneous adnexa, salivary glands, odontogenic epithelium, melanocytes and even mesenchymally derived cells of adipose and tendon sheath. In the head and neck, clear cell tumours represent a singular challenge to the pathologist since the classic morphological features of malignant neoplasia exemplified by cytological atypia are frequently absent in malignant clear cell variants, thereby excluding reliance on this histopathological hallmark for the establishment of a diagnosis. The differential diagnosis of both benign and malignant clear cell tumours must take into account patterns of growth as well as the phenotype of accompanying cell populations when attempting to arrive at a definitive histological diagnosis. In this review article, the histopathology of head and neck tumours that harbour significant clear cell populations will be compared and contrasted.

  13. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Glenn; Stein, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications include the monitoring of tumour burden, the monitoring of minimal residual disease, monitoring of tumour heterogeneity, monitoring of molecular resistance and early diagnosis of tumours and metastatic disease. PMID:26101870

  14. Relative biological effectiveness of light ions in human tumoural cell lines: role of protein p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggio, L.; Cavinato, M.; Cherubini, R.; Conzato, M.; Cucinotta, F.; Favaretto, S.; Gerardi, S.; Lora, S.; Stoppa, P.; Williams, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Protons and alpha particles of high linear energy transfer (LET) have shown an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with respect to X/gamma rays for several cellular and molecular endpoints in different in vitro cell systems. To contribute to understanding the biochemical mechanisms involved in the increased effectiveness of high LET radiation, an extensive study has been designed. The present work reports the preliminary result of this study on two human tumoural cell lines, DLD1 and HCT116, (with different p53 status), which indicate that for these cell lines, p53 does not appear to take a part in the response to radiation induced DNA damage, suggesting an alternative p53-independent pathway and a cell biochemical mechanism dependent on the cell type.

  15. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells.

    PubMed

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita; Azogui, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  16. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  17. Study of the cytotoxicity of asiaticoside on rats and tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer chemoprevention is considered one of the most promising areas in current cancer research, and asiaticoside, which is derived from the plant Centella asiatica, has a relative lack of systemic toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether asiaticoside is effective against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced carcinogenicity in vitro (MCF-7 and other cells) and in vivo (DMBA-induced rat cancer). Methods An MTT assay was performed involving the treatment of MCF-7 cells for 48 h with H2O2 alone and H2O2 + different asiaticoside concentrations. Flow cytometry was performed, and the level of caspase 3, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) were quantified. Adult female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were divided into five groups designated I (control), II (DMBA-induced cancer), III (pre- and post-treatment with asiaticoside (200 μg/animal) in DMBA-induced cancer), IV (post-treatment with asiaticoside in DMBA-induced cancer), and V (treated with asiaticoside alone, drug control). Twelve weeks post-DMBA, rats developed mammary tumours. Rats either were sacrificed or imaged with MIBI. Histological examination of tumour tissues was performed. Tumour MIBI uptake ratios were determined. The data are expressed as the means ± standard deviation. Appropriate t-test and ANOVA statistical methods were used to compare data. Results The IC50 of asiaticoside for MCF-7 cells was determined to be 40 μM. Asiaticoside has potential for hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity, and the caspase-3 activity increased with increasing asiaticoside dose in MCF-7 cells treated for 48 h. The expression of the cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly decreased and correlated with MIBI uptake ratios in vitro and in vivo after asiaticoside administration. Conclusion This study demonstrates that asiaticoside is effective in vitro and in vivo in inducing apoptosis and enhancing anti-tumour activity. PMID:24667059

  18. Predicting clinical outcome in feline oral squamous cell carcinoma: tumour initiating cells, telomeres and telomerase.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, H; Maranon, D G; Battaglia, C L R; Ehrhart, E J; Charles, J B; Bailey, S M; LaRue, S M

    2014-09-11

    Feline oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has very poor prognosis. Here, a retrospective pilot study was conducted on 20 feline oral SCC patients who underwent stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT), to evaluate: (1) the value of putative tumour initiating cell (TIC) markers of human head and neck SCC (CD44, Bmi-1); (2) telomere length (TL) specifically in putative TICs; and (3) tumour relative telomerase activity (TA). Significant inverse correlations were found between treatment outcomes and Bmi-1 expression, supporting the predictive value of Bmi-1 as a negative prognostic indicator. While TL exhibited a wide range of variability, particularly in very short fractions, many tumours possessed high levels of TA, which correlated with high levels of Bmi-1, Ki67 and EGFR. Taken together, our results imply that Bmi-1 and telomerase may represent novel therapeutic targets in feline oral SCC, as their inhibition - in combination with SRT - would be expected to have beneficial treatment outcome. PMID:25212092

  19. Emerging roles of regulatory T cells in tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Elizabeth C; Mahmoud, Sahar M; Bennewith, Kevin L

    2014-12-01

    The metastasis of cancer is a complex and life-threatening process that is only partially understood. Immune suppressive cells are recognized as important contributors to tumour progression and may also promote the development and growth of tumour metastases. Specifically, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been found to promote primary tumour progression, and emerging pre-clinical data suggests that Tregs may promote metastasis and metastatic tumour growth. While the precise role that Tregs play in metastatic progression is understudied, recent findings have indicated that by suppressing innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity, Tregs may shield tumour cells from immune detection, and thereby allow tumour cells to survive, proliferate and acquire characteristics that facilitate dissemination. This review will highlight our current understanding of Tregs in metastasis, including an overview of pre-clinical findings and discussion of clinical data regarding Tregs and therapeutic outcome. Evolving strategies to directly ablate Tregs or to inhibit their function will also be discussed. Improving our understanding of how Tregs may influence tumour metastasis may lead to novel treatments for metastatic cancer. PMID:25359584

  20. Emerging roles of regulatory T cells in tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Elizabeth C; Mahmoud, Sahar M; Bennewith, Kevin L

    2014-12-01

    The metastasis of cancer is a complex and life-threatening process that is only partially understood. Immune suppressive cells are recognized as important contributors to tumour progression and may also promote the development and growth of tumour metastases. Specifically, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been found to promote primary tumour progression, and emerging pre-clinical data suggests that Tregs may promote metastasis and metastatic tumour growth. While the precise role that Tregs play in metastatic progression is understudied, recent findings have indicated that by suppressing innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity, Tregs may shield tumour cells from immune detection, and thereby allow tumour cells to survive, proliferate and acquire characteristics that facilitate dissemination. This review will highlight our current understanding of Tregs in metastasis, including an overview of pre-clinical findings and discussion of clinical data regarding Tregs and therapeutic outcome. Evolving strategies to directly ablate Tregs or to inhibit their function will also be discussed. Improving our understanding of how Tregs may influence tumour metastasis may lead to novel treatments for metastatic cancer.

  1. [Giant cell tumours in a pyramidal bone: a clinical case and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Santiago, M M; González-Arteaga, J; Hidalgo-Ovejero, A M

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumours (GCT) of the bone are benign, but locally invasive tumours. We present a new case of carpus GCT, involving the triquetrum. The diagnosis required a prior biopsy before doing the block resection. This treatment is the best option to avoid recurrences. We review the literature on this particular lesion in the carpus bone.

  2. Macrophage polarisation changes within the time between diagnostic biopsy and tumour resection in oral squamous cell carcinomas—an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M; Moebius, P; Büttner-Herold, M; Amann, K; Preidl, R; Neukam, F W; Wehrhan, F

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prognosis of solid malignancies has been shown to depend on immunological parameters, such as macrophage polarisation (M1/M2). Recently, it was reported that preoperative oral surgery leads to a worsening of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) prognosis. Diagnostic incision biopsies are oral surgery procedures that might lead to healing-associated M2 macrophage polarisation with a potential negative influence on tumour biology. No studies have compared macrophage polarisation in OSCC biopsies and tumour specimens. Methods: Preoperative diagnostic incision biopsies (n=25) and tumour resection specimens (n=34) of T1/T2 OSCC were processed for immunohistochemistry to detect CD68-, CD11c-, CD163- and MRC1-positive cells. Samples were digitised using whole-slide imaging, and the expression of macrophage markers was quantitatively analysed. Results: Carcinoma tissues obtained during OSCC tumour resections showed a significantly (P<0.05) increased CD163 cell count (M2 macrophages) compared with tissues obtained during preoperative incision biopsies. Additionally, the CD163/CD68 ratio (an indicator of M2 polarisation) was significantly (P<0.05) higher in tumour resection specimens than in biopsies. Conclusions: This study revealed for the first time an increase in M2 polarisation in samples obtained during OSCC tumour resection surgery compared with preoperative incision biopsies. The biopsy-induced tissue trauma might explain the observed shift in macrophage polarisation towards the tumour-promoting M2 type and could lead to accelerated tumour progression. PMID:26110975

  3. Circulating tumour cells in metastatic head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Kulasinghe, Arutha; Perry, Chris; Jovanovic, Lidija; Nelson, Colleen; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2015-06-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer with 650,000 new cases p/a worldwide. HNSCC causes high morbidity with a 5-year survival rate of less than 60%, which has not improved due to the lack of early detection (Bozec et al. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol. 2013;270: 2745-9). Metastatic disease remains one of the leading causes of death in HNSCC patients. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of literature over the past 5 years on the detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in HNSCC; CTC biology and future perspectives. CTCs are a hallmark of invasive cancer cells and key to metastasis. CTCs can be used as surrogate markers of overall survival and progression-free survival. CTCs are currently used as prognostic factors for breast, prostate and colorectal cancers using the CellSearch® system. CTCs have been detected in HNSCC, however, these numbers depend on the technique applied, time of blood collection and the clinical stage of the patient. The impact of CTCs in HNSCC is not well understood, and thus, not in routine clinical practice. Validated detection technologies that are able to capture CTCs undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition are needed. This will aid in the capture of heterogeneous CTCs, which can be compiled as new targets for the current food and drug administration-cleared CellSearch® system. Recent studies on CTCs in HNSCC with the CellSearch® have shown variable data. Therefore, there is an immediate need for large clinical trials encompassing a suite of biomarkers capturing CTCs in HNSCC, before CTCs can be used as prognostic markers in HNSCC patient management.

  4. Targeting breast to brain metastatic tumours with death receptor ligand expressing therapeutic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Bagci-Onder, Tugba; Du, Wanlu; Figueiredo, Jose-Luiz; Martinez-Quintanilla, Jordi; Shah, Khalid

    2015-06-01

    Characterizing clinically relevant brain metastasis models and assessing the therapeutic efficacy in such models are fundamental for the development of novel therapies for metastatic brain cancers. In this study, we have developed an in vivo imageable breast-to-brain metastasis mouse model. Using real time in vivo imaging and subsequent composite fluorescence imaging, we show a widespread distribution of micro- and macro-metastasis in different stages of metastatic progression. We also show extravasation of tumour cells and the close association of tumour cells with blood vessels in the brain thus mimicking the multi-foci metastases observed in the clinics. Next, we explored the ability of engineered adult stem cells to track metastatic deposits in this model and show that engineered stem cells either implanted or injected via circulation efficiently home to metastatic tumour deposits in the brain. Based on the recent findings that metastatic tumour cells adopt unique mechanisms of evading apoptosis to successfully colonize in the brain, we reasoned that TNF receptor superfamily member 10A/10B apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) based pro-apoptotic therapies that induce death receptor signalling within the metastatic tumour cells might be a favourable therapeutic approach. We engineered stem cells to express a tumour selective, potent and secretable variant of a TRAIL, S-TRAIL, and show that these cells significantly suppressed metastatic tumour growth and prolonged the survival of mice bearing metastatic breast tumours. Furthermore, the incorporation of pro-drug converting enzyme, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase, into therapeutic S-TRAIL secreting stem cells allowed their eradication post-tumour treatment. These studies are the first of their kind that provide insight into targeting brain metastasis with stem-cell mediated delivery of pro-apoptotic ligands and have important clinical implications.

  5. Detection of circulating tumour cells in patients with breast or ovarian cancer by molecular cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H; Kleespies, C; Friedrich, J; Breidenbach, M; Kallenborn, A; Schöndorf, T; Kolhagen, H; Mallmann, P

    1999-01-01

    Detection of micrometastases in patients with solid tumours may aid the establishment of prognosis and development of new therapeutic approaches. This study was designed to investigate the presence and frequency of tumour cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with breast or ovarian cancer by using a combination of magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Separated tumour cell and PB-samples from 48 patients (35 breast cancers, 12 ovarian tumours, one uterine sarcoma) were analysed for the presence of numerical aberrations of chromosomes 7, 12, 17 and 17 q11.2–q12. Twenty-five patients had primary disease and 23 had relapsed. The technique allows the detection of one tumour cell in 106 normal cells. Circulating tumour cells were detected in 35/48 cases (17 patients had relapsed and 13 primary carcinoma with lymph node or solid metastases) by the expression of anti-cytokeratin and the presence of numerical chromosomal abnormalities. PB-tumour cells of patients with a primary carcinoma and without solid metastases had a significantly lower percentage of chromosomal aberrations, especially for chromosome 12 (P = 0.035; P = 0.038) compared to those with relapsed disease and solid metastases. Detection and quantification of minimal residual disease may monitor the response to cytotoxic or hormonal therapy and may identify women at risk of relapse. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10584878

  6. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lowengrub, J S; Frieboes, H B; Jin, F; Chuang, Y-L; Li, X; Macklin, P; Wise, S M; Cristini, V

    2010-01-01

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  7. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowengrub, J. S.; Frieboes, H. B.; Jin, F.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Li, X.; Macklin, P.; Wise, S. M.; Cristini, V.

    2010-01-01

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  8. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures. PMID:25227763

  9. Directed cytokine expression in tumour cells in vivo using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    Acres, B; Dott, K; Stefani, L; Kieny, M P

    1994-01-01

    Athymic (Swiss nude) and euthymic (DBA) tumour-bearing mice were injected intravenously with various vaccinia virus (Copenhagen strain) recombinants. Several days after inoculation, tumour cells were found to be well infected with infective vaccinia particles, while organs such as liver, spleen, brain and bone marrow showed barely detectable levels or no signs at all of virus infection. Injection of tumour bearing mice with recombinant VV harbouring the cDNA for either huIL-2 or muIL-6 resulted in detectable lymphokine in the sera of injected animals. Injection of tumour-bearing nude mice with VV-IL-6, but not with VV-IL-2, resulted in significant reduction in growth rate of the tumour, and in some cases, complete rejection of the tumour. Tumour-bearing euthymic mice responded differently. Intravenous injection of VV-IL-2, but not VV-IL-6 resulted in reduced growth rate of 50% of tumours and complete rejection of 17% of tumours. PMID:7584475

  10. Imaging of testicular tumours.

    PubMed

    Owens, E J; Kabala, J; Goddard, P

    2004-01-01

    This article reviews the diagnosis, pathology and imaging of testicular tumours, predominantly germ cell tumours. It will discuss the imaging techniques used in their diagnosis, staging and surveillance.

  11. Characterization of a novel transplantable orthotopic rat bladder transitional cell tumour model.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Z; McCallum, T J; Brown, K M; Miller, G G; Halls, S B; Parney, I; Moore, R B

    1999-10-01

    An animal tumour model that mimics the human counterpart is essential for preclinical evaluation of new treatment modalities. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize such a model. To accomplish this, the established AY-27 rat bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell line was transplanted orthotopically into Fischer CDF344 female rats. AY-27 TCC cells were grown in monolayer cell culture and instilled intravesically as single cell suspensions into bladders that had been conditioned with mild acid washing. Tumour growth was assessed weekly by subjecting the rats to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). At intervals following implantation and MRI tumour detection, the animals were sacrificed for necropsy, histological examination and immunocytochemical studies. Flow cytometry was also performed for detection of Fas or Fas-ligand expression on AY-27 cells. The overall tumour establishment was 95% (97/102 rats) at 12-50 days, while in a subgroup of animals sacrificed at 16 days, 80 out of 82 animals (97%) developed TCC, the majority of which was superficial. Tumour stage was assessed by gross pathology and light microscopy. Histological examination of the tumour specimens confirmed the presence of grade II-III TCC. Immunocytochemistry confirmed that the tumour model maintained the features of TCC. The changes seen on MRI correlated well with the extent of tumour invasion identified histologically. Patchy carcinoma in situ could be detected histologically 12-13 days post-inoculation, and progressed to papillary tumour or invasive disease thereafter. Neither Fas nor Fas-ligand was expressed on AY-27 cells. The orthotopic AY-27 TCC model is highly reproducible and is ideal for preclinical studies on experimental intravesical therapies.

  12. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha induces translocation of protein kinase C in tumour necrosis factor-sensitive cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Matsubara, N; Fuchimoto, S; Orita, K

    1991-01-01

    In this study we investigated whether the anti-proliferative effect of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) was associated with the activation of protein kinase C (PKC), using PANC-1 cells (TNF-alpha sensitive) and LoVo cells (TNF-alpha resistant). In combination with 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a potent activator of PKC, TNF-alpha caused marked inhibition of the growth of LoVo cells. Inhibition of PANC-1 cell growth by TNF-alpha was blocked by pretreatment with TPA for 24 hr, along with down-regulation of PKC activity. Intracellular translocation of PKC from cytosol to membrane was induced by TNF-alpha treatment in PANC-1 cells but not in LoVo cells. PMID:1916896

  13. Expression of the chemokine CXCL14 and cetuximab-dependent tumour suppression in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kondo, T; Ozawa, S; Ikoma, T; Yang, X-Y; Kanamori, K; Suzuki, K; Iwabuchi, H; Maehata, Y; Miyamoto, C; Taguchi, T; Kiyono, T; Kubota, E; Hata, R-I

    2016-01-01

    Cetuximab, a monoclonal antibody against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), has been successfully used to treat some patients with colorectal cancer and those with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). For the effective treatment, it is essential to first identify cetuximab-responsive patients. The level of EGFR expression and/or the presence of mutations in signalling molecules downstream of the EGFR pathway have been reported to be determining factors for cetuximab responsiveness in colorectal cancer patients; however, limited data have been reported for HNSCC patients. We previously reported that the chemokine CXCL14 exhibits tumour-suppressive effects against xenografted HNSCC cells, which may be classified into two groups, CXCL14-expressing and non-expressing cells under serum-starved culture conditions. Here we employed CXCL14-expressing HSC-3 cells and CXCL14-non-expressing YCU-H891 cells as representatives of the two groups and compared their responses to cetuximab and their CXCL14 expression under various conditions. The growth of xenografted tumours initiated by HSC-3 cells, which expressed CXCL14 in vivo and in vitro, was suppressed by the injection of cetuximab into tumour-bearing mice; however, neither the expression of the chemokine nor the cetuximab-dependent suppression of xenograft tumour growth was observed for YCU-H891 cells. Both types of cells expressed EGFR and neither type harboured mutations in signalling molecules downstream of EGFR that have been reported in cetuximab-resistant colon cancer patients. The inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling increased the levels of CXCL14 messenger RNA (mRNA) in HSC-3 cells, but not in YCU-H891 cells. We also observed that the CXCL14 promoter region in YCU-H891 cells was hypermethylated, and that demethylation of the promoter by treatment with 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine restored CXCL14 mRNA expression and in vivo cetuximab-mediated tumour growth suppression

  14. Blue Cell Tumour at Unusual Site: Retropritoneal Ewings Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Javalgi, Anita P; Karigoudar, Mahesh H; Palur, Katyayani

    2016-04-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly malignant tumour of osseous or non-osseous origin, tremed as extra-skeletal Ewings sarcoma if arising from soft tissue. It is rare occurrence tumor most commonly occurring in paravertebral area, chest wall, head & neck and retroperitoneum. Reporting an interesting case of retroperitoneal Ewing's sarcoma in 39 years old female. Patient had complains of abdominal discomfort & vague pain since 2 months, following weakness in lower limb and loss of weight. On detail history and examination she was further referred to detail pathological and radiological investigations. Haematological profile, renal function test and liver function test were in normal limits. USG abdomen was normal, MRI showed a mass in pelvis retroperitoneum measuring 10x10cms, bilateral ovaries and tubes were normal. Because of retroperitoneal nature of tumor and suspicion of uterine sarcoma, laparotomy was performed. The large retroperitoneal mass adherent to posterior of uterus was excised and send for histopathological diagnosis. On gross and microscopy examination the diagnosis of blue cell tumor with PAS positivity, possibility of extraskeletal Ewing's sarcoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor was made which was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry, positive for S100, Vementin and CD99 and negative for desmin and CK. Confirmed diagnosis help in accurate management and improves survival rate. PMID:27190820

  15. Interleukin 1 and tumour necrosis factor alpha may be responsible for the lytic mechanism during anti-tumour antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Pullyblank, A. M.; Guillou, P. J.; Monson, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    Antibodies are thought to bring about tumour cell lysis by antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), but the exact mechanism is not well elucidated. Monocytes are known to be important mediators of anti-tumour ADCC and are also known to secrete the cytokines tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), both of which have been shown to bring about tumour cell lysis. We examined the release of these cytokines during ADCC and attempted to elucidate which components of the ADCC reaction were necessary for cytokine production. We measured TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta in supernatants collected from a standard ADCC assay using each of the anti-colorectal antibodies m17-1A, c17-1A and cSF25. We found that there was significant TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta release during ADCC mediated by each of these three antibodies and that the magnitude of cytokine release seemed to reflect the degree of tumour cell lysis produced by each antibody. Furthermore, we found that effector cells, target cells and a specific anti-tumour antibody were necessary for this to occur. The presence of only some of the components of the reaction or of an irrelevant antibody produced little or no TNF-alpha or IL-1 beta. We conclude that TNF-alpha and IL-1 beta are released when an effector and tumour target cell are united by a specific tumour antibody and that these cytokines may be important in bringing about tumour cell lysis during the ADCC reaction. PMID:7669568

  16. Enhanced thermal stability of lysosomal beta-D-galactosidase in parenchymal cells of tumour bearing mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lenti, L.; Lipari, M.; Lombardi, D.; Zicari, A.; Dotta, A.; Pontieri, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal stability of the enzyme beta-D-galactosidase varies among different organs in normal C57Bl/6 mice, and increases in the same organs in mice with Lewis Lung carcinoma. Thermal stability of this enzyme is also increased by treatment of the mice with cell-free extracts of tumour cells or with inflammatory compounds such as carrageenan or orosomucoid. After desialylation, orosomucoid more effectively increases the heat stability of the enzyme. By contrast talc, which has no galactosyl groups, is without effect on the stability of the enzyme in vivo. Macrophages of tumour bearing mice release into the culture medium a more heat resistant enzyme than macrophages from control mice. In both cases the heat resistance of the secreted enzyme is higher when fetal calf serum is present in the culture medium. Bovine serum does not modify the thermal stability of beta-D-galactosidase in this system. Incubation of lysosomal fractions of various organs with the synthetic beta-D-galactosidase substrate, p-nitrophenyl-galactopyranoside, also strongly increases the heat resistance of the enzyme. The results suggest that one factor influencing the heat resistance of this enzyme may be complex formation between the enzyme and its substrates, an example of substrate protection of the enzyme. This may not be the only factor involved in enzyme stabilization in vivo. PMID:3099822

  17. In vitro immunopotentiating properties and tumour cell toxicity induced by Lophophora williamsii (peyote) cactus methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Franco-Molina, M; Gomez-Flores, R; Tamez-Guerra, P; Tamez-Guerra, R; Castillo-Leon, L; Rodríguez-Padilla, C

    2003-11-01

    Lophophora williamsii, also known as peyote, is found primarily in dry regions from Central Mexico, including the Mexican States of Nayarit, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas, Nuevo León, Chihuahua, Coahuila and Tamaulipas, to Texas particularly in regions along Rio Grande. Peyote extracts have been associated with stimulating the central nervous system and regulating blood pressure, sleep, hunger and thirst. However, there is no evidence of any effect of peyote on the immune system or against tumour cell growth. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effects of peyote methanolic extracts on some parameters of mouse and human leukocyte immunocompetence and tumour cell growth. Peyote extract (0.18-18 micro g/mL) activated nitric oxide production by murine macrophages, and stimulated up to 2.4-fold proliferation of murine thymic lymphocytes. In addition, peyote extract induced up to 1.85-, 2.29- and 1.89-fold increases in mRNA signal of IL-1, IL-6 and IL-8 by human leukocytes. Also examined were the effects of peyote extracts on murine lymphoma L5178Y-R and fi broblastoma L929, and human myeloid U937 and mammary gland MCF7 tumour cell growth using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). Peyote extracts were toxic for MCF7, L5178Y-R, U937 and L929 (18 mg/mL peyote extract caused 1.3%, 8%, 45% and 60% viability respectively) cell lines.

  18. Method validation of circulating tumour cell enumeration at low cell counts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating tumour cells (CTC) are receiving increasing attention as prognostic, predictive and pharmacodynamic biomarkers in cancer patients. However, their clinical significance can be dependent on an accurate determination of CTC around cut-off values at low cell counts (<10 cells/7.5 ml). Consequently, we have conducted method validation of the CellSearch™ system focusing on clinical samples containing CTC in the cut-off region. Methods Analytical accuracy was first assessed employing quality controls (QC) and spiked healthy volunteer blood specimens. Results were analysed by β-expectation tolerance intervals (BETI). Inter-operator error (6 different readers) was then characterised in 38 different patient samples, 68% of which had ≤5 CTC and data were analysed by β-content γ-confidence tolerance intervals (BCTI). Results Results from QCs and spiked blood confirmed a 3-4-fold higher degree of imprecision at the low (48 cells, BETI = + 0.288/-0.345, β = 95%) compared to the high QC (987 cells, BETI = +0.065/-0.140, β = 95%). However, when data for individual analysts were interrogated characteristic systematic errors were detected. In the analysis of patient samples again individual analysts introduced a highly specific error into the interpretation of CTC images, which correlated to the level of training and experience. When readers were selected based on BETI and BCTI results, the high level of between-operator error (up to 170%) observed at CTC of ≤ 5 was reduced to < 30%. Conclusions Inter-operator variability in enumeration of CTC at low cell counts can be considerable, but is also potentially avoidable by following simple guidance steps. PMID:24024881

  19. Germ cell tumours of the ovary. A clinical study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Friedman, M; Browde, S; Nissenbaum, M M

    1984-04-14

    Our experience with germ cell tumours of the ovary is reviewed. Over the last 10 years, 15 cases, representing 6,4% of all our referred patients with malignant ovarian tumours, have been analysed. The type of tumour, histological appearances, stage, treatment and results of treatment are presented. The tumour most commonly seen was the dysgerminoma, comprising 60% of all cases (9 patients). Multimodal treatment generally consisted of surgery and radiotherapy for dysgerminoma with the addition of chemotherapy for the non-dysgerminomas. Survival depends on the stage and histological appearances of the tumour. Patients in whom the disease is at advanced stages have a poor prognosis, irrespective of histological features. A general review of this subject is also given.

  20. Modelling circulating tumour cells for personalised survival prediction in metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ascolani, Gianluca; Occhipinti, Annalisa; Liò, Pietro

    2015-05-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics.

  1. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  2. LINE-1 induces hTERT and ensures telomere maintenance in tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Aschacher, T; Wolf, B; Enzmann, F; Kienzl, P; Messner, B; Sampl, S; Svoboda, M; Mechtcheriakova, D; Holzmann, K; Bergmann, M

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of cancer cells is an activated telomere maintenance mechanism, which allows prolonged survival of the malignant cells. In more than 80% of tumours, telomeres are elongated by the enzyme telomerase, which adds de novo telomere repeats to the ends of chromosomes. Cancer cells are also characterized by expression of active LINE-1 elements (L1s, long interspersed nuclear elements-1). L1 elements are abundant retrotransposons in the eukaryotic genome that are primarily known for facilitating aberrant recombination. Using L1-knockdown (KD), we show for the first time that L1 is critical for telomere maintenance in telomerase-positive tumour cells. The reduced length of telomeres in the L1-KD-treated cells correlated with an increased rate of telomere dysfunction foci, a reduced expression of shelterin proteins and an increased rate of anaphase bridges. The decreased telomere length was associated with a decreased telomerase activity and decreased telomerase mRNA level; the latter was increased upon L1 overexpression. L1-KD also led to a decrease in mRNA and protein expression of cMyc and KLF-4, two main transcription factors of telomerase and altered mRNA levels of other stem-cell-associated proteins such as CD44 and hMyb, as well as a corresponding reduced growth of spheroids. The KD of KLF-4 or cMyc decreased the level of L1-ORF1 mRNA, suggesting a specific reciprocal regulation with L1. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of L1 as a pathogenicity factor in cancer cells. As L1 is only expressed in pathophysiological conditions, L1 now appears to be target in the rational treatment of telomerase-positive cancer.

  3. Endometrial polypoid adenomyomatosis in a bitch with ovarian granulosa cell tumour and pyometra.

    PubMed

    Zanghì, A; Catone, G; Marino, G; Quartuccio, M; Nicòtina, P A

    2007-01-01

    Endometrial polypoid adenomyomatosis in an 8-year-old German shepherd bitch is described. The lesion was associated with ovarian granulosa cell tumour and pyometra; grossly, it consisted of sessile or pedunculated processes with both epithelial and non-epithelial components, in which smooth muscle cells were predominant. The endometrium was diffusely atrophic and showed multifocal squamous metaplasia. The findings are discussed as possible consequences of the functioning ovarian tumour and pyometra, but an involvement of growth factors is also proposed.

  4. Human tumour antigens defined by cytotoxicity and proliferative responses of cultured lymphoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vose, Brent M.; Bonnard, Guy D.

    1982-03-01

    The long-term goal of many laboratories has been to develop cellular reagents having specific reactivity against human tumour cells. Such immune cells should prove useful for defining the antigenicity of human malignancies and may have important therapeutic potential, as has been clearly shown in some animal models1. Here we describe methods of initiating continued lymphocyte cultures (CLC) having specific anti-tumour reactivity using conditioned media containing interleukin-2 (IL-2).

  5. Lack of anti-tumour reactivity despite enhanced numbers of circulating natural killer T cells in two patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Vyth-Dreese, F A; Sein, J; van de Kasteele, W; Dellemijn, T A M; van den Bogaard, C; Nooijen, W J; de Gast, G C; Haanen, J B A G; Bex, A

    2010-12-01

    Natural killer T (NK T) cells play a central role as intermediates between innate and adaptive immune responses important to induce anti-tumour reactivity in cancer patients. In two of 14 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients, treated with interferon (IFN)-α, we detected significantly enhanced numbers of circulating NK T cells which were typed phenotypically and analysed for anti-tumour reactivity. These NK T cells were T cell receptor (TCR) Vα24/Vβ11(+), 6B11(+) and bound CD1d tetramers. No correlation was observed between NK T frequencies and regulatory T cells (T(regs)), which were also enhanced. NK T cells expressed CD56, CD161, CD45RO and CD69 and were predominantly CD8(+), in contrast to the circulating T cell pool that contained both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, as is found in healthy individuals. It is unlikely that IFN-α triggered the high NK T frequency, as all other patients expressed low to normal NK T numbers. A parallel was observed in IFN-α-related increase in activation of NK T cells with that in conventional T and non-T cells. Normal interleukin (IL)-7, IL-12 and IL-15 plasma levels were found. In one of the patients sporadic NK T cells were detected at the tumour site. α-Galactosylceramide (αGalCer) stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells or isolated NK T cell lines from both patients induced IFN-γ, but no IL-4 and no response towards autologous tumour cells or lysates. The clinical course of disease in both patients was not exceptional with regard to histological subtype and extent of metastatic disease. Therefore, despite a constitutive high peripheral frequency and in vitroαGalCer responsiveness, the NK T cells in the two RCC patients did not show anti-tumour responsiveness.

  6. Tumour cell detection in G-CSF mobilised stem cell harvests of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Tögel, F; Kröger, N; Rössing, S; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Lindner, C; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    1999-04-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells were mobilised with G-CSF from steady-state haemopoiesis after previous anthracyclin-containing standard dose chemotherapy in patients with high-risk breast cancer. 48 samples were obtained from patients with stage II-III breast cancer and > or = 10 lymph nodes, 15 samples from patients with chemotherapy sensitive metastatic disease, and 13 samples from women with inflammatory breast cancer. 44 samples were first or single leukaphereses and 32 samples were second or third harvests. Aliquots were searched for contaminating tumour cells by immunocytochemistry (IC) and cytokeratin-19 reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction rtPCR). The median count of MNCs examined by IC was 2 x 10(6); cDNA prepared from 2 x 10(7) cells was subjected to PCR. Fifty-nine samples were examined by immunocytochemistry, 36 samples by rtPCR, and 19 samples by both techniques. Samples investigated by IC and rtPCR were judged as positive if there was at least one positive test. On the whole, 42/79 (55.3%) of the samples were positive with an insignificant trend to a higher positivity rate in second or subsequent leukaphereses (52.3% vs 59.3%). The median tumour cell load per 10(6) MNCs was low with 0.5 (0-7) cells in all, and a total of 2.2 (0.5-7) cells in positive specimen. Differences in the cancer cell load of first and subsequent leukaphereses and between subgroups of patients were not found. PCR and IC gave consistent results in 63.2%. This phenomenon can be explained by the greater sensitivity of the molecular method and by a Poisson distribution of coharvested tumour cells in samples. Tumour cell contamination in G-CSF mobilised stem cells from patients with breast cancer from steady state haemopoiesis after preceding anthacyclin-containing chemotherapy is frequent, but the tumour cell load is low. To allow a comparison of different studies dealing with cancer cell contamination in stem cells, standardisation of assays is necessary.

  7. Plumbagin alters telomere dynamics, induces DNA damage and cell death in human brain tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Aik Kia; Sameni, Safoura; Venkatesan, Shriram; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Hande, M Prakash

    2015-11-01

    Natural plant products may possess much potential in palliative therapy and supportive strategies of current cancer treatments with lesser cytotoxicity to normal cells compared to conventional chemotherapy. In the current study, anti-cancer properties of plumbagin, a plant-derived naphthoquinone, on brain cancer cells were determined. Plumbagin treatment resulted in the induction of DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, followed by suppression of the colony forming ability of the brain tumour cells. These effects were substantiated by upregulation of PTEN, TNFRSF1A and downregulation of E2F1 genes, along with a drop in MDM2, cyclin B1, survivin and BCL2 protein expression. Plumbagin induced elevated levels of caspase-3/7 activity as well. For the first time, we show here that plumbagin inhibits telomerase in brain tumour cells and results in telomere shortening following chronic long-term treatment. This observation implies considerable cytotoxicity of plumbagin towards cancer cells with higher telomerase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest plumbagin as a potential chemotherapeutic phytochemical in brain tumour treatment modalities.

  8. Immunoreactivity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen in salivary gland tumours: an assessment of growth potential.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Hashimura, K; Qin, C; Shrestha, P; Sumitomo, S; Mori, M

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactivity of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was assessed to evaluate growth potential in surgically resected tissue specimens from 70 cases of benign and malignant salivary gland tumours. Three stage streptavidin-biotin immunoperoxidase immunostaining using monoclonal antibody to PCNA showed a heterogeneity of PCNA index and distribution. In normal salivary gland specimens, PCNA was demonstrated in the nuclei of few ductal and acinar cells. In pleomorphic adenoma a multiple nodular growth pattern was observed with positive immunoreactivity restricted to the nuclei of tubulo-ductal structures. Warthin's tumour had positive nuclei in the outer cuboidal cells of epithelial component and germinal centres of lymphoid tissue. Myoepithelioma and acinic cell carcinoma showed slightly differing values and a statistically significant difference in the value of the index was observed in tumour cell aggregates of the cribiform type of adenoid cystic carcinoma and the solid undifferentiated type and between low/intermediate and high-grade mucoepidermoid tumours. PCNA is a useful marker of tumour cell proliferation; the index correlates with the grade of malignancy in salivary gland tumours.

  9. Circulating tumour cells: the evolving concept and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based methodology for basic and clinical cancer research.

    PubMed

    Grover, P K; Cummins, A G; Price, T J; Roberts-Thomson, I C; Hardingham, J E

    2014-08-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are responsible for metastatic relapse and this has fuelled interest in their detection and quantification. Although numerous methods have been developed for the enrichment and detection of CTCs, none has yet reached the 'gold' standard. Since epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-based enrichment of CTCs offers several advantages, it is one of the most commonly used and has been adapted for high-throughput technology. However, emerging evidence suggests that CTCs are highly heterogeneous: they consist of epithelial tumour cells, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cells, hybrid (epithelial/EMT(+)) tumour cells, irreversible EMT(+) tumour cells, and circulating tumour stem cells (CTSCs). The EpCAM-based approach does not detect CTCs expressing low levels of EpCAM and non-epithelial phenotypes such as CTSCs and those that have undergone EMT and no longer express EpCAM. Thus, the approach may lead to underestimation of the significance of CTCs, in general, and CTSCs and EMT(+) tumour cells, in particular, in cancer dissemination. Here, we provide a critical review of research literature on the evolving concept of CTCs and the inadequacy of their enrichment by EpCAM-based technology for basic and clinical cancer research. The review also outlines future perspectives in the field.

  10. Molecular PET and PET/CT imaging of tumour cell proliferation using F-18 fluoro-L-thymidine: a comprehensive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barwick, Tara; Bencherif, Badreddine; Mountz, James M; Avril, Norbert

    2009-12-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using F-18 fluoro-3'-deoxy-3-L-fluorothymidine (FLT) offers noninvasive assessment of cell proliferation in vivo. The most important application refers to the evaluation of tumour proliferative activity, representing a key feature of malignancy. Most data to date suggest that FLT is not a suitable biomarker for staging of cancers. This is because of the rather low fraction of tumour cells that undergo replication at a given time with subsequently relatively low tumour FLT uptake. In addition, generally, the high FLT uptake in liver and bone marrow limits the diagnostic use. We describe the current status on preclinical and clinical applications of FLT-PET including our own experience in brain tumours. The future of FLT-PET probably lies in the evaluation of tumour response to therapy and more importantly, in the prediction of early response in the course of treatment. The level of FLT accumulation in tumours depends on thymidine kinase 1 activity and on the therapy-induced activation of the salvage pathway and expression of nucleoside transporters. Therefore, cytostatic agents that cause arrest of the cell cycle in the S-phase may initially increase FLT uptake rather than reducing the tumour cell accumulation. In addition, agents that block the endogenous thymidine pathway may lead to overactivity of the salvage pathway and increase tumour FLT uptake. In contrast, many therapeutic agents inhibit both pathways and subsequently reduce tumour FLT uptake. Further studies comparing FLT with F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose-PET will be important to determine the complementary advantage of FLT-PET in early cancer therapy response assessment. Further research should be facilitated by simplified synthesis of FLT with improved yields and an increasing commercial availability.

  11. Effect of spermine synthase on the sensitivity of cells to anti-tumour agents.

    PubMed Central

    Ikeguchi, Yoshihiko; Mackintosh, Caroline A; McCloskey, Diane E; Pegg, Anthony E

    2003-01-01

    The role of spermine in the sensitivity of cells to various established and experimental anti-tumour agents was examined, using paired cell lines that possess or lack spermine synthase. All spermine-synthase-deficient cells had no detectable spermine, and elevated spermidine, content. Spermine content did not alter the cell growth rate. There was little or no difference in sensitivity of immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts to doxorubicin, etoposide, cisplatin, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) or H(2)O(2) and only a slight increase in sensitivity to vinblastine and nocodazole. However, the absence of spermine clearly increased the sensitivity to 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)- N -nitrosourea, suggesting that depletion of spermine may be a useful way to increase the anti-neoplastic effects of anti-tumour agents that form chloroethyl-mediated interstrand DNA cross-links. The effects of spermine on the response to polyamine analogues (which have been proposed to be useful anti-neoplastic agents) were complex, and depended on the compound examined and on the cells tested. Sensitivity to CHENSpm ( N (1)-ethyl- N (11)-[(cycloheptyl)methyl]-4,8-diazaundecane) was substantially greater in immortalized fibroblasts that lack spermine. In contrast, BE-3-4-3 [ N (1), N (12)-bis(ethyl)spermine] and BE-3-3-3 [ N (1), N (11)-bis(ethyl)norspermine] were more active against cells that contained spermine. The presence of spermine correlated with a greater induction of spermidine/spermine- N (1)-acetyltransferase by BE-3-3-3, which is consistent with suggestions that this induction is important for the response to this drug. These findings support the concepts that different polyamine analogues have different sites of action and that CHENSpm has a different site of action from BE-3-3-3. PMID:12737625

  12. The promoting effect of tumour necrosis factor alpha in radiation-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, R. F.; Gong, Y. F.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a potent endogenous inflammatory agent, to promote malignant transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells (SHE) initiated by a 0.5-Gy dose of alpha-particles was investigated. Opsonized zymosan particles, which were phagocytosed by a human macrophage-like cell line, triggered TNF-alpha production from U937 cells. This cell supernatant could significantly increase the transformation frequency (TF) of primary SHE cells previously irradiated by a 0.5-Gy dose of alpha-particles. The TF decreased significantly if monoclonal antibody against TNF-alpha was added to the supernatant. Similarly, recombinant human TNF-alpha (rhTNF-alpha) increased the TF of alpha-irradiated primary SHE cells to an even greater extent. Addition of TNF-alpha to subcultures of irradiated SHE cells permitted the continuous propagation of these primary cells. In contrast, both TNF-alpha-treated control and alpha-irradiated cells without subsequent TNF-alpha treatment senesced after 7-15 passages. Irradiated SHE cells treated continuously with TNF-alpha could be subcultured over 40 passages and produced fibrosarcomas upon inoculation into nude mice. Our results provide the first evidence that TNF-alpha released by activated macrophages may contribute to the process of malignant transformation initiated by low-dose alpha-particles. PMID:9579824

  13. The cell proliferation kinetics of the EMT6/M/AC mouse tumour at four volumes during unperturbed growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Watson, J V

    1976-03-01

    The cell proliferation kinetics of the EMT6/M/AC mouse tumour were determined at four different volumes between 1-5 mm3 and 175 mm3. The decrease in the growth rate between these volumes are mainly due to a decrease in the rate constant for cell production. A small increase in the rate constant for cell loss occurred, but this was thought to be insignificant. The cell loss factor increased from 40% at 1-5 mm3 to over 70% in the 175 mm3 tumours. An increase in the median cell cycle time, from 14-1 hr to 18-5 hr was also found between these same volumes. Results obtained for the NCTC fibrosarcoma and the R-1 rhabdo-myosarcoms indicate that there may be a threshold volume in these sarcomas below which little or no cell loss takes place. This was not found in the EMT6/M/AC tumour. PMID:1260835

  14. 1H MRS markers of tumour growth in intrasplenic tumours and liver metastasis induced by injection of HT-29 cells in nude mice spleen.

    PubMed

    Moreno, A; López, L A; Fabra, A; Arús, C

    1998-05-01

    We have characterized, by in vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), the metabolite pattern of perchloric acid (PCA) extracts of intrasplenic tumours and hepatic metastasis, produced by intra-spleen injection of the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HT-29 and its metastatic variant HT-29 MMM into nude mice. Our aim was to gain further understanding of colorectal tumour metabolism as a basis for future in vivo studies of human colon cancer by 1H MRS. Metabolite PCA extract analysis showed a good reproduction of the spectral pattern observed in human primary colon tumours, while they were very different from the spectral pattern of the host tissues (spleen and liver). The main differences between host and tumour tissues involved taurine, phosphocholine (PC), phosphoethanolamine (PE), creatine, glycogen and glucose. Creatine is the most promising marker to follow tumour growth because of its practical absence in the nude mice host tissues. Detection of variable levels of this compound and of taurine in hepatic foci in man, are suggested as possible diagnostic markers. No correlation could be found between spectral pattern differences and the different ability to metastasize of the two HT-29 cell lines used. Furthermore, indirect evidence for a functional link between taurine and myo-inositol in colon tumour cells is presented. In summary, our data suggest that the nude mice model may be a suitable system for the MRS study of the changes taking place in host tissues upon tumour progression.

  15. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  16. Precocious puberty due to a lipid-cell tumour of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Dengg, K; Fink, F M; Heitger, A; Tabarelli, M; Kreczy, A; Glatzl, J; Berger, H

    1993-01-01

    A 4-year-old girl with a lipid cell tumour of the ovary showed isosexual precocious pseudopuberty. The endocrine activity of the tumour led to elevated plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, oestradiol, testosterone and androstenedione. After tumour resection the clinical signs of abnormal hormonal stimulation disappeared within 10 months. The girl developed precocious puberty again 2 years later without any sign of relapse. Therapy with luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonist was effective although premature activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis could not clearly be demonstrated by hormonal investigations.

  17. Combined blockade of signalling pathways shows marked anti-tumour potential in phaeochromocytoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Nölting, Svenja; Garcia, Edwin; Alusi, Ghassan; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there is no completely effective therapy available for metastatic phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas. In this study, we explore new molecular targeted therapies for these tumours, using one more benign (mouse phaeochromocytoma cell (MPC)) and one more malignant (mouse tumour tissue (MTT)) mouse PCC cell line –both generated from heterozygous neurofibromin 1 knockout mice. Several PCC-promoting gene mutations have been associated with aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1 and RAS/RAF/ERK signalling. We therefore investigated different agents that interfere specifically with these pathways, including antagonism of the IGF1 receptor by NVP-AEW541. We found that NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at relatively high doses but led to a compensatory up-regulation of ERK and mTORC1 signalling at suboptimal doses while PI3K/AKT inhibition remained stable. We subsequently investigated the effect of the dual PI3K/mTORC1/2 inhibitor NVP-BEZ235, which led to a significant decrease of MPC and MTT cell viability at doses down to 50 nM but again increased ERK signalling. Accordingly, we next examined the combination of NVP-BEZ235 with the established agent lovastatin, as this has been described to inhibit ERK signalling. Lovastatin alone significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at therapeutically relevant doses and inhibited both ERK and AKT signalling, but increased mTORC1/p70S6K signalling. Combination treatment with NVP-BEZ235 and lovastatin showed a significant additive effect in MPC and MTT cells and resulted in inhibition of both AKT and mTORC1/p70S6K signalling without ERK up-regulation. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1/2 and ERK signalling suggests a novel therapeutic approach for malignant PCCs. PMID:22715163

  18. Combined blockade of signalling pathways shows marked anti-tumour potential in phaeochromocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nölting, Svenja; Garcia, Edwin; Alusi, Ghassan; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Korbonits, Márta; Grossman, Ashley B

    2012-10-01

    Currently, there is no completely effective therapy available for metastatic phaeochromocytomas (PCCs) and paragangliomas. In this study, we explore new molecular targeted therapies for these tumours, using one more benign (mouse phaeochromocytoma cell (MPC)) and one more malignant (mouse tumour tissue (MTT)) mouse PCC cell line - both generated from heterozygous neurofibromin 1 knockout mice. Several PCC-promoting gene mutations have been associated with aberrant activation of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1 and RAS/RAF/ERK signalling. We therefore investigated different agents that interfere specifically with these pathways, including antagonism of the IGF1 receptor by NVP-AEW541. We found that NVP-AEW541 significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at relatively high doses but led to a compensatory up-regulation of ERK and mTORC1 signalling at suboptimal doses while PI3K/AKT inhibition remained stable. We subsequently investigated the effect of the dual PI3K/mTORC1/2 inhibitor NVP-BEZ235, which led to a significant decrease of MPC and MTT cell viability at doses below 50 nM but again increased ERK signalling. Accordingly, we next examined the combination of NVP-BEZ235 with the established agent lovastatin, as this has been described to inhibit ERK signalling. Lovastatin alone significantly reduced MPC and MTT cell viability at therapeutically relevant doses and inhibited both ERK and AKT signalling, but increased mTORC1/p70S6K signalling. Combination treatment with NVP-BEZ235 and lovastatin showed a significant additive effect in MPC and MTT cells and resulted in inhibition of both AKT and mTORC1/p70S6K signalling without ERK up-regulation. Simultaneous inhibition of PI3K/AKT, mTORC1/2 and ERK signalling suggests a novel therapeutic approach for malignant PCCs.

  19. Primary Leydig cell tumour of epididymis: a rare case report with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Huang, Y; Song, J; Xu, M; Zan, Q

    2013-12-01

    Leydig cell tumour (LCT) is an uncommon tumour that typically occurs in the testis. Primary epididymal LCT is extremely rare. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases have been reported in the world literature. Herein, we report a case of primary epididymal LCT in a 41-year-old Chinese male. The patient presented with right epididymal swelling for 3 months without endocrine manifestations, including gynaecomastia and decreased libido. Scrotal ultrasound demonstrated a mass about 1.5 cm in diameter entirely in the cephalic region of right epididymis. No abnormality was found in his bilateral testes. The patient underwent total mass resection without post-operative therapy. Histological examination revealed that the well-circumscribed tumour was separated by conspicuous hyalinised fibrous stroma; the tumour cells were large and polygonal with round nuclei and abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunophenotypically, the tumour cells expressed four markers of sex cord differentiation (calretinin, melanA, CD99 and inhibin). There was no recurrence at 2-year follow-up. Our observation once again confirms that LCT could primarily occur in the epididymis, and we suppose that it probably originates from the ectopic Leydig cells. As little is known about the pathogenesis and prognosis for such a rare disease, accumulation of more pathological and clinical data can help to better interpret this tumour.

  20. An integrated on-chip platform for negative enrichment of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanendran Nair Gourikutty, Sajay; Chang, Chia-Pin; Poenar, Daniel Puiu

    2016-08-15

    The study of cancer cells in blood, popularly called circulating tumour cells (CTCs), has exceptional prospects for cancer risk assessment and analysis. Separation and enrichment of CTCs by size-based methods suffer from a well-known recovery/purity trade-off while methods targeting certain specific surface proteins can lead to risk of losing CTCs due to Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and thus adversely affect the separation efficiency. A negative selection approach is thus preferred for tumour cell isolation as it does not depend on biomarker expression or defines their physical property as the separation criteria. In this work, we developed a microfluidic chip to isolate CTCs from whole blood samples without targeting any tumour specific antigen. This chip employs a two-stage cell separation: firstly, magnetophoresis depletes the white blood cells (WBCs) from a whole blood sample and is then followed by a micro-slit membrane that enables depleting the red blood cells (RBCs) and retaining only the tumour cells. By creating strong magnetic field gradients along with customized antibody complexes to target WBCs, we are able to remove >99.9% of WBCs from 1:1 diluted blood at a sample processing rate of 500μL/min. This approach achieves an average of >80% recovery of spiked tumour cells from 2mL of whole blood in a total assay processing time of 50min without multiple processing steps. PMID:27344255

  1. An integrated on-chip platform for negative enrichment of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Bhuvanendran Nair Gourikutty, Sajay; Chang, Chia-Pin; Poenar, Daniel Puiu

    2016-08-15

    The study of cancer cells in blood, popularly called circulating tumour cells (CTCs), has exceptional prospects for cancer risk assessment and analysis. Separation and enrichment of CTCs by size-based methods suffer from a well-known recovery/purity trade-off while methods targeting certain specific surface proteins can lead to risk of losing CTCs due to Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and thus adversely affect the separation efficiency. A negative selection approach is thus preferred for tumour cell isolation as it does not depend on biomarker expression or defines their physical property as the separation criteria. In this work, we developed a microfluidic chip to isolate CTCs from whole blood samples without targeting any tumour specific antigen. This chip employs a two-stage cell separation: firstly, magnetophoresis depletes the white blood cells (WBCs) from a whole blood sample and is then followed by a micro-slit membrane that enables depleting the red blood cells (RBCs) and retaining only the tumour cells. By creating strong magnetic field gradients along with customized antibody complexes to target WBCs, we are able to remove >99.9% of WBCs from 1:1 diluted blood at a sample processing rate of 500μL/min. This approach achieves an average of >80% recovery of spiked tumour cells from 2mL of whole blood in a total assay processing time of 50min without multiple processing steps.

  2. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour in a young woman with widespread metastasis and peritoneal caking.

    PubMed

    Monappa, Vidya; Bhat, Sudha S; Valiathan, Manna

    2013-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumour (DSRCT) is a rare, highly aggressive, mesenchymal tumour that arises from the peritoneal cavity. It is commonly seen in adolescent and young adult males and its occurrence in females is uncommon. We are reporting here a rare case of DSRCT in a young woman, which clinically masqueraded as an ovarian malignancy, with metastasis to liver, lung, spleen and peritoneum. The cytologic findings, Histomorphological and immunohistochemical features have been discussed, with a brief review of literature.

  3. Tumour cell membrane poration and ablation by pulsed low-intensity electric field with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Liu, Dun; Zhou, Ru; Wang, Zhigang; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2015-03-26

    Electroporation is a physical method to increase permeabilization of cell membrane by electrical pulses. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can potentially act like "lighting rods" or exhibit direct physical force on cell membrane under alternating electromagnetic fields thus reducing the required field strength. A cell poration/ablation system was built for exploring these effects of CNTs in which two-electrode sets were constructed and two perpendicular electric fields could be generated sequentially. By applying this system to breast cancer cells in the presence of multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs), the effective pulse amplitude was reduced to 50 V/cm (main field)/15 V/cm (alignment field) at the optimized pulse frequency (5 Hz) of 500 pulses. Under these conditions instant cell membrane permeabilization was increased to 38.62%, 2.77-fold higher than that without CNTs. Moreover, we also observed irreversible electroporation occurred under these conditions, such that only 39.23% of the cells were viable 24 h post treatment, in contrast to 87.01% cell viability without presence of CNTs. These results indicate that CNT-enhanced electroporation has the potential for tumour cell ablation by significantly lower electric fields than that in conventional electroporation therapy thus avoiding potential risks associated with the use of high intensity electric pulses.

  4. Genistein modulates the decreased drug accumulation in non-P-glycoprotein mediated multidrug resistant tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Versantvoort, C. H.; Schuurhuis, G. J.; Pinedo, H. M.; Eekman, C. A.; Kuiper, C. M.; Lankelma, J.; Broxterman, H. J.

    1993-01-01

    In tumour cells the pharmacological basis for multidrug resistance (MDR) often appears to be a reduced cellular cytostatic drug accumulation caused by the drug efflux protein, P-glycoprotein (Pgp MDR), or by other drug transporters (non-Pgp MDR). Here we report the reversal of the decreased daunorubicin (DNR) accumulation in five non-Pgp MDR cell lines (GLC4/ADR, SW-1573/2R120, HT1080/DR4, MCF7/Mitox and HL60/ADR) by genistein. Genistein inhibited the enhanced DNR efflux in the GLC4/ADR cells. In these cells the decreased VP-16 accumulation was also reversed by genistein. Three other (iso)flavonoids biochanin A, apigenin and quercetin also increased the DNR accumulation in the GLC4/ADR cells. In contrast to the effects on non-Pgp MDR cells, 200 microM genistein did not increase the reduced DNR accumulation in three Pgp MDR cell lines (SW-1573/2R160, MCF7/DOX40 and KB8-5) or in the parental cell lines. In conclusion the use of genistein provides a means to probe non-Pgp related drug accumulation defects. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:8105867

  5. Evaluation of cell-line-derived xenograft tumours as controls for immunohistochemical testing for ER and PR.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Tahrim; Carter, Beverley; Denic, Nash; Gai, Luis; Power, Jennifer; Voisey, Kim; Kao, K R

    2015-09-01

    Quality control (QC) for immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis routinely incorporates archived specimens for on-slide control material. We have assessed the utility of cell-line-derived xenograft (CDX) tumours for QC in breast estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) biomarker testing. Immunoblot and IHC analyses were used to select cell lines with different steady-state levels of ER and PR expression. CDX tumours all demonstrated consistent and comparable expression of ER and PR with corresponding cell lines from which they were derived. Three pathologists experienced in breast biomarker reporting scored tumours from different locations on mammary fat pads to determine reproducibility. Tumours from different locations were consistently scored as identical, and the CDX tumours representing different levels of biomarker expression were similar to patient-derived controls. Pathologists could not consistently distinguish CDX tumours from patient-derived controls, suggesting that within the appropriate quality management setting, CDX tumours may serve as control material for reporting purposes.

  6. ADAM9 is highly expressed in renal cell cancer and is associated with tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Fritzsche, Florian R; Wassermann, Kirsten; Jung, Monika; Tölle, Angelika; Kristiansen, Ilka; Lein, Michael; Johannsen, Manfred; Dietel, Manfred; Jung, Klaus; Kristiansen, Glen

    2008-01-01

    Background A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease (ADAM) 9 has been implicated in tumour progression of various solid tumours, however, little is known about its role in renal cell carcinoma. We evaluated the expression of ADAM9 on protein and transcript level in a clinico-pathologically characterized renal cell cancer cohort. Methods 108 renal cancer cases were immunostained for ADAM9 on a tissue-micro-array. For 30 additional cases, ADAM9 mRNA of microdissected tumour and normal tissue was analyzed via quantitative RT-PCR. SPSS 14.0 was used to apply crosstables (Fisher's exact test and χ2-test), correlations and univariate as well as multivariate survival analyses. Results ADAM9 was significantly up-regulated in renal cancer in comparison to the adjacent normal tissue on mRNA level. On protein level, ADAM9 was significantly associated with higher tumour grade, positive nodal status and distant metastasis. Furthermore, ADAM9 protein expression was significantly associated with shortened patient survival in the univariate analysis. Conclusion ADAM9 is strongly expressed in a large proportion of renal cell cancers, concordant with findings in other tumour entities. Additionally, ADAM9 expression is significantly associated with markers of unfavourable prognosis. Whether the demonstrated prognostic value of ADAM9 is independent from other tumour parameters will have to be verified in larger study cohorts. PMID:18582378

  7. [Denosumab may be a supplement to the surgical treatment of giant cell tumours of bone].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Anna Lynge; Hansen, Rehne Lessmann; Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg

    2016-09-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an aggressive bone tumour causing bone destruction. GCTB requires surgical treatment, and severe cases have a high risk of functional morbidity. GCTB consists of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK)-positive osteoclast-like giant cells. The formation and activity of these cells are mediated by the interaction with RANK ligand (RANKL) released from neoplastic stromal cells. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody which inhibits RANKL and impairs the growth of the GCTB. Several studies have described the ability of denosumab to downgrade the extent of surgical treatment and improve the functional outcome. PMID:27593237

  8. Flow cytometric quantification of tumour endothelial cells; an objective alternative for microvessel density assessment.

    PubMed

    Baeten, C I M; Wagstaff, J; Verhoeven, I C L; Hillen, H F P; Griffioen, A W

    2002-07-29

    Assessment of microvessel density by immunohistochemical staining is subject to a considerable inter-observer variation, and this has led to variability in correlation between microvessel density and clinical outcome in different studies. In order to improve the method of microvessel density measurement in tumour biopsies, we have developed a rapid, objective and quantitative method using flow cytometry on frozen tissues. Frozen tissue sections of archival tumour material were enzymatically digested. The single-cell suspension was stained for CD31 and CD34 for flow cytometry. The number of endothelial cells was quantified using light scatter- and fluorescence-characteristics. Tumour endothelial cells were detectable in a single cell suspension, and the percentage of endothelial cells detected in 32 colon carcinomas correlated highly (r=0.84, P<0.001) with the immunohistochemical assessment of microvessel density. Flow cytometric endothelial cells quantification was found to be more sensitive especially at lower levels of immunohistochemical microvessel density measurement. The current method was found to be applicable for various tumour types and has the major advantage that it provides a retrospective and quantitative approach to the angiogenic potential of tumours.

  9. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  10. In vivo magnetic enrichment and multiplex photoacoustic detection of circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I; Shashkov, Evgeny V; Kelly, Thomas; Kim, Jin-Woo; Yang, Lily; Zharov, Vladimir P

    2009-12-01

    The spread of cancer cells between organs, a process known as metastasis, is the cause of most cancer deaths. Detecting circulating tumour cells -- a common marker for the development of metastasis -- is difficult because ex vivo methods are not sensitive enough owing to limited blood sample volume and in vivo diagnosis is time-consuming as large volumes of blood must be analysed. Here, we show a way to magnetically capture circulating tumour cells in the bloodstream of mice followed by rapid photoacoustic detection. Magnetic nanoparticles, which were functionalized to target a receptor commonly found in breast cancer cells, bound and captured circulating tumour cells under a magnet. To improve detection sensitivity and specificity, gold-plated carbon nanotubes conjugated with folic acid were used as a second contrast agent for photoacoustic imaging. By integrating in vivo multiplex targeting, magnetic enrichment, signal amplification and multicolour recognition, our approach allows circulating tumour cells to be concentrated from a large volume of blood in the vessels of tumour-bearing mice, and this could have potential for the early diagnosis of cancer and the prevention of metastasis in humans.

  11. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S; Hayes, Daniel F; Simeone, Diane M; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 ± 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of flow-sorted ovarian tumour cells: improved detection of loss of heterozygosity.

    PubMed Central

    Abeln, E. C.; Corver, W. E.; Kuipers-Dijkshoorn, N. J.; Fleuren, G. J.; Cornelisse, C. J.

    1994-01-01

    Detection of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is usually performed on homogenised tumour specimens. In this type of analysis samples with a low percentage of tumour cells have to be excluded and possible intra-tumour heterogeneity is obscured. In this study we report the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-driven LOH detection with in total 22 microsatellite markers for chromosome 1q, 3p, 3q, 4p, 6p, 6q, 11p, 11q, 17p, 17q, 18p, 18q, Xp and Xq on flow-sorted cells from fresh and paraffin-embedded ovarian tumour tissue. Titration experiments showed that LOH can be detected with as few as 100 cell equivalents of DNA. Clear examples of LOH could be detected in the sorted aneuploid fractions from one unilateral and two bilateral ovarian tumours from three patients. In two samples the sorted fraction was less than 10% of the total sample. The bilateral tumours from the same patient showed loss of identical alleles for one marker (case OV64) and two markers (case OV69), indicative of their monoclonal origin. Multiparameter flow cytometry using two different ovarian tumour markers (MOv18 and BMA180), an anti-cytokeratin monoclonal antibody (MAb) (M9), an anti-vimentin MAb (V9) and a MAb against the panepithelial antigen 17-1A on the fresh ascites cells of the fourth ovarian cancer patient was used to investigate possible intra-tumour heterogeneity. We showed the presence of at least three phenotypically different populations, of which the diploid, keratin-positive, vimentin-negative population showed a similar LOH pattern as the aneuploid population (DNA index = 1.7), indicative of its neoplastic origin. The same LOH pattern was shown in an omentum metastasis from this patient also having the same aneuploid DNA index of 1.7. The sharing of the same LOH pattern by the diploid and aneuploid tumour cell populations suggests that the observed allele loss events occurred before the development of aneuploidy. PCR on flow-sorted cells is thus an important tool to study

  13. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765

  14. Isolated guinea pig gastric chief cells express tumour necrosis factor receptors coupled with the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, S; Santucci, L; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Amorosi, A; Mancini, A; Roberti, R; Morelli, A

    1996-02-01

    The tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy and Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis. Both conditions are characterised by high plasma pepsinogen concentrations, which are thought to reflect an increased rate of enzyme release by the pepsinogen secreting (chief) cells. The mechanisms responsible for this cell dysfunction are unknown. This study investigates whether chief cells express TNF receptors and, if so, whether their activation results in cell death. Immunohistochemical studies conducted with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against two TNF receptor associated proteins of 55 kDa (TNF-R1) and 75 kDa (TNF-R2) showed that TNF binding sites were expressed in approximately 100% gastric chief cells. Western blot analysis of whole chief cell lysates probed with the TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mAbs gave two distinct bands of 55 and 75 kDa in the immunoprecipitate. Incubating chief cells with TNF caused concentration and time dependent cell death, which was prevented by pretreating the cells with anti-TNF receptor mAbs. Exposing the cells to TNF reduced sphingomyelin content by 25%. Sphingomyelinase (10(-6) to 10(-2) IU/ml) mimicked the effect of TNF in that it provoked a concentration and time dependent reduction in chief cell viability and increased pepsinogen release. In conclusion, gastric chief cells express two TNF receptors partially linked to the sphingomyelin pathway. TNF induced chief cell dysfunction might be responsible for the high plasma pepsinogen concentrations seen in patients with NSAID gastropathy or H pylori induced gastritis.

  15. Diffuse and extreme vacuolization of tumour cells in rectal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant therapy: an unusual finding.

    PubMed

    Amico, P; Greco, P

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of diffuse and extreme cytoplasmic vacuolization of tumour cells in a rectal adenocarcinoma after neoadjuvant treatment. A 64-year-old man with a moderately differentiated rectal adenocarcinoma, diagnosed by endoscopic rectal biopsy, underwent surgical treatment after chemoradiotherapy. Residual tumour mass was represented by foci of neoplastic cells with the morphological features of conventional type adenocarcinoma, and surprisingly, by numerous areas consisting of several giant vacuoles, variable in size, merging to form multilocular spaces separated by a rim of cell membrane with a "plant-like" appearance. Cytoplasmic vacuolization may represent a distinct form of cell death, and pathologists should carefully consider this unusual and potentially alarming morphological change among the chemoradiotherapy-induced effects on tumour mass.

  16. The mechanical microenvironment in cancer: How physics affects tumours.

    PubMed

    Nagelkerke, Anika; Bussink, Johan; Rowan, Alan E; Span, Paul N

    2015-12-01

    The tumour microenvironment contributes greatly to the response of tumour cells. It consists of chemical gradients, for example of oxygen and nutrients. However, a physical environment is also present. Apart from chemical input, cells also receive physical signals. Tumours display unique mechanical properties: they are a lot stiffer than normal tissue. This may be either a cause or a consequence of cancer, but literature suggests it has a major impact on tumour cells as will be described in this review. The mechanical microenvironment may cause malignant transformation, possibly through activation of oncogenic pathways and inhibition of tumour suppressor genes. In addition, the mechanical microenvironment may promote tumour progression by influencing processes such as epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, enhancing cell survival through autophagy, but also affects sensitivity of tumour cells to therapeutics. Furthermore, multiple intracellular signalling pathways prove sensitive to the mechanical properties of the microenvironment. It appears the increased stiffness is unlikely to be caused by increased stiffness of the tumour cells themselves. However, there are indications that tumours display a higher cell density, making them more rigid. In addition, increased matrix deposition in the tumour, as well as increased interstitial fluid pressure may account for the increased stiffness of tumours. Overall, tumour mechanics are significantly different from normal tissue. Therefore, this feature should be further explored for use in cancer prevention, detection and treatment.

  17. A rare case of combined placental site trophoblastic tumour with mature cystic teratoma and mixed germ cell tumour in the testis.

    PubMed

    Leow, Wei Qiang; Loh, Hwai Liang Alwin; Lee, Lui Shiong; Goh, Chin Hong Ronald

    2015-08-01

    A 20-year-old male presented with persistent right testicular pain. Following ultrasound detection of testicular nodules and biopsy for intraoperative consultation which yielded germ cell tumour, he underwent radical orchidectomy. A predominantly whitish cyst and a lobulated, variegated nodule were identified. Histology showed a mature cystic teratoma with a focus of infiltrative epithelioid cells containing eosinophilic cytoplasm and pleomorphic nuclei, invading ectatic vessel wall associated with fibrinoid change. These cells were positive for cytokeratin, human placental lactogen and inhibin, while negative for Melan-A, p63 and alpha-fetoprotein, consistent with placental site trophoblastic tumor (PSTT). The variegated nodule was a mixed germ cell tumour composed of embryonal carcinoma and immature teratoma. Aside from choriocarcinoma, primary trophoblastic tumors such as PSTT, which are derived from intermediate trophoblasts, are extremely rare in the testis. Aside from a case of pure testicular PSTT, 2 other cases have been described in association with germ cell tumour, of which one is a mature teratoma with PSTT that demonstrated gain of chromosome 12p. The other presented with PSTT in retroperitoneal recurrence of a testicular mixed germ cell tumour. We discussed the features of this tumour in the testis and important differentials in its diagnosis.

  18. The role of protein kinase C in cell surface signal transduction and tumour promotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishizuka, Yasutomi

    1984-04-01

    Protein kinase C has a crucial role in signal transduction for a variety of biologically active substances which activate cellular functions and proliferation. When cells are stimulated, protein kinase C is transiently activated by diacylglycerol which is produced in the membrane during the signal-induced turnover of inositol phospholipids. Tumour-promoting phorbol esters, when intercalated into the cell membrane, may substitute for diacylglycerol and permanently activate protein kinase C. The enzyme probably serves as a receptor for the tumour promoters. Further exploration of the roles of this enzyme may provide clues for understanding the mechanism of cell growth and differentiation.

  19. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  20. Radiofrequency ablation combined with liposomal quercetin to increase tumour destruction by modulation of heat shock protein production in a small animal model

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Ahmed, Muneeb; Tasawwar, Beenish; Levchenko, Tatyana; Sawant, Rupa R.; Collins, Michael; Signoretti, Sabina; Torchilin, Vladimir; Goldberg, S. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of heat shock protein (HSP) modulation on tumour coagulation by combining radiofrequency (RF) ablation with adjuvant liposomal quercetin and/or doxorubicin in a rat tumour model. Methods Sixty R3230 breast adenocarcinoma tumours/animals were used in this IACUC-approved study. Initially, 60 tumours (n = 6, each subgroup) were randomised into five groups: (1) RF alone, (2) intravenous (IV) liposomal quercetin alone (1 mg/kg), (3) IV liposomal quercetin followed 24 h later with RF, (4) RF followed 15 min later by IV liposomal doxorubicin (8 mg/kg), (5) IV liposomal quercetin 24 h before RF followed by IV liposomal doxorubicin 15 min post-ablation. Animals were sacrificed 4 or 24 h post-treatment and gross coagulation diameters were compared. Next, immunohistochemistry staining was performed for Hsp70 and cleaved caspase-3 expression. Comparisons were performed by using Student t-tests or ANOVA. Results Combination RF-quercetin significantly increased coagulation size compared with either RF or liposomal quercetin alone (13.1 ± 0.7 mm vs. 8.8 ± 1.2 mm or 2.3 ± 1.3 mm, respectively, P < 0.001 for all comparisons). Triple therapy (quercetin-RF-doxorubicin) showed larger coagulation diameter (14.5 ± 1.0mm) at 24 h than quercetin-RF (P = 0.016) or RF-doxorubicin (13.2 ± 1.3 mm, P = 0.042). Combination quercetin-RF decreased Hsp70 expression compared with RF alone at both 4 h (percentage of stained cells/hpf 22.4 ± 13.9% vs. 38.8 ± 16.1%, P < 0.03) and 24 h (45.2 ± 10.5% vs. 81.1 ± 3.6%, P < 0.001). Quercetin-RF increased cleaved caspase-3 expression at both 4 h (percentage of stained cells/hpf 50.7 ± 13.4% vs. 41.9 ± 15.1%, P < 0.03) and 24 h (37.4 ± 7.8% vs. 33.2 ± 6.5%, P = 0.045); with, triple therapy (quercetin-RF-doxorubicin) resulting in the highest levels of apoptosis (45.1 ± 10.7%) at 24 h. Similar trends were observed for rim thickness. Conclusions Suppression of HSP production using adjuvant liposomal quercetin can

  1. Diagnosing a rare case of desmoplastic small round cell tumour on liver biopsy.

    PubMed

    Cheo, F F; Leow, W Q

    2016-08-01

    A 50-year-old male of Indian descent presented with jaundice and right hypochondrium pain. Following a computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen, a segment 7 liver lesion was visualized, accompanied by extensive peritoneal tumour deposits. An ultrasound guided liver biopsy was performed and histology showed loose nests and sheets of tumour cells with a small blue round cell morphology. The tumour cells showed patchy strong immunopositivity for cytokeratins (AE1/3, CK7, CK19) and synaptophysin, while showing diffuse strong perinuclear positivity for desmin. Interphase fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) study using EWSR1 breakapart probe was positive for EWSR1 gene rearrangement. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour is a rare but aggressive intra-abdominal mesenchymal tumour. While the primary sites of involvement are usually the peritoneum and omentum, visceral involvement can occur. We wish to highlight the importance of considering this entity when evaluating a liver biopsy especially in a less than classical clinical context. PMID:27568672

  2. Cell lines from MYCN transgenic murine tumours reflect the molecular and biological characteristics of human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andy J; Cheng, Ngan Ching; Ford, Jette; Smith, Janice; Murray, Jayne E; Flemming, Claudia; Lastowska, Maria; Jackson, Michael S; Hackett, Christopher S; Weiss, William A; Marshall, Glenn M; Kees, Ursula R; Norris, Murray D; Haber, Michelle

    2007-06-01

    Overexpression of the human MYCN oncogene driven by a tyrosine hydroxylase promoter causes tumours in transgenic mice that recapitulate the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. To establish an in vitro model to study this process, a series of isogenic cell lines were developed from these MYCN-driven murine tumours. Lines were established from tumours arising in homozygous and hemizygous MYCN transgenic mice. Hemizygous tumours gave rise to cell lines growing only in suspension. Homozygous tumours gave rise to similar suspension lines as well as morphologically distinct substrate-adherent lines characteristic of human S-type neuroblastoma cells. FISH analysis demonstrated selective MYCN transgene amplification in cell lines derived from hemizygous mice. Comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis confirmed a range of neuroblastoma-associated genetic changes in the various lines, in particular, gain of regions syntenic with human 17q. These isogenic lines together with the transgenic mice thus represent valuable models for investigating the biological characteristics of aggressive neuroblastoma.

  3. The effect of a somatostatin analogue on the release of hormones from human midgut carcinoid tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Wängberg, B; Nilsson, O; Theodorsson, E; Dahlström, A; Ahlman, H

    1991-07-01

    The use of a somatostatin analogue (SMS 201-995) has greatly facilitated the treatment of patients with the midgut carcinoid syndrome. Clinical studies have shown that SMS reduces the peripheral levels of tumour-produced serotonin (5-HT) and tachykinins, e.g. neuropeptide K (NPK), basally and after pentagastrin provocation. Some studies have indicated an inhibitory effect of SMS on tumour cell growth as well. In the present study we have investigated the effects of SMS on four different human midgut carcinoid tumours maintained in long term culture. Media levels of 5-HT and NPK-LI in tumour cell cultures decreased rapidly during incubation with SMS (10(-8)-10(-10) M) in all four tumours studied without evidence for tachyphylaxis (up to 6 weeks observation period). SMS treatment (10(-8) M) during 4 days reduced the media concentrations of 5-HT by 56%, while the intracellular contents of 5-HT were decreased by 27% indicating dual inhibitory effects on synthesis and secretion of 5-HT from tumour cells. The DNA contents of cultures were not affected by SMS (10(-8) M or 10(-10) M) treatment for 4 or 14 days. When tumour cell cultures were challenged with isoprenaline (IP) (10(-6) M) no reduction of the IP induced release of 5-HT could be detected after pretreatment of tumour cell cultures with SMS (10(-8) M) for 1 h, 4 h or 4 days. These studies provide evidence for a direct action of the somatostatin analogue on midgut carcinoid tumour cells, reducing both synthesis and secretion of hormones from tumour cells. This effect appears not to be related to inhibition of tumour cell growth. The inhibition of 5-HT secretion from tumour cells by SMS seems to operate via a second messenger system different from the one mediating the beta-adrenoceptor stimulated release of 5-HT. PMID:1713051

  4. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  5. Giant adrenal germ cell tumour in a 59-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Fang, Lu; Liu, Zhiqi; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Daming; Wang, Yi; Xie, Dongdong; Min, Jie; Ding, Demao; Zhang, Tao; Zou, Ci; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal germ cell tumour is very rare. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with right flank discomfort. The laboratory examinations were normal and the chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion. The abdominal CT scan revealed a large mass on the right adrenal gland. The patient underwent an adrenalectomy. Histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with mixed germ cell tumour. Three months later following the operation, the patient was admitted to our hospital again with chest tightness and shortness of breath. The chest CT showed right pleural effusion recurrence and enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes and right hilar lymph nodes. The patient had right supraclavicular lymphadenectasis on physical examination. Fine needle aspiration cytology from the supraclavicular lymph nodes showed groups of malignant tumour cells. The patient died within 6 months postoperatively. In this case, the lymph node pathway played an important role in the metastatic procedure.

  6. Tumour thrombus consistency has no impact on survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gołąbek, T; Przydacz, M; Okoń, K; Kopczyński, J; Bukowczan, J; Sobczyński, R; Curyło, Ł; Gołąbek, K; Curyło, Ł; Chłosta, P

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumour thrombus (VTT) is variable and not always possible to predict. The prognostic impact and independence of tumour thrombus-related factors including the recently introduced tumour thrombus consistency (TTC) on overall survival remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of TTC in patients' survival. We determined the tumour thrombus consistency (solid vs. friable) in a cohort of 84 patients with RCC and VTT who underwent nephrectomy with thrombectomy, and performed a retrospective evaluation of the patients' data from the prospectively maintained database. A total of 45% of patients had solid thrombus (sTT) and 55% had friable thrombus (fTT). The venous tumour thrombus consistency was not predictive of overall survival. Further studies, preferably prospective and with a larger number of patients, are needed to validate the obtained results, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of tumour thrombus consistency in clinical practice for stratifying the risk of recurrence and planning further follow-up. PMID:27543869

  7. Tumour thrombus consistency has no impact on survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gołąbek, T; Przydacz, M; Okoń, K; Kopczyński, J; Bukowczan, J; Sobczyński, R; Curyło, Ł; Gołąbek, K; Curyło, Ł; Chłosta, P

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumour thrombus (VTT) is variable and not always possible to predict. The prognostic impact and independence of tumour thrombus-related factors including the recently introduced tumour thrombus consistency (TTC) on overall survival remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of TTC in patients' survival. We determined the tumour thrombus consistency (solid vs. friable) in a cohort of 84 patients with RCC and VTT who underwent nephrectomy with thrombectomy, and performed a retrospective evaluation of the patients' data from the prospectively maintained database. A total of 45% of patients had solid thrombus (sTT) and 55% had friable thrombus (fTT). The venous tumour thrombus consistency was not predictive of overall survival. Further studies, preferably prospective and with a larger number of patients, are needed to validate the obtained results, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of tumour thrombus consistency in clinical practice for stratifying the risk of recurrence and planning further follow-up.

  8. p53 Expression Helps Identify High Risk Oral Tongue Pre- malignant Lesions and Correlates with Patterns of Invasive Tumour Front and Tumour Depth in Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cases.

    PubMed

    Viveka, Thangaraj Soundara; Shyamsundar, Vidyarani; Krishnamurthy, Arvind; Ramani, Pratibha; Ramshankar, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is the most common oral cancer subtype with a maximum propensity for regional spread. Our objective was to study if p53 expression might have any correlation with aggressive patterns of invasion within oral tongue cancers as well as with the histologically identified degree of oral tongue dysplasia. p53 immunoexpression was studied using immunohistochemistry in early staged OTSCCs (n=155), oral tongue dysplasias, (n=29) and oral tongue normal specimens (n=10) and evaluated for correlations with histological and clinicopathological parameters. Our study (n=194) showed a pattern of p53 expression increasing with different grades of tongue dysplasia to different grades of invasive OTSCC (p=0.000). Among the OTSCC tumours, positive p53 expression was seen in 43.2% (67/155) and a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased Bryne's grade of the tumour invasive front (p=0.039) and increased tumour depth (p=0.018). Among the OTSCC patients with tobacco habits, (n=91), a higher p53 labelling index was significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence (p=0.025) and with lymphovascular space involvement (p=0.014). Evaluation of p53 through varying degrees of dysplasia to oral tongue cancer indicates that p53 expression is linked to aggressive features of oral tongue cancers and tongue precancers entailing a closer monitoring in positive cases. Among the OTSCCs, p53 expression is associated with tumour aggressiveness correlating with increased grading of invasive tumour front and tumour depth.

  9. Radiation enhances the therapeutic effect of Banoxantrone in hypoxic tumour cells with elevated levels of nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    MEHIBEL, MANAL; SINGH, SIMENDRA; COWEN, RACHEL L.; WILLIAMS, KAYE J.; STRATFORD, IAN J.

    2016-01-01

    Banoxantrone (AQ4N) is a prototype hypoxia selective cytotoxin that is activated by haem containing reductases such as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In the present study, we evaluate whether elevated levels of iNOS in human tumour cells will improve their sensitivity to AQ4N. Further, we examine the potential of radiation to increase cellular toxicity of AQ4N under normoxic (aerobic) and hypoxic conditions. We employed an expression vector containing the cDNA for human iNOS to transfect human fibrosarcoma HT1080 tumour cells. Alternatively, parental cells were exposed to a cytokine cocktail to induce iNOS gene expression and enzymatic activity. The cells were then treated with AQ4N alone and in combination with radiation in the presence or absence of the iNOS inhibitor N-methyl-L-arginine. In parental cells, AQ4N showed little difference in toxicity under hypoxic verses normoxic conditions. Notably, cells with upregulated iNOS activity showed a significant increase in sensitivity to AQ4N, but only under conditions of reduced oxygenation. When these cells were exposed to the combination of AQ4N and radiation, there was much greater cell killing than that observed with either modality alone. In the clinical development of hypoxia selective cytotoxins it is likely they will be used in combination with radiotherapy. In the present study, we demonstrated that AQ4N can selectively kill hypoxic cells via an iNOS-dependent mechanism. This hypoxia-selective effect can be augmented by combining AQ4N with radiation without increasing cytotoxicity to well-oxygenated tissues. Collectively, these results suggest that targeting hypoxic tumours with high levels of iNOS with a combination of AQ4N and radiotherapy could be a useful clinical therapeutic strategy. PMID:26782976

  10. Compliance of males with stage 1 testicular germ cell tumours on an active surveillance protocol.

    PubMed

    Honeyball, F; Murali-Ganesh, R; Hruby, G; Grimison, P

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the rate of compliance among 57 males with stage 1 testicular germ cell tumours on an active surveillance protocol at a single Australian centre. At median follow up of 24 months, 81% had adequate compliance with the follow-up regimen, 12% were lost to follow up, and 16% relapsed; none between protocol visits. Active surveillance is an acceptable alternative to adjuvant therapy for stage 1 testicular germ cell tumours, with reduced toxicity for most and equivalent survival, but requires efforts to maintain adequate compliance with follow up to avoid late detection of recurrence.

  11. Platelet–cancer interactions: mechanisms and pharmacology of tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Jurasz, Paul; Alonso-Escolano, David; Radomski, Marek W

    2004-01-01

    During haematogenous metastasis, cancer cells migrate to the vasculature and interact with platelets resulting in tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA). We review: The biological and clinical significance of TCIPA; Molecular mechanisms involved in platelet aggregation by cancer cells; Strategies for pharmacological regulation of these interactions. We conclude that pharmacological regulation of platelet–cancer cell interactions may reduce the impact of TCIPA on cancer biology. PMID:15492016

  12. Mechanism of cytotoxic action of crambescidin-816 on human liver-derived tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Rubiolo, J A; López-Alonso, H; Roel, M; Vieytes, M R; Thomas, O; Ternon, E; Vega, F V; Botana, L M

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Marine sponges have evolved the capacity to produce a series of very efficient chemicals to combat viruses, bacteria, and eukaryotic organisms. It has been demonstrated that several of these compounds have anti-neoplastic activity. The highly toxic sponge Crambe crambe has been the source of several molecules named crambescidins. Of these, crambescidin-816 has been shown to be cytotoxic for colon carcinoma cells. To further investigate the potential anti-carcinogenic effect of crambescidin-816, we analysed its effect on the transcription of HepG2 cells by microarray analysis followed by experiments guided by the results obtained. Experimental Approach After cytotoxicity determination, a transcriptomic analysis was performed to test the effect of crambescidin-816 on the liver-derived tumour cell HepG2. Based on the results obtained, we analysed the effect of crambescidin-816 on cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and cell migration by Western blot, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy. Cytotoxicity and cell migration were also studied in a variety of other cell lines derived from human tumours. Key Results Crambescidin-816 had a cytotoxic effect on all the cell lines studied. It inhibited cell-cell adhesion, interfered with the formation of tight junctions, and cell-matrix adhesion, negatively affecting focal adhesions. It also altered the cytoskeleton dynamics. As a consequence of all these effects on cells crambescidin-816 inhibited cell migration. Conclusions and Implications The results indicate that crambescidin-816 is active against tumour cells and implicate a new mechanism for the anti-tumour effect of this compound. PMID:24328908

  13. The novel tumour suppressor Madm regulates stem cell competition in the Drosophila testis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shree Ram; Liu, Ying; Zhao, Jiangsha; Zeng, Xiankun; Hou, Steven X

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell competition has emerged as a mechanism for selecting fit stem cells/progenitors and controlling tumourigenesis. However, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanism. Here we identify Mlf1-adaptor molecule (Madm), a novel tumour suppressor that regulates the competition between germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs) for niche occupancy. Madm knockdown results in overexpression of the EGF receptor ligand vein (vn), which further activates EGF receptor signalling and integrin expression non-cell autonomously in CySCs to promote their overproliferation and ability to outcompete GSCs for niche occupancy. Conversely, expressing a constitutively activated form of the Drosophila JAK kinase (hop(Tum-l)) promotes Madm nuclear translocation, and suppresses vn and integrin expression in CySCs that allows GSCs to outcompete CySCs for niche occupancy and promotes GSC tumour formation. Tumour suppressor-mediated stem cell competition presented here could be a mechanism of tumour initiation in mammals. PMID:26792023

  14. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W.; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  15. A flow cytometric in vivo chalone assay using retransplanted old murine JB-1 ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Barfod, N M

    1981-07-01

    A flow cytometric in vivo chalone assay is described. Transplantation of old JB-1 ascites tumour cells to new hosts induced an influx of tumour cells, with G1 DNA content, to the S phase. This induction could be reversibly and specifically blocked by injections of an ultrafiltrate of old JB-1 ascites fluid. The method described is superior to a previously published in vivo chalone assay using regenerating ascites tumours. Owing to a reduced variability in time of onset of DNA synthesis, a smaller scatter of observations is achieved and thus the number of mice per group may be reduced using the new method. In contrast to the older technique, the present one does not necessitate killing of mice during the observation period.

  16. P-glycoprotein expression in canine mammary gland tumours related with myoepithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, N-H; Hwang, Y-H; Im, K-S; Kim, J-H; Chon, S-K; Kim, H-Y; Sur, J-H

    2012-12-01

    P-glycoprotein is influential in chemotherapy-resistance in numerous cancers and has been widely studied in human breast cancer research, but is less studied in canine mammary gland tumour (MGT). The study was to evaluate P-glycoprotein expression and its localisations related with prognostic factors with monoclonal antibody C219, by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of 68 cases of canine malignant (n=54) and benign (n=14) MGT. Additional immunofluorescence (IF) and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were also performed. There was a novel finding that P-glycoprotein expression with C219 localised at two different cell types: epithelial and myoepithelial cells. Myoepithelial localised tumours were 5 benign (35.5%) and 21 malignant (63.6%), while epithelial localised tumours were 12 cases, all malignant (36.5%). Unlike conventional belief, semi-quantitative evaluation of IHC intensity scores of C219 expression in malignant MGT was related with favourable histopathological parameters. PMID:22554937

  17. Effect of in vivo activation of natural killer (NK) cells by a tilorone analogue on the survival of mice injected intravenously with different experimental murine tumours

    PubMed Central

    ALGARRA, I.; GONZÁLEZ, A.; PÉREZ, M.; GAFORIO, J J; GARRIDO, F.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the effect of a tilorone analogue (RMI 10,874DA) and anti-asialo GM1 serum on the survival of BALB/c and C57B1/6 mice after i.v. injections of different syngeneic murine tumour cells. Tumour lines used were different clones from chemically (GR9 wild type, GR9.B9, B7.1.B4, B7.1.B5, B7.2.38), and ultraviolet light (GRUV3)-induced sarcomas; B16 melanoma and LSTRA and YC8 lymphomas. Pretreatment of mice with tilorone inhibited metastatic colonization and increased survival significantly in all cases. In some tumour systems, the effect was attenuated when high numbers of cells were injected. Abrogation of NK cells with anti-asialo GM1 serum significantly decreased (in all tumours and at different cell doses) survival in comparison with untreated mice injected with tumours, regardless of cell dose used. These results clearly suggest that NK cell activation in vivo by the tilorone analogue we tested prolongs survival and inhibits metastasis formation in mice, even when pretreatment consists of a single dose of the analogue. PMID:8608652

  18. Interferon regulatory factor-8 modulates the development of tumour-induced CD11b+Gr-1+ myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Trina J; Greeneltch, Kristy M; Reid, Julia E; Liewehr, David J; Steinberg, Seth M; Liu, Kebin; Abrams, Scott I

    2009-09-01

    Tumour-induced myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) promote immune suppression and mediate tumour progression. However, the molecular basis for the generation of MDSC, which in mice co-express the CD11b(+) and Gr-1(+) cell surface markers remains unclear. Because CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells expand during progressive tumour growth, this suggests that tumour-induced events alter signalling pathways that affect normal myeloid cell development. Interferon regulatory factor-8 (IRF-8), a member of the IFN-gamma regulatory factor family, is essential for normal myelopoiesis. We therefore examined whether IRF-8 modulated tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cell development or accumulation using both implantable (4T1) and transgenic (MMTV-PyMT) mouse models of mammary tumour growth. In the 4T1 model, both splenic and bone marrow-derived CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells of tumour-bearing mice displayed a marked reduction in IRF-8 expression compared to control populations. A causal link between IRF-8 expression and the emergence of tumour-induced CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells was explored in vivo using a double transgenic (dTg) mouse model designed to express transgenes for both IRF-8 and mammary carcinoma development. Despite the fact that tumour growth was unaffected, splenomegaly, as well as the frequencies and absolute numbers of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells were significantly lower in dTg mice when compared with single transgenic tumour-bearing mice. Overall, these data reveal that IRF-8 plays an important role in tumour-induced development and/or accumulation of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells, and establishes a molecular basis for the potential manipulation of these myeloid populations for cancer therapy. PMID:20196788

  19. Measurement of cell kinetics in human tumours in vivo using bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, G. D.; McNally, N. J.; Dische, S.; Saunders, M. I.; Des Rochers, C.; Lewis, A. A.; Bennett, M. H.

    1988-01-01

    The proliferative potential of human solid tumours, in vivo, was investigated using bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation and flow cytometry (FCM). Patients with solid tumours from a variety of sites were injected with 500 mg BrdUrd, intravenously, several hours prior to biopsy or surgical excision. The labelling index (LI), duration of S-phase (Ts) and thus the potential doubling time (Tpot) could be measured within 24 h of sampling. The results show that both the LI and Ts vary greatly between tumours (Ts ranges from 5.8 to 30.7 h). However, within this study of 26 evaluable patients, tumours of the same tissue origin tended to have similar Ts values. Melanomas had the shortest Ts (8.8 h), nine patients with head and neck cancer had Ts values ranging from 5.8 to 18.8 h (median 12.5 h). The longest Ts values (24 h) were found in lung and rectum. The estimates of Tpot ranged from only 3.2 days in an oat cell carcinoma to 23.2 days in a lymphoma. The striking feature of the study was that 38% of the tumours had a potential doubling time of 5 days or less. We found no relationship between proliferation and histopathological differentiation or DNA ploidy. It should now be possible to assess the prognostic significance of pretreatment cell kinetic measurements which may, in the future, aid in the selection of treatment schedules for the individual patient. PMID:3207597

  20. A surface acoustic wave biosensor for interrogation of single tumour cells in microcavities.

    PubMed

    Senveli, Sukru U; Ao, Zheng; Rawal, Siddarth; Datar, Ram H; Cote, Richard J; Tigli, Onur

    2016-01-01

    In this study, biological cells are sensed and characterized with surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices utilising microcavities. After tumour cells in media are transported to and trapped in microcavities, the proposed platform uses SAW interaction between the substrate and the cells to extract their mechanical stiffness based on the ultrasound velocity. Finite element method (FEM) analysis and experimental results show that output phase information is an indicator of the stiffness modulus of the trapped cells. Small populations of various types of cells such as MCF7, MDA-MB-231, SKBR3, and JJ012 were characterized and characteristic moduli were estimated for each cell population. Results show that high frequency stiffness modulus is a possible biomarker for aggressiveness of the tumour and that microcavity coupled SAW devices are a good candidate for non-invasive interrogation of single cells.

  1. Increased serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in beta thalassaemia: effect of bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Meliconi, R; Uguccioni, M; Lalli, E; Nesci, S; Delfini, C; Paradisi, O; Lucarelli, G; Gasbarrini, G; Facchini, A

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: Serum concentrations of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) were determined in beta thalassemic patients before and after bone marrow transplantation (BMT) to evaluate whether changes in TNF concentrations after BMT were related to immune mediated complications. METHODS: Serum TNF concentrations were determined by enzyme linked immunoassay (EIA) in paired samples from 71 patients with beta thalassemia before and after BMT. Serial samples from 13 patients were also studied for up to six months after BMT. Forty one normal healthy children matched for sex and age were studied as controls. RESULTS: beta thalassemic patients had high serum TNF concentrations before transplantation compared with controls. These were not related to sex, age, duration of disease, number of blood transfusions, transferrin concentrations or splenectomy. DQw1 positive patients showed significantly lower TNF concentrations than non-DQw1 cases. Patients with severe liver fibrosis had significantly higher TNF concentrations. No correlation was found between TNF values and BMT outcome before transplantation but TNF alpha values fell significantly after BMT. The decrease persisted only in patients with successful engraftment. In serial samples studied for up to six months after BMT, TNF values decreased but in four out of five patients with graft rejection and in all five with acute graft versus host disease (GVHD) sharp increases occurred at the time of clinical symptoms. No correlation was found between the degree of GVHD and serum TNF-alpha concentrations nor between TNF-alpha concentrations after BMT and the presence of bacterial, viral, and fungal infections. CONCLUSIONS: About 50% of beta thalassemic patients have increased serum TNF, and the changes after BMT are related to the occurrence of immune mediate complications. The persistence of low TNF concentrations after successful engraftment may be due to the preparative regimen and the lack of adverse immune reactions. PMID:1740519

  2. Extracellular matrix glycoproteins and diffusion barriers in human astrocytic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zámecník, J; Vargová, L; Homola, A; Kodet, R; Syková, E

    2004-08-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) and changes in the size and geometry of the extracellular space (ECS) in tumour tissue are thought to be of critical importance in influencing the migratory abilities of tumour cells as well as the delivery of therapeutic agents into the tumour. In 21 astrocytic neoplasms, the ECM composition was investigated in situ by the immunohistochemical detection of ECM glycoproteins (tenascin, laminin, vitronectin, fibronectin, collagen types I-VI). To explain the changes in ECS size and to detect barriers to diffusion in the tumour tissue, the ECM composition, the cellularity, the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive tumour cell processes and the proliferative activity of the tumours were compared with the size and geometry of the ECS. The ECS volume fraction and the complex of hindrances to diffusion in the ECS (i.e. the tortuosity) were revealed by the real-time iontophoretic tetramethylammonium method. Increased proliferative activity of the tumours correlated with increased ECS volume fraction and tortuosity. The tortuosity of the tumour tissue was not significantly influenced by tumour cell density. Higher tortuosity was found in low-grade astrocytomas associated with the presence of a dense net of GFAP-positive fibrillary processes of the tumour cells. The increase in tortuosity in high-grade tumours correlated with an increased accumulation of ECM molecules, particularly of tenascin. We conclude that the increased malignancy of astrocytic tumours correlates with increases in both ECS volume and ECM deposition.

  3. Neonatal tumours.

    PubMed

    Moore, S W

    2013-12-01

    Neonatal or perinatal tumours frequently relate to prenatal or developmental events and have a short exposure window which provides an opportunity to study tumours in a selective sensitive period of development. As a result, they display a number of host-specific features which include occasional spontaneous maturational changes with cells still responding to developmental influences. Neonatal tumours (NNT) are studied for a number of important reasons. Firstly, many of the benign tumours arising from soft tissue appear to result from disturbances in growth and development and some are associated with other congenital anomalies. Study of these aspects may open the door for investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes in genes controlling foetal development as well as environmental and drug effects during pregnancy. Secondly, the clinical behaviour of NNT differs from that of similar tumours occurring later in childhood. In addition, certain apparently malignant NNT can 'change course' in infancy leading to the maturation of apparently highly malignant tumours. Thirdly, NNT underline the genetic associations of most tumours but appear to differ in the effects of proto-oncogenes and other oncogenic factors. In this context, there are also connections between the foetal and neonatal period and some "adult" cancers. Fourthly, they appear to arise in a period in which minimal environmental interference has occurred, thus providing a unique potential window of opportunity to study the pathogenesis of tumour behaviour. This study will seek to review what is currently known in each of these areas of study as they apply to NNT. Further study of the provocative differences in tumour behaviour in neonates provides insights into the natural history of cancer in humans and promotes novel cancer therapies.

  4. Optimization of tumour control probability in hypoxic tumours by radiation dose redistribution: a modelling study.

    PubMed

    Søvik, Aste; Malinen, Eirik; Bruland, Øyvind S; Bentzen, Søren M; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-21

    Tumour hypoxia is a known cause of clinical resistance to radiation therapy. The purpose of this work was to model the effects on tumour control probability (TCP) of selectively boosting the dose to hypoxic regions in a tumour, while keeping the mean tumour dose constant. A tumour model with a continuous oxygen distribution, incorporating pO(2) histograms published for head and neck patients, was developed. Temporal and spatial variations in the oxygen distribution, non-uniform cell density and cell proliferation during treatment were included in the tumour modelling. Non-uniform dose prescriptions were made based on a segmentation of the tumours into four compartments. The main findings were: (1) Dose redistribution considerably improved TCP for all tumours. (2) The effect on TCP depended on the degree of reoxygenation during treatment, with a maximum relative increase in TCP for tumours with poor or no reoxygenation. (3) Acute hypoxia reduced TCP moderately, while underdosing chronic hypoxic cells gave large reductions in TCP. (4) Restricted dose redistribution still gave a substantial increase in TCP as compared to uniform dose boosts. In conclusion, redistributing dose according to tumour oxygenation status might increase TCP when the tumour response to radiotherapy is limited by chronic hypoxia. This could potentially improve treatment outcome in a subpopulation of patients who respond poorly to conventional radiotherapy. PMID:17202629

  5. Five human tumour cell lines derived from a primary squamous carcinoma of the tongue, two subsequent local recurrences and two nodal metastases.

    PubMed Central

    Easty, D. M.; Easty, G. C.; Carter, R. L.; Monaghan, P.; Pittam, M. R.; James, T.

    1981-01-01

    Five tumour cell lines have been derived from a primary squamous carcinoma of the tongue, from 2 subsequent local recurrences, and from 2 lymph-node metastases--all from the same patient. While the cell lines shared many morphological and biochemical characteristics, those derived from recurrences and metastases appeared to be less differentiated, were less well organized in culture, and displayed fewer desmosomes and tonofilaments than cells in the primary tumour line. A recurrent line showing greatest morphological divergence from the primary tumour line also demonstrated the greatest differences at the ultrastructural level, in increased production of plasminogen activator and in the composition of cell-surface glycoproteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7284233

  6. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  7. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  8. Interdependent IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T-cell controls tumour eradication by combined α-CTLA-4+α-PD-1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Fu, Tihui; Guan, Baoxiang; Chen, Jianfeng; Blando, Jorge M.; Allison, James P.; Xiong, Liangwen; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 has shown significant clinical responses in different types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, combining detailed analysis of human tumour samples with preclinical tumour models, we report that concomitant blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 improves anti-tumour immune responses and synergistically eradicates tumour. Mechanistically, combination therapy relies on the interdependence between IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T cells, as lack of either pathway abrogates the immune-boosting and therapeutic effects of combination therapy. Combination treatment increases IL-7Rα expression on tumour-infiltrating T cells in an IFN-γ/IFN-γR signalling-dependent manner, which may serve as a potential biomarker for clinical trials with immune checkpoint blockade. Our data suggest that combining immune checkpoint blockade with IL-7 signalling could be an effective modality to improve immunotherapeutic efficacy. Taken together, we conclude that combination therapy potently reverses immunosuppression and eradicates tumours via an intricate interplay between IFN-γ/IFN-γR and IL-7/IL-7R pathways. PMID:27498556

  9. Interdependent IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T-cell controls tumour eradication by combined α-CTLA-4+α-PD-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Fu, Tihui; Guan, Baoxiang; Chen, Jianfeng; Blando, Jorge M; Allison, James P; Xiong, Liangwen; Subudhi, Sumit K; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 has shown significant clinical responses in different types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, combining detailed analysis of human tumour samples with preclinical tumour models, we report that concomitant blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 improves anti-tumour immune responses and synergistically eradicates tumour. Mechanistically, combination therapy relies on the interdependence between IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T cells, as lack of either pathway abrogates the immune-boosting and therapeutic effects of combination therapy. Combination treatment increases IL-7Rα expression on tumour-infiltrating T cells in an IFN-γ/IFN-γR signalling-dependent manner, which may serve as a potential biomarker for clinical trials with immune checkpoint blockade. Our data suggest that combining immune checkpoint blockade with IL-7 signalling could be an effective modality to improve immunotherapeutic efficacy. Taken together, we conclude that combination therapy potently reverses immunosuppression and eradicates tumours via an intricate interplay between IFN-γ/IFN-γR and IL-7/IL-7R pathways. PMID:27498556

  10. Suspension survival mediated by PP2A-STAT3-Col XVII determines tumour initiation and metastasis in cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Shih-Pei; Hsu, Han-Shui; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lin, Chiu-Hua; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Hung, Mien-Chie; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Targeting tumour-initiating cells (TICs) would lead to new therapies to cure cancer. We previously demonstrated that TICs have the capacity to survive under suspension conditions, while other cells undergo anoikis. Here we show that TICs exhibit increased phosphorylation levels of S727STAT3 because of PP2A inactivation. Collagen 17 gene expression is upregulated in a STAT3-dependent manner, which also stabilizes laminin 5 and engages cells to form hemidesmosome-like junctions in response. Blocking the PP2A-S727STAT3-collagen 17 pathway inhibits the suspension survival of TICs and their ability to form tumours in mice, while activation of the same pathway increases the suspension survival and tumour-initiation capacities of bulk cancer cells. The S727STAT3 phosphorylation levels correlate with collagen 17 expression in colon tumour samples, and correlate inversely with survival. Finally, this signalling axis enhances the ability of TIC to form tumours in mouse models of malignant lung cancer pleural effusion and spontaneous colon cancer metastasis. PMID:27306323

  11. Suspension survival mediated by PP2A-STAT3-Col XVII determines tumour initiation and metastasis in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Shih-Pei; Hsu, Han-Shui; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lin, Chiu-Hua; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Hung, Mien-Chie; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-06-16

    Targeting tumour-initiating cells (TICs) would lead to new therapies to cure cancer. We previously demonstrated that TICs have the capacity to survive under suspension conditions, while other cells undergo anoikis. Here we show that TICs exhibit increased phosphorylation levels of S727STAT3 because of PP2A inactivation. Collagen 17 gene expression is upregulated in a STAT3-dependent manner, which also stabilizes laminin 5 and engages cells to form hemidesmosome-like junctions in response. Blocking the PP2A-S727STAT3-collagen 17 pathway inhibits the suspension survival of TICs and their ability to form tumours in mice, while activation of the same pathway increases the suspension survival and tumour-initiation capacities of bulk cancer cells. The S727STAT3 phosphorylation levels correlate with collagen 17 expression in colon tumour samples, and correlate inversely with survival. Finally, this signalling axis enhances the ability of TIC to form tumours in mouse models of malignant lung cancer pleural effusion and spontaneous colon cancer metastasis.

  12. Suspension survival mediated by PP2A-STAT3-Col XVII determines tumour initiation and metastasis in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Shih-Pei; Hsu, Han-Shui; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lin, Chiu-Hua; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Hung, Mien-Chie; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Targeting tumour-initiating cells (TICs) would lead to new therapies to cure cancer. We previously demonstrated that TICs have the capacity to survive under suspension conditions, while other cells undergo anoikis. Here we show that TICs exhibit increased phosphorylation levels of S727STAT3 because of PP2A inactivation. Collagen 17 gene expression is upregulated in a STAT3-dependent manner, which also stabilizes laminin 5 and engages cells to form hemidesmosome-like junctions in response. Blocking the PP2A-S727STAT3-collagen 17 pathway inhibits the suspension survival of TICs and their ability to form tumours in mice, while activation of the same pathway increases the suspension survival and tumour-initiation capacities of bulk cancer cells. The S727STAT3 phosphorylation levels correlate with collagen 17 expression in colon tumour samples, and correlate inversely with survival. Finally, this signalling axis enhances the ability of TIC to form tumours in mouse models of malignant lung cancer pleural effusion and spontaneous colon cancer metastasis. PMID:27306323

  13. Interleukin-15 is able to suppress the increased DNA fragmentation associated with muscle wasting in tumour-bearing rats.

    PubMed

    Figueras, Maite; Busquets, Sílvia; Carbó, Neus; Barreiro, Esther; Almendro, Vanessa; Argilés, Josep M; López-Soriano, Francisco J

    2004-07-01

    Administration of interleukin-15 (IL-15) to rats bearing the Yoshida AH-130 ascites hepatoma (a tumour that induces an important cachectic response) resulted in a significant reduction of muscle wasting, both measured as muscle weight and as protein content of different types of skeletal muscle. In addition, the administration of the cytokine completely reversed the increased DNA fragmentation observed in skeletal muscle of tumour-bearing animals. Concerning the mechanism(s) involved in the anti-apoptotic effects of IL-15 on skeletal muscle, the administration of the cytokine resulted in a considerable decrease in both R1 (43%) and R2 (64%) TNF-alpha receptors (TNFRs), and therefore it may be suggested that IL-15 decreases apoptosis by affecting TNF-alpha signalling. Formation of NO could be the signalling event associated with the activation of apoptosis in muscle of tumour-bearing rats; indeed, administration of IL-15 decreased the inducible nitric oxide synthase protein levels by 73%, suggesting that NO formation and muscle apoptosis during tumour growth are related. In conclusion, IL-15 seems to be able to reduce/suppress protein loss and apoptosis related to muscle wasting during cancer cachexia in experimental animals.

  14. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events. PMID:26787230

  15. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaid, Harold N.; Muir, Mark F.; Taggart, Laura E.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T.; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M.; Hirst, David G.; Botchway, Stanley W.; Currell, Fred J.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  16. Distinct H2O2 concentration promotes proliferation of tumour cells after transient oxygen/glucose deprivation.

    PubMed

    Schild, Lorenz; Makarow, Petr; Haroon, Fahad; Krautwald, Karla; Keilhoff, Gerburg

    2008-03-01

    A solid tumour undergoes ischemia/reperfusion due to deficient vascularization and subsequent formation of new blood vessels. This study investigated the effect of transient oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) on proliferation of C6 glioma cells. The cells were subjected to 18 h of OGD followed by reoxygenation in the presence of glucose and different extra-cellular H(2)O(2) concentrations since H(2)O(2) affects cell proliferation. After reoxygenation, the cellular H(2)O(2) concentration was increased returning to control levels within 24 h. Within this period, increase in cell number and MTT-reduction were impaired. Regeneration was completed on the third day of reoxygenation. MTT-reduction increased faster than cell number, indicating an OGD-dependent up-regulation of protein expression. It is concluded that ischemia/reperfusion stress promotes proliferation of tumour cells. An essential factor is a distinct H(2)O(2) concentration. Massive elevation as well as significant reduction of H(2)O(2) concentration impairs the proliferation process. PMID:18344118

  17. Denosumab and giant cell tumour of bone—a review and future management considerations

    PubMed Central

    Xu, S.F.; Adams, B.; Yu, X.C.; Xu, M.

    2013-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (gctb) is one type of giant-cell-rich bone lesion characterized by the presence of numerous multinucleated osteoclast-type giant cells. Giant cells are known to express rankl (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand) and are responsible for the aggressive osteolytic nature of the tumour. No available treatment option is definitively effective in curing this disease, especially in surgically unsalvageable cases. In recent years, several studies of denosumab in patients with advanced or unresectable gctb have shown objective changes in tumour composition, reduced bony destruction, and clinical benefit. Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that targets and binds with high affinity and specificity to rankl. Several large phase iii studies have shown that denosumab is more effective than bisphosphonates in reducing skeletal morbidity arising from a wide range of tumours and that it can delay bone metastasis. The relevant articles are reviewed here. The controversies related to the future use of denosumab in the treatment of gctb are discussed. PMID:24155640

  18. The cancer process as a type of immunocomplex hypersensibility involving C3b, natural killer cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity: proposals for tumour immunotherapy and vaccine.

    PubMed

    Manzo, G

    1998-05-01

    I have previously assumed that stem tumour cells are 'para-embryonal cells' (PECs) poor or missing in major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens. PECs might induce adjoining differentiated hyperplastic cells to also express tumoral phenotype and properties, thus transforming them into 'differentiated para-embryonal cells' (DPECs), MHC-endowed. In such a way, PECs, MHC-lacking, would be automatically surrounded by DPECs, MHC-endowed: this tumour organization was experimentally found by Cordon-Cardo et al in a variety of cancers. Now, I suggest that such a tumour histology might preferentially induce an anti-DPEC T cell immune response which, sparing PECs, might release increasing amounts of DPEC antigens in the peritumour site. DPEC antigens might increase synthesis of specific antibodies and subsequent immunocomplex formation at the peritumour site. Here, abundant immunocomplexes might react through their Fc pieces with CD16 receptors of antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC)-endowed immune cells (natural killer (NK) cells, macrophages, polymorphonuclear cells). These cells would thus be stimulated to secrete their lytic factors before and without their coming into contact with target tumour cells. On the other hand, abundant immunocomplexes at the peritumour site might massively activate the complement system, thus generating large amounts of C3b. C3b might react with CD11b receptors of NK cells, stimulating them to also secrete their lytic factors in an ectopic way at the peritumour site, thus impairing NK cytotoxicity. In such a way, in the absence of ADCC and NK cytotoxicity, a tumour cell enhancement might easily occur. In the light of these ideas, a strategy for antitumour immunotherapy and vaccine is then proposed. PMID:9681920

  19. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge. PMID:26106496

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma of kidney co-existing with renal calculi: a rare tumour.

    PubMed

    Verma, Nidhi; Yadav, Gulabdhar; Dhawan, Nishi; Kumar, Awanish

    2011-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of urinary tract is a very rare tumour known to be associated with chronic renal calculi and infection. This tumour is highly aggressive and often detected at advanced stage with poor outcome. The authors describe a case report of a 62-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with right nephrolithiasis with non-functioning kidney. Histopathology revealed an unexpected co-existing SCC in renal pelvis. The present case highlights the careful search and use of newer imaging modalities in cases of long-standing renal calculi as they may have co-existing hidden malignancy which may change the treatment plan and prognosis.

  1. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour of Distal Radius and Sacrum with Pulmonary Metastases.

    PubMed

    Tandra, Varun Sharma; Kotha, Krishna Mohan Reddy; Satyanarayana, Moorthy Gadisetti Venkata; Vadlamani, Kali Varaprasad; Yerravalli, Vyjayanthi

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) is an uncommon primary bone tumour, and its multicentric presentation is exceedingly rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old female who presented to us with GCT of left distal radius. On the skeletal survey, osteolytic lesion was noted in her right sacral ala. Biopsy confirmed both lesions as GCT. Pulmonary metastasis was also present. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for distal radius and thorough curettage and bone grafting of the sacral lesion were done. Multicentric GCT involving distal radius and sacrum with primary sacral involvement is not reported so far to our knowledge. PMID:26106496

  2. Carpal tunnel syndrome caused by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Meek, Marcel F; Sheikh, Zahid A; Quinton, David N

    2014-02-01

    A 76-year-old woman developed right carpal tunnel syndrome after being conservatively treated for tenosynovitis of the flexor tendons with associated mild carpal tunnel syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a tumour in the carpal tunnel. Re-exploration showed that the median nerve was being compressed by a giant cell tumour of the flexor tendon sheaths. Appropriate imaging is advised in patients with additional findings (such as swelling) or in patients with secondary carpal tunnel syndrome and incomplete response to conservative treatment, to exclude a space-occupying lesion.

  3. Whole exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C.; Houlston, Richard S; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2014-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole exome sequencing of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the mutational profile of TGCT. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per megabase [Mb]) as compared to the common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT. PMID:25609015

  4. Whole-exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C; Houlston, Richard S; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the cancer's mutational profile. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per Mb) as compared with common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT, we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4 Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT.

  5. Intralymphatic mRNA vaccine induces CD8 T-cell responses that inhibit the growth of mucosally located tumours

    PubMed Central

    Bialkowski, Lukasz; van Weijnen, Alexia; Van der Jeught, Kevin; Renmans, Dries; Daszkiewicz, Lidia; Heirman, Carlo; Stangé, Geert; Breckpot, Karine; Aerts, Joeri L.; Thielemans, Kris

    2016-01-01

    The lack of appropriate mouse models is likely one of the reasons of a limited translational success rate of therapeutic vaccines against cervical cancer, as rapidly growing ectopic tumours are commonly used for preclinical studies. In this work, we demonstrate that the tumour microenvironment of TC-1 tumours differs significantly depending on the anatomical location of tumour lesions (i.e. subcutaneously, in the lungs and in the genital tract). Our data demonstrate that E7-TriMix mRNA vaccine-induced CD8+ T lymphocytes migrate into the tumour nest and control tumour growth, although they do not express mucosa-associated markers such as CD103 or CD49a. We additionally show that despite the presence of the antigen-specific T cells in the tumour lesions, the therapeutic outcomes in the genital tract model remain limited. Here, we report that such a hostile tumour microenvironment can be reversed by cisplatin treatment, leading to a complete regression of clinically relevant tumours when combined with mRNA immunization. We thereby demonstrate the necessity of utilizing clinically relevant models for preclinical evaluation of anticancer therapies and the importance of a simultaneous combination of anticancer immune response induction with targeting of tumour environment. PMID:26931556

  6. Sertoliform cystadenoma: a rare benign tumour of the rete testis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Sertoliform cystadenoma of the rete testis represents an uncommon benign tumour. They appear in patients from 26 to 62 years of age. We describe a case of a 66-year-old man with a tumour in the area of the epididymal head. The tumour markers were not increased. Under the assumption of a malignant testicular tumour an inguinal orchiectomy was performed. The cut surface of this tumour was of grey/white color and showed small cysts. The tumour consisted of two compartments. The epithelial like tumour cells showed a sertoliform growth pattern and cystic dilatations. In between the tumour cells repeatedly actin expressing sclerotic areas could be recognized as the second tumour component. Proliferative activity was not increased. Immunohistochemically the tumour cells were positiv for inhibin, S-100, and CD 99. Alpha feto protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (ß-HCG) and placental alkaline phosphatase (PLAP) as well as synaptophysin, epithelial membrane antigene (EMA), and BCL-2 were not expressed. As far as we know this is the sixth reported case of this tumour. Because of the benign nature of this tumour the correct diagnosis is important for the intra- and postoperative management. Here we present a case of this rare tumour and discuss potential differential diagnosis. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1956026143857335 PMID:23406299

  7. Cyclopedic protein expression analysis of cultured canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cells from six tumours.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, T; Watanabe, M; Ohashi, E; Uyama, R; Takauji, S; Mochizuki, M; Nishimura, R; Ogawa, H; Sugano, S; Sasaki, N

    2006-06-01

    We characterised cultured canine mammary gland adenocarcinoma cells by exhaustive step protein expression analysis to identify factors associated with tumour progression or metastasis of canine mammary gland tumour. Cultured adenocarcinoma cells derived from a total of 3 primary and 3 metastatic lesions from 3 dogs (CHMp/m, CIPp/m and CNMp/m, where CHM, CIP, and CNM indicate the 3 animals) were used in this study. The expression of 24 proteins reported to be related to tumourigenesis or malignancy of human breast cancers were examined by Western blot analysis using 24 antibodies. The expression of sialyl Lewis X [sLe(x)] was only observed in CHMm cells, which were derived from pleural effusion. This expression was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. The levels of some factors, such as 14-3-3sigma, cyclinD1 and Rb, differed among cells or between the primary and metastatic cells in the pair. Though the difference in their expression was not consistent within the cells from primary and metastatic origin, this characterisation should provide useful information for further molecular analysis of these cultured cells. Since some of the factors, such as sLe(x), 14-3-3sigma, cyclinD1 and Rb, showed different levels of expression in the pair, these cultured cells might be meaningful tools for clarification of distant metastasis in canine mammary gland tumours.

  8. A pilot study to explore circulating tumour cells in pancreatic cancer as a novel biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, L; Backen, A; Sloane, R; Menasce, L; Ryder, D; Krebs, M; Board, R; Clack, G; Hughes, A; Blackhall, F; Valle, J W; Dive, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obtaining tissue for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis and biomarker assessment to aid drug development is challenging. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) may represent a potential biomarker to address these unmet needs. We compared prospectively the utility of two platforms for CTC enumeration and characterisation in pancreatic cancer patients in a pilot exploratory study. Patients and methods: Blood samples were obtained prospectively from 54 consenting patients and analysed by CellSearch and isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET). CellSearch exploits immunomagnetic capture of CTCs-expressing epithelial markers, whereas ISET is a marker independent, blood filtration device. Circulating tumour cell expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was assessed to explore any discrepancy in CTC number between the two platforms. Results: ISET detected CTCs in more patients than CellSearch (93% vs 40%) and in higher numbers (median CTCs/7.5 ml, 9 (range 0–240) vs 0 (range 0–144)). Heterogeneity observed for epithelial cell adhesion molecule, pan-cytokeratin (CK), E-Cadherin, Vimentin and CK 7 expression in CTCs may account for discrepancy in CTC number between platforms. Conclusion: ISET detects more CTCs than CellSearch and offers flexible CTC characterisation with potential to investigate CTC biology and develop biomarkers for pancreatic cancer patient management. PMID:22187035

  9. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  10. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-07-28

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy.

  11. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  12. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  13. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature. PMID:26564735

  14. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  15. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K.; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  16. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Popova, N A; Nikolin, V P; Kaledin, V I; Kirpichnikov, A V; Pestryakov, Efim V

    2012-06-30

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  17. Manipulation of regulatory T cells and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G

    2015-01-01

    The most potent killing machinery in our immune system is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Since the possibility for self-destruction by these cells is high, many regulatory activities exist to prevent autoimmune destruction by these cells. A tumour (cancer) grows from the cells of the body and is tolerated by the body's immune system. Yet, it has been possible to generate tumour-associated antigen (TAA) -specific CTL that are also self-antigen specific in vivo, to achieve a degree of therapeutic efficacy. Tumour-associated antigen-specific T-cell tolerance through pathways of self-tolerance generation represents a significant challenge to successful immunotherapy. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells, referred to as T regulatory (Treg) cells, are selected in the thymus as controllers of the anti-self repertoire. These cells are referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. According to the new consensus (Nature Immunology 2013; 14:307–308) these cells are to be termed as (tTreg). There is another class of CD4+ Treg cells also involved in regulatory function in the periphery, also phenotypically CD4+ CD25±, classified as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. These cells are to be termed as peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. In vitro-induced Treg cells with suppressor function should be termed as iTreg. These different Treg cells differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. The current challenges are to determine the degree of specificity of these Treg cells in recognizing the same TAA as the CTL population and to circumvent their regulatory constraints so as to achieve robust CTL responses against cancer. PMID:25243729

  18. New evidence for the origin of intracranial germ cell tumours from primordial germ cells: expression of pluripotency and cell differentiation markers.

    PubMed

    Hoei-Hansen, C E; Sehested, A; Juhler, M; Lau, Y-F C; Skakkebaek, N E; Laursen, H; Rajpert-de Meyts, E

    2006-05-01

    Primary intracranial germ cell tumours are rare neoplasms that occur in children and adolescents. This study examined both the biology and the origin of these tumours, as it has been hypothesized that they originate from a totipotent primordial germ cell. We applied recent knowledge from gonadal germ cell tumours and analysed expression of a wide panel of stem cell-related proteins (C-KIT, OCT-3/4 (POU5F1), AP-2gamma (TFAP2C), and NANOG) and developmentally regulated germ cell-specific proteins (including MAGE-A4, NY-ESO-1, and TSPY). Expression at the protein level was analysed in 21 children and young adults with intracranial germinomas and non-germinomas, contributing to a careful description of these unusual tumours and adding to the understanding of pathogenesis. Stem cell related proteins were highly expressed in intracranial germ cell tumours, and many similarities were detected with their gonadal equivalents, including a close similarity with primordial germ cells. A notable difference was the sex-specific expression of TSPY, a gene previously implicated in the origin of gonadoblastoma. TSPY was only detected in germ cell tumours in the central nervous system (CNS) from males, suggesting that it is not required for the initiation of malignant germ cell transformation. The expression of genes associated with embryonic stem cell pluripotency in CNS germ cell tumours strongly suggests that these tumours are derived from cells that retain, at least partially, an embryonic stem cell-like phenotype, which is a hallmark of primordial germ cells. PMID:16456896

  19. The significance of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Castle, J; Shaker, H; Morris, K; Tugwood, J D; Kirwan, C C

    2014-10-01

    Haematogenous spread of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) is the principle mechanism for development of metastases. Research into the enumeration and characterisation of CTCs, particularly in the last decade, has allowed the introduction of semi-automated CTC assessment in the clinical setting. In breast cancer, CTC enumeration is being used as a prognostic biomarker, a predictive biomarker of treatment response and is being assessed to guide treatment in both the early and metastatic setting. CTC characterisation has the potential to direct targeted therapies, such as HER2 therapies in HER2 negative primary breast tumour patients. However, CTC assessment has considerable challenges. Capture and identification of these very rare cells is currently largely dependent on a presumed homogeneity of phenotype. In addition, high throughput assays are lacking. The clinical significance of CTCs is incompletely understood. A large proportion of CTC positive patients have no evidence of metastases, raising the issue of either inconsequential tumour dormancy or non-viable CTCs. CTCs may have additional clinical sequelae such as promoting venous thrombosis. However CTCs provide a real-time liquid biopsy of the tumour and represent an exciting, minimally invasive method of assessing disease status and also a novel therapeutic target for malignancy.

  20. The effect of PLC-γ2 inhibitors on the growth of human tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linda; Reynisdóttir, Inga; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2012-08-01

    The phosphoinositide specific-phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ1 and 2) enzymes are plausible anticancer targets implicated in cell motility important to invasion and dissemination of tumour cells. A host of known PLC-γ2 inhibitors were tested against the NCI60 panel of human tumour cell lines as well as their commercially available structural derivatives. A class of thieno[2,3-b]pyridines showed excellent growth arrest with derivative 3 giving GI(50) = 58 nM for the melanoma MDA-MB-435 cell line. The PLC-γ2 is uniquely expressed in haematopoietic cells and the leukaemia tumour cell lines were growth restricted on average GI(50) = 275 nM by derivative 3 indicating a specific interaction with this isoform. Furthermore, a moderate growth inhibition was found for compound classes of indoles and 1H-pyrazoles. It is likely that the active compounds do not only inhibit the PLC-γ2 isoform but other PLCs as well due to their conserved binding site. The compounds tested were identified by applying the tools of chemoinformatics, which supports the use of in silico methods in drug design.

  1. On-chip integrated labelling, transport and detection of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jane; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Haswell, Stephen J; Greenman, John

    2011-11-01

    Microflow cytometry represents a promising tool for the investigation of diagnostic and prognostic cellular cancer markers, particularly if integrated within a device that allows primary cells to be freshly isolated from the solid tumour biopsies that more accurately reflect patient-specific in vivo tissue microenvironments at the time of staining. However, current tissue processing techniques involve several sequential stages with concomitant cell losses, and as such are inappropriate for use with small biopsies. Accordingly, we present a simple method for combined antibody-labelling and dissociation of heterogeneous cells from a tumour mass, which reduces the number of processing steps. Perfusion of ex vivo tissue at 4°C with antibodies and enzymes slows cellular activity while allowing sufficient time for the diffusion of minimally active enzymes. In situ antibody-labelled cells are then dissociated at 37°C from the tumour mass, whereupon hydrogel-filled channels allow the release of relatively low cell numbers (<1000) into a biomimetic microenvironment. This novel approach to sample processing is then further integrated with hydrogel-based electrokinetic transport of the freshly liberated fluorescent cells for downstream detection. It is anticipated that this integrated microfluidic methodology will have wide-ranging biomedical and clinical applications.

  2. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs.

  3. The effect of calcium ions on the glycolytic activity of Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Bygrave, F. L.

    1966-01-01

    1. Added Ca2+ inhibited lactate formation from sugar phosphates by intact Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells. Lactate formation from glucose by these cells was unaffected by added Ca2+. 2. The Ca2+ inhibition of lactate formation by intact cells occurred in the extracellular medium. 3. Intact ascites-tumour cells did not take up Ca2+ in vitro. 4. Glycolysis of sugar phosphates by cell extracts as well as pyruvate formation from 3-phosphoglycerate and phosphoenolpyruvate was inhibited by Ca2+. 5. It was concluded that Ca2+ inhibited the pyruvate-kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) reaction. Further, Ca2+ inhibition of pyruvate kinase could be correlated with the overall inhibition of glycolysis. 6. Concentrations of Ca2+ usually present in Krebs–Ringer buffers, inhibited glycolysis and pyruvate-kinase activity by approx. 50%. 7. The inhibition of glycolysis by added Ca2+ could be partially reversed by K+ and completely reversed by Mg2+ or by stoicheiometric amounts of EDTA. 8. The hypothesis is advanced that the inability of tumour cells to take up Ca2+ is a factor contributing towards their high rate of glycolysis. PMID:6007855

  4. Minimal residual disease in breast cancer: an overview of circulating and disseminated tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tachtsidis, A; McInnes, L M; Jacobsen, N; Thompson, E W; Saunders, C M

    2016-08-01

    Within the field of cancer research, focus on the study of minimal residual disease (MRD) in the context of carcinoma has grown exponentially over the past several years. MRD encompasses circulating tumour cells (CTCs)-cancer cells on the move via the circulatory or lymphatic system, disseminated tumour cells (DTCs)-cancer cells which have escaped into a distant site (most studies have focused on bone marrow), and resistant cancer cells surviving therapy-be they local or distant, all of which may ultimately give rise to local relapse or overt metastasis. Initial studies simply recorded the presence and number of CTCs and DTCs; however recent advances are allowing assessment of the relationship between their persistence, patient prognosis and the biological properties of MRD, leading to a better understanding of the metastatic process. Technological developments for the isolation and analysis of circulating and disseminated tumour cells continue to emerge, creating new opportunities to monitor disease progression and perhaps alter disease outcome. This review outlines our knowledge to date on both measurement and categorisation of MRD in the form of CTCs and DTCs with respect to how this relates to cancer outcomes, and the hurdles and future of research into both CTCs and DTCs. PMID:27189371

  5. Evolution of cell motility in an individual-based model of tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Gerlee, P.; Anderson, A.R.A.

    2009-01-01

    Tumour invasion is driven by proliferation and importantly migration into the surrounding tissue. Cancer cell motility is also critical in the formation of metastases and is therefore a fundamental issue in cancer research. In this paper we investigate the emergence of cancer cell motility in an evolving tumour population using an individual-based modelling approach. In this model of tumour growth each cell is equipped with a microenvironment response network that determines the behaviour or phenotype of the cell based on the local environment. The response network is modelled using a feed-forward neural network, which is subject to mutations when the cells divide. With this model we have investigated the impact of the micro-environment on the emergence of a motile invasive phenotype. The results show that when a motile phenotype emerges the dynamics of the model are radically changed and we observe faster growing tumours exhibiting diffuse morphologies. Further we observe that the emergence of a motile subclone can occur in a wide range of micro-environmental growth conditions. Iterated simulations showed that in identical growth conditions the evolutionary dynamics either converge to a proliferating or migratory phenotype, which suggests that the introduction of cell motility into the model changes the shape of fitness landscape on which the cancer cell population evolves and that it now contains several local maxima. This could have important implications for cancer treatments which focus on the gene level, as our results show that several distinct genotypes and critically distinct phenotypes can emerge and become dominant in the same micro-environment. PMID:19285513

  6. Tumour-initiating capacity is independent of epithelial–mesenchymal transition status in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Xie, G; Ji, A; Yuan, Q; Jin, Z; Yuan, Y; Ren, C; Guo, Z; Yao, Q; Yang, K; Lin, X; Chen, L

    2014-01-01

    Background: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer stem cells (CSCs) are considered to be crucial for cancer biology. The purpose of this study was to determine whether EMT directly led to the acquisition of tumour-initiating capacity in breast cancer cell lines. Methods: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition was induced in five breast cancer cell lines and one normal breast cell line by EMT-related cytokine stimulation. Mesenchymal–epithelial transition (MET) was induced by stably overexpressing miR-200c in three mesenchymal-like breast cancer cell lines. Molecular expression and cell function analysis were performed to evaluate the effect of EMT or MET on tumour-initiating capacity and other biological characteristics. Results: The induction of EMT did not enhance tumour-initiating capacity but, instead, conferred a CD44+/CD24−/low phenotype as well as cell proliferation, migration, and resistance to doxorubicin and radiation on breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, MET did not lead to inhibition or loss of the tumour-initiating capacity in mesenchymal-like breast cancer cell lines, but it markedly attenuated other malignant properties, including proliferation, invasion, and resistance to therapy. Conclusions: Epithelial–mesenchymal transition does not alter tumour-initiating capacity of breast cancer cells but some other biological characteristics. Therefore, EMT and tumour-initiating capacity may not be directly linked in breast cancer cell lines. PMID:24755887

  7. LRIG1 is a triple threat: ERBB negative regulator, intestinal stem cell marker and tumour suppressor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Poulin, E J; Coffey, R J

    2013-05-14

    In baseball parlance, a triple threat is a person who can run, hit and throw with aplomb. Leucine-rich repeats and immunoglobulin-like domains 1 (LRIG1) is a cell surface protein that antagonises ERBB receptor signalling by downregulating receptor levels. Over 10 years ago, Hedman et al postulated that LRIG1 might be a tumour suppressor. Recently, Powell et al provided in vivo evidence substantiating that claim by demonstrating that Lrig1 loss in mice leads to spontaneously arising, highly penetrant intestinal adenomas. Interestingly, Lrig1 also marks stem cells in the gut, suggesting a potential role for Lrig1 in maintaining intestinal epithelial homeostasis. In this review, we will discuss the ability of LRIG1 to act as a triple threat: pan-ERBB negative regulator, intestinal stem cell marker and tumour suppressor. We will summarise studies of LRIG1 expression in human cancers and discuss possible related roles for LRIG2 and LRIG3.

  8. The bi-specific CD3 x NCAM antibody: a model to preactivate T cells prior to tumour cell lysis.

    PubMed

    Jensen, M; Ernestus, K; Kemshead, J; Klehr, M; Von Bergwelt-Baildon, M S; Schinköthe, T; Schultze, J L; Berthold, F

    2003-11-01

    To target the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, CD56) on neuroblastoma by T cell-based immunotherapy we have generated a bi-specific CD3 x NCAM antibody (OE-1). This antibody can be used to redirect T cells to NCAM+ cells. Expectedly, the antibody binds specifically to NCAM+ neuroblastoma cells and CD3+ T cells. OE-1 induces T cell activation, expansion and effector function in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-derived CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. T cell activation was shown to depend on the presence of normal natural killer (NK) cells in the culture. Interestingly, while PBMC- derived T cells were activated by OE-1, NK cells were almost completely depleted, suggesting that T cells activated by OE-1 deleted the NK cells. Activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells differentiate into a larger CCR7+ central memory and a smaller CCR7- effector memory cell population. Most importantly, preactivated T cells were highly cytotoxic for neuroblastoma cells. In eight of 11 experiments tumour-directed cytotoxicity was enhanced when NK cells were present during preactivation with OE-1. These data strongly support a bi-phasic therapeutic concept of primarily stimulating T cells with the bi-specific antibody in the presence of normal NCAM+ cells to induce T cell activation, migratory capacity and finally tumour cell lysis.

  9. NPM1 Silencing Reduces Tumour Growth and MAPK Signalling in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Loubeau, Gaëlle; Boudra, Rafik; Maquaire, Sabrina; Lours-Calet, Corinne; Beaudoin, Claude; Verrelle, Pierre; Morel, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The chaperone nucleophosmin (NPM1) is over-expressed in the epithelial compartment of prostate tumours compared to adjacent healthy epithelium and may represent one of the key actors that support the neoplastic phenotype of prostate adenocarcinoma cells. Yet, the mechanisms that underlie NPM1 mediated phenotype remain elusive in the prostate. To better understand NPM1 functions in prostate cancer cells, we sought to characterize its impact on prostate cancer cells behaviour and decipher the mechanisms by which it may act. Here we show that NPM1 favors prostate tumour cell migration, invasion and colony forming. Furthermore, knockdown of NPM1 leads to a decrease in the growth of LNCaP-derived tumours grafted in Nude mice in vivo. Such oncogenic-like properties are found in conjunction with a positive regulation of NPM1 on the ERK1/2 (Extracellular signal-Regulated Kinases 1/2) kinase phosphorylation in response to EGF (Epidermal Growth Factor) stimulus, which is critical for prostate cancer progression following the setting of an autonomous production of the growth factor. NPM1 could then be a target to switch off specifically ERK1/2 pathway activation in order to decrease or inhibit cancer cell growth and migration. PMID:24796332

  10. Perivascular epithelioid cell tumour of the vagina in an 8 year old girl.

    PubMed

    Ong, Lin Yin; Hwang, Wei Sek; Wong, Adelina; Chan, Mei Yoke; Chui, Chan Hon

    2007-03-01

    Perivascular epithelioid cell tumor (PEComa) is a rare mesenchymal tumor with an unpredictable natural history. We present the first reported case of PEComa of the vagina diagnosed in an 8-year-old girl. This was initially diagnosed on biopsy as an embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and the patient underwent 3 cycles of chemotherapy according to the Mesenchymal Malignant Tumour 1989 protocol. A repeat scan, however, revealed an increase in tumor size. Total resection was achieved via a transvaginal (vertical sleeve) partial vaginectomy. The resected tumor had the typical appearance of a PEComa. Immunostains showed positive staining of tumor cells for HMB45, neuron-specific enolase, and calponin but were negative for S100 protein, melaninA, chromogranin, smooth muscle actin, desmin, caldesmon, epithelial membrane antigen, AE1/3, and synaptophysin. Six months after surgery, she remains free of tumor and is on follow-up with regular local examinations under anesthesia and computed tomography scans. Our case highlights the importance of an accurate initial diagnosis, and we stress the importance of regular surveillance over a significant period. PMID:17336201

  11. Inhibition of arachidonic acid metabolism and its implication on cell proliferation and tumour-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hyde, C A C; Missailidis, S

    2009-06-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and its metabolites have recently generated a heightened interest due to growing evidence of their significant role in cancer biology. Thus, inhibitors of the AA cascade, first and foremost COX inhibitors, which have originally been of interest in the treatment of inflammatory conditions and certain types of cardiovascular disease, are now attracting attention as an arsenal against cancer. An increasing number of investigations support their role in cancer chemoprevention, although the precise molecular mechanisms that link levels of AA, and its metabolites, with cancer progression have still to be elucidated. This article provides an overview of the AA cascade and focuses on the roles of its inhibitors and their implication in cancer treatment. In particular, emphasis is placed on the inhibition of cell proliferation and neo-angiogenesis through inhibition of the enzymes COX-2, 5-LOX and CYP450. Downstream effects of inhibition of AA metabolites are analysed and the molecular mechanisms of action of a selected number of inhibitors of catalytic pathways reviewed. Lastly, the benefits of dietary omega-3 fatty acids and their mechanisms of action leading to reduced cancer risk and impeded cancer cell growth are mentioned. Finally, a proposal is put forward, suggesting a novel and integrated approach in viewing the molecular mechanisms and complex interactions responsible for the involvement of AA metabolites in carcinogenesis and the protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids in inflammation and tumour prevention. PMID:19239926

  12. Tumour biology: Senescence in premalignant tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collado, Manuel; Gil, Jesús; Efeyan, Alejo; Guerra, Carmen; Schuhmacher, Alberto J.; Barradas, Marta; Benguría, Alberto; Zaballos, Angel; Flores, Juana M.; Barbacid, Mariano; Beach, David; Serrano, Manuel

    2005-08-01

    Oncogene-induced senescence is a cellular response that may be crucial for protection against cancer development, but its investigation has so far been restricted to cultured cells that have been manipulated to overexpress an oncogene. Here we analyse tumours initiated by an endogenous oncogene, ras, and show that senescent cells exist in premalignant tumours but not in malignant ones. Senescence is therefore a defining feature of premalignant tumours that could prove valuable in the diagnosis and prognosis of cancer.

  13. Clinical evaluation of serum tumour marker CA 242 in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Pujol, J. L.; Cooper, E. H.; Lehmann, M.; Purves, D. A.; Dan-Aouta, M.; Midander, J.; Godard, P.; Michel, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    CA 242, a novel tumour carbohydrate antigen present in serum (upper limit of normal values: 20.0 U ml-1), has been measured in a group of 102 pathologically confirmed non-small cell lung cancer patients. The aim of the present prospective study was to identify any relationship between pre-treatment serum CA 242 level and different features of lung cancer including prognosis. Serum CA 242 was measured using the delayed europium lanthanide fluoroimmunometric assay. Sensitivity and specificity were 28.5% and 95.6% respectively. Its level was significantly lower in squamous cell carcinoma in comparison with non-squamous histologies (adenocarcinoma and large cell carcinoma). The CA 242 level was higher in metastatic disease (median: 15.3 U ml-1) in comparison with non-metastatic (median: 7.9 U ml-1; Mann Whitney U test; P < 0.003), and increased significantly from stage I to stage IV. In 50 patients who underwent chemotherapy, the serum CA 242 level was higher in non-responder patients when compared with responders (median: 16.8 U ml-1 and 9.5 U ml-1 respectively; Mann Whitney; P < 0.02). Univariate analysis of the entire population showed serum CA 242 levels were not related to survival. However, patients with unresectable non-small cell lung cancer and elevated CA 242 level proved to have a significantly shorter survival than those with a CA 242 < 20 U ml-1. In Cox's model analysis, stage of the disease and performance status were the only significant determinants of survival. We conclude that a high level of serum CA 242 (1) is significantly related to the stage of disease, (2) predictive of no response to chemotherapy but seems to add weak prognostic information to stage of disease and performance status, the main prognostic determinants of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:8390291

  14. Distinct subclonal tumour responses to therapy revealed by circulating cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gremel, G.; Lee, R. J.; Girotti, M. R.; Mandal, A. K.; Valpione, S.; Garner, G.; Ayub, M.; Wood, S.; Rothwell, D. G.; Fusi, A.; Wallace, A.; Brady, G.; Dive, C.; Dhomen, N.; Lorigan, P.; Marais, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The application of precision medicine in oncology requires in-depth characterisation of a patient's tumours and the dynamics of their responses to treatment. Patients and methods We used next-generation sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) to monitor the response of a KIT p.L576P-mutant metastatic vaginal mucosal melanoma to sequential targeted, immuno- and chemotherapy. Results Despite a KIT mutation, the response to imatinib was mixed. Unfortunately, tumours were not accessible for molecular analysis. To study the mechanism underlying the mixed clinical response, we carried out whole-exome sequencing and targeted longitudinal analysis of cfDNA. This revealed two tumour subclones; one with a KIT mutation that responded to imatinib and a second KIT-wild-type subclone that did not respond to imatinib. Notably, the subclones also responded differently to immunotherapy. However, both subclones responded to carboplatin/paclitaxel, and although the KIT-wild-type subclone progressed after chemotherapy, it responded to subsequent re-administration of paclitaxel. Conclusion We show that cfDNA can reveal tumour evolution and subclonal responses to therapy even when biopsies are not available. PMID:27502704

  15. Decrease in drug accumulation and in tumour aggressiveness marker expression in a fenretinide-induced resistant ovarianumour cell line

    PubMed Central

    Appierto, V; Cavadini, E; Pergolizzi, R; Cleris, L; Lotan, R; Canevari, S; Formelli, F

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether the efficacy of fenretinide (HPR) against ovarian tumours may be limited by induction of resistance. The human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780, which is sensitive to a pharmacologically achievable HPR concentration (IC 50= 1 μM), became 10-fold more resistant after exposure to increasing HPR concentrations. The cells (A2780/HPR) did not show cross-resistance to the synthetic retinoid 6-[3-adamantyl-4-hydroxyphenyl]-2-naphthalene carboxylic acid (CD437) and were not sensitive, similarly to the parent line, to all- trans -retinoic acid, 13- cis -retinoic acid or N-(4-methoxyphenyl)retinamide. A2780/HPR cells showed, compared to parental cells, a 3-fold reduction in colony-forming ability in agar. The development of HPR resistance was associated with a marked increase in retinoic acid receptor β (RARβ) mRNA and protein levels, which decreased, together with drug resistance, after drug removal. The expression of cell surface molecules associated with tumour progression including HER-2, laminin receptor and β1 integrin was markedly reduced. The increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species is not involved in HPR-resistance because it was similar in parental and resistant cells. Conversely differences in pharmacokinetics may account for resistance because, in A2780/HPR cells, intracellular peak drug levels were 2 times lower than in A2780 cells and an as yet unidentified polar metabolite was present. These data suggest that acquired resistance to HPR is associated with changes in marker expression, suggestive of a more differentiated status and may be explained, at least in part, by reduced drug accumulation and increased metabolism. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11384104

  16. AmotL2 disrupts apical-basal cell polarity and promotes tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Mojallal, Mahdi; Zheng, Yujuan; Hultin, Sara; Audebert, Stéphane; van Harn, Tanja; Johnsson, Per; Lenander, Claes; Fritz, Nicolas; Mieth, Christin; Corcoran, Martin; Lembo, Frédérique; Hallström, Marja; Hartman, Johan; Mazure, Nathalie M; Weide, Thomas; Grandér, Dan; Borg, Jean-Paul; Uhlén, Per; Holmgren, Lars

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity is essential for the functionality of glandular epithelia. Cell polarity is often lost in advanced tumours correlating with acquisition of invasive and malignant properties. Despite extensive knowledge regarding the formation and maintenance of polarity, the mechanisms that deregulate polarity in metastasizing cells remain to be fully characterized. Here we show that AmotL2 expression correlates with loss of tissue architecture in tumours from human breast and colon cancer patients. We further show that hypoxic stress results in activation of c-Fos-dependent expression of AmotL2 leading to loss of polarity. c-Fos/hypoxia-induced p60 AmotL2 interacts with the Crb3 and Par3 polarity complexes retaining them in large vesicles and preventing them from reaching the apical membrane. The resulting loss of polarity potentiates the response to invasive cues in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data provide a molecular mechanism how hypoxic stress deregulates cell polarity during tumour progression. PMID:25080976

  17. Univalent antibodies kill tumour cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, M. J.; Stevenson, G. T.

    1982-02-01

    Antibody molecules are bivalent, or less often multivalent, with each antibody site within a single molecule having the same specificity. Bivalency must enhance the tenacity of antibody attachment to cell surfaces, as dissociation will require simultaneous release at both sites. However, the bivalency of the antibody sometimes induces a target cell to undergo antigenic modulation1-3, thereby offering the cell a means of evading complement and the various effector cells recruited by the antibody. We have investigated the attack by univalent antibodies, which, despite removal of one antibody site, retain their Fc zones and hence their ability to recruit the killing agents, on neoplastic B lymphocytes of the guinea pig L2C line. Rabbit antibodies raised against surface immunoglobulin of these cells were partially digested with papain to yield the univalent Fab/c derivatives4,5. We report here that these derivatives showed enhanced cell killing both in vitro and in vivo, and that this enhancement appeared to derive from avoiding antigenic modulation.

  18. Hepatocyte growth factor-induced up-regulation of Twist drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a canine mammary tumour cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Choisunirachon, Nan; Saito, Tomochika; Matsumoto, Kaori; Saeki, Kohei; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial step in tumour progression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT in canine tumours remain to be elucidated. In this study, the similarity or difference in the molecular mechanism of EMT in canine cells was evaluated and compared with that reported in human and mouse cells. We used eight cell lines derived from canine mammary cancers. Stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased cell motility and changed EMT-related markers towards mesenchyme in CHMm cell line. These changes were accompanied by an increase in Twist expression and did not occur in CHMm transfected with Twist siRNA, indicating that Twist plays a key role in this phenomenon in CHMm. However, the down-regulation of E-cadherin was not observed by HGF stimulation. Further studies are required to elucidate the difference between human and canine Twist.

  19. Clinical Application of Circulating Tumour Cells in Prostate Cancer: From Bench to Bedside and Back

    PubMed Central

    León-Mateos, Luis; Vieito, María; Anido, Urbano; López López, Rafael; Muinelo Romay, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide. To improve future drug development and patient management, surrogate biomarkers associated with relevant outcomes are required. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are tumour cells that can enter the circulatory system, and are principally responsible for the development of metastasis at distant sites. In recent years, interest in detecting CTCs as a surrogate biomarker has ghiiukjrown. Clinical studies have revealed that high levels of CTCs in the blood correlate with disease progression in patients with prostate cancer; however, their predictive value for monitoring therapeutic response is less clear. Despite the important progress in CTC clinical development, there are critical requirements for the implementation of their analysis as a routine oncology tool. The goal of the present review is to provide an update on the advances in the clinical validation of CTCs as a surrogate biomarker and to discuss the principal obstacles and main challenges to their inclusion in clinical practice. PMID:27657044

  20. Unusual renal tumour: multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Palmeiro, Marta Morna; Niza, João Luz; Loureiro, Ana Luisa; Conceição e Silva, João Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma (MCRCC) is a rare presentation of renal cell carcinoma. Most patients are asymptomatic and frequently MCRCCs are detected incidentally. MCRCCs have good prognosis because of their low malignant potential. We report a case of a 39-year-old woman who presented with mild right flank pain and normal laboratory data. On imaging examinations, a Bosniak III cystic lesion was detected in the lower third of the right kidney. She underwent right partial nephrectomy and histopathology showed a multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma Fuhrman grade 1. In this article, we also present a review of the literature on MCRCC, highlight the correlation of the pathological and imaging characteristics of these low aggressive renal lesions, and underscore the importance of their recognition to prevent unnecessary radical surgery. PMID:26957035

  1. Functional granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor receptor is constitutively expressed on neoplastic plasma cells and mediates tumour cell longevity.

    PubMed

    Villunger, A; Egle, A; Kos, M; Egle, D; Tinhofer, I; Henn, T; Uberall, F; Maly, K; Greil, R

    1998-09-01

    It has been shown that granulocyte/macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is able to support myeloma cell propagation in cooperation with interleukin (IL)-6, the major growth factor for malignant plasma cells, although the biological mechanisms involved remain unknown. Therefore we investigated (i) the expression levels of the GM-CSF receptor (GM-CSFR) constituents in three malignant plasma cell lines and in native malignant plasma cells, (ii) the ability of the receptor to mediate common signalling pathways regulating proliferation and cell survival in malignant plasma cell lines, and (iii) the effects of GM-CSF on tumour cell biology. The GM-CSFRalpha subunit was detected in the malignant plasma cell lines RPMI-8226, MC/CAR, IM-9 as well as 6/6 native myeloma cell samples derived from the bone marrow of patients with overt disease. Furthermore, GM-CSFR expression was also detected in the CD19+ fraction from 2/3 bone marrow samples and 5/8 peripheral blood samples derived from patients with malignant plasma cell disorders, but not in the CD19+ fraction of peripheral blood from healthy donors. The expressed cytokine receptor alpha-subunit was able to constitute a functional signalling complex with the ubiquitously expressed GM-CSFRbeta subunit, as demonstrated by the fact that GM-CSF induced the p21-ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling cascade in malignant plasma cell lines. Since this signalling cascade plays an essential role in the mediation of both proliferation and cell survival, we investigated the impact of GM-CSF on these two events. Application of GM-CSF led to an increase of DNA-synthesis in MC/CAR, IM-9 and RPMI-8226 cells. Furthermore, it increased longevity of these malignant plasma cell lines by reducing the rates of spontaneous apoptosis. We conclude that (i) the functional GM-CSFR is commonly expressed on malignant plasma cells and that (ii) GM-CSF promotes the clonal expansion of myeloma cells by inhibiting spontaneous

  2. Identification of Metallothionein- and parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP)-positive cells in salivary gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Sunardhi-Widyaputra, S; van den Oord, J J; Van Houdt, K; De Ley, M; Van Damme, B

    1995-11-01

    Ductal basal cells and myoepithelial cells (MEC) of normal salivary gland share metallothionein (MT)-positivity, while PTHrP positivity is restricted to ductal basal cells. We studied 21 benign and 4 malignant tumours in which MEC are thought to play a role using immuno-histochemical methods for detecting the presence of MT and PTHrP positive cells. In benign tumours, a shared positivity for MT and PTHrP is found in the inner layer of tubulo-ductal and trabecular structures, in part of the cells in the myxoid and chondroid matrices of pleomorphic adenoma, and in the basal epithelial lining of Warthin's tumours. In myoepithelioma almost all tumour cells demonstrate MT reactivity and a restricted positivity for PTHrP. MT-positive cells in oncocytoma were demonstrated in the periphery of some oncocytic islets, while PTHrP positivity was restricted to a few oncocytic cells. In malignant tumours, positivity for MT is found in the periphery of epithelial clusters of mucoepidermoid carcinomas, while PTHrP-positive cells are seen in cyst-like structures and scattered cells in solid arrangements of squamous cells. Although the biologic significance of the presence of MT in neoplastic cells is not yet clearly understood, MT may be necessary for the growth and differentiation in actively growing cells. The variability of MT expression in salivary gland tumours could be a reflection of the morphological heterogeneity and correlate with the degree of differentiation and maturation of the tumour cells. The observations suggest that MT may be considered an oncodevelopmental product.

  3. The Ter Mutation In The Dead End Gene Causes Germ Cell Loss And Testicular Germ Cell Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Youngren, Kirsten K.; Coveney, Douglas; Peng, Xiaoning; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Schmidt, Laura S.; Nickerson, Michael L.; Lamb, Bruce T.; Deng Jian Min; Behringer, Richard R.; Capel, Blanche; Rubin, Edward M.; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Matin, Angabin

    2005-01-01

    In mice, the Ter mutation causes primordial germ cell (PGC) loss in all genetic backgrounds1. Ter is also a potent modifier of spontaneous testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) susceptibility in the 129 family of inbred strains, and markedly increases TGCT incidence in 129-Ter/Ter males2 4. In 129-Ter/Ter mice, some of the remaining PGCs transform into undifferentiated pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells2 6, and after birth differentiate into various cells and tissues that compose TGCTs. Here, we report the positional cloning of Ter, revealing a point mutation that introduces a termination codon in the mouse orthologue (Dnd1) of the zebrafish dead end (dnd) gene. PGC deficiency is corrected both with bacterial artificial chromosomes that contain Dnd1 and with a Dnd1-encoding transgene. Dnd1 is expressed in fetal gonads during the critical period when TGCTs originate. DND1 has an RNA recognition motif and is most similar to the apobec complementation factor, a component of the cytidine t o uridine RNA-editing complex. These results suggest that Ter may adversely affect essential aspects of RNA biology during PGC development. DND1 is the first protein known to have an RNA recognition motif directly implicated as a heritable cause of spontaneous tumorigenesis. TGCT development in the 129-Ter mouse strain models paediatric TGCT in humans. This work will have important implications for our understanding of the genetic control of TGCT pathogenesis and PGC biology.

  4. Cobalt(III) Chaperone Complexes of Curcumin: Photoreduction, Cellular Accumulation and Light-Selective Toxicity towards Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Renfrew, Anna K; Bryce, Nicole S; Hambley, Trevor

    2015-10-19

    Light-activated prodrugs offer the potential for highly selective tumour targeting. However, the application of many photoactivated chemotherapeutics is limited by a requirement for oxygen, or for short activation wavelengths that can damage surrounding tissue. Herein, we present a series of cobalt(III)-curcumin prodrugs that can be activated by visible light under both oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the photoproduct can be controlled by the activation wavelength: green light yields free curcumin, whereas blue light induces photolysis of curcumin to a phototoxic product. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and phototocytotoxicity studies in DLD-1 and MCF-7 tumour cells demonstrated that the cobalt(III) prodrugs are nontoxic in the dark but accumulate in significant concentrations in the cell membrane. When cells were treated with light for 15  min, the cytotoxicity of the cobalt complexes increased by up to 20-fold, whereas free curcumin exhibited only a two-fold increase in cytotoxicity. The nature of the ancillary ligand and cobalt reduction potential were found to strongly influence the stability and biological activity of the series. PMID:26471438

  5. Cobalt(III) Chaperone Complexes of Curcumin: Photoreduction, Cellular Accumulation and Light-Selective Toxicity towards Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Renfrew, Anna K; Bryce, Nicole S; Hambley, Trevor

    2015-10-19

    Light-activated prodrugs offer the potential for highly selective tumour targeting. However, the application of many photoactivated chemotherapeutics is limited by a requirement for oxygen, or for short activation wavelengths that can damage surrounding tissue. Herein, we present a series of cobalt(III)-curcumin prodrugs that can be activated by visible light under both oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the photoproduct can be controlled by the activation wavelength: green light yields free curcumin, whereas blue light induces photolysis of curcumin to a phototoxic product. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and phototocytotoxicity studies in DLD-1 and MCF-7 tumour cells demonstrated that the cobalt(III) prodrugs are nontoxic in the dark but accumulate in significant concentrations in the cell membrane. When cells were treated with light for 15  min, the cytotoxicity of the cobalt complexes increased by up to 20-fold, whereas free curcumin exhibited only a two-fold increase in cytotoxicity. The nature of the ancillary ligand and cobalt reduction potential were found to strongly influence the stability and biological activity of the series.

  6. The potential effect of patulin on mice bearing melanoma cells: an anti-tumour or carcinogenic effect?

    PubMed

    Boussabbeh, Manel; Ben Salem, Intidhar; Rjiba-Touati, Karima; Bouyahya, Chedy; Neffati, Fadwa; Najjar, Mohamed Fadhel; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-05-01

    Mycotoxins are bioactive compounds that are noxious to human. Their effects on oncogenesis have been satisfactorily elucidated, and some of mycotoxins have been classified as carcinogenic to humans. Nevertheless, patulin (PAT) is considered by the International Agency of Research on Cancer as 'not carcinogenic to humans'. The present study was designed to understand the effect of this mycotoxin on melanoma cells (B16F10) by measuring cell proliferation and assessing the anti-tumour effect in vivo in Balb/c mice. Our results revealed that intraperitoneally administration of PAT for 20 days significantly induces tumour regression in B16F10 cell-implanted mice. This effect was evidenced by the activation of apoptosis which is supported by the increase in p53 and Bax expressions, the downregulation of the protein levels of Bcl2, and the increase in caspase-3 activity. Moreover, systemic toxicity analysis demonstrated that there is no potential toxicity following PAT treatment unlike untreated melanoma mice which suffer from anaemia, inflammation and liver dysfunction. Remarkably, this is the first published report demonstrating the therapeutic efficacy of PAT in vivo models. PMID:26619846

  7. Identification of four new susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Holroyd, Amy; Lloyd, Amy; Broderick, Peter; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas F; Dudakia, Darshna; Bishop, D. Timothy; Reid, Alison; Huddart, Robert A.; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik; Shipley, Janet; Houlston, Richard S.; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT), revealing a polygenic model of disease susceptibility strongly influenced by common variation. To identify additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TGCT, we conducted a multistage GWAS with a combined data set of >25,000 individuals (6,059 cases and 19,094 controls). We identified new risk loci for TGCT at 3q23 (rs11705932, TFDP2, P=1.5 × 10−9), 11q14.1 (rs7107174, GAB2, P=9.7 × 10−11), 16p13.13 (rs4561483, GSPT1, P=1.6 × 10−8) and 16q24.2 (rs55637647, ZFPM1, P=3.4 × 10−9). We additionally present detailed functional analysis of these loci, identifying a statistically significant relationship between rs4561483 risk genotype and increased GSPT1 expression in TGCT patient samples. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of TGCT risk and further insight into the biological basis of disease development. PMID:26503584

  8. Genetic profiling of tumours using both circulating free DNA and circulating tumour cells isolated from the same preserved whole blood sample.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Dominic G; Smith, Nigel; Morris, Daniel; Leong, Hui Sun; Li, Yaoyong; Hollebecque, Antoine; Ayub, Mahmood; Carter, Louise; Antonello, Jenny; Franklin, Lynsey; Miller, Crispin; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-04-01

    Molecular information obtained from cancer patients' blood is an emerging and powerful research tool with immense potential as a companion diagnostic for patient stratification and monitoring. Blood, which can be sampled routinely, provides a means of inferring the current genetic status of patients' tumours via analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) or circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). However, accurate assessment of both CTCs and ctDNA requires all blood cells to be maintained intact until samples are processed. This dictates for ctDNA analysis EDTA blood samples must be processed with 4 h of draw, severely limiting the use of ctDNA in multi-site trials. Here we describe a blood collection protocol that is amenable for analysis of both CTCs and ctDNA up to four days after blood collection. We demonstrate that yields of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) obtained from whole blood CellSave samples are equivalent to those obtained from conventional EDTA plasma processed within 4 h of blood draw. Targeted and genome-wide NGS revealed comparable DNA quality and resultant sequence information from cfDNA within CellSave and EDTA samples. We also demonstrate that CTCs and ctDNA can be isolated from the same patient blood sample, and give the same patterns of CNA enabling direct analysis of the genetic status of patients' tumours. In summary, our results demonstrate the utility of a simple approach that enabling robust molecular analysis of CTCs and cfDNA for genotype-directed therapies in multi-site clinical trials and represent a significant methodological improvement for clinical benefit. PMID:26639657

  9. Decoy receptors block TRAIL sensitivity at a supracellular level: the role of stromal cells in controlling tumour TRAIL sensitivity.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, L; van der Sloot, A M; Reis, C R; Deegan, S; Ryan, A E; Dhami, S P S; Murillo, L S; Cool, R H; Correa de Sampaio, P; Thompson, K; Murphy, G; Quax, W J; Serrano, L; Samali, A; Szegezdi, E

    2016-03-10

    Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a death ligand cytokine known for its cytotoxic activity against malignantly transformed cells. TRAIL induces cell death through binding to death receptors DR4 and DR5. The inhibitory decoy receptors (DcR1 and DcR2) co-expressed with death receptor 4 (DR4)/DR5 on the same cell can block the transmission of the apoptotic signal. Here, we show that DcRs also regulate TRAIL sensitivity at a supracellular level and thus represent a mechanism by which the microenvironment can diminish tumour TRAIL sensitivity. Mathematical modelling and layered or spheroid stroma-extracellular matrix-tumour cultures were used to model the tumour microenvironment. By engineering TRAIL to escape binding by DcRs, we found that DcRs do not only act in a cell-autonomous or cis-regulatory manner, but also exert trans-cellular regulation originating from stromal cells and affect tumour cells, highlighting the potent inhibitory effect of DcRs in the tumour tissue and the necessity of selective targeting of the two death-inducing TRAIL receptors to maximise efficacy. PMID:26050621

  10. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidase and Lysyl Oxidase-Like Enzymes Has Tumour-Promoting and Tumour-Suppressing Roles in Experimental Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Bergh, Anders; Halin Bergström, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) and LOX-like (LOXL) enzymes are key players in extracellular matrix deposition and maturation. LOX promote tumour progression and metastasis, but it may also have tumour-inhibitory effects. Here we show that orthotopic implantation of rat prostate AT-1 tumour cells increased LOX and LOXLs mRNA expressions in the tumour and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue. Inhibition of LOX enzymes, using Beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), initiated before implantation of AT-1 cells, reduced tumour growth. Conversely, treatment that was started after the tumours were established resulted in unaffected or increased tumour growth. Moreover, treatment with BAPN did not suppress the formation of spontaneous lymph node metastases, or lung tumour burden, when tumour cells were injected intravenously. A temporal decrease in collagen fibre content, which is a target for LOX, was observed in tumours and in the tumour-adjacent prostate tissue. This may explain why early BAPN treatment is more effective in inhibiting tumour growth compared to treatment initiated later. Our data suggest that the enzymatic function of the LOX family is context-dependent, with both tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting properties in prostate cancer. Further investigations are needed to understand the circumstances under which LOX inhibition may be used as a therapeutic target for cancer patients. PMID:26804196

  11. Production of interferon and tumour necrosis factor by cloned human natural cytotoxic lymphocytes and T cells.

    PubMed

    Christmas, S E; Meager, A; Moore, M

    1987-08-01

    Cell lines and clones, derived from natural killer (NK) cell-enriched (B73.1+) peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from several human donors, that expressed distinct surface phenotypes and were cytolytically active against K562 target cells were tested for their capacity to produce interferon (IFN) and tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IFN and TNF were measured firstly in biological assays and secondly in specific immunoassays for alpha-IFN, gamma-IFN and tumour necrosis factor (TNF alpha). It was found that the majority of NK-derived lines and clones were highly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced relatively low or undetectable levels of gamma-IFN and TNF alpha following stimulation with phytohaemagglutinin. No alpha-IFN was detected in supernatants from these cells. In comparison, cell lines and clones, derived from T lymphocyte (B73.1-) enriched PBL from the same donors were poorly cytotoxic towards K562, but generally produced higher levels of gamma-IFN and TNF than NK-derived cells. Thus, neither gamma-IFN nor TNF production were shown to correlate well with the capacity of NK-derived or T cell clones to effect cytotoxic action towards K562 in vitro. These results suggest that the co-production of gamma-IFN and TNF is not indicative of cytotoxic potential.

  12. Cytoreductive surgery in disseminated non-seminomatous germ cell tumours of testis.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, R P; Reynolds, K W; Newlands, E S; Dawson, P M; Makey, A R; Theodorou, N A; Bradley, J; Begent, R H; Rustin, G J; Bagshawe, K D

    1991-02-01

    Between 1977 and 1988, 67 patients underwent surgical removal of residual metastatic deposits following an aggressive chemotherapy regimen (cisplatin, vincristine, methotrexate and bleomycin alternating with etoposide, actinomycin D and cyclophosphamide) for disseminated germ cell tumours of the testis (stage IIB or above). Ninety-one surgical procedures were performed. There were 63 (69 per cent) retroperitoneal lymph node dissections, 16 (18 per cent) thoracotomies, three (3 per cent) hepatic resections, three (3 per cent) craniotomies, five (5 per cent) delayed orchidectomies and one anterolateral decompression of the vertebral column. Nine (13 per cent) patients required a repeat retroperitoneal node dissection and one patient needed a repeat thoracotomy to remove recurrent metastatic deposits during the period of follow-up. Multivisceral resections and vascular reconstruction procedures were required in 20 (30 per cent) patients undergoing retroperitoneal node dissection. Fifty-five (82 per cent) patients remain in complete remission with a mean follow-up period of 49.6 months (range 2-121 months). Nine (13 per cent) patients died with metastatic disease between 2 months to 4 years after operation. There were three deaths in the perioperative period (4 per cent). The histology of the resected metastases revealed undifferentiated active tumour in 20 (30 per cent) patients, differentiated mature teratoma in 29 (43 per cent) patients and fibrosis/necrosis in 18 (27 per cent) patients. Twelve (60 per cent) patients with undifferentiated elements and 15 patients (60 per cent) with raised preoperative tumour markers (poor prognostic categories) are in complete remission. Cytoreductive surgery in patients with metastatic germ cell tumours offers the best chance of remission following chemotherapy even in poor prognostic group categories.

  13. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  14. Modelling evolutionary cell behaviour using neural networks: Application to tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, A.R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a modelling framework for cellular evolution that is based on the notion that a cell’s behaviour is driven by interactions with other cells and its immediate environment. We equip each cell with a phenotype that determines its behaviour and implement a decision mechanism to allow evolution of this phenotype. This decision mechanism is modelled using feed-forward neural networks, which have been suggested as suitable models of cell signalling pathways. The environmental variables are presented as inputs to the network and result in a response that corresponds to the phenotype of the cell. The response of the network is determined by the network parameters, which are subject to mutations when the cells divide. This approach is versatile as there are no restrictions on what the input or output nodes represent, they can be chosen to represent any environmental variables and behaviours that are of importance to the cell population under consideration. This framework was implemented in an individual-based model of solid tumour growth in order to investigate the impact of the tissue oxygen concentration on the growth and evolutionary dynamics of the tumour. Our results show that the oxygen concentration affects the tumour at the morphological level, but more importantly has a direct impact on the evolutionary dynamics. When the supply of oxygen is limited we observe a faster divergence away from the initial genotype, a higher population diversity and faster evolution towards aggressive phenotypes. The implementation of this framework suggests that this approach is well suited for modelling systems where evolution plays an important role and where a changing environment exerts selection pressure on the evolving population. PMID:19026711

  15. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  16. Clinico-pathological analysis of renal cell carcinoma demonstrates decreasing tumour grade over a 17-year period

    PubMed Central

    Nason, Gregory J.; McGuire, Barry B.; Kelly, Michael E.; Murphy, Theodore M.; Looney, Aisling T.; Byrne, Damien P.; Mulvin, David W.; Galvin, David J.; Quinlan, David M.; Lennon, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents about 3% of adult malignancies in Ireland. Worldwide there is a reported increasing incidence and recent studies report a stage migration towards smaller tumours. We assess the clinico-pathological features and survival of patients with RCC in a surgically treated cohort. Methods: A retrospective analysis of all nephrectomies carried out between 1995 and 2012 was carried out in an Irish tertiary referral university hospital. Data recorded included patient demographics, size of tumour, tumour-node-metastasis (TNM) classification, operative details and final pathology. The data were divided into 3 equal consecutive time periods for comparison purposes: Group 1 (1995–2000), Group 2 (2001–2006) and Group 3 (2007–2012). Survival data were verified with the National Cancer Registry of Ireland. Results: In total, 507 patients underwent nephrectomies in the study period. The median tumour size was 5.8 cm (range: 1.2–20 cm) and there was no statistical reduction in size observed over time (p = 0.477). A total of 142 (28%) RCCs were classified as pT1a, 111 (21.9%) were pT1b, 67 (13.2%) were pT2, 103 (20.3%) were pT3a, 75 (14.8%) were pT3b and 9 (1.8%) were pT4. There was no statistical T-stage migration observed (p = 0.213). There was a significant grade reduction over time (p = 0.017). There was significant differences noted in overall survival between the T-stages (p < 0.001), nuclear grades (p < 0.001) and histological subtypes (p = 0.022). Conclusion: There was a rising incidence in the number of nephrectomies over the study period. Despite previous reports, a stage migration was not evident; however, a grade reduction was apparent in this Irish surgical series. We can demonstrate that tumour stage, nuclear grade and histological subtype are significant prognosticators of relative survival in RCC. PMID:24839483

  17. A direct comparison of CellSearch and ISET for circulating tumour-cell detection in patients with metastatic carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Farace, F; Massard, C; Vimond, N; Drusch, F; Jacques, N; Billiot, F; Laplanche, A; Chauchereau, A; Lacroix, L; Planchard, D; Le Moulec, S; André, F; Fizazi, K; Soria, J C; Vielh, P

    2011-01-01

    Background: Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) can provide information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. However, there is no universal method to detect CTC currently available. Here, we compared the performance of two CTC detection systems based on the expression of the EpCAM antigen (CellSearch assay) or on cell size (ISET assay). Methods: Circulating tumour cells were enumerated in 60 patients with metastatic carcinomas of breast, prostate and lung origins using CellSearch according to the manufacturer's protocol and ISET by studying cytomorphology and immunolabelling with anti-cytokeratin or lineage-specific antibodies. Results: Concordant results were obtained in 55% (11 out of 20) of the patients with breast cancer, in 60% (12 out of 20) of the patients with prostate cancer and in only 20% (4 out of 20) of lung cancer patients. Conclusion: Our results highlight important discrepancies between the numbers of CTC enumerated by both techniques. These differences depend mostly on the tumour type. These results suggest that technologies limiting CTC capture to EpCAM-positive cells, may present important limitations, especially in patients with metastatic lung carcinoma. PMID:21829190

  18. Prevalence and heterogeneity of circulating tumour cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Shenjere, Patrick; Hodgson, Clare; Hodgetts, Jackie; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Lorigan, Paul; Dive, Caroline

    2014-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are detectable by the MelCAM and high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA)-dependent CellSearch platform. However, CTCs which do not express these capture and detection markers are not detectable by CellSearch. Consequently, we explored the use of isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET), a marker independent, filtration-based device to determine the prevalence and heterogeneity of CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients. Ninety patients were prospectively recruited and blood samples taken before treatment. Patients' blood was filtered using the ISET platform. CTCs were enumerated using dual immunohistochemistry with positive selection by S100 expression and exclusion of leucocytes and endothelial cells expressing CD45 or CD144, respectively. A panel of markers (Melan-A, MITF, MelCAM, high molecular melanoma-associated antigen, CD271 and MAGEC) was also examined. Fifty-one patients (57%) had CTCs (range 1-44 CTCs/4 ml blood) and 12 patients also had circulating tumour microemboli. Seven patients had S100- CTCs, 11 patients' CTCs were S100+ and 33 patients had S100+ and S100- CTCs. Substantial intrapatient and interpatient heterogeneity was observed for all other melanoma-associated markers. CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma are detectable using the flexible marker-independent ISET platform. CTCs display significant marker expression heterogeneity implying that marker-dependent platforms would not detect all CTCs and multimarker assays are now required to reveal the biological significance of this CTC heterogeneity.

  19. Prevalence and heterogeneity of circulating tumour cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Shenjere, Patrick; Hodgson, Clare; Hodgetts, Jackie; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Lorigan, Paul; Dive, Caroline

    2014-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are detectable by the MelCAM and high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA)-dependent CellSearch platform. However, CTCs which do not express these capture and detection markers are not detectable by CellSearch. Consequently, we explored the use of isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET), a marker independent, filtration-based device to determine the prevalence and heterogeneity of CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients. Ninety patients were prospectively recruited and blood samples taken before treatment. Patients' blood was filtered using the ISET platform. CTCs were enumerated using dual immunohistochemistry with positive selection by S100 expression and exclusion of leucocytes and endothelial cells expressing CD45 or CD144, respectively. A panel of markers (Melan-A, MITF, MelCAM, high molecular melanoma-associated antigen, CD271 and MAGEC) was also examined. Fifty-one patients (57%) had CTCs (range 1-44 CTCs/4 ml blood) and 12 patients also had circulating tumour microemboli. Seven patients had S100- CTCs, 11 patients' CTCs were S100+ and 33 patients had S100+ and S100- CTCs. Substantial intrapatient and interpatient heterogeneity was observed for all other melanoma-associated markers. CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma are detectable using the flexible marker-independent ISET platform. CTCs display significant marker expression heterogeneity implying that marker-dependent platforms would not detect all CTCs and multimarker assays are now required to reveal the biological significance of this CTC heterogeneity. PMID:24201293

  20. Human breast cancer bone metastasis in vitro and in vivo: a novel 3D model system for studies of tumour cell-bone cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Holen, I; Nutter, F; Wilkinson, J M; Evans, C A; Avgoustou, P; Ottewell, Penelope D

    2015-10-01

    Bone is established as the preferred site of breast cancer metastasis. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for this preference remain unidentified. In order to improve outcome for patients with advanced breast cancer and skeletal involvement, we need to better understand how this process is initiated and regulated. As bone metastasis cannot be easily studied in patients, researchers have to date mainly relied on in vivo xenograft models. A major limitation of these is that they do not contain a human bone microenvironment, increasingly considered to be an important component of metastases. In order to address this shortcoming, we have developed a novel humanised bone model, where 1 × 10(5) luciferase-expressing MDA-MB-231 or T47D human breast tumour cells are seeded on viable human subchaodral bone discs in vitro. These discs contain functional osteoclasts 2-weeks after in vitro culture and positive staining for calcine 1-week after culture demonstrating active bone resorption/formation. In vitro inoculation of MDA-MB-231 or T47D cells colonised human bone cores and remained viable for <4 weeks, however, use of matrigel to enhance adhesion or a moving platform to increase diffusion of nutrients provided no additional advantage. Following colonisation by the tumour cells, bone discs pre-seeded with MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously into NOD SCID mice, and tumour growth monitored using in vivo imaging for up to 6 weeks. Tumour growth progressed in human bone discs in 80 % of the animals mimicking the later stages of human bone metastasis. Immunohistochemical and PCR analysis revealed that growing MDA-MB-231 cells in human bone resulted in these cells acquiring a molecular phenotype previously associated with breast cancer bone metastases. MDA-MB-231 cells grown in human bone discs showed increased expression of IL-1B, HRAS and MMP9 and decreased expression of S100A4, whereas, DKK2 and FN1 were unaltered compared with the same cells grown in

  1. Heterogeneity of vascular endothelial cells with relevance to diagnosis of vascular tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Kuzu, I.; Bicknell, R.; Harris, A. L.; Jones, M.; Gatter, K. C.; Mason, D. Y.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To determine the distribution of factor VIII related antigen, CD31, CD34 and CD36 in normal and malignant human vascular tissues using a panel of well characterised monoclonal antibodies. METHODS: Frozen and fixed material from a wide range of normal tissues and routinely processed material from 43 benign and malignant vascular tumours were examined. Single immunocytochemical labelling was performed using the APAAP technique. Double staining involved the sequential use of APAAP with the peroxidase method. RESULTS: Human vascular endothelium was antigenically heterogeneous. One of the most restricted markers was factor VIII related antigen, despite its having been widely used in diagnostic pathology as a marker of vascular endothelium and of the tumours which arise from it. Three antibodies against factor VIII related antigen, CD31 (JC70) and CD34 (QBend 10) were identified as immunostaining routinely processed, formalin fixed, paraffin wax sections. Each antibody gave different staining when tested on a range of vascular tumours, both benign and malignant. CONCLUSIONS: A small panel of three reagents (factor VIII related antigen, CD31 (JC70) and CD34 (QBend 10)) should be used by diagnostic pathologists who want to show the presence of cells of endothelial origin in routine material. Images PMID:1371777

  2. In vitro photosensitization of tumour cell enzymes by photofrin II administered in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, S. L.; Murant, R. S.; Chazen, M. D.; Kelly, M. E.; Hilf, R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of injected Photofrin II, a preparation enriched in hydrophobic dihaematoporphyrin ethers and esters, to photosensitize selected mitochondrial and cytosolic enzymes during illumination in vitro was examined. Preparations of R3230AC mammary tumours, obtained at designated times after a single dose of Photofrin II, displayed a time-dependent photosensitivity. Maximum inhibition of mitochondrial enzymes occurred at 24 hours post-treatment, whereas no inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme, pyruvate kinase, was observed over the 168 hour time course. At the selected 24 hour time point, mitochondrial enzyme photosensitisation was found to be drug dose (5.25 mg kg-1 Photofrin II) and light dose dependent, the rank order of inhibition being cytochrome c oxidase greater than F0F1 ATPase greater than succinate dehydrogenase greater than NADH dehydrogenase. We conclude that porphyrin species contained in Photofrin II accumulate in mitochondria of tumour cells in vivo and produce maximum photosensitisation at 24-72 hours after administration to tumour-bearing animals. The time course observed here with Photofrin II is similar to that seen previously with the more heterogenous haematoporphyrin derivative preparation in this in vivo-in vitro model. PMID:2547413

  3. Tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour's survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible.

  4. Histopathologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of a granular cell tumour in an Australian parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Hernández, V; Carrera, E; Méndez, A; Morales, J C; Morales, E; Sánchez, F D

    2012-10-01

    An adult male Australian parakeet (Melopsittacus undulatus) presented a firm nodular lesion in the lateral metacarpal region of the right wing. Microscopically, there were neoplastic cells, round and polyhedral in shape, with abundant, slightly eosinophilic granular cytoplasm; they were strongly periodic-acid Schiff-positive and resistant to diastase digestion. Some groups of neoplastic cells were immunopositive for smooth muscle actin and desmin. There was no immunopositivity for S-100 protein, CD68 and cytokeratin. Ultrastructurally, the neoplastic cells were round and polygonal in shape, and they were characterized by abundant cytoplasm with numerous homogeneous osmophilic bodies covered by an electron-dense membrane (lysosomes). The histopathologic, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of the neoplastic tissue are consistent with a granular cell tumour, which has been described in different animal species and anatomic locations; however, this seems to be an infrequent neoplasm in Australian parakeets. The immunopositivity of the neoplastic cells for smooth muscle actin and desmin, as well as slight positivity for muscle with Masson's trichrome, suggest that this is a tumour of myogenic origin. PMID:22913601

  5. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  6. Effect of Spilanthes acmella hydroethanolic extract activity on tumour cell actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Pacheco Soares, Cristina; Lemos, Valeria Rosseto; da Silva, Ary Gomes; Campoy, Renan Meyer; da Silva, Carlos Augusto Priante; Menegon, Renato Farina; Rojahn, Iuri; Joaquim, Walderez Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Numerous natural products have pharmacological activity such that many biologically active compounds have led to the development of cancer chemotherapy drugs. Spilanthes acmella (Asteraceae) is widely cultivated in the State of Pará, Brazil, being employed in folk medicine for its anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, analgesic, insecticide, and larvicidal properties. However, its cytotoxicity and influence on actin cytoskeleton organisation in tumour cell lines are practically nonexistent. We have verified the cytotoxicity of a hydroethanolic extract of the inflorescence of S. acmella, and examined its effects on the cytoskeleton of tumour cells. Decreasing concentrations of the extract (250, 500 and 1,000 µg/mL) were given to cultures of neoplastic cells (HEp-2). Cytotoxicity was assessed by the MTT test, and the influence on cytoskeleton organisation was examined by fluorescence microscopy. The IC50 of the hydroethanolic extract was 513 µg/mL, confirming the data obtained from the MTT assay that gave high cytotoxicity. The actin cytoskeleton arrangement of HEp2 cells at 500 and 1,000 µg/mL showed depolymerisation of the filaments, causing loss of morphology and consequently compromising cell adhesion. PMID:24038906

  7. Manipulation of oxidative stress to induce cell death in Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours.

    PubMed

    Magwere, Tapiwanashe; Myatt, Stephen S; Burchill, Susan A

    2008-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma family of tumours (ESFT) are childhood cancers whose aggressive behaviour and propensity to relapse prompts the need for new treatment approaches. In this study, the role of cellular antioxidants in determining the sensitivity of ESFT cell lines to the cytotoxicity of the antineoplasic agent fenretinide was investigated with a view to identifying targets for the development of new treatment strategies. ESFT cell lines differentially express cellular antioxidants, although cellular glutathione (GSH) was identified as the major determinant of sensitivity to fenretinide. The importance of GSH in ESFT physiology was demonstrated by the depletion of intracellular GSH using l-buthionine (S,R) sulphoximine (BSO), which decreased cell viability. Furthermore, pre-treatment of ESFT cells with BSO sensitised them to fenretinide-induced death. Overall, these results demonstrate that ESFT cells are sensitive to changes in intracellular redox environment, and that targeting specific cellular antioxidants might be a viable strategy in treating ESFT.

  8. Glycosyltransferases as marker genes for the quantitative polymerase chain reaction-based detection of circulating tumour cells from blood samples of patients with breast cancer undergoing adjuvant therapy.

    PubMed

    Kölbl, Alexandra C; Hiller, Roman A; Ilmer, Mathias; Liesche, Friederike; Heublein, Sabine; Schröder, Lennard; Hutter, Stefan; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo; Andergassen, Ulrich

    2015-08-01

    Altered glycosylation is a predominant feature of tumour cells; it serves for cell adhesion and detachment, respectively, and facilitates the immune escape of these cells. Therefore changes in the expression of glycosyltransferase genes could help to identify circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in the blood samples of cancer patients using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach. Blood samples of healthy donors were inoculated with certain numbers of established breast cancer cell line cells, thus creating a model system. These samples were analysed by quantitative PCR for the expression of six different glycosyltransferase genes. The three genes with the best results in the model system were consecutively applied to samples from adjuvant breast cancer patients and of healthy donors. FUT3 and GALNT6 showed the highest increase in relative expression, while GALNT6 and ST3GAL3 were the first to reach statistically significant different ∆CT-values comparing the sample with and without addition of tumour cells. These three genes were applied to patient samples, but did not show any significant results that may suggest the presence of CTCs in the blood. Although the relative expression of some of the glycosyltransferase genes exhibited reasonable results in the model system, their application to breast cancer patient samples will have to be further improved, e.g. by co-analysis of patient blood samples by gold-standard methods.

  9. Regulation of intracellular pH in neuronal and glial tumour cells, studied by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Flögel, U; Willker, W; Leibfritz, D

    1994-06-01

    The effect of extracellular pH (pHe) on intracellular pH (pHi) and cellular metabolism was examined by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy of cells in vivo and in vitro. A decrease in pHe from 7.4 to 6.4 led to a significant drop in pHi, in both neuronal and glial tumour cells, as detected by in vivo 31P NMR of cells embedded in basement membrane gel threads. A more than 50% decrease in both the phosphocreatine (PCr) level and derivatives of glycolysis (i.e., glycerol 3-phosphate) was observed, concomitantly to the fall in pHi. A 50% decrease in intracellular lactate levels was seen in in vivo 1H NMR spectra under these conditions. Reperfusion with fresh medium (pHe 7.4) resulted in the full recovery of pHi, simultaneously with an increase in both PCr and intracellular lactate back to their control levels. Perchloric acid and lipid extract measurements confirmed the observations made by in vivo 31P and 1H NMR spectroscopy and further showed a decrease both in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity and phospholipid synthesis. The data revealed no significant differences between the neuronal and glial tumour cells investigated. pHi measurements in the presence of inhibitors of the various pH regulatory mechanisms showed that the Na+/H+ exchanger, the carbonic anhydrase and at least one of the bicarbonate-transport systems are involved in pH regulation of both cell types. The results suggest that Na+/H+ exchange is the preferred mechanism by which both neuronal and glial cells regulate their pHi after extracellular acidification.

  10. Increased proliferation in atypical hyperplasia/endometrioid intraepithelial neoplasia of the endometrium with concurrent inactivation of ARID1A and PTEN tumour suppressors.

    PubMed

    Ayhan, Ayse; Mao, Tsui-Lien; Suryo Rahmanto, Yohan; Zeppernick, Felix; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Wu, Ren-Chin; Wang, Tian-Li; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2015-07-01

    Uterine endometrioid carcinoma is the most common neoplastic disease in the female genital tract and develops from a common precursor lesion, atypical hyperplasia/endometrioid intraepithelial neoplasia (AH/EIN). Although the genomic landscape of endometrioid carcinoma has been recently revealed, the molecular alterations that contribute to tumour progression from AH/EIN to carcinoma remain to be elucidated. In this study, we used immunohistochemistry to determine if loss of expression of two of the most commonly mutated tumour suppressors in endometrioid carcinoma, PTEN and ARID1A, was associated with increased proliferation in AH/EIN. We found that 80 (70%) of 114 cases exhibited decreased or undetectable PTEN and 17 (15%) of 114 cases had focal loss of ARID1A staining. ARID1A loss was focal, while PTEN loss was diffuse, and all specimens with ARID1A loss had concurrent PTEN loss (p = 0.0003). Mapping the distribution of PTEN and ARID1A staining in the same specimens demonstrated that all AH/EIN areas with ARID1A loss were geographically nested within the areas of PTEN loss. A significant increase in the proliferative activity was observed in areas of AH/EIN with concurrent loss of PTEN and ARID1A compared to immediately adjacent AH/EIN areas showing only PTEN loss. In a cell culture system, co-silencing of ARID1A and PTEN in human endometrial epithelial cells increased cellular proliferation to a greater degree than silencing either ARID1A or PTEN alone. These results suggest an essential gatekeeper role for ARID1A that prevents PTEN inactivation from promoting cellular proliferation in the transition of pre-cancerous lesions to uterine endometrioid carcinoma. PMID:27499903

  11. Absolute monocyte count predicts overall survival in mantle cell lymphomas: correlation with tumour-associated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Koh, Young Wha; Shin, Su-Jin; Park, Chansik; Yoon, Dok Hyun; Suh, Cheolwon; Huh, Jooryung

    2014-12-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is characterized by a variable clinical course in which patients can experience indolent disease or frequent relapses despite a good initial response to conventional therapy. Risk stratification of MCL is most frequently performed using the MCL International Prognostic Index (MIPI). Recent studies indicate that the peripheral blood absolute monocyte count (AMC) and tumour-associated macrophages may reflect the state of the tumour microenvironment in lymphomas. The significance of AMC and tumour-associated macrophages in the clinical course of MCL is unknown. The prognostic impact of the AMC, of CD68 expression and of CD163 expression was retrospectively examined in 103 MCL samples using the receiver operating characteristic curved. Patients with an AMC ≥ 375 cells/μL at diagnosis were more likely to present with advanced-stage disease (p = 0.026), leukocytosis (p < 0.001), lymphocytosis (p = 0.01) and granulocytosis (p = 0.003). On univariate analysis, a high AMC (≥375 cells/μL) correlated with poorer overall survival (OS) (p = 0.01). Neither CD68 nor CD163 expression was significantly associated with either OS or event-free survival. Multivariate analysis showed that a high AMC was a prognostic factor for OS, independent of the MIPI [hazards ratio (HR), 1.811; 95% confidence interval, 1.018-3.223; p = 0.043]. This study demonstrates that the AMC at the time of diagnosis is an independent prognostic factor for OS in MCL, which suggests the possibility that AMC may be used in addition to the MIPI to predict outcome in patients with MCL.

  12. Isolation of rare circulating tumour cells in cancer patients by microchip technology

    PubMed Central

    Nagrath, Sunitha; Sequist, Lecia V.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Bell, Daphne W.; Irimia, Daniel; Ulkus, Lindsey; Smith, Matthew R.; Kwak, Eunice L.; Digumarthy, Subba; Muzikansky, Alona; Ryan, Paula; Balis, Ulysses J.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Haber, Daniel A.; Toner, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Viable tumour-derived epithelial cells (circulating tumour cells or CTCs) have been identified in peripheral blood from cancer patients and are probably the origin of intractable metastatic disease1–4. Although extremely rare, CTCs represent a potential alternative to invasive biopsies as a source of tumour tissue for the detection, characterization and monitoring of non-haematologic cancers5–8. The ability to identify, isolate, propagate and molecularly characterize CTC subpopulations could further the discovery of cancer stem cell biomarkers and expand the understanding of the biology of metastasis. Current strategies for isolating CTCs are limited to complex analytic approaches that generate very low yield and purity9. Here we describe the development of a unique microfluidic platform (the ‘CTC-chip’) capable of efficient and selective separation of viable CTCs from peripheral whole blood samples, mediated by the interaction of target CTCs with antibody (EpCAM)-coated microposts under precisely controlled laminar flow conditions, and without requisite pre-labelling or processing of samples. The CTC-chip successfully identified CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic lung, prostate, pancreatic, breast and colon cancer in 115 of 116 (99%) samples, with a range of 5–1,281 CTCs per ml and approximately 50% purity. In addition, CTCs were isolated in 7/7 patients with early-stage prostate cancer. Given the high sensitivity and specificity of the CTC-chip, we tested its potential utility in monitoring response to anti-cancer therapy. In a small cohort of patients with metastatic cancer undergoing systemic treatment, temporal changes in CTC numbers correlated reasonably well with the clinical course of disease as measured by standard radiographic methods. Thus, the CTC-chip provides a new and effective tool for accurate identification and measurement of CTCs in patients with cancer. It has broad implications in advancing both cancer biology

  13. Regan isoenzyme of alkaline phosphatase as a tumour marker for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bukowczan, J; Pattman, S; Jenkinson, F; Quinton, R

    2014-09-01

    Alkaline phosphatase is an enzyme present in all tissues of the human body. Several isoforms of this enzyme have been described with different catalytic nature, stability and antigenic structure. Rises in the activity of alkaline phosphatase are recognised in various states including bone diseases, liver disease, pregnancy, hyperthyroidism and malignant processes. The Regan isoenzyme, a rare variant of placental alkaline phosphatase, has been identified circulating in association with various tumours. The reported case describes a rising Regan isoform of alkaline phosphatase concentrations that led to a new diagnosis of occult renal cell carcinoma and persistently elevated activity postoperatively signposting persistent or recurrent disease.

  14. Physical nanoscale conduit-mediated communication between tumour cells and the endothelium modulates endothelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Connor, Yamicia; Tekleab, Sarah; Nandakumar, Shyama; Walls, Cherelle; Tekleab, Yonatan; Husain, Amjad; Gadish, Or; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Kaushik, Shelly; Sehrawat, Seema; Kulkarni, Ashish; Dvorak, Harold; Zetter, Bruce; R Edelman, Elazer; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and remains a hurdle in the search for a cure for cancer. Not much is known about metastatic cancer cells and endothelial cross-talk, which occurs at multiple stages during metastasis. Here we report a dynamic regulation of the endothelium by cancer cells through the formation of nanoscale intercellular membrane bridges, which act as physical conduits for transfer of microRNAs. The communication between the tumour cell and the endothelium upregulates markers associated with pathological endothelium, which is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of these nanoscale conduits. These results lead us to define the notion of 'metastatic hijack': cancer cell-induced transformation of healthy endothelium into pathological endothelium via horizontal communication through the nanoscale conduits. Pharmacological perturbation of these nanoscale membrane bridges decreases metastatic foci in vivo. Targeting these nanoscale membrane bridges may potentially emerge as a new therapeutic opportunity in the management of metastatic cancer. PMID:26669454

  15. Physical nanoscale conduit-mediated communication between tumour cells and the endothelium modulates endothelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Yamicia; Tekleab, Sarah; Nandakumar, Shyama; Walls, Cherelle; Tekleab, Yonatan; Husain, Amjad; Gadish, Or; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Kaushik, Shelly; Sehrawat, Seema; Kulkarni, Ashish; Dvorak, Harold; Zetter, Bruce; R. Edelman, Elazer; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and remains a hurdle in the search for a cure for cancer. Not much is known about metastatic cancer cells and endothelial cross-talk, which occurs at multiple stages during metastasis. Here we report a dynamic regulation of the endothelium by cancer cells through the formation of nanoscale intercellular membrane bridges, which act as physical conduits for transfer of microRNAs. The communication between the tumour cell and the endothelium upregulates markers associated with pathological endothelium, which is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of these nanoscale conduits. These results lead us to define the notion of ‘metastatic hijack': cancer cell-induced transformation of healthy endothelium into pathological endothelium via horizontal communication through the nanoscale conduits. Pharmacological perturbation of these nanoscale membrane bridges decreases metastatic foci in vivo. Targeting these nanoscale membrane bridges may potentially emerge as a new therapeutic opportunity in the management of metastatic cancer. PMID:26669454

  16. NK cells engineered to express a GD2 -specific antigen receptor display built-in ADCC-like activity against tumour cells of neuroectodermal origin.

    PubMed

    Esser, Ruth; Müller, Tina; Stefes, Dörthe; Kloess, Stephan; Seidel, Diana; Gillies, Stephen D; Aperlo-Iffland, Christel; Huston, James S; Uherek, Christoph; Schönfeld, Kurt; Tonn, Torsten; Huebener, Nicole; Lode, Holger N; Koehl, Ulrike; Wels, Winfried S

    2012-03-01

    Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) represents a major challenge in paediatric oncology. Alternative therapeutic strategies include antibodies targeting the disialoganglioside GD(2) , which is expressed at high levels on NB cells, and infusion of donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells. To combine specific antibody-mediated recognition of NB cells with the potent cytotoxic activity of NK cells, here we generated clonal derivatives of the clinically applicable human NK cell line NK-92 that stably express a GD(2) -specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) comprising an anti-GD(2) ch14.18 single chain Fv antibody fusion protein with CD3-ζ chain as a signalling moiety. CAR expression by gene-modified NK cells facilitated effective recognition and elimination of established GD(2) expressing NB cells, which were resistant to parental NK-92. In the case of intrinsically NK-sensitive NB cell lines, we observed markedly increased cell killing activity of retargeted NK-92 cells. Enhanced cell killing was strictly dependent on specific recognition of the target antigen and could be blocked by GD(2) -specific antibody or anti-idiotypic antibody occupying the CAR's cell recognition domain. Importantly, strongly enhanced cytotoxicity of the GD(2) -specific NK cells was also found against primary NB cells and GD(2) expressing tumour cells of other origins, demonstrating the potential clinical utility of the retargeted effector cells.

  17. NK cells engineered to express a GD2-specific antigen receptor display built-in ADCC-like activity against tumour cells of neuroectodermal origin

    PubMed Central

    Esser, Ruth; Müller, Tina; Stefes, Dörthe; Kloess, Stephan; Seidel, Diana; Gillies, Stephen D; Aperlo-Iffland, Christel; Huston, James S; Uherek, Christoph; Schönfeld, Kurt; Tonn, Torsten; Huebener, Nicole; Lode, Holger N; Koehl, Ulrike; Wels, Winfried S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB) represents a major challenge in paediatric oncology. Alternative therapeutic strategies include antibodies targeting the disialoganglioside GD2, which is expressed at high levels on NB cells, and infusion of donor-derived natural killer (NK) cells. To combine specific antibody-mediated recognition of NB cells with the potent cytotoxic activity of NK cells, here we generated clonal derivatives of the clinically applicable human NK cell line NK-92 that stably express a GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) comprising an anti-GD2 ch14.18 single chain Fv antibody fusion protein with CD3-ζ chain as a signalling moiety. CAR expression by gene-modified NK cells facilitated effective recognition and elimination of established GD2 expressing NB cells, which were resistant to parental NK-92. In the case of intrinsically NK-sensitive NB cell lines, we observed markedly increased cell killing activity of retargeted NK-92 cells. Enhanced cell killing was strictly dependent on specific recognition of the target antigen and could be blocked by GD2-specific antibody or anti-idiotypic antibody occupying the CAR’s cell recognition domain. Importantly, strongly enhanced cytotoxicity of the GD2-specific NK cells was also found against primary NB cells and GD2 expressing tumour cells of other origins, demonstrating the potential clinical utility of the retargeted effector cells. PMID:21595822

  18. Production of oxygen free radicals by Ehrlich ascites tumour cells: effect of lipids

    PubMed Central

    D'Souza, Cletus J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), calcium ionophore A23187 and platelet activating factor (PAF) stimulated the generation of oxygen free radicals (nitro-blue tetrazolium reduction) in Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells. PAF was effective at an optimal concentration of 4 μM, but was inhibited by BN 52021, a specific PAF antagonist. Lyso-PAF was ineffective. Inclusion of different lipids during incubation prior to the addition of PAF, resulted in the activation/inhibition of free radical generation. Among the phospholipids at a concentration of 50 μg/ml, the order of activation was phosphatidylserine > phosphatidylglycerol > phosphoinositides > phosphatidylinositol > phosphatidylethanolamine. Phosphatidylcholine was not effective, while sphingolipids were inhibitory. In addition, Ehrlich ascites tumour cells grown in mice under marginal vitamin A deficiency, showed an augmented production of free radicals compared to control cells. This was suppressed by exogenous addition of vitamin A or superoxide dismutase. These results suggest that membrane lipids and dietary factors like vitamin A probably function as physiological modulators in regulating the free radical generation. PMID:18475503

  19. Targeted inhibition of tumour cell growth by a bispecific single-chain toxin containing an antibody domain and TGF alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, M.; Wels, W.

    1996-01-01

    Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and ErbB-2 has been observed in a variety of human tumours, making these receptors promising targets for directed tumour therapy. Since many tumour cells express both ErbB-2 and EGFR and these receptors synergise in cellular transformation, therapeutic reagents simultaneously binding to ErbB-2 and EGFR might offer advantages for tumour therapy. We have previously described the potent anti-tumoral activity of a bispecific antibody toxin that contains ErbB-2- and EGFR-specific single-chain Fv (scFv) domains. Here we report the construction and functional characterisation of a novel bispecific recombinant toxin, scFv(FRP5)-TGF alpha-ETA. The fusion protein consists of the antigen-binding domain of the ErbB-2-specific MAb, FRP5, and the natural EGFR ligand, TGF alpha, inserted at different positions in truncated Pseudomonas exotoxin A. ScFv(FRP5)-TGF alpha-ETA protein displayed binding to EGFR and ErbB-2, thereby inducing activation of the receptors, which was dependent on the cellular context and the level of EGFR and ErbB-2 expression. The bispecific molecule was cytotoxic in vitro for tumour cells expressing various levels of the target receptors. In vivo scFv(FRP5)-TGF alpha-ETA potently inhibited the growth of established A431 tumour xenografts in nude mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:8826849

  20. A tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein accompanying p53 overexpression and higher growth potential for gastric cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Maehara, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Kakeji, Y.; Endo, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Sugimachi, K.

    1995-01-01

    Tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein is associated with tumour progression in gastric cancer. We investigated the biological significance of tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein, determined by the binding of Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), with regard to survival time and to the malignant potential of cancer cells in serosally invasive gastric cancer in 119 patients. HPA was positively stained in 75 of 119 patients (63.0%) with gastric cancer with serosal invasion. In patients with HPA-positive tissue, the tumour was larger than in HPA-negative cases and was frequently located in the middle third of the stomach. The incidence of lymph node metastasis was higher than in patients with HPA-negative tissue. There were no differences between the cases staining negatively and positively with HPA with respect to the other factors examined. Gastric cancer tissues with HPA-positive staining revealed a higher positive rate of abnormal p53 staining and a higher concentration of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) labelling. The survival time of the patients with HPA positive staining was shorter than for those whose tissues were HPA negative. Thus, tumour-associated cell-surface glycoprotein is apparently closely related to the malignant potential of serosally invasive gastric cancer. PMID:7537520

  1. Bronchial mucous gland tumours.

    PubMed

    Spencer, H

    1979-07-27

    Tumours arising in the bronchial mucous glands closely resemble tumours arising in the mixed salivary glands. Bronchial mucous gland tumours account for less than 0.5 per cent of all lung tumours. Twenty six tumours are reviewed and they have been divided into five types, (a) adenoidcystic carcinomas, (b) muco-epidermoid tumors, (c) mixed (pleomorphic) tumors, (d) cystadenomas and (f) oxyphilic adenoma. The clinical features, and postoperative course of the patients are reviewed. Adenocystic carcinomas, arising in the bronchus frequently involve the neighbouring trachea and spread mainly by direct infiltration. Most muco-epidermoid bronchial tumours were confined to young persons, and the only malignant muco-epidermoid tumour occurred in an elderly person. The prognosis in young persons is good provided the tumours are completely excised. The two mixed bronchial tumours resembled their salivary counterparts and one subsequently behaved as a carcinoma and metastasised. Bronchial cystadenomas all proved to be benign tumours but in two cases were associated with surface papillary proliferation. The only example of an oxyphil cell adenoma was discovered at post mortem examination. The histogenesis of the tumours is considered.

  2. The genomic landscape of testicular germ cell tumours: from susceptibility to treatment.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Levy, Max; Huddart, Robert A; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2016-07-01

    The genomic landscape of testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) can be summarized using four overarching hypotheses. Firstly, TGCT risk is dominated by inherited genetic factors, which determine nearly half of all disease risk and are highly polygenic in nature. Secondly KIT-KITLG signalling is currently the major pathway that is implicated in TGCT formation, both as a predisposition risk factor and a somatic driver event. Results from genome-wide association studies have also consistently suggested that other closely related pathways involved in male germ cell development and sex determination are associated with TGCT risk. Thirdly, the method of disease formation is unique, with tumours universally stemming from a noninvasive precursor lesion, probably of fetal origin, which lies dormant through childhood into adolescence and then eventually begins malignant growth in early adulthood. Formation of a 12p isochromosome, a hallmark of TGCT observed in nearly all tumours, is likely to be a key triggering event for malignant transformation. Finally, TGCT have been shown to have a distinctive somatic mutational profile, with a low rate of point mutations contrasted with frequent large-scale chromosomal gains. These four hypotheses by no means constitute a complete model that explains TGCT tumorigenesis, but advances in genomic technologies have enabled considerable progress in describing and understanding the disease. Further advancing our understanding of the genomic basis of TGCT offers a clear opportunity for clinical benefit in terms of preventing invasive cancer arising in young men, decreasing the burden of chemotherapy-related survivorship issues and reducing mortality in the minority of patients who have treatment-refractory disease. PMID:27296647

  3. Diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour: Current treatment concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Staals, Eric L; Ferrari, Stefano; Donati, Davide M; Palmerini, Emanuela

    2016-08-01

    At present, the optimal treatment strategy in patients with diffuse-type tenosynovial giant cell tumour (D-TGCT) is unclear. The purpose of this review was to describe current treatment options, and to highlight recent developments in the knowledge of the molecular pathogenesis of D-TGCT as well as related therapeutic implications. Epidemiology, clinical features, and the pathogenesis of D-TGCT and the most widely used treatment modalities are described. D-TGCT is a benign clonal neoplastic proliferation arising from the synovium. Patients are often symptomatic and require multiple surgical procedures during their lifetime. Currently, surgery is the main treatment for patients with D-TGCT, with relapse rates ranging from 14% to 55%. Radiosynovectomy and external beam radiotherapy have been used in combination with surgical excision or as single modalities. The finding that D-TGCT cells overexpress colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1), resulting in recruitment of CSF1 receptor (CSF1R)-bearing macrophages that are polyclonal and make up the bulk of the tumour, has led to clinical trials with CSF1R inhibitors. These inhibitors include small molecules such as imatinib, nilotinib, PLX3397, and the monoclonal antibody RG7155. In conclusion, D-TGCT impairs patients' quality of life significantly. The evidence that the pathogenetic loop of D-TGCT can be inhibited could potentially change the therapeutic armamentarium for this condition. Clinical trials of agents that target D-TGCT are currently ongoing. In the meantime, international registries should be activated in order to provide useful information on this relatively rare tumour. PMID:27267143

  4. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  5. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha impairs neuronal differentiation but not proliferation of hippocampal neural precursor cells: Role of Hes1.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Aoife; Ryan, Sinead; Maloney, Eimer; Sullivan, Aideen M; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, which influences neuronal survival and function yet there is limited information available on its effects on hippocampal neural precursor cells (NPCs). We show that TNFalpha treatment during proliferation had no effect on the percentage of proliferating cells prepared from embryonic rat hippocampal neurosphere cultures, nor did it affect cell fate towards either an astrocytic or neuronal lineage when cells were then allowed to differentiate. However, when cells were differentiated in the presence of TNFalpha, significantly reduced percentages of newly born and post-mitotic neurons, significantly increased percentages of astrocytes and increased expression of TNFalpha receptors, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2, as well as expression of the anti-neurogenic Hes1 gene, were observed. These data indicate that exposure of hippocampal NPCs to TNFalpha when they are undergoing differentiation but not proliferation has a detrimental effect on their neuronal lineage fate, which may be mediated through increased expression of Hes1.

  6. The in vivo activation of persistent nanophosphors for optical imaging of vascularization, tumours and grafted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldiney, Thomas; Bessière, Aurélie; Seguin, Johanne; Teston, Eliott; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Viana, Bruno; Bos, Adrie J. J.; Dorenbos, Pieter; Bessodes, Michel; Gourier, Didier; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2014-04-01

    Optical imaging for biological applications requires more sensitive tools. Near-infrared persistent luminescence nanoparticles enable highly sensitive in vivo optical detection and complete avoidance of tissue autofluorescence. However, the actual generation of persistent luminescence nanoparticles necessitates ex vivo activation before systemic administration, which prevents long-term imaging in living animals. Here, we introduce a new generation of optical nanoprobes, based on chromium-doped zinc gallate, whose persistent luminescence can be activated in vivo through living tissues using highly penetrating low-energy red photons. Surface functionalization of this photonic probe can be adjusted to favour multiple biomedical applications such as tumour targeting. Notably, we show that cells can endocytose these nanoparticles in vitro and that, after intravenous injection, we can track labelled cells in vivo and follow their biodistribution by a simple whole animal optical detection, opening new perspectives for cell therapy research and for a variety of diagnosis applications.

  7. Quantification of intra-tumour cell proliferation heterogeneity using imaging descriptors of 18F fluorothymidine-positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Willaime, J. M.; Turkheimer, F. E.; Kenny, L. M.; Aboagye, E. O.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-tumour heterogeneity is a characteristic shared by all cancers. We explored the use of texture variables derived from images of [18F]fluorothymidine-positron emission tomography (FLT-PET), thus notionally assessing the heterogeneity of proliferation in individual tumours. Our aims were to study the range of textural feature values across tissue types, verify the repeatability of these image descriptors and further, to explore associations with clinical response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. The repeatability of 28 textural descriptors was assessed in patients who had two FLT-PET scans prior to therapy using relative differences and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). We tested associations between features at baseline and clinical response measured in 11 patients after three cycles of chemotherapy, and explored changes in FLT-PET at one week after the start of therapy. A subset of eight features was characterized by low variations at baseline (<±30%) and high repeatability (0.7 ≤ ICC ≤ 1). The intensity distribution profile suggested fewer highly proliferating cells in lesions of non-responders compared to responders at baseline. A true increase in CV and homogeneity was measured in four out of six responders one week after the start of therapy. A number of textural features derived from FLT-PET are altered following chemotherapy in breast cancer, and should be evaluated in larger clinical trials for clinical relevance.

  8. MiR-203 is downregulated in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and can suppress proliferation and induce apoptosis of tumours.

    PubMed

    Tian, Linli; Li, Minghua; Ge, Jingchun; Guo, Yan; Sun, Yanan; Liu, Ming; Xiao, Hui

    2014-06-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been recognised to regulate cancer development and progression in carcinogenesis as either oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes. However, whether miR-203 plays a crucial role in human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC) remains largely unclear. In the study, we have found that miR-203 expression was significantly lower in LSCC tissues than that in corresponding adjacent non-neoplastic tissues and was negatively correlated with ASAP1 expression level. Lower expression of miR-203 was significantly related to poor differentiation, advanced clinical stages, T3-4 tumour grade, lymph node metastasis and decreased 5-year overall survival. Transfection with miR-203 inhibited proliferation, reduced invasion, induced apoptosis and caused G1 phase cell cycle arrest of Hep-2 cells in vitro, suggesting that miR-203 functioned as a tumour suppressor. We have also tested that over-expression of miR-203 may both suppress the growth of xenograft tumours in mice and downregulate the expressions of ASAP1 in vivo. Furthermore, miR-203 may regulate the expressions of mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker of E-cadherin and cancer stem cells (CSCs) marker of CD44. These findings suggest that miR-203 plays a role as a tumour suppressor in LSCC, likely by regulating ASAP1, probably in relation to EMT and CSCs and may serve as a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  9. A progesterone-receptor-positive huge retroperitoneal tumour mimics metastasis in a breast cancer patient: sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hong, Z-J; Chu, C-H; Fan, H-L; Hsu, K-F; Hsu, G-C; Yu, C-P; Char, D-L; Yu, J-C

    2011-01-01

    We report a rare case of breast cancer concomitant with progesterone-receptor-positive renal cell carcinoma. A 48-year-old woman was diagnosed as having infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the breast and underwent modified radical mastectomy. A synchronous retroperitoneal tumour was detected by sonography of the abdomen in a routine cancer staging. Initially, the tumour was diagnosed as a synchronous retroperitoneal metastasis by needle biopsy; further tests revealed that it was progesterone receptor-positive. The retroperitoneal tumour showed poor response to full courses of adjuvant chemotherapy for breast cancer. Subsequently, the patient underwent a radical operation that included nephrectomy. The final pathology confirmed a sarcomatoid renal cell carcinoma. The post-operative course was uneventful. The patient had no recurrence at the 1-year follow-up. In this report, accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment were discussed. An intra-abdominal tumour with progesterone receptor- (PR) positive features is usually considered to be metastatic in breast cancer patients. For breast cancer patients with a PR-positive retroperitoneal tumour, renal cell carcinoma should be differentiated from a metastatic lesion of breast cancer, even if PR-expression is rare in renal cell carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of PR-positive expression in breast cancer concomitant with renal carcinoma. In clinical settings, it is challenging for the surgeon to make an accurate diagnosis and to provide prompt treatment in such cases.

  10. Substance P activates responses correlated with tumour growth in human glioma cell lines bearing tachykinin NK1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Palma, C; Nardelli, F; Manzini, S; Maggi, C A

    1999-01-01

    The neuropeptide substance P (SP), by stimulating tachykinin NK1receptors (NK1R), triggers a number of biological responses in human glioma cells which are potentially relevant for tumour growth. First, radioligand binding studies demonstrated the presence of tachykinin NK1R on SNB-19, DBTRG-05 MG and U373 MG, but not on U138 MG and MOG-G-GCM human glioma cell lines. Second, application of SP or neurokinin A (NKA) to NK1R+glioma cell lines increased the secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and potentiated IL-6 secretion induced by IL-1β. SP also up-regulated the release of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) by the U373 MG glioma cell line. Third, SP induced new DNA synthesis and enhanced the proliferation rate of NK1R+, but not of NK1R−glioma cell lines. Also, NKA stimulated the proliferation and cytokine secretion in NK1R+glioma cell lines. All the stimulant effects of SP/NKA on NK1R+glioma cell lines were completely blocked by a specific tachykinin NK1R antagonist, MEN 11467. These data support the potential use of tachykinin NK1R antagonist for controlling the proliferative rate of human gliomas. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:9888463

  11. The effects of ultrasound and light on indocyanine-green-treated tumour cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Nomikou, Nikolitsa; Sterrett, Christine; Arthur, Ciara; McCaughan, Bridgeen; Callan, John F; McHale, Anthony P

    2012-08-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is emerging as a treatment modality for the management of neoplastic disease. Despite considerable clinical success, its application for the treatment of deep-seated lesions is constrained by the inability of visible light to penetrate deeply into tissues. An emerging alternative approach exploits the fact that many photosensitisers respond to ultrasound, eliciting cytotoxic effects on target cells and tissues; this has become known as sonodynamic therapy (SDT). The objectives of this study were 1) to determine whether the IR-absorbing dye, indocyanine green (ICG), can be employed as a sonosensitiser and 2) to determine whether ultrasound can be used to enhance ICG-mediated PDT. Exposing ICG-treated mouse fibrosarcoma cells to ultrasound at an energy density of 30 J cm(-2) decreased cell viability by 65 %. Prior exposure of ICG-treated cells to light (λ 830 nm) and subsequent treatment with ultrasound led to a 90 % decrease in cell viability. In combination treatments a synergistic effect was observed at lower doses of ultrasound. Microscopic examination of cell populations treated with light or ultrasound demonstrated the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a mouse tumour model, treatment with light, ultrasound, or a combination thereof led to respective decreases in tumour growth of 42, 67, and 98 % at day 27 post-treatment. These results could provide a means of circumventing light-penetration issues that currently challenge the widespread use of PDT in the treatment of cancer.

  12. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-08-18

    The changes in cell dynamics after oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the effect of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, initiated tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. This difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase in symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is dependent not only on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  13. Allele imbalance at tumour suppressor loci during the indolent phase of follicle centre cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Randerson, J; Cawkwell, L; Jack, A S; Child, A J; Shiach, C R; Lewis, F; Johnson, P; Evans, P; Barrans, S; Morgan, G J

    1996-06-01

    We have examined 41 cases of follicle centre cell lymphoma with fluorescent PCR of microsatellite repeats closely linked to or within six tumour suppressor gene loci (APC, DCC, P53, RB1, WT1 and NM23). These probes are highly informative with heterozygousity rates in the range of 57%-90%. In addition we have used four loci from chromosome 6 (D6S260, TNFa, D6S281 and D6S262) as control loci which are unlikely to be involved in the pathogenesis of lymphoma. Of 369 informative PCR reactions allele imbalance was identified in 38 (10%) and this was seen in 23 of the 41 cases. Looking at individual loci allele imbalance was seen in APC(1) 11%, APC(2) 12%, P53(1) 5%, P53 (2) 7%, WT1 5%, RB1 13%, DCC 18% and NM23 0%. This frequency of change was no different from that seen at the control loci D6S260 16%, TNFa 20%, D6S281 4% and D6S262 9%. In the indolent phase of germinal centre cell lymphoma there is therefore quite a high rate of allele imbalance at all loci but this is no higher in those loci linked to tumour suppressor genes. PMID:8724537

  14. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  15. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management. PMID:27610194

  16. Circulating tumour cells: their utility in cancer management and predicting outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Matthew G.; Hou, Jian-Mei; Ward, Tim H.; Blackhall, Fiona H.; Dive, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in technology now permit robust and reproducible detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) from a simple blood test. Standardization in methodology has been instrumental in facilitating multicentre trials with the purpose of evaluating the clinical utility of CTCs. We review the current body of evidence supporting the prognostic value of CTC enumeration in breast, prostate and colorectal cancer, using standardized approaches, and studies evaluating the correlation of CTC number with radiological outcome. The exploitation of CTCs in cancer management, however, is now extending beyond prognostication. As technologies emerge to characterize CTCs at the molecular level, biological information can be obtained in real time, with the promise of serving as a ‘surrogate tumour biopsy’. Current studies illuminate the potential of CTCs as pharmacodynamic and predictive biomarkers and potentially their use in revealing drug resistance in real time. Approaches for CTC characterization are summarized and the potential of CTCs in cancer patient management exemplified via the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations from CTCs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The opportunity to learn more about the biology of metastasis through CTC analysis is now being realized with the horizon of CTC-guided development of novel anticancer therapies. PMID:21789147

  17. Small cell neuroendocrine tumour of the endometrium and the importance of pathologic diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Estruch, Adriana; Minig, Lucas; Illueca, Carmen; Romero, Ignacio; Guinot, Jose Luis; Poveda, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    Small cell carcinoma of the endometrium is a very rare entity. They are very aggressive tumours, with a poor prognosis. They represent a clinical challenge because of a lack of a standardised treatment. We see here a case of a 67-year-old woman with a history of a lobular breast carcinoma, diagnosed in 2002. After presenting with postmenopausal vaginal bleeding in October 2014, she underwent a hysteroscopy-guided biopsy which revealed a metastasis of breast carcinoma. A hysterectomy and bilateral oophorectomy was performed because of uncontrolled uterine bleeding. The pathologic diagnosis was small cell carcinoma (SCC) of the endometrium. A surgical complete cytoreduction was achieved after the case being presented in a multidisciplinary tumour board. Pathologic results revealed metastasis from peritoneal implants of SCC on the endometrium, and metastasis in pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes from serous carcinoma of the endometrium. A total of four cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy based on cisplatin (80mg/m² day one) and etoposide (100mg/m² day one, two, three) every 21 days was given. The patient experienced persistent disease and died 17 months after the diagnosis. SCC of the endometrium is a very rare and aggressive disease that requires an individualised multidisciplinary management.

  18. Biology of childhood germ cell tumours, focussing on the significance of microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, M J; Nicholson, J C; Coleman, N

    2015-01-01

    Genomic and protein-coding transcriptomic data have suggested that germ cell tumours (GCTs) of childhood are biologically distinct from those of adulthood. Global messenger RNA profiles segregate malignant GCTs primarily by histology, but then also by age, with numerous transcripts showing age-related differential expression. Such differences are likely to account for the heterogeneous clinico-pathological behaviour of paediatric and adult malignant GCTs. In contrast, as global microRNA signatures of human tumours reflect their developmental lineage, we hypothesized that microRNA profiles would identify common biological abnormalities in all malignant GCTs owing to their presumed shared origin from primordial germ cells. MicroRNAs are short, non-protein-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression via translational repression and/or mRNA degradation. We showed that all malignant GCTs over-express the miR-371–373 and miR-302/367 clusters, regardless of patient age, histological subtype or anatomical tumour site. Furthermore, bioinformatic approaches and subsequent Gene Ontology analysis revealed that these two over-expressed microRNAs clusters co-ordinately down-regulated genes involved in biologically significant pathways in malignant GCTs. The translational potential of this finding has been demonstrated with the detection of elevated serum levels of miR-371–373 and miR-302/367 microRNAs at the time of malignant GCT diagnosis, with levels falling after treatment. The tumour-suppressor let-7 microRNA family has also been shown to be universally down-regulated in malignant GCTs, because of abundant expression of the regulatory gene LIN28. Low let-7 levels resulted in up-regulation of oncogenes including MYCN, AURKB and LIN28 itself, the latter through a direct feedback mechanism. Targeting LIN28, or restoring let-7 levels, both led to effective inhibition of this pathway. In summary, paediatric malignant GCTs show biological differences from their adult

  19. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O.; Clark, Susan K.; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3′-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted. PMID:27489864

  20. TLR ligand suppression or enhancement of Treg cells? A double-edged sword in immunity to tumours.

    PubMed

    Conroy, H; Marshall, N A; Mills, K H G

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are potent activators of innate immune responses, activating dendritic cell (DC) maturation and inflammatory cytokine secretion by innate immune cells and as a consequence they promote adaptive immune response when coadministered with foreign antigens. There is also some evidence from mouse models that TLR ligands can help to break tolerance to self-antigens and promote immune responses to tumour antigens. Therefore, they have been exploited as adjuvants for tumour vaccines or as immunotherapeutics against cancer. Clinical evaluation of TLR agonists has resulted in a licensed immunotherapeutic for basal cell carcinoma, but there have also been disappointing results from clinical trials, with one pharmaceutical company recently halting its clinical programme. A major obstacle to the development of any active immunotherapeutic approach to cancer is the immunosuppressive environment of the growing tumour, including the induction of tolerogenic DCs and regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress the development of protective effector T-cell responses. This can be compounded by the use of TLR ligands as immunotherapeutics. A problem with TLR agonists that has not been fully appreciated is that they can generate suppressive as well as inflammatory responses in innate immune cells and can promote the induction of regulatory as well as effector T cells. This is part of a normal mechanism for limiting collateral damage during infection or sterile inflammation, but can constrain their ability to induce protective antitumour immunity, especially in the immune suppressed environment of the tumour. Alternatively, manipulating the TLR-activated innate immune responses to selectively blocking immunosuppressive arm, as well as that induced by the tumour, may hold the key to enhancing their efficacy as tumour immunotherapeutics and as adjuvants for cancer vaccines.

  1. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  2. Dendrogenin A arises from cholesterol and histamine metabolism and shows cell differentiation and anti-tumour properties.

    PubMed

    de Medina, Philippe; Paillasse, Michael R; Segala, Gregory; Voisin, Maud; Mhamdi, Loubna; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Filleron, Thomas; Pont, Frederic; Saati, Talal Al; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We previously synthesized dendrogenin A and hypothesized that it could be a natural metabolite occurring in mammals. Here we explore this hypothesis and report the discovery of dendrogenin A in mammalian tissues and normal cells as an enzymatic product of the conjugation of 5,6α-epoxy-cholesterol and histamine. Dendrogenin A was not detected in cancer cell lines and was fivefold lower in human breast tumours compared with normal tissues, suggesting a deregulation of dendrogenin A metabolism during carcinogenesis. We established that dendrogenin A is a selective inhibitor of cholesterol epoxide hydrolase and it triggered tumour re-differentiation and growth control in mice and improved animal survival. The properties of dendrogenin A and its decreased level in tumours suggest a physiological function in maintaining cell integrity and differentiation. The discovery of dendrogenin A reveals a new metabolic pathway at the crossroads of cholesterol and histamine metabolism and the existence of steroidal alkaloids in mammals.

  3. Dendrogenin A arises from cholesterol and histamine metabolism and shows cell differentiation and anti-tumour properties

    PubMed Central

    de Medina, Philippe; Paillasse, Michael R.; Segala, Gregory; Voisin, Maud; Mhamdi, Loubna; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Filleron, Thomas; Pont, Frederic; Saati, Talal Al; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We previously synthesized dendrogenin A and hypothesized that it could be a natural metabolite occurring in mammals. Here we explore this hypothesis and report the discovery of dendrogenin A in mammalian tissues and normal cells as an enzymatic product of the conjugation of 5,6α-epoxy-cholesterol and histamine. Dendrogenin A was not detected in cancer cell lines and was fivefold lower in human breast tumours compared with normal tissues, suggesting a deregulation of dendrogenin A metabolism during carcinogenesis. We established that dendrogenin A is a selective inhibitor of cholesterol epoxide hydrolase and it triggered tumour re-differentiation and growth control in mice and improved animal survival. The properties of dendrogenin A and its decreased level in tumours suggest a physiological function in maintaining cell integrity and differentiation. The discovery of dendrogenin A reveals a new metabolic pathway at the crossroads of cholesterol and histamine metabolism and the existence of steroidal alkaloids in mammals. PMID:23673625

  4. Up-regulation of the embryonic self-renewal network through reversible polyploidy in irradiated p53-mutant tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Salmina, Kristine; Jankevics, Eriks; Huna, Anda; Perminov, Dmitry; Radovica, Ilze; Klymenko, Tetyana; Ivanov, Andrey; Jascenko, Elina; Scherthan, Harry; Cragg, Mark; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina

    2010-08-01

    We have previously documented that transient polyploidy is a potential cell survival strategy underlying the clonogenic re-growth of tumour cells after genotoxic treatment. In an attempt to better define this mechanism, we recently documented the key role of meiotic genes in regulating the DNA repair and return of the endopolyploid tumour cells (ETC) to diploidy through reduction divisions after irradiation. Here, we studied the role of the pluripotency and self-renewal stem cell genes NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in this polyploidy-dependent survival mechanism. In irradiation-resistant p53-mutated lymphoma cell-lines (Namalwa and WI-L2-NS) but not sensitive p53 wild-type counterparts (TK6), low background expression of OCT4 and NANOG was up-regulated by ionising radiation with protein accumulation evident in ETC as detected by OCT4/DNA flow cytometry and immunofluorescence (IF). IF analysis also showed that the ETC generate PML bodies that appear to concentrate OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 proteins, which extend into complex nuclear networks. These polyploid tumour cells resist apoptosis, overcome cellular senescence and undergo bi- and multi-polar divisions transmitting the up-regulated OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 self-renewal cassette to their descendents. Altogether, our observations indicate that irradiation-induced ETC up-regulate key components of germ-line cells, which potentially facilitate survival and propagation of the tumour cell population.

  5. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients.

    PubMed

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G; McGuigan, Alison P

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia. PMID:26595121

  6. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia.

  7. Tetrandrine suppresses human glioma growth by inhibiting cell survival, proliferation and tumour angiogenesis through attenuating STAT3 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji-wei; Zhang, Yong; Li, Ru; Ye, Jie-cheng; Li, Hai-ying; Zhang, Yi-kai; Ma, Zheng-lai; Li, Jin-ying; Zhong, Xue-yun; Yang, Xuesong

    2015-10-01

    Tetrandrine (Tet), a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid, has been reported to possess anti-tumour activity. However, its effects on human glioma remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that Tet inhibited human glioma cell growth in vitro and in vivo. It has been hypothesised that Tet inhibits glioma growth by affecting glioma cell survival, proliferation and vasculature in and around the xenograft tumour in the chick CAM model and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) mediated these activities. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis of the inhibitory effects of Tet on cell survival using a TUNEL assay and flow cytometric analysis; on cell proliferation based on the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen; and on angiogenesis using a CAM anti-angiogenesis assay. We used western blotting to investigate the role of STAT3 on the anti-glioma activities of Tet. The results revealed that Tet inhibited survival and proliferation in human glioma cells, impaired tumour angiogenesis and decreased the expression of phosphorylated STAT3 and its downstream proteins. In sum, our data indicate that STAT3 is involved in Tet-induced the regression of glioma growth by activating tumour cell apoptosis, inhibiting glioma cell proliferation and inhibiting angiogenesis. PMID:26086859

  8. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  9. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  10. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  11. Novel population of small tumour-initiating stem cells in the ovaries of women with borderline ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Virant-Klun, Irma; Stimpfel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Small stem cells with diameters of up to 5 μm previously isolated from adult human ovaries indicated pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially primordial germ cells, and developed into primitive oocyte-like cells in vitro. Here, we show that a comparable population of small stem cells can be found in the ovarian tissue of women with borderline ovarian cancer, which, in contrast to small stem cells in “healthy” ovaries, formed spontaneous tumour-like structures and expressed some markers related to pluripotency and germinal lineage. The gene expression profile of these small putative cancer stem cells differed from similar cells sorted from “healthy” ovaries by 132 upregulated and 97 downregulated genes, including some important forkhead box and homeobox genes related to transcription regulation, developmental processes, embryogenesis, and ovarian cancer. These putative cancer stem cells are suggested to be a novel population of ovarian tumour-initiating cells in humans. PMID:27703207

  12. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells)

    PubMed Central

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Background Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. Objective To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. ApcMin/+ mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. Method HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Results Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in ApcMin/+ mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. Conclusions These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death. PMID:23348960

  13. Hyper-IL-15 suppresses metastatic and autochthonous liver cancer by promoting tumour-specific CD8+ T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Du, Xuexiang; Wang, Zheng; Ju, Jianqi; Jia, Mingming; Huang, Qibin; Xing, Qiao; Xu, Meng; Tan, Yi; Liu, Mingyue; Du, Peishuang; Su, Lishan; Wang, Shengdian

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Liver cancer has a very dismal prognosis due to lack of effective therapy. Here, we studied the therapeutic effects of hyper-interleukin15 (hyper-IL-15), which is composed of IL-15 and the sushi domain of the IL-15 receptor α chain, on metastatic and autochthonous liver cancers. Methods Liver metastatic tumour models were established by intraportally injecting syngeneic mice with murine CT26 colon carcinoma cells or B16-OVA melanoma cells. Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was induced by diethylnitrosamine (DEN). A hydrodynamics-based gene delivery method was used to achieve sustained hyper-IL-15 expression in the liver. Results Liver gene delivery of hyper-IL-15 robustly expanded CD8+ T and NK cells, leading to a long-term (more than 40 days) accumulation of CD8+ T cells in vivo, especially in the liver. Hyper-IL-15 treatment exerted remarkable therapeutic effects on well-established liver metastatic tumours and even on DEN-induced autochthonous HCC, and these effects were abolished by depletion of CD8+ T cells but not NK cells. Hyper-IL-15 triggered IL-12 and interferon-γ production and reduced the expression of co-inhibitory molecules on dendritic cells in the liver. Adoptive transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic OT-1 cells showed that hyper-IL-15 preferentially expanded tumour-specific CD8+ T cells and promoted their interferon-γ synthesis and cytotoxicity. Conclusions Liver delivery of hyper-IL-15 provides an effective therapy against well-established metastatic and autochthonous liver cancers in mouse models by preferentially expanding tumour-specific CD8+ T cells and promoting their anti-tumour effects. PMID:25016226

  14. Prooxidative effect of copper--metallothionein in the acute cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Suntres, Zacharias E; Lui, Edmund M K

    2006-01-16

    This study was concerned with the role of copper (Cu) and Cu-metallothionein (Cu-MT) in oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative injury was examined in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells isolated from host mice pretreated with 0, 1 or 2mg of CuSO(4) (ip) 24h earlier. Control Ehrlich cells contained low levels of Cu and Cu treatment produced dose-related increases in cellular Cu and Cu-MT levels and corresponding increases in sensitivity to oxidative toxicity of H(2)O(2) (LC(50), cell blebbing, lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion, and increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)](i)). Hydrogen peroxide treatment also resulted in the oxidation of MT thiolates, reduction in the binding of Cu to MT resulting in translocation of Cu to other subcellular sites. d-penicillamine, a Cu-chelating agent, obliterated the sensitization effect of Cu-pretreatment and reduced the redistribution of MT-bound Cu, suggesting the participation of Cu ions derived from MT in promoting oxidant stress. Additional experiments with desferoxamine and mannitol have revealed the involvement of a Cu-dependent Fenton reaction in the mediation of the prooxidative effect of Cu-MT. These data suggest that cells with high levels of Cu-MT may be particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. PMID:16221516

  15. ERas protein is overexpressed and binds to the activated platelet-derived growth factor β receptor in bovine urothelial tumour cells associated with papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Russo, Valeria; Roperto, Franco; Esposito, Iolanda; Ceccarelli, Dora Maria; Zizzo, Nicola; Leonardi, Leonardo; Capparelli, Rosanna; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe; Roperto, Sante

    2016-06-01

    Embryonic stem cell-expressed Ras (ERas) encodes a constitutively active form of guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that binds to and activates phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), which in turn phosphorylates and activates downstream targets such as Akt. The current study evaluated ERas regulation and expression in papillomavirus-associated urothelial tumours in cattle grazing on lands rich in bracken fern. ERas was found upregulated and overexpressed by PCR, real time PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, protein overexpression was also confirmed by immunohistochemistry. ERas was found to interact physically and colocalise with the activated platelet derived growth factor β receptor (PDGFβR) by coimmunoprecipitation and laser scanning confocal investigations. Phosphorylation of Akt, a downstream effector both of ERas and PDGFβR, appeared to be increased in urothelial tumour cells. Altogether, these data indicate that ERas/PDGFβR complex could play a role in the pathogenesis of bovine papillomavirus-associated bladder neoplasia. PMID:27256024

  16. MINDEC-An Enhanced Negative Depletion Strategy for Circulating Tumour Cell Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Lapin, Morten; Tjensvoll, Kjersti; Oltedal, Satu; Buhl, Tove; Gilje, Bjørnar; Smaaland, Rune; Nordgård, Oddmund

    2016-01-01

    Most current methods of circulating tumour cell (CTC) enrichment target the epithelial protein EpCAM, which is commonly expressed in adenocarcinoma cells. However, such methods will not recover the fraction of CTCs that have a non-epithelial phenotype due to epithelial–mesenchymal transition. For phenotype-independent CTC enrichment, we developed a new enhanced negative depletion strategy—termed MINDEC—that is based on multi-marker (CD45, CD16, CD19, CD163, and CD235a/GYPA) depletion of blood cells rather than targeted enrichment of CTCs. Here we validated the performance of MINDEC using epithelial and mesenchymal cancer cell lines, demonstrating a mean recovery of 82 ± 10%, high depletion (437 ± 350 residual white blood cells (WBCs)/mL peripheral blood), linearity between spiked and recovered cells (correlation coefficient: r = 0.995), and a low detection limit (≥1 cell recovered in all four replicates spiked with 3 cells). For clinical validation of this method, we enumerated CTCs in peripheral blood samples from patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, detecting CTCs in 15 of 21 blood samples (71%) from 9 patients. The promising performance of the MINDEC enrichment strategy in our study encourages validation in larger clinical trials. PMID:27432216

  17. In vitro response of tumour cells to non-uniform irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowerska, N.; Ebert, M. A.; Zhang, M.; Jackson, M.

    2005-07-01

    This study examines differences in tumour cellular response using clonogenic cell survival between uniform and non-uniform irradiation. Cells were irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray intensity-modulated beam, in a single large flask (i.e. intercellular communication is possible) or in three small flasks (i.e. intercellular communication is inhibited across the dose gradient). For non-small-cell lung cancer and melanoma cell lines, the dose response over the entire cell culture was significantly different between freely communicating cell cultures and those with inhibited communication across the dose non-uniformity. Communicating cells exhibited poorer survival in the low dose region of the field but improved survival in the high dose region. In general, the response to non-uniform irradiation appeared to 'average out' over the entire cell culture. This was not seen when intercellular communication was inhibited. The results add strength to the body of evidence regarding bystander effects and the inter-dependence of cellular response.

  18. Metallothionein expression and nuclear size in benign, borderline, and malignant serous ovarian tumours.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y; Sinniah, R; Bay, B H; Singh, G

    1999-09-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low-molecular-weight proteins involved in metalloregulatory functions such as cell proliferation, growth, and differentiation. In recent years, MT expression has been linked with carcinogenesis, resistance to cancer therapy, and tumour progression. However, the significance of MT expression in ovarian cancers is at present inadequately documented. In this study, MT immunohistochemistry was performed in 12 benign, 14 borderline, and eight malignant serous tumours of the ovary. The intensity of the immunostaining was evaluated by image analysis. There was a significantly higher number of MT-immunopositive cells in the multilayered epithelial cells of borderline serous tumours (atypical proliferative serous tumours) than in the single layered epithelial cells within the same tumour, and in the single cell layer of benign serous tumours. There was no difference in the expression of MTs in the single layered tumour cells of benign and borderline serous tumours. Significantly higher numbers of MT-immunopositive cells were observed in both the single and the multilayered epithelial cells of serous carcinomas, the highest number being observed in the multiple layers of serous carcinomas. The positively stained malignant tumour cells in both single and multiple layers were larger than the negatively stained cells in benign, borderline, and malignant serous ovarian tumours. There was moderate to intense staining. These findings indicate that there is increased expression of MTs in the progression of malignancy, which could be used as a marker in grading the three groups of ovarian serous tumours and for determining prognosis.

  19. Immunolocalization of steroid hormone receptors in normal and tumour cells: mechanisms of their cellular traffic.

    PubMed

    Perrot-Applanat, M; Guiochon-Mantel, A; Milgrom, E

    1992-01-01

    Experimental conditions are described for the detection of steroid receptors in tissue sections or cells at the light microscope level. Current knowledge about the ultrastructural distribution of these receptors is summarized; the mechanisms of their nuclear localization are described. Karyophilic signals involved in nuclear translocation are characterized by means of in vitro mutagenesis of steroid receptor cDNAs. Studies analysing the subcellular distribution of various transfected receptor mutants in energy depleted cells together with fusion experiments provide evidence for nucleoplasmic shuttling of progesterone receptors. We conclude that the "nuclear" location of the wild type progesterone receptor reflects a dynamic equilibrium between active nuclear import and outward diffusion. We also describe the use of immunocytochemistry in pathology, especially for the detection of steroid receptors in hormone dependent tumours. PMID:1423330

  20. Tumour-Associated Tissue Eosinophilia in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma- A Boon or a Bane?

    PubMed Central

    Yellapurkar, Shweta; Boaz, Karen; Baliga, Mohan; Shetty, Premalatha; Manaktala, Nidhi; Prasad, Mukul; Ravi, Mahalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The infiltration of tumour stroma by eosinophils, Tumour-Associated Tissue Eosinophilia (TATE) is known to modulate the evolution of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). Identification of eosinophils in the inflammatory stroma has been proven to be an important factor in prognostication of malignant tumours including cancers of mouth, oesophagus, larynx, pharynx, breast, lung, intestine and genitourinary tract. Aim Our study aimed to assess the role of TATE as a prognosticator in OSCC as visualized by Haematoxylin and Eosin (H&E) and congo red staining. Materials and Methods Thirty histologically-proven cases of OSCC were retrieved from the archives of Department of Oral Pathology, Manipal College of Dental Sciences, Mangalore, Manipal University, Karnataka, India. Two serial sections of 4μm thickness were made and subjected to routine staining with H&E and modified congo red staining, where eosinophil granules stained red and nuclei stained blue. In 40x magnification, 10 HPF at invasive tumour front were assessed for counting eosinophils by placing a 49 square grid (measuring 0.0289 sq mm). Statistical Analysis The TATE was compared with the prognosticators using Mann-Whitney U-test. The grades of carcinoma were correlated with TATE using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Post-hoc Bonferronis correction. Agreement of the number of eosinophils counted in the two staining techniques (H&E and Congo red) in OSCC was achieved using interclass correlation coefficient, and Friedman’s test. A value of p< 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results Our results showed that tissue eosinophil counts were higher in well-differentiated cases of OSCC, cases with lymph node involvement, decreased survival, without margin involvement and in cases that did not recur. H&E stain showed significantly better visualization of eosinophils resulting in higher eosinophil counts than when seen with Congo red (p=0.008). Conclusion Thus, TATE can be used as a

  1. Isolation and characterisation of Kasumi-1 human myeloid leukaemia cell line resistant to tumour necrosis factor alpha-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ido, M.; Hayashi, K.; Kato, S.; Ogawa, H.; Komada, Y.; Zhau, Y. W.; Zhang, X. L.; Sakurai, M.; Suzuki, K.

    1996-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha induces apoptosis in a human acute myeloid leukaemia cell line, Kasumi-1. To examine the role of protein phosphorylation in signal transduction of TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis, a variant cell line resistant to TNF-alpha was established by an intermittent challenge of Kasumi-1 cells with increasing concentrations of TNF-alpha for 6 months. The mechanism of resistance to TNF-alpha appears to be in the post-receptor pathway because expression of p55 TNF receptor in the variant cells is increased compared with that of the parental Kasumi-1 cells. In renaturation assays, TNF-alpha induced a rapid activation of different protein kinases of different molecular weights, including the 50 kDa protein kinase (PK50) followed by the 35 kDa protein kinase (PK35), in the parental Kasumi-1 cells. The dose-response of TNF-alpha required to activate PK50 and PK35 was closely related to concentrations of TNF-alpha that induced apoptosis. Treatment of Kasumi-1 cells with ceramide also activated PK35. In TNF-resistant variant cells, activation of PK35 in response to TNF-alpha or ceramide was practically nil. These findings suggest that activation of PK35 through the ceramide pathway may play an important role in signal transduction of TNF-alpha in the Kasumi-1 cell line, while the decreased activation of PK35 may explain the insensitivity of the variant cells towards TNF-alpha. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8562342

  2. A tumour necrosis factor receptor-like protein encoded by Singapore grouper iridovirus modulates cell proliferation, apoptosis and viral replication.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yepin; Huang, Youhua; Wei, Shina; Li, Pengfei; Zhou, Lingli; Ni, Songwei; Huang, Xiaohong; Qin, Qiwei

    2016-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) homologues encoded by viruses are usually involved in virus immune evasion by regulating the host immune response or mediating apoptotic cell death. Here, a novel TNFR-like protein encoded by Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV VP51) was cloned and characterized. Amino acid analysis showed that VP51 contained three cysteine-rich domains (CRDs) and a transmembrane domain at its C terminus. The expression of VP51 in vitro enhanced cell proliferation, and affected cell cycle progression via altering the G1/S transition. Furthermore, VP51 overexpression improved cell viability during SGIV infection via inhibiting virus-induced apoptosis, evidenced by the reduction of apoptotic bodies and the decrease of caspase-3 activation. In addition, overexpression of VP51 increased viral titre and the expression of viral structural protein gene MCP and cell proliferation promoting gene ICP-18. In contrast, the expression of the viral apoptosis inducing gene, LITAF, was significantly decreased. Although all three CRDs were essential for the action of VP51, CRD2 and CRD3 exerted more crucial roles on virus-induced apoptosis, viral gene transcription and virus production, while CRD1 was more crucial for cell proliferation. Together, SGIV TNFR-like products not only affected cell cycle progression and enhanced cell growth by increasing the expression of the virus encoded cell proliferation gene, but also inhibited virus-induced apoptotic cell death by decreasing the expression of the viral apoptosis inducing gene. Our results provided new insights into understanding the underlying mechanism by which iridovirus regulated the apoptotic pathway to complete its life cycle.

  3. Both tumour cells and infiltrating T-cells in equine sarcoids express FOXP3 associated with an immune-supressed cytokine microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A Douglas; Hicks, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Bovine papillomavirus (BPV) infections of equine species have a central role in the aetiology of equine sarcoids; a common benign skin tumour of horses, zebras and donkeys. Within the lesions, all of the early papillomavirus genes are expressed and promote the excessive replication of fibroblasts which characterise these tumours. Equine sarcoids differ from BPV induced fibro-papillomas of cattle (the natural host of BPV), in that they do not produce high amounts of virus particles, do not usually regress spontaneously and do not sero-convert to BPV; features which suggest that affected horses lack an effective anti-viral immune response to BPV. Equine sarcoids contain large numbers of CD4+ CD8+ dual positive T-cells which uniformly express FOXP3, the key transcription factor of regulatory T-cells, and FOXP3 is also expressed within the BPV infected fibroblasts. Compared to healthy skin, sarcoids showed increased mRNA transcription for FOXP3 and the regulatory cytokine TGFβ. Transcription of IL17, which has been shown to have a regulatory function in human papillomavirus-associated tumours, was also elevated in equine sarcoids compared to spleen. In contrast, the levels of mRNA transcripts for effector T cell cytokines IL2, IL4 and interferon-gamma (IFNγ) were not elevated in sarcoids compared to healthy skin or spleen. Similarly neither interferon-alpha (IFNα), interferon-beta (IFNβ) nor IL12 family members were elevated in sarcoids compared to normal skin. We suggest that the regulatory cytokine micro-environment within sarcoids enables the persistence of the lesions by preventing an effective anti-viral immune response. PMID:27160146

  4. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  5. Involvement of the Fas/FasL pathway in the pathogenesis of germ cell tumours of the adult testis.

    PubMed

    Kersemaekers, Anne-Marie F; van Weeren, Pascale C; Oosterhuis, J Wolter; Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2002-04-01

    Induction of apoptosis by Fas ligand (FasL) of Fas-containing cells is a known mechanism involved in the eradication of inappropriate cells during normal development. Alterations of the Fas/FasL pathway have been found in various types of cancer, leading to circumvention of attack of the tumour by the immune system. An alternative way to circumvent eradication by induction of apoptosis is through changes in the downstream inhibitors. For example, Fas-associating phosphatase-1 (Fap-1) binds directly to the Fas receptor and results in a block of the downstream signalling. To shed more light on the role of the Fas/FasL pathway in the development of human testicular germ cell tumours of the adult testis, this study investigated the presence of Fas, FasL, Fap-1, HLA class I and II molecules, CD45 (lymphocyte marker), and CD57 [natural killer (NK) cell marker] by immunohistochemistry on frozen sections of 41 cases of seminomas, non-seminomas, and spermatocytic seminomas. Every germ cell tumour was positive for Fap-1 and negative for HLA classes I and II, like their non-malignant cells of origin. The infiltrating lymphocytes, predominantly present in seminomas, showed consistently positive staining for Fas and CD45, but not for Fap-1. No Fas was found on NK cells. All seminomas and non-seminomas (except teratomas), including their precursor stages, carcinoma in situ, intratubular seminoma and intratubular non-seminoma, showed positive staining for FasL, but not for Fas. Teratoma showed no staining for FasL and was positive for Fas. In contrast, both Fas and FasL were detectable on spermatocytic seminoma. These data indicate a different regulation of the Fas/FasL system in seminoma and spermatocytic seminoma, supporting a separate pathogenesis for these germ cell-derived tumours. The presence of Fap-1 in all histological variants of germ cell tumours might be related to the consistently positive staining in cells of the germ lineage. This study indicates that production of

  6. Treating giant cell tumours with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation.

    PubMed

    Moon, Myung-Sang; Kim, Sung-SooS S; Moon, Jeong-Lim; Kim, Sung-Sim; Moon, Hanlim

    2013-08-01

    PURPOSE. To report on 23 patients with giant cell tumour (GCT) of the femur or tibia treated with curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation. METHODS. Records of these 14 men and 9 women aged 22 to 38 (mean, 31) years were reviewed. The most common site involved was the distal femur (n=13), followed by proximal tibia (n=8), proximal femur (n=1), and distal tibia (n=1). The lesions were classified as grade I (n=3), grade II (n=18), and grade III (n=2). Based on histology, the tumour stage was classified as grade I (n=5) and grade II (n=18). Two of these patients had recurrences, which were initially treated with simple curettage and bone grafting of the distal femur and distal tibia. RESULTS. The mean follow-up period was 5.7 (range, 2.5-10.1) years. 14 of the 23 patients were followed up for over 10 years. No patient developed any local recurrence, remote metastasis, or complication related to surgery or adjuvant therapy. CONCLUSION. Combined treatment entailing curettage, electrocautery, burring, phenol irrigation, and cementation was effective in treating GCT of bone.

  7. Circulating tumour cells--a bona fide cause of metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Caixeiro, N J; Kienzle, N; Lim, S H; Spring, K J; Tognela, A; Scott, K F; de Souza, P; Becker, T M

    2014-09-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are emerging as important prognostic markers and have potential clinical utility as tumour biomarkers for targeted cancer therapy. Although CTCs were proposed more than 100 years ago as potential precursors that may form metastatic lesions, formal evidence that CTCs are indeed capable of initiating metastases is limited. Moreover, the process of CTCs shedding into the circulation, relocating to distant organ sites and initiating metastatic foci is complex and intrinsically inefficient. To partially explain the metastatic process, the concepts of CTCs as metastatic precursors or pre-metastatic conditioners have been proposed; however, it is questionable as to whether these are both variable pathways to metastasis or just markers of metastatic burden. This review explores the evidence for CTCs in the initiation and progression of metastatic cancer and the data supporting these different concepts in an attempt to better understand the role of CTCs in metastasis. A greater understanding of the metastatic potential of CTCs will open new avenues for therapeutic interventions in the future.

  8. Primary renal carcinoid tumour with lung metastasis misdiagnosed as renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Daboul, Nour; Monga, Dulabh; Bunker, Mark

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old man with a history of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) diagnosed 10 years prior, status post right nephrectomy, presented for evaluation of pulmonary nodules. A year after the nephrectomy, he had undergone cutaneous metastasectomy in the right flank area, and a further 2 years later he had had his second cutaneous metastasectomy in the right chest wall. Both cutaneous pathologies had, at the time, shown metastatic neoplasm with histological features compatible with those of the previous renal tumour. He was treated with sorafenib. 3 years later he developed asymptomatic pulmonary nodules, which gradually doubled in size over the next 2.5 years. He underwent bronchoscopy and left lower lobe biopsy. Pathology revealed a metastatic renal carcinoid/neuroendocrine tumour. Second review of the previous renal neoplasm and the cutaneous metastatic pathology showed trabecular architecture, consistent with carcinoid, but mimicking the long parallel arrays that have been described in some cases of papillary RCC. PMID:26951438

  9. Targeting Human Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumour Cells with a Quadruplex-binding Small Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Gunaratnam, Mekala; Beltran, Monica; Galesa, Katja; Haider, Shozeb M.; Reszka, Anthony P.; Cuenca, Francisco; Fletcher, Jonathan A.; Neidle, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The majority of human gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST) are driven by activating mutations in the proto-oncogene KIT, a tyrosine kinase receptor. Clinical treatment with imatinib targets the kinase domain of KIT, but tumour regrowth occurs as a result of the development of resistant mutations in the kinase active site. An alternative small-molecule approach to GIST therapy is described, in which the KIT gene is directly targeted, and thus kinase resistance may be circumvented. A naphthalene dimiide derivative has been used to demonstrate the concept of dual quadruplex targeting. This compound strongly stabilises both telomeric quadruplex DNA and quadruplex sites in the KIT promoter in vitro. It is shown here that the compound is a potent inducer of growth arrest in a patient-derived GIST cell line at a concentration (ca 1μM) that also results in effective inhibition of telomerase activity and almost complete suppression of KIT mRNA and KIT protein expression. Molecular modelling studies with a telomeric quadruplex have been used to rationalise aspects of the experimental quadruplex melting data. PMID:19469547

  10. Game theory in the death galaxy: interaction of cancer and stromal cells in tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Wu, Amy; Liao, David; Tlsty, Thea D; Sturm, James C; Austin, Robert H

    2014-08-01

    Preventing relapse is the major challenge to effective therapy in cancer. Within the tumour, stromal (ST) cells play an important role in cancer progression and the emergence of drug resistance. During cancer treatment, the fitness of cancer cells can be enhanced by ST cells because their molecular signalling interaction delays the drug-induced apoptosis of cancer cells. On the other hand, competition among cancer and ST cells for space or resources should not be ignored. We explore the population dynamics of multiple myeloma (MM) versus bone marrow ST cells by using an experimental microecology that we call the death galaxy, with a stable drug gradient and connected microhabitats. Evolutionary game theory is a quantitative way to capture the frequency-dependent nature of interactive populations. Therefore, we use evolutionary game theory to model the populations in the death galaxy with the gradients of pay-offs and successfully predict the future densities of MM and ST cells. We discuss the possible clinical use of such analysis for predicting cancer progression.

  11. Therapeutically engineered induced neural stem cells are tumour-homing and inhibit progression of glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bagó, Juli R.; Alfonso-Pecchio, Adolfo; Okolie, Onyi; Dumitru, Raluca; Rinkenbaugh, Amanda; Baldwin, Albert S.; Miller, C. Ryan; Magness, Scott T.; Hingtgen, Shawn D.

    2016-01-01

    Transdifferentiation (TD) is a recent advancement in somatic cell reprogramming. The direct conversion of TD eliminates the pluripotent intermediate state to create cells that are ideal for personalized cell therapy. Here we provide evidence that TD-derived induced neural stem cells (iNSCs) are an efficacious therapeutic strategy for brain cancer. We find that iNSCs genetically engineered with optical reporters and tumouricidal gene products retain the capacity to differentiate and induced apoptosis in co-cultured human glioblastoma cells. Time-lapse imaging shows that iNSCs are tumouritropic, homing rapidly to co-cultured glioblastoma cells and migrating extensively to distant tumour foci in the murine brain. Multimodality imaging reveals that iNSC delivery of the anticancer molecule TRAIL decreases the growth of established solid and diffuse patient-derived orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts 230- and 20-fold, respectively, while significantly prolonging the median mouse survival. These findings establish a strategy for creating autologous cell-based therapies to treat patients with aggressive forms of brain cancer. PMID:26830441

  12. Anti-tumour activity of two novel compounds in cisplatin-resistant testicular germ cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nitzsche, B; Gloesenkamp, C; Schrader, M; Hoffmann, B; Zengerling, F; Balabanov, S; Honecker, F; Höpfner, M

    2012-01-01

    Background: Resistance to cisplatin-based chemotherapy is associated with poor prognosis in testicular germ cell cancer, emphasising the need for new therapeutic approaches. In this respect, the therapeutic concept of anti-angiogenesis is of particular interest. In a previous study, we presented two novel anti-angiogenic compounds, HP-2 and HP-14, blocking the tyrosine kinase activity of angiogenic growth factor receptors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), and related signalling pathways in testicular cancer. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of these new compounds in platinum-resistant testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs), in vitro and in vivo. Methods and results: Drug-induced changes in cell proliferation of the cisplatin-sensitive TGCT cell line 2102EP and its cisplatin-resistant counterpart 2102EP-R, both expressing the VEGFR-2, were evaluated by crystal violet staining. Both compounds inhibited the growth of cisplatin-resistant TGCT cells in a dose-dependent manner. In combination experiments with cisplatin, HP-14 revealed additive growth-inhibitory effects in TGCT cells, irrespective of the level of cisplatin resistance. Anti-angiogenic effects of HP compounds were confirmed by tube formation assays with freshly isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Using TGCT cells inoculated onto the chorioallantoic membrane of fertilised chicken eggs (chicken chorioallantoic membrane assay), the anti-angiogenic and anti-proliferative potency of the novel compounds was also demonstrated in vivo. Gene expression profiling revealed changes in the expression pattern of genes related to DNA damage detection and repair, as well as in chaperone function after treatment with both cisplatin and HP-14, alone or in combination. This suggests that HP-14 can revert the lost effectiveness of cisplatin in the resistant cells by altering the expression of critical genes. Conclusion: The novel compound HP-14 effectively inhibits the

  13. Suppression of tumour growth by orally administered osteopontin is accompanied by alterations in tumour blood vessels

    PubMed Central

    Rittling, S R; Wejse, P L; Yagiz, K; Warot, G A; Hui, T

    2014-01-01

    Background: The integrin-binding protein osteopontin is strongly associated with tumour development, yet is an abundant dietary component as a constituent of human and bovine milk. Therefore, we tested the effect of orally administered osteopontin (o-OPN) on the development of subcutaneous tumours in mice. Methods: Bovine milk osteopontin was administered in drinking water to tumour-bearing immune-competent mice. Tumour growth, proliferation, necrosis, apoptosis and blood vessel size and number were measured. Expression of the α9 integrin was determined. Results: o-OPN suppressed tumour growth, increased the extent of necrosis, and induced formation of abnormally large blood vessels. Anti-OPN reactivity detected in the plasma of OPN-null mice fed OPN suggested that tumour-blocking peptides were absorbed during digestion, but the o-OPN effect was likely distinct from that of an RGD peptide. Expression of the α9 integrin was detected on both tumour cells and blood vessels. Potential active peptides from the α9 binding site of OPN were identified by mass spectrometry following in vitro digestion, and injection of these peptides suppressed tumour growth. Conclusions: These results suggest that peptides derived from o-OPN are absorbed and interfere with tumour growth and normal vessel development. o-OPN-derived peptides that target the α9 integrin are likely involved. PMID:24473400

  14. Low tumour cell proliferation at the invasive margin is associated with a poor prognosis in Dukes' stage B colorectal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Palmqvist, R; Sellberg, P; Öberg, Å; Tavelin, B; Rutegård, J N; Stenling, R

    1999-01-01

    The conflicting results about the prognostic impact of tumour cell proliferation in colorectal cancer might be explained by the heterogeneity observed within these tumours. We have investigated whether a systematic spatial heterogeneity exists between different compartments, and whether the presence of such a systematic heterogeneity has any impact on survival. Fifty-six Dukes' stage B colorectal cancers were carefully morphometrically quantified with respect to the immunohistochemical expression of the proliferative marker Ki-67 at both the luminal border and the invasive margin. The proliferative activity was significantly higher at the luminal border compared with the invasive margin (P < 0.001), although the two compartments were also significantly correlated with each other. Tumours with low proliferation at the invasive margin had a significantly poorer prognosis both in univariate (P = 0.014) and in multivariate survival analyses (P = 0.042). We conclude that Dukes' B colorectal cancers exhibit a systematic spatial heterogeneity with respect to proliferation, and tumours with low proliferation at the invasive margin had a poor prognosis. The present data independently confirm recent results from the authors, and provide new insights into the understanding of tumour cell proliferation in colorectal cancer. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10027333

  15. Co-stimulation of gastrointestinal tumour cell growth by gastrin, transforming growth factor alpha and insulin like growth factor-I.

    PubMed Central

    Durrant, L. G.; Watson, S. A.; Hall, A.; Morris, D. L.

    1991-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptors and insulin like growth factor-I receptors were co-expressed on two gastric and three colorectal tumour cell lines. Previous studies have shown that gastrin receptors were also expressed at a low level or two of these cell lines. Both TGF alpha and IGF-I promoted cell growth in all of the cell lines tested. The cell doubling time of a colorectal cell line was reduced from 48 to 30-34 h. Furthermore the effects of the growth factors were additive. Each growth factor also increased the response of the cells to gastrin, but a combination of both growth factors and gastrin did not further increase growth. PMID:1846553

  16. Internal temperature increase during photothermal tumour ablation in mice using gold nanorods.

    PubMed

    Mooney, R; Schena, E; Zhumkhawala, A; Aboody, K S; Berlin, J M

    2015-01-01

    Laser ablation (LA) is gaining large acceptance in the treatment of tumor. One of the main risks of this treatment is damaging the healthy tissue around the tumor. Among the solutions proposed to improve the selectivity of the LA and to localize heating to tumor tissue, the use of gold nanoparticles is one of the most promising. The aim of this work is threefold: i) to measure the temperature increase within the tumor during plasmonic photothermal therapy using gold nanorods; ii) to investigate the influence of nanorods concentration and laser settings on both the intra-tumoral temperature and the tumor surface temperature; iii) and to establish the nanorods concentrations able to cause tumor resorption at a defined laser settings. Two sets of trials were performed: i) 16 mice were divided in four groups with different treatment time (i.e., 5 min, 2 min, 1 min, and 30s), with constant gold nanorods amount (i.e., 12.5 μg) and laser power (i.e., 3 W·cm(-2)); ii) 16 mice were divided in four groups treated with different amount of gold nanorods (i.e., control, 12.5 μg, 25 μg, 50 μg) for 5 min at 2 W·cm(-2). Results show significant differences between internal and surface temperatures. We also demonstrate that this temperature difference increases with nanoparticle concentrations, decreases with laser power, and is not influenced by treatment time. This information is critical to improve the theoretical models that will guide future study designs in sensitive orthotopic tumor models. PMID:26736815

  17. Light-oxygen effect in cells and its potential applications in tumour therapy (review)

    SciTech Connect

    Zakharov, S D; Ivanov, Andrei V

    1999-12-31

    The light-oxygen effect (POE) represents damage (and at low optical doses, activation) of cells by photogeneration of molecular singlet oxygen from O{sub 2} dissolved in cells, in accordance with the reaction: {sup 3}O{sub 2}+h{nu}{yields}{sup 1}O{sub 2}{yields} biological effect. The phases of evolution of the LOE are similar to the phases, observed in cell experiments, of the photodynamic effect (PDE) the mechanism of which is the basis of the familiar method of photodynamic cancer therapy. The reported proofs of the occurrence of the LOE are in the form of detailed spectra of the biological action of optical radiation on cells recorded in four spectral intervals with the aid of tunable lasers. Allowances are made for the relationships governing a new type of cell excitation, associated with reversible structural transitions in the biomembrane. A demonstration is reported of the same efficiency of cw and pulsed irradiation. An analysis is made of the reasons why the optical doses initiating the PDE and the LOE are comparable. The results are given of the first experimental applications of the LOE in tumour therapy. Identification of the primary photoacceptor (O{sub 2}) in cell biostimulation and photodestruction provides a scientific basis for the development of low-intensity laser light-oxygen cancer therapy methods. (lasers in medicine)

  18. Lysyl oxidase-like-2 promotes tumour angiogenesis and is a potential therapeutic target in angiogenic tumours.

    PubMed

    Zaffryar-Eilot, Shelly; Marshall, Derek; Voloshin, Tali; Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Spangler, Rhyannon; Kessler, Ofra; Ghermazien, Haben; Brekhman, Vera; Suss-Toby, Edith; Adam, Dan; Shaked, Yuval; Smith, Victoria; Neufeld, Gera

    2013-10-01

    Lysyl oxidase-like 2 (LOXL2), a secreted enzyme that catalyzes the cross-linking of collagen, plays an essential role in developmental angiogenesis. We found that administration of the LOXL2-neutralizing antibody AB0023 inhibited bFGF-induced angiogenesis in Matrigel plug assays and suppressed recruitment of angiogenesis promoting bone marrow cells. Small hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of LOXL2 expression or inhibition of LOXL2 using AB0023 reduced the migration and network-forming ability of endothelial cells, suggesting that the inhibition of angiogenesis results from a direct effect on endothelial cells. To examine the effects of AB0023 on tumour angiogenesis, AB0023 was administered to mice bearing tumours derived from SKOV-3 ovarian carcinoma or Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells. AB0023 treatment significantly reduced the microvascular density in these tumours but did not inhibit tumour growth. However, treatment of mice bearing SKOV-3-derived tumours with AB0023 also promoted increased coverage of tumour vessels with pericytes and reduced tumour hypoxia, providing evidence that anti-LOXL2 therapy results in the normalization of tumour blood vessels. In agreement with these data, treatment of mice bearing LLC-derived tumours with AB0023 improved the perfusion of the tumour-associated vessels as determined by ultrasonography. Improved perfusion and normalization of tumour vessels after treatment with anti-angiogenic agents were previously found to improve the delivery of chemotherapeutic agents into tumours and to result in an enhancement of chemotherapeutic efficiency. Indeed, treatment with AB0023 significantly enhanced the anti-tumourigenic effects of taxol. Our results suggest that inhibition of LOXL2 may prove beneficial for the treatment of angiogenic tumours.

  19. Proliferating tricholemmal tumour: clinicopathological aspects of a case.

    PubMed

    Khoja, A A; Yan, B; Lee, S J; Cheong, E C; Tan, K B

    2011-12-01

    We report the case of a 49-year-old man who presented with an enlarging mass over his occipital scalp. The clinical impression was either a squamous cell carcinoma or an unusual adnexal tumour. A wide excision was performed with skin grafting. Gross examination revealed a large exophytic tumour mass measuring 10 cm. Histopathological examination showed a circumscribed, well-differentiated squamoproliferative lesion with a lobulated architecture. Clear cell features, pilar-type keratinisation, microcalcifications and the presence of mucinous degeneration were noted. A diagnosis of proliferating tricholemmal tumour was made. This entity incorporates a spectrum of lesions, ranging from the mostly benign proliferating tricholemmal cyst to tumours having more atypical cellular and invasive features, the latter features correlating with an increased capacity for aggressive behaviour. Management-wise, such tumours require complete excision with follow-up. As the tumours are often large in size at presentation, reconstruction is required. PMID:22159947

  20. Electrochemotherapy of Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Sersa, Gregor; Miklavcic, Damijan

    2008-01-01

    Electrochemotherapy is a combined use of certain chemotherapeutic drugs and electric pulses applied to the treated tumour nodule. Local application of electric pulses to the tumour increases drug delivery into cells, specifically at the site of electric pulse application. Drug uptake by delivery of electric pulses is increased for only those chemotherapeutic drugs whose transport through the plasma membrane is impeded. Among many drugs that have been tested so far, bleomycin and cisplatin found their way from preclinical testing to clinical use. Clinical data collected within a number of clinical studies indicate that approximately 80% of the treated cutaneous and subcutaneous tumour nodules of different malignancies are in an objective response, from these, approximately 70% in complete response after a single application of electrochemotherapy. Usually only one treatment is needed, however, electrochemotherapy can be repeated several times every few weeks with equal effectiveness each time. The treatment results in an effective eradication of the treated nodules, with a good cosmetic effect without tissue scarring. PMID:19229171

  1. Modulation by glycyrrhizin of the cell-surface expression of H-2 class I antigens on murine tumour cell lines and normal cell populations.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y H; Yoshida, T; Isobe, K; Rahman, S M; Nagase, F; Ding, L; Nakashima, I

    1990-01-01

    Glycyrrhizin (GL), a saponin fraction of licorice with defined chemical structure, was shown to display a definite action in vitro augmenting the cell-surface expression of H-2 class I antigens as well as class I gene transcription on various tumour cell lines. The magnitude of augmentation was varied among eight different cell lines tested, but reached more than three times. It was also found that GL enhanced the expression of H-2Dd antigens in some normal cell populations in vivo. The augmentation of H-2 class I antigens on tumour cell lines in vitro was probably not mediated by the interferon, which might have been produced by the cultured cells. These findings may suggest a new immunopharmacological action of GL. Images Figure 4 PMID:1696243

  2. Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus induces tumour necrosis factor-alpha in murine astrocyte cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sierra, A; Rubio, N

    1993-01-01

    Cytokines have been postulated to exert an important modulatory and recruiting role in demyelination induced by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in SJL/J mice. Using a cytolytic bioassay and ELISA, we have detected and quantified a cytokine, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), in supernatants from astrocyte cultures infected in vitro with TMEV. TNF was detected only after TMEV-specific infection of astrocyte cultures (approximately 200-400 U/ml). In vitro TNF synthesis appeared in a dose- and time-dependent manner and was produced by both SJL/J (a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination) and BALB/c (a resistant strain) astrocytes. The precise nature of TNF activity was further assessed by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC) and antibody neutralization. These results indicate an active role for astrocytes as accessory immune cells in our experimental model for multiple sclerosis. PMID:8478023

  3. Clinical challenges in the molecular characterization of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lianidou, E S; Mavroudis, D; Georgoulias, V

    2013-06-25

    Blood testing for circulating tumour cells (CTC) has emerged as one of the hottest fields in cancer research. CTC detection and enumeration can serve as a 'liquid biopsy' and an early marker of response to systemic therapy, whereas their molecular characterisation has a strong potential to be translated to individualised targeted treatments and spare breast cancer (BC) patients unnecessary and ineffective therapies. Different analytical systems for CTC detection and isolation have been developed and new areas of research are directed towards developing novel assays for CTC molecular characterisation. Molecular characterisation of single CTC holds considerable promise for predictive biomarker assessment and to explore CTC heterogeneity. The application of extremely powerful next-generation sequencing technologies in the area of CTC molecular characterisation in combination with reliable single CTC isolation opens new frontiers for the management of patients in the near future. This review is mainly focused on the clinical potential of the molecular characterisation of CTC in BC.

  4. Simultaneous removal of a tumour of the right atrium and inferior vena cava and coronary bypass-grafting in a patient with recurrent clear renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pietrzyk, Edward; Głuszek, Stanisław; Michta, Kamil; Kot, Marta; Wożakowska-Kapłon, Beata

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cardiac tumours are the most common malignant cardiac tumours. In the early stages they are usually asymptomatic, but their consequences can be very serious, and the prognosis is poor. We present a patient with recurrent renal cell carcinoma as a tumour of the right atrium and the vena cava inferior in whom cancerous masses were removed with simultaneously coronary artery bypass-grafting. PMID:26855653

  5. Trophoblastic cell lines generated from tumour necrosis factor receptor-deficient mice reveal specific functions for the two tumour necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, C A; Pace, J L; Banerjee, S; Phillips, T A; Hunt, J S

    1999-01-01

    In mice and humans, expression of the tumour necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNF-R1) gene in placental trophoblast cells is constitutive whereas expression of the TNF-R2 gene is developmentally programmed. In order to study the individual functions of TNF-R1 and -R2 in this lineage, cell lines were generated from placental explants of homozygous matings of gestation day 10 outbred mice (Swiss-Webster), TNF-R1-deficient (TNF-R1-/-) and TNF-R2-/- transgenic mice as well as the background strain for the TNF-R2-/- mice (WT, C57BL/6x129). All of the cells exhibited trophoblast markers; they contained cytokeratin intermediate filaments, expressed alkaline phosphatase activity and displayed transferrin receptors, but were negative for vimentin filaments and the macrophage marker, F4/80. Analysis of DNA by polymerase chain reaction demonstrated the expected TNF-R genotype in each line. In experiments testing the effects of recombinant mouse TNF-alpha (rmTNF-alpha) on viability and proliferation of the cell lines, rmTNF-alpha modestly but dose-dependently inhibited the growth of WT and TNF-R2-/- cells while having no effect on TNF-R1-/- cells. Actinomycin D-treated WT and, to a lesser extent, TNF-R2-/- cells, were more sensitive to growth inhibition than untreated cells whereas TNF-R1-/- cell responses remained unchanged. These data indicated that rmTNF-alpha inhibits growth of trophoblastic cells through TNF-R1 and that newly synthesized protein(s) provide partial protection against toxicity. In contrast to the receptor species-specific effects on cell growth exerted by rmTNF-alpha, both TNF-R mediated inhibition of alkaline phosphatase activity. Collectively, the observations support the postulate that receptor expression is the key factor which determines the nature and extent of TNF-alpha effects on trophoblast cell growth and function.

  6. Inhibition of 5′-nucleotidase from Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells by nucleoside triphosphates

    PubMed Central

    Murray, A. W.; Friedrichs, Beverly

    1969-01-01

    1. 5′-Nucleotidase activity was obtained in a soluble form after treatment of a particulate fraction from Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells with deoxycholate. The relative rates of hydrolysis of 6-thioinosine 5′-phosphate, UMP, AMP, CMP, GMP, IMP, xanthosine monophosphate, thymidine monophosphate and 2′,3′-AMP were 180, 129, 100, 93, 83, 79, 46, 41 and 3 respectively. 2. Values found for the Michaelis constant were: AMP, 67±12μm; IMP, 111±8μm; GMP, 93μm. 3. ATP and thymidine triphosphate were competitive inhibitors of AMP hydrolysis (inhibitor constants 0·4 and 4·8μm respectively); UTP, GTP and CTP were mixed competitive and non-competitive inhibitors. Thymidine triphosphate was a competitive inhibitor of IMP hydrolysis (inhibitor constant 14·4μm) and ATP, UTP and GTP showed mixed competitive and non-competitive inhibition. 4. ATP, thymidine triphosphate, UTP, GTP and CTP did not completely inhibit hydrolysis of AMP, IMP and UMP; the concentrations of ATP required to inhibit AMP and IMP hydrolysis by 50% were 12 and 230μm respectively. 5. Non-hyperbolic curves relating activity to UMP concentration were obtained in the presence and absence of triphosphates. 6. After fractionation on Sephadex G-200 columns a single peak of 5′-nucleotidase activity (particle weight 120000–125000) was obtained with AMP, IMP and GMP as substrates. UMP hydrolysis was catalysed by enzyme in this peak and in two slower peaks corresponding to apparent particle weights of 32000 and 16000; a single component (particle weight 120000), reacting with UMP and insensitive to UTP inhibition, was obtained when the column was eluted with buffer containing 1mm-UMP. 7. The possible significance of the results in the regulation of tumour-cell 5′-nucleotidase is discussed. PMID:5775689

  7. Genetic mutations in accordance with a low malignant potential tumour are not demonstrated in clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Raspollini, Maria Rosaria; Castiglione, Francesca; Cheng, Liang; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma (CCPRCC) cases were evaluated for mutations on the following genes: KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, ERBB2, DDR2, MAP2K1, RET and EGFR. Four male and three female patients of age 42-74 years were evaluated. All cases were incidentally detected by ultrasound and ranged 1.8-3.5 cm. Microscopic examination showed variably tubulopapillary, tubular acinar, cystic architecture and the characteristic linear arrangement of nuclei. The cells were reactive with CK7 (strong), CA IX (cup-shape) and 34 β E12. CD10, AMACR/RACEMASE and GATA3 were negative. There were no mutations on any of the investigated genes. This preliminary observation supports the concept that CCPRCC might be indeed an indolent tumour worth it to be named as clear cell papillary neoplasm of low potential. PMID:26941183

  8. AP-2γ promotes proliferation in breast tumour cells by direct repression of the CDKN1A gene

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Christopher M J; Scibetta, Angelo G; Friedrich, J Karsten; Canosa, Monica; Berlato, Chiara; Moss, Charlotte H; Hurst, Helen C

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression of the activator protein (AP)-2γ transcription factor in breast tumours has been identified as an independent predictor of poor outcome and failure of hormone therapy. To understand further the function of AP-2γ in breast carcinoma, we have used an RNA interference and gene expression profiling strategy with the MCF-7 cell line as a model. Gene expression changes between control and silenced cells implicate AP-2γ in the control of cell cycle progression and developmental signalling. A function for AP-2γ in cell cycle control was verified using flow cytometry: AP-2γ silencing led to a partial G1/S arrest and induction of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21cip/CDKN1A. Reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated a direct, functional interaction by AP-2γ at the CDKN1A proximal promoter. AP-2γ silencing coincided with acquisition of an active chromatin conformation at the CDKN1A locus and increased gene expression. These data provide a mechanism whereby AP-2γ overexpression can promote breast epithelial proliferation and, coupled with previously published data, suggest how loss of oestrogen regulation of AP-2γ may contribute to the failure of hormone therapy in patients. PMID:19798054

  9. Mathematical modelling of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, Imran; Humbert-Vidan, Laia; Chen, Tao; South, Christopher P.; Ezhil, Veni; Kirkby, Norman F.; Jena, Rajesh; Nisbet, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    This paper reports a modelling study of tumour volume dynamics in response to stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). The main objective was to develop a model that is adequate to describe tumour volume change measured during SABR, and at the same time is not excessively complex as lacking support from clinical data. To this end, various modelling options were explored, and a rigorous statistical method, the Akaike information criterion, was used to help determine a trade-off between model accuracy and complexity. The models were calibrated to the data from 11 non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with SABR. The results showed that it is feasible to model the tumour volume dynamics during SABR, opening up the potential for using such models in a clinical environment in the future.

  10. A patient-specific therapeutic approach for tumour cell population extinction and drug toxicity reduction using control systems-based dose-profile design

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background When anti-tumour therapy is administered to a tumour-host environment, an asymptotic tapering extremity of the tumour cell distribution is noticed. This extremity harbors a small number of residual tumour cells that later lead to secondary malignances. Thus, a method is needed that would enable the malignant population to be completely eliminated within a desired time-frame, negating the possibility of recurrence and drug-induced toxicity. Methods In this study, we delineate a computational procedure using the inverse input-reconstruction approach to calculate the unknown drug stimulus input, when one desires a known output tissue-response (full tumour cell elimination, no excess toxicity). The asymptotic extremity is taken care of using a bias shift of tumour-cell distribution and guided control of drug administration, with toxicity limits enforced, during mutually-synchronized chemotherapy (as Temozolomide) and immunotherapy (Interleukin-2 and Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte). Results Quantitative modeling is done using representative characteristics of rapidly and slowly-growing tumours. Both were fully eliminated within 2 months with checks for recurrence and toxicity over a two-year time-line. The dose-time profile of the therapeutic agents has similar features across tumours: biphasic (lymphocytes), monophasic (chemotherapy) and stationary (interleukin), with terminal pulses of the three agents together ensuring elimination of all malignant cells. The model is then justified with clinical case studies and animal models of different neurooncological tumours like glioma, meningioma and glioblastoma. Conclusion The conflicting oncological objectives of tumour-cell extinction and host protection can be simultaneously accommodated using the techniques of drug input reconstruction by enforcing a bias shift and guided control over the drug dose-time profile. For translational applicability, the procedure can be adapted to accommodate varying patient parameters

  11. Tumour-initiating cell-specific miR-1246 and miR-1290 expression converge to promote non-small cell lung cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen Cai; Chin, Tan Min; Yang, Henry; Nga, Min En; Lunny, Declan Patrick; Lim, Edwin Kok Hao; Sun, Li Li; Pang, Yin Huei; Leow, Yi Ning; Malusay, Shanneen Rossellini Y; Lim, Priscilla Xin Hui; Lee, Jeravan Zili; Tan, Benedict Jian Wei; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Lim, Elaine Hsuen; Lim, Wan Teck; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Tan, Eng Huat; Tai, Bee Choo; Soo, Ross Andrew; Tam, Wai Leong; Lim, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The tumour-initiating cell (TIC) model accounts for phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among tumour cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulatory molecules frequently aberrantly expressed in cancers, and may contribute towards tumour heterogeneity and TIC behaviour. More recent efforts have focused on miRNAs as diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Here, we identified the TIC-specific miRNAs, miR-1246 and miR-1290, as crucial drivers for tumour initiation and cancer progression in human non-small cell lung cancer. The loss of either miRNA impacted the tumour-initiating potential of TICs and their ability to metastasize. Longitudinal analyses of serum miR-1246 and miR-1290 levels across time correlate their circulating levels to the clinical response of lung cancer patients who were receiving ongoing anti-neoplastic therapies. Functionally, direct inhibition of either miRNA with locked nucleic acid administered systemically, can arrest the growth of established patient-derived xenograft tumours, thus indicating that these miRNAs are clinically useful as biomarkers for tracking disease progression and as therapeutic targets. PMID:27325363

  12. Tumour-initiating cell-specific miR-1246 and miR-1290 expression converge to promote non-small cell lung cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen Cai; Chin, Tan Min; Yang, Henry; Nga, Min En; Lunny, Declan Patrick; Lim, Edwin Kok Hao; Sun, Li Li; Pang, Yin Huei; Leow, Yi Ning; Malusay, Shanneen Rossellini Y; Lim, Priscilla Xin Hui; Lee, Jeravan Zili; Tan, Benedict Jian Wei; Shyh-Chang, Ng; Lim, Elaine Hsuen; Lim, Wan Teck; Tan, Daniel Shao Weng; Tan, Eng Huat; Tai, Bee Choo; Soo, Ross Andrew; Tam, Wai Leong; Lim, Bing

    2016-01-01

    The tumour-initiating cell (TIC) model accounts for phenotypic and functional heterogeneity among tumour cells. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are regulatory molecules frequently aberrantly expressed in cancers, and may contribute towards tumour heterogeneity and TIC behaviour. More recent efforts have focused on miRNAs as diagnostic or therapeutic targets. Here, we identified the TIC-specific miRNAs, miR-1246 and miR-1290, as crucial drivers for tumour initiation and cancer progression in human non-small cell lung cancer. The loss of either miRNA impacted the tumour-initiating potential of TICs and their ability to metastasize. Longitudinal analyses of serum miR-1246 and miR-1290 levels across time correlate their circulating levels to the clinical response of lung cancer patients who were receiving ongoing anti-neoplastic therapies. Functionally, direct inhibition of either miRNA with locked nucleic acid administered systemically, can arrest the growth of established patient-derived xenograft tumours, thus indicating that these miRNAs are clinically useful as biomarkers for tracking disease progression and as therapeutic targets. PMID:27325363

  13. Minimal residual disease in canine lymphoma: An objective marker to assess tumour cell burden in remission.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masahiko; Yamazaki, Jumpei; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Setoguchi, Asuka; Takahashi, Masashi; Baba, Kenji; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2016-09-01

    Lymphoma is the most common haematopoietic malignancy in dogs. Since a high proportion of dogs with lymphoma achieve remission soon after initiation of chemotherapy, an objective marker assessing treatment efficacy is required. Following clinical remission, the residual population of tumour cells can be referred to as the minimal residual disease (MRD). MRD traditionally has been detected by cytology and flow cytometry; however, if the burden of malignant cells is low, these methods might not be sufficiently sensitive to detect MRD. As an extension of the development of PCR for antigen receptor gene rearrangements (PARR) in dogs, there has been recent progress in the application of real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) to canine lymphoma. With the RT-qPCR system, a very high sensitivity (1 cell per 10,000 cells) has been achieved by preparing allele-specific oligonucleotide primers and probes designed from neoplastic clones of each dog. A series of MRD diagnostics studies employing the RT-qPCR system has revealed its usefulness as a prognostic indicator, an objective marker of treatment efficacy and a predictor of relapse for dogs with lymphoma receiving chemotherapy. Introduction of the MRD monitoring system will provide an innovative scientific tool in the development of superior treatments and monitoring strategies for canine lymphoma.

  14. Application of the pMHC Array to Characterise Tumour Antigen Specific T Cell Populations in Leukaemia Patients at Disease Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Suzanne E; Bonney, Stephanie A; Lee, Cindy; Publicover, Amy; Khan, Ghazala; Smits, Evelien L; Sigurdardottir, Dagmar; Arno, Matthew; Li, Demin; Mills, Ken I; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H; van Tendeloo, Viggo; Mufti, Ghulam J; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Elliott, Tim J; Orchard, Kim H; Guinn, Barbara-ann

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy treatments for cancer are becoming increasingly successful, however to further improve our understanding of the T-cell recognition involved in effective responses and to encourage moves towards the development of personalised treatments for leukaemia immunotherapy, precise antigenic targets in individual patients have been identified. Cellular arrays using peptide-MHC (pMHC) tetramers allow the simultaneous detection of different antigen specific T-cell populations naturally circulating in patients and normal donors. We have developed the pMHC array to detect CD8+ T-cell populations in leukaemia patients that recognise epitopes within viral antigens (cytomegalovirus (CMV) and influenza (Flu)) and leukaemia antigens (including Per Arnt Sim domain 1 (PASD1), MelanA, Wilms' Tumour (WT1) and tyrosinase). We show that the pMHC array is at least as sensitive as flow cytometry and has the potential to rapidly identify more than 40 specific T-cell populations in a small sample of T-cells (0.8-1.4 x 10(6)). Fourteen of the twenty-six acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) patients analysed had T cells that recognised tumour antigen epitopes, and eight of these recognised PASD1 epitopes. Other tumour epitopes recognised were MelanA (n = 3), tyrosinase (n = 3) and WT1(126-134) (n = 1). One of the seven acute lymphocytic leukaemia (ALL) patients analysed had T cells that recognised the MUC1(950-958) epitope. In the future the pMHC array may be used provide point of care T-cell analyses, predict patient response to conventional therapy and direct personalised immunotherapy for patients.

  15. Fc receptor-bearing peripheral blood mononuclear cells in breast cancer patients: a possible marker of tumour burden and prognosis.

    PubMed Central

    Bray, J; McPherson, T A

    1981-01-01

    Indirect immunofluorescence was used to identify and quantitate peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells possessing high avidity Fc receptors in 105 patients upon referral to the breast cancer clinic at the Cross Cancer Institute. The cell detected was shown to be a non-adherent PBM, probably belonging to the T or null cell population. The mean percentage +/- 2 standard deviations of PBM-positive cells in 75 patients with no disease or benign breast disease was 5.3 +/- ;6.7, and this was significantly (P less than 0.001) less than the percentage found for 31 patients with breast cancer. The percentage of PBM-positive cells correlated directly with tumour burden in patient with small (less than or equal to 5 cm) tumours without regional node or extranodal metastases (5/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) and in those with small tumours plus regional node metastases, but without extranodal metastases (8/10 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM). This correlation was less, however, in patients with large tumours (greater than 5 cm), and in those with extranodal metastases (4/8 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM), and in patients tested postoperatively (1/13 had greater than or equal to 12% positive PBM) even though 6!13 had regional node metastases at the time of surgery. Thus, this relatively simple assay, which can be done on peripheral blood samples, may turn out to be useful in patients with breast cancer as a prognostic marker insofar as it may be an indirect indicator of tumour burden preoperatively. If so, it may lead to a more aggressive postoperative adjuvant therapy approach to the subpopulation of node-negative PBM-positive breast cancer patients than is currently used for node-negative patients. PMID:7035033

  16. Genes implicated in stem cell identity and temporal programme are directly targeted by Notch in neuroblast tumours

    PubMed Central

    Zacharioudaki, Evanthia; Housden, Benjamin E.; Garinis, George; Stojnic, Robert; Delidakis, Christos; Bray, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    Notch signalling is involved in a multitude of developmental decisions and its aberrant activation is linked to many diseases, including cancers. One example is the neural stem cell tumours that arise from constitutive Notch activity in Drosophila neuroblasts. To investigate how hyperactivation of Notch in larval neuroblasts leads to tumours, we combined results from profiling the upregulated mRNAs and mapping the regions bound by the core Notch pathway transcription factor Su(H). This identified 246 putative direct Notch targets. These genes were highly enriched for transcription factors and overlapped significantly with a previously identified regulatory programme dependent on the proneural transcription factor Asense. Included were genes associated with the neuroblast maintenance and self-renewal programme that we validated as Notch regulated in vivo. Another group were the so-called temporal transcription factors, which have been implicated in neuroblast maturation. Normally expressed in specific time windows, several temporal transcription factors were ectopically expressed in the stem cell tumours, suggesting that Notch had reprogrammed their normal temporal regulation. Indeed, the Notch-induced hyperplasia was reduced by mutations affecting two of the temporal factors, which, conversely, were sufficient to induce mild hyperplasia on their own. Altogether, the results suggest that Notch induces neuroblast tumours by directly promoting the expression of genes that contribute to stem cell identity and by reprogramming the expression of factors that could regulate maturity. PMID:26657768

  17. Inhibition of Notch3 signalling induces rhabdomyosarcoma cell differentiation promoting p38 phosphorylation and p21Cip1 expression and hampers tumour cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Raimondi, L; Ciarapica, R; De Salvo, M; Verginelli, F; Gueguen, M; Martini, C; De Sio, L; Cortese, G; Locatelli, M; Dang, T P; Carlesso, N; Miele, L; Stifani, S; Limon, I; Locatelli, F; Rota, R

    2012-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is a paediatric soft-tissue sarcoma arising from skeletal muscle precursors coexpressing markers of proliferation and differentiation. Inducers of myogenic differentiation suppress RMS tumourigenic phenotype. The Notch target gene HES1 is upregulated in RMS and prevents tumour cell differentiation in a Notch-dependent manner. However, Notch receptors regulating this phenomenon are unknown. In agreement with data in RMS primary tumours, we show here that the Notch3 receptor is overexpressed in RMS cell lines versus normal myoblasts. Notch3-targeted downregulation in RMS cells induces hyper-phosphorylation of p38 and Akt essential for myogenesis, resulting in the differentiation of tumour cells into multinucleated myotubes expressing Myosin Heavy Chain. These phenomena are associated to a marked decrease in HES1 expression, an increase in p21Cip1 level and the accumulation of RMS cells in the G1 phase. HES1-forced overexpression in RMS cells reverses, at least in part, the pro-differentiative effects of Notch3 downregulation. Notch3 depletion also reduces the tumourigenic potential of RMS cells both in vitro and in vivo. These results indicate that downregulation of Notch3 is sufficient to force RMS cells into completing a correct full myogenic program providing evidence that it contributes, partially through HES1 sustained expression, to their malignant phenotype. Moreover, they suggest Notch3 as a novel potential target in human RMS. PMID:22117196

  18. Lack of MHC class I antigens and tumour aggressiveness of the squamous cell carcinoma of the larynx.

    PubMed Central

    Esteban, F.; Concha, A.; Delgado, M.; Pérez-Ayala, M.; Ruiz-Cabello, F.; Garrido, F.

    1990-01-01

    A series of 60 primary laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumours, 24 lymph node metastases and normal tissue were evaluated in frozen sections for the expression of MHC class I antigens, using monoclonal antibodies and the APAAP technique. We found 13 tumours presenting total HLA-ABC loss, five with selective loss of HLA-A antigens and one with absence of HLA-B antigens. These losses were statistically associated with clinical and pathological parameters, such as T stage, degree of differentiation, scores according to the Jakobsson and Glanz grading systems and degree of leukocytic infiltration. Our results lead us to the following conclusions: (a) HLA class I losses were found in a group of tumours showing greater aggressiveness and worse prognosis; (b) these alterations in expression were not associated with an increased metastatic potential. Thus, the absence of HLA molecules in laryngeal tumours is related to greater local aggressiveness, and the loss of class I antigens seems to constitute an adaptive tumour mechanism to avoid the different anatomical and immunological barriers within the larynx. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2257212

  19. Normal and tumour cervical cells respond differently to vaginal lactobacilli, independent of pH and lactate.

    PubMed

    Motevaseli, Elahe; Shirzad, Mahdieh; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad; Mousavi, Azam-Sadat; Mirsalehian, Akbar; Modarressi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-07-01

    Cervical cancer is a human papilloma virus (HPV)-related cancer, but most HPV infections are transient or intermittent and resolve spontaneously. Thus, other factors, such as cervical microflora, which are dominated by lactobacilli, must be involved in invasive cervical carcinoma development after HPV infection. Previous studies have demonstrated that lactobacilli have antitumour effects, and it is possible that vaginal lactobacilli prevent cervical cancer. Here we examined the proliferative and apoptotic responses of normal and tumour cervical cells to common vaginal lactobacilli components by investigating human normal fibroblast-like cervical (normal cervical) and HeLa (cervical tumour) cell responses to Lactobacillus gasseri and Lactobacillus crispatus. The effects of different lactobacilli components, such as culture supernatants, cytoplasmic extracts, cell-wall extracts and live cells, were determined by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] assay, trypan blue staining, lactate dehydrogenase assay and colorimetric caspase-3 activity assay. Changes in caspase-3 and human chorionic gonadotropin β (hCGβ) expression were analysed by quantitative RT-PCR. Tumour cell growth inhibition by culture supernatants was higher than that by pH- and lactate-adjusted controls. However, the effects of the supernatants on normal cells were similar to those of lactate-adjusted controls. Apoptosis was inhibited by supernatants, which was consistent with higher hCGβ expression since hCG inhibits apoptosis. Our study demonstrated that common vaginal lactobacilli exert cytotoxic effects on cervical tumour cells, but not on normal cells, and that this cytotoxicity is independent of pH and lactate. Our results encourage further studies on the interaction between lactobacilli and cervical cells, and administration of common vaginal lactobacilli as probiotics.

  20. Anti-nicastrin monoclonal antibodies elicit pleiotropic anti-tumour pharmacological effects in invasive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Filipović, Aleksandra; Lombardo, Ylenia; Faronato, Monica; Fronato, Monica; Abrahams, Joel; Aboagye, Eric; Nguyen, Quang-De; d'Aqua, Barbara Borda; Ridley, Anne; Green, Andrew; Rahka, Emad; Ellis, Ian; Recchi, Chiara; Przulj, Natasa; Sarajlić, Anida; Alattia, Jean-Rene; Fraering, Patrick; Deonarain, Mahendra; Coombes, R Charles

    2014-11-01

    The goal of targeted cancer therapies is to specifically block oncogenic signalling, thus maximising efficacy, while reducing side-effects to patients. The gamma-secretase (GS) complex is an attractive therapeutic target in haematological malignancies and solid tumours with major pharmaceutical activity to identify optimal inhibitors. Within GS, nicastrin (NCSTN) offers an opportunity for therapeutic intervention using blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Here we explore the role of anti-nicastrin monoclonal antibodies, which we have developed as specific, multi-faceted inhibitors of proliferation and invasive traits of triple-negative breast cancer cells. We use 3D in vitro proliferation and invasion assays as well as an orthotopic and tail vail injection triple-negative breast cancer in vivo xenograft model systems. RNAScope assessed nicastrin in patient samples. Anti-NCSTN mAb clone-2H6 demonstrated a superior anti-tumour efficacy than clone-10C11 and the RO4929097 small molecule GS inhibitor, acting by inhibiting GS enzymatic activity and Notch signalling in vitro and in vivo. Confirming clinical relevance of nicastrin as a target, we report evidence of increased NCSTN mRNA levels by RNA in situ hybridization (RNAScope) in a large cohort of oestrogen receptor negative breast cancers, conferring independent prognostic significance for disease-free survival, in multivariate analysis. We demonstrate here that targeting NCSTN using specific mAbs may represent a novel mode of treatment for invasive triple-negative breast cancer, for which there are few targeted therapeutic options. Furthermore, we propose that measuring NCSTN in patient samples using RNAScope technology may serve as companion diagnostic for anti-NCSTN therapy in the clinic. PMID:25248409

  1. EBV-Induced Human CD8+ NKT Cells Synergise CD4+ NKT Cells Suppressing EBV-Associated Tumours Upon Induction of Th1-Bias

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Wei; Li, Li; Zhou, Rui; Xiao, Ruijing; Wang, Yujuan; Ji, Xiang; Wu, Mengjun; Wang, Lan; Huang, Wei; Zheng, Xiaoling; Tan, Xinti; Chen, Lang; Xiong, Tao; Xiong, Jie; Jin, Youxin; Tan, Jinquan; He, Yuling

    2009-01-01

    CD8+ natural killer T (NKT) cells from EBV-associated tumour patients are quantitatively and functionally impaired. EBV-induced CD8+ NKT cells drive syngeneic T cells into a Th1-bias response to suppress EBV-associated malignancies. IL-4-biased CD4+ NKT cells do not affect either syngeneic T cell cytotoxicity or Th cytokine secretion. Circulating mDC1 cells from patients with EBV-associated malignancies impair the production of IFN-γ by CD8+ NKT cells. In this study, we have established a human-thymus-SCID chimaera model to further investigate the underlying mechanism of EBV-induced CD8+ NKT cells in suppressing EBV-associated malignancies. In the human-thymus-SCID chimera, EBV-induced CD8+ NKT cells suppress EBV-associated malignancies in a manner dependent on the Th1-bias response and syngeneic CD3+ T cells. However, adoptive transfer with CD4+ NKT cells alone inhibits T cell immunity. Interestingly, CD4+ NKT cells themselves secrete high levels of IL-2, enhancing the persistence of adoptively transferred CD8+ NKT cells and T cells, thereby leading to a more pronounced T cell anti-tumour response in chimaeras co-transferred with CD4+ CD8+ NKT cells. Thus, immune reconstitution with EBV-induced CD4+ and CD8+ NKT cells synergistically enhances T cell tumour immunity, providing a potential prophylactic and therapeutic treatment for EBV-associated malignancies. PMID:19887050

  2. Activating Transcription Factor 3 regulates in part the enhanced tumour cell cytotoxicity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor M344 and cisplatin in combination

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Activating Transcription Factor (ATF) 3 is a key regulator of the cellular integrated stress response whose expression has also been correlated with pro-apoptotic activities in tumour cell models. Combination treatments with chemotherapeutic drugs, such as cisplatin, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have been demonstrated to enhance tumour cell cytotoxicity. We recently demonstrated a role for ATF3 in regulating cisplatin-induced apoptosis and others have shown that HDAC inhibition can also induce cellular stress. In this study, we evaluated the role of ATF3 in regulating the co-operative cytotoxicity of cisplatin in combination with an HDAC inhibitor. Results The HDAC inhibitor M344 induced ATF3 expression at the protein and mRNA level in a panel of human derived cancer cell lines as determined by Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR analyses. Combination treatment with M344 and cisplatin lead to increased induction of ATF3 compared with cisplatin alone. Utilizing the MTT cell viability assay, M344 treatments also enhanced the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin in these cancer cell lines. The mechanism of ATF3 induction by M344 was found to be independent of MAPKinase pathways and dependent on ATF4, a known regulator of ATF3 expression. ATF4 heterozygote (+/-) and knock out (-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) as well as chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays were utilized in determining the mechanistic induction of ATF3 by M344. We also demonstrated that ATF3 regulates the enhanced cytotoxicity of M344 in combination with cisplatin as evidenced by attenuation of cytotoxicity in shRNAs targeting ATF3 expressing cells. Conclusion This study identifies the pro-apoptotic factor, ATF3 as a novel target of M344, as well as a mediator of the co-operative effects of cisplatin and M344 induced tumour cell cytotoxicity. PMID:20828393

  3. Ovarian tumours in pregnancy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pakhee; Kehoe, Sean

    2011-04-01

    Ovarian tumours in pregnancy are a diagnostic and management challenge that is increasingly being faced by the clinician. While most masses are benign and resolve spontaneously, there are others that persist and indicate the need for surgical management. Ultrasound not only detects asymptomatic masses but also helps to guide their management based on presence or absence of features suspicious of malignancy. The role of tumour markers in pregnancy is limited due to their non-specific nature. Most masses treated in pregnancy are benign (most commonly dermoids), and most malignancies are either of low malignant potential or germ cell tumours, usually early stage disease. Surgical management is indicated for symptomatic masses or those with increasing size or complexity indicating possible malignancy. Both laparoscopy and laparotomy have similar results with regard to obstetric outcome. Conservative management is preferred in the remainder. MRI may help in better characterization of doubtful masses. National tumour registries can help to establish guidelines.

  4. Unbiased and automated identification of a circulating tumour cell definition that associates with overall survival.

    PubMed

    Ligthart, Sjoerd T; Coumans, Frank A W; Attard, Gerhardt; Cassidy, Amy Mulick; de Bono, Johann S; Terstappen, Leon W M M

    2011-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTC) in patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. Classification of CTC however remains subjective, as they are morphologically heterogeneous. We acquired digital images, using the CellSearch™ system, from blood of 185 castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients and 68 healthy subjects to define CTC by computer algorithms. Patient survival data was used as the training parameter for the computer to define CTC. The computer-generated CTC definition was validated on a separate CRPC dataset comprising 100 patients. The optimal definition of the computer defined CTC (aCTC) was stricter as compared to the manual CellSearch CTC (mCTC) definition and as a consequence aCTC were less frequent. The computer-generated CTC definition resulted in hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.8 for baseline and 3.9 for follow-up samples, which is comparable to the mCTC definition (baseline HR 2.9, follow-up HR 4.5). Validation resulted in HRs at baseline/follow-up of 3.9/5.4 for computer and 4.8/5.8 for manual definitions. In conclusion, we have defined and validated CTC by clinical outcome using a perfectly reproducing automated algorithm.

  5. Unbiased and Automated Identification of a Circulating Tumour Cell Definition That Associates with Overall Survival

    PubMed Central

    Ligthart, Sjoerd T.; Coumans, Frank A. W.; Attard, Gerhardt; Mulick Cassidy, Amy; de Bono, Johann S.; Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTC) in patients with metastatic carcinomas are associated with poor survival and can be used to guide therapy. Classification of CTC however remains subjective, as they are morphologically heterogeneous. We acquired digital images, using the CellSearch™ system, from blood of 185 castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients and 68 healthy subjects to define CTC by computer algorithms. Patient survival data was used as the training parameter for the computer to define CTC. The computer-generated CTC definition was validated on a separate CRPC dataset comprising 100 patients. The optimal definition of the computer defined CTC (aCTC) was stricter as compared to the manual CellSearch CTC (mCTC) definition and as a consequence aCTC were less frequent. The computer-generated CTC definition resulted in hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.8 for baseline and 3.9 for follow-up samples, which is comparable to the mCTC definition (baseline HR 2.9, follow-up HR 4.5). Validation resulted in HRs at baseline/follow-up of 3.9/5.4 for computer and 4.8/5.8 for manual definitions. In conclusion, we have defined and validated CTC by clinical outcome using a perfectly reproducing automated algorithm. PMID:22087312

  6. Efficacy and toxicity management of CAR-T-cell immunotherapy: a matter of responsiveness control or tumour-specificity?

    PubMed

    Alonso-Camino, Vanesa; Harwood, Seandean Lykke; Álvarez-Méndez, Ana; Alvarez-Vallina, Luis

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T-cells have demonstrated potent clinical efficacy in patients with haematological malignancies. However, the use of CAR-T-cells targeting solid tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) has been limited by organ toxicities related to activation of T-cell effector functions through the CAR. Most existing CARs recognize TAAs, which are also found in normal tissues. CAR-T-cell-mediated destruction of normal tissues constitutes a major roadblock to CAR-T-cell therapy, and must be avoided or mitigated. There is a broad range of strategies for modulating antigen responsiveness of CAR-T-cells, with varying degrees of complexity. Some of them might ameliorate the acute and chronic toxicities associated with current CAR constructs. However, further embellishments to CAR therapy may complicate clinical implementation and possibly create new immunogenicity issues. In contrast, the development of CARs targeting truly tumour-specific antigens might circumvent on-target/off-tumour toxicities without adding additional complexity to CAR-T-cell therapies, but these antigens have been elusive and may require novel selection strategies for their discovery.

  7. Pro- and anti-tumour effects of B cells and antibodies in cancer: a comparison of clinical studies and preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Guy, Thomas V; Terry, Alexandra M; Bolton, Holly A; Hancock, David G; Shklovskaya, Elena; Fazekas de St. Groth, Barbara

    2016-08-01

    The primary immune role of B cells is to produce antibodies, but they can also influence T cell function via antigen presentation and, in some contexts, immune regulation. Whether their roles in tumour immunity are similar to those in other chronic immune responses such as autoimmunity and chronic infection, where both pro- and anti-inflammatory roles have been described, remains controversial. Many studies have aimed to define the role of B cells in antitumor immune responses, but despite this considerable body of work, it is not yet possible to predict how they will affect immunity to any given tumour. In many human cancers, the presence of tumour-infiltrating B cells and tumour-reactive antibodies correlates with extended patient survival, and this clinical observation is supported by data from some animal models. On the other hand, T cell responses can be adversely affected by B cell production of immunoregulatory cytokines, a phenomenon that has been demonstrated in humans and in animal models. The isotype and concentration of tumour-reactive antibodies may also influence tumour progression. Recruitment of B cells into tumours may directly reflect the subtype and strength of the anti-tumour T cell response. As the response becomes chronic, B cells may attenuate T cell responses in an attempt to decrease host damage, similar to their described role in chronic infection and autoimmunity. Understanding how B cell responses in cancer are related to the effectiveness of the overall anti-tumour response is likely to aid in the development of new therapeutic interventions against cancer.

  8. Development of a transplantable glioma tumour model from genetically engineered mice: MRI/MRS/MRSI characterisation.

    PubMed

    Ciezka, Magdalena; Acosta, Milena; Herranz, Cristina; Canals, Josep M; Pumarola, Martí; Candiota, Ana Paula; Arús, Carles

    2016-08-01

    The initial aim of this study was to generate a transplantable glial tumour model of low-intermediate grade by disaggregation of a spontaneous tumour mass from genetically engineered models (GEM). This should result in an increased tumour incidence in comparison to GEM animals. An anaplastic oligoastrocytoma (OA) tumour of World Health Organization (WHO) grade III was obtained from a female GEM mouse with the S100β-v-erbB/inK4a-Arf (+/-) genotype maintained in the C57BL/6 background. The tumour tissue was disaggregated; tumour cells from it were grown in aggregates and stereotactically injected into C57BL/6 mice. Tumour development was followed using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), while changes in the metabolomics pattern of the masses were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/Spectroscopic Imaging (MRS/MRSI). Final tumour grade was evaluated by histopathological analysis. The total number of tumours generated from GEM cells from disaggregated tumour (CDT) was 67 with up to 100 % penetrance, as compared to 16 % in the local GEM model, with an average survival time of 66 ± 55 days, up to 4.3-fold significantly higher than the standard GL261 glioblastoma (GBM) tumour model. Tumours produced by transplantation of cells freshly obtained from disaggregated GEM tumour were diagnosed as WHO grade III anaplastic oligodendroglioma (ODG) and OA, while tumours produced from a previously frozen sample were diagnosed as WHO grade IV GBM. We successfully grew CDT and generated tumours from a grade III GEM glial tumour. Freezing and cell culture protocols produced progression to grade IV GBM, which makes the developed transplantable model qualify as potential secondary GBM model in mice. PMID:27324642

  9. Development of a transplantable glioma tumour model from genetically engineered mice: MRI/MRS/MRSI characterisation.

    PubMed

    Ciezka, Magdalena; Acosta, Milena; Herranz, Cristina; Canals, Josep M; Pumarola, Martí; Candiota, Ana Paula; Arús, Car