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Sample records for increases tumour cell

  1. Increased oxidative stress in the placenta tissue and cell culture of tumour-bearing pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Toledo, M T; Ventrucci, G; Gomes-Marcondes, M C C

    2011-11-01

    Placental dysfunction leads to foetal damage, which jeopardises the exchange between the maternal and foetal systems. We evaluated the effects of tumour growth on the activity of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative stress in placental tissue and cell culture from tumour-bearing pregnant rats compared to non-tumour-bearing pregnant rats that were ascitic fluid injected. Ascitic fluid is obtained from Walker tumour-bearing rats and contains a cytokine called Walker factor (WF), which is a molecule similar to proteolysis-inducing factor (PIF), and induces changes in protein metabolism and oxidative stress. Pregnant Wistar rats were distributed into control (C), tumour-bearing (W) and ascitic fluid injected (A) groups and were sacrificed on days 16, 19 and 21 of pregnancy to analyse the profile of enzyme activities (glutathione-S-transferase (GST), catalase (CAT), alkaline phosphatase (AP)) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in placental tissue. Meanwhile, placenta samples from all groups were obtained on day 21, placed in primary culture and treated with WF for 72 h. The presence of tumour or ascitic fluid reduced the protein content of the placental tissue. On day 16 there was a significant reduction in AP activity in W rats, and on day 19, CAT activity and MDA content significantly increased. These results indicate that the presence of cancer decreased antioxidant enzyme capacity in the placenta, increasing the amount of oxidation in these cells, which may contribute to irreversible placental damage and compromisefoetal development. WF treatment induces similar changes in placental cells in primary culture, resulting in less cell viability and increased oxidative stress. These results indicate that WF, provided by the tumour or inoculation of ascitic fluid, has negative effects on placental homeostasis, which impairs foetal health.

  2. Oral administration of Aloe vera and honey reduces Walker tumour growth by decreasing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis in tumour tissue.

    PubMed

    Tomasin, Rebeka; Gomes-Marcondes, Maria Cristina Cintra

    2011-04-01

    Cancer is diagnosed in approximately 11 million people and is responsible for almost 8 million deaths worldwide every year. Research in cancer control has shown the importance of co-adjuvant therapies. Aloe vera may reduce tumour mass and metastasis rates, while honey may inhibit tumour growth. This study verified the influence of Aloe vera and honey on tumour growth and in the apoptosis process by assessing tumour size, the cell proliferation rate (Ki67-LI) and Bax/Bcl-2 expression at 7, 14 and 20 days after Walker 256 carcinoma implant in Wistar rats distributed into two groups: the WA group - tumour-bearing rats that received a gavage with a 670 µL/kg dose of Aloe vera and honey solution daily, and the CW group - tumour-bearing rats which received only a 0.9% NaCl solution. The effect of Aloe vera and honey against tumour growth was observed through a decrease in relative weight (%) and Ki67-LI in tumours from the WA group compared with those from the CW group. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio increased in tumours from the WA group at all tested timepoints. These data suggest Aloe vera and honey can modulate tumour growth by reducing cell proliferation and increasing apoptosis susceptibility.

  3. Osteoprotegerin regulates cancer cell migration through SDF-1/CXCR4 axis and promotes tumour development by increasing neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Benslimane-Ahmim, Zahia; Pereira, Jessica; Lokajczyk, Anna; Dizier, Blandine; Galy-Fauroux, Isabelle; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Heymann, Dominique; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine

    2017-06-01

    We previously reported that OPG is involved in ischemic tissue neovascularization through the secretion of SDF-1 by pretreated-OPG endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs). As the vascularization is one of the key factor influencing the tumour growth and cancer cell dissemination, we investigated whether OPG was able to modulate the invasion of human MNNG-HOS osteosarcoma and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Cell motility was analysed in vitro by using Boyden chambers. Human GFP-labelled MMNG-HOS cells were inoculated in immunodeficient mice and the tumour nodules formed were then injected with OPG and/or FGF-2, AMD3100 or 0.9% NaCl (control group). Tumour growth was manually followed and angiogenesis was assessed by immunohistochemistry. In vitro, SDF-1 released by OPG-pretreated ECFCs markedly attracted both MNNG-HOS and DU145 cells and induced spontaneous migration of cancer cells. In vivo, tumour volumes were significantly increased in OPG-treated group compared to the control group and OPG potentiated the effect of FGF-2. Concomitantly, OPG alone or combined with FGF-2 increased the number of new vasculature compared to the control group. Interestingly AMD3100, an inhibitor of SDF-1, prevented the in vivo effects of OPG induced by SDF-1 This study provides experimental evidence that OPG promotes tumour development trough SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  4. Isolation of inflammatory cells from human tumours.

    PubMed

    Polak, Marta E

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory cells are present in many tumours, and understanding their function is of increasing importance, particularly to studies of tumour immunology. The tumour-infiltrating leukocytes encompass a variety of cell types, e.g. T lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, NK cells, and mast cells. Choice of the isolation method greatly depends on the tumour type and the leukocyte subset of interest, but the protocol usually includes tissue disaggregation and cell enrichment. We recommend density centrifugation for initial enrichment, followed by specific magnetic bead negative or positive panning with leukocyte and tumour cell selective antibodies.

  5. Tumour Cell Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Laura; Baker, Ann-Marie; Graham, Trevor A.

    2016-01-01

    The population of cells that make up a cancer are manifestly heterogeneous at the genetic, epigenetic, and phenotypic levels. In this mini-review, we summarise the extent of intra-tumour heterogeneity (ITH) across human malignancies, review the mechanisms that are responsible for generating and maintaining ITH, and discuss the ramifications and opportunities that ITH presents for cancer prognostication and treatment. PMID:26973786

  6. Walker 256 tumour cells increase substance P immunoreactivity locally and modify the properties of the blood-brain barrier during extravasation and brain invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kate M; Harford-Wright, Elizabeth; Vink, Robert; Nimmo, Alan J; Ghabriel, Mounir N

    2013-01-01

    It is not yet known how tumour cells traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to form brain metastases. Substance P (SP) release is a key component of neurogenic inflammation which has been recently shown to increase the permeability of the BBB following CNS insults, making it a possible candidate as a mediator of tumour cell extravasation into the brain. This study investigated the properties of the BBB in the early stages of tumour cell invasion into the brain, and the possible involvement of SP. Male Wistar rats were injected with Walker 256 breast carcinoma cells via the internal carotid artery and euthanised at 1, 3, 6 and 9 days post tumour inoculation. Culture medium-injected animals served as controls at 1 and 9 days. Evidence of tumour cell extravasation across the BBB was first observed at 3 days post-inoculation, which corresponded with significantly increased albumin (p < 0.05) and SP immunoreactivity (p < 0.01) and significantly reduced endothelial barrier antigen labelling of microvessels when compared to culture medium control animals (p < 0.001). By day 9 after tumour cell inoculation, 100 % of animals developed large intracranial neoplasms that had significantly increased albumin in the peri-tumoral area (p < 0.001). The increased SP immunoreactivity and altered BBB properties at 3 days post-inoculation that coincided with early tumour invasion may be indicative of a mechanism for tumour cell extravasation into the brain. Thus, extravasation of tumour cells into the brain to form cerebral metastases may be a SP-mediated process.

  7. Volume increase and spatial shifts of chromosome territories in nuclei of radiation-induced polyploidizing tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Finsterle, Jutta; Scherthan, Harry; Huna, Anda; González, Paula; Mueller, Patrick; Schmitt, Eberhard; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Hausmann, Michael

    2013-08-30

    The exposure of tumour cells to high doses of ionizing radiation can induce endopolyploidization as an escape route from cell death. This strategy generally results in mitotic catastrophe during the first few days after irradiation. However, some cells escape mitotic catastrophe, polyploidize and attempt to undergo genome reduction and de-polyploidization in order to create new, viable para-diploid tumour cell sub-clones. In search for the consequences of ionizing radiation induced endopolyploidization, genome and chromosome architecture in nuclei of polyploid tumour cells, and sub-nuclei after division of bi- or multi-nucleated cells were investigated during 7 days following irradiation. Polyploidization was induced in p53-function deficient HeLa cells by exposure to 10Gy of X-irradiation. Chromosome territories #1, #4, #12 and centromeres of chromosomes #6, #10, #X were labelled by FISH and analysed for chromosome numbers, volumes and spatial distribution during 7 days post irradiation. The numbers of interphase chromosome territories or centromeres, respectively, the positions of the most peripherally and centrally located chromosome territories, and the territory volumes were compared to non-irradiated controls over this time course. Nuclei with three copies of several chromosomes (#1, #6, #10, #12, #X) were found in the irradiated as well as non-irradiated specimens. From day 2 to day 5 post irradiation, chromosome territories (#1, #4, #12) shifted towards the nuclear periphery and their volumes increased 16- to 25-fold. Consequently, chromosome territories returned towards the nuclear centre during day 6 and 7 post irradiation. In comparison to non-irradiated cells (∼500μm(3)), the nuclear volume of irradiated cells was increased 8-fold (to ∼4000μm(3)) at day 7 post irradiation. Additionally, smaller cell nuclei with an average volume of about ∼255μm(3) were detected on day 7. The data suggest a radiation-induced generation of large intra

  8. VEGF targets the tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Goel, Hira Lal; Mercurio, Arthur M

    2013-12-01

    The function of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in cancer is not limited to angiogenesis and vascular permeability. VEGF-mediated signalling occurs in tumour cells, and this signalling contributes to key aspects of tumorigenesis, including the function of cancer stem cells and tumour initiation. In addition to VEGF receptor tyrosine kinases, the neuropilins are crucial for mediating the effects of VEGF on tumour cells, primarily because of their ability to regulate the function and the trafficking of growth factor receptors and integrins. This has important implications for our understanding of tumour biology and for the development of more effective therapeutic approaches.

  9. SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells bind fibroblasts via ICAM-1 and this is increased by tumour necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    David, Manu S; Kelly, Elizabeth; Cheung, Ivan; Xaymardan, Munira; Moore, Malcolm A S; Zoellner, Hans

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported exchange of membrane and cytoplasmic markers between SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells and human gingival fibroblasts (h-GF) without comparable exchange of nuclear markers, while similar h-GF exchange was seen for melanoma and ovarian carcinoma cells. This process of "cellular sipping" changes phenotype such that cells sharing markers of both SAOS-2 and h-GF have morphology intermediate to that of either cell population cultured alone, evidencing increased tumour cell diversity without genetic change. TNF-α increases cellular sipping between h-GF and SAOS-2, and we here study binding of SAOS-2 to TNF-α treated h-GF to determine if increased cellular sipping can be accounted for by cytokine stimulated SAOS-2 binding. More SAOS-2 bound h-GF pe-seeded wells than culture plastic alone (p<0.001), and this was increased by h-GF pre-treatment with TNF-α (p<0.001). TNF-α stimulated binding was dose dependent and maximal at 1.16 nM (p<0.05) with no activity below 0.006 nM. SAOS-2 binding to h-GF was independent of serum, while the lipopolysaccharide antagonist Polymyxin B did not affect results, and TNF-α activity was lost on boiling. h-GF binding of SAOS-2 started to increase after 30min TNF-α stimulation and was maximal by 1.5 hr pre-treatment (p<0.001). h-GF retained maximal binding up to 6 hrs after TNF-α stimulation, but this was lost by 18 hrs (p<0.001). FACS analysis demonstrated increased ICAM-1 consistent with the time course of SAOS-2 binding, while antibody against ICAM-1 inhibited SAOS-2 adhesion (p<0.04). Pre-treating SAOS-2 with TNF-α reduced h-GF binding to background levels (p<0.003), and this opposite effect to h-GF cytokine stimulation suggests that the history of cytokine exposure of malignant cells migrating across different microenvironments can influence subsequent interactions with fibroblasts. Since cytokine stimulated binding was comparable in magnitude to earlier reported TNF-α stimulated cellular sipping, we conclude that TNF

  10. Fibulin-5 localisation in human endometrial cancer shifts from epithelial to stromal with increasing tumour grade, and silencing promotes endometrial epithelial cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    WINSHIP, AMY LOUISE; RAINCZUK, KATE; TON, AMANDA; DIMITRIADIS, EVA

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the most common invasive gynaecological malignancy. While endocrine, genetic and inflammatory factors are thought to contribute to its pathogenesis, its precise etiology and molecular regulators remain poorly understood. Fibulin-5 is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein that inhibits cell growth and invasion in several cancer cell types and is downregulated in a number of types of human cancer. However, it is unknown whether fibulin-5 plays a role in endometrial tumourigenesis. In the current report, the expression and localisation of fibulin-5 in type I endometrioid human endometrial cancers of grades (G) 1–3 was investigated using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry. Fibulin-5 mRNA was found to be significantly reduced in whole tumour tissues from women across G1-3 compared with benign endometrium (P<0.0001). Consistently, fibulin-5 protein was also reduced in the tumour epithelial compartment across increasing tumour grades. By contrast, increased protein localisation to the tumour stroma was observed with increasing grade. Knockdown by small interfering RNA in Ishikawa endometrial epithelial cancer cells expressing fibulin-5 stimulated cell adhesion and proliferation in vitro. Fibulin-5 mRNA expression in Ishikawa cells was induced by transforming growth factor-β and fibulin-5 in turn activated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2), suggesting that it may act via the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. In summary, the present study identified fibulin-5 as a downregulated ECM gene in human endometrial cancer and observed a shift from epithelial to stromal protein localisation with increasing tumour grade in women. These data suggest that loss of fibulin-5 function may promote endometrial cancer progression by enhancing epithelial cell adhesion and proliferation. PMID:27347195

  11. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ; Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A; Brolo, AG

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  12. Increased expression of the Th17-IL-6R/pSTAT3/BATF/RorγT-axis in the tumoural region of adenocarcinoma as compared to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Balabko, Ljubov; Andreev, Katerina; Burmann, Nadine; Schubert, Melanie; Mathews, Martina; Trufa, Denis I; Reppert, Sarah; Rau, Tilmann; Schicht, Martin; Sirbu, Horia; Hartmann, Arndt; Finotto, Susetta

    2014-12-10

    Here we describe increased expression of IL6R in the tumoural region of lung tissue from patients affected by lung adenocarcinoma as compared to squamous cell lung carcinoma. Moreover, here we found increased IL6R in the tumour free part of the lung. By using a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma, we discovered that few lung tumour cells expressed IL-6R and CD4+CD25+Foxp-3+ T regulatory cells down-regulated IL-6R in the tumour bearing lungs. Downstream of IL-6R, the Th17 lineage-specification factors: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), Basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BATF and a protein encoded by the RORC in human (RAR-related orphan receptor C) (RORγT), were also found induced in the tumoural region of lung tissue from patients affected by lung adenocarcinoma as compared to those carrying squamous cell carcinoma. Moreover, pSTAT3 protein was found phosphorylated and auto-phosphorylated in the tumoural region of patients with adeno cell carcinoma of the lung as compared to the tumoural region of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Intranasal application of anti-IL-6R antibodies in a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma, induced T regulatory cell markers such as Foxp3, Ctla4, Icos, Il10, Il21, Folr4 and Lag3 and inhibited Rorc in lung adenocarcinoma.

  13. Increased expression of the Th17-IL-6R/pSTAT3/BATF/RorγT-axis in the tumoural region of adenocarcinoma as compared to squamous cell carcinoma of the lung

    PubMed Central

    Balabko, Ljubov; Andreev, Katerina; Burmann, Nadine; Schubert, Melanie; Mathews, Martina; Trufa, Denis I.; Reppert, Sarah; Rau, Tilmann; Schicht, Martin; Sirbu, Horia; Hartmann, Arndt; Finotto, Susetta

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe increased expression of IL6R in the tumoural region of lung tissue from patients affected by lung adenocarcinoma as compared to squamous cell lung carcinoma. Moreover, here we found increased IL6R in the tumour free part of the lung. By using a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma, we discovered that few lung tumour cells expressed IL-6R and CD4+CD25+Foxp-3+ T regulatory cells down-regulated IL-6R in the tumour bearing lungs. Downstream of IL-6R, the Th17 lineage-specification factors: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), Basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BATF and a protein encoded by the RORC in human (RAR-related orphan receptor C) (RORγT), were also found induced in the tumoural region of lung tissue from patients affected by lung adenocarcinoma as compared to those carrying squamous cell carcinoma. Moreover, pSTAT3 protein was found phosphorylated and auto-phosphorylated in the tumoural region of patients with adeno cell carcinoma of the lung as compared to the tumoural region of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Intranasal application of anti-IL-6R antibodies in a murine model of lung adenocarcinoma, induced T regulatory cell markers such as Foxp3, Ctla4, Icos, Il10, Il21, Folr4 and Lag3 and inhibited Rorc in lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:25491772

  14. [Single-cell sequencing and tumour heterogeneity].

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2014-12-01

    The heterogeneity of tumours is now beginning to be documented precisely by single-cell new-generation sequencing. Recently published results on breast tumours show that each of the cells analysed displays a unique pattern of point mutations. This extensive genetic diversity is present before any treatment, and is likely to cause resistance to initially successful targeted therapies.

  15. Tumour endothelial cells in high metastatic tumours promote metastasis via epigenetic dysregulation of biglycan

    PubMed Central

    Maishi, Nako; Ohba, Yusuke; Akiyama, Kosuke; Ohga, Noritaka; Hamada, Jun-ichi; Nagao-Kitamoto, Hiroko; Alam, Mohammad Towfik; Yamamoto, Kazuyuki; Kawamoto, Taisuke; Inoue, Nobuo; Taketomi, Akinobu; Shindoh, Masanobu; Hida, Yasuhiro; Hida, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    Tumour blood vessels are gateways for distant metastasis. Recent studies have revealed that tumour endothelial cells (TECs) demonstrate distinct phenotypes from their normal counterparts. We have demonstrated that features of TECs are different depending on tumour malignancy, suggesting that TECs communicate with surrounding tumour cells. However, the contribution of TECs to metastasis has not been elucidated. Here, we show that TECs actively promote tumour metastasis through a bidirectional interaction between tumour cells and TECs. Co-implantation of TECs isolated from highly metastatic tumours accelerated lung metastases of low metastatic tumours. Biglycan, a small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycan secreted from TECs, activated tumour cell migration via nuclear factor-κB and extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2. Biglycan expression was upregulated by DNA demethylation in TECs. Collectively, our results demonstrate that TECs are altered in their microenvironment and, in turn, instigate tumour cells to metastasize, which is a novel mechanism for tumour metastasis. PMID:27295191

  16. Coordinated regulation of myeloid cells by tumours.

    PubMed

    Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-03-22

    Myeloid cells are the most abundant nucleated haematopoietic cells in the human body and are a collection of distinct cell populations with many diverse functions. The three groups of terminally differentiated myeloid cells - macrophages, dendritic cells and granulocytes - are essential for the normal function of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Mounting evidence indicates that the tumour microenvironment alters myeloid cells and can convert them into potent immunosuppressive cells. Here, we consider myeloid cells as an intricately connected, complex, single system and we focus on how tumours manipulate the myeloid system to evade the host immune response.

  17. Tumours with cancer stem cells: A PDE model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, A; Mancini, A; Primicerio, M

    2016-02-01

    The role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumour growth has received increasing attention in the recent literature. Here we stem from an integro-differential system describing the evolution of a population of CSC and of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells formulated and studied in a previous paper, and we investigate an approximation in which the system reduces to a pair of nonlinear coupled parabolic equation. We prove that the new system is well posed and we examine some general properties. Numerical simulations show more on the qualitative behaviour of the solutions, concerning in particular the so-called tumour paradox, according to which an increase of the mortality rate of ordinary (non-stem) tumour cells results asymptotically in a faster growth.

  18. Atorvastatin increases lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of tumour necrosis factor-α-induced protein 8-like 2 in RAW264.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, MING-WEI; SU, MEI-XIAN; ZHANG, WEI; WANG, LI; QIAN, CHUAN-YUN

    2014-01-01

    RAW264.7 cells are one of the major sources of productive inflammatory biomediators, including tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6. TNF-α-induced protein 8-like 2 (TIPE2) is an essential negative regulator of Toll-like and T-cell receptors, and the selective expression in the immune system prevents hyper-responsiveness and maintains immune homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether atorvastatin upregulates the expression of TIPE2 and further regulates the inflammatory response and oxidation emergency response in RAW264.7 cells. RAW264.7 cells were incubated in Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium containing lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the presence or absence of atorvastatin. Following incubation, the medium was collected and the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cells were harvested, and the mRNA and protein expression levels of TIPE2, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), IκB and nuclear factor (NF-κB)-κB were analysed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting analysis, respectively, the expression of NOS, COX-2 and HO-1 protein were essayed by western blotting analysis, NO and ROS activities were determined. The results revealed that LPS increased the mRNA and protein expression levels of TIPE2, MIF and NF-κB, as well as the production of IL-6 and TNF-α, in a dose and time dependent manner in RAW264.7 cells. Meanwhile, LPS enhanced the expression of NOS and COX-2 protein, blocked HO-1 protein expression, increased NO and PGE2 production and ROS activity in a dose dependent manner in RAW264.7 cells. Atorvastatin significantly increased LPS induced expression of TIPE2, downregulated the expression of NOS, COX-2, MIF and NF-κB and the production of PGE2, NO, IL-6 and TNF-α in a time and dose dependent manner, and increased HO-1 protein expression, reduced ROS production in a dose dependent manner. The observations indicated

  19. Canine mammary tumour cell lines established in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E

    1993-01-01

    Mammary tumours are the most common tumours in the female dog. The tumours have a complex histology and exist in epithelial, mixed and mesenchymal forms. To study the biology of canine mammary tumours, five cell lines have been established and characterized. The results indicate that canine mammary tumours might be derived from mammary stem cells and that the tumour growth is independent of oestrogens. The established canine mammary tumour cell lines will be valuable tools in further studies of the histogenesis and pathogenesis of these tumours.

  20. Stochastic Gompertz model of tumour cell growth.

    PubMed

    Lo, C F

    2007-09-21

    In this communication, based upon the deterministic Gompertz law of cell growth, a stochastic model in tumour growth is proposed. This model takes account of both cell fission and mortality too. The corresponding density function of the size of the tumour cells obeys a functional Fokker--Planck equation which can be solved analytically. It is found that the density function exhibits an interesting "multi-peak" structure generated by cell fission as time evolves. Within this framework the action of therapy is also examined by simply incorporating a therapy term into the deterministic cell growth term.

  1. p53 tumour suppressor gene expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, C; Ziske, C; Wiedenmann, B; Moelling, K

    1996-01-01

    Neuroendocrine pancreatic tumours grow slower and metastasise later than ductal and acinar carcinomas. The expression of the p53 tumour suppressor gene in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour cells is unknown. Pancreatic neuroendocrine cell lines (n = 5) and human tumour tissues (n = 19) were studied for changed p53 coding sequence, transcription, and translation. Proliferative activity of tumour cells was determined analysing Ki-67 expression. No mutation in the p53 nucleotide sequence of neuroendocrine tumour cell was found. However, an overexpression of p53 could be detected in neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines at a protein level. As no p53 mutations were seen, it is suggested that post-translational events can also lead to an overexpression of p53. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8675094

  2. Investigating citrullinated proteins in tumour cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The conversion of arginine into citrulline, termed citrullination, has important consequences for the structure and function of proteins. Studies have found PADI4, an enzyme performing citrullination, to be highly expressed in a variety of malignant tumours and have shown that PADI4 participates in the process of tumorigenesis. However, as citrullinated proteins have not been systematically investigated in tumours, the present study aimed to identify novel citrullinated proteins in tumours by 2-D western blotting (2-D WB). Methods Two identical two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gels were prepared using extracts from ECA, H292, HeLa, HEPG2, Lovo, MCF-7, PANC-1, SGC, and SKOV3 tumour cell lines. The expression profiles on a 2-DE gel were trans-blotted to PVDF membranes, and the blots were then probed with an anti-citrulline antibody. By comparing the 2-DE profile with the parallel 2-D WB profile at a global level, protein spots with immuno-signals were collected from the second 2-DE gel and identified using mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitation was used to verify the expression and citrullination of the targeted proteins in tumour cell lines. Results 2-D WB and mass spectrometry identified citrullinated α-enolase (ENO1), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60), keratin 8 (KRT8), tubulin beta (TUBB), T cell receptor chain and vimentin in these cell lines. Immunoprecipitation analyses verified the expression and citrullination of ENO1, HSP60, KRT8, and TUBB in the total protein lysates of the tumour cell lines. Conclusions The citrullination of these proteins suggests a new mechanism in the tumorigenic process. PMID:24099319

  3. Nine cases of Merkel cell tumour.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, A

    1997-01-01

    Merkel cell tumour is an aggressive neuroendocrine neoplasm arising in the dermis. Although only a few hundred cases have been reported worldwide, nine were seen in Nottingham between 1985 and early 1994. The patients were five women and four men age 63-88. One was the first Afro-Caribbean reported to have such a tumour. In no case was the diagnosis made clinically; histological and histochemical examination was necessary. Three of the patients died quickly with metastatic disease. The primary treatment is surgical excision. For advanced disease, radiotherapy is commonly beneficial. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9306997

  4. Induction of VEGF by tepoxalin does not lead to increased tumour growth in a canine osteosarcoma xenograft.

    PubMed

    Sottnik, J L; Hansen, R J; Gustafson, D L; Dow, S W; Thamm, D H

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug tepoxalin on canine tumour cell growth and describe the changes associated with tepoxalin treatment. In vitro experiments were performed to assess tepoxalin-associated alterations in tumour cell growth. Clinically achievable tepoxalin concentrations did not significantly alter tumour cell growth in vitro. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α dose-dependently increased in vitro in the presence of tepoxalin. A canine osteosarcoma xenograft was used to determine in vivo effects of tepoxalin on tumour growth and angiogenesis. Despite increased VEGF in vitro, there was a significant growth delay associated with tepoxalin treatment. Normal dogs were administered tepoxalin to assess effects on systemic VEGF production, but not found to have significantly increased VEGF. These data suggest that tepoxalin may moderately inhibit tumour growth and may be administered as an analgesic to tumour-bearing dogs.

  5. Thalidomide increases both intra-tumoural tumour necrosis factor-α production and anti-tumour activity in response to 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Z; Joseph, W R; Browne, W L; Mountjoy, K G; Palmer, B D; Baguley, B C; Ching, L-M

    1999-01-01

    5,6-Dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA), synthesized in this laboratory and currently in phase I clinical trial, is a low molecular weight inducer of tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Administration of DMXAA to mice with established transplantable tumours elicits rapid vascular collapse selectively in the tumour, followed by extensive haemorrhagic necrosis mediated primarily through the production of TNF-α. In this report we have investigated the synthesis of TNF-α mRNA in hepatic, splenic and tumour tissue. Co-administration of thalidomide with DMXAA increased anti-tumour activity and increased intra-tumoural TNF-α production approximately tenfold over that obtained with DMXAA alone. Thalidomide increased splenic TNF-α production slightly but significantly decreased serum and hepatic levels of TNF-α induced with DMXAA. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced 300-fold higher serum TNF-α than did DMXAA at the maximum tolerated dose, but induced similar amounts of TNF-α in spleen, liver and tumour. Splenic TNF-α activity induced with LPS was slightly increased with thalidomide, but serum and liver TNF-α levels were suppressed. Thalidomide did not increase intra-tumoural TNF-α production induced with LPS, in sharp contrast to that obtained with DMXAA. While thalidomide improved the anti-tumour response to DMXAA, it had no effect on the anti-tumour action of LPS that did not induce a significant growth delay or cures against the Colon 38 tumour. The increase in the anti-tumour action by thalidomide in combination with DMXAA corresponded to an increase in intra-tumoural TNF-α production. Co-administration of thalidomide may represent a novel approach to improving selective intra-tumoural TNF-α production and anti-tumour efficacy of DMXAA. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10360649

  6. The anti-malarial atovaquone increases radiosensitivity by alleviating tumour hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Ashton, Thomas M.; Fokas, Emmanouil; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A.; Folkes, Lisa K.; Anbalagan, Selvakumar; Huether, Melanie; Kelly, Catherine J.; Pirovano, Giacomo; Buffa, Francesca M.; Hammond, Ester M.; Stratford, Michael; Muschel, Ruth J.; Higgins, Geoff S.; McKenna, William Gillies

    2016-01-01

    Tumour hypoxia renders cancer cells resistant to cancer therapy, resulting in markedly worse clinical outcomes. To find clinical candidate compounds that reduce hypoxia in tumours, we conduct a high-throughput screen for oxygen consumption rate (OCR) reduction and identify a number of drugs with this property. For this study we focus on the anti-malarial, atovaquone. Atovaquone rapidly decreases the OCR by more than 80% in a wide range of cancer cell lines at pharmacological concentrations. In addition, atovaquone eradicates hypoxia in FaDu, HCT116 and H1299 spheroids. Similarly, it reduces hypoxia in FaDu and HCT116 xenografts in nude mice, and causes a significant tumour growth delay when combined with radiation. Atovaquone is a ubiquinone analogue, and decreases the OCR by inhibiting mitochondrial complex III. We are now undertaking clinical studies to assess whether atovaquone reduces tumour hypoxia in patients, thereby increasing the efficacy of radiotherapy. PMID:27453292

  7. Oncolytic viruses & their specific targeting to tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prafull K.; Doley, Juwar; Kumar, G. Ravi; Sahoo, A.P.; Tiwari, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide. In spite of achieving significant successes in medical sciences in the past few decades, the number of deaths due to cancer remains unchecked. The conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy have limited therapeutic index and a plethora of treatment related side effects. This situation has provided an impetus for search of novel therapeutic strategies that can selectively destroy the tumour cells, leaving the normal cells unharmed. Viral oncotherapy is such a promising treatment modality that offers unique opportunity for tumour targeting. Numerous viruses with inherent anti-cancer activity have been identified and are in different phases of clinical trials. In the era of modern biotechnology and with better understanding of cancer biology and virology, it has become feasible to engineer the oncolytic viruses (OVs) to increase their tumour selectivity and enhance their oncolytic activity. In this review, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses kill the tumour cells have been discussed as also the development made in virotherapy for cancer treatment with emphasis on their tumour specific targeting. PMID:23168697

  8. Cell metabolism, tumour diagnosis and multispectral FLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rück, A.; Hauser, C.; Lorenz, S.; Mosch, S.; Rotte, S.; Kessler, M.; Kalinina, S.

    2013-02-01

    Fluorescence guided diagnosis of tumour tissue is in many cases insufficient, because false positive results are interfering with the outcome. Discrimination between tumour and inflammation could be therefore difficult. Improvement of fluorescence diagnosis through observation of cell metabolism could be the solution, which needs a detailed understanding of the origin of autofluorescence. However, a complex combination of fluorophores give rise to the emission signal. Also in PDD (photodynamic diagnosis) different photosensitizer metabolites contribute to the fluorescence signal. Therefore, the fluorescence decay in many cases does not show a simple monoexponential profile. In those cases a considerable improvement could be achieved when time-resolved and spectral-resolved techniques are simultaneously incorporated. The discussion will focus on the detection of NADH, FAD and 5-ALA induced porphyrins. With respect to NADH and FAD the discrimination between protein bound and free coenzyme was investigated with multispectral FLIM in normal oral keratinocytes and squamous carcinoma cells from different origin. The redox ratio, which can be correlated with the fluorescence lifetimes of NADH and FAD changed depending on the state of the cells. Most of the investigations were done in monolayer cell cultures. However, in order to get information from a more realistic in vivo situation additionally the chorioallantoismembrane (CAM) of fertilized eggs was used where tumour cells or biopsies were allowed to grow. The results of theses measurements will be discussed as well.

  9. An imbalance in progenitor cell populations reflects tumour progression in breast cancer primary culture models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many factors influence breast cancer progression, including the ability of progenitor cells to sustain or increase net tumour cell numbers. Our aim was to define whether alterations in putative progenitor populations could predict clinicopathological factors of prognostic importance for cancer progression. Methods Primary cultures were established from human breast tumour and adjacent non-tumour tissue. Putative progenitor cell populations were isolated based on co-expression or concomitant absence of the epithelial and myoepithelial markers EPCAM and CALLA respectively. Results Significant reductions in cellular senescence were observed in tumour versus non-tumour cultures, accompanied by a stepwise increase in proliferation:senescence ratios. A novel correlation between tumour aggressiveness and an imbalance of putative progenitor subpopulations was also observed. Specifically, an increased double-negative (DN) to double-positive (DP) ratio distinguished aggressive tumours of high grade, estrogen receptor-negativity or HER2-positivity. The DN:DP ratio was also higher in malignant MDA-MB-231 cells relative to non-tumourogenic MCF-10A cells. Ultrastructural analysis of the DN subpopulation in an invasive tumour culture revealed enrichment in lipofuscin bodies, markers of ageing or senescent cells. Conclusions Our results suggest that an imbalance in tumour progenitor subpopulations imbalances the functional relationship between proliferation and senescence, creating a microenvironment favouring tumour progression. PMID:21521500

  10. Chemical modification and immunogenicity of membrane fractions from mouse tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Staab, H. J.; Anderer, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    A crude membrane fraction isolated from mouse tumour cells was treated with various chemicals. The effects on the immunogenicity of the membrane sample were tested in syngeneic mice for tumour protection, using a challenge dose of 10(5) viable tumour cells. Best protection was obtained after immunization of mice with a membrane sample modified with dimethylsulphate. Up to 60% of the animals remained tumour free, and the tumour-bearing animals showed a greatly increased mean survival time. The post-challenge sera contained no detectable amounts of cytotoxic antibodies. The membrane sample isolated from tumour cells which had been modified with dimethylsulphate showed less immunogenicity than the modified cells or the membrane fraction from unmodified cells. PMID:215180

  11. Clinical relevance associated to the analysis of circulating tumour cells in patients with solid tumours.

    PubMed

    Serrano Fernádez, María José; Alvarez Merino, Juan Carlos; Martínez Zubiaurre, Iñigo; Fernández García, Ana; Sánchez Rovira, Pedro; Lorente Acosta, José Antonio

    2009-10-01

    The distant growth of tumour cells escaping from primary tumours, a process termed metastasis, represents the leading cause of death among patients affected by malignant neoplasias from breast and colon. During the metastasis process, cancer cells liberated from primary tumour tissue, also termed circulating tumour cells (CTCs), travel through the circulatory and/or lymphatic systems to reach distant organs. The early detection and the genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of such CTCs could represent a powerful diagnostic tool of the disease, and could also be considered an important predictive and prognostic marker of disease progression and treatment response. In this article we discuss the potential relevance in the clinic of monitoring CTCs from patients suffering from solid epithelial tumours, with emphasis on the impact of such analyses as a predictive marker for treatment response.

  12. Variation, "evolution", immortality and genetic instabilities in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Bignold, L P

    2007-08-18

    The pathological characteristics of tumour cells often include variation of their histopathological features (i.e. "degrees of de-differentiation") between cases of the same tumour type and between different foci within individual tumours. Usually, only a few cell lines from tumours are immortal. Currently, somatic mutation, replicative infidelity of DNA and aneuploidy are suggested as alternative mechanisms of genomic disturbance underlying tumours. Nevertheless, apart from Hansemann's ideas of "anaplasia" and "de-differentiation" (proposed in the 1890s), and supposed "evolutionary themes" in cancer cell biology, little has been published concerning how histopathologic variation and immortality in tumour cells might arise. This paper reviews applications of the concepts of "variation" to tumours, including concepts of "evolution" and "cellular Darwinism". It is proposed that combinations of somatic mutation, DNA replicative infidelity and aneuploidy may explain the variabilities in tumours, and provide immortality in occasional tumour cells. A possible model involves (i) an initial somatic mutation causing reduced replicative fidelity of DNA, which could be variable in intensity, and thus give rise to variations between cases; (ii) a phase of replicative infidelity of DNA causing daughter cells lines to develop various abnormalities to different degrees, and hence provide for variation between areas of the same tumour. As a last event (iii) occasional asymmetric chromosomal distributions (aneuploidy) might "refresh" the ability of a daughter cell to replicate DNA faithfully causing them to become immortal. Thus extensively mutant and variable, hyperploid, and occasionally immortal cells might arise.

  13. Giant Mediastinal Germ Cell Tumour: An Enigma of Surgical Consideration

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Nurayub Mohd; Azizan, Nornazirah; Zakaria, Andee Dzulkarnaen; Rahman, Mohd Ramzisham Abdul

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of 16-year-old male, who was referred from private centre for dyspnoea, fatigue, and orthopnea. The chest radiograph revealed complete opacification of left chest which was confirmed by computed tomography as a large left mediastinal mass measuring 14 × 15 × 18 cm. The diagnostic needle core biopsy revealed mixed germ cell tumour with possible combination of embryonal carcinoma, yolk sac, and teratoma. After 4 cycles of neoadjuvant BEP regime, there was initial response of tumour markers but not tumour bulk. Instead of classic median sternotomy or clamshell incision, posterolateral approach with piecemeal manner was chosen. Histology confirmed mixed germ cell tumour with residual teratomatous component without yolk sac or embryonal carcinoma component. Weighing 3.5 kg, it is one of the largest mediastinal germ cell tumours ever reported. We describe this rare and gigantic intrathoracic tumour and discuss the spectrum of surgical approach and treatment of this exceptional tumour. PMID:27807495

  14. The relationship between total and phosphorylated STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression, components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gujam, Fadia J.A.; McMillan, Donald C.; Edwards, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between tumour cell expression of total and phosphorylated STAT1 (ph-STAT1) and STAT3 (ph-STAT-3), components of tumour microenvironment and survival in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of total and ph-STAT1, and STAT3 were performed on tissue microarray of 384 breast cancer specimens. Tumour cell expression of STAT1 and STAT3 at both cytoplasmic and nuclear locations were combined and identified as STAT1/STAT3 tumour cell expression. These results were related to cancer specific survival (CSS) and phenotypic features of the tumour and the host. High ph-STAT1 and ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression were associated with increased ER (both P≤0.001) and PR (both P <0.05), reduced tumour grade (P=0.015 and P<0.001 respectively) and necrosis (both P=0.001). Ph-STAT1 was associated with increased general inflammatory infiltrate (P=0.007) and ph-STAT3 was associated with lower CD4+ infiltration (P=0.024). In multivariate survival analysis, only high ph-STAT3 tumour cell expression was a predictor of improved CSS (P=0.010) independent of other tumour and host-based factors. STAT1 and STAT3 tumour cell expression appeared to be an important determinant of favourable outcome in patients with invasive ductal breast cancer. The present results suggest that STAT1 and STAT3 may affect disease outcome through direct impact on tumour cells, counteracting aggressive tumour features, as well as interaction with the surrounding microenvironment. PMID:27769057

  15. Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumours and nested stromal epithelial tumours of the liver.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sunayana; Bihari, Chhagan

    2016-04-01

    Desmoplastic nested spindle cell tumour of liver (DNSTL), nested stromal-epithelial tumour (NSET) and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumour (CNSET) are recently described entities with similar morphology, immunohistochemistry and molecular genetics. These are rare entities with only three large case series described till date. These tumours commonly present in the paediatric age group. NSETs, in addition have been described to be associated with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production and Cushingoid features. It is important to discuss this rare group of tumours with a low malignant potential as the most common radiological differential diagnosis is hepatoblastoma, which has a relatively poorer prognosis. Thus, a pathologist needs to keep this entity in mind, so as to offer a correct histological diagnosis.

  16. The tumour microenvironment harbours ontogenically distinct dendritic cell populations with opposing effects on tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Laoui, Damya; Keirsse, Jiri; Morias, Yannick; Van Overmeire, Eva; Geeraerts, Xenia; Elkrim, Yvon; Kiss, Mate; Bolli, Evangelia; Lahmar, Qods; Sichien, Dorine; Serneels, Jens; Scott, Charlotte L.; Boon, Louis; De Baetselier, Patrick; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Guilliams, Martin; Van Ginderachter, Jo A.

    2016-01-01

    Various steady state and inflamed tissues have been shown to contain a heterogeneous DC population consisting of developmentally distinct subsets, including cDC1s, cDC2s and monocyte-derived DCs, displaying differential functional specializations. The identification of functionally distinct tumour-associated DC (TADC) subpopulations could prove essential for the understanding of basic TADC biology and for envisaging targeted immunotherapies. We demonstrate that multiple mouse tumours as well as human tumours harbour ontogenically discrete TADC subsets. Monocyte-derived TADCs are prominent in tumour antigen uptake, but lack strong T-cell stimulatory capacity due to NO-mediated immunosuppression. Pre-cDC-derived TADCs have lymph node migratory potential, whereby cDC1s efficiently activate CD8+ T cells and cDC2s induce Th17 cells. Mice vaccinated with cDC2s displayed a reduced tumour growth accompanied by a reprogramming of pro-tumoural TAMs and a reduction of MDSCs, while cDC1 vaccination strongly induces anti-tumour CTLs. Our data might prove important for therapeutic interventions targeted at specific TADC subsets or their precursors. PMID:28008905

  17. Immunological hallmarks of stromal cells in the tumour microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Turley, Shannon J; Cremasco, Viviana; Astarita, Jillian L

    2015-11-01

    A dynamic and mutualistic interaction between tumour cells and the surrounding stroma promotes the initiation, progression, metastasis and chemoresistance of solid tumours. Far less understood is the relationship between the stroma and tumour-infiltrating leukocytes; however, emerging evidence suggests that the stromal compartment can shape antitumour immunity and responsiveness to immunotherapy. Thus, there is growing interest in elucidating the immunomodulatory roles of the stroma that evolve within the tumour microenvironment. In this Review, we discuss the evidence that stromal determinants interact with leukocytes and influence antitumour immunity, with emphasis on the immunological attributes of stromal cells that may foster their protumorigenic function.

  18. Optical diagnostics of tumour cells at different stages of pathology development

    SciTech Connect

    Shcheglova, L S; Maryakhina, V S; Abramova, L L

    2013-11-30

    The differences in optical and biophysical properties between the cells of mammary gland tumour extracted from tumours of different diameter are described. It is shown that the spectral and spectrokinetic properties of fluorescent probes in the cells extracted from the tumours 1 – 3 cm in diameter are essentially different. Thus, the extinction coefficient of rhodamine 6G gradually increases with the pathology development. At the same time the rate of interaction of the triplet states of molecular probes with the oxygen, diluted in the tumour cells cytoplasm, decreases with the growth of the tumour capsule diameter. The observed regularities can be due to the changes in the cell structure, biochemical and biophysical properties. The reported data may be useful for developing optical methods of diagnostics of biotissue pathological conditions. (optical methods in biology and medicine)

  19. Optical diagnostics of tumour cells at different stages of pathology development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcheglova, L. S.; Abramova, L. L.; Maryakhina, V. S.

    2013-11-01

    The differences in optical and biophysical properties between the cells of mammary gland tumour extracted from tumours of different diameter are described. It is shown that the spectral and spectrokinetic properties of fluorescent probes in the cells extracted from the tumours 1 - 3 cm in diameter are essentially different. Thus, the extinction coefficient of rhodamine 6G gradually increases with the pathology development. At the same time the rate of interaction of the triplet states of molecular probes with the oxygen, diluted in the tumour cells cytoplasm, decreases with the growth of the tumour capsule diameter. The observed regularities can be due to the changes in the cell structure, biochemical and biophysical properties. The reported data may be useful for developing optical methods of diagnostics of biotissue pathological conditions.

  20. Tumour Heterogeneity: The Key Advantages of Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Gabriel, Marta; Ory, Benjamin; Lamoureux, Francois; Heymann, Marie-Francoise; Heymann, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Tumour heterogeneity refers to the fact that different tumour cells can show distinct morphological and phenotypic profiles, including cellular morphology, gene expression, metabolism, motility, proliferation and metastatic potential. This phenomenon occurs both between tumours (inter-tumour heterogeneity) and within tumours (intra-tumour heterogeneity), and it is caused by genetic and non-genetic factors. The heterogeneity of cancer cells introduces significant challenges in using molecular prognostic markers as well as for classifying patients that might benefit from specific therapies. Thus, research efforts for characterizing heterogeneity would be useful for a better understanding of the causes and progression of disease. It has been suggested that the study of heterogeneity within Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs) could also reflect the full spectrum of mutations of the disease more accurately than a single biopsy of a primary or metastatic tumour. In previous years, many high throughput methodologies have raised for the study of heterogeneity at different levels (i.e., RNA, DNA, protein and epigenetic events). The aim of the current review is to stress clinical implications of tumour heterogeneity, as well as current available methodologies for their study, paying specific attention to those able to assess heterogeneity at the single cell level. PMID:27999407

  1. [(18)F]FDG PET monitoring of tumour response to chemotherapy: does [(18)F]FDG uptake correlate with the viable tumour cell fraction?

    PubMed

    Spaepen, Karoline; Stroobants, Sigrid; Dupont, Patrick; Bormans, Guy; Balzarini, Jan; Verhoef, Gregor; Mortelmans, Luc; Vandenberghe, Peter; De Wolf-Peeters, Christine

    2003-05-01

    Because metabolic changes induced by chemotherapy precede the morphological changes, fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([(18)F]FDG PET) is thought to predict response to therapy earlier and more accurately than other modalities. To be a reliable predictor of response, changes in tumour [(18)F]FDG uptake should reflect changes in viable cell fraction, but little is known about the contribution of apoptotic and necrotic cancer cells and inflammatory tissue to the [(18)F]FDG signal. In a tumour mouse model we investigated the relation between chemotherapy-induced changes in various tumoral components and tumour uptake and size. SCID mice were subcutaneously inoculated in the right thigh with 5 x 10(6) Daudi cells. When the tumour measured 15-20 mm, Endoxan was given intravenously. At different time points [1-15 days (d1-d15) after the injection of Endoxan], ex vivo autoradiography and histopathology were performed in two mice and [(18)F]FDG uptake in the tumour and tumour size were correlated with the different cell fractions measured with flow cytometry in five mice. At d1/d3, similar reductions in [(18)F]FDG uptake and viable tumoral cell fraction were observed and these reductions preceded changes in tumour size. By d8/d10, [(18)F]FDG uptake had stabilised despite a further reduction in viable tumoral cell fraction. At these time points a major inflammatory response was observed. At d15, an increase in viable tumour cells was again observed and this was accurately predicted by an increase in [(18)F]FDG uptake, while the tumour volume remained unchanged. In contrast with variations in tumour volume, [(18)F]FDG is a good marker for chemotherapy response monitoring. However, optimal timing seems crucial since a transient increase in stromal reaction may result in overestimation of the fraction of viable cells.

  2. A non-local model for cancer stem cells and the tumour growth paradox.

    PubMed

    Borsi, I; Fasano, A; Primicerio, M; Hillen, T

    2015-11-20

    The tumour growth paradox refers to the observation that incomplete treatment of cancers can enhance their growth. As shown here and elsewhere, the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) can explain this effect. CSC are less sensitive to treatments, hence any stress applied to the tumour selects for CSC, thereby increasing the fitness of the tumour. In this paper, we use a mathematical model to understand the role of CSC in the progression of cancer. Our model is a rather general system of integro-differential equations for tumour growth and tumour spread. Such a model has never been analysed, and we prove results on local and global existence of solutions, their uniqueness and their boundedness. We show numerically that this model exhibits the tumour growth paradox for all parameters tested. This effect becomes more relevant for small renewal rate of the CSC.

  3. Soft Tissue Giant Cell Tumour of Low Malignant Potential: A Rare Tumour at a Rare Site

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Amoolya; V., Geethamani; C., Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    “Soft tissue giant cell tumour of low malignant potential” is considered as the soft tissue counterpart of osteoclastoma of the bone. It is a primary soft tissue tumour which is classified under the category of fibrohistiocytic tumours of intermediate malignancy.Seventy percent of the tumours involve the extremities and only about seven percent of them arise in head and neck region. They are composed of nodules of histiocytes in a vascular stroma, with multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells positive for vimentin, smooth muscle actin (SMA), CD68 and Tarterate Resistant Acid Phosphatase (TRAP). We are presenting a case of a 75-year-old man who had a nodule on the ala of the nose. Histopathology showed a histiocytic lesion. Benign fibrous histiocytoma, plexiform fibrohistiocytic tumour, solitary reticulohistiocytoma and histioid leprosy were ruled out by using special stains and immunostains. Expression of smooth muscle actin and CD68 confirmed the diagnosis of a soft tissue giant cell tumour with a low malignant potential. PMID:24551690

  4. Tumour evolution inferred by single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Navin, Nicholas; Kendall, Jude; Troge, Jennifer; Andrews, Peter; Rodgers, Linda; McIndoo, Jeanne; Cook, Kerry; Stepansky, Asya; Levy, Dan; Esposito, Diane; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Krasnitz, Alex; McCombie, W Richard; Hicks, James; Wigler, Michael

    2011-04-07

    Genomic analysis provides insights into the role of copy number variation in disease, but most methods are not designed to resolve mixed populations of cells. In tumours, where genetic heterogeneity is common, very important information may be lost that would be useful for reconstructing evolutionary history. Here we show that with flow-sorted nuclei, whole genome amplification and next generation sequencing we can accurately quantify genomic copy number within an individual nucleus. We apply single-nucleus sequencing to investigate tumour population structure and evolution in two human breast cancer cases. Analysis of 100 single cells from a polygenomic tumour revealed three distinct clonal subpopulations that probably represent sequential clonal expansions. Additional analysis of 100 single cells from a monogenomic primary tumour and its liver metastasis indicated that a single clonal expansion formed the primary tumour and seeded the metastasis. In both primary tumours, we also identified an unexpectedly abundant subpopulation of genetically diverse 'pseudodiploid' cells that do not travel to the metastatic site. In contrast to gradual models of tumour progression, our data indicate that tumours grow by punctuated clonal expansions with few persistent intermediates.

  5. α2-Adrenoceptor action on cell proliferation and mammary tumour growth in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzone, A; Piñero, C Pérez; Castillo, L F; Sarappa, M G; Rojas, P; Lanari, C; Lüthy, I A

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Breast cancer, the most common cancer in women in most countries, is a highly stressful disease. Catecholamines released during stress bind to adrenoceptors and we have recently described α2-adrenoceptors in human breast cell lines, linked to enhanced cell proliferation. The purpose was to assess the in vivo effects of compounds acting on α2-adrenoceptors in a reliable model of breast cancer. Experimental approach: The expression of α2-adrenoceptors was confirmed by immunocytochemistry, immunofluorescence and reverse transcription-PCR in the mouse mammary tumour cell line MC4-L5. Proliferation was assessed by [3H]thymidine incorporation and tumours were measured daily. Apoptosis was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP digoxigenin nick-end labelling. Key results: Incubation for 2 days with α2-adrenoceptor agonists (clonidine and dexmedetomidine) significantly enhanced proliferation of the mouse mammary tumour cell line MC4-L5. These agonists also significantly stimulated tumour growth of the progestin-dependent tumour C4-HD even in the presence of medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA). In every tumour tested (C4-HD, CC4-2-HD and CC4-3-HI), regardless of MPA sensitivity, clonidine significantly enhanced tumour growth in the absence of MPA. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonists, yohimbine and rauwolscine, completely reversed the effects of clonidine. However, the group receiving yohimbine alone showed a nonsignificant but constant increase in tumour growth, whereas rauwolscine alone diminished tumour growth significantly, behaving as a reverse agonist. In CC4-3-HI tumours, rauwolscine treatment enhanced apoptosis and diminished the mitotic index, whereas clonidine had the inverse effect. Conclusions and implications: α2-Adrenoceptor agonists enhanced tumour growth and rauwolscine behaved in vivo as a reverse agonist, suggesting that it may be tested for adjuvant treatment. PMID:18604234

  6. Ionic immune suppression within the tumour microenvironment limits T cell effector function

    PubMed Central

    Eil, Robert; Vodnala, Suman K; Clever, David; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Pan, Jenny H; Palmer, Douglas C; Gros, Alena; Yamamoto, Tori N; Patel, Shashank J; Guittard, Geoffrey C; Yu, Zhiya; Carbonaro, Valentina; Okkenhaug, Klaus; Schrump, David S; Linehan, W Marston; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2016-01-01

    Tumours progress despite being infiltrated by tumour-specific effector T cells1. Tumours contain areas of cellular necrosis, which is associated with poor survival in a variety of cancers2. Here, we show that necrosis releases an intracellular ion, potassium, into the extracellular fluid of mouse and human tumours causing profound suppression of T cell effector function. We find that elevations in the extracellular potassium concentration [K+]e act to impair T cell receptor (TCR)-driven Akt-mTOR phosphorylation and effector programmes, this potassium-mediated suppression of Akt-mTOR signalling and T cell function is dependent upon the activity of the serine/threonine phosphatase PP2A3,4. While the suppressive effect mediated by elevated [K+]e is independent of changes in plasma membrane potential (Vm), it does require an increase in intracellular potassium ([K+]i). Concordantly, ionic reprogramming of tumour-specific T cells through overexpression of the potassium channel Kv1.3 lowers [K+]i and improves effector functions in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, Kv1.3 T cell overexpression enhances tumour clearance and survival of melanoma-bearing mice. These results uncover a previously undescribed ionic checkpoint blocking T cell function within tumours and identify new strategies for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27626381

  7. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 is induced by epidermal growth factor in human bladder tumour cell lines and is detectable in urine of patients with bladder tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Nutt, J. E.; Mellon, J. K.; Qureshi, K.; Lunec, J.

    1998-01-01

    The matrix metalloproteinases are a family of enzymes that degrade the extracellular matrix and are considered to be important in tumour invasion and metastasis. The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) on matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1) production in two human bladder tumour cell lines, RT112 and RT4, has been investigated. In the RT112 cell line, an increase in MMP1 mRNA levels was found after a 6-h incubation with EGF, and this further increased to 20-fold that of control levels at 24- and 48-h treatment with 50 ng ml(-1) of EGF. MMP2 mRNA levels remained constant over this time period, whereas in the RT4 cells no MMP2 transcripts were detectable, but MMP1 transcripts again increased with 24- and 48-h treatment with 50 ng ml(-1) of EGF. MMP1 protein concentration in the conditioned medium from both cell lines increased with 24- and 48-h treatment of the cells and the total MMP1 was higher in the medium than the cells, demonstrating that the bladder tumour cell lines synthesize and secrete MMP1 protein after continuous stimulation with EGF. MMP1 protein was detected in urine from patients with bladder tumours, with a significant increase in concentration with increased stage and grade of tumour. MMP1 urine concentrations may therefore be a useful prognostic indicator for bladder tumour progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9683296

  8. Immunology of cancer stem cells in solid tumours. A review.

    PubMed

    Maccalli, Cristina; Volontè, Andrea; Cimminiello, Carolina; Parmiani, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a minor subpopulation of tumour cells that share some features with the normal stem cells of the tissue from which tumour derives and have the properties of self-renewal, multiple differentiation and tumour initiation (tumour-initiating cells, TICs). Thus CSCs/TICs need to survive cancer therapies in order to provide new, more differentiated, metastatic-prone tumour cells. This occurs through different signals delivered within the tumour microenvironment. The immune system of cancer patients may recognise CSCs/TICs and kill them though it is unclear whether this may occur in vivo during spontaneous tumour growth. This review summarises findings on the immunological profile of CSCs/TICs as compared with neoplastic non-stem cells and discusses the possible antigens recognised by the patients' immune system, the in vitro and the potential in vivo immunogenicity of such antigens and the ability of human CSCs/TICs to down-regulate the immune response by the release of a variety of suppressive factors. We conclude that available data on immunological characterisation of CSCs/TICs may be useful in the perspective of designing new translational immunotherapy protocols targeting CSCs/TICs.

  9. Single-cell Raman spectroscopy of irradiated tumour cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Quinn

    This work describes the development and application of a novel combination of single-cell Raman spectroscopy (RS), automated data processing, and principal component analysis (PCA) for investigating radiation induced biochemical responses in human tumour cells. The developed techniques are first validated for the analysis of large data sets (˜200 spectra) obtained from single cells. The effectiveness and robustness of the automated data processing methods is demonstrated, and potential pitfalls that may arise during the implementation of such methods are identified. The techniques are first applied to investigate the inherent sources of spectral variability between single cells of a human prostate tumour cell line (DU145) cultured in vitro. PCA is used to identify spectral differences that correlate with cell cycle progression and the changing confluency of a cell culture during the first 3-4 days after sub-culturing. Spectral variability arising from cell cycle progression is (i) expressed as varying intensities of protein and nucleic acid features relative to lipid features, (ii) well correlated with known biochemical changes in cells as they progress through the cell cycle, and (iii) shown to be the most significant source of inherent spectral variability between cells. This characterization provides a foundation for interpreting spectral variability in subsequent studies. The techniques are then applied to study the effects of ionizing radiation on human tumour cells. DU145 cells are cultured in vitro and irradiated to doses between 15 and 50 Gy with single fractions of 6 MV photons from a medical linear accelerator. Raman spectra are acquired from irradiated and unirradiated cells, up to 5 days post-irradiation. PCA is used to distinguish radiation induced spectral changes from inherent sources of spectral variability, such as those arising from cell cycle. Radiation induced spectral changes are found to correlate with both the irradiated dose and the

  10. Vascular endothelial growth factor directly stimulates tumour cell proliferation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Devery, Aoife M; Wadekar, Rekha; Bokobza, Sivan M; Weber, Anika M; Jiang, Yanyan; Ryan, Anderson J

    2015-09-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key stimulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis. VEGF signals primarily through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), a receptor tyrosine kinase whose expression is found predominantly on endothelial cells. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of VEGFR2 expression in NSCLC cells. NSCLC cells and tissue sections were stained for VEGFR2 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine the activation and inhibition of VEGFR2 and its downstream signalling pathways. Five-day proliferation assays were carried out in the presence or absence of VEGF. IHC analysis of NSCLC demonstrated tumour cell VEGFR2 expression in 20% of samples. Immunoblot analysis showed expression of VEGFR2 protein in 3/8 NSCLC cell lines that correlated with VEGFR2 mRNA expression levels. VEGF-dependent VEGFR2 activation was apparent in NSCLC cells, and was associated with increased tumor cell proliferation. Cediranib treatment or siRNA against VEGFR2 inhibited VEGF-dependent increases in cell proliferation. Inhibition of VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase activity using cediranib was more effective than inhibition of AKT (MK2206) or MEK (AZD6244) for overcoming VEGFR2-driven cell proliferation. VEGF treatment did not affect cell survival following treatment with radiation, cisplatin, docetaxel or gemcitabine. Our data suggest that a subset of NSCLC tumour cells express functional VEGFR2 which can act to promote VEGF-dependent tumour cell growth. In this tumour subset, therapies targeting VEGFR2 signalling, such as cediranib, have the potential to inhibit both tumour cell proliferation and angiogenesis.

  11. Increased FcγRII expression and aberrant tumour necrosis factor α production by mature dendritic cells from patients with active rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Radstake, T; Blom, A; Sloetjes, A; van Gorselen, E O F; Pesman, G; Engelen, L; Torensma, R; van den Berg, W B; Figdor, C; van Lent, P L E M; Adema, G; Barrera, P

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate potential differences in phenotype and behaviour of immature (iDC) and mature dendritic cells (mDC) from patients with RA and healthy subjects. Methods: iDC and mDC were derived from blood monocytes of patients with RA and healthy controls following standardised protocols. FACS was used to analyse expression of FcγRI, II, and III and molecules to characterise DC. Discrimination between FcγRIIa and FcγRIIb was achieved by RT-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed on synovial biopsy specimens of three patients with RA and three healthy controls. TNFα production by iDC and mDC upon FcγR dependent stimulation was compared between patients with RA and controls by ELISA. Results: iDC from patients with active RA but not from patients with inactive RA or healthy controls markedly up regulated FcγRII. mDC from patients with active RA also lacked the physiological down regulation of FcγRII that occurs upon maturation in both control groups. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the increased expression of FcγRII in RA—especially marked for FcγRIIb. FcγR dependent stimulation of DC using antigen-IgG immune complexes (IC) significantly increased TNFα production by DC from healthy subjects, but significantly decreased TNFα by DC from patients with RA. Overlapping expression patterns between FcγRII and DC-LAMP in the synovial tissue of patients with RA imply that in vivo, also, mature DC express increased levels of FcγRIIb. Conclusion: The presence and altered characteristics of DC during active RA suggest that DC help to modulate autoimmunity in RA. Further studies should elucidate the role of local factors in altering the function of DC in RA and in increasing expression of FcγRII. PMID:15547078

  12. [Measuring 14C-glucose and 14C-acetate oxidation in tumour cells and tumorous host organism].

    PubMed

    Hujber, Zoltán; Jeney, András; Oláh, Júlia; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Baranyai, Lajos; Környei, József; Petõvári, Gábor; Sebestyén, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Tumour cell metabolism can be influenced by alterations of the extracellular microenvironment and the tumour-promoting genetically changed mechanisms. There is increasing interest to introduce appropriate bioenergetic assays to describe the therapeutic effect and metabolic subtypes of tumours in clinical oncology. The analysis of 14C-glucose and 14C-acetate oxidation could be a suitable method to examine the metabolic/bioenergetic profiles of tumour cells and tumorous host organisms. The metabolic activity of tumour cells (in vitro cell lines, primary human lymphocytes and leukaemia cells) and the tumourous host organism were examined in vitro and in vivo by detecting the released CO2 levels derived from the radioactive carbon atom labelled energy substrates. We have found that the most cancer cells of solid tumours oxidised glucose more intensively than acetate. It was interesting that AML, CML and CLL cells isolated from blood preferred acetate as an energy substrate in vitro. Furthermore, based on our observations, tumours affected the glucose or acetate oxidation of the organism when applying bioenergetic substrates per os or iv. We provided the first data about the alterations in metabolic profiles of the tumour bearing organism in xenograft models. In summary, according to our results, comparison of the energy substrate oxidation can be an indicative method related to the metabolic profile analysis of tumour cells in vitro and tumorous host organism in vivo.

  13. Monitoring ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate levels in cancer cells and macrophages from tumours treated by photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, Mladen; Zhang, Wei; Separovic, Duska

    2012-05-01

    Eradication of tumours by photodynamic therapy (PDT) is accompanied by marked changes in local sphingolipid (SL) engagement. Because of the heterogeneity of cellular composition, analysis of tumour tissue homogenates to quantify SL species is inadequate for evaluating their levels in parenchymal cancer cell population. By staining tumour-derived single cell suspensions with antibodies specific to ceramide and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) followed by flow cytometry, we were able to document changes in the levels of these two key SLs in cancer cells and tumour-associated macrophages (TAMs) of mouse SCCVII tumours following PDT. The results confirm previously obtained indications that tumour treatment by PDT induces a marked rise in ceramide levels in cancer cells within these lesions. Cancer cells from PDT-treated SCCVII tumours undergoing apoptosis were found to have much higher ceramide levels and substantially lower S1P levels than their viable counterparts. Compared to cancer cells, considerably higher ceramide and S1P levels were consistently found in TAMs. Treatment of SCCVII tumour-bearing mice with ceramide analog LCL29 induced a rise in ceramide levels in TAMs but not in cancer cells. When combined with PDT, LCL29 treatment produced a further increase in ceramide levels in TAMs while having no evident impact on ceramide content in cancer cells within same tumours. The results highlight SLs as important participants in tumour response to PDT and potential adjuvant therapeutic targets to PDT.

  14. Tumour metastasis as an adaptation of tumour cells to fulfil their phosphorus requirements.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Caramujo, Maria José

    2012-05-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is a vital component of nucleotides, membrane phospholipids, and phosphorylated intermediates in cellular signalling. The Growth Rate Hypothesis (GRH) states that fast growing organisms should be richer in phosphorus (relatively low C:P and N:P cell content) than slow developing organisms as a result of high ribosome biogenesis. Cells that proliferate rapidly, such as cancer cells, require a high amount of ribosomes and other P-rich RNA components that are necessary to manufacture proteins. The GRH hypothesis may be applied to cancer predicting that tumour cells are richer in phosphorus than the surrounding tissue, and that they resort to metastasis in order to meet their nutrient demands. Considering that the cells most P-deprived should be located in the inner parts of the tumour we propose that changes in the membrane of these cells favour the detachment of the more peripheral cells.

  15. Molecular design of hybrid tumour necrosis factor alpha with polyethylene glycol increases its anti-tumour potency.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Kihira, T.; Tsunoda, S.; Kanamori, T.; Nakagawa, S.; Mayumi, T.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to increase the anti-tumour potency and reduce the toxic side-effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Natural human TNF-alpha was chemically conjugated with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (PEG) using succinimidyl coupling of lysine amino groups of TNF-alpha. The number-average molecular weight of PEG-modified TNF-alpha (PEG-TNF-alpha) increased with an increase in the reaction time and the initial molar ratio of PEG relative to TNF-alpha. The resulting modified TNF-alpha was separated into fractions of various molecular weights. The specific activity of separated PEG-TNF-alpha s relative to that of native TNF-alpha gradually decreased with an increase in the degree of PEG modification, but the plasma half-life was drastically increased with the increase in molecular weight of modified TNF-alpha. PEG-TNF-alpha s, in which 29% and 56% of lysine residues were coupled to PEG, had anti-tumour activity approximately 4 and 100 times greater than unmodified TNF-alpha in the murine Meth-A fibrosarcoma model. Extensive PEG modification did not increase its in vivo activity. A high dose of unmodified TNF-alpha induced toxic side-effects, but these were not observed with the modified TNF-alpha s. Optimal PEG modification of TNF-alpha markedly increased its bioavailability and may facilitate its potential anti-tumour therapeutic use. PMID:7734321

  16. Re-programming tumour cell metabolism to treat cancer: no lone target for lonidamine

    PubMed Central

    Bhutia, Yangzom D.; Babu, Ellappan; Ganapathy, Vadivel

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell metabolism is very different from normal cell metabolism; cancer cells re-programme the metabolic pathways that occur in normal cells in such a manner that it optimizes their proliferation, growth and survival. Although this metabolic re-programming obviously operates to the advantage of the tumour, it also offers unique opportunities for effective cancer therapy. Molecules that target the tumour cell-specific metabolic pathways have potential as novel anti-cancer drugs. Lonidamine belongs to this group of molecules and is already in use in some countries for cancer treatment. It has been known for a long time that lonidamine interferes with energy production in tumour cells by inhibiting hexokinase II (HKII), a glycolytic enzyme. However, subsequent studies have uncovered additional pharmacological targets for the drug, which include the electron transport chain and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore, thus expanding the pharmacological effects of the drug on tumour cell metabolism. A study by Nancolas et al. in a recent issue of the Biochemical Journal identifies two additional new targets for lonidamine: the pyruvate transporter in the mitochondria and the H+-coupled monocarboxylate transporters in the plasma membrane (PM). It is thus becoming increasingly apparent that the anti-cancer effects of lonidamine do not occur through a single target; the drug works at multiple sites. Irrespective of the molecular targets, what lonidamine does in the end is to undo what the tumour cells have done in terms of re-programming cellular metabolism and mitochondrial function. PMID:27234586

  17. Phenotypic heterogeneity of disseminated tumour cells is preset by primary tumour hypoxic microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Fluegen, Georg; Avivar-Valderas, Alvaro; Wang, Yarong; Padgen, Michael R; Williams, James K; Nobre, Ana Rita; Calvo, Veronica; Cheung, Julie F; Bravo-Cordero, Jose Javier; Entenberg, David; Castracane, James; Verkhusha, Vladislav; Keely, Patricia J; Condeelis, John; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio A

    2017-02-01

    Hypoxia is a poor-prognosis microenvironmental hallmark of solid tumours, but it is unclear how it influences the fate of disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) in target organs. Here we report that hypoxic HNSCC and breast primary tumour microenvironments displayed upregulation of key dormancy (NR2F1, DEC2, p27) and hypoxia (GLUT1, HIF1α) genes. Analysis of solitary DTCs in PDX and transgenic mice revealed that post-hypoxic DTCs were frequently NR2F1(hi)/DEC2(hi)/p27(hi)/TGFβ2(hi) and dormant. NR2F1 and HIF1α were required for p27 induction in post-hypoxic dormant DTCs, but these DTCs did not display GLUT1(hi) expression. Post-hypoxic DTCs evaded chemotherapy and, unlike ER(-) breast cancer cells, post-hypoxic ER(+) breast cancer cells were more prone to enter NR2F1-dependent dormancy. We propose that primary tumour hypoxic microenvironments give rise to a subpopulation of dormant DTCs that evade therapy. These post-hypoxic dormant DTCs may be the source of disease relapse and poor prognosis associated with hypoxia.

  18. Up-regulation of Fas (CD95) expression in tumour cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peshes-Yaloz, Naama; Rosen, Dalia; Sondel, Paul M; Krammer, Peter H; Berke, Gideon

    2007-01-01

    Both the function and regulation of Fas expression in tumours is poorly understood. Our laboratory has reported that cultured, low Fas-expressing tumours undergo massive, yet reversible, up-regulation of cell surface Fas expression when injected into mice. The present study was aimed at determining what causes this enhanced Fas expression and whether the newly expressed Fas functions as a death receptor. Newly expressed Fas is indeed capable of inducing apoptosis. Based on our observation that Fas induction is reduced when tumour cells are injected into immune-deficient mice, we propose that Fas up-regulation in vivo involves the host's immune system. Accordingly, Fas up-regulation occurs in vitro when low Fas-expressing tumour cells are cocultured with lymphoid cells. Furthermore ascitic fluid extracted from tumour-bearing mice trigger Fas up-regulation in low Fas expressing tumours. This last finding suggests that a soluble factor(s) mediates induction of Fas expression. The best candidate for this soluble factor is nitric oxide (NO) based on the following observations: the factor in the ascites is unstable; Fas expression is induced to a lesser degree after injection into inducible NO synthase (NOS)-deficient (iNOS–/–) mice when compared to control mice; similarly, coculture with iNOS–/– splenocytes induces Fas less effectively than coculture with control splenocytes; and finally, the NO donor SNAP induces considerable Fas up-regulation in tumours in vitro. Our model is that host lymphoid cells in response to a tumour increase NO synthesis, which in turn causes enhanced Fas expression in the tumour. PMID:17343612

  19. Monitoring of lung tumour cell growth in artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Sulé-Suso, Josep; El Haj, Alicia J; Hoban, Paul R; Wang, Ruikang

    2004-10-15

    Morbidity of many tumour types is associated with invasion of tumour cells through the basement membrane and subsequent metastasis to vital organs. Tumour invasion is frequently detected late on as many patients present with advanced disease. The method of detecting invasion is through conventional histological staining techniques, which are time consuming and require processing of the sample. This can affect interpretation of the results. In this study, a new imaging technique, optical coherence tomography (OCT), was used to monitor lung tumour cell growth in two artificial membranes composed of either collagen type I or Matrigel. In parallel, standard histological section analysis was performed to validate the accuracy of the monitoring by OCT. Cross-sectional images from OCT revealed that lung tumour cells infiltrated only when low cell seeding density (5 x 10(5)) and low collagen concentration (1.5 mg/ml) were combined. The cells could be easily differentiated from the artificial membranes and appeared as either a brighter layer on the top of the membrane or brighter foci embedded within the darker membrane. These cell-membrane morphologies matched remarkably to the standard histological section images. Our results suggest that OCT has a great potential to become a useful tool for fast and robust imaging of cell growth in vivo and as a potential assessment of cell invasion.

  20. Hyperbaric oxygen activates discoidin domain receptor 2 via tumour necrosis factor-alpha and the p38 MAPK pathway to increase vascular smooth muscle cell migration through matrix metalloproteinase 2.

    PubMed

    Shyu, Kou-Gi; Wang, Bao-Wei; Chang, Hang

    2009-04-01

    DDR2 (discoidin domain receptor 2) regulates collagen turnover mediated by SMCs (smooth muscle cells) in atherosclerosis. HBO (hyperbaric oxygen) has been used in medical practice; however, the molecular mechanism of the beneficial effects of HBO is poorly understood. Furthermore, the effect of HBO on DDR2 has not been reported previously. In the present study, we investigated the cellular and molecular mechanisms of DDR2 regulation by HBO in VSMCs (vascular SMCs). Cells were exposed to 2.5 ATA (atmosphere absolute) of oxygen in a hyperbaric chamber. DDR2 protein (3.63-fold) and mRNA (2.34-fold) expression were significantly increased after exposure to 2.5 ATA HBO for 1 h. Addition of SB203580 and p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) siRNA (small interfering RNA) 30 min before HBO inhibited the induction of DDR2 protein. HBO also significantly increased DNA-protein binding activity of Myc/Max. Addition of SB203580 and an anti-TNF-alpha (tumour necrosis factor-alpha) monoclonal antibody 30 min before HBO abolished the DNA-protein binding activity induced by HBO. HBO significantly increased the secretion of TNF-alpha from cultured VSMCs. Exogenous addition of TNF-alpha significantly increased DDR2 protein expression, whereas anti-TNF-alpha and anti-(TNF-alpha receptor) antibodies blocked the induction of DDR2 protein expression. HBO significantly increased VSMC migration and proliferation, whereas DDR2 siRNA inhibited the migration induced by HBO. HBO increased activated MMP2 (matrix metalloproteinase 2) protein expression, and DDR2 siRNA abolished the induction of activated MMP2 expression induced by HBO. In conclusion, HBO activates DDR2 expression in cultured rat VSMCs. HBO-induced DDR2 is mediated by TNF-alpha and at least in part through the p38 MAPK and Myc pathways.

  1. Interphase cytogenetics of multicentric renal cell tumours confirm associations of specific aberrations with defined cytomorphologies

    PubMed Central

    Amo-Takyi, B K; Mittermayer, C; Günther, K; Handt, S

    2000-01-01

    To demonstrate associations of certain chromosomal aberrations with defined renal cell tumour (RCT) subtypes, we analysed 239 tumour nephrectomy cases for specimens with multicentric tumours. Chromosomal in situ hybridization was then performed on 15 cases with 34 foci (16 conventional renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), and 18 papillary RCTs (11 carcinomas and seven adenomas) for specific chromosomal aberrations, using α-satellite probes for chromosomes 3, 7 or 17. Particular preference was given to cases which had separate foci with different cytomorphologies. Furthermore, we compared aberrations in relation to tumour size, stage, grade and between different foci in a specimen. Thirty-four cases had multiple tumours. Forty-seven per cent of the multicentric tumours were conventional RCCs and 53% papillary RCTs (against 83% solitary conventional RCCs and 5% solitary papillary RCTs). Three conventional RCCs sized 8 mm (G3), 13 cm (pT2, G2) and 15 cm (pT3b, G3), respectively, revealed monosomy 3, and 13 were disomic. Seventeen papillary RCTs (11 carcinomas and six adenomas) displayed trisomy 17, irrespective of size or grade. Four papillary carcinomas and six papillary adenomas had trisomy 7, and the rest (seven papillary carcinomas and one papillary adenoma) revealed disomy 7. In conclusion, papillary RCTs were tendentially multicentric. Although specific for conventional RCCs heedless of size, monosomy 3 was only observed in high-grade and/or advanced tumours. Trisomy 17 was only detectable in papillary RCTs irrespective of tumour state, showing increased copies with tumour growth. Papillary RCTs also appeared to lose some copies of chromosome 7 with tumour progress, possibly reflecting malignancy. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10780519

  2. Mast cell tumour in a giant Galapagos tortoise (Geochelone nigra vicina).

    PubMed

    Santoro, M; Stacy, B A; Morales, J A; Gastezzi-Arias, P; Landazuli, S; Jacobson, E R

    2008-01-01

    A well-differentiated cutaneous mast cell tumour was diagnosed in a subadult female giant Galapagos tortoise. The tumour was a pedunculated, verrucose mass located near the base of the neck. The histological features, which were diagnostic for a mast cell tumour, included abundant intracytoplasmic granules that were stained metachromatically with Giemsa and toluidine blue stains. Mast cell tumours are rare in reptiles, and this is the first description of a mast cell tumour in a chelonian.

  3. Tumour-associated fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells: more similarities than differences.

    PubMed

    Paunescu, Virgil; Bojin, Florina M; Tatu, Calin A; Gavriliuc, Oana I; Rosca, Adriana; Gruia, Alexandra T; Tanasie, Gabriela; Bunu, Carmen; Crisnic, Daniela; Gherghiceanu, Mihaela; Tatu, Fabian R; Tatu, Carmen S; Vermesan, Simona

    2011-03-01

    Tumour-associated fibroblasts (TAFs) are part of the tumour stroma, providing functional and structural support for tumour progression and development. The origin and biology of TAFs are poorly understood, but within the tumour environment, TAFs become activated and secrete different paracrine and autocrine factors involved in tumorigenesis. It has been shown that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can be recruited into the tumours, where they proliferate and acquire a TAF-like phenotype. We attempted to determine to what extent TAFs characteristics in vitro juxtapose to MSCs' definition, and we showed that TAFs and MSCs share immunophenotypic similarities, including the presence of certain cell surface molecules [human leukocyte antigen-DR subregion (HLA-DR), CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD106 and CD117]; the expression of cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix proteins, such as vimentin, α-smooth muscle actin, nestin and trilineage differentiation potential (to adipocytes, chondrocytes and osteoblasts). When compared to MSCs, production of cytokines, chemokines and growth factors showed a significant increase in TAFs for vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-β1, interleukins (IL-4, IL-10) and tumour necrosis factor α. Proliferation rate was highly increased in TAFs and fibroblast cell lines used in our study, compared to MSCs, whereas ultrastructural details differentiated the two cell types by the presence of cytoplasmic elongations, lamellar content lysosomes and intermediate filaments. Our results provide supportive evidence to the fact that TAFs derive from MSCs and could be a subset of 'specialized' MSCs.

  4. Transport of calcium ions by Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Landry, Y; Lehninger, A L

    1976-08-15

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells accumulate Ca2+ when incubated aerobically with succinate, phosphate and rotenone, as revealed by isotopic and atomic-absorption measurements. Ca2+ does not stimulate oxygen consumption by carefully prepared Ehrlich cells, but des so when the cells are placed in a hypo-osmotic medium. Neither glutamate nor malate support Ca2+ uptake in 'intact' Ehrlich cells, nor does the endogenous NAD-linked respiration. Ca2+ uptake is completely dependent on mitochondrial energy-coupling mechansims. It was an unexpected finding that maximal Ca2+ uptake supported by succinate requires rotenone, which blocks oxidation of enogenous NAD-linked substrates. Phosphate functions as co-anion for entry of Ca2+. Ca2+ uptake is also supported by extra-cellular ATP; no other nucleoside 5'-di- or tri-phosphate was active. The accumulation of Ca2+ apparently takes place in the mitochondria, since oligomycin and atractyloside inhibit ATP-supported Ca2+ uptake. Glycolysis does not support Ca2+ uptake. Neither free mitochondria released from disrupted cells nor permeability-damaged cells capable of absorbing Trypan Blue were responsible for any large fraction of the total observed energy-coupled Ca2+ uptake. The observations reported also indicate that electron flow through energy-conserving site 1 promotes Ca2+ release from Ehrlich cells and that extra-cellular ATP increase permeability of the cell membrane, allowing both ATP and Ca2+ to enter the cells more readily.

  5. Therapeutic effect of interleukin 12 on mouse haemangiosarcomas is not associated with an increased anti-tumour cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity.

    PubMed Central

    Vizler, C.; Rosato, A.; Calderazzo, F.; Quintieri, L.; Fruscella, P.; Wainstok de Calmanovici, R.; Mantovani, A.; Vecchi, A.; Zanovello, P.; Collavo, D.

    1998-01-01

    In syngeneic mice, the H5V polyoma middle-T oncogene-transformed endothelioma cell line induces Kaposi's sarcoma-like cavernous haemangiomas that regress transiently, probably because of an anti-tumour immune response, but eventually grow progressively and kill the host. To evaluate the generation of tumour-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), spleen cells of tumour-bearing mice were restimulated with irradiated H5V cells in mixed leucocyte-tumour cell cultures. Tumour-specific CTLs were demonstrable only when low numbers of H5V stimulator cells were used (<1 H5V cell per 50 splenocytes). We found that H5V cells secrete immunosuppressive mediators because CTL generation was blocked when H5V cells culture supernatants were added to allogeneic mixed leucocyte cultures. As numerous tumour-derived immunosuppressive mediators may interfere with interleukin 12 (IL-12) production, we tested whether IL-12 treatment of the tumour-bearing mice would augment their immune response and thus suppress tumour growth. Indeed, IL-12 inhibited tumour growth and prevented mortality, but did not increase anti-H5V CTL generation either in vitro or in vivo. Moreover, the anti-tumour activity in IL-12-treated mice was abrogated by anti-interferon (IFN)-gamma monoclonal antibody (MAb) co-administration. These results strongly suggest that the anti-tumour effect of IL-12 is principally mediated by IFN-gamma release that in turn blocks H5V cell proliferation and induces the release of factors that suppress angiogenesis. PMID:9484826

  6. Systemic but not topical TRAIL-expressing mesenchymal stem cells reduce tumour growth in malignant mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Sage, Elizabeth K; Kolluri, Krishna K; McNulty, Katrina; Lourenco, Sofia Da Silva; Kalber, Tammy L; Ordidge, Katherine L; Davies, Derek; Gary Lee, Y C; Giangreco, Adam; Janes, Sam M

    2014-07-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare but devastating cancer of the pleural lining with no effective treatment. The tumour is often diffusely spread throughout the chest cavity, making surgical resection difficult, while systemic chemotherapy offers limited benefit. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) home to and incorporate into tumour stroma, making them good candidates to deliver anticancer therapies. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a pro-apoptotic molecule that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells, leaving healthy cells unaffected. We hypothesised that human MSCs expressing TRAIL (MSCTRAIL) would home to an in vivo model of malignant pleural mesothelioma and reduce tumour growth. Human MSCs transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding TRAIL were shown in vitro to kill multiple malignant mesothelioma cell lines as predicted by sensitivity to recombinant TRAIL (rTRAIL). In vivo MSC homing was delineated using dual fluorescence and bioluminescent imaging, and we observed that higher levels of MSC engraftment occur after intravenous delivery compared with intrapleural delivery of MSCs. Finally, we show that intravenous delivery of MSCTRAIL results in a reduction in malignant pleural mesothelioma tumour growth in vivo via an increase in tumour cell apoptosis.

  7. Tumour and immune cell dynamics explain the PSA bounce after prostate cancer brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yoichiro; Offord, Chetan P; Kimura, Go; Kuribayashi, Shigehiko; Takeda, Hayato; Tsuchiya, Shinichi; Shimojo, Hisashi; Kanno, Hiroyuki; Bozic, Ivana; Nowak, Martin A; Bajzer, Željko; Dingli, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Interstitial brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer may be followed by transient increases in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) that resolve without therapy. Such PSA bounces may be associated with an improved outcome but often cause alarm in the patient and physician, and have defied explanation. Methods: We developed a mathematical model to capture the interactions between the tumour, radiation and anti-tumour immune response. The model was fitted to data from a large cohort of patients treated exclusively with interstitial brachytherapy. Immunohistological analysis for T-cell infiltration within the same tumours was also performed. Results: Our minimal model captures well the dynamics of the tumour after therapy, and suggests that a strong anti-tumour immune response coupled with the therapeutic effect of radiation on the tumour is responsible for the PSA bounce. Patients who experience a PSA bounce had a higher density of CD3 and CD8 cells within the tumour that likely contribute to the PSA bounce and the overall better outcomes observed. Conclusions: Our observations provide a novel and unifying explanation for the PSA bounce in patients with early prostate cancer and also have implications for the use of immune-based therapies in such patients to improve outcomes. PMID:27404586

  8. Polystyrene nanoparticles facilitate the internalization of impermeable biomolecules in non-tumour and tumour cells from colon epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabeza, Laura; Cano-Cortés, Victoria; Rodríguez, María J.; Vélez, Celia; Melguizo, Consolación; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M.; Prados, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Advanced colon cancer has a poor prognosis due to the limited effectiveness of current chemotherapies. Treatment failures may be avoided by the utilization of nanoparticles, which can enhance the effects of antitumor drugs, reduce their side effects and increase their directionality. Polystyrene nanoparticles have shown high biocompatibility and appropriate physicochemical properties and may represent a novel and more effective approach against colon cancer. In the present study, polystyrene nanoparticles were synthesized and fluorescently labelled, analyzing their cell internalization, intracellular localization and capacity to release transported molecules in tumour and non-tumour human colon cell lines (T84 and CCD-18). Flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy studies demonstrated that polystyrene nanoparticles are an effective vehicle for the intracellular delivery of small molecules into colon epithelium cells. The percentage cell uptake was around 100 % in both T84 and CCD-18 cell lines after only 24 h of exposure and was cell confluence-independent. The polystyrene nanoparticles showed no cytotoxicity in either colon cell line. It was found that small molecules can be efficiently delivered into colon cells by using a disulphide bridge as release strategy. Analysis of the influence of the functionalization of the polystyrene nanoparticles surface on the internalization efficiency revealed some morphological changes in these cells. These results demonstrate that polystyrene nanoparticles may improve the transport of biomolecules into colon cells which could have a potential application in chemotherapeutic treatment against colon cancer.

  9. A signature motif in LIM proteins mediates binding to checkpoint proteins and increases tumour radiosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojie; Fan, Zhongyi; Liang, Chaoyang; Li, Ling; Wang, Lili; Liang, Yingchun; Wu, Jun; Chang, Shaohong; Yan, Zhifeng; Lv, Zhaohui; Fu, Jing; Liu, Yang; Jin, Shuai; Wang, Tao; Hong, Tian; Dong, Yishan; Ding, Lihua; Cheng, Long; Liu, Rui; Fu, Shenbo; Jiao, Shunchang; Ye, Qinong

    2017-01-01

    Tumour radiotherapy resistance involves the cell cycle pathway. CDC25 phosphatases are key cell cycle regulators. However, how CDC25 activity is precisely controlled remains largely unknown. Here, we show that LIM domain-containing proteins, such as FHL1, increase inhibitory CDC25 phosphorylation by forming a complex with CHK2 and CDC25, and sequester CDC25 in the cytoplasm by forming another complex with 14-3-3 and CDC25, resulting in increased radioresistance in cancer cells. FHL1 expression, induced by ionizing irradiation in a SP1- and MLL1-dependent manner, positively correlates with radioresistance in cancer patients. We identify a cell-penetrating 11 amino-acid motif within LIM domains (eLIM) that is sufficient for binding CHK2 and CDC25, reducing the CHK2–CDC25 and CDC25–14-3-3 interaction and enhancing CDC25 activity and cancer radiosensitivity accompanied by mitotic catastrophe and apoptosis. Our results provide novel insight into molecular mechanisms underlying CDC25 activity regulation. LIM protein inhibition or use of eLIM may be new strategies for improving tumour radiosensitivity. PMID:28094252

  10. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-01

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  11. Modelling radiation-induced cell death and tumour re-oxygenation: local versus global and instant versus delayed cell death.

    PubMed

    Gago-Arias, Araceli; Aguiar, Pablo; Espinoza, Ignacio; Sánchez-Nieto, Beatriz; Pardo-Montero, Juan

    2016-02-07

    The resistance of hypoxic cells to radiation, due to the oxygen dependence of radiosensitivity, is well known and must be taken into account to accurately calculate the radiation induced cell death. A proper modelling of the response of tumours to radiation requires deriving the distribution of oxygen at a microscopic scale. This usually involves solving the reaction-diffusion equation in tumour voxels using a vascularization distribution model. Moreover, re-oxygenation arises during the course of radiotherapy, one reason being the increase of available oxygen caused by cell killing, which can turn hypoxic tumours into oxic. In this work we study the effect of cell death kinetics in tumour oxygenation modelling, analysing how it affects the timing of re-oxygenation, surviving fraction and tumour control. Two models of cell death are compared, an instantaneous cell killing, mimicking early apoptosis, and a delayed cell death scenario in which cells can die shortly after being damaged, as well as long after irradiation. For each of these scenarios, the decrease in oxygen consumption due to cell death can be computed globally (macroscopic voxel average) or locally (microscopic). A re-oxygenation model already used in the literature, the so called full re-oxygenation, is also considered. The impact of cell death kinetics and re-oxygenation on tumour responses is illustrated for two radiotherapy fractionation schemes: a conventional schedule, and a hypofractionated treatment. The results show large differences in the doses needed to achieve 50% tumour control for the investigated cell death models. Moreover, the models affect the tumour responses differently depending on the treatment schedule. This corroborates the complex nature of re-oxygenation, showing the need to take into account the kinetics of cell death in radiation response models.

  12. Circulating tumour cells as tumour biomarkers in melanoma: detection methods and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Khoja, L; Lorigan, P; Dive, C; Keilholz, U; Fusi, A

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells of solid tumour origin detectable in the peripheral blood. Their occurrence is considered a prerequisite step for establishing distant metastases. Metastatic melanoma was the first malignancy in which CTCs were detected and numerous studies have been published on CTC detection in melanoma at various stages of disease. In spite of this, there is no general consensus as to the clinical utility of CTCs in melanoma, largely due to conflicting results from heterogeneous studies and discrepancies in methods of detection between studies. In this review, we examine the possible clinical significance of CTCs in cutaneous, mucosal and ocular melanoma, focusing on detection methods and prognostic value of CTC detection.

  13. Microfluidic impedance cytometry of tumour cells in blood

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Daniel; Morgan, Hywel

    2014-01-01

    The dielectric properties of tumour cells are known to differ from normal blood cells, and this difference can be exploited for label-free separation of cells. Conventional measurement techniques are slow and cannot identify rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in a realistic timeframe. We use high throughput single cell microfluidic impedance cytometry to measure the dielectric properties of the MCF7 tumour cell line (representative of CTCs), both as pure populations and mixed with whole blood. The data show that the MCF7 cells have a large membrane capacitance and size, enabling clear discrimination from all other leukocytes. Impedance analysis is used to follow changes in cell viability when cells are kept in suspension, a process which can be understood from modelling time-dependent changes in the dielectric properties (predominantly membrane conductivity) of the cells. Impedance cytometry is used to enumerate low numbers of MCF7 cells spiked into whole blood. Chemical lysis is commonly used to remove the abundant erythrocytes, and it is shown that this process does not alter the MCF7 cell count or change their dielectric properties. Combining impedance cytometry with magnetic bead based antibody enrichment enables MCF7 cells to be detected down to 100 MCF7 cells in 1 ml whole blood, a log 3.5 enrichment and a mean recovery of 92%. Microfluidic impedance cytometry could be easily integrated within complex cell separation systems for identification and enumeration of specific cell types, providing a fast in-line single cell characterisation method. PMID:25553198

  14. Role of the microtubule-targeting drug vinflunine on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vinflunine (VFL) is a microtubule-targeting drug that suppresses microtubule dynamics, showing anti-metastatic properties both in vitro and in living cancer cells. An increasing body of evidence underlines the influence of the microtubules dynamics on the cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions. E-cadherin is a marker of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a tumour suppressor; its reduced levels in carcinoma are associated with poor prognosis. In this report, we investigate the role of VFL on cell-cell adhesions in bladder epithelial tumour cells. Methods Human bladder epithelial tumour cell lines HT1376, 5637, SW780, T24 and UMUC3 were used to analyse cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesions under VFL treatment. VFL effect on growth inhibition was measured by using a MTT colorimetric cell viability assay. Western blot, immunofluorescence and transmission electron microscopy analyses were performed to assess the roles of VFL effect on cell-cell adhesions, epithelial-to-mesenchymal markers and apoptosis. The role of the proteasome in controlling cell-cell adhesion was studied using the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Results We show that VFL induces cell death in bladder cancer cells and activates epithelial differentiation of the remaining living cells, leading to an increase of E-cadherin-dependent cell-cell adhesion and a reduction of mesenchymal markers, such as N-cadherin or vimentin. Moreover, while E-cadherin is increased, the levels of Hakai, an E3 ubiquitin-ligase for E-cadherin, were significantly reduced in presence of VFL. In 5637, this reduction on Hakai expression was blocked by MG132 proteasome inhibitor, indicating that the proteasome pathway could be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in its degradation. Conclusions Our findings underscore a critical function for VFL in cell-cell adhesions of epithelial bladder tumour cells, suggesting a novel molecular mechanism by which VFL may impact upon EMT and metastasis. PMID:25012153

  15. Giant cell tumour of bone in the denosumab era.

    PubMed

    van der Heijden, Lizz; Dijkstra, P D Sander; Blay, Jean-Yves; Gelderblom, Hans

    2017-03-30

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an intermediate locally aggressive primary bone tumour, occurring mostly at the meta-epiphysis of long bones. Overexpression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) by mononuclear neoplastic stromal cells promotes recruitment of numerous reactive multinucleated osteoclast-like giant cells, causing lacunar bone resorption. Preferential treatment is curettage with local adjuvants such as phenol, alcohol or liquid nitrogen. The remaining cavity may be filled with bone graft or polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) bone cement; benefits of the latter are a lower risk of recurrence, possibility of direct weight bearing and early radiographic detection of recurrences. Reported recurrence rates are comparable for the different local adjuvants (27-31%). Factors increasing the local recurrence risk include soft tissue extension and anatomically difficult localisations such as the sacrum. When joint salvage is impossible, en-bloc resection and endoprosthetic joint replacement may be performed. Local tumour control on the one hand and maintenance of a functional native joint and quality of life on the other hand are the main pillars of surgical treatment for this disease. Current knowledge and development in the fields of imaging, functional biology and systemic therapy are forcing us into a paradigm shift from a purely surgical approach towards a multidisciplinary approach. Systemic therapy with denosumab (RANKL inhibitor) or zoledronic acid (bisphosphonates) blocks, respectively inhibits, bone resorption by osteoclast-like giant cells. After use of zoledronic acid, stabilisation of local and metastatic disease has been reported, although the level of evidence is low. Denosumab is more extensively studied in two prospective trials, and appears effective for the optimisation of surgical treatment. Denosumab should be considered in the standard multidisciplinary treatment of advanced GCTB (e.g. cortical destruction, soft

  16. Malignant Granular Cell Tumour Presenting as a Paravertebral Mass in an Adolescent Male- A Rare Presentation of an Uncommon Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajay Kr; Shubham, Swasti; Maan, Pratibha; Chauhan, Udit

    2017-01-01

    Granular Cell Tumour (GCT), also known as Abrikossoff’s tumour is a rare neural tumour, mostly benign and solitary but rare malignant and multifocal occurrence are also reported. Location of tumour varies widely within body with tongue, skin and subcutaneous tissue being the most common sites. We report a case of malignant GCT in a 17-year-old male presented with a paravertebral swelling. Radiological and histopathological findings along with immunohistochemistry were of malignant GCT. We emphasize this case for its uncommon age and site of presentation in addition to invasive nature.

  17. Hormonal modulation of brain tumour growth: a cell culture study.

    PubMed

    Gibelli, N; Zibera, C; Butti, G; Assietti, R; Sica, G; Scerrati, M; Iacopino, F; Roselli, R; Paoletti, P; Robustelli della Cuna, G

    1989-01-01

    Tissue samples derived from two neuroepithelial tumours and five meningiomas were obtained at surgery from seven patients and cultured in order to study the effect of dexamethasone (DEX) and testosterone acetate (TA) on cell proliferation. Glucocorticoid and androgen receptors (GR, AR) were determined both on tissue samples (7 cases) and on five out of the seven cell cultures obtained by tumours. GR and AR were present respectively in 5 and in 4 out of the tumour specimens assayed and in 4/5 and 2/3 of the tested cell cultures. DEX activity on cell growth was tested on six cell cultures. Four of them showed a significant growth inhibition at the highest drug concentration. On the contrary, a significant growth stimulation was observed in four out of the five cultures, where GR were present, using low hormone concentrations. Treatment with pharmacological doses of TA caused a significant cytotoxicity in all the tested cultures. Low TA concentrations inhibited cell growth in one out of the two cell cultures which contained AR, but were ineffective in cultures lacking AR. Our preliminary results suggest a possible role in growth regulation by DEX and TA in intracranial tumours, on the basis of the presence of specific hormone receptors.

  18. Relevance of density, size and DNA content of tumour cells to the lung colony assay.

    PubMed Central

    Grdina, D. J.; Hittelman, W. N.; White, R. A.; Meistrich, M. L.

    1977-01-01

    Mouse fibrosarcoma tumours were dissociated and divided into subpopulations of viable cells by centrifugation in linear density gradients of Renografin. Two of these subpopulations, designated Band 2 and Band 4, differed in their clonogenic ability in lung colony assay. The less dense Band 2 cells were significantly more clonogenic than the Band 4 cells (2.9 percent vs 1.4 percent respectively). Each band was further separated on the basis of cell size by centrifugal elutriation. Each size class of cells comprising Band 2 showed higher clonogenic ability than the corresponding size class in Band 4. Thus cell size differences were not responsible for the clonogenic differences between these bands. To determine whether cell-cycle distribution of the tumour cells was responsible for differences in cloning efficiency, flow microfluorometric and premature chromosome condensation methods were utilized. The unseparated and Band 4 populations showed a higher percentage of cells in S and G2 than did the Band 2 populations, but many of the S and G2 tumour cells showed extensive chromosome damage. From this study we conclude that the increased clonogenic ability of the lighter tumour cells is not due to differences in cell size or cell-cycle parameters. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:563726

  19. Chimaeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huan-huan; Wang, Dan-dan; Yan, Da-li; Hu, Yong; Yang, Su-jin; Liu, Si-wen

    2017-01-01

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies, as one of the cancer immunotherapies, have heralded a new era of treating cancer. The accumulating data, especially about CAR-modified T cells against CD19 support that CAR T-cell therapy is a highly effective immune therapy for B-cell malignancies. Apart from CD19, there have been many trials of CAR T cells directed other tumour specific or associated antigens (TSAs/TAAs) in haematologic malignancies and solid tumours. This review will briefly summarize basic CAR structure, parts of reported TSAs/TAAs, results of the clinical trials of CAR T-cell therapies as well as two life-threatening side effects. Experiments in vivo or in vitro, ongoing clinical trials and the outlook for CAR T-cell therapies also be included. Our future efforts will focus on identification of more viable cancer targets and more strategies to make CAR T-cell therapy safer. PMID:28053197

  20. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  1. Leukaemia cell of origin identified by chromatin landscape of bulk tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    George, Joshy; Uyar, Asli; Young, Kira; Kuffler, Lauren; Waldron-Francis, Kaiden; Marquez, Eladio; Ucar, Duygu; Trowbridge, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    The precise identity of a tumour's cell of origin can influence disease prognosis and outcome. Methods to reliably define tumour cell of origin from primary, bulk tumour cell samples has been a challenge. Here we use a well-defined model of MLL-rearranged acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) to demonstrate that transforming haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and multipotent progenitors results in more aggressive AML than transforming committed progenitor cells. Transcriptome profiling reveals a gene expression signature broadly distinguishing stem cell-derived versus progenitor cell-derived AML, including genes involved in immune escape, extravasation and small GTPase signal transduction. However, whole-genome profiling of open chromatin reveals precise and robust biomarkers reflecting each cell of origin tested, from bulk AML tumour cell sampling. We find that bulk AML tumour cells exhibit distinct open chromatin loci that reflect the transformed cell of origin and suggest that open chromatin patterns may be leveraged as prognostic signatures in human AML. PMID:27397025

  2. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth.

  3. Rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells undergo malignant transformation via indirect co-cultured with tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianping; Zhang, Yalan; Bai, Lu; Cui, Xiangrong; Zhu, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have potential applications in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering as well as being potential carriers for tumour therapy. However, the safety of using MSCs in tumours is unknown. Herein, we analyse malignant transformation of MSCs in the tumour microenvironment. Rat bone marrow MSCs were cultured with malignant rat glioma C6 cells without direct cell-cell contact. After 7 days, the cells were assessed for transformation using flow cytometry, real-time quantitative PCR, immunofluorescence and chromosomal analysis. In addition, wild-type (WT) p53, mutant p53 and mdm2 was determined using Western blotting. Almost all MSCs became phenotypically malignant cells, with significantly decreased WT p53 expression and increased expression of mutant p53 and mdm2, along with an aneuploid karyotype. To evaluate tumorigenesis in vivo, the MSCs indirect co-cultured with C6 cells for 7 days were transplanted subcutaneously into immuno-deficient mice. The cells developed into a large tumour at the injection site within 8 weeks, with systemic symptoms including cachexia and scoliosis. Pathological and cytological analysis revealed poorly differentiated pleomorphic cells with a dense vascular network and aggressive invasion into the adjacent muscle. These data demonstrate that MSCs became malignant cancer cells when exposed to the tumour microenvironment and suggest that factors released from the cancer cells have a critical role in the malignant transformation of MSCs.

  4. Increased concentrations of tumour necrosis factor in "cachectic" patients with severe chronic heart failure.

    PubMed Central

    McMurray, J; Abdullah, I; Dargie, H J; Shapiro, D

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain whether patients with cardiac failure and reduced body weight ("cardiac cachexia") have increased circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor (cachectin). DESIGN--Patients with cardiac failure were prospectively identified as "cachectic" (body fat less than 27% in men and less than 29% in women measured by skinfold thickness callipers) or "non-cachectic". Tumour necrosis factor was assayed blind to patient group. SETTING--Cardiology unit in a tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS--26 consecutive patients (10 women) (mean age 61) admitted for investigation or treatment of chronic heart failure. All were in New York Heart Association class III or IV. RESULTS--In nine of the 16 cachectic patients the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was increased (mean (SEM) 74 (20) pg/ml) compared with one of the 10 "non-cachectic" patients (22 pg/ml, p less than 0.001). Patients with a raised circulating concentration of tumour necrosis factor weighed significantly less (55.6 (3.5) kg) than those in whom the concentration of tumour necrosis factor was normal (69.0 (4.1) kg) (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS--Circulating concentrations of tumour necrosis factor were increased in a significant proportion of patients with chronic heart failure and low body weight. Tumour necrosis factor stimulates catabolism experimentally and it may be a factor in the weight loss seen in patients with "cardiac cachexia". PMID:1747295

  5. Scrotal Involvement with Testicular Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumour

    PubMed Central

    Allen, J. A.; O'Brien, F.; Tuthill, A.; Power, D. G.

    2016-01-01

    A 37-year-old male presented with a traumatic injury to the scrotal region necessitating emergency surgery. Evacuation of a haematoma and bilateral orchidectomy were performed. A left sided nonseminomatous germ cell tumour (NSGCT), predominantly yolk sac, was identified. Microscopic margins were positive for tumour. Initial tumour markers revealed an AFP of 22,854 ng/mL, HCG of <1 mIU/mL, and LDH of 463 IU/L. Eight weeks after surgery, AFP levels remained elevated at 11,646 ng/mL. Computed tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated left inguinal adenopathy, 1.5 cm in max dimension. On review, extensive evidence of scrotal involvement was evident. His tumour was staged as stage IIIC, poor risk NSGCT. He was treated with 4 cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin over a 12-week period. His tumour markers normalised after 3 cycles. There was a marked improvement noted clinically. Follow-up CT scans demonstrated complete resolution of his tumour. He later underwent further surgery to remove a small amount of remaining spermatic cord. Histology revealed no malignant tissue. The patient suffered many complications including testosterone deficiency, osteopenia, infertility, and psychological distress. Discussion. A small proportion of testicular cancer may present in an atypical manner. The scrotum and testicle have markedly different embryonic origins and therefore a distinct anatomic separation. As a result the scrotum is not a typical site of spread of testicular cancer. Case reports have been described that were managed in a similar manner with good outcomes. Therefore, even with significant scrotal involvement, if timely and appropriate treatment is administered, complete resolution of the tumour may be achieved. PMID:27830100

  6. Sonic Hedgehog promotes proliferation of Notch-dependent monociliated choroid plexus tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Grausam, Katie B.; Wang, Jun; Lun, Melody P.; Ohli, Jasmin; Lidov, Hart G. W.; Calicchio, Monica L.; Zeng, Erliang; Salisbury, Jeffrey L.; Wechsler-Reya, Robert J.; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Schüller, Ulrich; Zhao, Haotian

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant Notch signaling has been linked to many cancers including choroid plexus (CP) tumours, a group of rare and predominantly pediatric brain neoplasms. We developed animal models of CP tumours by inducing sustained expression of Notch1 that recapitulate properties of human CP tumours with aberrant NOTCH signaling. Whole transcriptome and functional analyses showed that tumour cell proliferation is associated with Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) in the tumour microenvironment. Unlike CP epithelial cells, which have multiple primary cilia, tumour cells possess a solitary primary cilium as a result of Notch-mediated suppression of multiciliate diffferentiation. A Shh-driven signaling cascade in the primary cilium occurs in tumour cells but not in epithelial cells. Lineage studies show that CP tumours arise from mono-ciliated progenitors in the roof plate characterized by elevated Notch signaling. Abnormal SHH signaling and distinct ciliogenesis are detected in human CP tumours, suggesting SHH pathway and cilia differentiation as potential therapeutic avenues. PMID:26999738

  7. CXCL1 mediates obesity-associated adipose stromal cell trafficking and function in the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Sirin, Olga; Corn, Paul G.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Troncoso, Patricia; Davis, John; Pettaway, Curtis; Ward, John; Frazier, Marsha L.; Logothetis, Christopher; Kolonin, Mikhail G.

    2016-01-01

    White adipose tissue (WAT) overgrowth in obesity is linked with increased aggressiveness of certain cancers. Adipose stromal cells (ASCs) can become mobilized from WAT, recruited by tumours and promote cancer progression. Mechanisms underlying ASC trafficking are unclear. Here we demonstrate that chemokines CXCL1 and CXCL8 chemoattract ASC by signalling through their receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2, in cell culture models. We further show that obese patients with prostate cancer have increased epithelial CXCL1 expression. Concomitantly, we observe that cells with ASC phenotype are mobilized and infiltrate tumours in obese patients. Using mouse models, we show that the CXCL1 chemokine gradient is required for the obesity-dependent tumour ASC recruitment, vascularization and tumour growth promotion. We demonstrate that αSMA expression in ASCs is induced by chemokine signalling and mediates the stimulatory effects of ASCs on endothelial cells. Our data suggest that ASC recruitment to tumours, driven by CXCL1 and CXCL8, promotes prostate cancer progression. PMID:27241286

  8. Recent developments in the histological diagnosis of spindle cell carcinoma, fibromatosis and phyllodes tumour of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H S

    2008-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances in the diagnosis of these three unusual tumours of the breast. Spindle cell carcinoma needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of many mammary spindle cell lesions: it is important to be aware of the wide range of appearances, including the recently described fibromatosis-like variant. Immunohistochemistry using a broad panel of cytokeratin antibodies is needed to exclude spindle cell carcinoma; there is frequent expression of basal cytokeratins and p63. CD34 is often expressed by the stroma of phyllodes tumours, but does not appear to be expressed by spindle cell carcinoma or fibromatosis. Nuclear beta-catenin is found in about 80% of fibromatoses, but can also be seen in spindle cell carcinomas and phyllodes tumours. Two recent studies have described features useful in the distinction of phyllodes tumour and fibroadenoma on core biopsy, including increased cellularity, mitoses and overgrowth of the stroma, adipose tissue in the stroma and fragmentation of the biopsy specimen. Periductal stromal tumour is a recently described biphasic tumour composed of spindle cells around open tubules or ducts (but no leaf-like architecture) with frequent CD34 expression. The overlap of morphology with phyllodes tumour suggests that it may be best regarded as a variant of phyllodes tumour.

  9. Pancreatic stellate cells support tumour metabolism through autophagic alanine secretion.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cristovão M; Biancur, Douglas E; Wang, Xiaoxu; Halbrook, Christopher J; Sherman, Mara H; Zhang, Li; Kremer, Daniel; Hwang, Rosa F; Witkiewicz, Agnes K; Ying, Haoqiang; Asara, John M; Evans, Ronald M; Cantley, Lewis C; Lyssiotis, Costas A; Kimmelman, Alec C

    2016-08-25

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive disease characterized by an intense fibrotic stromal response and deregulated metabolism. The role of the stroma in PDAC biology is complex and it has been shown to play critical roles that differ depending on the biological context. The stromal reaction also impairs the vasculature, leading to a highly hypoxic, nutrient-poor environment. As such, these tumours must alter how they capture and use nutrients to support their metabolic needs. Here we show that stroma-associated pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) are critical for PDAC metabolism through the secretion of non-essential amino acids (NEAA). Specifically, we uncover a previously undescribed role for alanine, which outcompetes glucose and glutamine-derived carbon in PDAC to fuel the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and thus NEAA and lipid biosynthesis. This shift in fuel source decreases the tumour’s dependence on glucose and serum-derived nutrients, which are limited in the pancreatic tumour microenvironment. Moreover, we demonstrate that alanine secretion by PSCs is dependent on PSC autophagy, a process that is stimulated by cancer cells. Thus, our results demonstrate a novel metabolic interaction between PSCs and cancer cells, in which PSC-derived alanine acts as an alternative carbon source. This finding highlights a previously unappreciated metabolic network within pancreatic tumours in which diverse fuel sources are used to promote growth in an austere tumour microenvironment.

  10. Large Cell Calcifying Sertoli Cell Tumour of Testis-A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Harresh; Gupta, Natasha; Mishra, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Sertoli cell tumours of testes are classified into sertoli cell tumour NOS (not otherwise specified), sclerosing variant and large cell calcifying variant. So far, 90 cases of the large cell calcifying variant have been reported in literature. We describe a rare case of inhibin negative locally invasive large cell calcifying sertoli cell tumour of testis. A 62-year-old man presented with complaints of pain and swelling in right scrotum for 8 months. Ultrasound revealed a right testicular mass with internal vascularity and calcification. Gross examination of right inguinal orchiectomy specimen showed firm to hard mass with yellow areas and calcification seen on cut section. Microscopy revealed a tumour in the testis infiltrating the epididymis and rete testis and reaching up to the skin. Tumour cells were arranged in the form of solid nests, tubules and cords with neutrophilic stromal infiltrate and calcification. Tumour cells had abundant clear to eosinophilic cytoplasm, round nucleus with vesicular chromatin and conspicuous nucleoli. On immunohistochemistry, tumour cells were positive for pan cytokeratin, Epithelial Membrane Antigen (EMA), S-100 protein, desmin, vimentin, neuron specific enolase, and chromogranin. However, it was negative for inhibin alpha, OCT4, CD10, CD99, Melan A. Inhibin negative large cell calcifying sertoli cell tumour is a rare entity. PMID:28050378

  11. Biosensors for the Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Clotilde; Abal, Miguel; López-López, Rafael; Muinelo-Romay, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is the cause of most cancer deaths. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are cells released from the primary tumour into the bloodstream that are considered the main promoters of metastasis. Therefore, these cells are targets for understanding tumour biology and improving clinical management of the disease. Several techniques have emerged in recent years to isolate, detect, and characterise CTCs. As CTCs are a rare event, their study requires multidisciplinary considerations of both biological and physical properties. In addition, as isolation of viable cells may give further insights into metastatic development, cell recovery must be done with minimal cell damage. The ideal system for CTCs analysis must include maximum efficiency of detection in real time. In this sense, new approaches used to enrich CTCs from clinical samples have provided an important improvement in cell recovery. However, this progress should be accompanied by more efficient strategies of cell quantification. A range of biosensor platforms are being introduced into the technology for CTCs quantification with promising results. This review provides an update on recent progress in CTCs identification using different approaches based on sensor signaling. PMID:24618729

  12. Nickel hydroxy carbonate increases tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 secretion by alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Arsalane, K; Gosset, P; Hildebrand, H F; Voisin, C; Tonnel, A B; Wallaert, B

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the in vitro effects of nickel hydroxy carbonate (NiHC) at noncytotoxic concentrations on the production of cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The effect of NiHC was evaluated in both unstimulated AMs and cells activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cytotoxicity was related to lactate dehydrogenase release and ATP cell content. The results confirm that NiHC at concentrations of 0.125, 1.25 and 3.125 micrograms NiHC 10(-6) cells was not cytotoxic. The NiHC exposure of unstimulated AMs significantly increased the release of TNF-alpha at all concentrations and that of IL-6 at 1.25 micrograms NiHC 10(-6) cells. LPS addition significantly increased the secretion of both cytokines. However, NiHC did not cause a significant increase in the release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 in LPS-stimulated cells. In conclusion, the ability of NiHC to activate AMs and to release increased amounts of pro-inflammatory mediators may be responsible, at least partly, for inflammation and pneumotoxicity associated with nickel exposure.

  13. Modification of tumour cell metabolism modulates sensitivity to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Chk1 kinase inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation as potentiators of cytotoxic chemotherapy and demonstrate potent activity in combination with anti-metabolite drugs that increase replication stress through the inhibition of nucleotide or deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Inhibiting other metabolic pathways critical for the supply of building blocks necessary to support DNA replication may lead to increased DNA damage and synergy with an inhibitor of Chk1. A screen of small molecule metabolism modulators identified combinatorial activity between a Chk1 inhibitor and chloroquine or the LDHA/LDHB inhibitor GSK 2837808A. Compounds, such as 2-deoxyglucose or 6-aminonicotinamide, that reduced the fraction of cells undergoing active replication rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Withdrawal of glucose or glutamine induced G1 and G2/M arrest without increasing DNA damage and reduced Chk1 expression and activation through autophosphorylation. This suggests the expression and activation of Chk1 kinase is associated with cells undergoing active DNA replication. Glutamine starvation rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage and reversal of the glutamine starvation restored the sensitivity of tumour cells to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Chk1 inhibitors may be a potentially useful therapeutic treatment for patients whose tumours contain a high fraction of replicating cells. PMID:28106079

  14. Tumour-initiating cells vs. cancer 'stem' cells and CD133: What's in the name?

    SciTech Connect

    Neuzil, Jiri; E-mail: j.neuzil@griffith.edu.au; Stantic, Marina; Zobalova, Renata; Chladova, Jaromira; Wang, Xiufang; Prochazka, Lubomir; Dong, Lanfeng; Andera, Ladislav; Ralph, Stephen J.

    2007-04-20

    Recent evidence suggests that a subset of cells within a tumour have 'stem-like' characteristics. These tumour-initiating cells, distinct from non-malignant stem cells, show low proliferative rates, high self-renewing capacity, propensity to differentiate into actively proliferating tumour cells, resistance to chemotherapy or radiation, and they are often characterised by elevated expression of the stem cell surface marker CD133. Understanding the molecular biology of the CD133{sup +} cancer cells is now essential for developing more effective cancer treatments. These may include drugs targeting organelles, such as mitochondria or lysosomes, using highly efficient and selective inducers of apoptosis. Alternatively, agents or treatment regimens that enhance sensitivity of these therapy-resistant 'tumour stem cells' to the current or emerging anti-tumour drugs would be of interest as well.

  15. Molecular classification of urothelial carcinoma: global mRNA classification versus tumour-cell phenotype classification.

    PubMed

    Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Eriksson, Pontus; Liedberg, Fredrik; Höglund, Mattias

    2017-02-13

    Global mRNA expression analysis is efficient for phenotypic profiling of tumours and has been used to define molecular subtypes for almost every major tumour type. A key limitation is that most tumours are communities of both tumour and non-tumour cells. This problem is particularly pertinent when analysing advanced invasive tumours, known to induce major changes and responses in both the tumour and the surrounding tissue. To identify bladder cancer tumour-cell phenotypes and compare classification by tumour-cell phenotype with classification by global gene expression analysis, we analysed 307 advanced bladder cancers (cystectomised) both by genome gene expression analysis and by immunohistochemistry using antibodies for 28 proteins. By systematic analysis of gene and protein expression data, focusing on key molecular processes, we describe five tumour-cell phenotypes of advanced urothelial carcinoma; Urothelial-like, Genomically Unstable, Basal/SCC-like, Mesenchymal-like, and Small cell/Neuroendocrine like. We provide molecular pathological definitions for each subtype. Tumours expressing urothelial differentiation factors show inconsistent and abnormal protein expression of terminal differentiation markers, suggesting pseudo-differentiation. Cancers with different tumour-cell phenotypes may co-cluster (converge), and cases with identical tumour-cell phenotypes may cluster apart (diverge) in global mRNA analyses. This divergence/convergence suggests that broad global commonalities related to the invasive process may exist between muscle-invasive tumours regardless of specific tumour-cell phenotype. Hence, there is a systematic disagreement in subtype classification determined by global mRNA profiling and by IHC profiling at the tumour-cell level. We suggest that a combination of molecular pathology (tumour cell phenotype) and global mRNA profiling (context) is required for adequate subtype classification of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

  16. Tumour-derived microvesicles carry several surface determinants and mRNA of tumour cells and transfer some of these determinants to monocytes.

    PubMed

    Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Szatanek, Rafał; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Baran, Jarosław; Urbanowicz, Barbara; Brański, Piotr; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Zembala, Marek

    2006-07-01

    This study was designed to determine the characteristics of tumour cell-derived microvesicles (TMV) and their interactions with human monocytes. TMV were shed spontaneously by three different human cancer cell lines but their release was significantly increased upon activation of the cells with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). TMV showed the presence of several surface determinants of tumour cells, e.g. HLA class I, CD29, CD44v7/8, CD51, chemokine receptors (CCR6, CX3CR1), extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), but their level of expression differed from that on cells they originated from. TMV also carried mRNA for growth factors: vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and surface determinants (CD44H). TMV were localized at the monocytes surface following their short exposure to TMV, while at later times intracellularly. TMV transferred CCR6 and CD44v7/8 to monocytes, exerted antiapoptotic effect on monocytes and activated AKT kinase (Protein Kinase B). Thus, TMV interact with monocytes, alter their immunophenotype and biological activity. This implicates the novel mechanism by which tumour infiltrating macrophages may be affected by tumour cells not only by a direct cell to cell contact, soluble factors but also by TMV.

  17. Detection and Characterization of CD133+ Cancer Stem Cells in Human Solid Tumours

    PubMed Central

    d'Aquino, Riccardo; De Francesco, Francesco; Pirozzi, Giuseppe; Galderisi, Umberto; Cavaliere, Carlo; De Rosa, Alfredo; Papaccio, Gianpaolo

    2008-01-01

    Background Osteosarcoma is the most common primary tumour of bone. Solid tumours are made of heterogeneous cell populations, which display different goals and roles in tumour economy. A rather small cell subset can hold or acquire stem potentials, gaining aggressiveness and increasing expectancy of recurrence. The CD133 antigen is a pentaspan membrane glycoprotein, which has been proposed as a cancer stem cell marker, since it has been previously demonstrated to be capable of identifying a cancer initiating subpopulation in brain, colon, melanoma and other solid tumours. Therefore, our aim was to observe the possible presence of cells expressing the CD133 antigen within solid tumour cell lines of osteosarcoma and, then, understand their biological characteristics and performances. Methodology and Principal Findings In this study, using SAOS2, MG63 and U2OS, three human sarcoma cell lines isolated from young Caucasian subjects, we were able to identify and characterize, among them, CD133+ cells showing the following features: high proliferation rate, cell cycle detection in a G2\\M phase, positivity for Ki-67, and expression of ABCG2 transporters. In addition, at the FACS, we were able to observe the CD133+ cell fraction showing side population profile and forming sphere-clusters in serum-free medium with a high clonogenic efficiency. Conclusions Taken together, our findings lead to the thought that we can assume that we have identified, for the first time, CD133+ cells within osteosarcoma cell lines, showing many features of cancer stem cells. This can be of rather interest in order to design new therapies against the bone cancer. PMID:18941626

  18. Circulating tumour cells in patients with lung cancer undergoing endobronchial cryotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chudasama, Dimple; Rice, Alexandra; Soppa, Gopal; Anikin, Vladimir

    2015-08-01

    Early diagnosis of lung cancer still poses a major issue, with a large proportion of patients diagnosed at late stages. Therapeutic options and treatment remain limited in these patients. In most cases only palliative therapies are available to alleviate any severe symptoms. Endobronchial cryotherapy (EC) is one form of palliative treatment offered to patients with obstructive airway tumours. Although successful, the impact on circulating tumour cell (CTCs) spread has not been investigated in detail. This study recruited 20 patients awaiting EC treatment. Baseline and post EC blood samples were analysed for presence of CTCs. Results showed an increase in CTCs following EC in 75% of patients. Significant increases were noticeable in some cases. Although EC is a well-accepted modality of treatment to alleviate symptoms, it may lead to an increase in CTCs, which in turn may have implications for tumour dissemination and metastatic spread.

  19. The effects of fluoride on cell migration, cell proliferation, and cell metabolism in GH4C1 pituitary tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Schulz, A; Solano-Agama, C; Arreola-Mendoza, L; Reyes-Márquez, B; Barbier, O; Del Razo, L M; Mendoza-Garrido, M E

    2009-10-28

    The consumption of drinking water rich in fluoride has toxic effects on the central nervous system. In cell biology research, fluoride is currently used as a phosphatase inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of fluoride on different physiological processes in GH4C1 pituitary tumour cells. We used a range of different fluoride concentrations, from levels below normal human serum concentrations (0.23 and 1.2 micromol/L) to those observed in chronically exposed persons (10.7 micromol/L) and above (107 and 1072 micromol/L). Treatment of 10.7 micromol/L fluoride resulted in a discrete induction of DNA synthesis, without a change in cell number. Cell migration, a behaviour stimulated by growth factors, was increased in cells treated with 2.4 micromol/L. At this fluoride concentration, changes in phosphorylation status of both cytoskeletal and cytosolic protein fractions, as well as in actin cytoskeletal arrangements were observed. The GH4C1 fluoride treated cells had significantly less cellular protein than control cells, suggesting an effect of fluoride on hormone secretion and protein synthesis in this endocrine cell. The bioreduction of MTT was significantly increased with a wide range of fluoride concentrations. With the highest fluoride concentration, 1072 micromol/L, all of the analysed parameters were significantly reduced, suggesting that this dose is highly toxic in GH4C1 cells. Our results show that biologically relevant concentrations of fluoride are capable of increasing cell migration in tumour cells, suggesting that exposure to fluoride could stimulate tumour invasion.

  20. Lack of Oestrogenic Inhibition of the Nuclear Factor-κB Pathway in Somatolactotroph Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Eijo, G; Gottardo, M F; Jaita, G; Magri, M L; Moreno Ayala, M; Zárate, S; Candolfi, M; Pisera, D; Seilicovich, A

    2015-09-01

    Activation of nuclear factor (NF)-κB promotes cell proliferation and inhibits apoptosis. We have previously shown that oestrogens sensitise normal anterior pituitary cells to the apoptotic effect of tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α by inhibiting NF-κB nuclear translocation. In the present study, we examined whether oestrogens also modulate the NF-κB signalling pathway and apoptosis in GH3 cells, a rat somatolactotroph tumour cell line. As determined by Western blotting, 17β-oestradiol (E2 ) (10(-9) m) increased the nuclear concentration of NF-κB/p105, p65 and p50 in GH3 cells. However, E2 did not modify the expression of Bcl-xL, a NF-κB target gene. TNF-α induced apoptosis of GH3 cells incubated in either the presence or absence of E2 . Inhibition of the NF-kB pathway using BAY 11-7082 (BAY) (5 μm) decreased the viability of GH3 cells and increased the percentage of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL)-positive GH3 cells. BAY also increased TNF-α-induced apoptosis of GH3 cells, an effect that was further increased by an inhibitor of the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase pathway, SP600125 (10 μm). We also analysed the role of the NF-κB signalling pathway on proliferation and apoptosis of GH3 tumours in vivo. The administration of BAY to nude mice bearing GH3 tumours increased the number of TUNEL-positive cells and decreased the number of proliferating GH3 cells. These findings suggest that GH3 cells lose their oestrogenic inhibitory action on the NF-κB pathway and that the pro-apoptotic effect of TNF-α on these tumour pituitary cells does not require sensitisation by oestrogens as occurs in normal pituitary cells. NF-κB was required for the survival of GH3 cells, suggesting that pharmacological inhibition of the NF-κB pathway could interfere with pituitary tumour progression.

  1. AMPK-mediated autophagy inhibits apoptosis in cisplatin-treated tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Harhaji-Trajkovic, L; Vilimanovich, U; Kravic-Stevovic, T; Bumbasirevic, V; Trajkovic, V

    2009-09-01

    The role of autophagy in cisplatin anticancer action was investigated using human U251 glioma, rat C6 glioma and mouse L929 fibrosarcoma cell lines. A dose- and time-dependent induction of autophagy was observed in tumour cells following cisplatin treatment, as demonstrated by up-regulation of autophagy-inducing protein beclin-1 and subsequent appearance of acridine orange-stained acidic autophagic vesicles. The presence of autophagosomes in cisplatin-treated cells was also confirmed by electron microscopy. Inhibition of autophagy with lysosomal inhibitors bafilomycin A1 and chloroquine, or a PI3 kinase inhibitor wortmannin, markedly augmented cisplatin-triggered oxidative stress and caspase activation, leading to an increase in DNA fragmentation and apoptotic cell death. The mechanisms underlying the protective effect of autophagy apparently involved the interference with cisplatin-induced modulation of Bcl-2 family proteins, as inhibition of autophagy potentiated cisplatin-mediated up-regulation of proapoptotic Bax and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Autophagy induction in cisplatin-treated cells was preceded by activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and concomitant down-regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-mediated phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase. The ability of cisplatin to trigger autophagy was reduced by small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated AMPK silencing, while transfection with mTOR siRNA was sufficient to trigger autophagy in tumour cells. Finally, siRNA-mediated AMPK down-regulation and AMPK inhibitor compound C increased cisplatin-induced tumour cell death, while mTOR siRNA and AMPK activator metformin protected tumour cells from cisplatin. Taken together, these data suggest that cisplatin-triggered activation of AMPK and subsequent suppression of mTOR activity can induce an autophagic response that protects tumour cells from cisplatin-mediated apoptotic death.

  2. The role of myeloid cells in the promotion of tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Murdoch, Craig; Muthana, Munitta; Coffelt, Seth B; Lewis, Claire E

    2008-08-01

    The use of various transgenic mouse models and analysis of human tumour biopsies has shown that bone marrow-derived myeloid cells, such as macrophages, neutrophils, eosinophils, mast cells and dendritic cells, have an important role in regulating the formation and maintenance of blood vessels in tumours. In this Review the evidence for each of these cell types driving tumour angiogenesis is outlined, along with the mechanisms regulating their recruitment and activation by the tumour microenvironment. We also discuss the therapeutic implications of recent findings that specific myeloid cell populations modulate the responses of tumours to agents such as chemotherapy and some anti-angiogenic therapies.

  3. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations.

    PubMed

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R A

    2015-08-12

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  4. The evolution of carrying capacity in constrained and expanding tumour cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerlee, Philip; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells are known to modify their micro-environment such that it can sustain a larger population, or, in ecological terms, they construct a niche which increases the carrying capacity of the population. It has however been argued that niche construction, which benefits all cells in the tumour, would be selected against since cheaters could reap the benefits without paying the cost. We have investigated the impact of niche specificity on tumour evolution using an individual based model of breast tumour growth, in which the carrying capacity of each cell consists of two components: an intrinsic, subclone-specific part and a contribution from all neighbouring cells. Analysis of the model shows that the ability of a mutant to invade a resident population depends strongly on the specificity. When specificity is low selection is mostly on growth rate, while high specificity shifts selection towards increased carrying capacity. Further, we show that the long-term evolution of the system can be predicted using adaptive dynamics. By comparing the results from a spatially structured versus well-mixed population we show that spatial structure restores selection for carrying capacity even at zero specificity, which poses a solution to the niche construction dilemma. Lastly, we show that an expanding population exhibits spatially variable selection pressure, where cells at the leading edge exhibit higher growth rate and lower carrying capacity than those at the centre of the tumour.

  5. Mice deleted for cell division cycle 73 gene develop parathyroid and uterine tumours: model for the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour syndrome.

    PubMed

    Walls, G V; Stevenson, M; Lines, K E; Newey, P J; Reed, A A C; Bowl, M R; Jeyabalan, J; Harding, B; Bradley, K J; Manek, S; Chen, J; Wang, P; Williams, B O; Teh, B T; Thakker, R V

    2017-03-13

    The hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumour (HPT-JT) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by occurrence of parathyroid tumours, often atypical adenomas and carcinomas, ossifying jaw fibromas, renal tumours and uterine benign and malignant neoplasms. HPT-JT is caused by mutations of the cell division cycle 73 (CDC73) gene, located on chromosome 1q31.2 and encodes a 531 amino acid protein, parafibromin. To facilitate in vivo studies of Cdc73 in tumourigenesis we generated conventional (Cdc73(+/-)) and conditional parathyroid-specific (Cdc73(+/L)/PTH-Cre and Cdc73(L/L)/PTH-Cre) mouse models. Mice were aged to 18-21 months and studied for survival, tumour development and proliferation, and serum biochemistry, and compared to age-matched wild-type (Cdc73(+/+) and Cdc73(+/+)/PTH-Cre) littermates. Survival of Cdc73(+/-) mice, when compared to Cdc73(+/+) mice was reduced (Cdc73(+/-)=80%; Cdc73(+/+)=90% at 18 months of age, P<0.05). Cdc73(+/-), Cdc73(+/L)/PTH-Cre and Cdc73(L/L)/PTH-Cre mice developed parathyroid tumours, which had nuclear pleomorphism, fibrous septation and increased galectin-3 expression, consistent with atypical parathyroid adenomas, from 9 months of age. Parathyroid tumours in Cdc73(+/-), Cdc73(+/L)/PTH-Cre and Cdc73(L/L)/PTH-Cre mice had significantly increased proliferation, with rates >fourfold higher than that in parathyroid glands of wild-type littermates (P<0.0001). Cdc73(+/-), Cdc73(+/L)/PTH-Cre and Cdc73(L/L)/PTH-Cre mice had higher mean serum calcium concentrations than wild-type littermates, and Cdc73(+/-) mice also had increased mean serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentrations. Parathyroid tumour development, and elevations in serum calcium and PTH, were similar in males and females. Cdc73(+/-) mice did not develop bone or renal tumours but female Cdc73(+/-) mice, at 18 months of age, had uterine neoplasms comprising squamous metaplasia, adenofibroma and adenomyoma. Uterine neoplasms, myometria and jaw bones of Cdc73(+/-) mice

  6. Beneficial role of overexpression of TFPI-2 on tumour progression in human small cell lung cancer☆

    PubMed Central

    Lavergne, Marion; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Blechet, Claire; Guyetant, Serge; Pape, Alain Le; Heuze-Vourc’h, Nathalie; Courty, Yves; Lerondel, Stephanie; Sobilo, Julien; Iochmann, Sophie; Reverdiau, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Tissue factor pathway inhibitor-2 (TFPI-2) is a potent inhibitor of plasmin, a protease which is involved in tumour progression by activating (MMPs). This therefore makes TFPI-2 a potential inhibitor of invasiveness and the development of metastases. In this study, low levels of TFPI-2 expression were found in 65% of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), the most aggressive type of lung cancer. To study the impact of TFPI-2 in tumour progression, TFPI-2 was overexpressed in NCI-H209 SCLC cells which were orthotopically implanted in nude mice. Investigations showed that TFPI-2 inhibited lung tumour growth. Such inhibition could be explained in vitro by a decrease in tumour cell viability, blockade of G1/S phase cell cycle transition and an increase in apoptosis shown in NCI-H209 cells expressing TFPI-2. We also demonstrated that TFPI-2 upregulation in NCI-H209 cells decreased MMP expression, particularly by downregulating MMP-1 and MMP-3. Moreover, TFPI-2 inhibited phosphorylation of the MAPK signalling pathway proteins involved in the induction of MMP transcripts, among which MMP-1 was predominant in SCLC tissues and was inversely expressed with TFPI-2 in 35% of cases. These results suggest that downregulation of TFPI-2 expression could favour the development of SCLC. PMID:23905012

  7. Methylator phenotype of malignant germ cell tumours in children identifies strong candidates for chemotherapy resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapalan, J N; Noor, D A Mohamed; Lee, S-H; Tan, C L; Appleby, V A; Kilday, J P; Palmer, R D; Schwalbe, E C; Clifford, S C; Walker, D A; Murray, M J; Coleman, N; Nicholson, J C; Scotting, P J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Yolk sac tumours (YSTs) and germinomas are the two major pure histological subtypes of germ cell tumours. To date, the role of DNA methylation in the aetiology of this class of tumour has only been analysed in adult testicular forms and with respect to only a few genes. Methods: A bank of paediatric tumours was analysed for global methylation of LINE-1 repeat elements and global methylation of regulatory elements using GoldenGate methylation arrays. Results: Both germinomas and YSTs exhibited significant global hypomethylation of LINE-1 elements. However, in germinomas, methylation of gene regulatory regions differed little from control samples, whereas YSTs exhibited increased methylation at a large proportion of the loci tested, showing a ‘methylator' phenotype, including silencing of genes associated with Caspase-8-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the methylator phenotype of YSTs was coincident with higher levels of expression of the DNA methyltransferase, DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3B, suggesting a mechanism underlying the phenotype. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of a large number of potential tumour suppressor genes in YSTs might explain why they exhibit a more aggressive natural history than germinomas and silencing of genes associated with Caspase-8-dependent cell death might explain the relative resistance of YSTs to conventional therapy. PMID:21712824

  8. The expression of CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) in the human ovary in vivo: specific increase in C/EBPβ during epithelial tumour progression

    PubMed Central

    Sundfeldt, K; Ivarsson, K; Carlsson, M; Enerbäck, S; Janson, P O; Brännström, M; Hedin, L

    1999-01-01

    The CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors is involved in metabolism and differentiation of cells, especially in rodent liver cells and adipocytes. Their roles in vivo and in particular during pathophysiological conditions in humans are largely unknown. We have investigated the presence of C/EBPα, -β, -δ and -ζ in normal ovaries and in epithelial ovarian tumours of different stages. Immunohistochemical experiments demonstrated that C/EBPα and C/EBPβ were preferentially expressed in epithelial/tumour cells irrespective of stage or grade of the tumour. C/EBPβ was located in the nuclei of the cells, in contrast to C/EBPα, which was present only in the cytoplasm of these cells. The nuclear localization of C/EBPβ indicates an active role of this transcription factor in tumour cells, whereas the cytoplasmic distribution suggests a more passive function of C/EBPα. C/EBPδ and -ζ demonstrated a more diverse distribution with predominant localization to epithelial cells, but stromal distribution was also noted. The intracellular distribution was confined to both the nucleus and the cytoplasm for C/EBPδ and -ζ. Western blotting demonstrated that C/EBPα, -β, -δ and -ζ were present in a majority of the samples. The amount of C/EBPβ increased markedly with malignancy, i.e. with degree of dedifferentiation, while the other members of the C/EBP family displayed a more constant expression level. These results demonstrate an association between the expression of members of the C/EBP family and the formation of epithelial ovarian tumours, with C/EBPβ as a potential marker for these tumours. As C/EBPβ is known to be expressed during proliferation of cells in vitro, it may participate in the proliferative process of ovarian epithelial tumour cells in vivo and play a central role in tumour progression. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10098766

  9. Defective regulation of insulin release and transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes by human islet cell tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Flatt, P. R.; Swanston-Flatt, S. K.; Powell, C. J.; Marks, V.

    1987-01-01

    Regulation of insulin release and transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes was examined using pieces of 3 benign medullary-type insulinomas removed from the pancreas of female patients at surgery. Immunocytochemical staining confirmed the presence of insulin-containing cells with no demonstrable glucagon, somatostatin or pancreatic polypeptide. After 3 days of culture in RPMI-1640, tumour pieces released 11-158 mg insulin kg-1 dry wt during acute 60 min incubations with the concomitant uptake of 2-47 mmol 45Ca kg-1 into the intracellular lanthanum-nondisplaceable pool. At 2.56 mM Ca2+, glucose alone or in combination with glyceraldehyde, mannoheptulose or diazoxide did not modify insulin release or 45Ca uptake. Theophylline significantly increased insulin release from 2 tumours with a small stimulatory effect on the third. A depolarising concentration of K+ enhanced insulin release from one tumour but this was not associated with an increase of 45Ca uptake. Calcium antagonists, (verapamil, D-600 and trifluoroperazine) and calcium ionophores (A23187 and Br-X537A) failed to modify insulin release or 45Ca uptake by each of the two tumours tested. Evaluation of 45Ca efflux from one tumour confirmed the unresponsiveness to glucose, K+, verapamil and A23187. Prolonged culture of 2 tumours for up to 16 days was associated with the gradual decline of insulin release to a steady output of 2-15 ng 24 h-1. Addition of verapamil to the cultures inhibited insulin output from one tumour, but mannoheptulose or diazoxide were without effect. The results indicate that inappropriate insulin release from these 3 benign medullary-type insulinomas is associated with disturbances in the regulation of transmembrane Ca2+ fluxes. Images Figure 1 PMID:2825749

  10. The Immunomodulatory Small Molecule Imiquimod Induces Apoptosis in Devil Facial Tumour Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Darby, Jocelyn M.; Tovar, Cesar; Lyons, A. Bruce; Woods, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    The survival of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened by devil facial tumour disease (DFTD). This transmissible cancer is usually fatal, and no successful treatments have been developed. In human studies, the small immunomodulatory molecule imiquimod is a successful immunotherapy, activating anti-tumour immunity via stimulation of toll-like receptor-7 (TLR7) signaling pathways. In addition, imiquimod is a potent inducer of apoptosis in human tumour cell lines via TLR7 independent mechanisms. Here we investigate the potential of imiquimod as a DFTD therapy through analysis of treated DFTD cell lines and Tasmanian devil fibroblasts. WST-8 proliferation assays and annexin V apoptosis assays were performed to monitor apoptosis, and changes to the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were analysed using qRT-PCR. Our results show that DFTD cell lines, but not Tasmanian devil fibroblasts, are sensitive to imiquimod-induced apoptosis in a time and concentration dependent manner. Induction of apoptosis was accompanied by down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic BCL2 and BCLXL genes, and up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic BIM gene. Continuous imiquimod treatment was required for these effects to occur. These results demonstrate that imiquimod can deregulate DFTD cell growth and survival in direct and targeted manner. In vivo, this may increase DFTD vulnerability to imiquimod-induced TLR7-mediated immune responses. Our findings have improved the current knowledge of imiquimod action in tumour cells for application to both DFTD and human cancer therapy. PMID:27936237

  11. The Immunomodulatory Small Molecule Imiquimod Induces Apoptosis in Devil Facial Tumour Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Patchett, Amanda L; Darby, Jocelyn M; Tovar, Cesar; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    The survival of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened by devil facial tumour disease (DFTD). This transmissible cancer is usually fatal, and no successful treatments have been developed. In human studies, the small immunomodulatory molecule imiquimod is a successful immunotherapy, activating anti-tumour immunity via stimulation of toll-like receptor-7 (TLR7) signaling pathways. In addition, imiquimod is a potent inducer of apoptosis in human tumour cell lines via TLR7 independent mechanisms. Here we investigate the potential of imiquimod as a DFTD therapy through analysis of treated DFTD cell lines and Tasmanian devil fibroblasts. WST-8 proliferation assays and annexin V apoptosis assays were performed to monitor apoptosis, and changes to the expression of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes were analysed using qRT-PCR. Our results show that DFTD cell lines, but not Tasmanian devil fibroblasts, are sensitive to imiquimod-induced apoptosis in a time and concentration dependent manner. Induction of apoptosis was accompanied by down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic BCL2 and BCLXL genes, and up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic BIM gene. Continuous imiquimod treatment was required for these effects to occur. These results demonstrate that imiquimod can deregulate DFTD cell growth and survival in direct and targeted manner. In vivo, this may increase DFTD vulnerability to imiquimod-induced TLR7-mediated immune responses. Our findings have improved the current knowledge of imiquimod action in tumour cells for application to both DFTD and human cancer therapy.

  12. CD117 immunoexpression in canine mast cell tumours: correlations with pathological variables and proliferation markers

    PubMed Central

    Gil da Costa, Rui M; Matos, Eduarda; Rema, Alexandra; Lopes, Célia; Pires, Maria A; Gärtner, Fátima

    2007-01-01

    Background Cutaneous mast cell tumours are one of the most common neoplasms in dogs and show a highly variable biologic behaviour. Several prognosis tools have been proposed for canine mast cell tumours, including histological grading and cell proliferation markers. CD117 is a receptor tyrosine kinase thought to play a key role in human and canine mast cell neoplasms. Normal (membrane-associated) and aberrant (cytoplasmic, focal or diffuse) CD117 immunoexpression patterns have been identified in canine mast cell tumours. Cytoplasmic CD117 expression has been found to correlate with higher histological grade and with a worsened post-surgical prognosis. This study addresses the role of CD117 in canine mast cell tumours by studying the correlations between CD117 immunoexpression patterns, two proliferation markers (Ki67 and AgNORs) histological grade, and several other pathological variables. Results Highly significant (p < 0,001) correlations were found between CD117 immunostaining patterns and histological grade, cell proliferation markers (Ki67, AgNORs) and tumoral necrosis. Highly significant (p < 0,001) correlations were also established between the two cellular proliferation markers and histological grade, tumour necrosis and epidermal ulceration. A significant correlation (p = 0.035) was observed between CD117 expression patterns and epidermal ulceration. No differences were observed between focal and diffuse cytoplasmic CD117 staining patterns concerning any of the variables studied. Conclusion These findings highlight the key role of CD117 in the biopathology of canine MCTs and confirm the relationship between aberrant CD117 expression and increased cell proliferation and higher histological grade. Further studies are needed to unravel the cellular mechanisms underlying focal and diffuse cytoplasmic CD117 staining patterns, and their respective biopathologic relevance. PMID:17711582

  13. Mitochondria: An intriguing target for killing tumour-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Dong, Lanfeng; Neuzil, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) play a pivotal role in cancer initiation, metastasis and recurrence, as well as in resistance to therapy. Therefore, development of drugs targeting TICs has become a focus of contemporary research. Mitochondria have emerged as a promising target of anti-cancer therapies due to their specific role in cancer metabolism and modulation of apoptotic pathways. Mitochondria of TICs possess special characteristics, some of which can be utilised to design drugs specifically targeting these cells. In this paper, we will review recent research on TICs and their mitochondria, and introduce drugs that kill these cells by way of mitochondrial targeting.

  14. Effect of VEGF receptor inhibitor PTK787/ZK222548 combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells and tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Hess, C; Vuong, V; Hegyi, I; Riesterer, O; Wood, J; Fabbro, D; Glanzmann, C; Bodis, S; Pruschy, M

    2001-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor is a major target for anti-angiogenesis-based cancer treatment. Here we report the treatment effect of ionizing radiation in combination with the novel orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 on endothelial cell proliferation in vitro and with tumour xenografts in vivo. Combined treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells with increasing doses of PTK787/ZK222584 and ionizing radiation abrogated VEGF-dependent proliferation in a dose-dependent way, but inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation was not due to apoptosis induction. In vivo, a combined treatment regimen of PTK787/ZK222584 (4 × 100 mg/kg) during 4 consecutive days in combination with ionizing radiation (4 × 3 Gy) exerted a substantial tumour growth delay for radiation-resistant p53-disfunctional tumour xenografts derived from SW480 colon adenocarcinoma cells while each treatment modality alone had only a minimal effect on tumour size and neovascularization. SW480 tumours from animals that received a combined treatment regimen, displayed not only an extended tumour growth delay but also a significant decrease in the number of microvessels in the tumour xenograft. These results support the model of a cooperative antitumoural effect of angiogenesis inhibitor and irradiation and show that the orally bioavailable VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor PTK787/ZK222584 is suitable for combination therapy with irradiation. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11747347

  15. Dendritic Cells Transfected with a DNA Construct Encoding Tumour-associated Antigen Epitopes Induce a Cytotoxic Immune Response Against Autologous Tumour Cells in a Culture of Mononuclear Cells from Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Kulikova, E V; Kurilin, V V; Shevchenko, J A; Obleukhova, I A; Khrapov, E A; Boyarskikh, U A; Filipenko, M L; Shorokhov, R V; Yakushenko, V K; Sokolov, A V; Sennikov, S V

    2015-08-01

    Significant effort has been devoted to developing effective cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with various tumour antigens, including DNA constructs that carry sequences of tumour-associated antigens (TAAs). Such vaccines efficiently and selectively activate the T cell immune response. In this study, we describe a method to induce an antitumour immune response in mononuclear cell (MNC) cultures from colorectal cancer patients using DNA-transfected DCs encoding TAA epitopes of carcinoembryonic antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule and mucin 4. DCs were obtained from peripheral blood monocytes of colorectal cancer patients. Magnetic-assisted transfection was used to deliver the genetic constructs to DCs. To assess the potency of the immune response, the antitumour cytotoxic response was assessed by lymphocyte intracellular perforin and the MNC cytotoxic activity against autologous tumour cells. We showed that polyepitope DNA-transfected DCs enhanced MNC antitumour activity, increasing tumour cell death and the percentage of perforin-positive lymphocytes. In addition, DNA-transfected DCs elicited a cytotoxic response that was as efficient as that of tumour lysate-loaded DCs. Taken together, the data suggest that it is feasible to induce an antitumour immune response in colorectal MNCs using transfected DCs. Thus, the DNA construct reported in this study may potentially be used in therapeutic and prophylactic DC-based vaccines.

  16. Early immunisation with dendritic cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation elicits graft vs tumour reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Gigi, V; Stein, J; Askenasy, N; Yaniv, I; Ash, S

    2013-01-01

    Background: Perspectives of immunotherapy to cancer mediated by bone marrow transplantation (BMT) in conjunction with dendritic cell (DC)-mediated immune sensitisation have yielded modest success so far. In this study, we assessed the impact of DC on graft vs tumour (GvT) reactions triggered by allogeneic BMT. Methods: H2Ka mice implanted with congenic subcutaneous Neuro-2a neuroblastoma (NB, H2Ka) tumours were irradiated and grafted with allogeneic H2Kb bone marrow cells (BMC) followed by immunisation with tumour-inexperienced or tumour-pulsed DC. Results: Immunisation with tumour-pulsed donor DC after allogeneic BMT suppressed tumour growth through induction of T cell-mediated NB cell lysis. Early post-transplant administration of DC was more effective than delayed immunisation, with similar efficacy of DC inoculated into the tumour and intravenously. In addition, tumour inexperienced DC were equally effective as tumour-pulsed DC in suppression of tumour growth. Immunisation of DC did not impact quantitative immune reconstitution, however, it enhanced T-cell maturation as evident from interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion, proliferation in response to mitogenic stimulation and tumour cell lysis in vitro. Dendritic cells potentiate GvT reactivity both through activation of T cells and specific sensitisation against tumour antigens. We found that during pulsing with tumour lysate DC also elaborate a factor that selectively inhibits lymphocyte proliferation, which is however abolished by humoral and DC-mediated lymphocyte activation. Conclusion: These data reveal complex involvement of antigen-presenting cells in GvT reactions, suggesting that the limited success in clinical application is not a result of limited efficacy but suboptimal implementation. Although DC can amplify soluble signals from NB lysates that inhibit lymphocyte proliferation, early administration of DC is a dominant factor in suppression of tumour growth. PMID:23511628

  17. ApoA-I mimetic administration, but not increased apoA-I-containing HDL, inhibits tumour growth in a mouse model of inherited breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cedó, Lídia; García-León, Annabel; Baila-Rueda, Lucía; Santos, David; Grijalva, Victor; Martínez-Cignoni, Melanie Raquel; Carbó, José M.; Metso, Jari; López-Vilaró, Laura; Zorzano, Antonio; Valledor, Annabel F.; Cenarro, Ana; Jauhiainen, Matti; Lerma, Enrique; Fogelman, Alan M.; Reddy, Srinivasa T.; Escolà-Gil, Joan Carles; Blanco-Vaca, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLc) have been associated with breast cancer risk, but several epidemiologic studies have reported contradictory results with regard to the relationship between apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and breast cancer. We aimed to determine the effects of human apoA-I overexpression and administration of specific apoA-I mimetic peptide (D-4F) on tumour progression by using mammary tumour virus-polyoma middle T-antigen transgenic (PyMT) mice as a model of inherited breast cancer. Expression of human apoA-I in the mice did not affect tumour onset and growth in PyMT transgenic mice, despite an increase in the HDLc level. In contrast, D-4F treatment significantly increased tumour latency and inhibited the development of tumours. The effects of D-4F on tumour development were independent of 27-hydroxycholesterol. However, D-4F treatment reduced the plasma oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) levels in mice and prevented oxLDL-mediated proliferative response in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, our study shows that D-4F, but not apoA-I-containing HDL, hinders tumour growth in mice with inherited breast cancer in association with a higher protection against LDL oxidative modification. PMID:27808249

  18. Selective induction of apoptosis in glioma tumour cells by a Gynostemma pentaphyllum extract.

    PubMed

    Schild, L; Chen, B H; Makarov, P; Kattengell, K; Heinitz, K; Keilhoff, G

    2010-07-01

    At low concentration H(2)O(2) is an important signal molecule in proliferation of tumour cells. We report about a study investigating the effect of an ethanolic extract from Gynostemma pentaphyllum on proliferation of C6 glioma tumour cells and cellular H(2)O(2) concentration. The proliferation of these cells was maximal at about 1 muM extracellular H(2)O(2). HPLC-finger prints of the extract revealed a set of saponines as essential components. In C6 glioma cells the extract caused increase in super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity, in the amount of SOD protein, and in cellular H(2)O(2) concentration. It inhibited cell proliferation and induced activation of caspase 3 as indication of apoptosis. No effect of the extract was observed on the proliferation of astrocytes of a primary cell culture. From these findings we suggest that the ethanolic extract from Gynostemma pentaphyllum may selectively shift the H(2)O(2) concentration to toxic levels exclusively in tumour cells due to increased SOD activity. It may have a high potency in cancer therapy and cancer prophylaxis.

  19. Molecular-cytogenetic characterisation of sex cord-stromal tumours: CGH analysis in sertoli cell tumours of the testis.

    PubMed

    Verdorfer, I; Höllrigl, A; Strasser, U; Susani, M; Hartmann, A; Rogatsch, H; Mikuz, G

    2007-04-01

    Sertoli cell tumours (SCT) are rare and poorly explored neoplasias, and the genetic features of these uncommon tumours are largely unknown. Data about chromosomal aberrations in human SCT of the testis are very rare. We present in this paper the first molecular-cytogenetic study of SCT of the testis. DNA was isolated from paraffin-embedded tumour material from 11 patients with unilateral SCT. We used comparative genomic hybridisation to investigate changes in DNA copy number. The detected DNA imbalances showed variation from case to case, indicating a high genetic heterogeneity. Chromosomal aberrations were detected in 9 of the 11 tumours evaluated, with 13 losses versus 14 gains. The most frequent aberrations detected were gain of chromosome X (5 of 11 cases) followed by losses of entire or part of chromosomes 2 and 19 in three cases. This study suggests a high variability in histomorphological and genetic patterns. Only gain of the entire chromosome X seems to be a frequent aberration in these tumours. Further studies of these tumour types are necessary to clarify the significance of chromosomal alterations in carcinogenesis of SCT.

  20. Tumour cell conditioned medium reveals greater M2 skewing of macrophages in the absence of properdin

    PubMed Central

    Al‐Rayahi, Izzat A.M.; Browning, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction The tumour microenvironment is shaped by the interaction of immune, non immune, and tumour cells present in close proximity. Tumour cells direct the development of a locally immune suppressed state, affecting the activity of anti tumour T cells and preparing the escape phase of tumour development. Macrophages in the tumour typically develop into so‐called tumour associated macrophages with a distinct profile of activities which lead to a reduction in inflammation and antigen presentation. The direct impact of tumour cell conditioned medium on the activity profile of macrophages in dependence of their complement component expression has not yet been investigated. Methods In our in vitro study, macrophages differentiated from bone marrows of properdin deficient and wildtype mice were stimulated with conditioned medium of a syngeneic tumour cell line, B16F10, a mouse melanoma subline. Results In comparison with macrophages from wildtype mice, those from congenic properdin deficient mice showed skewing towards M2 profile, encompassing mRNA expression for genes involved in arginine metabolism, production of type 2 cytokines, and relatively lower surface expression of molecules needed for antigen presentation. Conclusions These data suggest that properdin insufficiency promotes a tumour environment that helps the tumour evade the immune response. PMID:28250926

  1. Identification of tumour-reactive lymphatic endothelial cells capable of inducing progression of gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tokumoto, Mao Watanabe; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Tauchi, Yukie; Kasashima, Hiroaki; Kurata, Kento; Yashiro, Masakazu; Sakurai, Katsunobu; Toyokawa, Takahiro; Kubo, Naoshi; Amano, Ryosuke; Kimura, Kenjiro; Muguruma, Kazuya; Maeda, Kiyoshi; Ohira, Masaichi; Hirakawa, Kosei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour cells and stromal cells interact in the tumour microenvironment; moreover, stromal cells can acquire abnormalities that contribute to tumour progression. However, interactions between lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and tumour cells are largely unexamined. In this study, we aimed to determine whether tumour-specific LECs inhabit the tumour microenvironment and examine their influence on this microenvironment. Methods: We isolated normal LECs (NLECs) from a non-metastatic lymph node and tumour-associated LECs (TLECs) from cancerous lymph nodes. We examined proliferative and migratory potency, growth factor production, and gene expression of each type of LEC. Moreover, we developed a co-culture system to investigate the interactions between gastric cancer cells and LECs. Results: When compared with NLEC, TLECs had an abnormal shape, high proliferative and migratory abilities, and elevated expression of genes associated with inflammation, cell growth, and cell migration. NLECs co-cultured with gastric cancer cells from the OCUM12 cell line acquired TLEC-like phenotypes. Also, OCUM12 cells co-cultured with TLECs expressed high levels of genes responsible for metastasis. Conclusions: Our results demonstrated that LECs interacted with tumour cells and obtained abnormal phenotypes that could have important roles in tumour progression. PMID:26355233

  2. Non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth supports sub-clonal heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Marusyk, Andriy; Tabassum, Doris P; Altrock, Philipp M; Almendro, Vanessa; Michor, Franziska; Polyak, Kornelia

    2014-10-02

    Cancers arise through a process of somatic evolution that can result in substantial sub-clonal heterogeneity within tumours. The mechanisms responsible for the coexistence of distinct sub-clones and the biological consequences of this coexistence remain poorly understood. Here we used a mouse xenograft model to investigate the impact of sub-clonal heterogeneity on tumour phenotypes and the competitive expansion of individual clones. We found that tumour growth can be driven by a minor cell subpopulation, which enhances the proliferation of all cells within a tumour by overcoming environmental constraints and yet can be outcompeted by faster proliferating competitors, resulting in tumour collapse. We developed a mathematical modelling framework to identify the rules underlying the generation of intra-tumour clonal heterogeneity. We found that non-cell-autonomous driving of tumour growth, together with clonal interference, stabilizes sub-clonal heterogeneity, thereby enabling inter-clonal interactions that can lead to new phenotypic traits.

  3. Characterization of HOX gene expression in canine mammary tumour cell lines from spontaneous tumours.

    PubMed

    DeInnocentes, P; Perry, A L; Graff, E C; Lutful Kabir, F M; Curtis Bird, R

    2015-09-01

    Spatial/temporal controls of development are regulated by the homeotic (HOX) gene complex and require integration with oncogenes and tumour suppressors regulating cell cycle exit. Spontaneously derived neoplastic canine mammary carcinoma cell models were investigated to determine if HOX expression profiles were associated with neoplasia as HOX genes promote neoplastic potential in human cancers. Comparative assessment of human and canine breast cancer expression profiles revealed remarkable similarity for all four paralogous HOX gene clusters and several unlinked HOX genes. Five canine HOX genes were overexpressed with expression profiles consistent with oncogene-like character (HOXA1, HOXA13, HOXD4, HOXD9 and SIX1) and three HOX genes with underexpressed profiles (HOXA11, HOXC8 and HOXC9) were also identified as was an apparent nonsense mutation in HOXC6. This data, as well as a comparative analysis of similar data from human breast cancers suggested expression of selected HOX genes in canine mammary carcinoma could be contributing to the neoplastic phenotype.

  4. Increased tumour necrosis factor alpha production by neutrophils in patients with hepatitis B.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, X; Zhang, Z

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To investigate the role of serum and neutrophil tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) in patients with viral hepatitis. METHODS--The activities of serum and neutrophil TNF alpha were measured using a bioassay of in vitro cytotoxicity against L929 cells in 57 patients with viral hepatitis and 20 healthy blood donors. RESULTS--Both serum and neutrophil TNF alpha in patients with chronic active hepatitis (CAH) and subacute fulminant hepatitis (SAFH) increased compared with those in normal controls (p < 0.01). No such differences were seen in patients with acute hepatitis. Serum and neutrophil TNF alpha were obviously reduced in patients with CAH and SAFH during convalescence compared with the active period (p < 0.05; p < 0.01). Furthermore, serum TNF alpha was significantly increased in patients with SAFH and complications compared with those without (p < 0.01), and in patients with SAFH who died compared with those who survived (p < 0.01). Neutrophil TNF alpha was significantly higher in patients with SAFH and secondary bacterial infections (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS--Production of serum and neutrophil TNF alpha is increased in patients with CAH and SAFH, suggesting that neutrophil TNF alpha causes liver injury in these patients. PMID:8089217

  5. Induction of mitochondrial dysfunction as a strategy for targeting tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaonan; Fryknäs, Mårten; Hernlund, Emma; Fayad, Walid; De Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gogvadze, Vladimir; Dang, Long; Påhlman, Sven; Schughart, Leoni A Kunz; Rickardson, Linda; D'Arcy, Padraig; Gullbo, Joachim; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf; Linder, Stig

    2014-01-01

    Abnormal vascularization of solid tumours results in the development of microenvironments deprived of oxygen and nutrients that harbour slowly growing and metabolically stressed cells. Such cells display enhanced resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents and repopulate tumours after therapy. Here we identify the small molecule VLX600 as a drug that is preferentially active against quiescent cells in colon cancer 3-D microtissues. The anticancer activity is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration, leading to bioenergetic catastrophe and tumour cell death. VLX600 shows enhanced cytotoxic activity under conditions of nutrient starvation. Importantly, VLX600 displays tumour growth inhibition in vivo. Our findings suggest that tumour cells in metabolically compromised microenvironments have a limited ability to respond to decreased mitochondrial function, and suggest a strategy for targeting the quiescent populations of tumour cells for improved cancer treatment.

  6. Tumour and host cell PD-L1 is required to mediate suppression of anti-tumour immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Janet; Cheung, Jeanne; Navarro, Armando; Lianoglou, Steve; Haley, Benjamin; Totpal, Klara; Sanders, Laura; Koeppen, Hartmut; Caplazi, Patrick; McBride, Jacqueline; Chiu, Henry; Hong, Rebecca; Grogan, Jane; Javinal, Vincent; Yauch, Robert; Irving, Bryan; Belvin, Marcia; Mellman, Ira; Kim, Jeong M.; Schmidt, Maike

    2017-01-01

    Expression of PD-L1, the ligand for T-cell inhibitory receptor PD-1, is one key immunosuppressive mechanism by which cancer avoids eradication by the immune system. Therapeutic use of blocking antibodies to PD-L1 or its receptor PD-1 has produced unparalleled, durable clinical responses, with highest likelihood of response seen in patients whose tumour or immune cells express PD-L1 before therapy. The significance of PD-L1 expression in each cell type has emerged as a central and controversial unknown in the clinical development of immunotherapeutics. Using genetic deletion in preclinical mouse models, here we show that PD-L1 from disparate cellular sources, including tumour cells, myeloid or other immune cells can similarly modulate the degree of cytotoxic T-cell function and activity in the tumour microenvironment. PD-L1 expression in both the host and tumour compartment contribute to immune suppression in a non-redundant fashion, suggesting that both sources could be predictive of sensitivity to therapeutic agents targeting the PD-L1/PD-1 axis. PMID:28220772

  7. CDH1 (E-cadherin) in testicular germ cell neoplasia: suppressed translation of mRNA in pre-invasive carcinoma in situ but increased protein levels in advanced tumours.

    PubMed

    Sonne, Si B; Hoei-Hansen, Christina E; Nielsen, John E; Herlihy, Amy S; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Almstrup, Kristian; Daugaard, Gedske; Skakkebaek, Niels E; Leffers, Henrik; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    E-cadherin (CDH1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein involved in cellular adhesion. In our recent microarray studies of testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) and the common precursor carcinoma in situ (CIS), CDH1 mRNA was highly expressed in CIS and embryonal carcinoma. It has previously been reported that the CDH1 protein is not expressed in CIS. To resolve the discrepancy, we performed a detailed analysis of the expression of CDH1 mRNA and protein in a series of normal and neoplastic testes. High expression of CDH1 mRNA in CIS was confirmed by real-time PCR and in situ hybridisation. At the protein level, however, CDH1 was only detected with one of three tested antibodies, but Western blotting analysis with this antibody showed additional bands, suggesting unspecific staining. The levels of a CDH1 protein fragment in serum samples from 58 patients with TGCTs were analysed by ELISA; we found significantly higher levels in patients with advanced disease (stage II/III) when compared to healthy individuals and patients with stage I TGCT. In conclusion, despite high mRNA levels, the CDH1 protein is not expressed in CIS, suggesting translational suppression of CDH1 protein expression. CDH1 serum levels may be a serological marker for staging of TGCT patients.

  8. Identification of circulating tumour cells in early stage breast cancer patients using multi marker immunobead RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Raynor, Michael P; Stephenson, Sally-Anne; Pittman, Kenneth B; Walsh, David CA; Henderson, Michael A; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The ability to screen blood of early stage operable breast cancer patients for circulating tumour cells is of potential importance for identifying patients at risk of developing distant relapse. We present the results of a study of the efficacy of the immunobead RT-PCR method in identifying patients with circulating tumour cells. Results Immunomagnetic enrichment of circulating tumour cells followed by RT-PCR (immunobead RT-PCR) with a panel of five epithelial specific markers (ELF3, EPHB4, EGFR, MGB1 and TACSTD1) was used to screen for circulating tumour cells in the peripheral blood of 56 breast cancer patients. Twenty patients were positive for two or more RT-PCR markers, including seven patients who were node negative by conventional techniques. Significant increases in the frequency of marker positivity was seen in lymph node positive patients, in patients with high grade tumours and in patients with lymphovascular invasion. A strong trend towards improved disease free survival was seen for marker negative patients although it did not reach significance (p = 0.08). Conclusion Multi-marker immunobead RT-PCR analysis of peripheral blood is a robust assay that is capable of detecting circulating tumour cells in early stage breast cancer patients. PMID:19500345

  9. Effect of anti-glycolytic agents on tumour cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korshunov, D. A.; Kondakova, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    A metabolic change is one of the tumour hallmarks, which has recently attracted a great amount of attention. One of the main metabolic characteristics of tumour cells is a high level of glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen, known as aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg effect. The energy production is much less in a glycolysis pathway than that in a tricarboxylic acid cycle. The Warburg effect constitutes a fundamental adaptation of tumour cells to a relatively hostile environment, and supports the evolution of aggressive and metastatic phenotypes. As a result, tumour glycolysis may become an attractive target for cancer therapy. Here, we research the effect of potential anticancer agents on tumour cells in vitro. In our study, we found a high sensitivity of tumour cells to anti-glycolityc drugs. In addition, tumour cells are more resistant to the agents studied in comparison with normal cells. We also observed an atypical cooperative interaction of tumour cells in the median lethal dose of drugs. They formed the specific morphological structure of the surviving cells. This behavior is not natural for the culture of tumour cells. Perhaps this is one of the mechanisms of cells' adaptation to the aggressive environment.

  10. Lysis of primary hepatic tumours by lymphokine activated killer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, K H; Shu, S Y; Lee, C S; Chu, C T; Yang, C S; Chang, K J

    1987-01-01

    Lymphokine activated killer cell is a newly described lytic system against a variety of solid tumours and is distinct in several respects from the classic cytolytic T cell and the natural killer systems. This study was conducted to evaluate the lytic activity of lymphokine activated killer cells against fresh autologous and allogeneic, as well as cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Lymphokine activated killer cell was generated by incubating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with various concentrations of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2, Cetus, USA) for various periods of time. A four hour 51Cr release assay was used to measure cytotoxicity. The results show that fresh and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells were only slightly susceptible to natural killer cells. Normal hepatocytes were resistant to lymphokine activated killer-mediated lysis. Lymphokine activated killer cells could be generated from mononuclear cells of hepatocellular carcinoma patients and normal subjects with lytic activity against fresh autologous and allogeneic and cultured hepatocellular carcinoma cells, but lymphokine activated killer cells from the former was less efficient than that from the latter. It is concluded that the adoptive immunotherapy with combined rIL-2 and lymphokine activated killer may be worth trying in early cases of primary hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:3030899

  11. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  12. Teratocarcinoma in a non seminomatous, mixed germ cell tumour of the testis-a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Malavalli, Gayathri; Karra, Shilpa; Muniyappa, Bharathi

    2013-07-01

    Mixed Germ Cell Tumours (MGCTs) of the testis are the second most common testicular tumours. In the 10 years retrospective study which was done on testicular neoplasms at our institute, this reported case accounted for 0.4%. We are presenting the case of a 30 year old male with a painless testicular swelling. Abdominal ultrasonography disclosed it as a seminoma and the FNAC report was Mixed Germ Cell tumour of the testis. Histopathology concurred the cytological diagnosis and it additionally revealed the concomitant presence of a Yolk Sac Tumour (YST) and a Teratocarcinoma in a Non-Seminomatous Tumour of the testis. This case attains uniqueness with the very rare presence of the yolk sac tumour with the teratocarcinoma component in Non-Seminomatous Testicular Tumours. The reason behind the reporting of the case was its poor therapeutic response.

  13. Differential expression and cytoplasm/membrane distribution of endoglin (CD105) in human tumour cell lines: Implications in the modulation of cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Postiglione, L; Di Domenico, G; Caraglia, M; Marra, M; Giuberti, G; Del Vecchio, L; Montagnani, S; Macri, M; Bruno, E M; Abbruzzese, A; Rossi, G

    2005-05-01

    Endoglin (CD105, an accessory component of the TGF-beta receptor complex) expression and distribution on different human tumour cells and its role in cellular proliferation were evaluated. We examined: 1) sixteen human carcinoma cell lines, 2) eight human sarcoma cell lines, 3) five miscellaneous tumour cell lines. HECV (endothelial cells) were employed as a positive control for endoglin expression. Normal Human Dermal Fibroblasts (NHDF) and 293 cells (epithelial kidney cells) were used as normal controls for connective and epithelial tissues, respectively. The results showed that CD105 was poorly expressed in the majority of human carcinoma cells (10/16), whereas it was highly expressed in most human sarcoma cells (7/8), and differently expressed by miscellaneous tumour cell lines. These data reflect endoglin expression by the normal counterparts of tumour cell lines, i.e. NHDF and 293 cells. However, CD105 levels in sarcoma cell lines, even though consistently lower than in NHDF, were significantly higher than those observed in carcinoma cells. Interestingly, CD105 presented a strong expression in the cytoplasm of MDA-MB-453 (breast carcinoma), NPA (papillary thyroid carcinoma), COLO-853 (melanoma) and SaOS-2 (osteosarcoma), but was weakly expressed on their cell membrane. This differential expression in the cytoplasm and on the membrane of some tumour cells, suggests a complex mechanism of translocation for this protein. The analysis of clonal growth in soft agar of some cell lines, characterized by high CD105 expression, showed an increased colony formation potential that was antagonized by the addition of anti-CD105 blocking mAb. The results indicated that endoglin is differentially expressed in human carcinoma and sarcoma cells and its overexpression modulates the proliferative rate of human solid tumour cells. Moreover, these data suggest that CD105 is involved in the regulation of TGF-beta effects in human solid malignancies, and therefore it could play an

  14. Tumour growth inhibition in mice by glycosylated recombinant human lymphotoxin: analysis of tumour-regional mononuclear cells involved with its action.

    PubMed Central

    Funahashi, I.; Watanabe, H.; Abo, T.; Indo, K.; Miyaji, H.

    1993-01-01

    We compared the antitumour effects of glycosylated LT (gLT), nonglycosylated LT and TNF against a solid tumour in mice. We found that: (a) The systemic administration of gLT showed significant antitumour activity. These effects were, however, quite small in nude mice. Nonglycosylated LT and TNF attained the same degree of effectiveness as gLT, but at a 5-times higher dose. The serum half-life of gLT was 3-fold longer than that of nonglycosylated LT and 22-fold longer than that of TNF. (b) The effect of gLT was significantly blocked by pretreatment with anti-asialo GM1 antibody. Treatment with gLT produced a significant reduction in numbers of tumour-regional mononuclear cells, which in turn, produced increases intensive necrosis. (c) Mononuclear cells in the tumour tissues before gLT-injection were predominantly IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells and CD3+ cells. Pretreatment with the anti-asialo GM1 antibody produced a drastic reduction of IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells. These findings suggest that the efficient antitumour effect of gLT is due to a longer serum half-life than that of nonglycosylated LT or TNF in vivo, and its function is largely mediated by IL-2 receptor +/CD3- cells. Images Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8439496

  15. Cell-cycle distribution of urothelial tumour cells as measured by flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Collste, L. G.; Darzynkiewicz, Z.; Traganos, F.; Sharpless, T. K.; Devonec, M.; Claps, M. L.; Whitmore, W. F.; Melamed, M. R.

    1979-01-01

    The fraction of cells in S + G2 + mitosis from 54 urothelial tumours was calculated by flow cytometry after acridine orange (AO) staining of cells obtained by bladder irrigation or biopsy. Fluorescence signals emitted by the AO-stained DNA and RNA of each cell were separated optically and measured for 5,000 cells per specimen. The patients were classified by the histology of their tumours and clinical data into 5 diagnostic categories: NED (no evidence of disease, but history of bladder tumour), 3; papilloma, 8; non-invasive papillary carcinoma, 8; carcinoma in situ, 17 and invasive carcinoma, 18. The fraction of cells with DNA values in S + G2 + M of the cell cycle varied between 7 and 57% of the total, with a wide range within each diagnostic category, but no statistically significant differences between the groups. The proportion of cells in S + G2 + M from an individual tumour was not correlated with histologic grade or clinical behaviour. The possibility that some tumour cells with DNA values above G1 level are quiescent cells arrested at S or G2 is discussed. PMID:526428

  16. Short SULF1/SULF2 splice variants predominate in mammary tumours with a potential to facilitate receptor tyrosine kinase-mediated cell signalling.

    PubMed

    Gill, Roop Ms; Mehra, Vedika; Milford, Emma; Dhoot, Gurtej K

    2016-10-01

    The relative roles of SULF1 and SULF2 enzymes in tumour growth are controversial, but short SULF1/SULF2 splice variants predominate in human mammary tumours despite their non-detectable levels in normal mammary tissue. Compared with the normal, the level of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activity was markedly increased in triple-positive mammary tumours during later stages of tumour progression showing increased p-EGFR, p-FGFR1 and p-cMet activity in triple-positive but not in triple-negative tumours. The abundance of catalytically inactive short SULF1/SULF2 variants permits high levels of HS sulphation and thus growth driving RTK cell signalling in primary mammary tumours. Also observed in this study, however, was increased N-sulphation detected by antibody 10E4 indicating that not only 6-O sulphation but also N-sulphation may contribute to increased RTK cell signalling in mammary tumours. The levels of such increases in not only SULF1/SULF2 but also in pEGFR, pFGFR1, p-cMet and Smad1/5/8 signalling were further enhanced following lymph node metastasis. The over-expression of Sulf1 and Sulf2 variants in mammary tumour-derived MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cell lines by transfection further confirms Sulf1-/Sulf2-mediated differential modulation of growth. The short variants of both Sulf1 and Sulf2 promoted FGF2-induced MDA-MB231 and MCF7 in vitro growth while full-length Sulf1 inhibited growth supporting in vivo mammary tumour cell signalling patterns of growth. Since a number of mammary tumours become drug resistant to hormonal therapy, Sulf1/Sulf2 inhibition could be an alternative therapeutic approach to target such tumours by down-regulating RTK-mediated cell signalling.

  17. Quantitative tumour necrosis is an independent predictor of overall survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Renshaw, Andrew A; Cheville, John C

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have reached conflicting results regarding whether tumour necrosis is a predictor of survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma. In addition, studies quantifying the extent of necrosis are limited.The aim of this study was to determine if quantifying tumour necrosis could improve its predictive value for survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.We reviewed the clinical pathological information contained in The Cancer Genome Atlas for clear cell renal cell carcinoma and correlated it with overall survival using a Cox proportional hazard model. Necrosis was quantified on a single frozen section slide taken at the time of tissue harvesting for molecular studies.For all tumours, the presence of tumour necrosis was a significant predictor of overall survival (p < 0.001) on univariate analysis. When quantitated, >10% necrosis was associated with survival, but ≤10% necrosis was not. On multivariate analysis, age (p = 0.004), T3b stage (p = 0.02), M1 stage (p < 0.001), necrosis >30% (p < 0.001), and elevated serum calcium (p = 0.003) remained significant. For clinical stage 1-2 (T1-T2N0M0) tumours, necrosis >20% was significant on univariate analysis (p ≤ 0.005), and remained so on multivariate analysis (p < 0.001).We conclude that quantitating the extent of tumour necrosis adds prognostic information in clear cell renal cell carcinomas, including organ confined tumours.

  18. Seladin-1 and testicular germ cell tumours: new insights into cisplatin responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Nuti, Francesca; Luciani, Paola; Marinari, Eliana; Erdei, Edit; Bak, Mihaly; Deledda, Cristiana; Rosati, Fabiana; Mazzinghi, Benedetta; Danza, Giovanna; Stoop, Hans; Looijenga, Leendert H J; Peri, Alessandro; Serio, Mario; Krausz, Csilla

    2009-12-01

    The molecular basis for the exquisite sensitivity of testicular germ cell tumours of adolescents and adults (TGCTs), ie seminomas and non-seminomatous germ cell tumours, to chemo/radiotherapy has not been fully clarified so far. It has been suggested that it may be dependent on factors involved in the regulation of apoptosis. Seladin-1 is a multi-functional protein involved in various biological processes, including apoptosis. The aim of our study was to assess the expression of seladin-1 in different histological types of TGCTs, known to have varying treatment sensitivity, in order to establish whether this protein may influence cisplatin responsiveness in vitro. Seladin-1 expression levels, both at the mRNA and at the protein level, were higher in the adjacent normal parenchyma than in the pathological counterparts. In tumoural tissues, the level of expression differed among TGCT histological types. The highest tumour-expression level was found in teratoma, whereas the lowest was detected in seminoma, corresponding to the different chemo/and radiosensitivities of these tumour types. In common with other cancers, in TGCT-derived cell lines seladin-1 showed anti-apoptotic properties through inhibition of caspase-3 activation. We confirmed our results using a non-seminomatous cell line model (NT2) before and after differentiation with retinoic acid. Significantly higher seladin-1 expression was observed in the differentiated derivatives (teratoma) and an inverse relationship was found between seladin-1 expression and the amount of cleaved caspase-3. Seladin-1 silencing or overexpression in this cell line supports involvement of seladin-1 in cisplatin responsiveness. Seladin-1 silencing was associated with greater cisplatin responsiveness demonstrated by decreased cell viability and increased expression of apoptotic markers. In contrast, overexpression of seladin-1 was associated with a higher survival rate and a clear anti-apoptotic effect. In conclusion, we have

  19. Guiding intracortical brain tumour cells to an extracortical cytotoxic hydrogel using aligned polymeric nanofibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Anjana; Betancur, Martha; Patel, Gaurangkumar D.; Valmikinathan, Chandra M.; Mukhatyar, Vivek J.; Vakharia, Ajit; Pai, S. Balakrishna; Brahma, Barunashish; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Bellamkonda, Ravi V.

    2014-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive, invasive brain tumour with a poor survival rate. Available treatments are ineffective and some tumours remain inoperable because of their size or location. The tumours are known to invade and migrate along white matter tracts and blood vessels. Here, we exploit this characteristic of glioblastoma multiforme by engineering aligned polycaprolactone (PCL)-based nanofibres for tumour cells to invade and, hence, guide cells away from the primary tumour site to an extracortical location. This extracortial sink is a cyclopamine drug-conjugated, collagen-based hydrogel. When aligned PCL-nanofibre films in a PCL/polyurethane carrier conduit were inserted in the vicinity of an intracortical human U87MG glioblastoma xenograft, a significant number of human glioblastoma cells migrated along the aligned nanofibre films and underwent apoptosis in the extracortical hydrogel. Tumour volume in the brain was significantly lower following insertion of aligned nanofibre implants compared with the application of smooth fibres or no implants.

  20. Rapid and quantitative discrimination of tumour cells on tissue slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kai-Wen; Chieh, Jen-Jie; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Wei, Wen-Chun; Hsiao, Pei-Yi; Yang, Hong-Chang; Horng, Herng-Er

    2016-06-01

    After a needle biopsy, immunohistochemistry is generally used to stain tissue slices for clinically confirming tumours. Currently, tissue slices are immersed in a bioprobe-linked fluorescent reagent for several minutes, washed to remove the unbound reagent, and then observed using a fluorescence microscope. However, the observation must be performed by experienced pathologists, and producing a qualitative analysis is time consuming. Therefore, this study proposes a novel scanning superconducting quantum interference device biosusceptometry (SSB) method for avoiding these drawbacks. First, stain reagents were synthesised for the dual modalities of fluorescent and magnetic imaging by combining iron-oxide magnetic nanoparticles and the currently used fluorescent reagent. The reagent for the proposed approach was stained using the same procedure as that for the current fluorescent reagent, and tissue slices were rapidly imaged using the developed SSB for obtaining coregistered optical and magnetic images. Analysing the total intensity of magnetic spots in SSB images enables quantitatively determining the tumour cells of tissue slices. To confirm the magnetic imaging results, a traditional observation methodology entailing the use of a fluorescence microscope was also performed as the gold standard. This study determined high consistency between the fluorescent and magnetic spots in different regions of the tissue slices, demonstrating the feasibility of the proposed approach, which will benefit future clinical pathology.

  1. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-02-15

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids.

  2. L-lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, T L; Lehninger, A L

    1976-01-01

    Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells were investigated with regard to their stability to transport L-lactate by measuring either the distribution of [14C]lactate or concomitant H+ ion movements. The movement of lactate was dependent on the pH difference across the cell membrane and was electroneutral, as evidenced by an observed 1:1 antiport for OH- ions or 1:1 symport with H+ ions. 2. Kinetic experiments showed that lactate transport was saturable, with an apparent Km of approx. 4.68 mM and a Vmax. as high as 680 nmol/min per mg of protein at pH 6.2 and 37 degrees C. 3. Lactate transport exhibited a high temperature dependence (activation energy = 139 kJ/mol). 4. Lactate transport was inhibited competitively by (a) a variety of other substituted monocarboxylic acids (e.g. pyruvate, Ki = 6.3 mM), which were themselves transported, (b) the non-transportable analogues alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 0.5 mM), alpha-cyano-3-hydroxycinnamate (Ki = 2mM) and DL-p-hydroxyphenyl-lactate (Ki = 3.6 mM) and (c) the thiol-group reagent mersalyl (Ki = 125 muM). 5. Transport of simple monocarboxylic acids, including acetate and propionate, was insensitive to these inhibitors; they presumably cross the membrane by means of a different mechanism. 6. Experiments using saturating amounts of mersalyl as an "inhibitor stop" allowed measurements of the initial rates of net influx and of net efflux of [14C]lactate. Influx and efflux of lactate were judged to be symmetrical reactions in that they exhibited similar concentration dependence. 7. It is concluded that lactate transport in Ehrlich ascites-tumour cells is mediated by a carrier capable of transporting a number of other substituted monocarboxylic acids, but not unsubstituted short-chain aliphatic acids. PMID:7237

  3. HPV vaccine stimulates cytotoxic activity of killer dendritic cells and natural killer cells against HPV-positive tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Van den Bergh, Johan M J; Guerti, Khadija; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Cools, Nathalie; Goossens, Herman; Vorsters, Alex; Van Tendeloo, Viggo F I; Anguille, Sébastien; Van Damme, Pierre; Smits, Evelien L J M

    2014-07-01

    Cervarix™ is approved as a preventive vaccine against infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) strains 16 and 18, which are causally related to the development of cervical cancer. We are the first to investigate in vitro the effects of this HPV vaccine on interleukin (IL)-15 dendritic cells (DC) as proxy of a naturally occurring subset of blood DC, and natural killer (NK) cells, two innate immune cell types that play an important role in antitumour immunity. Our results show that exposure of IL-15 DC to the HPV vaccine results in increased expression of phenotypic maturation markers, pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cytotoxic activity against HPV-positive tumour cells. These effects are mediated by the vaccine adjuvant, partly through Toll-like receptor 4 activation. Next, we demonstrate that vaccine-exposed IL-15 DC in turn induce phenotypic activation of NK cells, resulting in a synergistic cytotoxic action against HPV-infected tumour cells. Our study thus identifies a novel mode of action of the HPV vaccine in boosting innate immunity, including killing of HPV-infected cells by DC and NK cells.

  4. Mixed Malignant Germ Cell Tumour of Third Ventricle with Hydrocephalus: A Rare Case with Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Monappa, Vidya; Rao, Lakshmi; Kudva, Ranjini

    2014-01-01

    Malignant Germ Cell Tumours (GCTs) are rare, accounting for 3% of intracranial tumours and just like their extracranial counterparts represent a wide array of disease. Combination of Germinoma with Teratoma is very rare. Here in, we describe a case of Mixed Malignant Germ cell tumor of third ventricle with recurrence with emphasis on histopathological and radiological findings. PMID:25584231

  5. Management of Giant Cell Tumour Radius in a Three Year old Child with an Improvised Technique

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Ajay; Gulia, Ashish; Sharma, Seema; Verma, Amit K

    2014-01-01

    Giant cell tumours of immature skeleton have a very low incidence and epi-metaphyseal location. We are presenting giant cell tumour distal radius in a skeletally immature patient; an uncontained defect with a large soft tissue component which was managed by wide excision and reconstruction with an improvised technique. PMID:25654002

  6. Amigo2-upregulation in Tumour Cells Facilitates Their Attachment to Liver Endothelial Cells Resulting in Liver Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Yusuke; Osaki, Mitsuhiko; Onuma, Kunishige; Sonoda, Ayana; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Hamada, Junichi; Nicolson, Garth L.; Ochiya, Takahiro; Okada, Futoshi

    2017-01-01

    Since liver metastasis is the main cause of death in cancer patients, we attempted to identify the driver gene involved. QRsP-11 fibrosarcoma cells were injected into the spleens of syngeneic mice to isolate tumour sub-populations that colonize the liver. Cells from liver metastatic nodules were established and subsequently injected intrasplenically for selection. After 12 cycles, the cell subline LV12 was obtained. Intravenous injection of LV12 cells produced more liver metastases than QRsP-11 cells, whereas the incidence of lung metastases was similar to that of QRsP-11 cells. LV12 cells adhered to liver-derived but not to lung-derived endothelial cells. DNA chip analysis showed that amphoterin-induced gene and open reading frame 2 (Amigo2) was overexpressed in LV12 cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Amigo2 expression in LV12 cells attenuated liver endothelial cell adhesion. Ex vivo imaging showed that suppression of Amigo2 in luciferase-expressing LV12 cells reduced attachment/metastasis to liver to the same level as that observed with QRsP-11 cells. Forced expression of Amigo2 in QRsP-11 cells increased liver endothelial cell adhesion and liver metastasis. Additionally, Amigo2 expression in human cancers was higher in liver metastatic lesions than in primary lesions. Thus, Amigo2 regulated tumour cell adhesion to liver endothelial cells and formation of liver metastases. PMID:28272394

  7. Antibody–peptide–MHC fusion conjugates target non-cognate T cells to kill tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    King, Ben C.; Hamblin, Angela D.; Savage, Philip M.; Douglas, Leon R.; Hansen, Ted H.; Johnson, Peter W. M.; Glennie, Martin J.

    2013-01-01

    Attempts to generate robust anti-tumour cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses using immunotherapy are frequently thwarted by exhaustion and anergy of CTL recruited to tumour. One strategy to overcome this is to retarget a population of virus-specific CTL to kill tumour cells. Here, we describe a proof-of-principle study using a bispecific conjugate designed to retarget ovalbumin (OVA)-specific CTL to kill tumour cells via CD20. A single-chain trimer (SCT) consisting of MHCI H-2Kb/SI-INFEKL peptide/beta 2 microglobulin/BirA was expressed in bacteria, refolded and chemically conjugated to one (1:1; F2) or two (2:1; F3) anti-hCD20 Fab′ fragments. In vitro, the [SCT × Fab′] (F2 and F3) redirected SIINFEKL-specific OT-I CTL to kill CD20+ target cells, and in the presence of CD20+ target cells to provide crosslinking, they were also able to induce proliferation of OT-I cells. In vivo, activated OT-I CTL could be retargeted to kill [SCT × Fab′]-coated B cells from hCD20 transgenic (hCD20 Tg) mice and also EL4 and B16 mouse tumour cells expressing human CD20 (hCD20). Importantly, in a hCD20 Tg mouse model, [SCT × Fab′] administered systemically were able to retarget activated OT-I cells to deplete normal B cells, and their performance matched that of a bispecific antibody (BsAb) comprising anti-CD3 and anti-CD20. [SCT × Fab′] were also active therapeutically in an EL4 tumour model. Furthermore, measurement of serum cytokine levels suggests that [SCT × Fab′] are associated with a lower level of inflammatory cytokine release than the BsAb and so may be advantageous clinically in terms of reduced toxicity. PMID:23604105

  8. Tumour-suppressor microRNAs regulate ovarian cancer cell physical properties and invasive behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yinghong; Nyberg, Kendra; Marra, Marco A.; Lim, Emilia L.; Jones, Steven J. M.; Maar, Dianna; Gibb, Ewan A.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Robertson, A. Gordon; Rowat, Amy C.

    2016-01-01

    The activities of pathways that regulate malignant transformation can be influenced by microRNAs (miRs). Recently, we showed that increased expression of five tumour-suppressor miRs, miR-508-3p, miR-508-5p, miR-509-3p, miR-509-5p and miR-130b-3p, correlate with improved clinical outcomes in human ovarian cancer patients, and that miR-509-3p attenuates invasion of ovarian cancer cell lines. Here, we investigate the mechanism underlying this reduced invasive potential by assessing the impact of these five miRs on the physical properties of cells. Human ovarian cancer cells (HEYA8, OVCAR8) that are transfected with miR mimics representing these five miRs exhibit decreased invasion through collagen matrices, increased cell size and reduced deformability as measured by microfiltration and microfluidic assays. To understand the molecular basis of altered invasion and deformability induced by these miRs, we use predicted and validated mRNA targets that encode structural and signalling proteins that regulate cell mechanical properties. Combined with analysis of gene transcripts by real-time PCR and image analysis of F-actin in single cells, our results suggest that these tumour-suppressor miRs may alter cell physical properties by regulating the actin cytoskeleton. Our findings provide biophysical insights into how tumour-suppressor miRs can regulate the invasive behaviour of ovarian cancer cells, and identify potential therapeutic targets that may be implicated in ovarian cancer progression. PMID:27906134

  9. Isolation of canine mammary cells with stem cell properties and tumour-initiating potential.

    PubMed

    Cocola, C; Anastasi, P; Astigiano, S; Piscitelli, E; Pelucchi, P; Vilardo, L; Bertoli, G; Beccaglia, M; Veronesi, M C; Sanzone, S; Barbieri, O; Reinbold, R A; Luvoni, G C; Zucchi, I

    2009-07-01

    Recent data suggest that mammary carcinogenesis may be driven by cancer stem cells (CSCs) derived from mutated adult stem cells, which have acquired aberrant cell self-renewal or by progenitor cells that have acquired the capacity for cell self-renewal. Spontaneous mammary cancers in cats and dogs are important models for the understanding of human breast cancer and may represent alternative species model systems that can significantly contribute to the study of human oncogenesis. With the goal of identifying markers for isolating human breast CSCs, we have generated a canine model system to isolate and characterize normal and CSCs from dog mammary gland. Insight into the hierarchical organization of canine tumours may contribute to the development of universal concepts in oncogenesis by CSCs. Cells with stem cell properties were isolated from normal and tumoural canine breast tissue and propagated as mammospheres and tumourspheres in long-term non-adherent culture conditions. We showed that cells obtained from spheres that display self-renewing properties, have multi-lineage differentiation potential, could generate complex branched tubular structures in vitro and form tumours in NOD/SCID mice. We analysed these cells for the expression of human stem and CSC markers and are currently investigating the tumour-initiating properties of these cells and the hierarchical organization of normal and neoplastic canine mammary tissue.

  10. A 3D model of tumour angiogenic microenvironment to monitor hypoxia effects on cell interactions and cancer stem cell selection.

    PubMed

    Klimkiewicz, Krzysztof; Weglarczyk, Kazimierz; Collet, Guillaume; Paprocka, Maria; Guichard, Alan; Sarna, Michal; Jozkowicz, Alicja; Dulak, Jozef; Sarna, Tadeusz; Grillon, Catherine; Kieda, Claudine

    2017-03-10

    Tumour microenvironment determines the fate of treatments. Reconstitution of tumour conditions is mandatory for alternative in vitro methods devoted to cancer development and the selection of therapeutic strategies. This work describes a 3D model of melanoma growth in its environment. Introducing means to mimic tumour angiogenesis, which turns on tumour progression, the model shows that melanoma tumour spheroids allow reconstitution of solid tumours with stromal cells. Angiogenesis evidenced the differential recruitment of endothelial cells (EC) from early progenitors (EEPCs) to mature ECs. Hypoxia was the key parameter that selected and stabilized melanoma cancer stem like cells (CSCs) phenotype based on aldehyde dehydrogenase expression as the best criterion. The 3D-tumour-model demonstrated the distinct reactivity of ECs toward tumour cells in terms of cellular cross-talk and humoral response. Intra-spheroid cell-to-cell membrane dye exchanges, mediated by intercellular interactions, uncovered the melanoma-to-EEPC cooperation. The resulting changes in tumour milieu were evidenced by the chemokinic composition and hypoxia-related variations in microRNA expression assessed in each cellular component of the spheroids. This method brings new tools to decipher the molecular mechanism of tumour-mediated cell recruitment and for in vitro assessment of therapeutic approaches.

  11. Knockdown of T-cell intracellular antigens triggers cell proliferation, invasion and tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, José M; Alcalde, José; Carrascoso, Isabel; Reyes, Raquel; Ludeña, María Dolores

    2011-04-15

    TIA (T-cell intracellular antigen) proteins function as DNA/RNA trans-acting regulators to expand transcriptome and proteome diversity in mammals. In the present paper we report that the stable silencing of TIA1 and/or TIAR/TIAL1 (TIA1-related/like protein 1) expression in HeLa cells enhances cell proliferation, anchorage-dependent and -independent growth and invasion. HeLa cells lacking TIA1 and/or TIAR generate larger and faster-growing epithelial tumours with high rates of proliferation and angiogenesis in nude mice xenografts. Protein array analysis of a collection of human tumours shows that TIA1 and TIAR protein expression is down-regulated in a subset of epithelial tumours relative to normal tissues. Our results suggest a link between the epigenetic control exerted by TIA proteins and the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of a subset of specific genes involved in tumour progression. Taken together, these results are consistent with a role for TIA proteins as growth/tumour-suppressor genes.

  12. Co-expression of glutaminase K and L isoenzymes in human tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The pattern of expression of glutaminase isoenzymes in tumour cells has been investigated to clarify its role in the malignant transformation and the prospect of its use as a clinically relevant factor. Using leukaemia cells from medullar blood of human patients and several established human cancer cell lines, we have developed a competitive RT (reverse transcriptase)-PCR assay to quantify simultaneously K-type (kidney-type) and L-type (liver-type) glutaminase mRNAs. Co-expression of both transcripts and higher amounts of L-type mRNA were always found in all cancer cell types analysed. However, mature lymphocytes from the medullar blood of a patient suffering aplasia did not express the K-type transcript and showed a 15-fold increase of L-type transcript. Co-expression was also confirmed at the protein level using isoform-specific antibodies; nevertheless, it did not correlate with the relative abundance of glutaminase transcripts and strong K-type protein signals were detected. On the other hand, marked differences were found with regard to glutamate inhibition and phosphate activation of tumour glutaminase activity. Taken together, the protein data suggest that K isoform would account for the majority of glutaminase activity in these human tumour cells. The results confirm that simultaneous expression of both isoenzymes in human cancer cells is a more frequent event than previously thought. Furthermore, the present work and other previous data suggest that K isoform is up-regulated with increased rates of proliferation, whereas prevalence of the L isoform seems to be related with resting or quiescent cell states. PMID:15496140

  13. Increasing the speed of tumour diagnosis during surgery with selective scanning Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Kenny; Rowlands, Christopher J.; Varma, Sandeep; Perkins, William; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Pitiot, Alain; Williams, Hywel C.; Notingher, Ioan

    2014-09-01

    One of the main challenges in cancer surgery is ensuring that all tumour cells are removed during surgery, while sparing as much healthy tissue as possible. Histopathology, the gold-standard technique for cancer diagnosis, is often impractical for intra-operative use because of the time-consuming tissue preparation procedures (sectioning and staining). Raman micro-spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can discriminate between tumours and healthy tissues with high accuracy, based entirely on intrinsic chemical differences. However, raster-scanning Raman micro-spectroscopy is a slow imaging technique that typically requires data acquisition times as long as several days for typical tissue samples obtained during surgery (1 × 1 cm2) - in particular when high signal-to-noise ratio spectra are required to ensure accurate diagnosis. In this paper we present two techniques based on selective sampling Raman micro-spectroscopy that can overcome these limitations. In selective sampling, information regarding the spatial features of the tissue, either measured by an alternative optical technique or estimated in real-time from the Raman spectra, can be used to drastically reduce the number of Raman spectra required for diagnosis. These sampling strategies allowed diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma in skin tissue samples excised during Mohs micrographic surgery faster than frozen section histopathology, and two orders of magnitude faster than previous techniques based on raster-scanning Raman microscopy. Further development of these techniques may help during cancer surgery by providing a fast and objective way for surgeons to ensure the complete removal of tumour cells while sparing as much healthy tissue as possible.

  14. Dual targeted immunotherapy via in vivo delivery of biohybrid RNAi-peptide nanoparticles to tumour-associated macrophages and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Conde, João; Bao, Chenchen; Tan, Yeqi; Cui, Daxiang; Edelman, Elazer R; Azevedo, Helena S; Byrne, Hugh J; Artzi, Natalie; Tian, Furong

    2015-07-15

    Lung cancer is associated with very poor prognosis and considered one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Here, we present highly potent and selective bio-hybrid RNAi-peptide nanoparticles that can induce specific and long-lasting gene therapy in inflammatory tumour associated macrophages (TAMs), via an immune modulation of the tumour milieu combined with tumour suppressor effects. Our data prove that passive gene silencing can be achieved in cancer cells using regular RNAi NPs. When combined with M2 peptide-based targeted immunotherapy that immuno-modulates TAMs cell-population, a synergistic effect and long-lived tumour eradication can be observed along with increased mice survival. Treatment with low doses of siRNA (ED50 0.0025-0.01 mg/kg) in a multi and long-term dosing system substantially reduced the recruitment of inflammatory TAMs in lung tumour tissue, reduced tumour size (∼95%) and increased animal survival (∼75%) in mice. Our results suggest that it is likely that the combination of silencing important genes in tumour cells and in their supporting immune cells in the tumour microenvironment, such as TAMs, will greatly improve cancer clinical outcomes.

  15. Metronomic chemotherapy following the maximum tolerated dose is an effective anti-tumour therapy affecting angiogenesis, tumour dissemination and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Vives, Marta; Ginestà, Mireia M; Gracova, Kristina; Graupera, Mariona; Casanovas, Oriol; Capellà, Gabriel; Serrano, Teresa; Laquente, Berta; Viñals, Francesc

    2013-11-15

    In this article, the effectiveness of a multi-targeted chemo-switch (C-S) schedule that combines metronomic chemotherapy (MET) after treatment with the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is reported. This schedule was tested with gemcitabine in two distinct human pancreatic adenocarcinoma orthotopic models and with cyclophosphamide in an orthotopic ovarian cancer model. In both models, the C-S schedule had the most favourable effect, achieving at least 80% tumour growth inhibition without increased toxicity. Moreover, in the pancreatic cancer model, although peritoneal metastases were observed in control and MTD groups, no dissemination was observed in the MET and C-S groups. C-S treatment caused a decrease in angiogenesis, and its effect on tumour growth was similar to that produced by the MTD followed by anti-angiogenic DC101 treatment. C-S treatment combined an increase in thrombospondin-1 expression with a decrease in the number of CD133+ cancer cells and triple-positive CD133+/CD44+/CD24+ cancer stem cells (CSCs). These findings confirm that the C-S schedule is a challenging clinical strategy with demonstrable inhibitory effects on tumour dissemination, angiogenesis and CSCs.

  16. Microencapsulation of human cells: its effects on growth of normal and tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, S. M.; Hopwood, D.; Newman, E. L.; Cuschieri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth kinetics of established human colorectal tumour cell lines (HT29, HT115 and COLO 320DM) and human diploid fibroblasts (Flow 2002) were studied in conventional culture and in microcapsules formed from alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate membranes. The tumour lines grew rapidly in microcapsules but, in the case of the substrate-adherent lines HT29 and HT115, only after a prolonged lag phase. This phase was reduced by serial passage in microcapsules. The anchorage-independent line COLO 320DM showed no lengthening in lag phase. Microencapsulated fibroblasts underwent negligible growth but remained viable. Some evidence for functional differentiation (microvilli, cell-cell junctions) of the tumour line HT115 within the microcapsules was observed. We conclude that the use of microcapsules provides an alternative system with some advantages for the study of human cancer and its metastases in vitro. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2039691

  17. Expression of different phenotypes in cell lines from canine mammary spindle-cell tumours and osteosarcomas indicating a pluripotent mammary stem cell origin.

    PubMed

    Hellmén, E; Moller, M; Blankenstein, M A; Andersson, L; Westermark, B

    2000-06-01

    Mammary spindle-cell tumours and sarcomas seem to be restricted to dogs and humans. Two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary spindle-cell tumours (CMT-U304 and CMT-U309) and two cell lines from spontaneous primary canine mammary osteosarcomas (CMT-U334 and CMT-U335) were established to study the mesenchymal phenotypes of mammary tumours in the female dog. The cells from the spindle-cell tumours expressed cytokeratin, vimentin and smooth muscle actin filaments. When these cells were inoculated subcutaneously into female and male nude mice they formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as spindle-cell tumours, fibroma and rhabdomyoid tumours (n = 6/8). The cells from the osteosarcomas expressed vimentin filaments and also formed different types of mesenchymal tumours such as chondroid, rhabdomyoid, smooth muscle-like and spindle-cell tumours (n = 6/10). The cell lines CMT-U304, CMT-U309 and CMT-U335 had receptors for progesterone but none of the four cell lines had receptors for estrogen. All four cell lines and their corresponding primary tumours showed identical allelic patterns in microsatellite analysis. By in situ hybridization with genomic DNA we could verify that all formed tumours but one were of canine origin. Our results support the hypothesis that canine mammary tumours are derived from pluripotent stem cells.

  18. Interactions of ion transporters and channels with cancer cell metabolism and the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Anne Poder; Moreira, José M. A.; Pedersen, Stine Falsig

    2014-01-01

    Major changes in intra- and extracellular pH homoeostasis are shared features of most solid tumours. These changes stem in large part from the metabolic shift of most cancer cells towards glycolytic metabolism and other processes associated with net acid production. In combination with oncogenic signalling and impact from factors in the tumour microenvironment, this upregulates acid-extruding plasma membrane transport proteins which maintain intracellular pH normal or even more alkaline compared with that of normal cells, while in turn acidifying the external microenvironment. Mounting evidence strongly indicates that this contributes significantly to cancer development by favouring e.g. cancer cell migration, invasion and chemotherapy resistance. Finally, while still under-explored, it seems likely that non-cancer cells in the tumour microenvironment also exhibit altered pH regulation and that this may contribute to their malignant properties. Thus, the physical tumour microenvironment and the cancer and stromal cells within it undergo important reciprocal interactions which modulate the tumour pH profile, in turn severely impacting on the course of cancer progression. Here, we summarize recent knowledge of tumour metabolism and the tumour microenvironment, placing it in the context of tumour pH regulation, and discuss how interfering with these properties may be exploited clinically. PMID:24493746

  19. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Glenn; Stein, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications include the monitoring of tumour burden, the monitoring of minimal residual disease, monitoring of tumour heterogeneity, monitoring of molecular resistance and early diagnosis of tumours and metastatic disease. PMID:26101870

  20. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor produced by the tumour stroma but not by tumour cells regulates angiogenesis in the B16-F10 melanoma model

    PubMed Central

    Girard, E; Strathdee, C; Trueblood, E; Quéva, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has been proposed as a link between inflammation and tumorigenesis. Despite its potentially broad influence in tumour biology and prevalent expression, the value of MIF as a therapeutic target in cancer remains unclear. We sought to validate MIF in tumour models by achieving a complete inhibition of its expression in tumour cells and in the tumour stroma. Methods: We used MIF shRNA-transduced B16-F10 melanoma cells implanted in wild-type and MIF−/− C57Bl6 mice to investigate the effect of loss of MIF on tumour growth. Cytokine detection and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were used to evaluate tumours ex vivo. Results: Macrophage migration inhibitory factor shRNA inhibited expression of MIF protein by B16-F10 melanoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, the loss of MIF in this cell line resulted in a decreased response to hypoxia as indicated by reduced expression of VEGF. In vivo the growth of B16-F10 tumours was inhibited by an average of 47% in the MIF−/− mice compared with wild-type but was unaffected by loss of MIF expression by the tumour cells. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that microvessel density was decreased in tumours implanted in the MIF−/− mice. Profiling of serum cytokines showed a decrease in pro-angiogenic cytokines in MIF−/− mice. Conclusion: We report that the absence of MIF in the host resulted in slower tumour growth, which was associated with reduced vascularity. While the major contribution of MIF appeared to be in the regulation of angiogenesis, tumour cell-derived MIF played a negligible role in this process. PMID:22955855

  1. Targeting colon cancer cell NF-κB promotes an anti-tumour M1-like macrophage phenotype and inhibits peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Ryan, A E; Colleran, A; O'Gorman, A; O'Flynn, L; Pindjacova, J; Lohan, P; O'Malley, G; Nosov, M; Mureau, C; Egan, L J

    2015-03-19

    In a model of peritoneal metastasis in immune-competent mice, we show that nuclear factor (NF)-κB inhibition in CT26 colon cancer cells prevents metastasis. NF-κB inhibition, by stable overexpression of IκB-α super-repressor, induced differential polarization of co-cultured macrophages to an M1-like anti-tumour phenotype in vitro. NF-κB-deficient cancer cell-conditioned media (CT26/IκB-α SR) induced interleukin (IL)-12 and nitric oxide (NO) synthase (inducible NO synthase (iNOS)) expression in macrophages. Control cell (CT26/EV) conditioned media induced high levels of IL-10 and arginase in macrophages. In vivo, this effect translated to reduction in metastasis in mice injected with CT26/ IκB-α SR cells and was positively associated with increased CD8(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) and CD4(+)CD44(+)CD62L(-) effector T cells. Furthermore, inhibition of NF-κB activity induced high levels of NO in infiltrating immune cells and decreases in matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, simultaneous with increases in tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1 and 2 within tumours. CT26/IκB-α SR tumours displayed increased pro-inflammatory gene expression, low levels of angiogenesis and extensive intratumoral apoptosis, consistent with the presence of an anti-tumour macrophage phenotype. Macrophage depletion reduced tumour size in CT26/EV-injected animals and increased tumour size in CT26/IκB-α SR cells compared with untreated tumours. Our data demonstrate, for the first time, that an important implication of targeting tumour cell NF-κB is skewing of macrophage polarization to an anti-tumour phenotype. This knowledge offers novel therapeutic opportunities for anticancer treatment.

  2. Study of the cytotoxicity of asiaticoside on rats and tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cancer chemoprevention is considered one of the most promising areas in current cancer research, and asiaticoside, which is derived from the plant Centella asiatica, has a relative lack of systemic toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether asiaticoside is effective against 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced carcinogenicity in vitro (MCF-7 and other cells) and in vivo (DMBA-induced rat cancer). Methods An MTT assay was performed involving the treatment of MCF-7 cells for 48 h with H2O2 alone and H2O2 + different asiaticoside concentrations. Flow cytometry was performed, and the level of caspase 3, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) were quantified. Adult female Sprague–Dawley (SD) rats were divided into five groups designated I (control), II (DMBA-induced cancer), III (pre- and post-treatment with asiaticoside (200 μg/animal) in DMBA-induced cancer), IV (post-treatment with asiaticoside in DMBA-induced cancer), and V (treated with asiaticoside alone, drug control). Twelve weeks post-DMBA, rats developed mammary tumours. Rats either were sacrificed or imaged with MIBI. Histological examination of tumour tissues was performed. Tumour MIBI uptake ratios were determined. The data are expressed as the means ± standard deviation. Appropriate t-test and ANOVA statistical methods were used to compare data. Results The IC50 of asiaticoside for MCF-7 cells was determined to be 40 μM. Asiaticoside has potential for hydrogen peroxide cytotoxicity, and the caspase-3 activity increased with increasing asiaticoside dose in MCF-7 cells treated for 48 h. The expression of the cytokines TNF-α and IL-1β was significantly decreased and correlated with MIBI uptake ratios in vitro and in vivo after asiaticoside administration. Conclusion This study demonstrates that asiaticoside is effective in vitro and in vivo in inducing apoptosis and enhancing anti-tumour activity. PMID:24667059

  3. Relative biological effectiveness of light ions in human tumoural cell lines: role of protein p53

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baggio, L.; Cavinato, M.; Cherubini, R.; Conzato, M.; Cucinotta, F.; Favaretto, S.; Gerardi, S.; Lora, S.; Stoppa, P.; Williams, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    Protons and alpha particles of high linear energy transfer (LET) have shown an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with respect to X/gamma rays for several cellular and molecular endpoints in different in vitro cell systems. To contribute to understanding the biochemical mechanisms involved in the increased effectiveness of high LET radiation, an extensive study has been designed. The present work reports the preliminary result of this study on two human tumoural cell lines, DLD1 and HCT116, (with different p53 status), which indicate that for these cell lines, p53 does not appear to take a part in the response to radiation induced DNA damage, suggesting an alternative p53-independent pathway and a cell biochemical mechanism dependent on the cell type.

  4. Emerging roles of regulatory T cells in tumour progression and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Elizabeth C; Mahmoud, Sahar M; Bennewith, Kevin L

    2014-12-01

    The metastasis of cancer is a complex and life-threatening process that is only partially understood. Immune suppressive cells are recognized as important contributors to tumour progression and may also promote the development and growth of tumour metastases. Specifically, regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been found to promote primary tumour progression, and emerging pre-clinical data suggests that Tregs may promote metastasis and metastatic tumour growth. While the precise role that Tregs play in metastatic progression is understudied, recent findings have indicated that by suppressing innate and adaptive anti-tumour immunity, Tregs may shield tumour cells from immune detection, and thereby allow tumour cells to survive, proliferate and acquire characteristics that facilitate dissemination. This review will highlight our current understanding of Tregs in metastasis, including an overview of pre-clinical findings and discussion of clinical data regarding Tregs and therapeutic outcome. Evolving strategies to directly ablate Tregs or to inhibit their function will also be discussed. Improving our understanding of how Tregs may influence tumour metastasis may lead to novel treatments for metastatic cancer.

  5. [Giant cell tumours in a pyramidal bone: a clinical case and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Santiago, M M; González-Arteaga, J; Hidalgo-Ovejero, A M

    2012-01-01

    Giant cell tumours (GCT) of the bone are benign, but locally invasive tumours. We present a new case of carpus GCT, involving the triquetrum. The diagnosis required a prior biopsy before doing the block resection. This treatment is the best option to avoid recurrences. We review the literature on this particular lesion in the carpus bone.

  6. A Rare Collision Tumour of Uterus- Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Bindiya; Pathre, Abhishek; Rajaram, Shalini; Goyal, Neerja

    2017-01-01

    Collision tumours are defined by co-existence of two tumours in the same or adjacent organs which are topographically and histologically distinct with minimal or no histological admixture. Collision tumours have been described in many organs notably thyroid, brain, adrenal gland, stomach and rarely uterus. Most of the collision tumours reported in uterus have two components; an adenocarcinoma and a sarcoma. We report a case of a 60-year-old lady who presented with complaints of post-menopausal bleeding. A cervical biopsy was performed which showed a non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma of cervix. Intra-operatively the uterus was bulky with a 6 cm x 5 cm polypoidal mass in the endometrial canal along with a 2 cm friable cervical growth. The fleshy uterine cavity mass was a spindle cell tumour with moderate pleomorphism and frequent mitosis. It was immunopositive for CD10 and negative for smooth muscle actin and cytokeratin 5/6. The other growth showed non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma which was positive for cytokeratin 5/6. Based on the distinct topographical location and limited areas of tumour admixture of the two tumours, a diagnosis of collision tumour of uterus comprising of endometrial stromal sarcoma (high grade) uterus and squamous cell carcinoma cervix was made. PMID:28384878

  7. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells.

    PubMed

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita; Azogui, Orly

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy.

  8. Depletion of Regulatory T Cells Induces High Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Unmasks a Subset of Anti-Tumour CD8+CD11c+ PD-1lo Effector T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goudin, Nicolas; Chappert, Pascal; Mégret, Jérome; Gross, David-Alexandre; Rocha, Benedita

    2016-01-01

    Natural regulatory T (Treg) cells interfere with multiple functions, which are crucial for the development of strong anti-tumour responses. In a model of 4T1 mammary carcinoma, depletion of CD25+Tregs results in tumour regression in Balb/c mice, but the mechanisms underlying this process are not fully understood. Here, we show that partial Treg depletion leads to the generation of a particular effector CD8 T cell subset expressing CD11c and low level of PD-1 in tumour draining lymph nodes. These cells have the capacity to migrate into the tumour, to kill DCs, and to locally regulate the anti-tumour response. These events are concordant with a substantial increase in CD11b+ resident dendritic cells (DCs) subsets in draining lymph nodes followed by CD8+ DCs. These results indicate that Treg depletion leads to tumour regression by unmasking an increase of DC subsets as a part of a program that optimizes the microenvironment by orchestrating the activation, amplification, and migration of high numbers of fully differentiated CD8+CD11c+PD1lo effector T cells to the tumour sites. They also indicate that a critical pattern of DC subsets correlates with the evolution of the anti-tumour response and provide a template for Treg depletion and DC-based therapy. PMID:27341421

  9. Macrophage polarisation changes within the time between diagnostic biopsy and tumour resection in oral squamous cell carcinomas—an immunohistochemical study

    PubMed Central

    Weber, M; Moebius, P; Büttner-Herold, M; Amann, K; Preidl, R; Neukam, F W; Wehrhan, F

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prognosis of solid malignancies has been shown to depend on immunological parameters, such as macrophage polarisation (M1/M2). Recently, it was reported that preoperative oral surgery leads to a worsening of oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCC) prognosis. Diagnostic incision biopsies are oral surgery procedures that might lead to healing-associated M2 macrophage polarisation with a potential negative influence on tumour biology. No studies have compared macrophage polarisation in OSCC biopsies and tumour specimens. Methods: Preoperative diagnostic incision biopsies (n=25) and tumour resection specimens (n=34) of T1/T2 OSCC were processed for immunohistochemistry to detect CD68-, CD11c-, CD163- and MRC1-positive cells. Samples were digitised using whole-slide imaging, and the expression of macrophage markers was quantitatively analysed. Results: Carcinoma tissues obtained during OSCC tumour resections showed a significantly (P<0.05) increased CD163 cell count (M2 macrophages) compared with tissues obtained during preoperative incision biopsies. Additionally, the CD163/CD68 ratio (an indicator of M2 polarisation) was significantly (P<0.05) higher in tumour resection specimens than in biopsies. Conclusions: This study revealed for the first time an increase in M2 polarisation in samples obtained during OSCC tumour resection surgery compared with preoperative incision biopsies. The biopsy-induced tissue trauma might explain the observed shift in macrophage polarisation towards the tumour-promoting M2 type and could lead to accelerated tumour progression. PMID:26110975

  10. The long non-coding RNA HOTAIR increases tumour growth and invasion in cervical cancer by targeting the Notch pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sang Wun; Park, Sun-Ae; Chun, Kyung-Hee; Cho, Nam Hoon; Song, Yong Sang; Kim, Young Tae

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), HOTAIR, is involved in cervical cancer pathogenesis. We examined serum HOTAIR expression levels in cervical cancer patients and determined the relationships between HOTAIR expression and several clinicopathological factors, including survival. We also examined the functional consequences of HOTAIR overexpression both in vitro and in vivo. Compared with control patients, HOTAIR expression was significantly greater in the serum of cervical cancer patients (P < 0.001). The results indicated that this increase was significantly associated with tumour size (P = 0.030), lymphovascular space invasion (P = 0.037), and lymph node metastasis (P = 0.043). Univariate analysis revealed that disease-free survival and overall survival times were significantly shorter in cervical cancer patients with high HOTAIR expression (hazard ratio [HR] = 4.27, 4.68 and P = 0.039, 0.031, respectively). Cell proliferation and invasion in vitro increased as a result of lentiviral-mediated HOTAIR overexpression in cervical cancer cell lines. HOTAIR knockdown inhibited these properties and increased apoptosis. In vivo xenograft experiments using the HOTAIR-overexpressing SiHa cell line revealed that HOTAIR was a strong inducer of tumour growth and modulated the expression of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and Notch-Wnt signalling pathway-related genes. This result suggested that HOTAIR overexpression promoted cell proliferation and invasion. In conclusion, increased HOTAIR expression was associated with decreased patient survival times. HOTAIR may be a useful target for treatment of cervical cancer patients. PMID:27323817

  11. A Study of the Mechanisms of Attachment of Allergised Lymphocytes to BP8 Ascites Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, P. J.; Cater, D. B.

    1969-01-01

    The attachment of allergised and non-allergised lymph-node cells from C57B1 mice to BP8 ascites tumour cells were compared in vitro in the presence of vaso-active agents and mediators of the inflammatory reaction. It was found that Priscol, noradrenaline, adrenaline, 5-HT and histamine caused some cell adherence, while bradykinin and lysolecithin caused a marked increase of adherence of the allergised lymph-node cells to the BP8 cells. Electrophoretic studies of BP8 cells in the presence of polyornithine showed an abolition of the anodic mobility. Theories of action of the various agents are discussed. ImagesFigs. 5-8Figs. 1-4 PMID:5364386

  12. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowengrub, J. S.; Frieboes, H. B.; Jin, F.; Chuang, Y.-L.; Li, X.; Macklin, P.; Wise, S. M.; Cristini, V.

    2010-01-01

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  13. Nonlinear modelling of cancer: bridging the gap between cells and tumours

    PubMed Central

    Lowengrub, J S; Frieboes, H B; Jin, F; Chuang, Y-L; Li, X; Macklin, P; Wise, S M; Cristini, V

    2010-01-01

    Despite major scientific, medical and technological advances over the last few decades, a cure for cancer remains elusive. The disease initiation is complex, and including initiation and avascular growth, onset of hypoxia and acidosis due to accumulation of cells beyond normal physiological conditions, inducement of angiogenesis from the surrounding vasculature, tumour vascularization and further growth, and invasion of surrounding tissue and metastasis. Although the focus historically has been to study these events through experimental and clinical observations, mathematical modelling and simulation that enable analysis at multiple time and spatial scales have also complemented these efforts. Here, we provide an overview of this multiscale modelling focusing on the growth phase of tumours and bypassing the initial stage of tumourigenesis. While we briefly review discrete modelling, our focus is on the continuum approach. We limit the scope further by considering models of tumour progression that do not distinguish tumour cells by their age. We also do not consider immune system interactions nor do we describe models of therapy. We do discuss hybrid-modelling frameworks, where the tumour tissue is modelled using both discrete (cell-scale) and continuum (tumour-scale) elements, thus connecting the micrometre to the centimetre tumour scale. We review recent examples that incorporate experimental data into model parameters. We show that recent mathematical modelling predicts that transport limitations of cell nutrients, oxygen and growth factors may result in cell death that leads to morphological instability, providing a mechanism for invasion via tumour fingering and fragmentation. These conditions induce selection pressure for cell survivability, and may lead to additional genetic mutations. Mathematical modelling further shows that parameters that control the tumour mass shape also control its ability to invade. Thus, tumour morphology may serve as a predictor of

  14. Bax/bcl-2: cellular modulator of apoptosis in feline skin and basal cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Madewell, B R; Gandour-Edwards, R; Edwards, B F; Matthews, K R; Griffey, S M

    2001-01-01

    Bcl-2 and bax are two members of the BCL-2 gene family that play a prominent role in the regulation of apoptosis. Bax and bcl-2 expression were examined immunohistochemically in normal (healthy) feline skin and in 24 benign feline cutaneous basal cell tumours. The tumours were also examined for cellular proliferation by measurement of reactivity for the proliferation marker Ki-67, and for apoptosis by in-situ labelling for fragmented DNA. Bcl-2 was detected in normal basal epithelium and in 23 of 24 basal cell tumours. Bax was detected in both basal and suprabasal epithelium, but in only seven of 24 tumours. For tumours that expressed both bax and bcl-2, the bax:bcl-2 ratio was low. Neither bax nor bcl-2 expression was detected in 14 feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas. Basal cell tumours showed modest cellular proliferation (median, 17.5% Ki-67- reactive cells), but few (less than 1%) apoptotic cells. The slow, indolent growth of feline cutaneous basal cells in these benign skin tumours may be a response, at least in part, to opposing regulatory expressions of bcl-2 and bax.

  15. Ferroptosis, a new form of cell death, and its relationships with tumourous diseases.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Guo, Pengyi; Xie, Xiaozai; Wang, Yi; Chen, Gang

    2017-04-01

    Ferroptosis is a newly discovered type of cell death that differs from traditional apoptosis and necrosis and results from iron-dependent lipid peroxide accumulation. Ferroptotic cell death is characterized by cytological changes, including cell volume shrinkage and increased mitochondrial membrane density. Ferroptosis can be induced by two classes of small-molecule substances known as class 1 (system Xc(-) inhibitors) and class 2 ferroptosis inducers [glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPx4) inhibitors]. In addition to these small-molecule substances, a number of drugs (e.g. sorafenib, artemisinin and its derivatives) can induce ferroptosis. Various factors, such as the mevalonate (MVA) and sulphur-transfer pathways, play pivotal roles in the regulation of ferroptosis. Ferroptosis plays an unneglectable role in regulating the growth and proliferation of some types of tumour cells, such as lymphocytoma, ductal cell cancer of the pancreas, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we will first introduce the discovery of and research pertaining to ferroptosis; then summarize the induction mechanisms and regulatory pathways of ferroptosis; and finally, further elucidate the roles of ferroptosis in human tumourous diseases.

  16. Improved cytotoxic effects of Salmonella-producing cytosine deaminase in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Camacho, Eva María; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the cytotoxic activity of a Salmonella strain carrying a salicylate-inducible expression system that controls cytosine deaminase production, we have modified both, the vector and the producer bacterium. First, the translation rates of the expression module containing the Escherichia coli codA gene cloned under the control of the Pm promoter have been improved by using the T7 phage gene 10 ribosome binding site sequence and replacing the original GUG start codon by AUG. Second, to increase the time span in which cytosine deaminase may be produced by the bacteria in the presence of 5-fluorocytosine, a 5-fluorouracyl resistant Salmonella strain has been constructed by deleting its upp gene sequence. This new Salmonella strain shows increased cytosine deaminase activity and, after infecting tumour cell cultures, increased cytotoxic and bystander effects under standard induction conditions. In addition, we have generated a purD mutation in the producer strain to control its intracellular proliferation by the presence of adenine and avoid the intrinsic Salmonella cell death induction. This strategy allows the analysis and comparison of the cytotoxic effects of cytosine deaminase produced by different Salmonella strains in tumour cell cultures.

  17. Inflammatory pseudotumour-like follicular dendritic cell tumour of the spleen

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Raisuke; Baba, Satoshi; Watahiki, Yoichi; Maruo, Hirotoshi

    2015-01-01

    We describe an unusual case of a 73-year-old woman presenting with a solitary splenic mass 8 cm in diameter and an elevation of serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor level. The preoperative diagnosis was primary malignant lymphoma of the spleen. Splenectomy was conducted. Histological analysis confirmed an inflammatory pseudotumour-like follicular dendritic cell tumour that showed different clinicopathological features from those of the classic follicular dendritic cell tumour. Only 33 cases of inflammatory pseudotumour-like follicular dendritic cell tumour have so far been reported. We discuss the incidence, presentation and management of this rare disease. PMID:25766434

  18. Numerical Solutions for a Model of Tissue Invasion and Migration of Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kolev, M.; Zubik-Kowal, B.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to construct a new algorithm for the numerical simulations of the evolution of tumour invasion and metastasis. By means of mathematical model equations and their numerical solutions we investigate how cancer cells can produce and secrete matrix degradative enzymes, degrade extracellular matrix, and invade due to diffusion and haptotactic migration. For the numerical simulations of the interactions between the tumour cells and the surrounding tissue, we apply numerical approximations, which are spectrally accurate and based on small amounts of grid-points. Our numerical experiments illustrate the metastatic ability of tumour cells. PMID:21331265

  19. Significance and therapeutic implications of endothelial progenitor cells in angiogenic-mediated tumour metastasis.

    PubMed

    Flamini, Valentina; Jiang, Wen G; Lane, Jane; Cui, Yu-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Cancer conveys profound social and economic consequences throughout the world. Metastasis is responsible for approximately 90% of cancer-associated mortality and, when it occurs, cancer becomes almost incurable. During metastatic dissemination, cancer cells pass through a series of complex steps including the establishment of tumour-associated angiogenesis. The human endothelial progenitor cells (hEPCs) are a cell population derived from the bone marrow which are required for endothelial tubulogenesis and neovascularization. They also express abundant inflammatory cytokines and paracrine angiogenic factors. Clinically hEPCs are highly correlated with relapse, disease progression, metastasis and treatment response in malignancies such as breast cancer, ovarian cancer and non-small-cell lung carcinoma. It has become evident that the hEPCs are involved in the angiogenesis-required progression and metastasis of tumours. However, it is not clear in what way the signalling pathways, controlling the normal cellular function of human BM-derived EPCs, are hijacked by aggressive tumour cells to facilitate tumour metastasis. In addition, the actual roles of hEPCs in tumour angiogenesis-mediated metastasis are not well characterised. In this paper we reviewed the clinical relevance of the hEPCs with cancer diagnosis, progression and prognosis. We further summarised the effects of tumour microenvironment on the hEPCs and underlying mechanisms. We also hypothesized the roles of altered hEPCs in tumour angiogenesis and metastasis. We hope this review may enhance our understanding of the interaction between hEPCs and tumour cells thus aiding the development of cellular-targeted anti-tumour therapies.

  20. Cellular immortality in brain tumours: an integration of the cancer stem cell paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ruman; Heath, Rachel; Grundy, Richard

    2009-04-01

    Brain tumours are a diverse group of neoplasms that continue to present a formidable challenge in our attempt to achieve curable intervention. Our conceptual framework of human brain cancer has been redrawn in the current decade. There is a gathering acceptance that brain tumour formation is a phenotypic outcome of dysregulated neurogenesis, with tumours viewed as abnormally differentiated neural tissue. In relation, there is accumulating evidence that brain tumours, similar to leukaemia and many solid tumours, are organized as a developmental hierarchy which is maintained by a small fraction of cells endowed with many shared properties of tissue stem cells. Proof that neurogenesis persists throughout adult life, compliments this concept. Although the cancer cell of origin is unclear, the proliferative zones that harbour stem cells in the embryonic, post-natal and adult brain are attractive candidates within which tumour-initiation may ensue. Dysregulated, unlimited proliferation and an ability to bypass senescence are acquired capabilities of cancerous cells. These abilities in part require the establishment of a telomere maintenance mechanism for counteracting the shortening of chromosomal termini. A strategy based upon the synthesis of telomeric repeat sequences by the ribonucleoprotein telomerase, is prevalent in approximately 90% of human tumours studied, including the majority of brain tumours. This review will provide a developmental perspective with respect to normal (neurogenesis) and aberrant (tumourigenesis) cellular turnover, differentiation and function. Within this context our current knowledge of brain tumour telomere/telomerase biology will be discussed with respect to both its developmental and therapeutic relevance to the hierarchical model of brain tumourigenesis presented by the cancer stem cell paradigm.

  1. Duck lymphocytes. VIII. T-lymphoblastoid cell lines from reticuloendotheliosis virus-induced tumours.

    PubMed

    Chan, S W; Bando, Y; Warr, G W; Middleton, D L; Higgins, D A

    1999-04-01

    The T strain of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV-T) obtained, along with the helper chicken syncytia virus (CSV), from the CSO4 cell line was highly oncogenic and rapidly fatal in ducks. Tumours were mainly seen in spleen, but neoplastic cells were observed microscopically in many organs. In vitro REV transformation of duck lymphocytes failed to yield stable cell lines, so cells from organs (blood, bone marrow, spleen, lymph node, bursa of Fabricius) of infected birds were used to establish cell lines. Some of these cell lines have been cloned. The success rates of establishment and cloning were increased if cells were cultured in a range of media containing different supplements; however, medium containing 5% foetal calf serum (FCS) and 5% duck serum was generally most efficacious for initial establishment, while spent medium from the parental line supplemented with a further 20% FCS gave best results for cloning. Cloned cell lines had the morphology of lymphoblastoid cells, with irregular nuclei and diffuse chromatin. Analysis of mRNA extracted from these cell lines showed that the uncloned lines were strongly expressing the β chain of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and weakly expressing immunoglobulin (Ig) polypeptides [λ light chain and μ, υ, υ (ΔFc) and α heavy chains in various proportions], suggesting the presence of T and B cells. The cloned cell lines that could be classified were TCR β+ ve T cells. This is the first report of the establishment, cloning and partial characterization of duck lymphoblastoid cell lines.

  2. Candidate tumour suppressor Fau regulates apoptosis in human cells: an essential role for Bcl-G.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Mark R; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Williams, Gwyn T

    2011-09-01

    FAU, which encodes a ubiquitin-like protein (termed FUBI) with ribosomal protein S30 as a carboxy-terminal extension, has recently been identified as a pro-apoptotic regulatory gene. This activity may be mediated by Bcl-G (a pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family) which can be covalently modified by FUBI. FAU gene expression has been shown to be down-regulated in human breast, prostate and ovarian tumours, and this down-regulation is strongly associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. We demonstrate here that ectopic FAU expression increases basal apoptosis in human T-cell lines and 293T/17 cells, whereas it has only a transient stimulatory effect on ultraviolet-C (UVC)-induced apoptosis. Conversely, siRNA-mediated silencing of FAU gene expression has no effect on basal apoptosis, but attenuates UV-induced apoptosis. Importantly, prior knockdown of Bcl-G expression ablates the stimulation of basal apoptosis by FAU, consistent with an essential downstream role for Bcl-G, itself a candidate tumour suppressor, in mediating the apoptosis regulatory role of FAU. In 293T/17 cells, Bcl-G knockdown also attenuates UV-induced apoptosis, so that Bcl-G may constitute a common factor in the pathways by which both FAU and UV-irradiation induce apoptosis. UV irradiation increases Bcl-G mRNA levels, providing an explanation for the transient nature of the effect of ectopic FAU expression on UV-induced apoptosis. Since failure of apoptosis is fundamental to the development of many cancers, the pro-apoptotic activity of the Fau/Bcl-G pathway offers an attractive explanation for the putative tumour suppressor role of FAU.

  3. In vitro immunopotentiating properties and tumour cell toxicity induced by Lophophora williamsii (peyote) cactus methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Franco-Molina, M; Gomez-Flores, R; Tamez-Guerra, P; Tamez-Guerra, R; Castillo-Leon, L; Rodríguez-Padilla, C

    2003-11-01

    Lophophora williamsii, also known as peyote, is found primarily in dry regions from Central Mexico, including the Mexican States of Nayarit, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas, Nuevo León, Chihuahua, Coahuila and Tamaulipas, to Texas particularly in regions along Rio Grande. Peyote extracts have been associated with stimulating the central nervous system and regulating blood pressure, sleep, hunger and thirst. However, there is no evidence of any effect of peyote on the immune system or against tumour cell growth. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effects of peyote methanolic extracts on some parameters of mouse and human leukocyte immunocompetence and tumour cell growth. Peyote extract (0.18-18 micro g/mL) activated nitric oxide production by murine macrophages, and stimulated up to 2.4-fold proliferation of murine thymic lymphocytes. In addition, peyote extract induced up to 1.85-, 2.29- and 1.89-fold increases in mRNA signal of IL-1, IL-6 and IL-8 by human leukocytes. Also examined were the effects of peyote extracts on murine lymphoma L5178Y-R and fi broblastoma L929, and human myeloid U937 and mammary gland MCF7 tumour cell growth using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). Peyote extracts were toxic for MCF7, L5178Y-R, U937 and L929 (18 mg/mL peyote extract caused 1.3%, 8%, 45% and 60% viability respectively) cell lines.

  4. Betulin elicits anti-cancer effects in tumour primary cultures and cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rzeski, Wojciech; Stepulak, Andrzej; Szymański, Marek; Juszczak, Małgorzata; Grabarska, Aneta; Sifringer, Marco; Kaczor, Józef; Kandefer-Szerszeń, Martyna

    2009-12-01

    Betulin is a pentacyclic triterpene found in many plant species, among others, in white birch bark. The aim of the study was in vitro characterization of the anticancer activity of betulin in a range of human tumour cell lines (neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma-medulloblastoma, glioma, thyroid, breast, lung and colon carcinoma, leukaemia and multiple myeloma), and in primary tumour cultures isolated from patients (ovarian carcinoma, cervical carcinoma and glioblastoma multiforme). In this study, we demonstrated a remarkable anti-proliferative effect of betulin in all tested tumour cell cultures. Neuroblastoma (SK-N-AS) and colon carcinoma (HT-29) were the most sensitive to the anti-proliferative effect of betulin. Furthermore, betulin altered tumour cells morphology, decreased their motility and induced apoptotic cell death. These findings demonstrate the anti-cancer potential of betulin and suggest that they may be applied as an adjunctive measure in cancer treatment.

  5. Postoperative Depression of Tumour-directed Cell-mediated Immunity in Patients with Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, A. J.; Spilg, W. G. S.; Mackie, Rona M.; Thomas, Catherine E.

    1972-01-01

    Leucocytes from 46 melanoma patients, 45 breast carcinoma patients, and 95 control donors were tested by the leucocyte migration test against the supernatants of homogenates of malignant melanomas, breast carcinomas, simple breast tumours, and breasts showing simple cystic disease. By comparison with controls inhibition of migration occurred significantly more frequently when tumour patients' leucocytes were exposed to extracts of histogenetically similar tumours. Cell-mediated immunity to tumour-associated antigens was measured in 12 patients with breast carcinoma and 12 with malignant melanoma immediately before surgical operation and in the postoperative period. All patients tested before operation showed significant inhibition of migration on contact with extracts of histogenetically similar tumours. Postoperatively the degree of leucocyte migration inhibition was reduced in all patients with melanoma and breast carcinoma. Significant inhibition of leucocyte migration returned in most patients 6-22 days after operation. PMID:5077468

  6. Modelling Circulating Tumour Cells for Personalised Survival Prediction in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ductal carcinoma is one of the most common cancers among women, and the main cause of death is the formation of metastases. The development of metastases is caused by cancer cells that migrate from the primary tumour site (the mammary duct) through the blood vessels and extravasating they initiate metastasis. Here, we propose a multi-compartment model which mimics the dynamics of tumoural cells in the mammary duct, in the circulatory system and in the bone. Through a branching process model, we describe the relation between the survival times and the four markers mainly involved in metastatic breast cancer (EPCAM, CD47, CD44 and MET). In particular, the model takes into account the gene expression profile of circulating tumour cells to predict personalised survival probability. We also include the administration of drugs as bisphosphonates, which reduce the formation of circulating tumour cells and their survival in the blood vessels, in order to analyse the dynamic changes induced by the therapy. We analyse the effects of circulating tumour cells on the progression of the disease providing a quantitative measure of the cell driver mutations needed for invading the bone tissue. Our model allows to design intervention scenarios that alter the patient-specific survival probability by modifying the populations of circulating tumour cells and it could be extended to other cancer metastasis dynamics. PMID:25978366

  7. Endometrial polypoid adenomyomatosis in a bitch with ovarian granulosa cell tumour and pyometra.

    PubMed

    Zanghì, A; Catone, G; Marino, G; Quartuccio, M; Nicòtina, P A

    2007-01-01

    Endometrial polypoid adenomyomatosis in an 8-year-old German shepherd bitch is described. The lesion was associated with ovarian granulosa cell tumour and pyometra; grossly, it consisted of sessile or pedunculated processes with both epithelial and non-epithelial components, in which smooth muscle cells were predominant. The endometrium was diffusely atrophic and showed multifocal squamous metaplasia. The findings are discussed as possible consequences of the functioning ovarian tumour and pyometra, but an involvement of growth factors is also proposed.

  8. Human tumour antigens defined by cytotoxicity and proliferative responses of cultured lymphoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vose, Brent M.; Bonnard, Guy D.

    1982-03-01

    The long-term goal of many laboratories has been to develop cellular reagents having specific reactivity against human tumour cells. Such immune cells should prove useful for defining the antigenicity of human malignancies and may have important therapeutic potential, as has been clearly shown in some animal models1. Here we describe methods of initiating continued lymphocyte cultures (CLC) having specific anti-tumour reactivity using conditioned media containing interleukin-2 (IL-2).

  9. Method validation of circulating tumour cell enumeration at low cell counts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Circulating tumour cells (CTC) are receiving increasing attention as prognostic, predictive and pharmacodynamic biomarkers in cancer patients. However, their clinical significance can be dependent on an accurate determination of CTC around cut-off values at low cell counts (<10 cells/7.5 ml). Consequently, we have conducted method validation of the CellSearch™ system focusing on clinical samples containing CTC in the cut-off region. Methods Analytical accuracy was first assessed employing quality controls (QC) and spiked healthy volunteer blood specimens. Results were analysed by β-expectation tolerance intervals (BETI). Inter-operator error (6 different readers) was then characterised in 38 different patient samples, 68% of which had ≤5 CTC and data were analysed by β-content γ-confidence tolerance intervals (BCTI). Results Results from QCs and spiked blood confirmed a 3-4-fold higher degree of imprecision at the low (48 cells, BETI = + 0.288/-0.345, β = 95%) compared to the high QC (987 cells, BETI = +0.065/-0.140, β = 95%). However, when data for individual analysts were interrogated characteristic systematic errors were detected. In the analysis of patient samples again individual analysts introduced a highly specific error into the interpretation of CTC images, which correlated to the level of training and experience. When readers were selected based on BETI and BCTI results, the high level of between-operator error (up to 170%) observed at CTC of ≤ 5 was reduced to < 30%. Conclusions Inter-operator variability in enumeration of CTC at low cell counts can be considerable, but is also potentially avoidable by following simple guidance steps. PMID:24024881

  10. LINE-1 induces hTERT and ensures telomere maintenance in tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Aschacher, T; Wolf, B; Enzmann, F; Kienzl, P; Messner, B; Sampl, S; Svoboda, M; Mechtcheriakova, D; Holzmann, K; Bergmann, M

    2016-01-07

    A hallmark of cancer cells is an activated telomere maintenance mechanism, which allows prolonged survival of the malignant cells. In more than 80% of tumours, telomeres are elongated by the enzyme telomerase, which adds de novo telomere repeats to the ends of chromosomes. Cancer cells are also characterized by expression of active LINE-1 elements (L1s, long interspersed nuclear elements-1). L1 elements are abundant retrotransposons in the eukaryotic genome that are primarily known for facilitating aberrant recombination. Using L1-knockdown (KD), we show for the first time that L1 is critical for telomere maintenance in telomerase-positive tumour cells. The reduced length of telomeres in the L1-KD-treated cells correlated with an increased rate of telomere dysfunction foci, a reduced expression of shelterin proteins and an increased rate of anaphase bridges. The decreased telomere length was associated with a decreased telomerase activity and decreased telomerase mRNA level; the latter was increased upon L1 overexpression. L1-KD also led to a decrease in mRNA and protein expression of cMyc and KLF-4, two main transcription factors of telomerase and altered mRNA levels of other stem-cell-associated proteins such as CD44 and hMyb, as well as a corresponding reduced growth of spheroids. The KD of KLF-4 or cMyc decreased the level of L1-ORF1 mRNA, suggesting a specific reciprocal regulation with L1. Thus, our findings contribute to the understanding of L1 as a pathogenicity factor in cancer cells. As L1 is only expressed in pathophysiological conditions, L1 now appears to be target in the rational treatment of telomerase-positive cancer.

  11. Mitogen-activated Tasmanian devil blood mononuclear cells kill devil facial tumour disease cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Tovar, Cesar; Cooray, Anne A; Kreiss, Alexandre; Darby, Jocelyn; Murphy, James M; Corcoran, Lynn M; Bettiol, Silvana S; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2016-08-01

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is a transmissible cancer that has brought the host species, the Tasmanian devil, to the brink of extinction. The cancer cells avoid allogeneic immune recognition by downregulating cell surface major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I expression. This should prevent CD8(+) T cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, cytotoxicity. The reason why NK cells, normally reactive to MHC-negative cells, are not activated to kill DFTD cells has not been determined. The immune response of wild devils to DFTD, if it occurs, is uncharacterised. To investigate this, we tested 12 wild devils with DFTD, and found suggestive evidence of low levels of antibodies against DFTD cells in one devil. Eight of these devils were also analysed for cytotoxicity, however, none showed evidence for cytotoxicity against cultured DFTD cells. To establish whether mimicking activation of antitumour responses could induce cytotoxic activity against DFTD, Tasmanian devil peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were treated with either the mitogen Concanavalin A, the Toll-like receptor agonist polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid or recombinant Tasmanian devil IL-2. All induced the PBMC cells to kill cultured DFTD cells, suggesting that activation does not occur after encounter with DFTD cells in vivo, but can be induced. The identification of agents that activate cytotoxicity against DFTD target cells is critical for developing strategies to protect against DFTD. Such agents could function as adjuvants to induce functional immune responses capable of targeting DFTD cells and tumours in vivo.

  12. Tumour stromal cells derived from paediatric malignancies display MSC-like properties and impair NK cell cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Tumour growth and metastatic infiltration are favoured by several components of the tumour microenvironment. Bone marrow-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are known to contribute to the tumour stroma. When isolated from healthy bone marrow, MSC exert potent antiproliferative effects on immune effector cells. Due to phenotypic and morphological similarities of MSC and tumour stromal cells (TStrC), we speculated that immunotherapeutic approaches may be hampered if TStrC may still exhibit immunomodulatory properties of MSC. Methods In order to compare immunomodulatory properties of MSC and tumour stromal cells (TStrC), we established and analyzed TStrC cultures from eleven paediatric tumours and MSC preparations from bone marrow aspirates. Immunophenotyping, proliferation assays and NK cell cytotoxicity assays were employed to address the issue. Results While TStrC differed from MSC in terms of plasticity, they shared surface expression of CD105, CD73 and other markers used for MSC characterization. Furthermore, TStrC displayed a strong antiproliferative effect on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in coculture experiments similar to MSC. NK cell cytotoxicity was significantly impaired after co-culture with TStrC and expression of the activating NK cell receptors NKp44 and NKp46 was reduced. Conclusions Our data show that TStrC and MSC share important phenotypic and functional characteristics. The inhibitory effect of TStrC on PBMC and especially on NK cells may facilitate the immune evasion of paediatric tumours. PMID:20858262

  13. Plumbagin alters telomere dynamics, induces DNA damage and cell death in human brain tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Khaw, Aik Kia; Sameni, Safoura; Venkatesan, Shriram; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Hande, M Prakash

    2015-11-01

    Natural plant products may possess much potential in palliative therapy and supportive strategies of current cancer treatments with lesser cytotoxicity to normal cells compared to conventional chemotherapy. In the current study, anti-cancer properties of plumbagin, a plant-derived naphthoquinone, on brain cancer cells were determined. Plumbagin treatment resulted in the induction of DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis, followed by suppression of the colony forming ability of the brain tumour cells. These effects were substantiated by upregulation of PTEN, TNFRSF1A and downregulation of E2F1 genes, along with a drop in MDM2, cyclin B1, survivin and BCL2 protein expression. Plumbagin induced elevated levels of caspase-3/7 activity as well. For the first time, we show here that plumbagin inhibits telomerase in brain tumour cells and results in telomere shortening following chronic long-term treatment. This observation implies considerable cytotoxicity of plumbagin towards cancer cells with higher telomerase activity. Collectively, our findings suggest plumbagin as a potential chemotherapeutic phytochemical in brain tumour treatment modalities.

  14. Tumour-experienced T cells promote NK cell activity through trogocytosis of NKG2D and NKp46 ligands

    PubMed Central

    Domaica, Carolina I; Fuertes, Mercedes B; Rossi, Lucas E; Girart, María V; Ávila, Damián E; Rabinovich, Gabriel A; Zwirner, Norberto W

    2009-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells trigger cytotoxicity and interferon (IFN)-γ secretion on engagement of the natural-killer group (NKG)2D receptor or members of the natural cytotoxicity receptor (NCR) family, such as NKp46, by ligands expressed on tumour cells. However, it remains unknown whether T cells can regulate NK cell-mediated anti-tumour responses. Here, we investigated the early events occurring during T cell–tumour cell interactions, and their impact on NK cell functions. We observed that on co-culture with some melanomas, activated CD4+ T cells promoted degranulation, and NKG2D- and NKp46-dependent IFN-γ secretion by NK cells, probably owing to the capture of NKG2D and NKp46 ligands from the tumour-cell surface (trogocytosis). This effect was observed in CD4+, CD8+ and resting T cells, which showed substantial amounts of cell surface major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related protein A on co-culture with tumour cells. Our findings identify a new, so far, unrecognized mechanism by which effector T cells support NK cell function through the capture of specific tumour ligands with profound implications at the crossroad of innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:19498463

  15. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy induces transient clinical response in advanced rat fibrosarcoma - comparison with preventive anti-tumour vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kucera, A; Pýcha, K; Pajer, P; Spísek, R; Skába, R

    2009-01-01

    In this study we present the models of preventive and therapeutic vaccination of sarcoma-bearing rats with dendritic cells that present tumour antigens from killed tumour cells. We present the characteristics of dendritic cell-based vaccine and its capacity to induce anti-tumour immune response both in vitro and in vivo. We show that preventive vaccination efficiently prevents tumour growth. On the other hand, vaccination of rats with established tumours did not lead to eradication of the tumours. Despite the induction of a vigorous immune response after administration of dendritic cell-based vaccine and transient decrease in tumour progression, tumours eventually resumed their growth and animals vaccinated with dendritic cells succumbed to cancer. In both settings, preventive and therapeutic, dendritic cell-based vaccination induced a vigorous tumour-specific T-cell response. These results argue for the timing of cancer immunotherapy to the stages of low tumour load. Immunotherapy initiated at the stage of minimal residual disease, after reduction of tumour load by other modalities, will have much better chance to offer a clinical benefit to cancer patients than the immunotherapy at the stage of metastatic disease.

  16. The contribution of lactic acid to acidification of tumours: studies of variant cells lacking lactate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Yamagata, M.; Hasuda, K.; Stamato, T.; Tannock, I. F.

    1998-01-01

    Solid tumours develop an acidic extracellular environment with high concentration of lactic acid, and lactic acid produced by glycolysis has been assumed to be the major cause of tumour acidity. Experiments using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-deficient ras-transfected Chinese hamster ovarian cells have been undertaken to address directly the hypothesis that lactic acid production is responsible for tumour acidification. The variant cells produce negligible quantities of lactic acid and consume minimal amounts of glucose compared with parental cells. Lactate-producing parental cells acidified lightly-buffered medium but variant cells did not. Tumours derived from parental and variant cells implanted into nude mice were found to have mean values of extracellular pH (pHe) of 7.03 +/- 0.03 and 7.03 +/- 0.05, respectively, both of which were significantly lower than that of normal muscle (pHe = 7.43 +/- 0.03; P < 0.001). Lactic acid concentration in variant tumours (450 +/- 90 microg g(-1) wet weight) was much lower than that in parental tumours (1880 +/- 140 microg/g(-1)) and similar to that in serum (400 +/- 35 microg/g(-1)). These data show discordance between mean levels of pHe and lactate content in tumours; the results support those of Newell et al (1993) and suggest that the production of lactic acid via glycolysis causes acidification of culture medium, but is not the only mechanism, and is probably not the major mechanism responsible for the development of an acidic environment within solid tumours. PMID:9667639

  17. Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells in Urothelial Cancers and Clinical Correlations: Comparison of Two Methods

    PubMed Central

    Fina, Emanuela; Necchi, Andrea; Bottelli, Stefano; Reduzzi, Carolina; Pizzamiglio, Sara; Iacona, Chiara; Daidone, Maria Grazia

    2017-01-01

    Circulating tumour cells (CTC) are identified exploiting their protein/gene expression patterns or distinct size compared to blood cells. Data on CTC in bladder cancer (BC) are still scarce. We comparatively analyzed CTC enrichment by AdnaTest ProstateCancerSelect (AT) and ScreenCell®Cyto (SC) kits, combined with identification by EPCAM, MUC1, and ERBB2 expression and by cytological criteria, respectively, in 19 nonmetastatic (M0) and 47 metastatic (M+) BC patients, at baseline (T0) and during treatment (T1). At T0, CTC positivity rates by AT were higher in M+ compared to M0 cases (57.4% versus 25%, p = 0.041). EPCAM was detected in 75% of CTC-positive samples by AT, showing increasing expression levels from T0 to T1 (median (interquartile range, IQR): 0.18 (0.07–0.42) versus 0.84 (0.33–1.84), p = 0.005) in M+ cases. Overall, CTC positivity by SC was around 80% regardless of clinical setting and time point of analysis, except for a lower occurrence at T1 in M0 cases. At T0, circulating tumour microemboli were more frequently (25% versus 8%) detected and more numerous in M+ compared to M0 patients. The approach used for CTC detection impacts the outcome of CTC studies. Further investigations are required to clarify the clinical validity of AT and SC in specific BC clinical contexts. PMID:28321147

  18. The tumour suppressor DLC2 ensures mitotic fidelity by coordinating spindle positioning and cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Elisa; Ferreira, Jorge G; Maiato, Helder; Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2014-12-18

    Dividing epithelial cells need to coordinate spindle positioning with shape changes to maintain cell-cell adhesion. Microtubule interactions with the cell cortex regulate mitotic spindle positioning within the plane of division. How the spindle crosstalks with the actin cytoskeleton to ensure faithful mitosis and spindle positioning is unclear. Here we demonstrate that the tumour suppressor DLC2, a negative regulator of Cdc42, and the interacting kinesin Kif1B coordinate cell junction maintenance and planar spindle positioning by regulating microtubule growth and crosstalk with the actin cytoskeleton. Loss of DLC2 induces the mislocalization of Kif1B, increased Cdc42 activity and cortical recruitment of the Cdc42 effector mDia3, a microtubule stabilizer and promoter of actin dynamics. Accordingly, DLC2 or Kif1B depletion promotes microtubule stabilization, defective spindle positioning, chromosome misalignment and aneuploidy. The tumour suppressor DLC2 and Kif1B are thus central components of a signalling network that guides spindle positioning, cell-cell adhesion and mitotic fidelity.

  19. RA-XII inhibits tumour growth and metastasis in breast tumour-bearing mice via reducing cell adhesion and invasion and promoting matrix degradation

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Hoi-Wing; Zhao, Si-Meng; Yue, Grace Gar-Lee; Lee, Julia Kin-Ming; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Tan, Ning-Hua; Lau, Clara Bik-San

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells acquire invasive ability to degrade and adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) and migrate to adjacent tissues. This ultimately results metastasis. Hence, the present study investigated the in vitro effects of cyclopeptide glycoside, RA-XII on cell adhesion, invasion, proliferation and matrix degradation, and its underlying mechanism in murine breast tumour cells, 4T1. The effect of RA-XII on tumour growth and metastasis in 4T1-bearing mice was also investigated. Our results showed that RA-XII inhibited tumour cell adhesion to collagen, fibronectin and laminin, RA-XII also reduced the expressions of vascular cell adhesion molecule, intracellular adhesion molecule and integrins, and integrin binding. In addition, RA-XII significantly inhibited breast tumour cell migration via interfering cofilin signaling and chemokine receptors. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and urokinase-type of plasminogen activator, and the expressions of ECM-associated proteinases were attenuated significantly by RA-XII. Furthermore, RA-XII induced G1 phase arrest and inhibited the expressions of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases. RA-XII inhibited the expressions of molecules in PI3K/AKT, NF-kappaB, FAK/pSRC, MAPK and EGFR signaling. RA-XII was also shown to have anti-tumour, anti-angiogenic and anti-metastatic activities in metastatic breast tumour-bearing mice. These findings strongly suggested that RA-XII is a potential anti-metastatic agent for breast cancer. PMID:26592552

  20. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G. R.; Cowan, M.; Davies, J.; Brookes, K.; Billstrom, M.; Buchan, A.

    1988-01-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer. PMID:2846027

  1. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Cowan, M; Davies, J; Brookes, K; Billstrom, M; Buchan, A

    1988-08-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer.

  2. Tumour-associated mast cells in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma: correlation with histological subtype, other tumour-infiltrating inflammatory cell subsets and outcome.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Maja D; Kamper, Peter; Nielsen, Patricia S; Bendix, Knud; Riber-Hansen, Rikke; Steiniche, Torben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Clausen, Michael; d'Amore, Francesco

    2016-03-01

    The tumour microenvironment in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is characterised by a minor population of neoplastic Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells within a heterogeneous background of non-neoplastic bystanders cells, including mast cells. The number of infiltrating mast cells in cHL has been reported to correlate with poor prognosis. We used immunohistochemistry to assess the degree of tumour-infiltrating mast cells in cHL tissue microarrays and correlated this with clinico-pathological features and prognosis in a cohort of homogeneously treated patients with Hodgkin's disease. A high degree of tumour mast cells was associated with nodular sclerosis (NS) subtype histology (P = 0.0002). Moreover, the number of mast cells was inversely correlated with the numbers of CD68+ and CD163+ macrophages (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.003, respectively) and with the number of granzyme+ cytotoxic cells (P = 0.004). The degree of mast cell infiltration was not a prognostic factor in cHL of nodular sclerosis subtype. In contrast, in mixed cellularity cHL a high number of intratumoral mast cells correlated with significantly poorer outcome both in terms of overall (P = 0.03) and event-free survival (P = 0.01). Further studies are warranted into the biological mechanisms underlying this adverse outcome and their possible therapeutic implications.

  3. Graded Foxo1 activity in Treg cells differentiates tumour immunity from spontaneous autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Chong T; Liao, Will; Dadi, Saida; Toure, Ahmed; Li, Ming O

    2016-01-28

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells expressing the transcription factor Foxp3 have a pivotal role in maintaining immunological self-tolerance; yet, excessive Treg cell activities suppress anti-tumour immune responses. Compared to the resting Treg (rTreg) cell phenotype in secondary lymphoid organs, Treg cells in non-lymphoid tissues exhibit an activated Treg (aTreg) cell phenotype. However, the function of aTreg cells and whether their generation can be manipulated are largely unexplored. Here we show that the transcription factor Foxo1, previously demonstrated to promote Treg cell suppression of lymphoproliferative diseases, has an unexpected function in inhibiting aTreg-cell-mediated immune tolerance in mice. We find that aTreg cells turned over at a slower rate than rTreg cells, but were not locally maintained in tissues. aTreg cell differentiation was associated with repression of Foxo1-dependent gene transcription, concomitant with reduced Foxo1 expression, cytoplasmic localization and enhanced phosphorylation at the Akt sites. Treg-cell-specific expression of an Akt-insensitive Foxo1 mutant prevented downregulation of lymphoid organ homing molecules, and impeded Treg cell homing to non-lymphoid organs, causing CD8(+) T-cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. Compared to Treg cells from healthy tissues, tumour-infiltrating Treg cells downregulated Foxo1 target genes more substantially. Expression of the Foxo1 mutant at a lower dose was sufficient to deplete tumour-associated Treg cells, activate effector CD8(+) T cells, and inhibit tumour growth without inflicting autoimmunity. Thus, Foxo1 inactivation is essential for the migration of aTreg cells that have a crucial function in suppressing CD8(+) T-cell responses; and the Foxo signalling pathway in Treg cells can be titrated to break tumour immune tolerance preferentially.

  4. Soluble factors regulated by epithelial-mesenchymal transition mediate tumour angiogenesis and myeloid cell recruitment.

    PubMed

    Suarez-Carmona, Meggy; Bourcy, Morgane; Lesage, Julien; Leroi, Natacha; Syne, Laïdya; Blacher, Silvia; Hubert, Pascale; Erpicum, Charlotte; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Delvenne, Philippe; Birembaut, Philippe; Noël, Agnès; Polette, Myriam; Gilles, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programmes provide cancer cells with invasive and survival capacities that might favour metastatic dissemination. Whilst signalling cascades triggering EMT have been extensively studied, the impact of EMT on the crosstalk between tumour cells and the tumour microenvironment remains elusive. We aimed to identify EMT-regulated soluble factors that facilitate the recruitment of host cells in the tumour. Our findings indicate that EMT phenotypes relate to the induction of a panel of secreted mediators, namely IL-8, IL-6, sICAM-1, PAI-1 and GM-CSF, and implicate the EMT-transcription factor Snail as a regulator of this process. We further show that EMT-derived soluble factors are pro-angiogenic in vivo (in the mouse ear sponge assay), ex vivo (in the rat aortic ring assay) and in vitro (in a chemotaxis assay). Additionally, conditioned medium from EMT-positive cells stimulates the recruitment of myeloid cells. In a bank of 40 triple-negative breast cancers, tumours presenting features of EMT were significantly more angiogenic and infiltrated by a higher quantity of myeloid cells compared to tumours with little or no EMT. Taken together, our results show that EMT programmes trigger the expression of soluble mediators in cancer cells that stimulate angiogenesis and recruit myeloid cells in vivo, which might in turn favour cancer spread.

  5. Human DESC1 serine protease confers tumorigenic properties to MDCK cells and it is upregulated in tumours of different origin

    PubMed Central

    Viloria, C G; Peinado, J R; Astudillo, A; García-Suárez, O; González, M V; Suárez, C; Cal, S

    2007-01-01

    Proteolysis of the extracellular matrix components plays a crucial role in the regulation of the cellular and physiological processes, and different pathologies have been associated with the loss or gain of function of proteolytic enzymes. DESC1 (differentially expressed in squamous cell carcinoma gene 1), a member of the TTSP (type II transmembrane serine protease) family of serine proteases, is an epithelial-specific enzyme that has been found downregulated in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck region. We describe new properties of DESC1 suggesting that this protease may be involved in the progression of some type of tumours. Thus, this enzyme hydrolyses some extracellular matrix components, such as fibronectin, gelatin or fibrinogen. Moreover, Madin–Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells expressing exogenous human DESC1 acquire properties associated with tumour growth such as enhanced motility and an increase of tubular forms in a 3D collagen lattice following HGF treatment. Finally, we generated polyclonal anti-DESC1 antibodies and immunohistochemical analysis in tissues different from head and neck region indicated that this protease was overexpressed in tumours of diverse origins. Taken together, our results suggest that DESC1 could be considered as a potential therapeutic target in some type of tumours. PMID:17579619

  6. Silencing of hypoxia inducible factor-1α by RNA interference inhibits growth of SK-NEP-1 Wilms tumour cells in vitro, and suppresses tumourigenesis and angiogenesis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shi, Bo; Li, Ying; Wang, Xiuli; Yang, Yi; Li, Dan; Liu, Xin; Yang, Xianghong

    2016-06-01

    Wilms tumour is the most common tumour of the pediatric kidney. Elevation of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) has been detected in 93% to 100% of human Wilms tumour specimens, suggesting a potential value of HIF-1α as a therapeutic target for Wilms tumour. In the present study, a stable HIF-1α-silenced Wilms tumour cell strain was established by introducing HIF-1α short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) into SK-NEP-1 cells. Silencing of HIF-1α significantly reduced single-cell growth capacity, suppressed proliferation and arrested cell cycle of SK-NEP-1 cells. In addition, reduction of HIF-1α expression induced apoptosis in SK-NEP-1 cells, which was accompanied by increased levels of cleaved caspase-3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and Bax as well as downregulation of Bcl-2 in the cells. Furthermore, when inoculated subcutaneously in nude mice, HIF-1α-silenced SK-NEP-1 cells displayed retarded tumour growth and impaired tumour angiogenesis. In summary, the findings of this study suggest that HIF-1α plays a critical role in the development of Wilms tumour, and it may serve as a candidate target of gene therapy for Wilms tumour.

  7. Interleukin-10 promotes B16-melanoma growth by inhibition of macrophage functions and induction of tumour and vascular cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    García-Hernández, M L; Hernández-Pando, R; Gariglio, P; Berumen, J

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms by which interleukin-10 (IL-10) induces tumour growth in a mouse-melanoma model. A B16-melanoma cell line (B16-0) was transfected with IL-10 cDNA and three clones that secreted high (B16-10), medium and low amounts of IL-10 were selected. Cell proliferation and IL-10 production were compared in vitro, and tumour growth, percentages of necrotic areas, tumour cells positive for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) and major histocompatibility complex type I (MHC-I) and II (MHC-II), as well as infiltration of macrophages, CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes and blood vessels were compared in vivo among IL-10-transfected and non-transfected tumours. Proliferation and tumour growth were greater for IL-10-transfected than for non-transfected cells (P < 0·001), and correlated with IL-10 concentration (r ≥ 0·79, P < 0·006). Percentages of tumour cells positive for PCNA and IL-10R were 4·4- and 16·7-fold higher, respectively, in B16-10 than in B16-0 tumours (P < 0·001). Macrophage distribution changed from a diffuse pattern in non-transfected (6·4 ± 1·7%) to a peripheral pattern in IL-10-transfected (3·8 ± 1·7%) tumours. The percentage of CD4+ lymphocytes was 7·6 times higher in B16-10 than in B16-0 tumours (P = 0·002). The expression of MHC-I molecules was present in all B16-0 tumour cells and completely negative in B16–10 tumour cells. In B16-0 tumours, 89 ± 4% of the whole tumour area was necrotic, whereas tumours produced by B16-10 cells showed only 4·3 ± 6% of necrotic areas. IL-10-transfected tumours had 17-fold more blood vessels than non-transfected tumours (61·8 ± 8% versus 3·5 ± 1·7% blood vessels/tumour; P < 0·001). All the effects induced by IL-10 were prevented in mice treated with a neutralizing anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. These data indicate that IL-10 could induce tumour growth in this B16-melanoma model by stimulation of tumour-cell proliferation

  8. Glucocorticoid regulation of SLIT/ROBO tumour suppressor genes in the ovarian surface epithelium and ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Rachel E; Fegan, K Scott; Ren, Xia; Hillier, Stephen G; Duncan, W Colin

    2011-01-01

    The three SLIT ligands and their four ROBO receptors have fundamental roles in mammalian development by promoting apoptosis and repulsing aberrant cell migration. SLITs and ROBOs have emerged as candidate tumour suppressor genes whose expression is inhibited in a variety of epithelial tumours. We demonstrated that their expression could be negatively regulated by cortisol in normal ovarian luteal cells. We hypothesised that after ovulation the locally produced cortisol would inhibit SLIT/ROBO expression in the ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) to facilitate its repair and that this regulatory pathway was still present, and could be manipulated, in ovarian epithelial cancer cells. Here we examined the expression and regulation of the SLIT/ROBO pathway in OSE, ovarian cancer epithelial cells and ovarian tumour cell lines. Basal SLIT2, SLIT3, ROBO1, ROBO2 and ROBO4 expression was lower in primary cultures of ovarian cancer epithelial cells when compared to normal OSE (P<0.05) and in poorly differentiated SKOV-3 cells compared to the more differentiated PEO-14 cells (P<0.05). Cortisol reduced the expression of certain SLITs and ROBOs in normal OSE and PEO-14 cells (P<0.05). Furthermore blocking SLIT/ROBO activity reduced apoptosis in both PEO-14 and SKOV-3 tumour cells (P<0.05). Interestingly SLIT/ROBO expression could be increased by reducing the expression of the glucocorticoid receptor using siRNA (P<0.05). Overall our findings indicate that in the post-ovulatory phase one role of cortisol may be to temporarily inhibit SLIT/ROBO expression to facilitate regeneration of the OSE. Therefore this pathway may be a target to develop strategies to manipulate the SLIT/ROBO system in ovarian cancer.

  9. Short term ex-vivo expansion of circulating head and neck tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Kulasinghe, Arutha; Perry, Chris; Warkiani, Majid E.; Blick, Tony; Davies, Anthony; O'Byrne, Ken; Thompson, Erik W.; Nelson, Colleen C.; Vela, Ian; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive techniques are required for the identification of head and neck cancer (HNC) patients who are at an increased risk of metastasis, or are not responding to therapy. An approach utilised in other solid cancers is the identification and enumeration of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in the peripheral blood of patients. Low numbers of CTCs has been a limiting factor in the HNC field to date. Here we present a methodology to expand HNC patient derived CTCs ex-vivo. As a proof of principle study, 25 advanced stage HNC patient bloods were enriched for circulating tumour cells through negative selection and cultured in 2D and 3D culture environments under hypoxic conditions (2% O2, 5% CO2). CTCs were detected in 14/25 (56%) of patients (ranging from 1–15 CTCs/5 mL blood). Short term CTC cultures were successfully generated in 7/25 advanced stage HNC patients (5/7 of these cultures were from HPV+ patients). Blood samples from which CTC culture was successful had higher CTC counts (p = 0.0002), and were predominantly from HPV+ patients (p = 0.007). This is, to our knowledge, the first pilot study to culture HNC CTCs ex-vivo. Further studies are warranted to determine the use of short term expansion in HNC and the role of HPV in promoting culture success. PMID:27517751

  10. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8) expression associated with cell survival and death in cancer cell lines infected with canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J A; Ferreira, H L; Vieira, F V; Gameiro, R; Andrade, A L; Eugênio, F R; Flores, E F; Cardoso, T C

    2015-09-16

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel strategy for treatment of cancer in humans and companion animals as well. Canine distemper virus (CDV), a paramyxovirus, has proven to be oncolytic through induction of apoptosis in canine-derived tumour cells, yet the mechanism behind this inhibitory action is poorly understood. In this study, three human mammary tumour cell lines and one canine-derived adenofibrosarcoma cell line were tested regarding to their susceptibility to CDV infection, cell proliferation, apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression of tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced protein 8 (TNFAIP8). CDV replication-induced cytopathic effect, decrease of cell proliferation rates, and >45% of infected cells were considered death and/or under late apoptosis/necrosis. TNFAIP8 and CDVM gene expression were positively correlated in all cell lines. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was associated with increase in virus titres (p < 0.005). Thus, these results strongly suggest that both human and canine mammary tumour cells are potential candidates for studies concerning CDV-induced cancer therapy.

  11. Exosome in tumour microenvironment: overview of the crosstalk between normal and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Fernandes, Alexandra R; Baptista, Pedro Viana

    2014-01-01

    Cancer development is a multistep process in which exosomes play important roles. Exosomes are small vesicles formed in vesicular bodies in the endosomal network. The major role of exosomes seems to be the transport of bioactive molecules between cells. Depending on the cell of origin, exosomes are implicated in the regulation of several cellular events, with phenotypic consequences in recipient cells. Cancer derived exosomes (CCEs) are important players in the formation of the tumour microenvironment by (i) enabling the escape of tumour cells to immunological system and help initiating the inflammatory response; (ii) acting in the differentiation of fibroblasts and mesenchymal cells into myofibroblasts; (iii) triggering the angiogenic process; and (iv) enhancing the metastatic evolution of the tumour by promoting epithelial to mesenchymal transformation of tumour cells and by preparing the tumour niche in the new anatomical location. Since the finding that exosomes content resembles that of the cell of origin, they may be regarded as suitable biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, allowing for diagnosis and prognosis via a minimal invasive procedure. Exosome involvement in cancer may open new avenues regarding therapeutics, such as vectors for targeted drug delivery.

  12. Advances in understanding tumour evolution through single-cell sequencing.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jack; Jahn, Katharina; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2017-02-11

    The mutational heterogeneity observed within tumours poses additional challenges to the development of effective cancer treatments. A thorough understanding of a tumour's subclonal composition and its mutational history is essential to open up the design of treatments tailored to individual patients. Comparative studies on a large number of tumours permit the identification of mutational patterns which may refine forecasts of cancer progression, response to treatment and metastatic potential. The composition of tumours is shaped by evolutionary processes. Recent advances in next-generation sequencing offer the possibility to analyse the evolutionary history and accompanying heterogeneity of tumours at an unprecedented resolution, by sequencing single cells. New computational challenges arise when moving from bulk to single-cell sequencing data, leading to the development of novel modelling frameworks. In this review, we present the state of the art methods for understanding the phylogeny encoded in bulk or single-cell sequencing data, and highlight future directions for developing more comprehensive and informative pictures of tumour evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Evolutionary principles - heterogeneity in cancer?, edited by Dr. Robert A. Gatenby.

  13. Characterization of the effector cells in Con A-induced cytotoxicity against HEp 2 tumour targets.

    PubMed

    Pócsik, E; González-Cabello, R; Benedek, K; Perl, A; Láng, I; Gergely, P

    1983-01-01

    Con A-induced cytotoxic activity of human lymphocyte subpopulations obtained by cell fractionation procedures was studied in a test system using human epipharynx carcinoma cells (HEp 2) as targets. Only T lymphocytes were cytotoxic, non-T cells exerted no cytotoxic activity, but enhanced the adherence of the tumour cells. Tnon-G lymphocytes (Fc-receptor negative T cells) were more active than TG cells (Fc-receptor-positive T cells) in mediating the Con A-induced cytotoxic reaction.

  14. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and circulating tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Wikner, Johannes; Gröbe, Alexander; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Due to a lack of substantial improvement in the outcome of patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) during the past decades, current staging methods need to be revised. This disease is associated with poor survival rates despite considerable advances in diagnosis and treatment. The early detection of metastases is an important indicator of survival, prognosis and relapse. Therefore, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying metastasis is crucial. Exploring alternative measures apart from common procedures is needed to identify new prognostic markers. Similar to previous findings predominantly for other solid tumours, recently published studies demonstrate that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) might serve as prognostic markers and could supplement routine staging in OSCC. Thus, the detection of CTCs/DTCs is a promising tool to determine the individual need for therapeutic intervention. Encouraging results and new approaches point to the future use of targeted therapies for OSCC, an exceedingly heterogeneous subgroup of head and neck cancer. This review focuses on summarising technologies currently used to detect CTCs/DTCs. The translational relevance for OSCC is highlighted. The inherent challenges in detecting CTCs/DTCs will be emphasised. PMID:24829858

  15. Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity and circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Wikner, Johannes; Gröbe, Alexander; Pantel, Klaus; Riethdorf, Sabine

    2014-05-10

    Due to a lack of substantial improvement in the outcome of patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) during the past decades, current staging methods need to be revised. This disease is associated with poor survival rates despite considerable advances in diagnosis and treatment. The early detection of metastases is an important indicator of survival, prognosis and relapse. Therefore, a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying metastasis is crucial. Exploring alternative measures apart from common procedures is needed to identify new prognostic markers. Similar to previous findings predominantly for other solid tumours, recently published studies demonstrate that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) and disseminated tumour cells (DTCs) might serve as prognostic markers and could supplement routine staging in OSCC. Thus, the detection of CTCs/DTCs is a promising tool to determine the individual need for therapeutic intervention. Encouraging results and new approaches point to the future use of targeted therapies for OSCC, an exceedingly heterogeneous subgroup of head and neck cancer. This review focuses on summarising technologies currently used to detect CTCs/DTCs. The translational relevance for OSCC is highlighted. The inherent challenges in detecting CTCs/DTCs will be emphasised.

  16. Autografting with CD34+ peripheral blood stem cells: retained engraftment capability and reduced tumour cell content.

    PubMed

    Voso, M T; Hohaus, S; Moos, M; Pförsich, M; Cremer, F W; Schlenk, R F; Martin, S; Hegenbart, U; Goldschmidt, H; Haas, R

    1999-02-01

    The efficacy of an immunomagnetic purging method and the Isolex 300 devices were assessed for selecting CD34+ cells from leukapheresis products of 29 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 39 with multiple myeloma and 34 with breast cancer. The mean purity of the CD34+ cell population was 93.6% and the mean recovery was 67.7%. Following enzymatic cleavage by chymopapain the expression of Thy-1 and Leu-8 was significantly reduced without affecting haematological recovery. The population of selected CD34+ cells of 4/8 patients with follicular lymphoma became PCR-negative. A 2.5 log reduction of tumour cells could be achieved in four patients with multiple myeloma as shown by a quantitative PCR assay. There were no tumour cells detectable in any of the 19 CD34+ cell preparations of patients with breast cancer. In 64 patients who received 94 cycles of high-dose therapy, a mean number of 4.7x 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg were autografted. The time needed for platelet reconstitution was different when a comparison was made with 156 patients, who had received unmanipulated leukapheresis products (10 v 12 d, P = 0.006). No significant differences with regard to neutrophil recovery were noted. Five patients had a graft failure. Two of them died (on day 78 and 88 following PBSCT), and three patients were rescued with unmanipulated back-up transplants. In conclusion, the immunomagnetic selection of CD34+ cells provides autografts with reduced tumour cell content and an engraftment ability similar to that of unmanipulated autografts.

  17. Nestin expression on tumour vessels and tumour-infiltrating macrophages define a poor prognosis subgroup of pt1 clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cros, Jérôme; Sbidian, Emilie; Posseme, Katia; Letierce, Alexia; Guettier, Catherine; Benoît, Gérard; Ferlicot, Sophie

    2016-09-01

    The behaviour of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) is highly unpredictable. Despite adequate initial surgery, 20 to 30 % of patients will develop local recurrence or metastasis during follow-up. Usual clinical and pathology parameters tend to classify most patients in an intermediate prognosis group, and molecular markers to determine prognosis more accurately are needed. A key feature of CCRCC is its abundant vascularization. Factors that upregulate angiogenesis, such as hypoxia and the presence of immune cells including macrophages, also modulate tumour proliferation and metastasis. We studied angiogenesis, as defined by nestin-positive capillaries, and tumour infiltration by macrophages especially in the good prognosis pT1 subgroup of CCRCC. We assessed whether these parameters are associated with metastatic extension and survival in CCRCC. The expression of HIF1α, CAIX, nestin, CD68 and CD163 was assessed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray (TMA) containing tissue samples from 257 consecutive patients with sporadic CCRCC. Factors associated with progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analysed. The presence of nestin-positive tumour vessels was independently associated with shorter PFS in the whole cohort and in the pT1 subgroup. The presence of tumour-infiltrating macrophages was independently associated with shorter OS in the whole cohort and in the pT1 subgroup. The presence of nestin-positive endothelial cells is associated with early relapse, especially in the pT1 subgroup and may help to select patients for antiangiogenic treatment. The presence of tumour-infiltrating M2-type macrophages is a strong predictor of short survival and may be used to adapt treatment strategy.

  18. Dissection of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis for testing gene expression directly ex vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, M.; Hexel, K.; Bucur, M.; Schirrmacher, V.; Umansky, V.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a new methodology which allows the direct analysis ex vivo of tumour cells and host cells (lymphocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells) from a metastasised organ (liver or spleen) at any time point during the metastatic process and without any further in vitro culture. First, we used a tumour cell line transduced with the bacterial gene lacZ, which permits the detection of the procaryotic enzyme beta-galactosidase in eukaryotic cells at the single cell level thus allowing flow adhesion cell sorting (FACS) analysis of tumour cells from metastasised target organs. Second, we established a method for the separation and enrichment of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis with a high viability and reproducibility. As exemplified with the murine lymphoma ESb, this new methodology permits the study of molecules of importance for metastasis or anti-tumour immunity (adhesion, costimulatory and cytotoxic molecules, cytokines, etc.) at the RNA or protein level in tumour and host cells during the whole process of metastasis. This novel approach may open new possibilities of developing strategies for intervention in tumour progression, since it allows the determination of the optimal window in time for successful treatments. The possibility of direct analysis of tumour and host cell properties also provides a new method for the evaluation of the effects of immunisation with tumour vaccines or of gene therapy. Images Figure 3 PMID:8883407

  19. A cell-autonomous tumour suppressor role of RAF1 in hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jeric, Ines; Maurer, Gabriele; Cavallo, Anna Lina; Raguz, Josipa; Desideri, Enrico; Tarkowski, Bartosz; Parrini, Matthias; Fischer, Irmgard; Zatloukal, Kurt; Baccarini, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths, but its molecular heterogeneity hampers the design of targeted therapies. Currently, the only therapeutic option for advanced HCC is Sorafenib, an inhibitor whose targets include RAF. Unexpectedly, RAF1 expression is reduced in human HCC samples. Modelling RAF1 downregulation by RNAi increases the proliferation of human HCC lines in xenografts and in culture; furthermore, RAF1 ablation promotes chemical hepatocarcinogenesis and the proliferation of cultured (pre)malignant mouse hepatocytes. The phenotypes depend on increased YAP1 expression and STAT3 activation, observed in cultured RAF1-deficient cells, in HCC xenografts, and in autochthonous liver tumours. Thus RAF1, although essential for the development of skin and lung tumours, is a negative regulator of hepatocarcinogenesis. This unexpected finding highlights the contribution of the cellular/tissue environment in determining the function of a protein, and underscores the importance of understanding the molecular context of a disease to inform therapy design. PMID:28000790

  20. Sensitive capture of circulating tumour cells by functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Hyeun Joong; Kim, Tae Hyun; Zhang, Zhuo; Azizi, Ebrahim; Pham, Trinh M.; Paoletti, Costanza; Lin, Jules; Ramnath, Nithya; Wicha, Max S.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Simeone, Diane M.; Nagrath, Sunitha

    2013-10-01

    The spread of cancer throughout the body is driven by circulating tumour cells (CTCs). These cells detach from the primary tumour and move from the bloodstream to a new site of subsequent tumour growth. They also carry information about the primary tumour and have the potential to be valuable biomarkers for disease diagnosis and progression, and for the molecular characterization of certain biological properties of the tumour. However, the limited sensitivity and specificity of current methods for measuring and studying these cells in patient blood samples prevents the realization of their full clinical potential. The use of microfluidic devices is a promising method for isolating CTCs. However, the devices are reliant on three-dimensional structures, which limits further characterization and expansion of cells on the chip. Here we demonstrate an effective approach to isolating CTCs from blood samples of pancreatic, breast and lung cancer patients, by using functionalized graphene oxide nanosheets on a patterned gold surface. CTCs were captured with high sensitivity at a low concentration of target cells (73 +/- 32.4% at 3-5 cells per ml blood).

  1. Plasma levels of soluble tumour necrosis factor receptors are increased in coal miners with pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Schins, R P; Borm, P J

    1995-10-01

    Among other cytokines, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is considered to play a key role in the development of mineral dust related fibrosis. Previously, we showed that ex-vivo release of TNF by peripheral blood monocytes is a marker for progression of coal workers' pneumoconiosis (CWP). Since soluble TNF receptors (sTNF-Rs) are believed to play an important regulatory role in systemic effects of TNF, we measured plasma levels of sTNF-R55 and sTNF-R75 in coal miners with (n = 28) or without (n = 76) CWP and in nonexposed controls (n = 29). sTNF-R75 levels were significantly increased in miners with CWP (2.09 +/- 0.44 ng.mL-1) versus the nonexposed controls (1.86 +/- 0.23 ng.mL-1). Neither sTNF-R55 nor sTNF-R75 were related to exposure, stage of pneumoconiosis, smoking, or (spontaneous or ex-vivo induced) monocyte TNF-release. sTNF-R55 was increased in subjects with medication (especially those using cardiovascular drugs); upon exclusion of these subjects, sTNF-R55 was found also to be significantly increased in CWP. In conclusion, bearing in mind a confounding effect of medication, soluble TNF receptors are elevated in plasma of retired miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis. These observations further support the important role of TNF-mediated pathways in the pathogenesis of mineral dust related fibrosis.

  2. Cell-free circulating tumour DNA as a liquid biopsy in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    De Mattos-Arruda, Leticia; Caldas, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in massively parallel sequencing and digital genomic techniques support the clinical validity of cell-free circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) as a 'liquid biopsy' in human cancer. In breast cancer, ctDNA detected in plasma can be used to non-invasively scan tumour genomes and quantify tumour burden. The applications for ctDNA in plasma include identifying actionable genomic alterations, monitoring treatment responses, unravelling therapeutic resistance, and potentially detecting disease progression before clinical and radiological confirmation. ctDNA may be used to characterise tumour heterogeneity and metastasis-specific mutations providing information to adapt the therapeutic management of patients. In this article, we review the current status of ctDNA as a 'liquid biopsy' in breast cancer.

  3. Immunological Characterization of Whole Tumour Lysate-Loaded Dendritic Cells for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ottobrini, Luisa; Biasin, Mara; Borelli, Manuela; Lucignani, Giovanni; Trabattoni, Daria; Clerici, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dendritic cells play a key role as initiators of T-cell responses, and even if tumour antigen-loaded dendritic cells can induce anti-tumour responses, their efficacy has been questioned, suggesting a need to enhance immunization strategies. Matherials & Methods We focused on the characterization of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells pulsed with whole tumour lysate (TAA-DC), as a source of known and unknown antigens, in a mouse model of breast cancer (MMTV-Ras). Dendritic cells were evaluated for antigen uptake and for the expression of MHC class I/II and costimulatory molecules and markers associated with maturation. Results Results showed that antigen-loaded dendritic cells are characterized by a phenotypically semi-mature/mature profile and by the upregulation of genes involved in antigen presentation and T-cell priming. Activated dendritic cells stimulated T-cell proliferation and induced the production of high concentrations of IL-12p70 and IFN-γ but only low levels of IL-10, indicating their ability to elicit a TH1-immune response. Furthermore, administration of Antigen loaded-Dendritic Cells in MMTV-Ras mice evoked a strong anti-tumour response in vivo as demonstrated by a general activation of immunocompetent cells and the release of TH1 cytokines. Conclusion Data herein could be useful in the design of antitumoral DC-based therapies, showing a specific activation of immune system against breast cancer. PMID:26795765

  4. Immunosuppressive mediators of oral squamous cell carcinoma in tumour samples and saliva.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Andréia Souza; Arantes, Diego Antonio Costa; Bernardes, Vanessa Fátima; Jaeger, Filipe; Silva, Janine Mayra; Silva, Tarcília Aparecida; Aguiar, Maria Cássia Ferreira; Batista, Aline Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the salivary concentrations of IL-10, TGF-β1 and soluble HLA-G (sHLA-G) in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) to those in healthy individuals (control group), and to correlate the expression of these mediators in saliva with that in the tumour microenvironment. Neoplastic tissue and saliva samples from patients with OSCC (n=22) were analysed by immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) respectively. We detected high expression of IL-10 and HLA-G in the tumour microenvironment when compared to healthy oral mucosa samples. Determination of IL-10 salivary concentration enabled us to distinguish patients with OSCC from healthy individuals (P=0.038), which showed correlation with tissue expression of this cytokine. HLA-G salivary release was similar in both groups (P=0.17) and no correlation with tumour expression was observed. TGF-β1 expression was low or absent in tumours, and salivary concentration was similar between groups. Our results suggest that of the three markers analysed, IL-10 is a potential salivary biomarker. Furthermore, the elevated expression of HLA-G and IL-10 in tumour sites could favour the escape of tumour cells from immune defense mechanisms.

  5. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and colorectal cancer: a troublesome twosome for the anti-tumour immune response?

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Grace; Heijltjes, Madelon; Houston, Aileen M.; Rani, Sweta; Ritter, Thomas; Egan, Laurence J.; Ryan, Aideen E.

    2016-01-01

    The tumour microenvironment (TME) is an important factor in determining the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer, and can aid tumours by both establishing an immunosuppressive milieu, allowing the tumour avoid immune clearance, and by hampering the efficacy of various therapeutic regimens. The tumour microenvironment is composed of many cell types including tumour, stromal, endothelial and immune cell populations. It is widely accepted that cells present in the TME acquire distinct functional phenotypes that promote tumorigenesis. One such cell type is the mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC). Evidence suggests that MSCs exert effects in the colorectal tumour microenvironment including the promotion of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. MSCs immunomodulatory capacity may represent another largely unexplored central feature of MSCs tumour promoting capacity. There is considerable evidence to suggest that MSCs and their secreted factors can influence the innate and adaptive immune responses. MSC-immune cell interactions can skew the proliferation and functional activity of T-cells, dendritic cells, natural killer cells and macrophages, which could favour tumour growth and enable tumours to evade immune cell clearance. A better understanding of the interactions between the malignant cancer cell and stromal components of the TME is key to the development of more specific and efficacious therapies for colorectal cancer. Here, we review and explore MSC- mediated mechanisms of suppressing anti-tumour immune responses in the colon tumour microenvironment. Elucidation of the precise mechanism of immunomodulation exerted by tumour-educated MSCs is critical to inhibiting immunosuppression and immune evasion established by the TME, thus providing an opportunity for targeted and efficacious immunotherapy for colorectal cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:27542276

  6. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) and colorectal cancer: a troublesome twosome for the anti-tumour immune response?

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Grace; Heijltjes, Madelon; Houston, Aileen M; Rani, Sweta; Ritter, Thomas; Egan, Laurence J; Ryan, Aideen E

    2016-09-13

    The tumour microenvironment (TME) is an important factor in determining the growth and metastasis of colorectal cancer, and can aid tumours by both establishing an immunosuppressive milieu, allowing the tumour avoid immune clearance, and by hampering the efficacy of various therapeutic regimens. The tumour microenvironment is composed of many cell types including tumour, stromal, endothelial and immune cell populations. It is widely accepted that cells present in the TME acquire distinct functional phenotypes that promote tumorigenesis. One such cell type is the mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC). Evidence suggests that MSCs exert effects in the colorectal tumour microenvironment including the promotion of angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. MSCs immunomodulatory capacity may represent another largely unexplored central feature of MSCs tumour promoting capacity. There is considerable evidence to suggest that MSCs and their secreted factors can influence the innate and adaptive immune responses. MSC-immune cell interactions can skew the proliferation and functional activity of T-cells, dendritic cells, natural killer cells and macrophages, which could favour tumour growth and enable tumours to evade immune cell clearance. A better understanding of the interactions between the malignant cancer cell and stromal components of the TME is key to the development of more specific and efficacious therapies for colorectal cancer. Here, we review and explore MSC- mediated mechanisms of suppressing anti-tumour immune responses in the colon tumour microenvironment. Elucidation of the precise mechanism of immunomodulation exerted by tumour-educated MSCs is critical to inhibiting immunosuppression and immune evasion established by the TME, thus providing an opportunity for targeted and efficacious immunotherapy for colorectal cancer growth and metastasis.

  7. Isolated guinea pig gastric chief cells express tumour necrosis factor receptors coupled with the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Fiorucci, S; Santucci, L; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Amorosi, A; Mancini, A; Roberti, R; Morelli, A

    1996-01-01

    The tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy and Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis. Both conditions are characterised by high plasma pepsinogen concentrations, which are thought to reflect an increased rate of enzyme release by the pepsinogen secreting (chief) cells. The mechanisms responsible for this cell dysfunction are unknown. This study investigates whether chief cells express TNF receptors and, if so, whether their activation results in cell death. Immunohistochemical studies conducted with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against two TNF receptor associated proteins of 55 kDa (TNF-R1) and 75 kDa (TNF-R2) showed that TNF binding sites were expressed in approximately 100% gastric chief cells. Western blot analysis of whole chief cell lysates probed with the TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mAbs gave two distinct bands of 55 and 75 kDa in the immunoprecipitate. Incubating chief cells with TNF caused concentration and time dependent cell death, which was prevented by pretreating the cells with anti-TNF receptor mAbs. Exposing the cells to TNF reduced sphingomyelin content by 25%. Sphingomyelinase (10(-6) to 10(-2) IU/ml) mimicked the effect of TNF in that it provoked a concentration and time dependent reduction in chief cell viability and increased pepsinogen release. In conclusion, gastric chief cells express two TNF receptors partially linked to the sphingomyelin pathway. TNF induced chief cell dysfunction might be responsible for the high plasma pepsinogen concentrations seen in patients with NSAID gastropathy or H pylori induced gastritis. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8801194

  8. Flow cytometric techniques for detection of candidate cancer stem cell subpopulations in canine tumour models.

    PubMed

    Blacking, T M; Waterfall, M; Samuel, K; Argyle, D J

    2012-12-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes that tumour growth is maintained by a distinct subpopulation of 'CSC'. This study applied flow cytometric methods, reported to detect CSC in both primary and cultured cancer cells of other species, to identify candidate canine subpopulations. Cell lines representing diverse canine malignancies, and cells derived from spontaneous canine tumours, were evaluated for expression of stem cell-associated surface markers (CD34, CD44, CD117 and CD133) and functional properties [Hoecsht 33342 efflux, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity]. No discrete marker-defined subsets were identified within established cell lines; cells derived directly from spontaneous tumours demonstrated more heterogeneity, although this diminished upon in vitro culture. Functional assays produced variable results, suggesting context-dependency. Flow cytometric methods may be adopted to identify putative canine CSC. Whilst cell lines are valuable in assay development, primary cells may provide a more rewarding model for studying tumour heterogeneity in the context of CSC. However, it will be essential to fully characterize any candidate subpopulations to ensure that they meet CSC criteria.

  9. Cancer-associated-fibroblasts and tumour cells: a diabolic liaison driving cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Cirri, Paolo; Chiarugi, Paola

    2012-06-01

    Several recent papers have now provided compelling experimental evidence that the progression of tumours towards a malignant phenotype does not depend exclusively on the cell-autonomous properties of cancer cells themselves but is also deeply influenced by tumour stroma reactivity, thereby undergoing a strict environmental control. Tumour microenvironmental elements include structural components such as the extracellular matrix or hypoxia as well as stromal cells, either resident cells or recruited from circulating precursors, as macrophages and other inflammatory cells, endothelial cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs). All these elements synergistically play a specific role in cancer progression. This review summarizes our current knowledge on the role of CAFs in tumour progression, with a particular focus on the biunivocal interplay between CAFs and cancer cells leading to the activation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition programme and the achievement of stem cell traits, as well as to the metabolic reprogramming of both stromal and cancer cells. Recent advances on the role of CAFs in the preparation of metastatic niche, as well as the controversial origin of CAFs, are discussed in light of the new emerging therapeutic implications of targeting CAFs.

  10. MicroRNA-200c attenuates tumour growth and metastasis of presumptive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Lo, Wen-Liang; Yu, Cheng-Chia; Chiou, Guang-Yuh; Chen, Yi-Wei; Huang, Pin-I; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Tseng, Ling-Ming; Chu, Pen-Yuan; Lu, Kai-Hsi; Chang, Kuo-Wei; Kao, Shou-Yen; Chiou, Shih-Hwa

    2011-03-01

    MicroRNA-200c (miR200c) is emerging as an important regulator of tumourigenicity and cancer metastasis with a strong capacity for inducing epithelial-mesenchymal transitions. However, the role of miR200c in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and HNSCC-associated cancer stem cells (HNSCC-CSCs) is unknown. In this study, the expression of miR200c in the regional metastatic lymph node of HNSCC tissues was significantly decreased, but BMI1 expression was increased as compared to parental tumours. Importantly, site-directed mutagenesis with a luciferase reporter assay showed that miR200c targeted the 3' UTR of BMI1 in HNSCC cells. Isolated HNSCC-derived ALDH1(+) /CD44(+) cells displayed CSC-like tumour initiating and radio-resistant properties. The expression levels of miR200c were significantly down-regulated while BMI1 was increased in HNSCC-ALDH1(+) /CD44(+) compared to the other subsets of HNSCC cells. Furthermore, increased miR200c expression or knockdown of BMI1 could significantly inhibit the malignant CSC-like properties of ALDH1(+) /CD44(+) cells. miR200c over-expression further down-regulated the expressions of ZEB1, Snail and N-cadherin, but up-regulated E-cadherin expression in ALDH1(+) /CD44(+) cells. Finally, a xenotransplantion study confirmed that over-expression of miR200c or BMI1 knockdown effectively inhibited the lung metastatic ability and prolonged the survival rate of ALDH1(+) /CD44(+) -transplanted mice. In summary, miR200c negatively modulates the expression of BMI1 but also significantly inhibits the metastatic capability of epithelial-mesenchymal transitions in malignant HNSCC by reducing the expression of BMI1/ZEB1. Restoration of miR200c in HNSCC and CSCs may be a promising therapeutic approach.

  11. Cell lines from MYCN transgenic murine tumours reflect the molecular and biological characteristics of human neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Andy J; Cheng, Ngan Ching; Ford, Jette; Smith, Janice; Murray, Jayne E; Flemming, Claudia; Lastowska, Maria; Jackson, Michael S; Hackett, Christopher S; Weiss, William A; Marshall, Glenn M; Kees, Ursula R; Norris, Murray D; Haber, Michelle

    2007-06-01

    Overexpression of the human MYCN oncogene driven by a tyrosine hydroxylase promoter causes tumours in transgenic mice that recapitulate the childhood cancer neuroblastoma. To establish an in vitro model to study this process, a series of isogenic cell lines were developed from these MYCN-driven murine tumours. Lines were established from tumours arising in homozygous and hemizygous MYCN transgenic mice. Hemizygous tumours gave rise to cell lines growing only in suspension. Homozygous tumours gave rise to similar suspension lines as well as morphologically distinct substrate-adherent lines characteristic of human S-type neuroblastoma cells. FISH analysis demonstrated selective MYCN transgene amplification in cell lines derived from hemizygous mice. Comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) and fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) analysis confirmed a range of neuroblastoma-associated genetic changes in the various lines, in particular, gain of regions syntenic with human 17q. These isogenic lines together with the transgenic mice thus represent valuable models for investigating the biological characteristics of aggressive neuroblastoma.

  12. Tumour thrombus consistency has no impact on survival in patients with renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Gołąbek, T; Przydacz, M; Okoń, K; Kopczyński, J; Bukowczan, J; Sobczyński, R; Curyło, Ł; Gołąbek, K; Curyło, Ł; Chłosta, P

    2016-06-01

    The prognosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with venous tumour thrombus (VTT) is variable and not always possible to predict. The prognostic impact and independence of tumour thrombus-related factors including the recently introduced tumour thrombus consistency (TTC) on overall survival remain controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the prognostic role of TTC in patients' survival. We determined the tumour thrombus consistency (solid vs. friable) in a cohort of 84 patients with RCC and VTT who underwent nephrectomy with thrombectomy, and performed a retrospective evaluation of the patients' data from the prospectively maintained database. A total of 45% of patients had solid thrombus (sTT) and 55% had friable thrombus (fTT). The venous tumour thrombus consistency was not predictive of overall survival. Further studies, preferably prospective and with a larger number of patients, are needed to validate the obtained results, as well as to evaluate the usefulness of tumour thrombus consistency in clinical practice for stratifying the risk of recurrence and planning further follow-up.

  13. Cytotoxic activity of a diptheria toxin/FGF6 mitotoxin on human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed

    Coll-Fresno, P M; Batoz, M; Tarquin, S; Birnbaum, D; Coulier, F

    1997-01-16

    The FGFs constitute a family of, at least, 12 polypeptides (FGF1 to FGF12) implicated in a number of physiological and pathological processes throughout embryogenesis and adult life. They bind to at least three types of cell surface molecules, including four high affinity transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFR1 to FGFR4). In addition to important roles during development, FGF involvement in pathological conditions, including tumour formation, has been suspected, and overexpression of FGFR in tumour specimens is well documented. Diphtheria Toxin/FGF6 (DT/FGF6) mitotoxin has been shown to selectively and effectively target FGFR1-expressing cells. We show here that DT/FGF6 targets myoblasts engineered to express either one of the four FGFR, as well as FGFR-expressing tumour cells.

  14. Synchronous Multicentric Giant Cell Tumour (GCT)-A Rare Case Report.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Anshu; Murgod, Gururaj; Korlhalli, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    Giant Cell Tumours (GCT) of bone account for 5% of all primary bone tumours. Multicentric variety is a rare variant of this condition, accounting for less than 1% of all cases and can occur as synchronous or metachronous lesions. We report a 22-year-old male patient with 18 months history of painful progressive swellings around the right knee. Radiographs revealed expansile lytic lesions in the distal femur, proximal tibia and fibula and core needle biopsy was typical of GCT. Biochemical parameters were normal and radiological investigations did not reveal any metastasis. The patient was treated by above knee amputation due to the extensive nature of the tumours. The excised tissue from all sites had features of giant cell tumor with no atypia or malignant cells seen. The patient is free from recurrence or metastasis at three years follow up.

  15. Giant adrenal germ cell tumour in a 59-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Fang, Lu; Liu, Zhiqi; Yu, Dexin; Wang, Daming; Wang, Yi; Xie, Dongdong; Min, Jie; Ding, Demao; Zhang, Tao; Zou, Ci; Zhang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal germ cell tumour is very rare. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman who presented with right flank discomfort. The laboratory examinations were normal and the chest computed tomography (CT) showed right pleural effusion. The abdominal CT scan revealed a large mass on the right adrenal gland. The patient underwent an adrenalectomy. Histopathologic examination and immunohistochemical findings were consistent with mixed germ cell tumour. Three months later following the operation, the patient was admitted to our hospital again with chest tightness and shortness of breath. The chest CT showed right pleural effusion recurrence and enlargement of mediastinal lymph nodes and right hilar lymph nodes. The patient had right supraclavicular lymphadenectasis on physical examination. Fine needle aspiration cytology from the supraclavicular lymph nodes showed groups of malignant tumour cells. The patient died within 6 months postoperatively. In this case, the lymph node pathway played an important role in the metastatic procedure. PMID:27790306

  16. Display of GPI-anchored anti-EGFR nanobodies on extracellular vesicles promotes tumour cell targeting

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander A. A.; Aleza, Clara Gómez; Roffler, Steve R.; van Solinge, Wouter W.; Vader, Pieter; Schiffelers, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are attractive candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transport biological cargo to recipient cells. However, the apparent lack of target cell specificity of exogenously administered EVs limits their therapeutic applicability. In this study, we propose a novel method to equip EVs with targeting properties, in order to improve their interaction with tumour cells. Methods EV producing cells were transfected with vectors encoding for anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nanobodies, which served as targeting ligands for tumour cells, fused to glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor signal peptides derived from decay-accelerating factor (DAF). EVs were isolated using ultrafiltration/size-exclusion liquid chromatography and characterized using western blotting, Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, and electron microscopy. EV–tumour cell interactions were analyzed under static conditions using flow cytometry and under flow conditions using a live-cell fluorescence microscopy-coupled perfusion system. Results EV analysis showed that GPI-linked nanobodies were successfully displayed on EV surfaces and were highly enriched in EVs compared with parent cells. Display of GPI-linked nanobodies on EVs did not alter general EV characteristics (i.e. morphology, size distribution and protein marker expression), but greatly improved EV binding to tumour cells dependent on EGFR density under static conditions. Moreover, nanobody-displaying EVs showed a significantly improved cell association to EGFR-expressing tumour cells under flow conditions. Conclusions We show that nanobodies can be anchored on the surface of EVs via GPI, which alters their cell targeting behaviour. Furthermore, this study highlights GPI-anchoring as a new tool in the EV toolbox, which may be applied for EV display of a variety of proteins, such as antibodies, reporter proteins and signaling molecules. PMID:26979463

  17. Malignant H1299 tumour cells preferentially internalize iron-bound inositol hexakisphosphate.

    PubMed

    Helmis, Christina; Blechner, Christine; Lin, Hongying; Schweizer, Michaela; Mayr, Georg W; Nielsen, Peter; Windhorst, Sabine

    2013-10-22

    In colon enterocytes and in well-differentiated colon cancer CaCo-2 cells, InsP6 (inositol hexakisphosphate) inhibits iron uptake by forming extracellular insoluble iron/InsP6 complexes. In this study, we confirmed that CaCo-2 cells are not able to take up iron/InsP6 but, interestingly, found that the cells are able to internalize metal-free and Cr3+-bound InsP6. Thus, the inability of CaCo-2 cells to take up iron/InsP6 complexes seems to be due to the iron-bound state of InsP6. Since recently we demonstrated that the highly malignant bronchial carcinoma H1299 cells internalize and process InsP6, we examined whether these cells may be able to take up iron/InsP6 complexes. Indeed, we found that InsP6 dose-dependently increased uptake of iron and demonstrated that in the iron-bound state InsP6 is more effectively internalized than in the metal-free or Cr3+-bound state, indicating that H1299 cells preferentially take up iron/InsP6 complexes. Electron microscope and cell fraction assays indicate that after uptake H1299 cells mainly stored InsP6/iron in lysosomes as large aggregates, of which about 10% have been released to the cytosol. However, this InsP6-mediated iron transport had no significant effects on cell viability. This result together with our finding that the well-differentiated CaCo-2 cells did not, but the malignant H1299 cells preferentially took up iron/InsP6, may offer the possibility to selectively transport cytotoxic substances into tumour cells.

  18. Multi-agent chemotherapy for mast cell tumours in the dog.

    PubMed

    Gerritsen, R J; Teske, E; Kraus, J S; Rutteman, G R

    1998-01-01

    Seventeen dogs with mast cell tumours received chemotherapy. Fifteen dogs were treated with a vincristine, cyclophosphamide, hydroxyurea, and prednisolone (VCHP) regimen. Seven of these were later switched to doxyrubicin and prednisolone either because they stopped responding or because they did not respond from the start of the treatment. Two dogs received the latter regimen as the primary therapy. All dogs were treated with cimitidine and metoclopramide to minimize the effect of paraneoplastic syndrome associated with histamine release. Ten of the 17 dogs were found to respond (4/17 complete response (CR), 6/17 partial response (PR)). Response duration varied from 39 to 910 days (median 53 days), including 3 dogs with a CR that lasted more than 2 years. Survival time in responders varied from 41 to 910 days (median 97 days) and from 30 to 126 (median 39) in the other 7 dogs. Dogs that became refractory to VCHP did not respond to doxyrubicin and prednisolone. It is concluded that multi-agent chemotherapy has anti-tumour activity in a considerable proportion of dogs with mast cell tumours, but its efficacy is variable. The multivariate analyses showed that significant factors predicting survival in dogs with mast cell tumours were sex (P = 0.009), absence or presence of non-abdominal distant metastases, or abdominal metastases, respectively (P = 0.023), and malignancy grade of the tumours (P = 0.053).

  19. Expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP proteins in in vitro co-culture of colon tumour cell spheroids with normal cells after incubation with rhTGF- beta1 and/or CPT-11.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Roman; Jakubowicz-Gil, Joanna; Kandefer-Szerszen, Martyna

    2009-12-01

    We studied the expression of inducible heat shock protein (HSP27, HSP72) and multidrug-resistance protein (MRP) in co-cultures of human colon carcinoma cell spheroids obtained from different grades of tumour with normal human colon epithelium, myofibroblast and endothelial cell monolayers. We also measured the influence of recombinant human transforming growth factor beta1 (rhTGF-beta1) and camptothecin (CPT-11), added as single agents or in combination, on the levels of the HSPs, MRP, interleukin (IL)-6 and nitric oxide (NO). An immunoblotting analysis with densitometry showed that rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 increased HSP27, HSP72 and MRP expression in tumour cells and myofibroblasts, as well as in co-cultures compared with appropriate controls. By contrast, in colonic epithelium, inhibition of HSPs and MRP was comparable with that of the control. In endothelial cells, HSP72 was undetectable. Direct interaction of colon tumour spheroids with normal myofibroblasts caused a significant, tumour-grade dependent increase in IL-6 production. Production of IL-6 was significantly lowered by rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11. Tumour cell spheroids cultivated alone produced larger amounts of NO than normal cells. In co-culture, the level of the radical decreased compared with the sum of NO produced by the monocultures of the two types of cells. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 decreased NO production both in tumour and normal cell monocultures and their co-cultures. In conclusion, direct interactions between tumour and normal cells influence the expression of HSP27, HSP72 and MRP, and alter IL-6 and NO production. rhTGF-beta1 and/or CPT-11 may potentate resistance to chemotherapy by increasing HSP and MRP expression but, on the other hand, they may limit tumour cell spread by decreasing the level of some soluble mediators of inflammation (IL-6 and NO).

  20. Giant Cell Tumour of Proximal Phalanx of Ring Finger: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soni, Rishit; Shah, Malkesh; Patel, Amit; Golwala, Paresh

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumour (GCT) of bone arising from a phalanx of a finger is extremely rare. Only two percent of all reported GCTs are found in the hand, which show a higher rate of recurrence as compared to those occurring at a more proximal location. Here we report a rare case of giant cell tumour of proximal phalanx of the ring finger in a 20-year-old male, which was treated with extended curettage and bone grafting. After two years of follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic with complete functional recovery and no signs of recurrence. PMID:27900230

  1. Src family kinase activity regulates adhesion, spreading and migration of pancreatic endocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Alessia; Capurso, Gabriele; Milione, Massimo; Panzuto, Francesco; Geremia, Raffaele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are rare and 'indolent' neoplasms that usually develop metastatic lesions and exhibit poor response to standard medical treatments. Few studies have investigated pathways responsible for PET cell growth and invasion and no alternative therapeutic strategies have been proposed. In a recent microarray analysis for genes up-regulated in PETs, we have described the up-regulation of soluble Src family tyrosine kinases in this neoplasia, which may represent potentially promising candidates for therapy. Herein, we have investigated the expression and function of Src family kinases in PETS and PET cell lines. Western blot analysis indicated that Src is highly abundant in the PET cell lines CM and QGP-1. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed that Src is up-regulated also in human PET lesions. Pharmacological inhibition of Src family kinases by the specific inhibitor PP2 strongly interfered with adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cell lines. Accordingly, the actin cytoskeleton was profoundly altered after inhibition of Src kinases, whereas even prolonged incubation with PP2 exerted no effect on cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis of PET cells. A transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of a subset of proteins was observed in QGP-1 cells adhering to the plate, with a peak at 75 min after seeding, when approximately 80% of cells were attached. Inhibition of Src kinases caused a dramatic reduction in the phosphorylation of proteins with different molecular weight that were isolated from the cell extracts by anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation or pull-down with the SH2 domain of Src. Among them, the docking protein p130Cas interacted with Src and is a major substrate of the Src kinases in QGP-1 cells undergoing adhesion. Our results suggest that Src kinases play a specific role during adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cells and may indicate therapeutical approaches directed to limiting the metastatic

  2. Breast tumour initiating cell fate is regulated by microenvironmental cues from an extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sharmistha; Lo, Pang-Kuo; Duan, Xinrui; Chen, Hexin; Wang, Qian

    2012-08-01

    Cancer stem cells, also known as tumour-initiating cells (TICs), are identified as highly tumorigenic population within tumours and hypothesized to be main regulators in tumour growth, metastasis and relapse. Evidence also suggests that a tumour microenvironment plays a critical role in the development and progression of cancer, by constantly modulating cell-matrix interactions. Scientists have tried to characterize and identify the TIC population but the actual combination of extracellular components in deciphering the fate of TICs has not been explored. The basic unanswered question is the phenotypic stability of this TIC population in a tissue extracellular matrix setting. The in vivo complexity makes it difficult to identify parameters in a diverse milieu that affect TICs behaviour. Herein we studied how the TIC population would respond when subjected to a unique microenvironment composed of different extracellular proteins. The TIC-enriched population isolated from a Her2/neu-induced mouse mammary tumour was cultured on collagen, fibronectin and laminin coated substrates for one to two weeks. Our observations indicate that a laminin substrate can maintain the majority of the self-renewing and tumorigenic TIC population, whereas collagen induced a more differentiated phenotype of the cells. Also interestingly, fibronectin substrates dictated an invasive phenotype of TICs as evidenced from the EMT-related gene expression pattern. The results of this study signify that the microenvironmental cues play a considerable role in tumour relapse and progression by altering the cancer stem cell behaviour and thus this knowledge could be used to design novel cancer therapeutics.

  3. Ptaquiloside from bracken (Pteridium spp.) inhibits tumour-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells in HPV-16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Santos, Carlos; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Sousa, Hugo; Ribeiro, Joana; Bastos, Margarida M S M; Neto, Tiago; Oliveira, Paula A; Medeiros, Rui; Vilanova, Manuel; Gil da Costa, Rui M

    2016-11-01

    Bracken is a fern with worldwide distribution. Exposure to bracken toxins such as ptaquiloside is hypothesized to increase the risk of papillomavirus-related cancers of the upper digestive tract. Ptaquiloside is thought to be an immunosupressor, thus allowing for the development of viral lesions. We have used a human papillomavirus type 16-transgenic (K14-HPV16) mouse model to study the effects of ptaquiloside on tumour-infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes, which are critical players in anti-tumour immunity. HPV16(+/-) mice received ptaquiloside (0.5 mg/mouse/week) for 10 weeks. These were then euthanized at 30 weeks of age, along with age-matched untreated controls. Skin samples were enzymatically digested and CD8(+) T cells analysed for CD107a and CD44 surface expression. Ptaquiloside-exposed HPV16(+/-) mice showed a significantly decreased percentage (P < 0.05) of CD8(+)CD107a(+) and CD8(+)CD44 (+) T cells when compared with untreated HPV16(+/-) animals. Histologically, 100% of ptaquilosidetreated mice showed diffuse epidermal dysplasia, compared with 50% of the untreated mice. These findings suggest that ptaquiloside exerts an immunosuppressive role by decreasing CD8(+) T cell activation and degranulation in HPV-induced lesions. Given the key role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes against HPV-induced lesions, this effect is likely to contribute for viral persistence, tumour progression and increased aggressiveness in patients with HPV-related malignancies.

  4. Sequential detection of alphafetoprotein-bearing cells in blood stem cell fraction of germ cell tumour patients

    PubMed Central

    Kasahara, T; Hara, N; Bilim, V; Tomita, Y; Saito, K; Obara, K; Takahashi, K

    2001-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation in advanced germ cell tumour (GCT) patients is widely applied. The aims of this study were: (1) To examine the presence of alphafetoprotein (AFP) bearing tumour cells in PBSC harvests from advanced GCT patients obtained after multiple cycles of induction chemotherapy. (2) To determine whether induction chemotherapy contributed to in vivo purging of the tumour. We evaluated cryopreserved PBSC samples from 5 patients with advanced stage II/III AFP producing GCT. PBSC were separated after the first, second and third cycles of induction chemotherapy. Those samples were analysed using the nested reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method to detect AFP mRNA. Although, in all patients, AFP mRNA was detected in PBSC samples after the first or second cycle of induction chemotherapy, but was not detected in 3 of 4 samples after the third cycle of chemotherapy. Although it is not clear whether tumour cells contaminating PBSC fraction contribute to disease relapse, PBSC harvested after at least 3 cycles of induction chemotherapy might be recommended to avoid such a possibility. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaignhttp://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11710823

  5. Platelet–cancer interactions: mechanisms and pharmacology of tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Jurasz, Paul; Alonso-Escolano, David; Radomski, Marek W

    2004-01-01

    During haematogenous metastasis, cancer cells migrate to the vasculature and interact with platelets resulting in tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA). We review: The biological and clinical significance of TCIPA; Molecular mechanisms involved in platelet aggregation by cancer cells; Strategies for pharmacological regulation of these interactions. We conclude that pharmacological regulation of platelet–cancer cell interactions may reduce the impact of TCIPA on cancer biology. PMID:15492016

  6. Decreased NK-cell tumour immunosurveillance consequent to JAK inhibition enhances metastasis in breast cancer models

    PubMed Central

    Bottos, Alessia; Gotthardt, Dagmar; Gill, Jason W.; Gattelli, Albana; Frei, Anna; Tzankov, Alexandar; Sexl, Veronika; Wodnar-Filipowicz, Aleksandra; Hynes, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    The JAK/STAT pathway is an attractive target for breast cancer therapy due to its frequent activation, and clinical trials evaluating JAK inhibitors (JAKi) in advanced breast cancer are ongoing. Using patient biopsies and preclinical models of breast cancer, we demonstrate that the JAK/STAT pathway is active in metastasis. Unexpectedly, blocking the pathway with JAKi enhances the metastatic burden in experimental and orthotopic models of breast cancer metastasis. We demonstrate that this prometastatic effect is due to the immunosuppressive activity of JAKi with ensuing impairment of NK-cell-mediated anti-tumour immunity. Furthermore, we show that immunostimulation with IL-15 overcomes the enhancing effect of JAKi on metastasis formation. Our findings highlight the importance of evaluating the effect of targeted therapy on the tumour environment. The impact of JAKi on NK cells and the potential value of immunostimulators to overcome the weakened tumour immunosurveillance, are worthwhile considering in the clinical setting of breast cancer. PMID:27406745

  7. Latent cytomegalovirus infection enhances anti-tumour cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C+ NK cells in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Bigley, A B; Rezvani, K; Shah, N; Sekine, T; Balneger, N; Pistillo, M; Agha, N; Kunz, H; O'Connor, D P; Bollard, C M; Simpson, R J

    2016-08-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection markedly expands NKG2C+/NKG2A- NK cells, which are potent killers of infected cells expressing human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E. As HLA-E is also over-expressed in several haematological malignancies and CMV has been linked to a reduced risk of leukaemic relapse, we determined the impact of latent CMV infection on NK cell cytotoxicity against four tumour target cell lines with varying levels of HLA-E expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against K562 (leukaemia origin) and U266 (multiple myeloma origin) target cells was strikingly greater in healthy CMV-seropositive donors than seronegative donors and was associated strongly with target cell HLA-E and NK cell NKG2C expression. NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E transfected lymphoma target cells (221.AEH) was ∼threefold higher with CMV, while NK cell cytotoxicity against non-transfected 721.221 cells was identical between the CMV groups. NK cell degranulation (CD107a(+) ) and interferon (IFN)-γ production to 221.AEH cells was localized almost exclusively to the NKG2C subset, and antibody blocking of NKG2C completely eliminated the effect of CMV on NK cell cytotoxicity against 221.AEH cells. Moreover, 221.AEH feeder cells and interleukin (IL)-15 were found to expand NKG2C(+) /NKG2A(-) NK cells preferentially from CMV-seronegative donors and increase NK cell cytotoxicity against HLA-E(+) tumour cell lines. We conclude that latent CMV infection enhances NK cell cytotoxicity through accumulation of NKG2C(+) NK cells, which may be beneficial in preventing the initiation and progression of haematological malignancies characterized by high HLA-E expression.

  8. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  9. A biophysical approach to the optimisation of dendritic-tumour cell electrofusion

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhorukov, Vladimir L.; Reuss, Randolph; Endter, Joerg M.; Fehrmann, Steffen; Katsen-Globa, Alisa; Gessner, Petra; Steinbach, Andrea; Mueller, Kilian J.; Karpas, Abraham; Zimmermann, Ulrich . E-mail: zimmermann@biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de; Zimmermann, Heiko

    2006-08-04

    Electrofusion of tumour and dendritic cells (DCs) is a promising approach for production of DC-based anti-tumour vaccines. Although human DCs are well characterised immunologically, little is known about their biophysical properties, including dielectric and osmotic parameters, both of which are essential for the development of efficient electrofusion protocols. In the present study, human DCs from the peripheral blood along with a tumour cell line used as a model fusion partner were examined by means of time-resolved cell volumetry and electrorotation. Based on the biophysical cell data, the electrofusion protocol could be rapidly optimised with respect to the sugar composition of the fusion medium, duration of hypotonic treatment, frequency range for stable cell alignment, and field strengths of breakdown pulses triggering membrane fusion. The hypotonic electrofusion consistently gave a tumour-DC hybrid rate of up to 19%, as determined by counting dually labelled fluorescent hybrids in a microscope. This fusion rate is nearly twice as high as that usually reported in the literature for isotonic media. The experimental findings and biophysical approach presented here are generally useful for the development of efficient electrofusion protocols, especially for rare and valuable human cells.

  10. The Somatostatin Analogue Octreotide Inhibits Growth of Small Intestine Neuroendocrine Tumour Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Su-Chen; Martijn, Cécile; Cui, Tao; Essaghir, Ahmed; Luque, Raúl M.; Demoulin, Jean-Baptiste; Castaño, Justo P.; Öberg, Kjell; Giandomenico, Valeria

    2012-01-01

    Octreotide is a widely used synthetic somatostatin analogue that significantly improves the management of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). Octreotide acts through somatostatin receptors (SSTRs). However, the molecular mechanisms leading to successful disease control or symptom management, especially when SSTRs levels are low, are largely unknown. We provide novel insights into how octreotide controls NET cells. CNDT2.5 cells were treated from 1 day up to 16 months with octreotide and then were profiled using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analyses were used to validate microarray profiling in silico data. WST-1 cell proliferation assay was applied to evaluate cell growth of CNDT2.5 cells in the presence or absence of 1 µM octreotide at different time points. Moreover, laser capture microdissected tumour cells and paraffin embedded tissue slides from SI-NETs at different stages of disease were used to identify transcriptional and translational expression. Microarrays analyses did not reveal relevant changes in SSTR expression levels. Unexpectedly, six novel genes were found to be upregulated by octreotide: annexin A1 (ANXA1), rho GTPase-activating protein 18 (ARHGAP18), epithelial membrane protein 1 (EMP1), growth/differentiation factor 15 (GDF15), TGF-beta type II receptor (TGFBR2) and tumour necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 15 (TNFSF15). Furthermore, these novel genes were expressed in tumour tissues at transcript and protein levels. We suggest that octreotide may use a potential novel framework to exert its beneficial effect as a drug and to convey its action on neuroendocrine cells. Thus, six novel genes may regulate cell growth and differentiation in normal and tumour neuroendocrine cells and have a role in a novel octreotide mechanism system. PMID:23119007

  11. Combined toll-like receptor 3/7/9 deficiency on host cells results in T-cell-dependent control of tumour growth

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Johanna C.; Moses, Katrin; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy; Sody, Simon; Buer, Jan; Lang, Stephan; Helfrich, Iris; Dittmer, Ulf; Kirschning, Carsten J.; Brandau, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are located either on the cell surface or intracellularly in endosomes and their activation normally contributes to the induction of protective immune responses. However, in cancer their activation by endogenous ligands can modulate tumour progression. It is currently unknown how endosomal TLRs regulate endogenous anti-tumour immunity. Here we show that TLR3, 7 and 9 deficiencies on host cells, after initial tumour growth, result in complete tumour regression and induction of anti-tumour immunity. Tumour regression requires the combined absence of all three receptors, is dependent on both CD4 and CD8 T cells and protects the mice from subsequent tumour challenge. While tumours in control mice are infiltrated by higher numbers of regulatory T cells, tumour regression in TLR-deficient mice is paralleled by altered vascular structure and strongly induced influx of cytotoxic and cytokine-producing effector T cells. Thus, endosomal TLRs may represent a molecular link between the inflamed tumour cell phenotype, anti-tumour immunity and the regulation of T-cell activation. PMID:28300057

  12. The radiation response of cells from 9L gliosarcoma tumours is correlated with [F18]-EF5 uptake

    PubMed Central

    KOCH, CAMERON J.; SHUMAN, ANNE L.; JENKINS, WALTER T.; KACHUR, ALEXANDER V.; KARP, JOEL S.; FREIFELDER, RICHARD; DOLBIER, WILLIAM R.; EVANS, SYDNEY M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tumour hypoxia affects cancer biology and therapy-resistance in both animals and humans. The purpose of this study was to determine whether EF5 ([2-(2-nitro-1-H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)-acetamide]) binding and/or radioactive drug uptake correlated with single-dose radiation response in 9L gliosarcoma tumours. Materials and methods Twenty-two 9L tumours were grown in male Fischer rats. Rats were administered low specific activity 18F-EF5 and their tumours irradiated and assessed for cell survival and hypoxia. Hypoxia assays included EF5 binding measured by antibodies against bound-drug adducts and gamma counts of 18F-EF5 tumour uptake compared with uptake by normal muscle and blood. These assays were compared with cellular radiation response (in vivo to in vitro assay). In six cases, uptake of tumour versus muscle was also assayed using images from a PET (positron emission tomography) camera (PENN G-PET). Results The intertumoural variation in radiation response of 9L tumour-cells was significantly correlated with uptake of 18F-labelled EF5 (i.e., including both bound and non-bound drug) using either tumour to muscle or tumour to blood gamma count ratios. In the tumours where imaging was performed, there was a significant correlation between the image analysis and gamma count analysis. Intertumoural variation in cellular radiation response of the same 22 tumours was also correlated with mean flow cytometry signal due to EF5 binding. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first animal model/drug combination demonstrating a correlation of radioresponse for tumour-cells from individual tumours with drug metabolism using either immunohistochemical or non-invasive techniques. PMID:19995239

  13. In vitro evaluation of human hybrid cell lines generated by fusion of B-lymphoblastoid cells and ex vivo tumour cells as candidate vaccines for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Dunnion, Debbie; Teobald, Iryna; Walewska, Renata; Browning, Michael J

    2012-10-12

    Fusions of dendritic cells (DCs) and tumour cells have been shown to induce protective immunity to tumour challenge in animal models, and to represent a promising approach to cancer immunotherapy. The broader clinical application of this approach, however, is potentially constrained by the lack of replicative capacity and limited standardisation of fusion cell preparations. We show here that fusion of ex vivo tumour cells isolated from patients with a range of haematological malignancies with the human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL), HMy2, followed by chemical selection of the hybridomas, generated stable, self-replicating human hybrid cell lines that grew continuously in tissue culture, and survived freeze/thawing cycles. The hybrid cell lines expressed HLA class I and class II molecules, and the major T-cell costimulatory molecules, CD80 and CD86. All but two of 14 hybrid cell lines generated expressed tumour-associated antigens that were not expressed by HMy2 cells, and were therefore derived from the parent tumour cells. The hybrid cell lines stimulated allogeneic T-cell proliferative responses and interferon-gamma release in vitro to a considerably greater degree than their respective parent tumour cells. The enhanced T-cell stimulation was inhibited by CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, and by blocking antibodies to MHC class I and class II molecules. Finally, all of five LCL/tumour hybrid cell lines tested induced tumour antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell responses in vitro in PBL from healthy, HLA-A2+ individuals, as detected by HLA-A2-peptide pentamer staining and cellular cytotoxicity. These data show that stable hybrid cell lines, with enhanced immunostimulatory properties and potential for therapeutic vaccination, can be generated by in vitro fusion and chemical selection of B-LCL and ex vivo haematological tumour cells.

  14. [Should the contralateral testis be systematically biopsied after orchidectomy for unilateral germ cell tumour of the testis?].

    PubMed

    Iborra, François; Mottet, Nicolas

    2005-04-01

    Intratubular neoplasia (ITN) of the testis is a precursor of germ cell tumour, apart from spermatocytic seminoma. It is often detected in testicular tissue adjacent to germ cell tumours, but is less common in the contralateral testis. Early diagnosis of ITN by testicular biopsy would allow earlier, conservative management. However, this approach remains highly controversial except in very specific indications.

  15. Increasing rates of brain tumours in the Swedish national inpatient register and the causes of death register.

    PubMed

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2015-04-03

    Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz-300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., "possibly", carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) and Causes of Death Register (CDR) to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998-2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007-2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008-2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk.

  16. Increasing Rates of Brain Tumours in the Swedish National Inpatient Register and the Causes of Death Register

    PubMed Central

    Hardell, Lennart; Carlberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency emissions in the frequency range 30 kHz–300 GHz were evaluated to be Group 2B, i.e., “possibly”, carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) at WHO in May 2011. The Swedish Cancer Register has not shown increasing incidence of brain tumours in recent years and has been used to dismiss epidemiological evidence on a risk. In this study we used the Swedish National Inpatient Register (IPR) and Causes of Death Register (CDR) to further study the incidence comparing with the Cancer Register data for the time period 1998–2013 using joinpoint regression analysis. In the IPR we found a joinpoint in 2007 with Annual Percentage Change (APC) +4.25%, 95% CI +1.98, +6.57% during 2007–2013 for tumours of unknown type in the brain or CNS. In the CDR joinpoint regression found one joinpoint in 2008 with APC during 2008–2013 +22.60%, 95% CI +9.68, +37.03%. These tumour diagnoses would be based on clinical examination, mainly CT and/or MRI, but without histopathology or cytology. No statistically significant increasing incidence was found in the Swedish Cancer Register during these years. We postulate that a large part of brain tumours of unknown type are never reported to the Cancer Register. Furthermore, the frequency of diagnosis based on autopsy has declined substantially due to a general decline of autopsies in Sweden adding further to missing cases. We conclude that the Swedish Cancer Register is not reliable to be used to dismiss results in epidemiological studies on the use of wireless phones and brain tumour risk. PMID:25854296

  17. High-content analysis of tumour cell invasion in three-dimensional spheroid assays

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Vinton; Esteves, Filomena; Chakrabarty, Aruna; Cockle, Julia; Short, Susan; Brüning-Richardson, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Targeting infiltrating tumour cells is an attractive way of combating cancer invasion and metastasis. Here we describe a novel and reproducible method for high content analysis of invading cells using multicellular tumour spheroid assays in a high grade glioma model. Live cell imaging of spheroids generated from glioma cell lines, U87 and U251, gave insight into migration dynamics and cell morphology in response to anti-migratory drugs. Immunofluorescence imaging confirmed cytoskeletal rearrangements in the treated cells indicating a direct effect on cell morphology. Effect on migration was determined by a Migration Index (MI) from brightfield images which confirmed anti-migratory activity of the drugs. A marked effect on the core with treatment suggestive of disordered proliferation was also observed. A newly developed technique to prepare the spheroids and migratory cells for immunohistochemistry allowed an assessment of response to drug treatment with a selection of markers. A difference in protein expression was noted between cells maintained within the core and migratory cells indicative of the presence of cell subpopulations within the spheroid core. We conclude that this high content analysis allows researchers to perform screening of anti-tumour invasion compounds and study their effects on cellular dynamics, particularly in relation to protein expression, for the first time. PMID:26244167

  18. Pharmacological Inhibition of polysialyltransferase ST8SiaII Modulates Tumour Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Al-Saraireh, Yousef M. J.; Sutherland, Mark; Springett, Bradley R.; Freiberger, Friedrich; Ribeiro Morais, Goreti; Loadman, Paul M.; Errington, Rachel J.; Smith, Paul J.; Fukuda, Minoru; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita; Patterson, Laurence H.; Shnyder, Steven D.; Falconer, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Polysialic acid (polySia), an α-2,8-glycosidically linked polymer of sialic acid, is a developmentally regulated post-translational modification predominantly found on NCAM (neuronal cell adhesion molecule). Whilst high levels are expressed during development, peripheral adult organs do not express polySia-NCAM. However, tumours of neural crest-origin re-express polySia-NCAM: its occurrence correlates with aggressive and invasive disease and poor clinical prognosis in different cancer types, notably including small cell lung cancer (SCLC), pancreatic cancer and neuroblastoma. In neuronal development, polySia-NCAM biosynthesis is catalysed by two polysialyltransferases, ST8SiaII and ST8SiaIV, but it is ST8SiaII that is the prominent enzyme in tumours. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of ST8SiaII inhibition by a small molecule on tumour cell migration, utilising cytidine monophosphate (CMP) as a tool compound. Using immunoblotting we showed that CMP reduced ST8iaII-mediated polysialylation of NCAM. Utilizing a novel HPLC-based assay to quantify polysialylation of a fluorescent acceptor (DMB-DP3), we demonstrated that CMP is a competitive inhibitor of ST8SiaII (Ki = 10 µM). Importantly, we have shown that CMP causes a concentration-dependent reduction in tumour cell-surface polySia expression, with an absence of toxicity. When ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells (SH-SY5Y and C6-STX) were evaluated in 2D cell migration assays, ST8SiaII inhibition led to significant reductions in migration, while CMP had no effect on cells not expressing ST8SiaII (DLD-1 and C6-WT). The study demonstrates for the first time that a polysialyltransferase inhibitor can modulate migration in ST8SiaII-expressing tumour cells. We conclude that ST8SiaII can be considered a druggable target with the potential for interfering with a critical mechanism in tumour cell dissemination in metastatic cancers. PMID:23951351

  19. MPLA incorporation into DC-targeting glycoliposomes favours anti-tumour T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Boks, Martine A; Ambrosini, Martino; Bruijns, Sven C; Kalay, Hakan; van Bloois, Louis; Storm, Gert; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2015-10-28

    Dendritic cells (DC) are attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy as they initiate strong and long-lived tumour-specific T cell responses. DC can be effectively targeted in vivo with tumour antigens by using nanocarriers such as liposomes. Cross-presentation of tumour antigens is enhanced with strong adjuvants such as TLR ligands. However, often these adjuvants have off-target effects, and would benefit from a DC-specific targeting strategy, similar to the tumour antigen. The goal of this study was to develop a strategy for specifically targeting DC with tumour antigen and adjuvant by using glycoliposomes. We have generated liposomes containing the glycan Lewis(Le)(X) which is highly specific for the C-type lectin receptor DC-SIGN expressed by DC. Le(X)-modified liposomes were taken up by human monocyte-derived DC in a DC-SIGN-specific manner. As adjuvants we incorporated the TLR ligands Pam3CySK4, Poly I:C, MPLA and R848 into liposomes and compared their adjuvant capacity on DC. Incorporation of the TLR4 ligand MPLA into glycoliposomes induced DC maturation and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a DC-SIGN-specific manner, and DC activation was comparable to administration of soluble MPLA. Incorporation of MPLA into glycoliposomes significantly enhanced antigen cross-presentation of the melanoma tumour antigen gp100280-288 peptide to CD8(+) T cells compared to non-glycosylated MPLA liposomes. Importantly, antigen cross-presentation of the gp100280-288 peptide was significantly higher using MPLA glycoliposomes compared to the co-administration of soluble MPLA with glycoliposomes. Taken together, our data demonstrates that specific targeting of a gp100 tumour antigen and the adjuvant MPLA to DC-SIGN-expressing DC enhances the uptake of peptide-containing liposomes, the activation of DC, and induces tumour antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. These data demonstrate that adjuvant-containing glycoliposome-based vaccines targeting DC-SIGN(+) DC

  20. Sex determination by SRY PCR and sequencing of Tasmanian devil facial tumour cell lines reveals non-allograft transmission.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xianlan; Wang, Yunfeng; Hua, Bobby; Miller, Webb; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Hongyu; Kong, Xiangang

    2016-05-20

    Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is an infectious tumour disease and was hypothesised to be transmitted by allograft during biting based on two cytogenetic findings of DFTD tumours in 2006. It was then believed that DFTD tumours were originally from a female devil. In this study the devil sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene was PCR amplified and sequenced, and six pairs of devil SRY PCR primers were used for detection of devil SRY gene fragments in purified DFTD tumour cell lines. Using three pairs of devil SRY PCR primers, devil SRY gene sequence was detected by PCR and sequencing in genomic DNA of DFTD tumour cell lines from six male devils, but not from six female devils. Four out of six DFTD tumour cell lines from male devils contained nucleotides 288-482 of the devil SRY gene, and another two DFTD tumour cell lines contained nucleotides 381-577 and 493-708 of the gene, respectively. These results indicate that the different portions of the SRY gene in the DFTD tumours of the male devils were originally from the male hosts, rejecting the currently believed DFTD allograft transmission theory. The reasons why DFTD transmission was incorrectly defined as allograft are discussed.

  1. Mesothelioma and anti-Ma paraneoplastic syndrome; heterogeneity in immunogenic tumours increases.

    PubMed

    Archer, Hilary Anne; Panopoulou, Aikaterini; Bhatt, Nidhi; Edey, Anthony James; Giffin, Nicola Jane

    2014-02-01

    We present a patient with opsoclonus and diffuse cerebellar signs who had an anti-Ma2 antibody-associated paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to a sarcomatoid mesothelioma. This case highlights the importance of early tumour detection, instigation of therapeutic measures, and the heterogeneity of underlying malignancies in neurological paraneoplastic syndromes.

  2. Interdependent IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T-cell controls tumour eradication by combined α-CTLA-4+α-PD-1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Fu, Tihui; Guan, Baoxiang; Chen, Jianfeng; Blando, Jorge M.; Allison, James P.; Xiong, Liangwen; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 has shown significant clinical responses in different types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, combining detailed analysis of human tumour samples with preclinical tumour models, we report that concomitant blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 improves anti-tumour immune responses and synergistically eradicates tumour. Mechanistically, combination therapy relies on the interdependence between IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T cells, as lack of either pathway abrogates the immune-boosting and therapeutic effects of combination therapy. Combination treatment increases IL-7Rα expression on tumour-infiltrating T cells in an IFN-γ/IFN-γR signalling-dependent manner, which may serve as a potential biomarker for clinical trials with immune checkpoint blockade. Our data suggest that combining immune checkpoint blockade with IL-7 signalling could be an effective modality to improve immunotherapeutic efficacy. Taken together, we conclude that combination therapy potently reverses immunosuppression and eradicates tumours via an intricate interplay between IFN-γ/IFN-γR and IL-7/IL-7R pathways. PMID:27498556

  3. Cross-Talk between Cancer Cells and the Tumour Microenvironment: The Role of the 5-Lipoxygenase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gillian Y.; Pidgeon, Graham P.

    2017-01-01

    5-lipoxygenase is an enzyme responsible for the synthesis of a range of bioactive lipids signalling molecules known collectively as eicosanoids. 5-lipoxygenase metabolites such as 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (5-HETE) and a number of leukotrienes are mostly derived from arachidonic acid and have been shown to be lipid mediators of inflammation in different pathological states including cancer. Upregulated 5-lipoxygenase expression and metabolite production is found in a number of cancer types and has been shown to be associated with increased tumorigenesis. 5-lipoxygenase activity is present in a number of diverse cell types of the immune system and connective tissue. In this review, we discuss potential routes through which cancer cells may utilise the 5-lipoxygenase pathway to interact with the tumour microenvironment during the development and progression of a tumour. Furthermore, immune-derived 5-lipoxygenase signalling can drive both pro- and anti-tumour effects depending on the immune cell subtype and an overview of evidence for these opposing effects is presented. PMID:28125014

  4. Effects of preset sequential administrations of sunitinib and everolimus on tumour differentiation in Caki-1 renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Santos, C D; Tijeras-Raballand, A; Serova, M; Sebbagh, S; Slimane, K; Faivre, S; de Gramont, A; Raymond, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sunitinib (VEGFR/PDGFR inhibitor) and everolimus (mTOR inhibitor) are both approved for advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) as first-line and second-line therapy, respectively. In the clinics, sunitinib treatment is limited by the emergence of acquired resistance, leading to a switch to second-line treatment at progression, often based on everolimus. No data have been yet generated on programmed alternating sequential strategies combining alternative use of sunitinib and everolimus before progression. Such strategy is expected to delay the emergence of acquired resistance and improve tumour control. The aim of our study was to assess the changes in tumours induced by three different sequences administration of sunitinib and everolimus. Methods: In human Caki-1 RCC xenograft model, sunitinib was alternated with everolimus every week, every 2 weeks, or every 3 weeks. Effects on necrosis, hypoxia, angiogenesis, and EMT status were assessed by immunohisochemistry and immunofluorescence. Results: Sunitinib and everolimus programmed sequential regimens before progression yielded longer median time to tumour progression than sunitinib and everolimus monotherapies. In each group of treatment, tumour growth control was associated with inhibition of mTOR pathway and changes from a mesenchymal towards an epithelial phenotype, with a decrease in vimentin and an increase in E-cadherin expression. The sequential combinations of these two agents in a RCC mouse clinical trial induced antiangiogenic effects, leading to tumour necrosis. Conclusions: In summary, our study showed that alternate sequence of sunitinib and everolimus mitigated the development of mesenchymal phenotype compared with sunitinib as single agent. PMID:25422908

  5. Suspension survival mediated by PP2A-STAT3-Col XVII determines tumour initiation and metastasis in cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen-Chi; Lin, Shih-Pei; Hsu, Han-Shui; Yang, Shung-Haur; Lin, Chiu-Hua; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Hung, Mien-Chie; Hung, Shih-Chieh

    2016-01-01

    Targeting tumour-initiating cells (TICs) would lead to new therapies to cure cancer. We previously demonstrated that TICs have the capacity to survive under suspension conditions, while other cells undergo anoikis. Here we show that TICs exhibit increased phosphorylation levels of S727STAT3 because of PP2A inactivation. Collagen 17 gene expression is upregulated in a STAT3-dependent manner, which also stabilizes laminin 5 and engages cells to form hemidesmosome-like junctions in response. Blocking the PP2A-S727STAT3-collagen 17 pathway inhibits the suspension survival of TICs and their ability to form tumours in mice, while activation of the same pathway increases the suspension survival and tumour-initiation capacities of bulk cancer cells. The S727STAT3 phosphorylation levels correlate with collagen 17 expression in colon tumour samples, and correlate inversely with survival. Finally, this signalling axis enhances the ability of TIC to form tumours in mouse models of malignant lung cancer pleural effusion and spontaneous colon cancer metastasis. PMID:27306323

  6. Endosonographic features predictive of benign and malignant gastrointestinal stromal cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, L; Landi, B; Cellier, C; Cuillerier, E; Roseau, G; Barbier, J

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM—Some endoscopic ultrasonographic (EUS) features have been reported to be suggestive of malignancy in gastrointestinal stromal cell tumours (SCTs). The aim of this study was to assess the predictive value of these features for malignancy.
METHODS—A total of 56 histologically proven cases of SCT studied by EUS between 1989 and 1996 were reviewed. There were 42 gastric tumours, 12 oesophageal tumours, and two rectal tumours. The tumours were divided into two groups: (a) benign SCT, comprising benign leiomyoma (n = 34); (b) malignant or borderline SCT (n = 22), comprising leiomyosarcoma (n = 9), leiomyoblastoma (n = 9), and leiomyoma of uncertain malignant potential (n = 4). The main EUS features recorded were tumour size, ulceration, echo pattern, cystic spaces, extraluminal margins, and lymph nodes with a malignant pattern. The two groups were compared by univariate and multivariate analysis.
RESULTS—Irregular extraluminal margins, cystic spaces, and lymph nodes with a malignant pattern were most predictive of malignant or borderline SCT. Pairwise combinations of the three features had a specificity and positive predictive value of 100% for malignant or borderline SCT, but a sensitivity of only 23%. The presence of at least one of these three criteria had 91% sensitivity, 88% specificity, and 83% predictive positive value. In multivariate analysis, cystic spaces and irregular margins were the only two features independently predictive of malignant potential. The features most predictive of benign SCTs were regular margins, tumour size ⩽30 mm, and a homogeneous echo pattern. When the three features were combined, histology confirmed a benign SCT in all cases.
CONCLUSIONS—The combined presence of two out of three EUS features (irregular extraluminal margins, cystic spaces, and lymph nodes with a malignant pattern) had a positive predictive value of 100% for malignant or borderline gastrointestinal SCT. Tumours less than 30

  7. Association of blebbing with assembly of cytoskeletal proteins in ATP-depleted EL-4 ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Gabai, V L; Kabakov, A E; Mosin, A F

    1992-01-01

    ATP depletion in EL-4 ascites tumour cells rapidly induced the changes in cell morphology (blebbing), cytoskeletal protein assembly and finally resulted in cell death. After 1 hr of incubation with 2 microM rotenone (inhibitor of respiration) in glucose-free medium, when ATP level was 4% of the initial level, there were increases in triton-insoluble actin and vinculin levels (2.5-fold and 2.8-fold, respectively) and 44% of cells showed blebs; such treatment damaged cells irreversibly. Ca2+ removal did not diminish the effect of ATP depletion on cytoskeleton, blebbing and cell death, although the elevation of free intracellular Ca2+ in rotenone-treated cells was prevented. The role of ATP in maintaining cytoskeleton and cell shape is discussed.

  8. Imaging and radiation effects of gold nanoparticles in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    McQuaid, Harold N; Muir, Mark F; Taggart, Laura E; McMahon, Stephen J; Coulter, Jonathan A; Hyland, Wendy B; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T; Schettino, Giuseppe; Prise, Kevin M; Hirst, David G; Botchway, Stanley W; Currell, Fred J

    2016-01-20

    Gold nanoparticle radiosensitization represents a novel technique in enhancement of ionising radiation dose and its effect on biological systems. Variation between theoretical predictions and experimental measurement is significant enough that the mechanism leading to an increase in cell killing and DNA damage is still not clear. We present the first experimental results that take into account both the measured biodistribution of gold nanoparticles at the cellular level and the range of the product electrons responsible for energy deposition. Combining synchrotron-generated monoenergetic X-rays, intracellular gold particle imaging and DNA damage assays, has enabled a DNA damage model to be generated that includes the production of intermediate electrons. We can therefore show for the first time good agreement between the prediction of biological outcomes from both the Local Effect Model and a DNA damage model with experimentally observed cell killing and DNA damage induction via the combination of X-rays and GNPs. However, the requirement of two distinct models as indicated by this mechanistic study, one for short-term DNA damage and another for cell survival, indicates that, at least for nanoparticle enhancement, it is not safe to equate the lethal lesions invoked in the local effect model with DNA damage events.

  9. The radiosensitizing effect of the aurora kinase inhibitors, ENMD-2076, on canine mast cell tumours in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shiomitsu, K; Sajo, E; Rubin, C; Sehgal, I

    2016-03-01

    ENMD-2076 is an aurora kinase inhibitor that also has multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitor properties. In this study, the mRNA and the protein expression of aurora-A and aurora-B were evaluated in three canine mast cell tumour cell lines. Dose-dependent cytotoxicity was seen in the cells treated, and it affected the cell cycle with cells in the G2/M phase being selectively killed. The cells were also evaluated for radiosensitivity with/without ENMD-2076, and radiosensitization was seen after 3 Gy and 6 Gy exposures with ENMD-2076 for 48 h. Protein expression of caspase-3 was gradually increased, and the expression intensity was highest at 24 h post irradiation in cells without ENMD-2076 treatment, which indicates that radiation exposure with ENMD-2076-induced cell death faster than radiation treatment alone. Our study results suggest the potential usefulness of treating canine mast cell tumours with aurora kinase inhibitors alone or in conjunction with radiation therapy.

  10. Tumour resistance in induced pluripotent stem cells derived from naked mole-rats.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Shingo; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Oiwa, Yuki; Shimizu, Atsushi; Hachiya, Tsuyoshi; Bono, Hidemasa; Koya, Ikuko; Okada, Yohei; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Tsuchiya, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Onishi, Nobuyuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Narita, Minoru; Ikeda, Eiji; Okanoya, Kazuo; Seino, Ken-Ichiro; Saya, Hideyuki; Okano, Hideyuki; Miura, Kyoko

    2016-05-10

    The naked mole-rat (NMR, Heterocephalus glaber), which is the longest-lived rodent species, exhibits extraordinary resistance to cancer. Here we report that NMR somatic cells exhibit a unique tumour-suppressor response to reprogramming induction. In this study, we generate NMR-induced pluripotent stem cells (NMR-iPSCs) and find that NMR-iPSCs do not exhibit teratoma-forming tumorigenicity due to the species-specific activation of tumour-suppressor alternative reading frame (ARF) and a disruption mutation of the oncogene ES cell-expressed Ras (ERAS). The forced expression of Arf in mouse iPSCs markedly reduces tumorigenicity. Furthermore, we identify an NMR-specific tumour-suppression phenotype-ARF suppression-induced senescence (ASIS)-that may protect iPSCs and somatic cells from ARF suppression and, as a consequence, tumorigenicity. Thus, NMR-specific ARF regulation and the disruption of ERAS regulate tumour resistance in NMR-iPSCs. Our findings obtained from studies of NMR-iPSCs provide new insight into the mechanisms of tumorigenicity in iPSCs and cancer resistance in the NMR.

  11. Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells from Blood of Breast Cancer Patients via RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Hutter, Stefan; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is still the most frequent cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Often death is not caused only by the primary tumour itself, but also by metastatic lesions. Today it is largely accepted, that these remote metastases arise out of cells, which detach from the primary tumour, enter circulation, settle down at secondary sites in the body and are called Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs). The occurrence of such minimal residual diseases in the blood of breast cancer patients is mostly linked to a worse prognosis for therapy outcome and overall survival. Due to their very low frequency, the detection of CTCs is, still a technical challenge. RT-qPCR as a highly sensitive method could be an approach for CTC-detection from peripheral blood of breast cancer patients. This assumption is based on the fact that CTCs are of epithelial origin and therefore express a different gene panel than surrounding blood cells. For the technical approach it is necessary to identify appropriate marker genes and to correlate their gene expression levels to the number of tumour cells within a sample in an in vitro approach. After that, samples from adjuvant and metastatic patients can be analysed. This approach may lead to new concepts in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24202442

  12. Congenital granular cell tumour of the newborn: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Steckler, David; Sargent, Larry A; Turner, Leslie A

    2011-01-01

    A congenital granular cell tumour is rare, and presents in newborns as a mass arising from the alveolus. While its pathogenesis is unclear, it has no malignant potential and may, occasionally, spontaneously regress postpartum. Successful treatment usually consists of conservative simple excision.

  13. Increase in Sialylation and Branching in the Mouse Serum N-glycome Correlates with Inflammation and Ovarian Tumour Progression

    PubMed Central

    Saldova, Radka; Piccard, Helene; Pérez-Garay, Marta; Harvey, David J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Galligan, Marie C.; Berghmans, Nele; Madden, Stephen F.; Peracaula, Rosa; Opdenakker, Ghislain; Rudd, Pauline M.

    2013-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynaecological cancer and is often diagnosed in late stage, often as the result of the unavailability of sufficiently sensitive biomarkers for early detection, tumour progression and tumour-associated inflammation. Glycosylation is the most common posttranslational modification of proteins; it is altered in cancer and therefore is a potential source of biomarkers. We investigated the quantitative and qualitative effects of anti-inflammatory (acetylsalicylic acid) and pro-inflammatory (thioglycolate and chlorite-oxidized oxyamylose) drugs on glycosylation in mouse cancer serum. A significant increase in sialylation and branching of glycans in mice treated with an inflammation-inducing compound was observed. Moreover, the increases in sialylation correlated with increased tumour sizes. Increases in sialylation and branching were consistent with increased expression of sialyltransferases and the branching enzyme MGAT5. Because the sialyltransferases are highly conserved among species, the described changes in the ovarian cancer mouse model are relevant to humans and serum N-glycome analysis for monitoring disease treatment and progression might be a useful biomarker. PMID:24023608

  14. Whole-exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C; Houlston, Richard S; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-22

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the cancer's mutational profile. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per Mb) as compared with common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT, we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4 Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT.

  15. Whole-exome sequencing reveals the mutational spectrum of testicular germ cell tumours

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Summersgill, Brenda; Yost, Shawn; Sultana, Razvan; Labreche, Karim; Dudakia, Darshna; Renwick, Anthony; Seal, Sheila; Al-Saadi, Reem; Broderick, Peter; Turner, Nicholas C.; Houlston, Richard S.; Huddart, Robert; Shipley, Janet; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCTs) are the most common cancer in young men. Here we perform whole-exome sequencing (WES) of 42 TGCTs to comprehensively study the cancer's mutational profile. The mutation rate is uniformly low in all of the tumours (mean 0.5 mutations per Mb) as compared with common cancers, consistent with the embryological origin of TGCT. In addition to expected copy number gain of chromosome 12p and mutation of KIT, we identify recurrent mutations in the tumour suppressor gene CDC27 (11.9%). Copy number analysis reveals recurring amplification of the spermatocyte development gene FSIP2 (15.3%) and a 0.4 Mb region at Xq28 (15.3%). Two treatment-refractory patients are shown to harbour XRCC2 mutations, a gene strongly implicated in defining cisplatin resistance. Our findings provide further insights into genes involved in the development and progression of TGCT. PMID:25609015

  16. Concerted microRNA control of Hedgehog signalling in cerebellar neuronal progenitor and tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferretti, Elisabetta; De Smaele, Enrico; Miele, Evelina; Laneve, Pietro; Po, Agnese; Pelloni, Marianna; Paganelli, Arianna; Di Marcotullio, Lucia; Caffarelli, Elisa; Screpanti, Isabella; Bozzoni, Irene; Gulino, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) are crucial post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression and control cell differentiation and proliferation. However, little is known about their targeting of specific developmental pathways. Hedgehog (Hh) signalling controls cerebellar granule cell progenitor development and a subversion of this pathway leads to neoplastic transformation into medulloblastoma (MB). Using a miRNA high-throughput profile screening, we identify here a downregulated miRNA signature in human MBs with high Hh signalling. Specifically, we identify miR-125b and miR-326 as suppressors of the pathway activator Smoothened together with miR-324-5p, which also targets the downstream transcription factor Gli1. Downregulation of these miRNAs allows high levels of Hh-dependent gene expression leading to tumour cell proliferation. Interestingly, the downregulation of miR-324-5p is genetically determined by MB-associated deletion of chromosome 17p. We also report that whereas miRNA expression is downregulated in cerebellar neuronal progenitors, it increases alongside differentiation, thereby allowing cell maturation and growth inhibition. These findings identify a novel regulatory circuitry of the Hh signalling and suggest that misregulation of specific miRNAs, leading to its aberrant activation, sustain cancer development. PMID:18756266

  17. A parametric study of freezing injury in ELT-3 uterine leiomyoma tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Bischof, J; Fahssi, W; Smith, D; Nagel, T; Swanlund, D

    2001-02-01

    Cellular level freeze injury was investigated after controlled freezing of an Eker rat uterine fibroid cell line in both the presence and absence of oestradiol. The connection between thermal history and cell injury in single ELT-3 cells in suspension (without oestradiol) was studied through a two-level, four-parameter (2(4)) experiment with membrane dye exclusion as the end-point. The four parameters considered were cooling rate (CR), end temperature (ET), hold time (HT) and thawing rate (TR). A high and low value of each parameter was selected as follows: CR, 5-25 degrees C/min; ET, -20 to -30 degrees C; HT, 0-5 min; TR 20-200 degrees C/min. The greatest parameter effect on freeze injury in this range was ET followed by HT, then TR and finally CR. In addition, significant parameter interactions and curvature were found. Additional CR results outside the original parameter range showed a reduction in survival at both 1 and 50 degrees C/min suggestive of an inverted U-shaped survival curve. These results show that this tumour system is susceptible to cryoinjury, particularly at temperatures below -30 degrees C with HT of >5 min and slow thawing. In addition, the presence of oestradiol was found to increase the susceptibility of these cells to cryoinjury.

  18. Cancer cell survival during detachment from the ECM: multiple barriers to tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Buchheit, Cassandra L; Weigel, Kelsey J; Schafer, Zachary T

    2014-09-01

    Epithelial cells require attachment to the extracellular matrix (ECM) for survival. However, during tumour progression and metastasis, cancerous epithelial cells must adapt to and survive in the absence of ECM. During the past 20 years, several cellular changes, including anoikis, have been shown to regulate cell viability when cells become detached from the ECM. In this Opinion article, we review in detail how cancer cells can overcome or take advantage of these specific processes. Gaining a better understanding of how cancer cells survive during detachment from the ECM will be instrumental in designing chemotherapeutic strategies that aim to eliminate ECM-detached metastatic cells.

  19. Investigating the role of tumour cell derived iNOS on tumour growth and vasculature in vivo using a tetracycline regulated expression system.

    PubMed

    Papaevangelou, Efthymia; Whitley, Guy S; Johnstone, Alan P; Robinson, Simon P; Howe, Franklyn A

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical signalling molecule involved in various physiological and pathological processes, including cancer. Both tumouricidal and tumour promoting effects have been attributed to NO, making its role in cancer biology controversial and unclear. To investigate the specific role of tumour-derived NO in vascular development, C6 glioma cells were genetically modified to include a doxycycline regulated gene expression system that controls the expression of an antisense RNA to inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) to manipulate endogenous iNOS expression. Xenografts of these cells were propagated in the presence or absence of doxycycline. Susceptibility magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), initially with a carbogen (95% O2/5% CO2) breathing challenge and subsequently an intravascular blood pool contrast agent, was used to assess haemodynamic vasculature (ΔR2*) and fractional blood volume (fBV), and correlated with histopathological assessment of tumour vascular density, maturation and function. Inhibition of NO production in C6 gliomas led to significant growth delay and inhibition of vessel maturation. Parametric fBV maps were used to identify vascularised regions from which the carbogen-induced ΔR2* was measured and found to be positively correlated with vessel maturation, quantified ex vivo using fluorescence microscopy for endothelial and perivascular cell staining. These data suggest that tumour-derived iNOS is an important mediator of tumour growth and vessel maturation, hence a promising target for anti-vascular cancer therapies. The combination of ΔR2* response to carbogen and fBV MRI can provide a marker of tumour vessel maturation that could be applied to non-invasively monitor treatment response to iNOS inhibitors.

  20. Matrix metalloproteinases are involved in both type I (apoptosis) and type II (autophagy) cell death induced by sodium phenylacetate in MDA-MB-231 breast tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Sébastien; Berard, Madeleine; Kellaf, Sabine; Peyri, Nicole; Fauvel-Lafève, Françoise; Legrand, Chantal; He, Lu; Crépin, Michel

    2009-04-01

    The effects of sodium phenylacetate (NaPa), an antitumoral molecule, on cell death and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activities and synthesis were investigated in two metastatic breast tumour cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435, cultured on three-dimensional type I collagen gels (3-D cultures). In both cell lines, NaPa inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptotic cell death as measured by TUNEL assay, with an IC(30) of 20 mM and 10 mM for MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 cells, respectively. In MDA-MB-231 cells, NaPa also induced (i) an autophagic process evidenced by the appearance of autophagic vacuoles and an increased phosphatase acid activity, (ii) the formation of pseudopodia and (iii) an increase in MMP-1 and MMP-9 secretion without affecting MT1-MMP. In NaPa-treated MDA-MB-435 cells, no autophagic vacuoles were formed but F-actin depolymerisation was observed. MMP-1, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP levels were strongly enhanced in these cells but MMPs were not secreted and accumulated intracellularly. When breast cancer cells were treated with NaPa in the presence of an MMP inhibitor (GM6001), apoptotic cell death decreased and the induction of autophagic vacuoles in MDA-MB-231 cells was inhibited. Taken together, these data suggest that MMPs are involved in the autophagic cell death and/or apoptosis of breast tumour cells.

  1. Engineering Salmonella as intracellular factory for effective killing of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Eva María; Mesa-Pereira, Beatriz; Medina, Carlos; Flores, Amando; Santero, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella have many desirable properties as antitumour-agent due to its ability to proliferate inside tumours and induce tumour regression. Additionally, this bacterium can be genetically engineered to deliver therapeutic proteins intratumourally. The main limitation of this approach is the efficient release of therapeutic molecules from intratumoural bacteria. Here we have developed an inducible autolysis system based in the lysis operon of the lambda phage that, in response to anhydrotetracycline, lysates Salmonella thus releasing its content. The system was combined with a salicylate cascade system that allows efficient production of therapeutic molecules in response to aspirin and with a sifA mutation that liberates bacteria from the vacuoles to a cytosolic location. The combination of these three elements makes this strain a putative powerful instrument in cancer treatment. We have used this engineered strain for the intracellular production and delivery of Cp53 peptide. The engineered strain is able to sequentially produce and release the cytotoxic peptide while proliferating inside tumour cells, thus inducing host cell death. Our results show that temporal separation of protein production from protein release is essential to efficiently kill tumour cells. The combined system is a further step in the engineering of more efficient bacteria for cancer therapy. PMID:27464652

  2. Systematic analysis of tumour cell-extracellular matrix adhesion identifies independent prognostic factors in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jocelyn P.; Natrajan, Rachael C.; Yuan, Yinyin; Tan, Aik-Choon; Huang, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Tumour cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are fundamental for discrete steps in breast cancer progression. In particular, cancer cell adhesion to ECM proteins present in the microenvironment is critical for accelerating tumour growth and facilitating metastatic spread. To assess the utility of tumour cell-ECM adhesion as a means for discovering prognostic factors in breast cancer survival, here we perform a systematic phenotypic screen and characterise the adhesion properties of a panel of human HER2 amplified breast cancer cell lines across six ECM proteins commonly deregulated in breast cancer. We determine a gene expression signature that defines a subset of cell lines displaying impaired adhesion to laminin. Cells with impaired laminin adhesion showed an enrichment in genes associated with cell motility and molecular pathways linked to cytokine signalling and inflammation. Evaluation of this gene set in the Molecular Taxonomy of Breast Cancer International Consortium (METABRIC) cohort of 1,964 patients identifies the F12 and STC2 genes as independent prognostic factors for overall survival in breast cancer. Our study demonstrates the potential of in vitro cell adhesion screens as a novel approach for identifying prognostic factors for disease outcome. PMID:27556857

  3. A pilot study to explore circulating tumour cells in pancreatic cancer as a novel biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, L; Backen, A; Sloane, R; Menasce, L; Ryder, D; Krebs, M; Board, R; Clack, G; Hughes, A; Blackhall, F; Valle, J W; Dive, C

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obtaining tissue for pancreatic carcinoma diagnosis and biomarker assessment to aid drug development is challenging. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) may represent a potential biomarker to address these unmet needs. We compared prospectively the utility of two platforms for CTC enumeration and characterisation in pancreatic cancer patients in a pilot exploratory study. Patients and methods: Blood samples were obtained prospectively from 54 consenting patients and analysed by CellSearch and isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET). CellSearch exploits immunomagnetic capture of CTCs-expressing epithelial markers, whereas ISET is a marker independent, blood filtration device. Circulating tumour cell expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers was assessed to explore any discrepancy in CTC number between the two platforms. Results: ISET detected CTCs in more patients than CellSearch (93% vs 40%) and in higher numbers (median CTCs/7.5 ml, 9 (range 0–240) vs 0 (range 0–144)). Heterogeneity observed for epithelial cell adhesion molecule, pan-cytokeratin (CK), E-Cadherin, Vimentin and CK 7 expression in CTCs may account for discrepancy in CTC number between platforms. Conclusion: ISET detects more CTCs than CellSearch and offers flexible CTC characterisation with potential to investigate CTC biology and develop biomarkers for pancreatic cancer patient management. PMID:22187035

  4. Tumour-associated macrophages influence canine mammary cancer stem-like cells enhancing their pro-angiogenic properties.

    PubMed

    Rybicka, A; Eyileten, C; Taciak, B; Mucha, J; Majchrzak, K; Hellmen, E; Krol, M

    2016-08-01

    Cancer stem-like cells as cells with ability to self-renewal and potential to differentiate into various types of cells are known to be responsible for tumour initiation, recurrence and drug resistance. Hence a comprehensive research is concentrated on discovering cancer stem-like cells biology and interdependence between them and other cells. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of macrophages on cancer stem-like cells in canine mammary carcinomas. As recent studies indicated presence of macrophages in cancer environment stimulates cancer cells into more motile and invasive cells by acquisition of macrophage phenotypes. From two canine mammary tumour cell lines, CMT-U27 and P114 cancer stem-like cells were stained with Sca1, CD44 and EpCAM monoclonal antibodies and isolated. Those cells were next co-cultured with macrophages for 5 days and used for further experiments. Canine Gene Expression Microarray revealed 29 different expressed transcripts in cancer stem-like cells co-cultured with macrophages compared to those in mono-culture. Up-regulation of C-C motif chemokine 2 was considered as the most interesting for further investigation. Additionally, those cells showed overexpression of genes involved in non-canonical Wnt pathway. The results of 3D tubule formation in endothelial cells induced by cancer stem-like cells co-cultured with macrophages compared to cancer stem-like cells from mono-cultures and with addition of Recombinant Canine CCL2/MCP-1 revealed the same stimulating effect. Based on those results we can conclude that macrophages have an impact on cancer stem-like cells increasing secretion of pro-angiogenic factors.

  5. Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath with simultaneous two tendon involvement of the foot treated with excision of the tumour and reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum using tibialis posterior tendon in a paediatric patient: A rare case report.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Vivek; Ansari, Tahir; Mittal, Samarth; Sharma, Pankaj; Nalwa, Aasma

    2015-12-01

    Giant cell tumour of tendon sheath is a benign soft tissue tumour arising from the tendon sheath. The involvement of foot and ankle by such tumours is relatively rare. Children are not commonly afflicted by this condition. All such tumours are reported to arise either from a single tendon sheath or one joint. We report a case of giant cell tumour of tendon sheath in a 12-year-old child, arising simultaneously from the tendon sheaths of tibialis posterior and flexor digitorum longus tendons, as well as extending into the ankle joint. It was treated by complete excision of the mass along with the tendon sheaths with reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum. The location of the tumour, age of the patient, diffuse nature of the tumour and novel technique of reconstruction of the flexor retinaculum make this case extremely rare and the first to be reported in literature.

  6. Combined cytotoxic activity of an infectious, but non-replicative herpes simplex virus type 1 and plasmacytoid dendritic cells against tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Thomann, Sabrina; Boscheinen, Jan B; Vogel, Karin; Knipe, David M; DeLuca, Neal; Gross, Stefanie; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Schuster, Philipp; Schmidt, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is an aggressive tumour of the skin with increasing incidence, frequent metastasis and poor prognosis. At the same time, it is an immunogenic type of cancer with spontaneous regressions. Most recently, the tumoricidal effect of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and their capacity to overcome the immunosuppressive tumour microenvironment are being investigated. In this respect, we studied the effect of the infectious, but replication-deficient, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) d106S vaccine strain, which lacks essential immediate early genes, in pDC co-cultures with 11 melanoma cell lines. We observed a strong cytotoxic activity, inducing apoptotic and necrotic cell death in most melanoma cell lines. The cytotoxic activity of HSV-1 d106S plus pDC was comparable to the levels of cytotoxicity induced by natural killer cells, but required only a fraction of cells with effector : target ratios of 1 : 20 (P < 0·05). The suppressive activity of cell-free supernatants derived from virus-stimulated pDC was significantly neutralized using antibodies against the interferon-α receptor (P < 0·05). In addition to type I interferons, TRAIL and granzyme B contributed to the inhibitory effect of HSV-1 d106S plus pDC to a minor extent. UV-irradiated viral stocks were significantly less active than infectious particles, both in the absence and presence of pDC (P < 0·05), indicating that residual activity of HSV-1 d106S is a major component and sensitizes the tumour cells to interferon-producing pDC. Three leukaemic cell lines were also susceptible to this treatment, suggesting a general anti-tumour effect. In conclusion, the potential of HSV-1 d106S for therapeutic vaccination should be further evaluated in patients suffering from different malignancies. PMID:26194553

  7. Autocrine growth inhibition by transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Wimmel, A; Wiedenmann, B; Rosewicz, S

    2003-01-01

    Background and aim: The role of transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1) in neuroendocrine tumour biology is currently unknown. We therefore examined the expression and biological significance of TGFβ signalling components in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of the gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) tract. Methods: Expression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors, Smads and Smad regulated proteins, was examined in surgically resected NET specimens and human NET cell lines by immunohistochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and ELISA. Activation of TGFβ-1 dependent promoters was tested by transactivation assays. Growth regulation was evaluated by cell numbers, soft agar assays, and cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry. The role of endogenous TGFβ was assessed by a TGFβ neutralising antibody and stable transfection of a dominant negative TGFβR II receptor construct. Results: Coexpression of TGFβ-1 and its receptors TGFβR I and TGFβR II was detected in 67% of human NETs and in all three NET cell lines examined. NET cell lines expressed the TGFβ signal transducers Smad 2, 3, and 4. In two of the three cell lines, TGFβ-1 treatment resulted in transactivation of a TGFβ responsive reporter construct as well as inhibition of c-myc and induction of p21(WAF1) expression. TGFβ-1 inhibited anchorage dependent and independent growth in a time and dose dependent manner in TGFβ-1 responsive cell lines. TGFβ-1 mediated growth inhibition was due to G1 arrest without evidence of induction of apoptosis. Functional inactivation of endogenous TGFβ revealed the existence of an autocrine antiproliferative loop in NET cells. Conclusions: Neuroendocrine tumour cells of the gastroenteropancreatic tract are subject to paracrine and autocrine growth inhibition by TGFβ-1, which may account in part for the low proliferative index of this tumour entity. PMID:12912863

  8. Thrombospondin modulates melanoma--platelet interactions and melanoma tumour cell growth in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Boukerche, H.; Berthier-Vergnes, O.; Tabone, E.; Bailly, M.; Doré, J. F.; McGregor, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the role of thrombospondin (TSP) as a possible ligand playing a key role in human M3Da. melanoma cell interaction with platelets and in tumour growth. TSP is secreted (80 +/- 6 ng TSP 10(-6) cells) and bound to the surface of M3Da. cells via receptors different from CD36, as shown by biosynthetic labelling and immunofluorescence studies. The levels of TSP binding to M3Da. cells evaluated by binding studies, using an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody (MAb) (LYP8), shows 367,000 +/- 58,000 (mean +/- s.d.) LYP8 binding sites per cell with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 67 nM. TSP binding to M3Da. cells shows 400,000 +/- 50,000 TSP binding sites per cell with a Kd of 10 nM. The capacity of anti-TSP MAb (LYP8) to inhibit M3Da.-platelet interactions was followed on an aggregometer and evaluated by electron microscopy studies. The biological role of TSP binding to M3Da. cells was investigated by implanting subcutaneously the M3Da. cell line in nude mice and following the size and time of in vivo tumour growth. Reducing the availability or the functional level of TSP by using an anti-TSP MAb (LYP8) resulted in a significant decrease in platelet aggregates interacting with M3Da. melanoma cells. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, purified alpha nu beta 3 was shown to bind TSP. Moreover, LYP8-coated M3Da. cells showed a reduced capacity to form tumours in vivo. M3Da. cells were observed to attach and spread on human platelet TSP-coated plastic wells. This attachment by M3Da. cells was inhibited in a similar way by LYP8 and an anti-alpha nu beta 3 MAb (LYP18). The results obtained in this study show that TSP secreted and bound to the surface of a human melanoma cell line (M3Da.) acts as a link between aggregated platelets and the M3Da. cell surface. Moreover, these results shows that TSP can modulate tumour growth in vivo. Reagents such as MAbs directed against TSP and peptides derived from TSP could not only be used as a new therapeutic

  9. Para-Phenylenediamine Induces Apoptotic Death of Melanoma Cells and Reduces Melanoma Tumour Growth in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Debajit; Bhar, Kaushik; Mallick, Sanjaya K.; Das, Subhadip; Chatterjee, Nabanita; Sarkar, Tuhin Subhra; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi; Das Saha, Krishna; Siddhanta, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of cancer, usually resistant to standard chemotherapeutics. Despite a huge number of clinical trials, any success to find a chemotherapeutic agent that can effectively destroy melanoma is yet to be achieved. Para-phenylenediamine (p-PD) in the hair dyes is reported to purely serve as an external dyeing agent. Very little is known about whether p-PD has any effect on the melanin producing cells. We have demonstrated p-PD mediated apoptotic death of both human and mouse melanoma cells in vitro. Mouse melanoma tumour growth was also arrested by the apoptotic activity of intraperitoneal administration of p-PD with almost no side effects. This apoptosis is shown to occur primarily via loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and caspase 8 activation. p-PD mediated apoptosis was also confirmed by the increase in sub-G0/G1 cell number. Thus, our experimental observation suggests that p-PD can be a potential less expensive candidate to be developed as a chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma. PMID:27293892

  10. Pharmacological characterization of beta2-adrenoceptor in PGT-beta mouse pineal gland tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Suh, B C; Chae, H D; Chung, J H; Kim, K T

    1999-01-01

    1. The adrenoceptor in a mouse pineal gland tumour cell line (PGT-beta) was identified and characterized using pharmacological and physiological approaches. 2. Adrenaline and noradrenaline, adrenoceptor agonists, stimulated cyclic AMP generation in a concentration-dependent manner, but had no effect on inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate production. Adrenaline was a more potent activator of cyclic AMP generation than noradrenaline, with half maximal-effective concentrations (EC50) seen at 175+/-22 nM and 18+/-2 microM for adrenaline and noradrenaline, respectively. 3. The addition of forskolin synergistically stimulated the adrenaline-mediated cyclic AMP generation in a concentration-dependent manner. 4. The pA2 value for the specific beta2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-118,551 (8.7+/-0.4) as an antagonist of the adrenaline-stimulated cyclic AMP generation were 3 units higher than the value for the betaI-adrenoceptor antagonist atenolol (5.6+/-0.3). 5. Treatment of the cells with adrenaline and forskolin evoked a 3 fold increase in the activity of serotonin N-acetyltransferase with the peak occurring 6 h after stimulation. 6. These results suggest the presence of beta2-adrenoceptors in mouse pineal cells and a functional relationship between the adenylyl cyclase system and the regulation of N-acetyltransferase expression.

  11. Tracking the dynamics of circulating tumour cell phenotypes using nanoparticle-mediated magnetic ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poudineh, Mahla; Aldridge, Peter M.; Ahmed, Sharif; Green, Brenda J.; Kermanshah, Leyla; Nguyen, Vivian; Tu, Carmen; Mohamadi, Reza M.; Nam, Robert K.; Hansen, Aaron; Sridhar, Srikala S.; Finelli, Antonio; Fleshner, Neil E.; Joshua, Anthony M.; Sargent, Edward H.; Kelley, Shana O.

    2016-11-01

    Profiling the heterogeneous phenotypes of rare circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in whole blood is critical to unravelling the complex and dynamic properties of these potential clinical markers. This task is challenging because these cells are present at parts per billion levels among normal blood cells. Here we report a new nanoparticle-enabled method for CTC characterization, called magnetic ranking cytometry, which profiles CTCs on the basis of their surface expression phenotype. We achieve this using a microfluidic chip that successfully processes whole blood samples. The approach classifies CTCs with single-cell resolution in accordance with their expression of phenotypic surface markers, which is read out using magnetic nanoparticles. We deploy this new technique to reveal the dynamic phenotypes of CTCs in unprocessed blood from mice as a function of tumour growth and aggressiveness. We also test magnetic ranking cytometry using blood samples collected from cancer patients.

  12. Collision Tumour of Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Malignant Melanoma in the Oral Cavity of a Dog.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, F; Castro, P; Ramírez, G A

    2016-05-01

    A 7-year-old, male cocker spaniel was presented with a gingival proliferative lesion in the rostral maxilla and enlargement of the regional lymph node. Morphological and immunohistochemical analysis revealed a collision tumour composed of two malignant populations, epithelial and melanocytic, with metastasis of the neoplastic melanocytes to the regional lymph node. The epithelial component consisted of trabeculae and islands of well-differentiated squamous epithelium immunoreactive to cytokeratins. The melanocytic component had a varying degree of pigmentation of polygonal and spindle-shaped cells, growing in nests or densely packed aggregates and immunolabelled with S100, melanoma-associated antigen (melan A), neuron-specific enolase and vimentin antibodies. Protein markers involved in tumorigenesis or cell proliferation (i.e. COX-2, p53, c-kit and Ki67), were overexpressed by the neoplastic cells. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first description of an oral collision tumour involving malignant melanoma and squamous cell carcinoma in the dog.

  13. Could plant lectins become promising anti-tumour drugs for causing autophagic cell death?

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Luo, Y; Zhou, T-T; Zhang, W-Z

    2013-10-01

    Plant lectins, a group of highly diverse carbohydrate-binding proteins of non-immune origin, are ubiquitously distributed through a variety of plant species, and have recently drawn rising attention due to their remarkable ability to kill tumour cells using mechanisms implicated in autophagy. In this review, we provide a brief outline of structures of some representative plant lectins such as concanavalin A, Polygonatum cyrtonema lectin and mistletoe lectins. These can target autophagy by modulating BNIP-3, ROS-p38-p53, Ras-Raf and PI3KCI-Akt pathways, as well as Beclin-1, in many types of cancer cells. In addition, we further discuss how plant lectins are able to kill cancer cells by modulating autophagic death, for therapeutic purposes. Together, these findings provide a comprehensive perspective concerning plant lectins as promising new anti-tumour drugs, with respect to autophagic cell death in future cancer therapeutics.

  14. Feline intestinal sclerosing mast cell tumour: 50 cases (1997-2008).

    PubMed

    Halsey, C H C; Powers, B E; Kamstock, D A

    2010-03-01

    This case series presents a unique and unreported variant of feline intestinal mast cell tumour recognized at the CSU Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory. Fifty cases of feline intestinal mast cell tumours described as having a significant stromal component were reviewed. Neoplastic cells formed a trabecular pattern admixed with moderate to abundant dense stromal collagen (sclerosis). Neoplastic cells had poorly discernible intracytoplasmic granules which demonstrated metachromasia with special histochemical stains consistent with mast cell granules. Additionally, a subset of cases stained for mast cell-specific tryptase and c-kit demonstrated positive immunoreactivity. Eosinophilic infiltrates were moderate to marked in almost all cases. Lymph node and hepatic metastases were present in 66% of the cases. Treatment and clinical outcome was available in 25/50 cases. Twenty-three of these patients died or were euthanized within 2 months of initial diagnosis. This is the first case series to characterize a sclerosing variant of intestinal mast cell tumour in the cat which appears to have a high propensity for metastasis and a guarded prognosis.

  15. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Popova, N A; Nikolin, V P; Kaledin, V I; Kirpichnikov, A V; Pestryakov, Efim V

    2012-06-30

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  16. Influence of femtosecond laser radiation on cells of the transplantable tumour Krebs-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkin, Yu P.; Popova, N. A.; Nikolin, V. P.; Kaledin, V. I.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Pestryakov, Efim V.

    2012-06-01

    The influence of femtosecond radiation of a titaniumsapphire laser on cells of the transplantable ascitic tumour Krebs-2 was studied. After in vitro irradiation by the pulsed fundamentalharmonic radiation with the wavelength 800 nm, pulse duration 30 fs, repetition rate 1 kHz, mean power 100 and 300 mW and exposure time 3 min, as well as by the second-harmonic radiation (40 nm, 50 fs, 120 mW), all cells were diffusely stained by the vital stain trypan blue, which may be an evidence of their death or abnormalities of membrane permeability. However, implantation of such cells to experimental animals led to formation of tumours at the transplantation site with the kinetics slightly different from the control one. In the group of mice to which the cells were inoculated after irradiation with second harmonic pulses of titanium-sapphire laser the inhibition of tumour growth was observed due to partial death of cells under the action of UV spectral components. To explain the mechanism of the observed phenomenon the possibility of pore formation (photoporation) in the cell membrane, described earlier in the papers on foreign DNA transfection into cells, is considered.

  17. Evaluation of pretreatment serum interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha as a potential biomarker for recurrence in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Brailo, Vlaho; Vidovic-Juras, Danica; Vucicevic-Boras, Vanja; Milenovic, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    Background Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) constitutes 3 percent of all cancers with predominant occurrence in middle aged and elderly males. Tumour recurrence worsens disease prognosis and decreases quality of life in patients with OSCC. Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) have been suggested to play a certain role in variety of tumours. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship of pretreatment serum IL-6 and TNF-α levels on tumour recurrence in patients with OSCC in order to identify potential biomarkers for the early detection of disease recurrence. Material and Methods The patients with newly diagnosed OSCC were treated and followed from the first visit from November 2006 until January 2008. Serum IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations were measured. The records of the patients were re-examined in July 2012 and data were recorded about cancer characteristics and tumour recurrence. Disease free survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier survival curves, log rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Results Serum IL-6 was shown as an independent risk factor for tumour recurrence. Conclusions Pretreatment serum IL-6 concentration may be a useful biomarker for identification of OSCC patients with increased risk of the disease recurrence. Key words: Serum IL-6, serum TNF-α, oral cancer, recurrence. PMID:25858079

  18. Semiautomated isolation and molecular characterisation of single or highly purified tumour cells from CellSearch enriched blood samples using dielectrophoretic cell sorting

    PubMed Central

    Peeters, D J E; De Laere, B; Van den Eynden, G G; Van Laere, S J; Rothé, F; Ignatiadis, M; Sieuwerts, A M; Lambrechts, D; Rutten, A; van Dam, P A; Pauwels, P; Peeters, M; Vermeulen, P B; Dirix, L Y

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molecular characterisation of single circulating tumour cells (CTCs) holds considerable promise for predictive biomarker assessment and to explore CTC heterogeneity. We evaluate a new method, the DEPArray system, that allows the dielectrophoretic manipulation and isolation of single and 100% purified groups of CTCs from pre-enriched blood samples and explore the feasibility of their molecular characterisation. Methods: Samples containing known numbers of two cell populations were used to assess cell loss during sample loading. Cultured breast cancer cells were isolated from spiked blood samples using CellSearch CTC and Profile kits. Single tumour cells and groups of up to 10 tumour cells were recovered with the DEPArray system and subjected to transcriptional and mutation analysis. Results: On average, 40% cell loss was observed when loading samples to the DEPArray system. Expected mutations in clinically relevant markers could be obtained for 60% of single recovered tumour cells and all groups of tumour cells. Reliable gene expression profiles were obtained from single cells and groups of up to 10 cells for 2 out of 3 spiked breast cancer cell lines. Conclusion: We describe a semiautomated workflow for the isolation of small groups of 1 to 10 tumour cells from whole blood samples and provide proof of principle for the feasibility of their comprehensive molecular characterisation. PMID:23470469

  19. Smac mimetics induce inflammation and necrotic tumour cell death by modulating macrophage activity

    PubMed Central

    Lecis, D; De Cesare, M; Perego, P; Conti, A; Corna, E; Drago, C; Seneci, P; Walczak, H; Colombo, M P; Delia, D; Sangaletti, S

    2013-01-01

    Smac mimetics (SMs) comprise a class of small molecules that target members of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of pro-survival proteins, whose expression in cancer cells hinders the action of conventional chemotherapeutics. Herein, we describe the activity of SM83, a newly synthesised dimeric SM, in two cancer ascites models: athymic nude mice injected intraperitoneally with IGROV-1 human ovarian carcinoma cells and immunocompetent BALB/c mice injected with murine Meth A sarcoma cells. SM83 rapidly killed ascitic IGROV-1 and Meth A cells in vivo (prolonging mouse survival), but was ineffective against the same cells in vitro. IGROV-1 cells in nude mice were killed within the ascites by a non-apoptotic, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-dependent mechanism. SM83 administration triggered a rapid inflammatory event characterised by host secretion of TNF, interleukin-1β and interferon-γ. This inflammatory response was associated with the reversion of the phenotype of tumour-associated macrophages from a pro-tumoural M2- to a pro-inflammatory M1-like state. SM83 treatment was also associated with a massive recruitment of neutrophils that, however, was not essential for the antitumoural activity of this compound. In BALB/c mice bearing Meth A ascites, SM83 treatment was in some cases curative, and these mice became resistant to a second injection of cancer cells, suggesting that they had developed an adaptive immune response. Altogether, these results indicate that, in vivo, SM83 modulates the immune system within the tumour microenvironment and, through its pro-inflammatory action, leads cancer cells to die by necrosis with the release of high-mobility group box-1. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that SMs could be more therapeutically active than expected by stimulating the immune system. PMID:24232096

  20. Translational reprogramming in tumour cells can generate oncoselectivity in viral therapies

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, Eneko; Navarro, Pilar; Rovira-Rigau, Maria; Sibilio, Annarita; Méndez, Raúl; Fillat, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Systemic treatment of cancer requires tumour-selective therapies that eliminate cancer cells yet preserve healthy tissues from undesired damage. Tumoral transformation is associated with profound effects in translational reprogramming of gene expression, such that tumour-specific translational regulation presents an attractive possibility for generating oncoselective therapies. We recently discovered that mRNA translational control by cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins (CPEBs) is reactivated in cancer. Here we present a novel approach to restrict genetic-engineered therapies to malignant tissues based on CPEB translational regulation of target mRNAs. We demonstrate that tumour reprogramming of CPEB-mediated mRNA stability and translational regulation modulates tumour-specific expression of viral proteins. For oncolytic adenoviruses, insertion of CPE regulatory sequences in the 3′-untranslated region of the E1A gene provides oncoselectivity, with full potency in cancer cells but attenuated in normal tissues. Our results demonstrate the potential of this strategy to improve oncolytic virus design and provide a framework for exploiting CPE-regulated transgenes for therapy. PMID:28300077

  1. Translational reprogramming in tumour cells can generate oncoselectivity in viral therapies.

    PubMed

    Villanueva, Eneko; Navarro, Pilar; Rovira-Rigau, Maria; Sibilio, Annarita; Méndez, Raúl; Fillat, Cristina

    2017-03-16

    Systemic treatment of cancer requires tumour-selective therapies that eliminate cancer cells yet preserve healthy tissues from undesired damage. Tumoral transformation is associated with profound effects in translational reprogramming of gene expression, such that tumour-specific translational regulation presents an attractive possibility for generating oncoselective therapies. We recently discovered that mRNA translational control by cytoplasmic polyadenylation element-binding proteins (CPEBs) is reactivated in cancer. Here we present a novel approach to restrict genetic-engineered therapies to malignant tissues based on CPEB translational regulation of target mRNAs. We demonstrate that tumour reprogramming of CPEB-mediated mRNA stability and translational regulation modulates tumour-specific expression of viral proteins. For oncolytic adenoviruses, insertion of CPE regulatory sequences in the 3'-untranslated region of the E1A gene provides oncoselectivity, with full potency in cancer cells but attenuated in normal tissues. Our results demonstrate the potential of this strategy to improve oncolytic virus design and provide a framework for exploiting CPE-regulated transgenes for therapy.

  2. Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes correlate with improved survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dongxian; Liu, Yalan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Haixing; Song, Qi; Sujie, Akesu; Huang, Jie; Xu, Yifan; Zeng, Haiying; Tan, Lijie; Hou, Yingyong; Xu, Chen

    2017-01-01

    We undertook a study of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a large and relatively homogeneous group of patients with completely resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Hematoxylin and eosin–stained sections of 235 ESCC tumours were evaluated for density of TILs in intratumoural (iTIL) and stromal compartments (sTIL). Foxp3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells in tumoural and stromal areas were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Of the 235 tumours, high sTIL (>10%), and iTIL (>10%) were observed in 101 (43.0%) and 98 (41.7%), respectively. The median follow-up period was 36.0 months (95% CI 29.929–42.071). Univariate analysis revealed that sTIL (>10%), iTIL (>20%), vessels involvement, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stage were significantly associated with postoperative outcome. In multivariate analysis, high sTIL (HR: 0.664, P = 0.019 for Disease free survival; HR: 0.608, P = 0.005 for Overall survival) was identified as independent better prognostic factor. Further analysis, sTIL was identified as independently prognostic factor in Stage III-IVa disease, which was not found in Stage I-II disease. Our study demonstrated that sTIL was associated with better ESCC patients’ survival, especially in Stage III-IVa disease. Assessment of sTIL could be useful to discriminate biological behavior for ESCC patients. PMID:28322245

  3. Tumour infiltrating lymphocytes correlate with improved survival in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dongxian; Liu, Yalan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Haixing; Song, Qi; Sujie, Akesu; Huang, Jie; Xu, Yifan; Zeng, Haiying; Tan, Lijie; Hou, Yingyong; Xu, Chen

    2017-03-21

    We undertook a study of tumour infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in a large and relatively homogeneous group of patients with completely resected esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Hematoxylin and eosin-stained sections of 235 ESCC tumours were evaluated for density of TILs in intratumoural (iTIL) and stromal compartments (sTIL). Foxp3+, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells in tumoural and stromal areas were evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Of the 235 tumours, high sTIL (>10%), and iTIL (>10%) were observed in 101 (43.0%) and 98 (41.7%), respectively. The median follow-up period was 36.0 months (95% CI 29.929-42.071). Univariate analysis revealed that sTIL (>10%), iTIL (>20%), vessels involvement, lymph node metastasis, and clinical stage were significantly associated with postoperative outcome. In multivariate analysis, high sTIL (HR: 0.664, P = 0.019 for Disease free survival; HR: 0.608, P = 0.005 for Overall survival) was identified as independent better prognostic factor. Further analysis, sTIL was identified as independently prognostic factor in Stage III-IVa disease, which was not found in Stage I-II disease. Our study demonstrated that sTIL was associated with better ESCC patients' survival, especially in Stage III-IVa disease. Assessment of sTIL could be useful to discriminate biological behavior for ESCC patients.

  4. Microenvironment–A Role in Tumour Progression and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Muppalla, Jaya Nagendra Krishna; Muddana, Keerthi; Dorankula, Shyam Prasad Reddy; Thokala, Madhusudan Rao; Pasupula, Ajay Prakash

    2013-01-01

    In addition to malignant cells, solid tumours comprise supporting stromal tissue that consists of Extra Cellular Matrix (ECM), connective tissue cells, inflammatory cells and blood vessels. The stromal compartment and the malignant cells together shape the tumour microenvironment that in turn determines tumour progression and efficacy of anti-tumour treatments. It is now recognized that the host microenvironment undergoes extensive change during the evolution and progression of cancer. This involves the generation of Tumour-Associated Fibroblasts (TAFs), which, through release of growth factors and cytokines, lead to enhanced angiogenesis, increased tumour growth and invasion. It has also been demonstrated that TAFs may modulate the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) phenotype, which has therapeutic implications. Understanding the various components in the tumour microenvironment may afford us the opportunity to develop new drugs that target these reversible nonmutational events in the prevention and treatment of cancer. PMID:24179956

  5. On-chip integrated labelling, transport and detection of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Woods, Jane; Docker, Peter T; Dyer, Charlotte E; Haswell, Stephen J; Greenman, John

    2011-11-01

    Microflow cytometry represents a promising tool for the investigation of diagnostic and prognostic cellular cancer markers, particularly if integrated within a device that allows primary cells to be freshly isolated from the solid tumour biopsies that more accurately reflect patient-specific in vivo tissue microenvironments at the time of staining. However, current tissue processing techniques involve several sequential stages with concomitant cell losses, and as such are inappropriate for use with small biopsies. Accordingly, we present a simple method for combined antibody-labelling and dissociation of heterogeneous cells from a tumour mass, which reduces the number of processing steps. Perfusion of ex vivo tissue at 4°C with antibodies and enzymes slows cellular activity while allowing sufficient time for the diffusion of minimally active enzymes. In situ antibody-labelled cells are then dissociated at 37°C from the tumour mass, whereupon hydrogel-filled channels allow the release of relatively low cell numbers (<1000) into a biomimetic microenvironment. This novel approach to sample processing is then further integrated with hydrogel-based electrokinetic transport of the freshly liberated fluorescent cells for downstream detection. It is anticipated that this integrated microfluidic methodology will have wide-ranging biomedical and clinical applications.

  6. The effect of PLC-γ2 inhibitors on the growth of human tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Linda; Reynisdóttir, Inga; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2012-08-01

    The phosphoinositide specific-phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ1 and 2) enzymes are plausible anticancer targets implicated in cell motility important to invasion and dissemination of tumour cells. A host of known PLC-γ2 inhibitors were tested against the NCI60 panel of human tumour cell lines as well as their commercially available structural derivatives. A class of thieno[2,3-b]pyridines showed excellent growth arrest with derivative 3 giving GI(50) = 58 nM for the melanoma MDA-MB-435 cell line. The PLC-γ2 is uniquely expressed in haematopoietic cells and the leukaemia tumour cell lines were growth restricted on average GI(50) = 275 nM by derivative 3 indicating a specific interaction with this isoform. Furthermore, a moderate growth inhibition was found for compound classes of indoles and 1H-pyrazoles. It is likely that the active compounds do not only inhibit the PLC-γ2 isoform but other PLCs as well due to their conserved binding site. The compounds tested were identified by applying the tools of chemoinformatics, which supports the use of in silico methods in drug design.

  7. MOB1-YAP1/TAZ-NKX2.1 axis controls bronchioalveolar cell differentiation, adhesion and tumour formation.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, K; Goto, H; Nishio, M; Kawamura, K; Yanagi, S; Nishie, W; Sasaki, T; Maehama, T; Nishina, H; Mimori, K; Nakano, T; Shimizu, H; Mak, T W; Nakao, K; Nakanishi, Y; Suzuki, A

    2017-03-27

    Mps One Binder Kinase Activator (MOB)1A/1B are core components of the Hippo pathway. These proteins, which coactivate LArge Tumour Suppressor homologue kinases, are also tumour suppressors. To investigate MOB1A/B's roles in normal physiology and lung cancer, we generated doxycycline (Dox)-inducible, bronchioalveolar epithelium-specific, null mutations of MOB1A/B in mice (SPC-rtTA/(tetO)7-Cre/Mob1a(flox/flox)/Mob1b(-/-); termed luMob1DKO mice). Most mutants (70%) receiving Dox in utero (luMob1DKO (E6.5-18.5) mice) died of hypoxia within 1 h post-birth. Their alveolar epithelial cells showed increased proliferation, impaired YAP1/TAZ-dependent differentiation and decreased surfactant protein production, all features characteristic of human respiratory distress syndrome. Intriguingly, mutant mice that received Dox postnatally (luMob1DKO (P21-41) mice) did not develop spontaneous lung adenocarcinomas, and urethane treatment-induced lung tumour formation was decreased (rather than increased). Lungs of luMob1DKO (P21-41) mice exhibited increased detachment of bronchiolar epithelial cells and decreased numbers of the bronchioalveolar stem cells thought to initiate lung adenocarcinomas. YAP1/TAZ-NKX2.1-dependent expression of collagen XVII, a key hemidesmosome component, was also reduced. Thus, a MOB1-YAP1/TAZ-NKX2.1 axis is essential for normal lung homeostasis and expression of the collagen XVII protein necessary for alveolar stem cell maintenance in the lung niche.Oncogene advance online publication, 27 March 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.58.

  8. Human lymphatic endothelial cells contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma metastasis by promoting lymphangiogenesis and tumour cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    XIE, YIHONG; ZHONG, YANPING; GAO, TING; ZHANG, XINYING; LI, LI; RUAN, HEYUN; LI, DANRONG

    2016-01-01

    The microenvironment of a tumour is an important factor in ovarian cancer metastasis. The present study aimed to simulate the in vivo microenvironment of an ovarian carcinoma using a co-culture system consisting of human lymphatic endothelial cells (HLECs) and human ovarian carcinoma cells with directional high lymphatic metastasis (SKOV3-PM4s) in order to investigate the role of both cell types in ovarian carcinoma metastasis. The SKOV3-PM4s cultured in the HLEC-conditioned medium exhibited increased numbers of pseudopodia and mitotic figures, proliferated at a faster rate and exhibited enhanced invasion and migratory abilities. Furthermore, the HLECs cultured in SKOV3-PM4-conditioned medium exhibited significant morphological alterations and vacuolisation of the cytoplasm, as well as increased invasion, migratory and tube forming abilities. In addition, spontaneous fusion of the SKOV3-PM4s and HLECs was observed in the co-culture system using laser confocal microscopy. The gelatin zymography assay demonstrated that matrix metalloproteinase-2, which was downregulated in the SKOV3-PM4s, was upregulated in the co-culture system. The results of the present study suggested that the invasion ability of the SKOV3-PM4s was increased in the in vitro co-culture system of SKOV3-PM4 and HLECs. Therefore, alterations in the cell microenvironment may represent a novel strategy for ovarian cancer therapy. PMID:27168777

  9. Biomarkers characterization of circulating tumour cells in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Increasing evidence supports the view that the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) predicts outcomes of nonmetastatic breast cancer patients. CTCs differ genetically from the primary tumor and may contribute to variations in prognosis and response to therapy. As we start to understand more about the biology of CTCs, we can begin to address how best to treat this form of disease. Methods Ninety-eight nonmetastatic breast cancer patients were included in this study. CTCs were isolated by immunomagnetic techniques using magnetic beads labelled with a multi-CK-specific antibody (CK3-11D5) and CTC detection through immunocytochemical methods. Estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were evaluated by immunofluorescence experiments and HER2 and TOP2A by fluorescence in situ hybridization. We aimed to characterize this set of biomarkers in CTCs and correlate it with clinical-pathological characteristics. Results Baseline detection rate was 46.9% ≥ 1 CTC/30 ml threshold. CTC-positive cells were more frequent in HER2-negative tumors (p = 0.046). In patients younger than 50 years old, HER2-amplified and G1-G2 tumors had a higher possibility of being nondetectable CTCs. Heterogeneous expression of hormonal receptors (HRs) in samples from the same patients was found. Discordances between HR expression, HER2 and TOP2A status in CTCs and their primary tumor were found in the sequential blood samples. Less that 35% of patients switched their CTC status after receiving chemotherapy. EGFR-positive CTCs were associated with Luminal tumors (p = 0.03). Conclusions This is the largest exploratory CTC biomarker analysis in nonmetastatic BC patients. Our study suggests that CTC biomarkers profiles might be useful as a surrogate marker for therapeutic selection and monitoring since heterogeneity of the biomarker distribution in CTCs and the lack of correlation with the primary tumor biomarker status were found. Further

  10. Tumour-infiltrating regulatory T cell density before neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer does not predict treatment response.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Melanie J; Hemmings, Chris; Anyaegbu, Chidozie C; Austin, Stephanie J; Lee-Pullen, Tracey F; Miller, Timothy J; Bulsara, Max K; Zeps, Nikolajs; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A; Platell, Cameron F

    2017-02-03

    Neoadjuvant (preoperative) chemoradiotherapy (CRT) decreases the risk of rectal cancer recurrence and reduces tumour volume prior to surgery. However, response to CRT varies considerably between individuals and factors associated with response are poorly understood. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) inhibit anti-tumour immunity and may limit any response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We have previously reported that a low density of Tregs in the tumour stroma following neoadjuvant CRT for rectal cancer is associated with improved tumour regression. Here we have examined the association between Treg density in pre-treatment diagnostic biopsy specimens and treatment response, in this same patient cohort. We aimed to determine whether pre-treatment tumour-infiltrating Treg density predicts subsequent response to neoadjuvant CRT. Foxp3+, CD8+ and CD3+ cell densities in biopsy samples from 106 patients were assessed by standard immunohistochemistry (IHC) and evaluated for their association with tumour regression grade and survival. We found no association between the density of any T cell subset pre-treatment and clinical outcome, indicating that tumour-infiltrating Treg density does not predict response to neoadjuvant CRT in rectal cancer. Taken together with the findings of the previous study, these data suggest that in the context of neoadjuvant CRT for rectal cancer, the impact of chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy on anti-tumour immunity may be more important than the state of the pre-existing local immune response.

  11. DNA damage following combination of radiation with the bioreductive drug AQ4N: possible selective toxicity to oxic and hypoxic tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hejmadi, M. V.; McKeown, S. R.; Friery, O. P.; McIntyre, I. A.; Patterson, L. H.; Hirst, D. G.

    1996-01-01

    AQ4N (1,4-bis-([2-(dimethylamino-N- oxide)ethyl]amino)5,8-dihydroxyanthracene-9,10-dione) is a novel bioreductive agent that can be reduced to a stable, DNA-affinic compound, AQ4. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate DNA damage induced by AQ4N and radiation. Cells prepared from freshly excised T50/80 murine tumours were shown to have the ability to reduce AQ4N to a DNA-damaging agent; this had disappeared within 24 h of excision. When T50/80 tumours implanted in BDF mice were exposed to radiation in vivo a considerable amount of DNA damage was present in tumours excised immediately. Minimal levels of DNA damage were detectable in tumours excised after 2-5 h. AQ4N given 30 min before radiation had no appreciable influence on this effect and AQ4N alone caused only a small amount of damage. When AQ4N and radiation were combined an increasing number of damaged cells were seen in tumours excised 24-96 h after irradiation. This was interpreted as evidence of the continued presence of AQ4, or AQ4-induced damage, which was formed in cells hypoxic at the time of administration of AQ4N. AQ4, a potent topoisomerase II inhibitor, would be capable of damaging cells recruited into the cell cycle following radiation damage to the well-oxygenated cells of the tumour. The kinetics of the expression of the DNA damage is consistent with this hypothesis and shows that AQ4 has persistent activity in vivo. PMID:8595165

  12. Induced p53 loss in mouse luminal cells causes clonal expansion and development of mammary tumours

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Luwei; Xiang, Dongxi; Xie, Ying; Bronson, Roderick T.; Li, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Most breast cancers may have a luminal origin. TP53 is one of the most frequently mutated genes in breast cancers. However, how p53 deficiency contributes to breast tumorigenesis from luminal cells remains elusive. Here we report that induced p53 loss in Krt8+ mammary luminal cells leads to their clonal expansion without directly affecting their luminal identity. All induced mice develop mammary tumours with 9qA1 (Yap1) and/or 6qA2 (Met) amplification(s). These tumours exhibit a mammary stem cell (MaSC)-like expression signature and most closely resemble claudin-low breast cancer. Thus, although p53 does not directly control the luminal fate, its loss facilitates acquisition of MaSC-like properties by luminal cells and predisposes them to development of mammary tumours with loss of luminal identity. Our data also suggest that claudin-low breast cancer can develop from luminal cells, possibly via a basal-like intermediate state, although further study using a different luminal promoter is needed to fully support this conclusion. PMID:28194015

  13. Immunohistochemical detection of major histocompatibility complex antigens and quantitative analysis of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells in renal cell cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Y.; Nishiyama, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Sato, S.

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the anti-tumour immune responsiveness of patients with renal cell cancer (RCC), we examined 30 such patients for the degree of expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II antigens on RCC and the populations of tumour-infiltrating mononuclear cells (TIM). Normal renal tubular cells expressed class I but not class II antigens. Most of the tumour cells expressed class I antigens in 25 (83%) cases, but the proportion of such cells was reduced in five cases, three of which were of granular cell type histologically. Class II antigens were detected in all specimens with class I positivity. Various numbers of TIM were detected in 25 cases, being composed mainly of T cells and a smaller number of macrophages. Examination for the phenotype of T cells showed that CD8-positive cells were the dominant population. B cells were not detected. Quantitative analysis revealed that the numbers of TIM were significantly lower in cases showing class I reduction than in those with normal class I expression. Therefore, it was clear that class I antigens were preserved in RCC cells in most cases. Furthermore, a higher rate of reduction of class I antigens was observed in cases of granular cell type, which has been reported to have a worse prognosis than the clear cell type. The present data suggest that degree of the expression of MHC class I antigen on RCC might influence the host immune responsiveness against it. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2206942

  14. Apoptosis and autophagy: BIM as a mediator of tumour cell death in response to oncogene-targeted therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gillings, Annette S; Balmanno, Kathryn; Wiggins, Ceri M; Johnson, Mark; Cook, Simon J

    2009-11-01

    The BCL-2 homology domain 3 (BH3)-only protein, B-cell lymphoma 2 interacting mediator of cell death (BIM) is a potent pro-apoptotic protein belonging to the B-cell lymphoma 2 protein family. In recent years, advances in basic biology have provided a clearer picture of how BIM kills cells and how BIM expression and activity are repressed by growth factor signalling pathways, especially the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and protein kinase B pathways. In tumour cells these oncogene-regulated pathways are used to counter the effects of BIM, thereby promoting tumour cell survival. In parallel, a new generation of targeted therapeutics has been developed, which show remarkable specificity and efficacy in tumour cells that are addicted to particular oncogenes. It is now apparent that the expression and activation of BIM is a common response to these new therapeutics. Indeed, BIM has emerged from this marriage of basic and applied biology as an important mediator of tumour cell death in response to such drugs. The induction of BIM alone may not be sufficient for significant tumour cell death, as BIM is more likely to act in concert with other BH3-only proteins, or other death pathways, when new targeted therapeutics are used in combination with traditional chemotherapy agents. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding BIM regulation and review the role of BIM as a mediator of tumour cell death in response to novel oncogene-targeted therapeutics.

  15. Treatment algorithm in 2014 for advanced non-small cell lung cancer: therapy selection by tumour histology and molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Manegold, Christian

    2014-09-01

    The availability of antineoplastic monoclonal antibodies, small molecules and newer cytotoxics such as pemetrexed, the EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors erlotinib, gefitinib, afatinib as well as the anti-angiogenic bevacizumab and the ALK-inhibitor crizotinib has recently changes the treatment algorithm of advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Decision making in 2014 is characterized by customizing therapy, by selecting a specific therapeutic regimen based on the histotype and the genotype of the tumour. This refers to first-line induction therapy and maintenance therapy as well, but also to subsequent lines of therapy since anti-neoplastic drugs and regimens used upfront clinically influence the selection of agents/regimes considered for second-/third-line treatment. Consequently, therapy customization through tumour histology and molecular markers has significantly influenced the work of pathologists around the globe and the process of obtaining an extended therapeutically relevant tumour diagnosis. Not only histological sub-typing became standard but molecular information is also considered of increasing importance for treatment selection. Routine molecular testing in certified laboratories must be established, and the diagnostic process should ideally be performed under the guidance of evidence based recommendation. The process of investigating and implementing medical targeting in lung cancer therefore, requires advanced diagnostic techniques and expertise and because of its large dimension is costly and influenced by the limitation of financial and clinical resources.

  16. Cytotoxic effects of Argentinean plant extracts on tumour and normal cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mamone, L; Di Venosa, G; Valla, J J; Rodriguez, L; Gándara, L; Batlle, A; Heinrich, M; Juarranz, A; Sanz-Rodriguez, F; Casas, A

    2011-05-30

    In the search for possible new anti-cancer agents, we investigated the effects of 75 aqueous and methanol extracts from 41 Argentinean plant species. The effect in cell growth was evaluated in the LM2 mammary adenocarcinoma cells. In a second stage, the highly active selected extracts were assayed in 3 other tumour cell lines: melanoma B16, bladder MB49 and lung A549; and 3 normal cell lines: mammary Hb4a and keratinocytes PAM212 and HaCat. Eight methanol extracts were found to be highly cytotoxic: Collaea argentina leaf, Iochroma australe leaf, Ipomoea bonariensis flower, Jacaranda mimosifolia flower, Solanum amygdalifolium flower, Solanum chacoense leaf, Solanum sisymbriifolium flower and Solanum verbascifolium flower. However, extract inhibition on cell growth was highly dependent on cell type. In general, except for the highly resistant cell lines, the inhibitory concentrations 50% were in the range of 10-150 μg/ml The eight extracts highly inhibited cell growth in a concentration-dependent manner, and in general the methanol extracts were always more active than the aqueous. Murine cells appear to be more sensitive than human cells to the cytotoxic action of the plant extracts. The human melanoma B16 line was the most resistant to four of the extracts. In terms of selectivity, S. verbascifolium was the species which showed most selectivity for tumour cells. Overall, this is one of the first studies focusing on southern South American native plants and their biological effects. Since some species of 5 genera analyzed have been reported to possess different degrees of alkaloid content, we examined microtubule structures after extract treatments. The eight extracts induced destabilization, condensation and aggregation of microtubules in LM2 cells, although no depolarization, typical of Vinca alkaloids damage was observed. In a near future, antitumour activity of purified fractions of the extracts administered at non-toxic doses will be assayed in transplantable

  17. Distinct subclonal tumour responses to therapy revealed by circulating cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Gremel, G.; Lee, R. J.; Girotti, M. R.; Mandal, A. K.; Valpione, S.; Garner, G.; Ayub, M.; Wood, S.; Rothwell, D. G.; Fusi, A.; Wallace, A.; Brady, G.; Dive, C.; Dhomen, N.; Lorigan, P.; Marais, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The application of precision medicine in oncology requires in-depth characterisation of a patient's tumours and the dynamics of their responses to treatment. Patients and methods We used next-generation sequencing of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) to monitor the response of a KIT p.L576P-mutant metastatic vaginal mucosal melanoma to sequential targeted, immuno- and chemotherapy. Results Despite a KIT mutation, the response to imatinib was mixed. Unfortunately, tumours were not accessible for molecular analysis. To study the mechanism underlying the mixed clinical response, we carried out whole-exome sequencing and targeted longitudinal analysis of cfDNA. This revealed two tumour subclones; one with a KIT mutation that responded to imatinib and a second KIT-wild-type subclone that did not respond to imatinib. Notably, the subclones also responded differently to immunotherapy. However, both subclones responded to carboplatin/paclitaxel, and although the KIT-wild-type subclone progressed after chemotherapy, it responded to subsequent re-administration of paclitaxel. Conclusion We show that cfDNA can reveal tumour evolution and subclonal responses to therapy even when biopsies are not available. PMID:27502704

  18. Desmoplastic small round cell tumour of the pleura: a case report with unusual follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ostoros, Gyula; Orosz, Zsolt; Kovács, Gábor; Soltész, Ilona

    2002-06-01

    In 1994 a 19-year-old woman presented with a few weeks history of back ache. Routine chest X-ray and CT examination revealed a lesion originating from the parietal pleura and destroying the ribs. The tumour was resected during thoracotomy. The histological examination raised the possibility of atypical carcinoid tumour. One year later the tumour recurred. After its re-resection, the patient received radiotherapy. Three years after the initial presentation multiple pulmonary metastases developed. The patient was treated with chemotherapy, receiving vincristine, epi-adriamycin and cyclophosphamide in 8 cycles, which resulted in complete remission. Between 1998 and 1999 progressions and partial remissions were observed, while the patient received further cycles of chemotherapy. Histological revision was performed in 1999 and a final diagnosis of desmoplastic small round cell tumour of the pleura was made. Immunohistochemically co-expression of cytokeratin, vimentin, desmin, and NSE was observed. The patient died in June 2000. The whole follow-up period was 76 months. We thought this case to be worth for presentation because this unusual long survival, which was probably due to the aggressive complex anticancer treatment.

  19. Induction of matrix metalloprotease-1 gene expression by retinoic acid in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Z von; Riecken, E-O; Rosewicz, S

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of retinoic acid (RA) on matrix metalloprotease-1 (MMP-1) gene expression in the human pancreatic tumour cell line Dan-G. 13-cis RA results in a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 protein concentration. These stimulatory effects were paralleled by a time- and dose-dependent increase of MMP-1 mRNA steady-state concentrations. Nuclear run-on analysis revealed that the increase of MMP-1 mRNA was partially due to an increase of MMP-1 gene transcription. In addition, 13-cis RA treatment results in an increase of MMP-1 mRNA stability. These data demonstrate that RA stimulates MMP-1 gene expression in human pancreatic carcinoma cells by transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10362099

  20. A sequential treatment regimen with melatonin and all-trans retinoic acid induces apoptosis in MCF-7 tumour cells.

    PubMed Central

    Eck, K. M.; Yuan, L.; Duffy, L.; Ram, P. T.; Ayettey, S.; Chen, I.; Cohn, C. S.; Reed, J. C.; Hill, S. M.

    1998-01-01

    Neoplastic events are marked by uncontrolled cell proliferation. One major focus of cancer research has been to identify treatments that reduce or inhibit cell growth. Over the years, various compounds, both naturally occurring and chemically synthesized, have been used to inhibit neoplastic cell proliferation. Two such oncostatic agents, melatonin and retinoic acid, have been shown to suppress the growth of hormone-responsive breast cancer. Currently, separate clinical protocols exist for the administration of retinoids and melatonin as adjuvant therapies for cancer. Using the oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF-7 human breast tumour cell line, our laboratory has studied the effects of a sequential treatment regimen of melatonin followed by all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) on breast tumour cell proliferation in vitro. Incubation of hormonally responsive MCF-7 and T47D cells with melatonin (10(-9) M) followed 24 h later by atRA (10(-9) M) resulted in the complete cessation of cell growth as well as a reduction in the number of cells to below the initial plating density. This cytocidal effect is in contrast to the growth-suppressive effects seen with either hormone alone. This regimen of melatonin followed by atRA induced cytocidal effects on MCF-7 cells by activating pathways leading to apoptosis (programmed cell death) as evidenced by decreased ER and Bcl-2 and increased Bax and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-beta1) expression. Apoptosis was reflected morphologically by an increase in the number of lysosomal bodies and perinuclear chromatin condensation, cytoplasmic blebbing and the presence of apoptotic bodies. The apoptotic effect of this sequential treatment with melatonin and atRA appears to be both cell and regimen specific as (a) ER-negative MDA-MB-231 and BT-20 breast tumour cells were unaffected, and (b) the simultaneous administration of melatonin and atRA was not associated with apoptosis in any of the breast cancer cell lines studied. Taken

  1. Mitomycin C in combination with radiotherapy as a potent inhibitor of tumour cell repopulation in a human squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Budach, W; Paulsen, F; Welz, S; Classen, J; Scheithauer, H; Marini, P; Belka, C; Bamberg, M

    2002-01-01

    The potential of Mitomycin C in combination with fractionated irradiation to inhibit tumour cell repopulation of a fast growing squamous cell carcinoma after fractionated radiotherapy was investigated in vivo. A rapidly growing human squamous cell carcinoma (FaDudd) was used for the study. For experiments, NMRI (nu/nu) mice with subcutaneously growing tumours were randomly allocated to no treatment, Mitomycin C, fractionated irradiation (ambient: 11x4.5 Gy in 15 days), or fractionated irradiation combined with Mitomycin C. Graded top up doses (clamped blood flow: 0–57 Gy) were given at day 16, 23, 30 or 37. End point of the study was the time to local tumour progression. Data were examined by multiple regression analysis (Cox). Mitomycin C alone resulted in a median time to local tumour progression of 23 (95% confidence limits: 17–43) days, fractionated irradiation in 31 (25–35) days and combined Mitomycin C plus fractionated irradiation in 65 (58–73) days (P=0.02). Mitomycin C decreased the relative risk of local recurrence by 94% (P<<0.001) equivalent to 31.7 Gy top up dose. Repopulation accounted for 1.33 (0.95–1.72) Gy per day top up dose after fractionated irradiation alone and for 0.68 (0.13–1.22) Gy per day after fractionated irradiation+Mitomycin C (P=0.018). Mitomycin C significantly reduces the risk of local recurrence and inhibits tumour cell repopulation in combination with fractionated irradiation in vivo in the tested tumour model. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 470–476. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600081 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 The Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11875717

  2. Anti-tumour activity of tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of VEGF receptors, in therapy-resistant ovarian carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Momeny, Majid; Sabourinejad, Zahra; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Moghaddaskho, Farima; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Yousefi, Hassan; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Poursani, Ensieh M.; Barghi, Farinaz; Poursheikhani, Arash; Dardaei, Leila; Bashash, Davood; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Tavangar, Seyyed M.; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Yaghmaie, Marjan; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H.

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the most fatal gynaecological malignancy. Despite initial therapeutic response, the majority of advanced-stage patients relapse and succumb to chemoresistant disease. Overcoming drug resistance is the key to successful treatment of EOC. Members of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) family are overexpressed in EOC and play key roles in its malignant progression though their contribution in development of the chemoresistant disease remains elusive. Here we show that expression of the VEGF family is higher in therapy-resistant EOC cells compared to sensitive ones. Overexpression of VEGFR2 correlated with resistance to cisplatin and combination with VEGFR2-inhibitor apatinib synergistically increased cisplatin sensitivity. Tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of VEGF receptors, reduced proliferation of the chemoresistant EOC cells through induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptotic cell death. Tivozanib decreased invasive potential of these cells, concomitant with reduction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and diminishing the enzymatic activity of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Moreover, tivozanib synergistically enhanced anti-tumour effects of EGFR-directed therapies including erlotinib. These findings suggest that the VEGF pathway has potential as a therapeutic target in therapy-resistant EOC and VEGFR blockade by tivozanib may yield stronger anti-tumour efficacy and circumvent resistance to EGFR-directed therapies. PMID:28383032

  3. AmotL2 disrupts apical-basal cell polarity and promotes tumour invasion.

    PubMed

    Mojallal, Mahdi; Zheng, Yujuan; Hultin, Sara; Audebert, Stéphane; van Harn, Tanja; Johnsson, Per; Lenander, Claes; Fritz, Nicolas; Mieth, Christin; Corcoran, Martin; Lembo, Frédérique; Hallström, Marja; Hartman, Johan; Mazure, Nathalie M; Weide, Thomas; Grandér, Dan; Borg, Jean-Paul; Uhlén, Per; Holmgren, Lars

    2014-08-01

    The establishment and maintenance of apical-basal cell polarity is essential for the functionality of glandular epithelia. Cell polarity is often lost in advanced tumours correlating with acquisition of invasive and malignant properties. Despite extensive knowledge regarding the formation and maintenance of polarity, the mechanisms that deregulate polarity in metastasizing cells remain to be fully characterized. Here we show that AmotL2 expression correlates with loss of tissue architecture in tumours from human breast and colon cancer patients. We further show that hypoxic stress results in activation of c-Fos-dependent expression of AmotL2 leading to loss of polarity. c-Fos/hypoxia-induced p60 AmotL2 interacts with the Crb3 and Par3 polarity complexes retaining them in large vesicles and preventing them from reaching the apical membrane. The resulting loss of polarity potentiates the response to invasive cues in vitro and in vivo in mice. These data provide a molecular mechanism how hypoxic stress deregulates cell polarity during tumour progression.

  4. Suppression of tumourigenicity, and induction of differentiation of the canine mammary tumour cell line MCM-B2 by sodium phenylacetate.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, M; Sugano, S; Imai, J; Yoshida, K; Onodera, R; Amin, M R; Uchida, K; Yamaguchi, R; Tateyama, S

    2001-02-01

    The authors evaluated the cell growth inhibition, reduction of tumourigenicity, and differentiation-inducing effects of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA) on a canine mammary tumour cell line. Treatment of the canine mammary tumour cell line (MCM-B2) with NaPA lead to the arrest of cell growth. Sodium phenylacetate induced changes in the cells to non-malignant characteristics, as indicated by a reduction of colony formation in semi-solid agar and a decrease in tumour formation in athymic mice. Moreover, NaPA induced morphological changes from a spindle-shaped to an epithelial-like appearance, and significant accumulation of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Immunohistochemically, these treated cells reacted clearly with the antibody for keratin/cytokeratin. Sodium phenylacetate treatment increased the expression of the milk-specific genes alpha-lactalbumin and beta-casein. The results of this study warrant an evaluation of NaPA in a clinical trial to establish its possible value as adjunctive treatment of malignant canine mammary tumours.

  5. Univalent antibodies kill tumour cells in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glennie, M. J.; Stevenson, G. T.

    1982-02-01

    Antibody molecules are bivalent, or less often multivalent, with each antibody site within a single molecule having the same specificity. Bivalency must enhance the tenacity of antibody attachment to cell surfaces, as dissociation will require simultaneous release at both sites. However, the bivalency of the antibody sometimes induces a target cell to undergo antigenic modulation1-3, thereby offering the cell a means of evading complement and the various effector cells recruited by the antibody. We have investigated the attack by univalent antibodies, which, despite removal of one antibody site, retain their Fc zones and hence their ability to recruit the killing agents, on neoplastic B lymphocytes of the guinea pig L2C line. Rabbit antibodies raised against surface immunoglobulin of these cells were partially digested with papain to yield the univalent Fab/c derivatives4,5. We report here that these derivatives showed enhanced cell killing both in vitro and in vivo, and that this enhancement appeared to derive from avoiding antigenic modulation.

  6. Clinical Application of Circulating Tumour Cells in Prostate Cancer: From Bench to Bedside and Back

    PubMed Central

    León-Mateos, Luis; Vieito, María; Anido, Urbano; López López, Rafael; Muinelo Romay, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men worldwide. To improve future drug development and patient management, surrogate biomarkers associated with relevant outcomes are required. Circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are tumour cells that can enter the circulatory system, and are principally responsible for the development of metastasis at distant sites. In recent years, interest in detecting CTCs as a surrogate biomarker has ghiiukjrown. Clinical studies have revealed that high levels of CTCs in the blood correlate with disease progression in patients with prostate cancer; however, their predictive value for monitoring therapeutic response is less clear. Despite the important progress in CTC clinical development, there are critical requirements for the implementation of their analysis as a routine oncology tool. The goal of the present review is to provide an update on the advances in the clinical validation of CTCs as a surrogate biomarker and to discuss the principal obstacles and main challenges to their inclusion in clinical practice. PMID:27657044

  7. Benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions in men.

    PubMed Central

    Karhunen, P J

    1986-01-01

    In a consecutive medicolegal necropsy series benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions occurred in 52% of the 95 men aged 35-69 years. The incidence increased with age, mainly due to small bile duct tumours (n = 26; mean age 56.7 years; p less than 0.01; mean size 1.3 mm). The next most common tumours were cavernous hemangiomas (n = 19; mean age 53.9 years; mean size 5.2 mm) that were not related to age. Focal nodular hyperplasia (n = 3; mean size 8.0 mm) tended to occur in a younger age group (mean age 40.3 years; p less than 0.001). Multiple bile duct tumours were present in 46% and hemangiomas in 50% of the men studied. Liver cell adenoma, nodular regenerative hyperplasia, and peliosis hepatis were incidental findings (one case of each). Nodular regenerative hyperplasia was associated with the consumption of alcohol and a total dose of 21.5 g of testosterone. These results indicate that benign hepatic tumours and tumour like conditions are not rare in men but may remain undetected because of their small size. Images PMID:3950039

  8. The ligand Sas and its receptor PTP10D drive tumour-suppressive cell competition.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masatoshi; Ohsawa, Shizue; Kunimasa, Kei; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2017-02-09

    Normal epithelial cells often exert anti-tumour effects against nearby oncogenic cells. In the Drosophila imaginal epithelium, clones of oncogenic cells with loss-of-function mutations in the apico-basal polarity genes scribble or discs large are actively eliminated by cell competition when surrounded by wild-type cells. Although c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling plays a crucial role in this cell elimination, the initial event, which occurs at the interface between normal cells and polarity-deficient cells, has not previously been identified. Here, through a genetic screen in Drosophila, we identify the ligand Sas and the receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase PTP10D as the cell-surface ligand-receptor system that drives tumour-suppressive cell competition. At the interface between the wild-type 'winner' and the polarity-deficient 'loser' clones, winner cells relocalize Sas to the lateral cell surface, whereas loser cells relocalize PTP10D there. This leads to the trans-activation of Sas-PTP10D signalling in loser cells, which restrains EGFR signalling and thereby enables elevated JNK signalling in loser cells, triggering cell elimination. In the absence of Sas-PTP10D, elevated EGFR signalling in loser cells switches the role of JNK from pro-apoptotic to pro-proliferative by inactivating the Hippo pathway, thereby driving the overgrowth of polarity-deficient cells. These findings uncover the mechanism by which normal epithelial cells recognize oncogenic polarity-deficient neighbours to drive cell competition.

  9. Juxtaglomerular cell tumour as a curable cause of hypertension: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Jeremías T; Rigo, Diego; Arancibia, Agustín; Mukdsi, Jorge; Nicolai, Silvia; Ortiz, M Elvira

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a highly prevalent disease and its secondary causes must always be kept in mind because the treatment and prognosis differ between these and essential hypertension. Here we present the first reported case in Argentina of a 21-year-old patient with arterial hypertension and hypokalaemia due to a renin-secreting juxtaglomerular cell tumour, which was diagnosed after seven years of development.

  10. Transplantation of a cell line derived from a canine benign mixed mammary tumour into nude mice.

    PubMed

    Priosoeryanto, B P; Tateyama, S; Yamaguchi, R; Uchida, K

    1995-11-01

    The MCM-B2 canine mammary cell line was serially transplanted into nude mice. The tumour masses consisted of elongated pleomorphic cells of varying size in the first to third passages; oval cells, becoming rounder, in the sixth to eighth passages; and cord-like, glandular and duct-like structures with compact radiating projections in the ninth and tenth passages. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical examination of round cells confirmed their epithelial cell nature, but the morphology of the elongated and oval cells was identical with that of the original cell line. The findings suggest that the MCM-B2 cell line is a multipotential stem cell or is derived from glandular differentiation of mammary gland.

  11. Comet assay study of DNA damage and repair of tumour cells following boron neutron capture irradiation with fast d(14) + Be neutrons.

    PubMed

    Pöller, F; Bauch, T; Sauerwein, W; Böcker, W; Wittig, A; Streffer, C

    1996-11-01

    We compared the amount of radiation-induced DNA damage and the extent of DNA repair in human melanoma cells (MeWo) using the 'comet assay' after neutron, boron neutron capture and X-irradiation. Using a colony-forming assay it was shown earlier that lethal effects in tumour cells treated with fast neutrons may be increased by the neutron capture reaction 10B(n, alpha)7Li. The effectiveness of boron neutron capture in killing tumour cells depends on the number of 10B atoms delivered to the tumour, the subcellular distribution of 10B and the thermal neutron fluence at the side of the tumour. Using the 'comet assay' the DNA damage of fast neutrons (mean energy 5.8 MeV) was shown to be significantly greater than for the same absorbed dose of X-rays. The presence of 600 ppm 10B (boric acid H5 10BO3) in the cell medium during irradiation with d(14) + Be neutrons in a phantom enhances the DNA damage by 20% compared with neutron irradiation alone. After DNA damage induction by neutrons and neutron capture of boron, the DNA repair capacity of the MeWo cells is significantly reduced in comparison with X-irradiation resulting in proportionally more residual DNA damage after 180 min of repair time.

  12. Cobalt(III) Chaperone Complexes of Curcumin: Photoreduction, Cellular Accumulation and Light-Selective Toxicity towards Tumour Cells.

    PubMed

    Renfrew, Anna K; Bryce, Nicole S; Hambley, Trevor

    2015-10-19

    Light-activated prodrugs offer the potential for highly selective tumour targeting. However, the application of many photoactivated chemotherapeutics is limited by a requirement for oxygen, or for short activation wavelengths that can damage surrounding tissue. Herein, we present a series of cobalt(III)-curcumin prodrugs that can be activated by visible light under both oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. Furthermore, the photoproduct can be controlled by the activation wavelength: green light yields free curcumin, whereas blue light induces photolysis of curcumin to a phototoxic product. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and phototocytotoxicity studies in DLD-1 and MCF-7 tumour cells demonstrated that the cobalt(III) prodrugs are nontoxic in the dark but accumulate in significant concentrations in the cell membrane. When cells were treated with light for 15  min, the cytotoxicity of the cobalt complexes increased by up to 20-fold, whereas free curcumin exhibited only a two-fold increase in cytotoxicity. The nature of the ancillary ligand and cobalt reduction potential were found to strongly influence the stability and biological activity of the series.

  13. Next-generation sequencing-based detection of circulating tumour DNA After allogeneic stem cell transplantation for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Alex F; Kim, Haesook T; Kong, Katherine A; Faham, Malek; Sun, Heather; Sohani, Aliyah R; Alyea, Edwin P; Carlton, Victoria E; Chen, Yi-Bin; Cutler, Corey S; Ho, Vincent T; Koreth, John; Kotwaliwale, Chitra; Nikiforow, Sarah; Ritz, Jerome; Rodig, Scott J; Soiffer, Robert J; Antin, Joseph H; Armand, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) detection is a promising monitoring tool for lymphoid malignancies. We evaluated whether the presence of ctDNA was associated with outcome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in lymphoma patients. We studied 88 patients drawn from a phase 3 clinical trial of reduced-intensity conditioning HSCT in lymphoma. Conventional restaging and collection of peripheral blood samples occurred at pre-specified time points before and after HSCT and were assayed for ctDNA by sequencing of the immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor genes. Tumour clonotypes were identified in 87% of patients with adequate tumour samples. Sixteen of 19 (84%) patients with disease progression after HSCT had detectable ctDNA prior to progression at a median of 3·7 months prior to relapse/progression. Patients with detectable ctDNA 3 months after HSCT had inferior progression-free survival (PFS) (2-year PFS 58% vs. 84% in ctDNA-negative patients, P = 0·033). In multivariate models, detectable ctDNA was associated with increased risk of progression/death (Hazard ratio 3·9, P = 0·003) and increased risk of relapse/progression (Hazard ratio 10·8, P = 0·0006). Detectable ctDNA is associated with an increased risk of relapse/progression, but further validation studies are necessary to confirm these findings and determine the clinical utility of NGS-based minimal residual disease monitoring in lymphoma patients after HSCT.

  14. Dermal mast cells affect the development of sunlight-induced skin tumours.

    PubMed

    Sarchio, Seri N E; Kok, Lai-Fong; O'Sullivan, Clare; Halliday, Gary M; Byrne, Scott N

    2012-04-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation contained in sunlight is considered a major risk in the induction of skin cancer. While mast cells are best known for their role in allergic responses, they have also been shown to play a crucial role in suppressing the anti-tumour immune response following UV exposure. Evidence is now emerging that UV may also trigger mast cell release of cutaneous tissue remodelling and pro-angiogenic factors. In this review, we will focus on the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which UV recruits and then activates mast cells to initiate and promote skin cancer development.

  15. The Ter Mutation In The Dead End Gene Causes Germ Cell Loss And Testicular Germ Cell Tumours

    SciTech Connect

    Youngren, Kirsten K.; Coveney, Douglas; Peng, Xiaoning; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Schmidt, Laura S.; Nickerson, Michael L.; Lamb, Bruce T.; Deng Jian Min; Behringer, Richard R.; Capel, Blanche; Rubin, Edward M.; Nadeau, Joseph H.; Matin, Angabin

    2005-01-01

    In mice, the Ter mutation causes primordial germ cell (PGC) loss in all genetic backgrounds1. Ter is also a potent modifier of spontaneous testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT) susceptibility in the 129 family of inbred strains, and markedly increases TGCT incidence in 129-Ter/Ter males2 4. In 129-Ter/Ter mice, some of the remaining PGCs transform into undifferentiated pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells2 6, and after birth differentiate into various cells and tissues that compose TGCTs. Here, we report the positional cloning of Ter, revealing a point mutation that introduces a termination codon in the mouse orthologue (Dnd1) of the zebrafish dead end (dnd) gene. PGC deficiency is corrected both with bacterial artificial chromosomes that contain Dnd1 and with a Dnd1-encoding transgene. Dnd1 is expressed in fetal gonads during the critical period when TGCTs originate. DND1 has an RNA recognition motif and is most similar to the apobec complementation factor, a component of the cytidine t o uridine RNA-editing complex. These results suggest that Ter may adversely affect essential aspects of RNA biology during PGC development. DND1 is the first protein known to have an RNA recognition motif directly implicated as a heritable cause of spontaneous tumorigenesis. TGCT development in the 129-Ter mouse strain models paediatric TGCT in humans. This work will have important implications for our understanding of the genetic control of TGCT pathogenesis and PGC biology.

  16. HPV Status and second primary tumours in Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introductions The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCCs) is rising in developed nations. Studies have shown that these virally mediated tumours are epidemiologically, clinically, and biologically different than other head and neck squamous cell carcinomas and traditional concepts of field cancerization may not apply to HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer. Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the rate of second primary tumors and the diagnostic yield of field cancerization work up in the upper aerodigestive tract in patients with HPV-related and HPV-unrelated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Design Retrospective review. Setting Tertiary cancer care centers in Alberta. Methods Retrospective review of 406 patients diagnosed with OPSCC in Alberta between 2005 and 2009. HPV-status of tumours was determined by tissue microarray using immunohistochemistry staining for p16. Main outcome measures Primary outcome: incidence of upper aerodigestive tract second primary tumours in p16-positive versus p16-negative OPSCC. Secondary outcomes: diagnostic yield of traditional field cancerization work-up in p16-positive versus negative patients. Results The overall rate of SPTs was 7.4% (30/406). The incidence rate of SPTs was significantly lower in p16-positive patients (0.7 per 100 patient-yrs vs. 8.5 in p16-negative, p < 0.0001). Field cancerization work-up for synchronous lesions in the upper aerodigestive tract, including panendoscopy and whole-body PET-CT, had decreased diagnostic yield in p16-positive patients (2.8% vs. 10.2% in HPV-negative patients, p=0.02). Conclusions Patients with HPV-related OPSCC, who are non-smokers have decreased risk of developing second primary tumours in the upper aerodigestive tract and have low yield on field cancerization work-up. This study provides further evidence that virally mediated OPSCC are distinct and may benefit from alternate diagnostic pathways. PMID:23718873

  17. Prognostic value of tumour cell detection in peripheral blood of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zach, O; Kasparu, H; Wagner, H; Krieger, O; Lutz, D

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of tumour cells in peripheral blood (pB) of breast cancer (BC) patients, pB samples from 143 patients with benign lesions of the breast and from 467 BC patients were tested via a nested RT-PCR assay for mammaglobin mRNA. No sample from patients with benign lesions of the breast was found to be mammaglobin positive in contrast to 5/310 (2%) BC patients with no evidence of disease (NED) and 46/157 (29%) patients with metastatic disease (MD). Two hundred and eighteen BC patients with NED were followed for at least 12 months. All five mammaglobin-positive BC patients relapsed 1-13 months after first examination of positive pB samples in contrast to 27/213 (13%) patients without detectable tumour cells in pB. Fifty-nine BC patients with MD were tested for mammaglobin expression in pB at the time of first diagnosis of MD; 20 of them (34%) were mammaglobin positive. Patients were followed for a median of 19 months (2-51 months). During this time, 19/59 (32%) died due to tumour progression. In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, BC patients with mammaglobin-negative pB samples at time of diagnosis of MD lived significantly longer than mammaglobin-positive patients (log-rank test: P = 0.0013). In addition, mammaglobin was an independent prognostic parameter and the difference reached significance in univariate as well as in multivariate analysis (P < 0.01). We conclude that the presence of tumour cells in pB of BC patients is of prognostic value.

  18. Genetic profiling of tumours using both circulating free DNA and circulating tumour cells isolated from the same preserved whole blood sample.

    PubMed

    Rothwell, Dominic G; Smith, Nigel; Morris, Daniel; Leong, Hui Sun; Li, Yaoyong; Hollebecque, Antoine; Ayub, Mahmood; Carter, Louise; Antonello, Jenny; Franklin, Lynsey; Miller, Crispin; Blackhall, Fiona; Dive, Caroline; Brady, Ged

    2016-04-01

    Molecular information obtained from cancer patients' blood is an emerging and powerful research tool with immense potential as a companion diagnostic for patient stratification and monitoring. Blood, which can be sampled routinely, provides a means of inferring the current genetic status of patients' tumours via analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) or circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA). However, accurate assessment of both CTCs and ctDNA requires all blood cells to be maintained intact until samples are processed. This dictates for ctDNA analysis EDTA blood samples must be processed with 4 h of draw, severely limiting the use of ctDNA in multi-site trials. Here we describe a blood collection protocol that is amenable for analysis of both CTCs and ctDNA up to four days after blood collection. We demonstrate that yields of circulating free DNA (cfDNA) obtained from whole blood CellSave samples are equivalent to those obtained from conventional EDTA plasma processed within 4 h of blood draw. Targeted and genome-wide NGS revealed comparable DNA quality and resultant sequence information from cfDNA within CellSave and EDTA samples. We also demonstrate that CTCs and ctDNA can be isolated from the same patient blood sample, and give the same patterns of CNA enabling direct analysis of the genetic status of patients' tumours. In summary, our results demonstrate the utility of a simple approach that enabling robust molecular analysis of CTCs and cfDNA for genotype-directed therapies in multi-site clinical trials and represent a significant methodological improvement for clinical benefit.

  19. Identification of four new susceptibility loci for testicular germ cell tumour

    PubMed Central

    Litchfield, Kevin; Holroyd, Amy; Lloyd, Amy; Broderick, Peter; Nsengimana, Jérémie; Eeles, Rosalind; Easton, Douglas F; Dudakia, Darshna; Bishop, D. Timothy; Reid, Alison; Huddart, Robert A.; Grotmol, Tom; Wiklund, Fredrik; Shipley, Janet; Houlston, Richard S.; Turnbull, Clare

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple risk loci for testicular germ cell tumour (TGCT), revealing a polygenic model of disease susceptibility strongly influenced by common variation. To identify additional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TGCT, we conducted a multistage GWAS with a combined data set of >25,000 individuals (6,059 cases and 19,094 controls). We identified new risk loci for TGCT at 3q23 (rs11705932, TFDP2, P=1.5 × 10−9), 11q14.1 (rs7107174, GAB2, P=9.7 × 10−11), 16p13.13 (rs4561483, GSPT1, P=1.6 × 10−8) and 16q24.2 (rs55637647, ZFPM1, P=3.4 × 10−9). We additionally present detailed functional analysis of these loci, identifying a statistically significant relationship between rs4561483 risk genotype and increased GSPT1 expression in TGCT patient samples. These findings provide additional support for a polygenic model of TGCT risk and further insight into the biological basis of disease development. PMID:26503584

  20. Long-term prognostic impact of circulating tumour cells in gastric cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroaki; Sato, Jun; Tsujino, Yukio; Yamaguchi, Noriko; Kimura, Satoshi; Gohda, Keigo; Murakami, Katsuhiro; Onimaru, Manabu; Ohmori, Tohru; Ishikawa, Fumihiro; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    AIM To analyse the long-term prognostic impact of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in gastric cancer patients who underwent surgery. METHODS A 7.5-mL peripheral vein blood sample was obtained from each patient with treatment-negative gastric adenocarcinoma before surgery. OBP-401, a telomerase-specific, replication-selective, oncolytic adenoviral agent carrying the green fluorescent protein gene, was used to label CTCs. Correlations between the number of CTCs and clinical end points were evaluated. RESULTS The median follow-up period of the surviving patients with gastric cancer was 60 mo. The CTC number tended to increase concomitantly with disease progression. The overall survival of patients with more than five CTCs in 7.5-mL of peripheral blood was lower than that of patients with five or less CTCs, although the difference was not significant (P = 0.183). A significant difference in relapse-free survival was found between patients with more than five and those with five or less CTCs (P = 0.034). CONCLUSION A lower number of CTCs was correlated with higher relapse-free survival rates in patients. Detection of CTCs using OBP-401 may be useful for predicting prognosis in gastric cancer. PMID:28028372

  1. Efficient loading of dendritic cells following cryo and radiofrequency ablation in combination with immune modulation induces anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    den Brok, M H M G M; Sutmuller, R P M; Nierkens, S; Bennink, E J; Frielink, C; Toonen, L W J; Boerman, O C; Figdor, C G; Ruers, T J M; Adema, G J

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are professional antigen-presenting cells that play a pivotal role in the induction of immunity. Ex vivo-generated, tumour antigen-loaded mature DC are currently exploited as cancer vaccines in clinical studies. However, antigen loading and maturation of DC directly in vivo would greatly facilitate the application of DC-based vaccines. We formerly showed in murine models that radiofrequency-mediated tumour destruction can provide an antigen source for the in vivo induction of anti-tumour immunity, and we explored the role of DC herein. In this paper we evaluate radiofrequency and cryo ablation for their ability to provide an antigen source for DC and compare this with an ex vivo-loaded DC vaccine. The data obtained with model antigens demonstrate that upon tumour destruction by radiofrequency ablation, up to 7% of the total draining lymph node (LN) DC contained antigen, whereas only few DC from the conventional vaccine reached the LN. Interestingly, following cryo ablation the amount of antigen-loaded DC is almost doubled. Analysis of surface markers revealed that both destruction methods were able to induce DC maturation. Finally, we show that in situ tumour ablation can be efficiently combined with immune modulation by anti-CTLA-4 antibodies or regulatory T-cell depletion. These combination treatments protected mice from the outgrowth of tumour challenges, and led to in vivo enhancement of tumour-specific T-cell numbers, which produced more IFN-γ upon activation. Therefore, in situ tumour destruction in combination with immune modulation creates a unique, ‘in situ DC-vaccine' that is readily applicable in the clinic without prior knowledge of tumour antigens. PMID:16953240

  2. Inhibition of Lysyl Oxidase and Lysyl Oxidase-Like Enzymes Has Tumour-Promoting and Tumour-Suppressing Roles in Experimental Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Maria; Adamo, Hanibal; Bergh, Anders; Halin Bergström, Sofia

    2016-01-25

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) and LOX-like (LOXL) enzymes are key players in extracellular matrix deposition and maturation. LOX promote tumour progression and metastasis, but it may also have tumour-inhibitory effects. Here we show that orthotopic implantation of rat prostate AT-1 tumour cells increased LOX and LOXLs mRNA expressions in the tumour and in the surrounding non-malignant prostate tissue. Inhibition of LOX enzymes, using Beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), initiated before implantation of AT-1 cells, reduced tumour growth. Conversely, treatment that was started after the tumours were established resulted in unaffected or increased tumour growth. Moreover, treatment with BAPN did not suppress the formation of spontaneous lymph node metastases, or lung tumour burden, when tumour cells were injected intravenously. A temporal decrease in collagen fibre content, which is a target for LOX, was observed in tumours and in the tumour-adjacent prostate tissue. This may explain why early BAPN treatment is more effective in inhibiting tumour growth compared to treatment initiated later. Our data suggest that the enzymatic function of the LOX family is context-dependent, with both tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting properties in prostate cancer. Further investigations are needed to understand the circumstances under which LOX inhibition may be used as a therapeutic target for cancer patients.

  3. Endothelial progenitor cells support tumour growth and metastatisation: implications for the resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy.

    PubMed

    Moccia, Francesco; Zuccolo, Estella; Poletto, Valentina; Cinelli, Mariapia; Bonetti, Elisa; Guerra, Germano; Rosti, Vittorio

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) have recently been shown to promote the angiogenic switch in solid neoplasms, thereby promoting tumour growth and metastatisation. The genetic suppression of EPC mobilization from bone marrow prevents tumour development and colonization of remote organs. Therefore, it has been assumed that anti-angiogenic treatments, which target vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signalling in both normal endothelial cells and EPCs, could interfere with EPC activation in cancer patients. Our recent data, however, show that VEGF fails to stimulate tumour endothelial colony-forming cells (ECFCs), i.e. the only EPC subtype truly belonging to the endothelial lineage. The present article will survey current evidence about EPC involvement in the angiogenic switch: we will focus on the controversy about EPC definition and on the debate around their actual incorporation into tumour neovessels. We will then discuss how ECFC insensitivity to VEGF stimulation in cancer patients could underpin their well-known resistance to anti-VEGF therapies.

  4. Disparate responses of tumour vessels to angiotensin II: tumour volume-dependent effects on perfusion and oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Thews, O; Kelleher, D K; Vaupel, P

    2000-01-01

    Perfusion and oxygenation of experimental tumours were studied during angiotensin II (AT II) administration whereby the rate of the continuous AT II infusion was chosen to increase the mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) by 50–70 mmHg. In subcutaneous DS- sarcomas the red blood cell (RBC) flux was assessed using the laser Doppler technique and the mean tumour oxygen partial pressure (p O 2) was measured polarographically using O 2-sensitive catheter and needle electrodes. Changes in RBC flux with increasing MABP depended mainly on tumour size. In small tumours, RBC flux decreased with rising MABP whereas in larger tumours RBC flux increased parallel to the MABP. As a result of these volume-dependent effects on tumour blood flow, the impact of AT II on tumour p O 2 was also mainly tumour volume-related. In small tumours oxygenation decreased with increasing MABP during AT II infusion, whereas in large tumours a positive relationship between blood pressure and O 2 status was found. This disparate behaviour might be the result of the co-existence of two functionally distinct populations of tumour vessels. In small tumours, perfusion decreases presumably due to vasoconstriction of pre-existing host vessels feeding the tumour. In larger malignancies, newly formed tumour vessels predominate and seem not to have this vasoresponsive capability (lack of smooth muscle cells and/or AT receptors), resulting in an improvement of perfusion which is not tumour-related per se, but is due to the increased perfusion pressure. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901375

  5. Codon 12 Ki-ras mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer: comparative evaluation in tumoural and non-tumoural lung.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, T.; Ricci, S.; Lacave, R.; Antoine, M.; Kambouchner, M.; Capron, F.; Bernaudin, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Ki-ras activation by point mutation on codon 12 has been reported in non-small-cell lung carcinomas and in various models of experimental lung tumours induced by chemical carcinogens. The cellular targets for carcinogenic compounds of tobacco smoke are usually considered to be the cells of the bronchial mucosa or alveolar epithelium. However, little is known about preneoplastic events in bronchopulmonary carcinogenesis. The hypothesis of the presence of widespread target cells containing Ki-ras mutation was investigated by evaluating concurrent neoplastic and non-neoplastic bronchial and alveolar samples from 51 patients with non-small-cell lung carcinomas. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method used can detect one cell with a mutation on codon 12 among 10(2) normal cells. In tumour samples, a mutation was detected in 20% of adenocarcinomas, but in none of the adenosquamous or squamous cell carcinomas. No mutation was detected in the non-neoplastic bronchial or parenchymal samples. When using an enriched PCR-RFLP method detecting one mutated allele among 10(3) normal alleles a mutation was detected in 23% of adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, Ki-ras activation by mutation on codon 12 was not observed in non-neoplastic bronchial or parenchymal tissues in patients with bronchopulmonary cancers and does not appear to be a genetic event present in non-malignant epithelial target cells exposed to tobacco smoke. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8855973

  6. The sodium channel β1 subunit mediates outgrowth of neurite-like processes on breast cancer cells and promotes tumour growth and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michaela; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Forrest, Lorna C; Brackenbury, William J

    2014-11-15

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are heteromeric proteins composed of pore-forming α subunits and smaller β subunits. The β subunits are multifunctional channel modulators and are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). β1, encoded by SCN1B, is best characterized in the central nervous system (CNS), where it plays a critical role in regulating electrical excitability, neurite outgrowth and migration during development. β1 is also expressed in breast cancer (BCa) cell lines, where it regulates adhesion and migration in vitro. In the present study, we found that SCN1B mRNA/β1 protein were up-regulated in BCa specimens, compared with normal breast tissue. β1 upregulation substantially increased tumour growth and metastasis in a xenograft model of BCa. β1 over-expression also increased vascularization and reduced apoptosis in the primary tumours, and β1 over-expressing tumour cells had an elongate morphology. In vitro, β1 potentiated outgrowth of processes from BCa cells co-cultured with fibroblasts, via trans-homophilic adhesion. β1-mediated process outgrowth in BCa cells required the presence and activity of fyn kinase, and Na(+) current, thus replicating the mechanism by which β1 regulates neurite outgrowth in CNS neurons. We conclude that when present in breast tumours, β1 enhances pathological growth and cellular dissemination. This study is the first demonstration of a functional role for β1 in tumour growth and metastasis in vivo. We propose that β1 warrants further study as a potential biomarker and targeting β1-mediated adhesion interactions may have value as a novel anti-cancer therapy.

  7. Using naturally occurring tumours in dogs and cats to study telomerase and cancer stem cell biology.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lisa Y; Argyle, David J

    2009-04-01

    The recently described cancer stem cell theory opens up many new challenges and opportunities to identify targets for therapeutic intervention. However, the majority of cancer related therapeutic studies rely upon rodent models of human cancer that rarely translate into clinical success in human patients. Naturally occurring cancers in dogs, cats and humans share biological features, including molecular targets, telomerase biology and tumour genetics. Studying cancer stem cell biology and telomere/telomerase dynamics in the cancer bearing pet population may offer the opportunity to develop a greater understanding of cancer biology in the natural setting and evaluate the development of novel therapies targeted at these systems.

  8. Effects of a cloned cell line with NK activity on bone marrow transplants, tumour development and metastasis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John F.; Dennert, Gunther

    1982-11-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells cloned in vitro have been transferred into NK-deficient hosts. These cells have been shown to have a role in the rejection of allogeneic bone marrow grafts, resistance to both radiation-induced thymic leukaemia and challenge with melanoma tumour cells. It appears that NK cells have an important role in immune surveillance.

  9. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  10. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-05-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells.

  11. Midkine promoter-driven suicide gene expression and -mediated adenovirus replication produced cytotoxic effects to immortalised and tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, L; Hamada, K; Namba, M; Kadomatsu, K; Muramatsu, T; Matsubara, S; Tagawa, M

    2004-07-01

    We examined possible application of a regulatory region of midkine (MK) gene, which is frequently upregulated in a number of human tumours but not in normal cells, to cancer gene therapy. We examined transcriptional activity of the MK genomic fragments in paired cell lines, immortalized cells and their parental normal fibroblasts, and found that the MK fragments activated a fused reporter or a suicide gene preferentially in the immortalized cells. Recombinant adenoviruses (Ad), in which the MK fragment was inserted upstream to the E1A gene (AdMK), replicated preferentially in the immortalized cells and were cytotoxie to them. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cells were significantly susceptible to AdMK compared with human normal fibroblasts in vitro and the replication of AdMK was less than that of wild-type Ad in the infected fibroblasts. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells infected with AdMK did not form tumours in immunocompromised mice and intratumoural injection of AdMK into the hepatocellular carcinoma developed in mice retarded the subsequent tumour growth. Expression of E1A and necrosis of tumours were detected in AdMK-injected but not control Ad-injected cases. The MK promoter-driven suicide gene therapy and -mediated replicative Ad can thereby produce cytotoxic effects to immortalized and tumour cells with minimal damage to normal cells.

  12. Sepsis-induced expansion of granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells promotes tumour growth through Toll-like receptor 4.

    PubMed

    Llitjos, Jean-François; Auffray, Cédric; Alby-Laurent, Fanny; Rousseau, Christophe; Merdji, Hamid; Bonilla, Nelly; Toubiana, Julie; Belaïdouni, Nadia; Mira, Jean-Paul; Lucas, Bruno; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Pène, Frédéric

    2016-08-01

    Severe sepsis remains a frequent and dreaded complication in cancer patients. Beyond the often fatal short-term outcome, the long-term sequelae of severe sepsis may also impact directly on the prognosis of the underlying malignancy in survivors. The immune system is involved in all stages of tumour development, in the detection of transforming and dying cells and in the prevention of tumour growth and dissemination. In fact, the profound and sustained immune defects induced by sepsis may constitute a privileged environment likely to favour tumour growth. We investigated the impact of sepsis on malignant tumour growth in a double-hit animal model of polymicrobial peritonitis, followed by subcutaneous inoculation of MCA205 fibrosarcoma cells. As compared to their sham-operated counterparts, post-septic mice exhibited accelerated tumour growth. This was associated with intratumoural accumulation of CD11b(+) Ly6G(high) polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) that could be characterized as granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells (G-MDSCs). Depletion of granulocytic cells in post-septic mice inhibited the sepsis-enhanced tumour growth. Toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 (Tlr4) and Myd88 deficiencies prevented sepsis-induced expansion of G-MDSCs and tumour growth. Our results demonstrate that the myelosuppressive environment induced by severe bacterial infections promotes malignant tumour growth, and highlight a critical role of CD11b(+) Ly6G(high) G-MDSCs under the control of TLR-dependent signalling. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Prevalence and heterogeneity of circulating tumour cells in metastatic cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Shenjere, Patrick; Hodgson, Clare; Hodgetts, Jackie; Clack, Glen; Hughes, Andrew; Lorigan, Paul; Dive, Caroline

    2014-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are detectable by the MelCAM and high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen (HMW-MAA)-dependent CellSearch platform. However, CTCs which do not express these capture and detection markers are not detectable by CellSearch. Consequently, we explored the use of isolation by size of epithelial tumour cells (ISET), a marker independent, filtration-based device to determine the prevalence and heterogeneity of CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma patients. Ninety patients were prospectively recruited and blood samples taken before treatment. Patients' blood was filtered using the ISET platform. CTCs were enumerated using dual immunohistochemistry with positive selection by S100 expression and exclusion of leucocytes and endothelial cells expressing CD45 or CD144, respectively. A panel of markers (Melan-A, MITF, MelCAM, high molecular melanoma-associated antigen, CD271 and MAGEC) was also examined. Fifty-one patients (57%) had CTCs (range 1-44 CTCs/4 ml blood) and 12 patients also had circulating tumour microemboli. Seven patients had S100- CTCs, 11 patients' CTCs were S100+ and 33 patients had S100+ and S100- CTCs. Substantial intrapatient and interpatient heterogeneity was observed for all other melanoma-associated markers. CTCs in metastatic cutaneous melanoma are detectable using the flexible marker-independent ISET platform. CTCs display significant marker expression heterogeneity implying that marker-dependent platforms would not detect all CTCs and multimarker assays are now required to reveal the biological significance of this CTC heterogeneity.

  14. Effect of actin cytoskeleton disruption on electric pulse-induced apoptosis and electroporation in tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Deyou; Tang, Liling; Zeng, Chao; Wang, Jianfei; Luo, Xiao; Yao, Chenguo; Sun, Caixin

    2011-02-01

    Electric pulses are known to affect the outer membrane and intracellular structures of tumour cells. By applying electrical pulses of 450 ns duration with electric field intensity of 8 kV/cm to HepG2 cells for 30 s, electric pulse-induced changes in the integrity of the plasma membrane, apoptosis, viability and mitochondrial transmembrane potential were investigated. Results demonstrated that electric pulses induced cell apoptosis and necrosis accompanied with the decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the formation of pores in the membrane. The role of cytoskeleton in cellular response to electric pulses was investigated. We found that the apoptotic and necrosis percentages of cells in response to electric pulses decreased after cytoskeletal disruption. The electroporation of cell was not affected by cytoskeletal disruption. The results suggest that the disruption of actin skeleton is positive in protecting cells from killing by electric pulses, and the skeleton is not involved in the electroporation directly.

  15. In vitro photosensitization of tumour cell enzymes by photofrin II administered in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, S. L.; Murant, R. S.; Chazen, M. D.; Kelly, M. E.; Hilf, R.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of injected Photofrin II, a preparation enriched in hydrophobic dihaematoporphyrin ethers and esters, to photosensitize selected mitochondrial and cytosolic enzymes during illumination in vitro was examined. Preparations of R3230AC mammary tumours, obtained at designated times after a single dose of Photofrin II, displayed a time-dependent photosensitivity. Maximum inhibition of mitochondrial enzymes occurred at 24 hours post-treatment, whereas no inhibition of the cytosolic enzyme, pyruvate kinase, was observed over the 168 hour time course. At the selected 24 hour time point, mitochondrial enzyme photosensitisation was found to be drug dose (5.25 mg kg-1 Photofrin II) and light dose dependent, the rank order of inhibition being cytochrome c oxidase greater than F0F1 ATPase greater than succinate dehydrogenase greater than NADH dehydrogenase. We conclude that porphyrin species contained in Photofrin II accumulate in mitochondria of tumour cells in vivo and produce maximum photosensitisation at 24-72 hours after administration to tumour-bearing animals. The time course observed here with Photofrin II is similar to that seen previously with the more heterogenous haematoporphyrin derivative preparation in this in vivo-in vitro model. PMID:2547413

  16. Pyruvate kinase type M2 promotes tumour cell exosome release via phosphorylating synaptosome-associated protein 23

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yao; Wang, Dong; Jin, Fangfang; Bian, Zhen; Li, Limin; Liang, Hongwei; Li, Mingzhen; Shi, Lei; Pan, Chaoyun; Zhu, Dihan; Chen, Xi; Hu, Gang; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke

    2017-01-01

    Tumour cells secrete exosomes that are involved in the remodelling of the tumour–stromal environment and promoting malignancy. The mechanisms governing tumour exosome release, however, remain incompletely understood. Here we show that tumour cell exosomes secretion is controlled by pyruvate kinase type M2 (PKM2), which is upregulated and phosphorylated in tumours. During exosome secretion, phosphorylated PKM2 serves as a protein kinase to phosphorylate synaptosome-associated protein 23 (SNAP-23), which in turn enables the formation of the SNARE complex to allow exosomes release. Direct phosphorylation assay and mass spectrometry confirm that PKM2 phosphorylates SNAP-23 at Ser95. Ectopic expression of non-phosphorylated SNAP-23 mutant (Ser95→Ala95) significantly reduces PKM2-mediated exosomes release whereas expression of selective phosphomimetic SNAP-23 mutants (Ser95→Glu95 but not Ser20→Glu20) rescues the impaired exosomes release induced by PKM2 knockdown. Our findings reveal a non-metabolic function of PKM2, an enzyme associated with tumour cell reliance on aerobic glycolysis, in promoting tumour cell exosome release. PMID:28067230

  17. Low prevalence of Merkel cell polyomavirus with low viral loads in oral and maxillofacial tumours or tumour-like lesions from immunocompetent patients: Absence of Merkel cell polyomavirus-associated neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    TANIO, SHUNSUKE; MATSUSHITA, MICHIKO; KUWAMOTO, SATOSHI; HORIE, YASUSHI; KODANI, ISAMU; MURAKAMI, ICHIRO; RYOKE, KAZUO; HAYASHI, KAZUHIKO

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that ~80% of Merkel cell carcinomas (MCCs) harbour a novel polyomavirus, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). MCPyV has been detected in various human tissue samples. However, previous studies on the prevalence of MCPyV in oral tumours or tumour-like lesions are incomplete. To address this issue, we measured MCPyV DNA quantity using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in 327 oral tumours or tumour-like lesions and 54 jaw tumours or cyst lesions from 381 immunocompetent patients, as well as in 4 oral lesions from 4 immunosuppressed patients. qPCR revealed a low MCPyV prevalence (25/381, 6.6%) with low viral loads (0.00024-0.026 copies/cell) in oral and maxillofacial tumours and tumour-like lesions from immunocompetent patients. The prevalence was 7/176 (4.0%) in invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) [2/60 (3.33%) SCCs of the tongue, 4/52 (7.7%) SCCs of the gingiva and 1/19 (5.3%) SCCs of the floor of the mouth], 1/10 (10%) in dysplasias, 1/5 (20%) in adenocarcinomas, 2/13 (15.4%) in adenoid cystic carcinomas, 1/10 (10%) in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 3/10 (30%) in lipomas, 3/5 (60%) in neurofibromas, 1/3 (33.3%) in Schwannomas, 2/12 (16.7%) in Warthin's tumours, 2/11 (18.2%) in pyogenic granulomas, 1/14 (7.1%) in radicular cysts and 1/12 (8.3%) in ameloblastomas. The prevalence in lesions from immunosuppressed patients (1/4, 25%) was higher compared with that in lesions from immunocompetent patients (25/381, 6.6%), but the difference was not statistically significant. To the best of our knowledge, this study was the first to report prevalence data of MCPyV in tumours and cysts of the jaws (2/54, 3.7%). These data indicated absence of MCPyV-related tumours or tumour-like lesions in the oral cavity and jaws and suggested that the detected MCPyV DNA was derived from non-neoplastic background tissues with widespread low-level MCPyV infection. PMID:26807237

  18. Secretion of soluble complement inhibitors factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) by ovarian tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Junnikkala, S; Hakulinen, J; Jarva, H; Manuelian, T; Bjørge, L; Bützow, R; Zipfel, P F; Meri, S

    2002-11-04

    We observed that the soluble complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein were abundantly present in ascites samples as well as in primary tumours of patients with ovarian cancer. RT-PCR and immunoblotting analyses showed that the two complement inhibitors were constitutively produced by the ovarian tumour cell lines SK-OV-3 and Caov-3, but not PA-1 or SW626 cells. The amounts of factor H-like protein secreted were equal to those of factor H. This is exceptional, because e.g. in normal human serum the concentration of factor H-like protein is below 1/10th of that of factor H. In ascites samples the mean level of factor H-like protein (130+/-55 microg ml(-1)) was 5.5-fold higher than in normal human serum (24+/-3 microg ml(-1)). Ovarian tumour cells thus preferentially synthesise factor H-like protein, the alternatively spliced short variant of factor H. The tumour cells were found to bind both (125)I-labelled factor H and recombinant factor H-like protein to their surfaces. Surprisingly, the culture supernatants of all of the ovarian tumour cell lines studied, including those of PA-1 and SW626 that did not produce factor H/factor H-like protein, promoted factor I-mediated cleavage of C3b to inactive iC3b. Subsequently, the PA-1 and SW626 cell lines were found to secrete a soluble form of the membrane cofactor protein (CD46). Thus, our studies reveal two novel complement resistance mechanisms of ovarian tumour cells: (i) production of factor H-like protein and factor H and (ii) secretion of soluble membrane cofactor protein. Secretion of soluble complement inhibitors could protect ovarian tumour cells against humoral immune attack and pose an obstacle for therapy with monoclonal antibodies.

  19. Heterozygous carriers of the I171V mutation of the NBS1 gene have a significantly increased risk of solid malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Jerzy; Mosor, Maria; Ziółkowska, Iwona; Wierzbicka, Malgorzta; Pernak-Schwarz, Monika; Przyborska, Marta; Roznowski, Krzysztof; Pławski, Andrzej; Słomski, Ryszard; Januszkiewicz, Danuta

    2008-03-01

    Homozygous mutation 657del5 within the NBS1 gene is responsible for the majority of Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS) cases. NBS patients are characterised by increased susceptibility to malignancies mainly of lymphoid origin. Recently it has been postulated that heterozygous carriers of 657del5 NBS1 mutation are at higher risk of cancer development. The aim of the study was to analyse the frequency of I171V mutation in NBS1 gene in 270 women with breast cancer, 176 patients with larynx cancer, 81 with second primary tumours of head and neck, 131 with colorectal carcinoma and 600 healthy individuals. I171V mutation was present in 17 cancer patients compared with only one in healthy individuals. This constitutes 2.58% in studied patients with malignancies and 0.17% in the control group (P=0.0002; relative risk 1.827; odds ratio 15.886; 95% confidence interval 2.107-119.8). Since DNA was isolated from non malignant cells, all mutations found in cancer patients appeared to be of germinal origin. It can be concluded that NBS1 allele I171V may be a general susceptibility gene in solid tumours.

  20. Xanthohumol attenuates tumour cell-mediated breaching of the lymphendothelial barrier and prevents intravasation and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Viola, Katharina; Kopf, Sabine; Rarova, Lucie; Jarukamjorn, Kanokwan; Kretschy, Nicole; Teichmann, Mathias; Vonach, Caroline; Atanasov, Atanas G; Giessrigl, Benedikt; Huttary, Nicole; Raab, Ingrid; Krieger, Sigurd; Strnad, Miroslav; de Martin, Rainer; Saiko, Philipp; Szekeres, Thomas; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Dirsch, Verena M; Jäger, Walter; Grusch, Michael; Dolznig, Helmut; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Krupitza, Georg

    2013-07-01

    Health beneficial effects of xanthohumol have been reported, and basic research provided evidence for anti-cancer effects. Furthermore, xanthohumol was shown to inhibit the migration of endothelial cells. Therefore, this study investigated the anti-metastatic potential of xanthohumol. MCF-7 breast cancer spheroids which are placed on lymphendothelial cells (LECs) induce "circular chemorepellent-induced defects" (CCIDs) in the LEC monolayer resembling gates for intravasating tumour bulks at an early step of lymph node colonisation. NF-κB reporter-, EROD-, SELE-, 12(S)-HETE- and adhesion assays were performed to investigate the anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol. Western blot analyses were used to elucidate the mechanisms inhibiting CCID formation. Xanthohumol inhibited the activity of CYP, SELE and NF-kB and consequently, the formation of CCIDs at low micromolar concentrations. More specifically, xanthohumol affected ICAM-1 expression and adherence of MCF-7 cells to LECs, which is a prerequisite for CCID formation. Furthermore, markers of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and of cell mobility such as paxillin, MCL2 and S100A4 were suppressed by xanthohumol. Xanthohumol attenuated tumour cell-mediated defects at the lymphendothelial barrier and inhibited EMT-like effects thereby providing a mechanistic explanation for the anti-intravasative/anti-metastatic properties of xanthohumol.

  1. Myoepithelial Cells (MEC) of the Salivary Glands in Health and Tumours

    PubMed Central

    Veeravarmal, V.; Nirmal, R. Madhavan; Reddy, B. Venkat Ramana

    2015-01-01

    Myoepithelial cells (MEC) are found in the secretory units of many mammalian exocrine glands such as mammary, sweat, lacrimal and salivary glands. They are interposed between the secretory cells and the basal lamina. Immunohistochemically they are found to contain keratin intermediate filaments and are, therefore, considered to have an epithelial origin but at the same time they contain a large number of myofilaments which represent a massive expression of contractile proteins such as actin, myosin, calponin and caldesmon. Thus have smooth muscle like property also and hence the name. Numerous functions of MEC have been described, the most important of them being important for contraction of the glands and recently it has been found to prevent tumour progression. It should be noted that the diversity in the occurrence and dilemma regarding the pathogenesis of salivary gland tumours is due to lack in uniformity regarding the cells participating in its oncogenesis, especially the MEC. Also proper and extensive studies regarding MEC are very limited and thus have posed difficulty for a pathologist to understand this cell. In this review we try to bring about a thorough description of this cell in both physiological and pathological aspects. PMID:25954719

  2. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  3. Establishment of a cell line (MCM-B2) from a benign mixed tumour of canine mammary gland.

    PubMed

    Priosoeryanto, B P; Tateyama, S; Yamaguchi, R; Uchida, K

    1995-05-01

    A cell line was established from a benign mixed tumour of the canine mammary gland. Light microscopy of the cells cultured on plastic dishes revealed monolayer colonies. Cells that grew within the collagen gel matrix formed large three-dimensional colonies with a branching pattern. Immunohistochemically, these cells reacted intensely with anti-vimentin antiserum and mildly with anti-desmin antiserum. Ultrastructural examination revealed a large nucleus, intracytoplasmic organelles and intermediate filaments, which varied among cells. The cells possessed an abnormal chromosome number, an average of 80 per cell. Histologically, the xenografted tumour of cultured cells was similar to anaplastic carcinoma and reacted strongly with anti-vimentin antiserum, mildly with anti-desmin antiserum, and weakly with anti-keratin antiserum. The average chromosome number of cells form the xenografted tumour was the same as that of the original cultured cells. These findings suggest that the cell line might be derived from stem cells or atypical cells, and that it should be useful as model for the study of cell differentiation and proliferation in canine mammary tumours.

  4. Possible role of macrophage-like suppressor cells in the anti-tumour activity of BCG.

    PubMed Central

    Castés, M.; Lynch, N. R.; Lespinats, G.; Orbach-Arbouys, S.

    1981-01-01

    The i.v. injection of high doses (3 mg) of BCG into C3H mice bearing a transplantable 3-methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcoma caused the regression of a significant proportion. This effect was most evident when the BCG was injected on the day of the graft, or 7 days later. The injection of this agent either 14 days before the graft, or in low doses (0.1 or 0.5 mg), or directly into the tumour (i.t.) only prolonged the survival of the animals. Spleen cells from systemic high-dose BCG-treated mice were found to exert a strong nonspecific cytostatic effect in vitro that was not an artefact of the test conditions, and was not expressed by cells from low-dose animals. The cytostatic effect was shown to be caused by cells with the characteristics of macrophages, i.e. they were strongly adherent, unaffected by treatment with anti-Thy 1.2 + C', radioresistant but heat-sensitive, and were detected in BCG-treated "B" mice. The spleens of high-dose BCG-treated mice also contained suppressor cells that were capable of inhibiting the in vitro reactivity of normal T cells to PHA. Like the cytostatic effect, this suppressor activity was not detected in low-dose mice, and the cells responsible had the properties of macrophages; the effect was lost after the removal of adherent cells by sequential exposure to plastic and colloidal iron, but was conserved after treatment with anti-Thy 1.2 + C'. T-cell-deprived animals, such as "B" or nude mice, also developed suppressor-cell activity when treated with systemic high-dose BCG. Close parallels became evident between the in vivo anti-tumour activity of BCG, the in vitro cytostatic effect, and the suppressor-cell activity. We here discuss the possible role of suppressor cells in the mechanism of action of this agent. PMID:6459797

  5. Tumour microenvironment factors shaping the cancer metabolism landscape

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiou, Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit metabolic alterations that distinguish them from healthy tissues and make their metabolic processes susceptible to pharmacological targeting. Although typical cell-autonomous features of cancer metabolism have been emerging, it is increasingly appreciated that extrinsic factors also influence the metabolic properties of tumours. This review highlights evidence from the recent literature to discuss how conditions within the tumour microenvironment shape the metabolic character of tumours. PMID:28006817

  6. A model of vascular tumour growth in mice combining longitudinal tumour size data with histological biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ribba, Benjamin; Watkin, Emmanuel; Tod, Michel; Girard, Pascal; Grenier, Emmanuel; You, Benoît; Giraudo, Enrico; Freyer, Gilles

    2011-02-01

    Optimising the delivery of antiangiogenic drugs requires the development of drug-disease models of vascular tumour growth that incorporate histological data indicative of cytostatic action. In this study, we formulated a model to analyse the dynamics of tumour progression in nude mice xenografted with HT29 or HCT116 colorectal cancer cells. In 30 mice, tumour size was periodically measured, and percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue were assessed using immunohistochemistry techniques on tumour samples after euthanasia. The simultaneous analysis of histological data together with longitudinal tumour size data prompted the development of a semi-mechanistic model integrating random effects of parameters. In this model, the peripheral non-hypoxic tissue proliferates according to a generalised-logistic equation where the maximal tumour size is represented by a variable called 'carrying capacity'. The ratio of the whole tumour size to the carrying capacity was used to define the hypoxic stress. As this stress increases, non-hypoxic tissue turns hypoxic. Hypoxic tissue does not stop proliferating, but hypoxia constitutes a transient stage before the tissue becomes necrotic. As the tumour grows, the carrying capacity increases owing to the process of angiogenesis. The model is shown to correctly predict tumour growth dynamics as well as percentages of necrotic and hypoxic tissues within the tumour. We show how the model can be used as a theoretical tool to investigate the effects of antiangiogenic treatments on tumour growth. This model provides a tool to analyse tumour size data in combination with histological biomarkers such as the percentages of hypoxic and necrotic tissue and is shown to be useful for gaining insight into the effects of antiangiogenic drugs on tumour growth and composition.

  7. Human testicular (non)seminomatous germ cell tumours: the clinical implications of recent pathobiological insights.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2009-06-01

    Human germ cell tumours (GCTs) comprise several types of neoplasias with different pathogeneses and clinical behaviours. A classification into five subtypes has been proposed. Here, the so-called type II testicular GCTs (TGCTs), ie the seminomas and non-seminomas, will be reviewed with emphasis on pathogenesis and clinical implications. Various risk factors have been identified that define subpopulations of men who are amenable to early diagnosis. TGCTs are omnipotent, able to generate all differentiation lineages, both embryonic and extra-embryonic, as well as the germ cell lineage itself. The precursor lesion, composed of primordial germ cells/gonocytes, is referred to as carcinoma in situ of the testis (CIS) and gonadoblastoma of the dysgenetic gonad. These pre-malignant cells retain embryonic characteristics, which probably explains the unique responsiveness of the derived tumours to DNA-damaging agents. Development of CIS and gonadoblastoma is crucially dependent on the micro-environment created by Sertoli cells in the testis, and granulosa cells in the dysgenetic gonad. OCT3/4 has high sensitivity and specificity for CIS/gonadoblastoma, seminoma, and embryonal carcinoma, and is useful for the detection of CIS cells in semen, thus a promising tool for non-invasive screening. Overdiagnosis of CIS due to germ cell maturation delay can be avoided using immunohistochemical detection of stem cell factor (SCF). Immunohistochemistry is helpful in making the distinction between seminoma and embryonal carcinoma, especially SOX17 and SOX2. The different non-seminomatous histological elements can be recognized using various markers, such as AFP and hCG, while others need confirmation. The value of micro-satellite instability as well as BRAF mutations in predicting treatment resistance needs validation in prospective trials. The availability of representative cell lines, both for seminoma and for embryonal carcinoma, allows mechanistic studies into the initiation and

  8. Changes in P-glycoprotein activity are mediated by the growth of a tumour cell line as multicellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Valeria, Ponce de León; Raúl, Barrera-Rodríguez

    2005-01-01

    Background Expression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp), the multidrug resistance (MDR) 1 gene product, can lead to multidrug resistance in tumours. However, the physiological role of P-gp in tumours growing as multicellular spheroids is not well understood. Recent evidence suggests that P-gp activity may be modulated by cellular components such as membrane proteins, membrane-anchoring proteins or membrane-lipid composition. Since, multicellular spheroids studies have evidenced alterations in numerous cellular components, including those related to the plasma membrane function, result plausible that some of these changes might modulate P-gp function and be responsible for the acquisition of multicellular drug resistance. In the present study, we asked if a human lung cancer cell line (INER-51) grown as multicellular spheroids can modify the P-gp activity to decrease the levels of doxorubicin (DXR) retained and increase their drug resistance. Results Our results showed that INER-51 spheroids retain 3-folds lower doxorubicin than the same cells as monolayers however; differences in retention were not observed when the P-gp substrate Rho-123 was used. Interestingly, neither the use of the P-gp-modulating agent cyclosporin-A (Cs-A) nor a decrease in ATP-pools were able to increase DXR retention in the multicellular spheroids. Only the lack of P-gp expression throughout the pharmacological selection of a P-gp negative (P-gpneg) mutant clone (PSC-1) derived from INER-51 cells, allow increase of DXR retention in spheroids. Conclusion Thus, multicellular arrangement appears to alter the P-gp activity to maintain lower levels of DXR. However, the non expression of P-gp by cells forming multicellular spheroids has only a minor impact in the resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:16001980

  9. PKM2 phosphorylates MLC2 and regulates cytokinesis of tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuhui; Wang, Yugang; Wang, Ting; Hawke, David H; Zheng, Yanhua; Li, Xinjian; Zhou, Qin; Majumder, Sadhan; Bi, Erfei; Liu, David X; Huang, Suyun; Lu, Zhimin

    2014-11-21

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is expressed at high levels during embryonic development and tumour progression and is important for cell growth. However, it is not known whether it directly controls cell division. Here, we found that Aurora B phosphorylates PKM2, but not PKM1, at T45; this phosphorylation is required for PKM2's localization and interaction with myosin light chain 2 (MLC2) in the contractile ring region of mitotic cells during cytokinesis. PKM2 phosphorylates MLC2 at Y118, which primes the binding of ROCK2 to MLC2 and subsequent ROCK2-dependent MLC2 S15 phosphorylation. PKM2-regulated MLC2 phosphorylation, which is greatly enhanced by EGF stimulation or EGFRvIII, K-Ras G12V and B-Raf V600E mutant expression, plays a pivotal role in cytokinesis, cell proliferation and brain tumour development. These findings underscore the instrumental function of PKM2 in oncogenic EGFR-, K-Ras- and B-Raf-regulated cytokinesis and tumorigenesis.

  10. The World Health Organization 2016 classification of testicular germ cell tumours: a review and update from the International Society of Urological Pathology Testis Consultation Panel.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Sean R; Delahunt, Brett; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Algaba, Ferran; Egevad, Lars; Ulbright, Thomas M; Tickoo, Satish K; Srigley, John R; Epstein, Jonathan I; Berney, Daniel M

    2017-02-01

    Since the last World Health Organization (WHO) classification scheme for tumours of the urinary tract and male genital organs, there have been a number of advances in the understanding, classification, immunohistochemistry and genetics of testicular germ cell tumours. The updated 2016 draft classification was discussed at an International Society of Urological Pathology Consultation on Testicular and Penile Cancer. This review addresses the main updates to germ cell tumour classification. Major changes include a pathogenetically derived classification using germ cell neoplasia in situ (GCNIS) as a new name for the precursor lesion, and the distinction of prepubertal tumours (non-GCNIS-derived) from postpubertal-type tumours (GCNIS-derived), acknowledging the existence of rare benign prepubertal-type teratomas in the postpubertal testis. Spermatocytic tumour is adopted as a replacement for spermatocytic seminoma, to avoid potential confusion with the unrelated usual seminoma. The spectrum of trophoblastic tumours arising in the setting of testicular germ cell tumour continues to expand, to include epithelioid and placental site trophoblastic tumours analogous to those of the gynaecological tract. Currently, reporting of anaplasia (seminoma or spermatocytic tumour) or immaturity (teratoma) is not required, as these do not have demonstrable prognostic importance. In contrast, overgrowth of a teratomatous component (somatic-type malignancy) and sarcomatous change in spermatocytic tumour indicate more aggressive behaviour, and should be reported.

  11. The Fc-region of a new class of intact bispecific antibody mediates activation of accessory cells and NK cells and induces direct phagocytosis of tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Zeidler, R; Mysliwietz, J; Csánady, M; Walz, A; Ziegler, I; Schmitt, B; Wollenberg, B; Lindhofer, H

    2000-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAb) are considered as promising tools for the elimination of disseminated tumour cells in a minimal residual disease situation. The bsAb-mediated recruitment of an immune effector cell in close vicinity of a tumour cell is thought to induce an antitumoural immune response. However, classical bispecific molecules activate only a single class of immune effector cell that may not yield optimal immune responses. We therefore constructed an intact bispecific antibody, BiUII (anti-CD3 × anti-EpCAM), that not only recognizes tumour cells and T lymphocytes with its two binding arms, but also binds and activates Fcγ-receptor positive accessory cells through its Fc-region. We have demonstrated recently that activated accessory cells contribute to the bsAb-induced antitumoural activity. We now analyse this stimulation in more detail and demonstrate here the BiUll-induced upregulation of activation markers like CD83 and CD95 on accessory cells and the induction of neopterin and biopterin synthesis. Experiments with pure cell subpopulations revealed binding of BiUll to CD64+ accessory cells and CD16+ NK cells, but not to CD32+ B lymphocytes. We provide further evidence for the importance of the Fc-region in that this bispecific molecule stimulates Fcγ-R-positive accessory cells to eliminate tumour cells in vitro by direct phagocytosis. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10901380

  12. Stressed Jerusalem artichoke tubers (Helianthus tuberosus L.) excrete a protein fraction with specific cytotoxicity on plant and animal tumour cell.

    PubMed

    Griffaut, B; Debiton, E; Madelmont, J C; Maurizis, J C; Ledoigt, G

    2007-09-01

    Wounds from Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus L.) tubers excrete bioactive metabolites from a variety of structural classes, including proteins. Here we describe a protein specifically active against tumour cells arising either from human, animal or plant tissues. The non-tumour animal cells or the plant callus cells are not sensitive to these excreta. The active product was only obtained after a wound-drought stress of plant tubers. The cytotoxicity varies according to the tumour cell type. For instance, some human tumour cell lines and especially the human mammary tumour cells MDA-MB-231 were shown to be very susceptible to the active product. The active agent is shown to contain an 18-kDa polypeptide with homology to a superoxide dismutase (SOD). A 28-kDa polypeptide, related to an alkaline phosphatase (AP), was shown to be tightly linked to this 18-kDa polypeptide. The excreted 28-kDa polypeptide also displayed a consensus sequence similar to the group of DING proteins, but with a smaller molecular weight. The superoxide dismutase polypeptide was shown to be involved in the antitumour activity, but the presence of smaller factors (MW<10 kDa), such as salicylic acid, can enhance this activity.

  13. Trabectedin, a drug acting on both cancer cells and the tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    D'Incalci, M; Badri, N; Galmarini, C M; Allavena, P

    2014-01-01

    Trabectedin is the first marine-derived anti-neoplastic drug approved for the treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and, in combination with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin, for the treatment of patients with relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. From the beginning of its development, trabectedin showed some peculiar properties that clearly distinguished it from other anti-cancer drugs. In this mini-review, we will outline the current state of knowledge regarding the mode of action of trabectedin, which appears to represent a new class of anti-neoplastic drugs acting both on cancer cells and on the tumour microenvironment. PMID:24755886

  14. Role of hypoxia and HIF2α in development of the sympathoadrenal cell lineage and chromaffin cell tumours with distinct catecholamine phenotypic features

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Susan; Qin, Nan; Pacak, Karel; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia has wide-ranging impact in normal physiology and disease processes. This stimulus evokes changes in gene expression mediated by transcription factors termed hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) that affect numerous processes: angiogenesis, cell survival, cellular metabolism, stem cell self- renewal and multipotency, migration, invasiveness and metastatic progression in tumour cells. Over the past decade increasing numbers of reports have emerged documenting differential roles of HIF1α and HIF2α in these processes. In cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage both HIFs differentially mediate influences of hypoxia on catecholamine synthesis and secretion, but HIF2α signalling has particularly prominent functions in regulating developmental processes of growth and differentiation. This article discusses the role of HIF2α and HIF1α in the context of the development, phenotypic features and functions of chromaffin cells. Moreover, current knowledge about tumour formation in cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage, leading to catecholamine producing pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas, is analysed in the light of the HIF2α signalling network. PMID:24054150

  15. Constitutive expression and activation of stress response genes in cancer stem-like cells/tumour initiating cells: potent targets for cancer stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Torigoe, Toshihiko; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Yasuda, Kazuyo; Sato, Noriyuki

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/tumour-initiating cells (TICs) are defined as the small population of cancer cells that have stem cell-like phenotypes and high capacity for tumour initiation. These cells may have a huge impact in the field of cancer therapy since they are extremely resistant to standard chemoradiotherapy and thus are likely to be responsible for disease recurrence after therapy. Therefore, extensive efforts are being made to elucidate the pathological and molecular properties of CSCs/TICs and, with this information, to establish efficient anti-CSC/TIC targeting therapies. This review considers recent findings on stress response genes that are preferentially expressed in CSCs/TICs and their roles in tumour-promoting properties. Implications for a novel therapeutic strategy targeting CSCs/TICs are also discussed.

  16. A phenomenological approach to the simulation of metabolism and proliferation dynamics of large tumour cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignola, Roberto; Milotti, Edoardo

    2005-03-01

    A major goal of modern computational biology is to simulate the collective behaviour of large cell populations starting from the intricate web of molecular interactions occurring at the microscopic level. In this paper we describe a simplified model of cell metabolism, growth and proliferation, suitable for inclusion in a multicell simulator, now under development (Chignola R and Milotti E 2004 Physica A 338 261-6). Nutrients regulate the proliferation dynamics of tumour cells which adapt their behaviour to respond to changes in the biochemical composition of the environment. This modelling of nutrient metabolism and cell cycle at a mesoscopic scale level leads to a continuous flow of information between the two disparate spatiotemporal scales of molecular and cellular dynamics that can be simulated with modern computers and tested experimentally.

  17. Physical nanoscale conduit-mediated communication between tumour cells and the endothelium modulates endothelial phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Yamicia; Tekleab, Sarah; Nandakumar, Shyama; Walls, Cherelle; Tekleab, Yonatan; Husain, Amjad; Gadish, Or; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Kaushik, Shelly; Sehrawat, Seema; Kulkarni, Ashish; Dvorak, Harold; Zetter, Bruce; R. Edelman, Elazer; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is a major cause of mortality and remains a hurdle in the search for a cure for cancer. Not much is known about metastatic cancer cells and endothelial cross-talk, which occurs at multiple stages during metastasis. Here we report a dynamic regulation of the endothelium by cancer cells through the formation of nanoscale intercellular membrane bridges, which act as physical conduits for transfer of microRNAs. The communication between the tumour cell and the endothelium upregulates markers associated with pathological endothelium, which is reversed by pharmacological inhibition of these nanoscale conduits. These results lead us to define the notion of ‘metastatic hijack': cancer cell-induced transformation of healthy endothelium into pathological endothelium via horizontal communication through the nanoscale conduits. Pharmacological perturbation of these nanoscale membrane bridges decreases metastatic foci in vivo. Targeting these nanoscale membrane bridges may potentially emerge as a new therapeutic opportunity in the management of metastatic cancer. PMID:26669454

  18. The oxidation of cyst(e)ine by mast-cell tumour P815 in culture

    PubMed Central

    Wheldrake, J. F.; Pasternak, C. A.

    1968-01-01

    1. Mast-cell tumour P815 cells oxidize [35S]cyst(e)ine to 35SO42−. 2. Addition of cysteinesulphinate or sulphite decreases the formation of 35SO42−; at the same time [35S]cysteinesulphinate or 35SO32− accumulates. 3. Extracts of P815 cells form sulphite from cysteinesulphinate and 2-oxoglutarate. The Km for cysteinesulphinate is 6·35mm and that for 2-oxoglutarate is 0·165mm. 4. Extracts oxidize sulphite to sulphate. 5. No formation of hydrogen sulphide from cyst(e)ine was detectable. 6. It is concluded that P815 cells oxidize cyst(e)ine to sulphate solely via cysteinesulphinate and sulphite. 7. The concentration of the enzymes catalysing this sequence is unaltered by several variations in the conditions of growth. PMID:4966082

  19. Photodynamic therapy and anti-tumour immunity

    PubMed Central

    Castano, Ana P.; Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light in combination with oxygen to produce cytotoxic reactive oxygen species that kill malignant cells by apoptosis and/or necrosis, shut down the tumour microvasculature and stimulate the host immune system. In contrast to surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy that are mostly immunosuppressive, PDT causes acute inflammation, expression of heat-shock proteins, invasion and infiltration of the tumour by leukocytes, and might increase the presentation of tumour-derived antigens to T cells. PMID:16794636

  20. Tumour progression and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Arvelo, Francisco; Sojo, Felipe; Cotte, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The two biological mechanisms that determine types of malignancy are infiltration and metastasis, for which tumour microenvironment plays a key role in developing and establishing the morphology, growth and invasiveness of a malignancy. The microenvironment is formed by complex tissue containing the extracellular matrix, tumour and non-tumour cells, a signalling network of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, and proteases that control autocrine and paracrine communication among individual cells, facilitating tumour progression. During the development of the primary tumour, the tumour stroma and continuous genetic changes within the cells makes it possible for them to migrate, having to count on a pre-metastatic niche receptor that allows the tumour’s survival and distant growth. These niches are induced by factors produced by the primary tumour; if it is eradicated, the active niches become responsible for activating the latent disseminated cells. Due to the importance of these mechanisms, the strategies that develop tumour cells during tumour progression and the way in which the microenvironment influences the formation of metastasis are reviewed. It also suggests that the metastatic niche can be an ideal target for new treatments that make controlling metastasis possible. PMID:26913068

  1. The predictive value of centre tumour CD8⁺ T cells in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma: comparison with Immunoscore.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cheng; Xu, Jing; Song, Jiaxi; Liu, ChaoQun; Wang, Jinyu; Weng, Chenchun; Sun, Haoyu; Wei, Haiming; Xiao, Weihua; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-11-03

    The increasing evidences suggest that Immunoscore(IS), a combinatorial density analysis of CD8+ and CD3+ cells in the centre and invasive margin of tumour (CT and IM), has an advantage over the currently used tumour staging methods in a variety of tumours; however, IS in hepatocellular carcinoma remains unreported. In this study, IS was performed on serial sections from two HCC cohorts (total 449) and compared with current tumour staging systems. Kaplan-Meier curves illustrate a positive association between a higher IS (IS≥2) and longer survival of HCC patients. Although the IS was highly related to the outcome of patients, however, IS seems not to be the optimal prognostic factor when compared with the CD8CT. As noted, among CD8CT, CD8IM, CD3CT, CD3IM and IS, CD8CT, as an independent indicator, demonstrated the highest prognostic impact on both DFS and OS in our Cox multivariate regression analysis (P< 0.0001). In our study, the minimum cut-off value was 93 CD8CT cells per mm2, to be used to divide the patients into CD8CTHi group and CD8CTLo group in clinical settings. Our results suggest that CD8CT densities analysis notably improved the accuracy of survival prediction with convenience of clinical manipulation in HCC.

  2. Tumour cell labelling by magnetic nanoparticles with determination of intracellular iron content and spatial distribution of the intracellular iron.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhigang; Cuschieri, Alfred

    2013-04-26

    Magnetically labelled cells are used for in vivo cell tracking by MRI, used for the clinical translation of cell-base therapies. Studies involving magnetic labelled cells may include separation of labelled cells, targeted delivery and controlled release of drugs, contrast enhanced MRI and magnetic hyperthermia for the in situ ablation of tumours. Dextran-coated super-paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) ferumoxides are used clinically as an MR contrast agents primarily for hepatic imaging. The material is also widely used for in vitro cell labelling, as are other SPIO-based particles. Our results on the uptake by human cancer cell lines of ferumoxides indicate that electroporation in the presence of protamine sulphate (PS) results in rapid high uptake of SPIO nanoparticles (SPIONs) by parenchymal tumour cells without significant impairment of cell viability. Quantitative determination of cellular iron uptake performed by colorimetric assay is in agreement with data from the literature. These results on intracellular iron content together with the intracellular distribution of SPIONs by magnetic force microscopy (MFM) following in vitro uptake by parenchymal tumour cells confirm the potential of this technique for clinical tumour cell detection and destruction.

  3. Regulatory mechanisms of interleukin-8 production induced by tumour necrosis factor-α in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaohui; Wang, Weimin; Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xiangdong; Xia, Jinglin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Interleukin (IL)-8 plays the critical role in the initiation of micro-environmental inflammation responsible for tumour growth and patient prognosis. This study aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms of IL-8 production from human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. The levels of IL-8 and phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), ERK1/2 and Akt in MHCC-97H cells were measured by ELISA, Western blot and immunofluorescence. NF-κB p65 protein nuclear translocation was determined by non-radioactive NF-κB p50/p65 transcription factor activity kit and cell bio-behaviours were detected by the real-time cell-monitoring system. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) significantly induced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, ERK, Akt and production of IL-8 from HCC cells, which were prevented by SB203580 (p38 MAPK inhibitor), PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), LY294002 and Wortmannin (PI3K inhibitor) and SB328437 (CCR3 inhibitor). TNF-α could significantly increase the translocation of NF-κB p65 protein into the nucleus in a dose-dependent manner, while SB203580 partially inhibited. In inflammatory micro-environment, HCC auto-produced IL-8 through p38 MAPK, ERK and PI3K/Akt signalling pathways, where the p38 MAPK is a central factor to activate the NF-κB pathway and regulate the expression of IL-8 production. There was a potential cross-talking between receptors. PMID:21545687

  4. Calcium-dependent photodynamic action of di- and tetrasulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine on normal and tumour-derived rat pancreatic exocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    al-Laith, M.; Matthews, E. K.

    1994-01-01

    Important differences exist in the responses to photodynamic agents of normal and tumour-derived pancreatic acinar cells. In the present study amylase release has been used to assess the mechanisms by which the photodynamic drugs tetra- and disulphonated aluminium phthalocyanine (A1PcS4, A1PcS2) act on pancreatic cells via energy and calcium-dependent activation and transduction pathways. The photodynamic release of amylase was found to be energy dependent and inhibited by the chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium but not by the removal of extracellular calcium. In contrast to their effects on normal acinar cells, the photodynamic action of A1PcS4 and A1PcS2 was to inhibit amylase secretion from pancreatoma AR4-2J cells. Removal of extracellular calcium reversed this inhibitory effect on AR4-2J cells and produced a significant increase in amylase release, but chelation of free cytoplasmic calcium did not affect the inhibitory photodynamic action of the phthalocyanines on amylase release from the tumour cells. Overall, these results demonstrate further important distinctions between the photodynamic action of sulphonated aluminium phthalocyanines on normal versus tumour exocrine cells of the pancreas and indicate that calcium plays an important role in photodynamic drug action, since these agents affected intracellular calcium mobilisation at some distal point in the membrane signal transduction pathway for regulated secretion. Furthermore, the photodynamic inhibition of constitutive secretion in tumour cells may involve a calcium-dependent membrane target site or modulation of membrane calcium channels by activation of protein kinase C. PMID:7524603

  5. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour of the ovary presenting with hyperprolactinaemic amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Ahmed; Lubina-Solomon, Alexandra; Kew, Fiona M; Webster, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Secondary amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea represent a common endocrine presentation. We report a case of an oestrogen-producing juvenile granulosa cell tumour (JGCT) of the ovary in a 16-year-old post-pubertal woman with hyperprolactinaemia amenorrhoea and galactorrhoea which resolved following surgical resection of the tumour. This patient presented with a 9-month history of secondary amenorrhoea and a 2-month history of galactorrhoea. Elevated serum prolactin at 7081 mIU/l and suppressed gonadotropins (LH <0.1 U/l; FSH <0.1 U/l) were detected. Serum oestradiol was significantly elevated at 7442 pmol/l with undetectable β-human chorionic gonadotropin. MRI showed a bulky pituitary with no visible adenoma. MRI of the abdomen showed a 4.8 cm mass arising from the right ovary with no evidence of metastatic disease. Serum inhibin B was elevated at 2735 ng/l. A right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed, and histology confirmed the diagnosis of a JGCT, stage International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics 1A. Immunohistochemical staining for prolactin was negative. Post-operatively, oestrogen and prolactin levels were normalised, and she subsequently had a successful pregnancy. In summary, we present a case of an oestrogen-secreting JGCT with hyperprolactinaemia manifesting clinically with galactorrhoea and secondary amenorrhoea. We postulate that observed hyperprolactinaemia was caused by oestrogenic stimulation of pituitary lactotroph cells, a biochemical state analogous to pregnancy. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of hyperprolactinaemia as a result of excessive oestrogen production in the context of a JGCT. Learning points Hyperprolactinaemia with bilateral galactorrhoea and secondary amenorrhoea has a wide differential diagnosis and is not always caused by a prolactin secreting pituitary adenoma.Significantly elevated serum oestradiol levels in the range seen in this case, in the absence of pregnancy, are indicative

  6. Prominent role for T cell-derived Tumour Necrosis Factor for sustained control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Allie, Nasiema; Grivennikov, Sergei I.; Keeton, Roanne; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Court, Nathalie; Fremond, Cecile; Yeremeev, Vladimir; Shebzukhov, Yuriy; Ryffel, Bernhard; Nedospasov, Sergei A.; Quesniaux, Valerie F. J.; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2013-01-01

    Tumour Necrosis Factor (TNF) is critical for host control of M. tuberculosis, but the relative contribution of TNF from innate and adaptive immune responses during tuberculosis infection is unclear. Myeloid versus T-cell-derived TNF function in tuberculosis was investigated using cell type-specific TNF deletion. Mice deficient for TNF expression in macrophages/neutrophils displayed early, transient susceptibility to M. tuberculosis but recruited activated, TNF-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells and controlled chronic infection. Strikingly, deficient TNF expression in T-cells resulted in early control but susceptibility and eventual mortality during chronic infection with increased pulmonary pathology. TNF inactivation in both myeloid and T-cells rendered mice critically susceptible to infection with a phenotype resembling complete TNF deficient mice, indicating that myeloid and T-cells are the primary TNF sources collaborating for host control of tuberculosis. Thus, while TNF from myeloid cells mediates early immune function, T-cell derived TNF is essential to sustain protection during chronic tuberculosis infection. PMID:23657146

  7. Tumour endoproteases: the cutting edge of cancer drug delivery?

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, J M; Siller, C S; Gill, J H

    2008-01-01

    Despite progression in anticancer drug development and improvements in the clinical utilization of therapies, current treatment regimes are still dependent upon the use of systemic antiproliferative cytotoxic agents. Although these agents are unquestionably potent, their efficacy is limited by toxicity towards ‘normal' cells and a lack of tumour selective targeting, resulting in a therapeutic index which is modest at best. Consequently, the development of more tumour selective cancer treatments, with better discrimination between tumour and normal cells is unequivocally an important goal for cancer drug discovery. One such strategy is to exploit the tumour phenotype as a mechanism for tumour-selective delivery of potent therapeutics. An exciting approach in this area is to develop anticancer therapeutics as prodrugs, which are non-toxic until activated by enzymes localized specifically in the tumour. Enzymes suitable for tumour-activated prodrug development must have increased activity in the tumour relative to non-diseased tissue and an ability to activate the prodrug to its active form. One class of enzyme satisfying these criteria are the tumour endoproteases, particularly the serine- and metallo-proteases. These proteolytic enzymes are essential for tumour angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis, the major defining features of malignancy. This review describes the concept behind development of tumour-endoprotease activated prodrugs and discusses the various studies to date that have demonstrated the huge potential of this approach for improvement of cancer therapy. PMID:18204490

  8. Spatial distribution of FoxP3+ and CD8+ tumour infiltrating T cells reflects their functional activity

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Matthias; JeΔberger, Jonas; Büttner-Herold, Maike; Haderlein, Marlen; Hecht, Markus; Hartmann, Arndt; Fietkau, Rainer; Distel, Luitpold V.

    2016-01-01

    Background Regulatory and cytotoxic T cells are key players in the host's anticancer immune response. We studied the spatial distribution of FoxP+ and CD8+ cells to identify potential interactions. Methods In 202 patients 103 pre-radiochemotherapy biopsies and 153 post-radiochemotherapy tumour specimens of advanced rectal cancer were available and an immunohistochemical double staining of FoxP3+ and CD8+ tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes was performed to investigate cell density and cell-to-cell distances. Results FoxP3+ cells decreased after radiochemotherapy by a factor of 3 while CD8+ cells remained nearly unchanged. High epithelial (p=0.033) and stromal (p=0.009) FoxP3+ cell density was associated with an improved overall survival. Cell-to-cell distances of randomly distributed cells were simulated and compared to observed cell-to-cell distances. Observed distances shorter than the simulated, random distances were hypothesized to represent FoxP3+ cells actively interacting with CD8+ cells. Epithelial short distances were associated with a favourable prognosis while the opposite was true for the stromal compartment. Conclusion The analysis of cell-to-cell distances may offer a tool to predict outcome, maybe by identifying functionally active, interacting infiltrating inflammatory cells in different tumour compartments. PMID:27494875

  9. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O.; Clark, Susan K.; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3′-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted. PMID:27489864

  10. Familial adenomatous patients with desmoid tumours show increased expression of miR-34a in serum and high levels in tumours.

    PubMed

    Walton, Sarah-Jane; Lewis, Amy; Jeffery, Rosemary; Thompson, Hannah; Feakins, Roger; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Yau, Christopher; Lindsay, James O; Clark, Susan K; Silver, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is rare affecting 1 in 10,000 people and a subset (10%) are at risk of myofibroblastic desmoid tumours (DTs) after colectomy to prevent cancer. DTs are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The absence of markers to monitor progression and a lack of treatment options are significant limitations to clinical management. We investigated microRNAs (miRNA) levels in DTs and serum using expression array analysis on two independent cohorts of FAP patients (total, n=24). Each comprised equal numbers of patients who had formed DTs (cases) and those who had not (controls). All controls had absence of DTs confirmed by clinical and radiological assessment over at least three years post- colectomy. Technical qPCR validation was performed using an expanded cohort (29 FAP patients; 16 cases and 13 controls). The most significant elevated serum miRNA marker of DTs was miR-34a-5p and in-situ hybridisation (ISH) showed most DTs analysed (5/6) expressed miRNA-34a-5p. Exome sequencing of tumour and matched germline DNA did not detect mutations within the miR-34a-5p transcript sites or 3'-UTR of target genes that would alter functional miRNA activity. In conclusion, miR-34a-5p is a potential circulatory marker and therapy target. A large prospective world-wide multi-centre study is now warranted.

  11. Tumour necrosis factor-alpha impairs neuronal differentiation but not proliferation of hippocampal neural precursor cells: Role of Hes1.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Aoife; Ryan, Sinead; Maloney, Eimer; Sullivan, Aideen M; Nolan, Yvonne M

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFalpha) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine, which influences neuronal survival and function yet there is limited information available on its effects on hippocampal neural precursor cells (NPCs). We show that TNFalpha treatment during proliferation had no effect on the percentage of proliferating cells prepared from embryonic rat hippocampal neurosphere cultures, nor did it affect cell fate towards either an astrocytic or neuronal lineage when cells were then allowed to differentiate. However, when cells were differentiated in the presence of TNFalpha, significantly reduced percentages of newly born and post-mitotic neurons, significantly increased percentages of astrocytes and increased expression of TNFalpha receptors, TNF-R1 and TNF-R2, as well as expression of the anti-neurogenic Hes1 gene, were observed. These data indicate that exposure of hippocampal NPCs to TNFalpha when they are undergoing differentiation but not proliferation has a detrimental effect on their neuronal lineage fate, which may be mediated through increased expression of Hes1.

  12. Primary retroperitoneal transitional cell carcinoma presenting as a dumb-bell tumour.

    PubMed

    Basu, S; Ansari, M; Gupta, S; Kumar, A

    2009-11-01

    We report a retroperitoneal transitional cell carcinoma arising from the primitive urogenital remnants of a 56-year-old married Indian woman. She presented with a huge cystic mass in the hypogastrium and right iliac fossa, which extended into the right thigh as a massive dumb-bell tumour. On exploration, it was found not to be arising from any known retroperitoneal structure. The mass was excised, and the histopathology confirmed transitional cell carcinoma with positive margins. Though she received postoperative chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, adriamycin and cisplatin, she developed extensive local recurrence and hepatic secondaries, and succumbed to the disease after ten months of follow-up. We highlight the rarity of the disease, its atypical presentation as a cystic dumb-bell lump, its diagnostic challenges and aggressive behaviour, and review the literature on primary retroperitoneal transitional cell carcinomas.

  13. The in vivo activation of persistent nanophosphors for optical imaging of vascularization, tumours and grafted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldiney, Thomas; Bessière, Aurélie; Seguin, Johanne; Teston, Eliott; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Viana, Bruno; Bos, Adrie J. J.; Dorenbos, Pieter; Bessodes, Michel; Gourier, Didier; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2014-04-01

    Optical imaging for biological applications requires more sensitive tools. Near-infrared persistent luminescence nanoparticles enable highly sensitive in vivo optical detection and complete avoidance of tissue autofluorescence. However, the actual generation of persistent luminescence nanoparticles necessitates ex vivo activation before systemic administration, which prevents long-term imaging in living animals. Here, we introduce a new generation of optical nanoprobes, based on chromium-doped zinc gallate, whose persistent luminescence can be activated in vivo through living tissues using highly penetrating low-energy red photons. Surface functionalization of this photonic probe can be adjusted to favour multiple biomedical applications such as tumour targeting. Notably, we show that cells can endocytose these nanoparticles in vitro and that, after intravenous injection, we can track labelled cells in vivo and follow their biodistribution by a simple whole animal optical detection, opening new perspectives for cell therapy research and for a variety of diagnosis applications.

  14. Quantification of intra-tumour cell proliferation heterogeneity using imaging descriptors of 18F fluorothymidine-positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Willaime, J. M.; Turkheimer, F. E.; Kenny, L. M.; Aboagye, E. O.

    2013-01-01

    Intra-tumour heterogeneity is a characteristic shared by all cancers. We explored the use of texture variables derived from images of [18F]fluorothymidine-positron emission tomography (FLT-PET), thus notionally assessing the heterogeneity of proliferation in individual tumours. Our aims were to study the range of textural feature values across tissue types, verify the repeatability of these image descriptors and further, to explore associations with clinical response to chemotherapy in breast cancer patients. The repeatability of 28 textural descriptors was assessed in patients who had two FLT-PET scans prior to therapy using relative differences and the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). We tested associations between features at baseline and clinical response measured in 11 patients after three cycles of chemotherapy, and explored changes in FLT-PET at one week after the start of therapy. A subset of eight features was characterized by low variations at baseline (<±30%) and high repeatability (0.7 ≤ ICC ≤ 1). The intensity distribution profile suggested fewer highly proliferating cells in lesions of non-responders compared to responders at baseline. A true increase in CV and homogeneity was measured in four out of six responders one week after the start of therapy. A number of textural features derived from FLT-PET are altered following chemotherapy in breast cancer, and should be evaluated in larger clinical trials for clinical relevance.

  15. FDG uptake, a surrogate of tumour hypoxia?

    PubMed Central

    Van de Wiele, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Tumour hyperglycolysis is driven by activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) through tumour hypoxia. Accordingly, the degree of 2-fluro-2-deoxy-d-glucose (FDG) uptake by tumours might indirectly reflect the level of hypoxia, obviating the need for more specific radiopharmaceuticals for hypoxia imaging. Discussion In this paper, available data on the relationship between hypoxia and FDG uptake by tumour tissue in vitro and in vivo are reviewed. In pre-clinical in vitro studies, acute hypoxia was consistently shown to increase FDG uptake by normal and tumour cells within a couple of hours after onset with mobilisation or modification of glucose transporters optimising glucose uptake, followed by a delayed response with increased rates of transcription of GLUT mRNA. In pre-clinical imaging studies on chronic hypoxia that compared FDG uptake by tumours grown in rat or mice to uptake by FMISO, the pattern of normoxic and hypoxic regions within the human tumour xenografts, as imaged by FMISO, largely correlated with glucose metabolism although minor locoregional differences could not be excluded. In the clinical setting, data are limited and discordant. Conclusion Further evaluation of FDG uptake by various tumour types in relation to intrinsic and bioreductive markers of hypoxia and response to radiotherapy or hypoxia-dependent drugs is needed to fully assess its application as a marker of hypoxia in the clinical setting. PMID:18509637

  16. Defining the clonal dynamics leading to mouse skin tumour initiation

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Danés, Adriana; Hannezo, Edouard; Larsimont, Jean-Christophe; Liagre, Mélanie; Youssef, Khalil Kass; Simons, Benjamin D; Blanpain, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    The changes that occur in cell dynamics following oncogenic mutation that lead to the development of tumours are currently unknown. Here, using skin epidermis as a model, we assessed the impact of oncogenic hedgehog signalling in distinct cell populations and their capacity to induce basal cell carcinoma, the most frequent cancer in humans. We found that only stem cells, and not progenitors, were competent to initiate tumour formation upon oncogenic hedgehog signalling. Interestingly, this difference was due to the hierarchical organization of tumour growth in oncogene-targeted stem cells, characterized by an increase of symmetric self-renewing divisions and a higher p53-dependent resistance to apoptosis, leading to rapid clonal expansion and progression into invasive tumours. Our work reveals that the capacity of oncogene-targeted cells to induce tumour formation is not only dependent on their long-term survival and expansion, but also on the specific clonal dynamics of the cancer cell of origin. PMID:27459053

  17. A class of extracellular vesicles from breast cancer cells activates VEGF receptors and tumour angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qiyu; Zhang, Chengliang; Lum, David; Druso, Joseph E.; Blank, Bryant; Wilson, Kristin F.; Welm, Alana; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.

    2017-01-01

    Non-classical secretory vesicles, collectively referred to as extracellular vesicles (EVs), have been implicated in different aspects of cancer cell survival and metastasis. Here, we describe how a specific class of EVs, called microvesicles (MVs), activates VEGF receptors and tumour angiogenesis through a unique 90 kDa form of VEGF (VEGF90K). We show that VEGF90K is generated by the crosslinking of VEGF165, catalysed by the enzyme tissue transglutaminase, and associates with MVs through its interaction with the chaperone Hsp90. We further demonstrate that MV-associated VEGF90K has a weakened affinity for Bevacizumab, causing Bevacizumab to be ineffective in blocking MV-dependent VEGF receptor activation. However, treatment with an Hsp90 inhibitor releases VEGF90K from MVs, restoring the sensitivity of VEGF90K to Bevacizumab. These findings reveal a novel mechanism by which cancer cell-derived MVs influence the tumour microenvironment and highlight the importance of recognizing their unique properties when considering drug treatment strategies. PMID:28205552

  18. Prediction of relapse after lymph node dissection for germ cell tumours: can salvage chemotherapy be avoided?

    PubMed Central

    Berney, D M; Shamash, J; Hendry, W F; Arora, A; Jordan, S; Oliver, R T

    2001-01-01

    Salvage chemotherapy has been used by some oncology centres for patients with residual malignant or immature elements in retroperitoneal lymph node dissections removed for metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours. However, surveillance of these patients shows that many are cured by surgery alone. 118 retroperitoneal lymph node dissections for metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumours were reviewed and the morphology seen within them was quantified. 28 of these had immature or malignant elements and had been treated by surveillance before administration of further chemotherapy. The proliferation rate in these cases was assessed by immunochemistry. The proliferation index and the amount of embryonal carcinoma (EC) were both predictors of recurrence and therefore the need for further chemotherapy. Patients with greater than 25% of EC had an 84% chance of relapse and those with a Ki-67 index of greater than 50% had a 71% chance of relapse. The two tests had a positive predictive value of 83% and 71%, respectively. Patients with such a high risk of recurrence could be considered for post-operative adjuvant therapy at this point whilst others would be suitable for a watchful waiting approach. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11161398

  19. Targeted O-glycoproteomics explored increased sialylation and identified MUC16 as a poor prognosis biomarker in advanced stage bladder tumours.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Sofia; Azevedo, Rita; Gaiteiro, Cristiana; Ferreira, Dylan; Lima, Luís; Peixoto, Andreia; Fernandes, Elisabete; Neves, Manuel; Neves, Diogo; Amaro, Teresina; Cruz, Ricardo; Tavares, Ana; Rangel, Maria; Silva, André M N; Santos, Lúcio Lara; Ferreira, José Alexandre

    2017-02-03

    Bladder carcinogenesis and tumour progression is accompanied by profound alterations in protein glycosylation on the cell surface, which may be explored for improving disease management. In a search for prognosis biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets we have screened, using immunohistochemistry, a series of bladder tumours with differing clinicopathology for short-chain O-glycans commonly found in glycoproteins of human solid tumours. These included the Tn and T antigens and their sialylated counterparts sialyl-Tn(STn) and sialyl-T(ST), which are generally associated with poor prognosis. We have also explored the nature of T antigen sialylation, namely the sialyl-3-T(S3T) and sialyl-6-T(S6T) sialoforms, based on combinations of enzymatic treatments. We observed a predominance of sialoglycans over neutral glycoforms (Tn and T antigens) in bladder tumours. In particular, the STn antigen was associated with high-grade disease and muscle invasion, in accordance with our previous observations. The S3T and S6T antigens were detected for the first time in bladder tumours but not in healthy urothelia, highlighting their cancer-specific nature. These glycans were also overexpressed in advanced lesions, especially in cases showing muscle invasion. Glycoproteomic analyses of advanced bladder tumours based on enzymatic treatments, Vicia Villosa lectin-affinity chromatography enrichment and nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of several key cancer-associated glycoproteins (MUC16, CD44, integrins) carrying altered glycosylation. Of particular interest were MUC16 STn(+) -glycoforms, characteristic of ovarian cancers, which were found in a subset of advanced-stage bladder tumours facing the worst prognosis. In summary, significant alterations in the O-glycome and O-glycoproteome of bladder tumors hold promise for the development of novel non-invasive diagnostic tools and targeted therapeutics. Furthermore, abnormal MUC16 glycoforms hold potential as

  20. Dendrogenin A arises from cholesterol and histamine metabolism and shows cell differentiation and anti-tumour properties

    PubMed Central

    de Medina, Philippe; Paillasse, Michael R.; Segala, Gregory; Voisin, Maud; Mhamdi, Loubna; Dalenc, Florence; Lacroix-Triki, Magali; Filleron, Thomas; Pont, Frederic; Saati, Talal Al; Morisseau, Christophe; Hammock, Bruce D.; Silvente-Poirot, Sandrine; Poirot, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We previously synthesized dendrogenin A and hypothesized that it could be a natural metabolite occurring in mammals. Here we explore this hypothesis and report the discovery of dendrogenin A in mammalian tissues and normal cells as an enzymatic product of the conjugation of 5,6α-epoxy-cholesterol and histamine. Dendrogenin A was not detected in cancer cell lines and was fivefold lower in human breast tumours compared with normal tissues, suggesting a deregulation of dendrogenin A metabolism during carcinogenesis. We established that dendrogenin A is a selective inhibitor of cholesterol epoxide hydrolase and it triggered tumour re-differentiation and growth control in mice and improved animal survival. The properties of dendrogenin A and its decreased level in tumours suggest a physiological function in maintaining cell integrity and differentiation. The discovery of dendrogenin A reveals a new metabolic pathway at the crossroads of cholesterol and histamine metabolism and the existence of steroidal alkaloids in mammals. PMID:23673625

  1. Prevention and treatment of colon cancer by peroral administration of HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells)

    PubMed Central

    Puthia, Manoj; Storm, Petter; Nadeem, Aftab; Hsiung, Sabrina; Svanborg, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    Background Most colon cancers start with dysregulated Wnt/β-catenin signalling and remain a major therapeutic challenge. Examining whether HAMLET (human α-lactalbumin made lethal to tumour cells) may be used for colon cancer treatment is logical, based on the properties of the complex and its biological context. Objective To investigate if HAMLET can be used for colon cancer treatment and prevention. ApcMin/+ mice, which carry mutations relevant to hereditary and sporadic human colorectal tumours, were used as a model for human disease. Method HAMLET was given perorally in therapeutic and prophylactic regimens. Tumour burden and animal survival of HAMLET-treated and sham-fed mice were compared. Tissue analysis focused on Wnt/β-catenin signalling, proliferation markers and gene expression, using microarrays, immunoblotting, immunohistochemistry and ELISA. Confocal microscopy, reporter assay, immunoprecipitation, immunoblotting, ion flux assays and holographic imaging were used to determine effects on colon cancer cells. Results Peroral HAMLET administration reduced tumour progression and mortality in ApcMin/+ mice. HAMLET accumulated specifically in tumour tissue, reduced β-catenin and related tumour markers. Gene expression analysis detected inhibition of Wnt signalling and a shift to a more differentiated phenotype. In colon cancer cells with APC mutations, HAMLET altered β-catenin integrity and localisation through an ion channel-dependent pathway, defining a new mechanism for controlling β-catenin signalling. Remarkably, supplying HAMLET to the drinking water from the time of weaning also significantly prevented tumour development. Conclusions These data identify HAMLET as a new, peroral agent for colon cancer prevention and treatment, especially needed in people carrying APC mutations, where colon cancer remains a leading cause of death. PMID:23348960

  2. A 3D engineered tumour for spatial snap-shot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients

    PubMed Central

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2016-01-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional (3D) tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble 3D tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snap-shot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia. PMID:26595121

  3. Up-regulation of the embryonic self-renewal network through reversible polyploidy in irradiated p53-mutant tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Salmina, Kristine; Jankevics, Eriks; Huna, Anda; Perminov, Dmitry; Radovica, Ilze; Klymenko, Tetyana; Ivanov, Andrey; Jascenko, Elina; Scherthan, Harry; Cragg, Mark; Erenpreisa, Jekaterina

    2010-08-01

    We have previously documented that transient polyploidy is a potential cell survival strategy underlying the clonogenic re-growth of tumour cells after genotoxic treatment. In an attempt to better define this mechanism, we recently documented the key role of meiotic genes in regulating the DNA repair and return of the endopolyploid tumour cells (ETC) to diploidy through reduction divisions after irradiation. Here, we studied the role of the pluripotency and self-renewal stem cell genes NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in this polyploidy-dependent survival mechanism. In irradiation-resistant p53-mutated lymphoma cell-lines (Namalwa and WI-L2-NS) but not sensitive p53 wild-type counterparts (TK6), low background expression of OCT4 and NANOG was up-regulated by ionising radiation with protein accumulation evident in ETC as detected by OCT4/DNA flow cytometry and immunofluorescence (IF). IF analysis also showed that the ETC generate PML bodies that appear to concentrate OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 proteins, which extend into complex nuclear networks. These polyploid tumour cells resist apoptosis, overcome cellular senescence and undergo bi- and multi-polar divisions transmitting the up-regulated OCT4, NANOG and SOX2 self-renewal cassette to their descendents. Altogether, our observations indicate that irradiation-induced ETC up-regulate key components of germ-line cells, which potentially facilitate survival and propagation of the tumour cell population.

  4. The role of meiotic cohesin REC8 in chromosome segregation in {gamma} irradiation-induced endopolyploid tumour cells

    SciTech Connect

    Erenpreisa, Jekaterina; Cragg, Mark S.; Salmina, Kristine; Hausmann, Michael; Scherthan, Harry

    2009-09-10

    Escape from mitotic catastrophe and generation of endopolyploid tumour cells (ETCs) represents a potential survival strategy of tumour cells in response to genotoxic treatments. ETCs that resume the mitotic cell cycle have reduced ploidy and are often resistant to these treatments. In search for a mechanism for genome reduction, we previously observed that ETCs express meiotic proteins among which REC8 (a meiotic cohesin component) is of particular interest, since it favours reductional cell division in meiosis. In the present investigation, we induced endopolyploidy in p53-dysfunctional human tumour cell lines (Namalwa, WI-L2-NS, HeLa) by gamma irradiation, and analysed the sub-cellular localisation of REC8 in the resulting ETCs. We observed by RT-PCR and Western blot that REC8 is constitutively expressed in these tumour cells, along with SGOL1 and SGOL2, and that REC8 becomes modified after irradiation. REC8 localised to paired sister centromeres in ETCs, the former co-segregating to opposite poles. Furthermore, REC8 localised to the centrosome of interphase ETCs and to the astral poles in anaphase cells where it colocalised with the microtubule-associated protein NuMA. Altogether, our observations indicate that radiation-induced ETCs express features of meiotic cell divisions and that these may facilitate chromosome segregation and genome reduction.

  5. A three-dimensional engineered tumour for spatial snapshot analysis of cell metabolism and phenotype in hypoxic gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenhizer, Darren; Gaude, Edoardo; Cojocari, Dan; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Frezza, Christian; Wouters, Bradly G.; McGuigan, Alison P.

    2016-02-01

    The profound metabolic reprogramming that occurs in cancer cells has been investigated primarily in two-dimensional cell cultures, which fail to recapitulate spatial aspects of cell-to-cell interactions as well as tissue gradients present in three-dimensional tumours. Here, we describe an engineered model to assemble three-dimensional tumours by rolling a scaffold-tumour composite strip. By unrolling the strip, the model can be rapidly disassembled for snapshot analysis, allowing spatial mapping of cell metabolism in concert with cell phenotype. We also show that the establishment of oxygen gradients within samples that are shaped by oxygen-dependent signalling pathways, as well as the consequential variations in cell growth, response to hypoxic gradients extending from normoxia to severe hypoxia, and therapy responsiveness, are consistent with those of tumours in vivo. Moreover, by using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we mapped cellular metabolism and identified spatially defined metabolic signatures of cancer cells to reveal both known and novel metabolic responses to hypoxia.

  6. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A.; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Strowski, Mathias Z.

    2016-01-01

    Highly Ca2+ permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca2+ response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca2+-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation. PMID:27450545

  7. TRPV6 modulates proliferation of human pancreatic neuroendocrine BON-1 tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Skrzypski, Marek; Kołodziejski, Paweł A; Mergler, Stefan; Khajavi, Noushafarin; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Strowski, Mathias Z

    2016-08-01

    Highly Ca(2+) permeable receptor potential channel vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) modulates a variety of biological functions including calcium-dependent cell growth and apoptosis. So far, the role of TRPV6 in controlling growth of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumour (NET) cells is unknown. In the present study, we characterize the expression of TRPV6 in pancreatic BON-1 and QGP-1 NET cells. Furthermore, we evaluate the impact of TRPV6 on intracellular calcium, the activity of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and proliferation of BON-1 cells. TRPV6 expression was assessed by real-time PCR and Western blot. TRPV6 mRNA expression and protein production were down-regulated by siRNA. Changes in intracellular calcium levels were detected by fluorescence calcium imaging (fura-2/AM). NFAT activity was studied by NFAT reporter assay; cell proliferation by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU), MTT and propidium iodine staining. TRPV6 mRNA and protein are present in BON-1 and QGP-1 NET-cells. Down-regulation of TRPV6 attenuates BON-1 cell proliferation. TRPV6 down-regulation is associated with decreased Ca(2+) response pattern and reduced NFAT activity. In conclusion, TRPV6 is expressed in pancreatic NETs and modulates cell proliferation via Ca(2+)-dependent mechanism, which is accompanied by NFAT activation.

  8. CD3 directed bispecific antibodies induce increased lymphocyte–endothelial cell interactions in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Molema, G; Tervaert, J W Cohen; Kroesen, B J; Helfrich, W; Meijer, D K F; Leij, L F M H de

    2000-01-01

    Bispecific antibody (BsMAb) BIS-1 has been developed to redirect the cytolytic activity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to epithelial glycoprotein-2 (EGP-2) expressing tumour cells. Intravenous administration of BIS-1 F(ab′)2to carcinoma patients in a phase I/II clinical trial, caused immunomodulation as demonstrated by a rapid lymphopenia prior to a rise in plasma tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ levels. Yet, no lymphocyte accumulation in the tumour tissue and no anti-tumour effect could be observed. These data suggest a BsMAb-induced lymphocyte adhesion to blood vessel walls and/or generalized redistribution of the lymphocytes into tissues. In this study, we describe the effects of BIS-1 F(ab′)2binding to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) on their capacity to interact with resting endothelial cells in vitro. Resting and pre-activated PBMC exhibited a significant increase in adhesive interaction with endothelial cells when preincubated with BIS-1 F(ab′)2, followed by an increase in transendothelial migration (tem). Binding of BIS-1 F(ab′)2to PBMC affected the expression of a number of adhesion molecules involved in lymphocyte adhesion/migration. Furthermore, PBMC preincubated with BIS-1 F(ab′)2induced the expression of endothelial cell adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 during adhesion/tem. These phenomena were related to the CD3 recognizing antibody fragment of the BsMAb and dependent on lymphocyte–endothelial cell contact. Possibly, in patients, the BIS-1 F(ab′)2infusion induced lymphopenia is a result of generalized activation of endothelial cells, leading to the formation of a temporary sink for lymphocytes. This process may distract the lymphocytes from homing to the tumour cells, and hence prevent the occurrence of BIS-1 F(ab′)2– CTL-mediated tumour cell lysis. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10646907

  9. The cholesterol transporter ABCG1 links cholesterol homeostasis and tumour immunity.

    PubMed

    Sag, Duygu; Cekic, Caglar; Wu, Runpei; Linden, Joel; Hedrick, Catherine C

    2015-02-27

    ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) promotes cholesterol efflux from cells and regulates intracellular cholesterol homeostasis. Here we demonstrate a role of ABCG1 as a mediator of tumour immunity. Abcg1(-/-) mice have dramatically suppressed subcutaneous MB49-bladder carcinoma and B16-melanoma growth and prolonged survival. We show that reduced tumour growth in Abcg1(-/-) mice is myeloid cell intrinsic and is associated with a phenotypic shift of the macrophages from a tumour-promoting M2 to a tumour-fighting M1 within the tumour. Abcg1(-/-) macrophages exhibit an intrinsic bias towards M1 polarization with increased NF-κB activation and direct cytotoxicity for tumour cells in vitro. Overall, our study demonstrates that the absence of ABCG1 inhibits tumour growth through modulation of macrophage function within the tumour, and illustrates a link between cholesterol homeostasis and cancer.

  10. Novel population of small tumour-initiating stem cells in the ovaries of women with borderline ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Virant-Klun, Irma; Stimpfel, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Small stem cells with diameters of up to 5 μm previously isolated from adult human ovaries indicated pluripotency and germinal lineage, especially primordial germ cells, and developed into primitive oocyte-like cells in vitro. Here, we show that a comparable population of small stem cells can be found in the ovarian tissue of women with borderline ovarian cancer, which, in contrast to small stem cells in “healthy” ovaries, formed spontaneous tumour-like structures and expressed some markers related to pluripotency and germinal lineage. The gene expression profile of these small putative cancer stem cells differed from similar cells sorted from “healthy” ovaries by 132 upregulated and 97 downregulated genes, including some important forkhead box and homeobox genes related to transcription regulation, developmental processes, embryogenesis, and ovarian cancer. These putative cancer stem cells are suggested to be a novel population of ovarian tumour-initiating cells in humans. PMID:27703207

  11. Changing incidence of oral and maxillofacial tumours in East Java, Indonesia, 1987-1992. Part 2: Malignant tumours.

    PubMed

    Budhy, T I; Soenarto, S D; Yaacob, H B; Ngeow, W C

    2001-12-01

    A total of 2193 tumours of the mouth and jaw diagnosed at the Laboratorium Patologi Anatomi Fakultas Kedokteran Universitas Airlangga, Indonesia from 1987 to 1992, inclusive, was studied. Malignant tumours constituted 45.3% of the lesions. Almost 71% of the malignant tumours were squamous cell carcinomas. The remainder were salivary gland tumours (21.5%) and sarcomas (4.5%). The male to female ratio for malignant tumours was 5.1:4.7. The incidence of malignant tumours per 100,000 population over the 6-year study period was 2.64. The yearly incidence seemed to increase except in 1990, when it dropped. The incidence of squamous cell carcinoma over the 6 years was 2.1. Calculation of the odds ratio suggested that people aged 40 and over are 5.8 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma.

  12. Increased intestinal protein synthesis during sepsis and following the administration of tumour necrosis factor alpha or interleukin-1 alpha.

    PubMed Central

    von Allmen, D; Hasselgren, P O; Higashiguchi, T; Frederick, J; Zamir, O; Fischer, J E

    1992-01-01

    The influence of sepsis on intestinal protein synthesis was studied in rats. Sepsis was induced by caecal ligation and puncture (CLP); control rats were sham-operated. Protein synthesis was measured in vivo in the jejunum and ileum following a flooding dose of [14C]leucine. At 8 h after CLP the protein synthesis rate was increased by approx. 15% in jejunal mucosa, and at 16 h after CLP, the protein synthesis rate was increased by 50-60% in the mucosa and seromuscular layer of both jejunum and ileum. In a second series of experiments, rats were treated with recombinant tumour necrosis factor alpha (rTNF alpha) or recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) administered at a total dose of 300 micrograms/kg body weight over 16 h. Control rats received corresponding volumes of solvent. Treatment with rTNF alpha resulted in an approx. 25% increase in mucosal protein synthesis in jejunum. Following treatment with rIL-1 alpha, protein synthesis increased by 25% in jejunal mucosa and almost doubled in ileal mucosa. The results suggest that sepsis stimulates intestinal protein synthesis and that this response may, at least in part, be mediated by TNF and/or IL-1. PMID:1530589

  13. Role of AMP-activated protein kinase activators in antiproliferative multi-drug pituitary tumour therapies: effects of combined treatments with compounds affecting the mTOR-p70S6 kinase axis in cultured pituitary tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Tulipano, G; Faggi, L; Cacciamali, A; Spinello, M; Cocchi, D; Giustina, A

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated under conditions that deplete cellular ATP levels and elevate AMP levels. We have recently shown that AMPK can represent a valid target for improving the medical treatment of growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary adenomas and the effects of its activation or inhibition in pituitary tumour cells are worthy of further characterisation. We aimed to determine whether AMPK may have a role in combined antiproliferative therapies based on multiple drugs targeting cell anabolic functions at different levels in pituitary tumour cells to overcome the risk of cell growth escape phenomena. Accordingly, we tried to determine whether a rationale exists in combining compounds activating AMPK with compounds targeting the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR/p70S6K signalling pathway. AMPK down-regulation by specific small-interfering RNAs confirmed that activated AMPK had a role in restraining growth of GH3 cells. Hence, we compared the effects of compounds directly targeting the mTOR-p70S6K axis, namely the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin and the p70S6K inhibitor PF-4708671, with the effects of the AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside (AICAR) on cell signalling and cell growth, in rat pituitary GH3 cells. AICAR was able to reduce growth factor-induced p70S6K activity, as shown by the decrease of phospho-p70S6K levels. However, it was far less effective than rapamycin and PF-4708671. We observed significant differences between the growth inhibitory effects of the three compounds in GH3 and GH1 cells. Interestingly, PF-4708671 was devoid of any effect. AICAR was at least as effective as rapamycin and the co-treatment was more effective than single treatments. AICAR induced apoptosis of GH3 cells, whereas rapamycin caused preferentially a decrease of cell proliferation. Finally, AICAR and rapamycin differed in their actions on growth factor-induced extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation

  14. Inhibitory effects of retinoic acid metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs) on the growth of human prostate cancer cells and LNCaP prostate tumour xenografts in SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, C K; Brodie, A M H; Njar, V C O

    2006-01-01

    In recent studies, we have identified several highly potent all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) metabolism blocking agents (RAMBAs). On the basis of previous effects of liarozole (a first-generation RAMBA) on the catabolism of ATRA and on growth of rat Dunning R3227G prostate tumours, we assessed the effects of our novel RAMBAs on human prostate tumour (PCA) cell lines. We examined three different PCA cell lines to determine their capacity to induce P450-mediated oxidation of ATRA. Among the three different cell lines, enhanced catabolism was detected in LNCaP, whereas it was not found in PC-3 and DU-145. This catabolism was strongly inhibited by our RAMBAs, the most potent being VN/14-1, VN/50-1, VN/66-1, and VN/69-1 with IC50 values of 6.5, 90.0, 62.5, and 90.0 nM, respectively. The RAMBAs inhibited the growth of LNCaP cells with IC50 values in the μM-range. In LNCaP cell proliferation assays, VN/14-1, VN/50-1, VN/66-1, and VN/69-1 also enhanced by 47-, 60-, 70-, and 65-fold, respectively, the ATRA-mediated antiproliferative activity. We then examined the molecular mechanism underlying the growth inhibitory properties of ATRA alone and in combination with RAMBAs. The mechanism appeared to involve the induction of differentiation, cell-cycle arrest, and induction of apoptosis (TUNEL), involving increase in Bad expression and decrease in Bcl-2 expression. Treatment of LNCaP tumours growing in SCID mice with VN/66-1 and VN/69-1 resulted in modest but statistically significant tumour growth inhibition of 44 and 47%, respectively, while treatment with VN/14-1 was unexpectedly ineffective. These results suggest that some of our novel RAMBAs may be useful agents for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:16449997

  15. Prooxidative effect of copper--metallothionein in the acute cytotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Suntres, Zacharias E; Lui, Edmund M K

    2006-01-16

    This study was concerned with the role of copper (Cu) and Cu-metallothionein (Cu-MT) in oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-induced oxidative injury was examined in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells isolated from host mice pretreated with 0, 1 or 2mg of CuSO(4) (ip) 24h earlier. Control Ehrlich cells contained low levels of Cu and Cu treatment produced dose-related increases in cellular Cu and Cu-MT levels and corresponding increases in sensitivity to oxidative toxicity of H(2)O(2) (LC(50), cell blebbing, lipid peroxidation, GSH depletion, and increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)](i)). Hydrogen peroxide treatment also resulted in the oxidation of MT thiolates, reduction in the binding of Cu to MT resulting in translocation of Cu to other subcellular sites. d-penicillamine, a Cu-chelating agent, obliterated the sensitization effect of Cu-pretreatment and reduced the redistribution of MT-bound Cu, suggesting the participation of Cu ions derived from MT in promoting oxidant stress. Additional experiments with desferoxamine and mannitol have revealed the involvement of a Cu-dependent Fenton reaction in the mediation of the prooxidative effect of Cu-MT. These data suggest that cells with high levels of Cu-MT may be particularly susceptible to oxidative stress.

  16. Nanoparticle-blood interactions: the implications on solid tumour targeting.

    PubMed

    Lazarovits, James; Chen, Yih Yang; Sykes, Edward A; Chan, Warren C W

    2015-02-18

    Nanoparticles are suitable platforms for cancer targeting and diagnostic applications. Typically, less than 10% of all systemically administered nanoparticles accumulate in the tumour. Here we explore the interactions of blood components with nanoparticles and describe how these interactions influence solid tumour targeting. In the blood, serum proteins adsorb onto nanoparticles to form a protein corona in a manner dependent on nanoparticle physicochemical properties. These serum proteins can block nanoparticle tumour targeting ligands from binding to tumour cell receptors. Additionally, serum proteins can also encourage nanoparticle uptake by macrophages, which decreases nanoparticle availability in the blood and limits tumour accumulation. The formation of this protein corona will also increase the nanoparticle hydrodynamic size or induce aggregation, which makes nanoparticles too large to enter into the tumour through pores of the leaky vessels, and prevents their deep penetration into tumours for cell targeting. Recent studies have focused on developing new chemical strategies to reduce or eliminate serum protein adsorption, and rescue the targeting potential of nanoparticles to tumour cells. An in-depth and complete understanding of nanoparticle-blood interactions is key to designing nanoparticles with optimal physicochemical properties with high tumour accumulation. The purpose of this review article is to describe how the protein corona alters the targeting of nanoparticles to solid tumours and explains current solutions to solve this problem.

  17. MINDEC-An Enhanced Negative Depletion Strategy for Circulating Tumour Cell Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Lapin, Morten; Tjensvoll, Kjersti; Oltedal, Satu; Buhl, Tove; Gilje, Bjørnar; Smaaland, Rune; Nordgård, Oddmund

    2016-01-01

    Most current methods of circulating tumour cell (CTC) enrichment target the epithelial protein EpCAM, which is commonly expressed in adenocarcinoma cells. However, such methods will not recover the fraction of CTCs that have a non-epithelial phenotype due to epithelial–mesenchymal transition. For phenotype-independent CTC enrichment, we developed a new enhanced negative depletion strategy—termed MINDEC—that is based on multi-marker (CD45, CD16, CD19, CD163, and CD235a/GYPA) depletion of blood cells rather than targeted enrichment of CTCs. Here we validated the performance of MINDEC using epithelial and mesenchymal cancer cell lines, demonstrating a mean recovery of 82 ± 10%, high depletion (437 ± 350 residual white blood cells (WBCs)/mL peripheral blood), linearity between spiked and recovered cells (correlation coefficient: r = 0.995), and a low detection limit (≥1 cell recovered in all four replicates spiked with 3 cells). For clinical validation of this method, we enumerated CTCs in peripheral blood samples from patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, detecting CTCs in 15 of 21 blood samples (71%) from 9 patients. The promising performance of the MINDEC enrichment strategy in our study encourages validation in larger clinical trials. PMID:27432216

  18. In vitro response of tumour cells to non-uniform irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchowerska, N.; Ebert, M. A.; Zhang, M.; Jackson, M.

    2005-07-01

    This study examines differences in tumour cellular response using clonogenic cell survival between uniform and non-uniform irradiation. Cells were irradiated with a 6 MV x-ray intensity-modulated beam, in a single large flask (i.e. intercellular communication is possible) or in three small flasks (i.e. intercellular communication is inhibited across the dose gradient). For non-small-cell lung cancer and melanoma cell lines, the dose response over the entire cell culture was significantly different between freely communicating cell cultures and those with inhibited communication across the dose non-uniformity. Communicating cells exhibited poorer survival in the low dose region of the field but improved survival in the high dose region. In general, the response to non-uniform irradiation appeared to 'average out' over the entire cell culture. This was not seen when intercellular communication was inhibited. The results add strength to the body of evidence regarding bystander effects and the inter-dependence of cellular response.

  19. Enrichment of circulating head and neck tumour cells using spiral microfluidic technology

    PubMed Central

    Kulasinghe, Arutha; Tran, Thao Huynh Phuoc; Blick, Tony; O’Byrne, Ken; Thompson, Erik W.; Warkiani, Majid E.; Nelson, Colleen; Kenny, Liz; Punyadeera, Chamindie

    2017-01-01

    Whilst locoregional control of head and neck cancers (HNCs) has improved over the last four decades, long-term survival has remained largely unchanged. A possible reason for this is that the rate of distant metastasis has not changed. Such disseminated disease is reflected in measurable levels of cancer cells in the blood of HNC patients, referred to as circulating tumour cells (CTCs). Numerous marker-independent techniques have been developed for CTC isolation and detection. Recently, microfluidics-based platforms have come to the fore to avoid molecular bias. In this pilot, proof of concept study, we evaluated the use of the spiral microfluidic chip for CTC enrichment and subsequent detection in HNC patients. CTCs were detected in 13/24 (54%) HNC patients, representing both early to late stages of disease. Importantly, in 7/13 CTC-positive patients, CTC clusters were observed. This is the first study to use spiral microfluidics technology for CTC enrichment in HNC. PMID:28198401

  20. Ultrasmall nanoparticles induce ferroptosis in nutrient-deprived cancer cells and suppress tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Eun; Zhang, Li; Ma, Kai; Riegman, Michelle; Chen, Feng; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Turker, Melik Ziya; Gao, Minghui; Jiang, Xuejun; Monette, Sebastien; Pauliah, Mohan; Gonen, Mithat; Zanzonico, Pat; Quinn, Thomas; Wiesner, Ulrich; Bradbury, Michelle S; Overholtzer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The design of cancer-targeting particles with precisely tuned physicochemical properties may enhance the delivery of therapeutics and access to pharmacological targets. However, a molecular-level understanding of the interactions driving the fate of nanomedicine in biological systems remains elusive. Here, we show that ultrasmall (<10 nm in diameter) poly(ethylene glycol)-coated silica nanoparticles, functionalized with melanoma-targeting peptides, can induce a form of programmed cell death known as ferroptosis in starved cancer cells and cancer-bearing mice. Tumour xenografts in mice intravenously injected with nanoparticles using a high-dose multiple injection scheme exhibit reduced growth or regression, in a manner that is reversed by the pharmacological inhibitor of ferroptosis, liproxstatin-1. These data demonstrate that ferroptosis can be targeted by ultrasmall silica nanoparticles and may have therapeutic potential.

  1. Ultrasmall nanoparticles induce ferroptosis in nutrient-deprived cancer cells and suppress tumour growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Eun; Zhang, Li; Ma, Kai; Riegman, Michelle; Chen, Feng; Ingold, Irina; Conrad, Marcus; Turker, Melik Ziya; Gao, Minghui; Jiang, Xuejun; Monette, Sebastien; Pauliah, Mohan; Gonen, Mithat; Zanzonico, Pat; Quinn, Thomas; Wiesner, Ulrich; Bradbury, Michelle S.; Overholtzer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The design of cancer-targeting particles with precisely tuned physicochemical properties may enhance the delivery of therapeutics and access to pharmacological targets. However, a molecular-level understanding of the interactions driving the fate of nanomedicine in biological systems remains elusive. Here, we show that ultrasmall (<10 nm in diameter) poly(ethylene glycol)-coated silica nanoparticles, functionalized with melanoma-targeting peptides, can induce a form of programmed cell death known as ferroptosis in starved cancer cells and cancer-bearing mice. Tumour xenografts in mice intravenously injected with nanoparticles using a high-dose multiple injection scheme exhibit reduced growth or regression, in a manner that is reversed by the pharmacological inhibitor of ferroptosis, liproxstatin-1. These data demonstrate that ferroptosis can be targeted by ultrasmall silica nanoparticles and may have therapeutic potential.

  2. Blockade of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors by tivozanib has potential anti-tumour effects on human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Momeny, Majid; Moghaddaskho, Farima; Gortany, Narges K.; Yousefi, Hassan; Sabourinejad, Zahra; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Mirshahvaladi, Shahab; Eyvani, Haniyeh; Barghi, Farinaz; Ahmadinia, Leila; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Dehpour, Ahmad R.; Amanpour, Saeid; Tavangar, Seyyed M.; Dardaei, Leila; Emami, Amir H.; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir; Ghaffari, Seyed H.

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) remains one of the most fatal human malignancies due to its high angiogenic and infiltrative capacities. Even with optimal therapy including surgery, radiotherapy and temozolomide, it is essentially incurable. GBM is among the most neovascularised neoplasms and its malignant progression associates with striking neovascularisation, evidenced by vasoproliferation and endothelial cell hyperplasia. Targeting the pro-angiogenic pathways is therefore a promising anti-glioma strategy. Here we show that tivozanib, a pan-inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptors, inhibited proliferation of GBM cells through a G2/M cell cycle arrest via inhibition of polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) signalling pathway and down-modulati