Science.gov

Sample records for incremental dynamic analysis

  1. Incremental Centrality Algorithms for Dynamic Network Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    dynamically. Betweenness is also commonly discussed within the concept of vulnerability of networks to different attacks since it is useful for...perform coordinated attacks . In other words, we issue shrinking network updates and introduce progressive failures to the central nodes. Simulated...protocol ( OLSR ) as the routing protocol. It is a proactive link state routing protocol where each node stores next-hop destinations for all nodes in

  2. Investigation of the nonlinear seismic behavior of knee braced frames using the incremental dynamic analysis method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheidaii, Mohammad Reza; TahamouliRoudsari, Mehrzad; Gordini, Mehrdad

    2016-06-01

    In knee braced frames, the braces are attached to the knee element rather than the intersection of beams and columns. This bracing system is widely used and preferred over the other commonly used systems for reasons such as having lateral stiffness while having adequate ductility, damage concentration on the second degree convenience of repairing and replacing of these elements after Earthquake. The lateral stiffness of this system is supplied by the bracing member and the ductility of the frame attached to the knee length is supplied through the bending or shear yield of the knee member. In this paper, the nonlinear seismic behavior of knee braced frame systems has been investigated using incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) and the effects of the number of stories in a building, length and the moment of inertia of the knee member on the seismic behavior, elastic stiffness, ductility and the probability of failure of these systems has been determined. In the incremental dynamic analysis, after plotting the IDA diagrams of the accelerograms, the collapse diagrams in the limit states are determined. These diagrams yield that for a constant knee length with reduced moment of inertia, the probability of collapse in limit states heightens and also for a constant knee moment of inertia with increasing length, the probability of collapse in limit states increases.

  3. Incremental dynamic analysis of concrete gravity dams including base and lift joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alembagheri, Mohammad; Ghaemian, Mohsen

    2013-03-01

    The growth in computer processing power has made it possible to use time-consuming analysis methods such as incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) with higher accuracy in less time. In an IDA study, a series of earthquake records are applied to a structure at successively increasing intensity levels, which causes the structure to shift from the elastic state into the inelastic state and finally into collapse. In this way, the limit-states and capacity of a structure can be determined. In the present research, the IDA of a concrete gravity dam considering a nonlinear concrete behavior, and sliding planes within the dam body and at the dam-foundation interface, is performed. The influence of the friction angle and lift joint slope on the response parameters are investigated and the various limit-states of the dam are recognized. It is observed that by introducing a lift joint, the tensile damage can be avoided for the dam structure. The lift joint sliding is essentially independent of the base joint friction angle and the upper ligament over the inclined lift joint slides into the upstream direction in strong earthquakes.

  4. Incremental dynamic analysis of concrete moment resisting frames reinforced with shape memory composite bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Adeel; Andrawes, Bassem

    2012-02-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) reinforcing bars have been used in concrete structures as an alternative to conventional steel reinforcement, in order to overcome corrosion problems. However, due to the linear behavior of the commonly used reinforcing fibers, they are not considered in structures which require ductility and damping characteristics. The use of superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) fibers with their nonlinear elastic behavior as reinforcement in the composite could potentially provide a solution for this problem. Small diameter SMA wires are coupled with polymer matrix to produce SMA-FRP composite, which is sought in this research as reinforcing bars. SMA-FRP bars are sought in this study to enhance the seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) moment resisting frames (MRFs) in terms of reducing their residual inter-story drifts while still maintaining the elastic characteristics associated with conventional FRP. Three story one bay and six story two bay RC MRF prototype structures are designed with steel, SMA-FRP and glass-FRP reinforcement. The incremental dynamic analysis technique is used to investigate the behaviors of the two frames with the three different reinforcement types under a suite of ground motion records. It is found that the frames with SMA-FRP composite reinforcement exhibit higher performance levels including lower residual inter-story drifts, high energy dissipation and thus lower damage, which are important for structures in highly seismic zones.

  5. Seismic Performance Evaluation of the Jacket Type Offshore Platforms through Incremental Dynamic Analysis considering Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Asgarian, Behrouz; Shokrgozar, Hamed R.; Talarposhti, Ali Shakeri

    2008-07-08

    Of great interest in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) is the accurate estimation of the seismic performance of structures. A performance prediction and evaluation procedure is based on nonlinear dynamics and reliability theory. In this method, a full integration over the three key stochastic models is as follow: ground motion hazard curve, nonlinear dynamic displacement demand, and displacement capacity. Further, both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties are evaluated and carried through the analysis.In this paper, jacket and soil-pile system have been modeled using Finite Element program (OpenSees) and the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) are performed to investigate nonlinear behavior of offshore platforms. The system demand is determined by performing time history response analyses of the jacket under a suite of FEMA/SAC uniform hazard ground motions. The system capacity in terms of the drift ratio against incipient collapse is generally difficult to predict since the structural response goes into nonlinear range before collapse. All the analyses are performed in two directions and the results are compared with each others. The confidence level of a jacket in each direction for a given hazard level is calculated using the procedure described.

  6. Seismic Performance Evaluation of the Jacket Type Offshore Platforms through Incremental Dynamic Analysis considering Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgarian, Behrouz; Shokrgozar, Hamed R.; Talarposhti, Ali Shakeri

    2008-07-01

    Of great interest in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) is the accurate estimation of the seismic performance of structures. A performance prediction and evaluation procedure is based on nonlinear dynamics and reliability theory. In this method, a full integration over the three key stochastic models is as follow: ground motion hazard curve, nonlinear dynamic displacement demand, and displacement capacity. Further, both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties are evaluated and carried through the analysis. In this paper, jacket and soil-pile system have been modeled using Finite Element program (OpenSees) and the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) are performed to investigate nonlinear behavior of offshore platforms. The system demand is determined by performing time history response analyses of the jacket under a suite of FEMA/SAC uniform hazard ground motions. The system capacity in terms of the drift ratio against incipient collapse is generally difficult to predict since the structural response goes into nonlinear range before collapse. All the analyses are performed in two directions and the results are compared with each others. The confidence level of a jacket in each direction for a given hazard level is calculated using the procedure described.

  7. Incremental Discriminant Analysis in Tensor Space

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Liu; Weidong, Zhao; Tao, Yan; Qiang, Pu; Xiaodan, Du

    2015-01-01

    To study incremental machine learning in tensor space, this paper proposes incremental tensor discriminant analysis. The algorithm employs tensor representation to carry on discriminant analysis and combine incremental learning to alleviate the computational cost. This paper proves that the algorithm can be unified into the graph framework theoretically and analyzes the time and space complexity in detail. The experiments on facial image detection have shown that the algorithm not only achieves sound performance compared with other algorithms, but also reduces the computational issues apparently. PMID:26339229

  8. Incremental SSVEP analysis for BCI implementation.

    PubMed

    Torres Müller, Sandra Mara; Freire Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; Sarcinelli-Filho, Mário

    2010-01-01

    This work presents an incremental analysis of EEG records containing Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP). This analysis consists of two steps: feature extraction, performed using a statistic test, and classification, performed by a decision tree. The result is a system with high classification rate (a test with six volunteers resulted in an average classification rate of 91.2%), high Information Transfer Rate (ITR) (a test with the same six volunteers resulted in an average value of 100.2 bits/min) and processing time, for each incremental analysis, of approximately 120 ms. These are very good features for an efficient Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) implementation.

  9. A simplified method in comparison with comprehensive interaction incremental dynamic analysis to assess seismic performance of jacket-type offshore platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolfaghari, M. R.; Ajamy, A.; Asgarian, B.

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal of seismic reassessment procedures in oil platform codes is to determine the reliability of a platform under extreme earthquake loading. Therefore, in this paper, a simplified method is proposed to assess seismic performance of existing jacket-type offshore platforms (JTOP) in regions ranging from near-elastic to global collapse. The simplified method curve exploits well agreement between static pushover (SPO) curve and the entire summarized interaction incremental dynamic analysis (CI-IDA) curve of the platform. Although the CI-IDA method offers better understanding and better modelling of the phenomenon, it is a time-consuming and challenging task. To overcome the challenges, the simplified procedure, a fast and accurate approach, is introduced based on SPO analysis. Then, an existing JTOP in the Persian Gulf is presented to illustrate the procedure, and finally a comparison is made between the simplified method and CI-IDA results. The simplified method is very informative and practical for current engineering purposes. It is able to predict seismic performance elasticity to global dynamic instability with reasonable accuracy and little computational effort.

  10. Dynamic and stability analysis of the linear guide with time-varying, piecewise-nonlinear stiffness by multi-term incremental harmonic balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiangxi; Sun, Wei; Wang, Bo; Wen, Bangchun

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic behaviors and stability of the linear guide considering contact actions are studied by multi-term incremental harmonic balance method (IHBM). Based on fully considering the parameters of the linear guide, a static model is developed and the contact stiffness is calculated according to Hertz contact theory. A generalized time-varying and piecewise-nonlinear dynamic model of the linear guide is formulated to perform an accurate investigation on its dynamic behaviors and stability. The numerical simulation is used to confirm the feasibility of the approach. The effects of excitation force and mean load on the system are analyzed in low-order nonlinearity. Multi-term IHBM and numerical simulation are employed to the effect of high-order nonlinearity and show the transition to chaos. Additionally, the effects of preload, initial contact angle, the number and diameter of balls are discussed.

  11. Metastable Pain-Attention Dynamics during Incremental Exhaustive Exercise.

    PubMed

    Slapšinskaitė, Agnė; Hristovski, Robert; Razon, Selen; Balagué, Natàlia; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pain attracts attention on the bodily regions. Attentional allocation toward pain results from the neural communication across the brain-wide network "connectome" which consists of pain-attention related circuits. Connectome is intrinsically dynamic and spontaneously fluctuating on multiple time-scales. The present study delineates the pain-attention dynamics during incremental cycling performed until volitional exhaustion and investigates the potential presence of nested metastable dynamics. Method: Fifteen young and physically active adults completed a progressive incremental cycling test and reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15 s. Results: The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout five temporal windows reaching an average of 4.26 ± 0.59 locations per participant. A total of 37 different locations were reported and marked as painful for all participants throughout the cycling task. Significant differences in entropy were observed between all temporal windows except the fourth and fifth windows. Transient dynamics of bodily locations with perceived discomfort and pain were spanned by three principal components. The metastable dynamics of the body pain locations groupings over time were discerned by three time scales: (1) the time scale of shifts (15 s); (2) the time scale of metastable configurations (100 s), and (3) the observational time scale (1000 s). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that body locations perceived as painful increase throughout the incremental cycling task following a switching metastable and nested dynamics. These findings support the view that human brain is intrinsically organized into active, mutually interacting complex and nested functional networks, and that subjective experiences inherent in pain perception depict identical dynamical principles to the neural tissue in the brain.

  12. Metastable Pain-Attention Dynamics during Incremental Exhaustive Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Slapšinskaitė, Agnė; Hristovski, Robert; Razon, Selen; Balagué, Natàlia; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pain attracts attention on the bodily regions. Attentional allocation toward pain results from the neural communication across the brain-wide network “connectome” which consists of pain-attention related circuits. Connectome is intrinsically dynamic and spontaneously fluctuating on multiple time-scales. The present study delineates the pain-attention dynamics during incremental cycling performed until volitional exhaustion and investigates the potential presence of nested metastable dynamics. Method: Fifteen young and physically active adults completed a progressive incremental cycling test and reported their discomfort and pain on a body map every 15 s. Results: The analyses revealed that the number of body locations with perceived pain and discomfort increased throughout five temporal windows reaching an average of 4.26 ± 0.59 locations per participant. A total of 37 different locations were reported and marked as painful for all participants throughout the cycling task. Significant differences in entropy were observed between all temporal windows except the fourth and fifth windows. Transient dynamics of bodily locations with perceived discomfort and pain were spanned by three principal components. The metastable dynamics of the body pain locations groupings over time were discerned by three time scales: (1) the time scale of shifts (15 s); (2) the time scale of metastable configurations (100 s), and (3) the observational time scale (1000 s). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that body locations perceived as painful increase throughout the incremental cycling task following a switching metastable and nested dynamics. These findings support the view that human brain is intrinsically organized into active, mutually interacting complex and nested functional networks, and that subjective experiences inherent in pain perception depict identical dynamical principles to the neural tissue in the brain. PMID:28111563

  13. An online incremental orthogonal component analysis method for dimensionality reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tao; Xu, Ye; Shen, Furao; Zhao, Jinxi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a fast linear dimensionality reduction method named incremental orthogonal component analysis (IOCA). IOCA is designed to automatically extract desired orthogonal components (OCs) in an online environment. The OCs and the low-dimensional representations of original data are obtained with only one pass through the entire dataset. Without solving matrix eigenproblem or matrix inversion problem, IOCA learns incrementally from continuous data stream with low computational cost. By proposing an adaptive threshold policy, IOCA is able to automatically determine the dimension of feature subspace. Meanwhile, the quality of the learned OCs is guaranteed. The analysis and experiments demonstrate that IOCA is simple, but efficient and effective.

  14. Design and Performance Analysis of Incremental Networked Predictive Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Donghua

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the design and performance analysis of networked control systems with network-induced delay, packet disorder, and packet dropout. Based on the incremental form of the plant input-output model and an incremental error feedback control strategy, an incremental networked predictive control (INPC) scheme is proposed to actively compensate for the round-trip time delay resulting from the above communication constraints. The output tracking performance and closed-loop stability of the resulting INPC system are considered for two cases: 1) plant-model match case and 2) plant-model mismatch case. For the former case, the INPC system can achieve the same output tracking performance and closed-loop stability as those of the corresponding local control system. For the latter case, a sufficient condition for the stability of the closed-loop INPC system is derived using the switched system theory. Furthermore, for both cases, the INPC system can achieve a zero steady-state output tracking error for step commands. Finally, both numerical simulations and practical experiments on an Internet-based servo motor system illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Determination of season at death using dental cementum increment analysis.

    PubMed

    Wedel, Vicki L

    2007-11-01

    Dental cementum anchors teeth into their sockets via the periodontal ligament. In mammals, dental cementum is laid down in alternating opaque and translucent bands representing winter (dormant) and summer (growth) seasons. Each pair of bands represents 1 year of life. Estimates of age at death based on counting pairs of bands are highly accurate. If the timing of the transition between winter and summer bands could be identified in humans, dental cementum increment analysis could be used to specify the season at death. This pilot project attempts to determine when these transitions occur and thus provide forensic anthropologists with a technique that would refine our estimates of postmortem interval. Extracted teeth were obtained from a local oral surgeon, embedded, sectioned, ground, polished, and examined under transmitted polarized light. The outermost increment was identified and measured along with other randomly chosen like bands. A transition from translucent to opaque bands was observed in teeth extracted in early October, while teeth extracted in early April exhibited nascent translucent bands. Further, significant correlations were observed between band thickness and number of days into either season, suggesting that band width increases as either season progresses. In this blind study, extracted teeth were effectively sorted into the spring/summer or fall/winter season 99% of the time.

  16. Incremental analysis of large elastic deformation of a rotating cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, G. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of finite deformation upon a rotating, orthotropic cylinder was investigated using a general incremental theory. The incremental equations of motion are developed using the variational principle. The governing equations are derived using the principle of virtual work for a body with initial stress. The governing equations are reduced to those for the title problem and a numerical solution is obtained using finite difference approximations. Since the problem is defined in terms of one independent space coordinate, the finite difference grid can be modified as the incremental deformation occurs without serious numerical difficulties. The nonlinear problem is solved incrementally by totaling a series of linear solutions.

  17. Policy Analysis in Education: The Case for Incrementalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Lelia B.

    1981-01-01

    Policy analysts approach problems of decision-making from two distinct perspectives: rational-comprehensive and incremental. This paper examines the theory behind both perspectives and argues that incrementalism may be a more appropriate strategy for applied decision-making in education. In considering the appropriateness of applying…

  18. Political dynamics promoting the incremental regulation of secondhand smoke: a case study of New South Wales, Australia.

    PubMed

    Bryan-Jones, Katherine; Chapman, Simon

    2006-07-21

    The history of governmental responses to the accumulation of scientific evidence about the harms of secondhand smoke (SHS) presents an intriguing case study of incremental public health policy development. Australia has long been considered a world-leader in progressive tobacco control policies, but in the last decade has fallen behind other jurisdictions in introducing SHS legislation that protects all workers. Bars, clubs and pubs remain the only public indoor spaces where smoking is legally permitted, despite SHS exposure in the hospitality industry being higher and affecting more people than in any other setting after domestic exposure. This paper examines the political dynamics that have shaped this incremental approach to SHS. In-depth interviews with 21 key stakeholders in the state of New South Wales (NSW), including politicians, their advisors, health officials and tobacco control advocates, were conducted and subjected to thematic content analysis. Interviewees' comments provided insights into the dynamics surrounding the debates and outcomes of SHS legislative attempts and the current political environment, and about how to progress SHS legislation. SHS restrictions have been delayed by several broad factors: the influence of industry groups successfully opposing regulation; issue wear-out; and political perceptions that there is not a salient constituency demanding that smoking be banned in bars and clubs. Interviewees also provided suggestions of strategies that advocates might utilise to best overcome the current political inertia of incremental compromises and achieve timely comprehensive smoking bans. Advocates concerned to shorten the duration of incremental endgames must continue to insist that governments address SHS fundamentally as a health issue rather than making political concessions to industry groups, and should broaden and amplify community voices calling on governments to finish the job. Publicity to the growing number of state and

  19. Political dynamics promoting the incremental regulation of secondhand smoke: a case study of New South Wales, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Bryan-Jones, Katherine; Chapman, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Background The history of governmental responses to the accumulation of scientific evidence about the harms of secondhand smoke (SHS) presents an intriguing case study of incremental public health policy development. Australia has long been considered a world-leader in progressive tobacco control policies, but in the last decade has fallen behind other jurisdictions in introducing SHS legislation that protects all workers. Bars, clubs and pubs remain the only public indoor spaces where smoking is legally permitted, despite SHS exposure in the hospitality industry being higher and affecting more people than in any other setting after domestic exposure. This paper examines the political dynamics that have shaped this incremental approach to SHS. Methods In-depth interviews with 21 key stakeholders in the state of New South Wales (NSW), including politicians, their advisors, health officials and tobacco control advocates, were conducted and subjected to thematic content analysis. Interviewees' comments provided insights into the dynamics surrounding the debates and outcomes of SHS legislative attempts and the current political environment, and about how to progress SHS legislation. Results SHS restrictions have been delayed by several broad factors: the influence of industry groups successfully opposing regulation; issue wear-out; and political perceptions that there is not a salient constituency demanding that smoking be banned in bars and clubs. Interviewees also provided suggestions of strategies that advocates might utilise to best overcome the current political inertia of incremental compromises and achieve timely comprehensive smoking bans. Conclusion Advocates concerned to shorten the duration of incremental endgames must continue to insist that governments address SHS fundamentally as a health issue rather than making political concessions to industry groups, and should broaden and amplify community voices calling on governments to finish the job. Publicity to

  20. Comparison of different incremental analysis update schemes in a realistic assimilation system with Ensemble Kalman Filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Y.; Barth, A.; Beckers, J. M.; Brankart, J. M.; Brasseur, P.; Candille, G.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, three incremental analysis update schemes (IAU 0, IAU 50 and IAU 100) are compared in the same assimilation experiments with a realistic eddy permitting primitive equation model of the North Atlantic Ocean using the Ensemble Kalman Filter. The difference between the three IAU schemes lies on the position of the increment update window. The relevance of each IAU scheme is evaluated through analyses on both thermohaline and dynamical variables. The validation of the assimilation results is performed according to both deterministic and probabilistic metrics against different sources of observations. For deterministic validation, the ensemble mean and the ensemble spread are compared to the observations. For probabilistic validation, the continuous ranked probability score (CRPS) is used to evaluate the ensemble forecast system according to reliability and resolution. The reliability is further decomposed into bias and dispersion by the reduced centred random variable (RCRV) score. The obtained results show that 1) the IAU 50 scheme has the same performance as the IAU 100 scheme 2) the IAU 50/100 schemes outperform the IAU 0 scheme in error covariance propagation for thermohaline variables in relatively stable region, while the IAU 0 scheme outperforms the IAU 50/100 schemes in dynamical variables estimation in dynamically active region 3) in case with sufficient number of observations and good error specification, the impact of IAU schemes is negligible. The differences between the IAU 0 scheme and the IAU 50/100 schemes are mainly due to different model integration time and different instability (density inversion, large vertical velocity, etc.) induced by the increment update. The longer model integration time with the IAU 50/100 schemes, especially the free model integration, on one hand, allows for better re-establishment of the equilibrium model state, on the other hand, smooths the strong gradients in dynamically active region.

  1. Cold pressure welding by incremental rolling: Deformation zone analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Hans Christian; Homberg, Werner; Hoppe, Christian; Grundmeier, Guido; Hordych, Illia; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we analyse the deformation zone that forms during cold welding of metal pairs by incremental rolling. The tool geometry has great influence on the forming behaviour and the overall shape of the metal part. In order to improve the process, an increase in surface exposure is aspired since it should lead to an increased weld strength. Six tool geometries were tested by means of FEA and analysed based on the surface exposure created between the surfaces in contact.

  2. Error Analysis In Explicit Finite Element Analysis Of Incremental Sheet Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Bambach, M.; Hirt, G.

    2007-05-17

    Asymmetric incremental sheet forming (AISF) is a relatively new manufacturing process for the production of low volumes of sheet metal parts. Forming is accomplished by the CNC controlled movements of a simple ball-headed tool that follows a 3D trajectory to gradually shape a sheet metal blank. The local plastic deformation under the tool leads to a number of challenges for the Finite Element Modeling. Previous work indicates that implicit finite element methods are at present not efficient enough to allow for the simulation of AISF for industrially relevant parts, mostly due to the fact that the moving contact requires a very small time step. Explicit Finite Element methods can be speeded up by means of mass or load scaling to enable the simulation of large scale sheet metal forming problems, even for AISF. However, it is well known that the methods used to speed up the FE calculations can entail poor results when dynamic effects start to dominate the solution. Typically, the ratio of kinetic to internal energy is used as an assessment of the influence of dynamical effects. It has already been shown in the past that this global criterion can easily be violated locally for a patch of elements of the finite element mesh. This is particularly important for AISF with its highly localised loading and complex tool kinematics. The present paper details an investigation of dynamical effects in explicit Finite Element analysis of AISF. The interplay of mass or time scaling scheme and the smoothness of the tool trajectory is analysed with respect to the resulting errors. Models for tool path generation will be presented allowing for a generation of tool trajectories with predefined maximum speed and acceleration. Based on this, a strategy for error control is proposed which helps reduce the time for setting up reliable explicit finite element models for AISF.

  3. Incremental Volumetric Remapping Method: Analysis and Error Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baptista, A. J.; Alves, J. L.; Oliveira, M. C.; Rodrigues, D. M.; Menezes, L. F.

    2007-05-01

    In this paper the error associated with the remapping problem is analyzed. A range of numerical results that assess the performance of three different remapping strategies, applied to FE meshes that typically are used in sheet metal forming simulation, are evaluated. One of the selected strategies is the previously presented Incremental Volumetric Remapping method (IVR), which was implemented in the in-house code DD3TRIM. The IVR method fundaments consists on the premise that state variables in all points associated to a Gauss volume of a given element are equal to the state variable quantities placed in the correspondent Gauss point. Hence, given a typical remapping procedure between a donor and a target mesh, the variables to be associated to a target Gauss volume (and point) are determined by a weighted average. The weight function is the Gauss volume percentage of each donor element that is located inside the target Gauss volume. The calculus of the intersecting volumes between the donor and target Gauss volumes is attained incrementally, for each target Gauss volume, by means of a discrete approach. The other two remapping strategies selected are based in the interpolation/extrapolation of variables by using the finite element shape functions or moving least square interpolants. The performance of the three different remapping strategies is address with two tests. The first remapping test was taken from a literature work. The test consists in remapping successively a rotating symmetrical mesh, throughout N increments, in an angular span of 90°. The second remapping error evaluation test consists of remapping an irregular element shape target mesh from a given regular element shape donor mesh and proceed with the inverse operation. In this second test the computation effort is also measured. The results showed that the error level associated to IVR can be very low and with a stable evolution along the number of remapping procedures when compared with the other

  4. Process Mechanics Analysis in Single Point Incremental Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogio, G.; Filice, L.; Fratini, L.; Micari, F.

    2004-06-01

    The request of highly differentiated products and the need of process flexibility have brought the researchers to focus the attention on innovative sheet forming processes. Industrial application of conventional processes is, in fact, economically convenient just for large scale productions; furthermore conventional processes do not allow to fully satisfy the mentioned demand of flexibility. In this contest, single point incremental forming (SPIF) is an innovative and flexible answer to market requests. The process is characterized by a peculiar process mechanics, being the sheet plastically deformed only through a localised stretching mechanism. Some recent experimental studies have shown that SPIF permits a relevant increase of formability limits, just as a consequence of the peculiar deformation mechanics. The research here addressed is focused on the theoretical investigation of process mechanics; the aim was to achieve a deeper understanding of basic phenomena involved in SPIF which justify the above mentioned formability enhancing.

  5. Impulse processing: A dynamical systems model of incremental eye movements in the visual world paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kukona, Anuenue; Tabor, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    The visual world paradigm presents listeners with a challenging problem: they must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a dynamical landscape of attractors corresponding to the potential eye-movement behaviors of the system. We test three unique predictions of our approach in an empirical study in the visual world paradigm, and describe an implementation in an artificial neural network. We discuss the Impulse Processing framework in relation to other models of the visual world paradigm. PMID:21609355

  6. Impulse processing: a dynamical systems model of incremental eye movements in the visual world paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kukona, Anuenue; Tabor, Whitney

    2011-08-01

    The Visual World Paradigm (VWP) presents listeners with a challenging problem: They must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a dynamical landscape of attractors corresponding to the potential eye-movement behaviors of the system. We test three unique predictions of our approach in an empirical study in the VWP, and describe an implementation in an artificial neural network. We discuss the Impulse Processing framework in relation to other models of the VWP.

  7. Marginal increment analysis: a new statistical approach of testing for temporal periodicity in fish age verification.

    PubMed

    Okamura, H; Punt, A E; Semba, Y; Ichinokawa, M

    2013-04-01

    This paper proposes a new and flexible statistical method for marginal increment analysis that directly accounts for periodicity in circular data using a circular-linear regression model with random effects. The method is applied to vertebral marginal increment data for Alaska skate Bathyraja parmifera. The best fit model selected using the AIC indicates that growth bands are formed annually. Simulation, where the underlying characteristics of the data are known, shows that the method performs satisfactorily when uncertainty is not extremely high.

  8. A variable step incremental procedure. [for nonlinear equations in finite element structural analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, G. R.

    1973-01-01

    Description of a variable step incremental procedure for the solution of nonlinear equations in finite element structural analysis. The proposed procedure is effective in improving the accuracy of the basic incremental technique and in providing, in addition, an accurate estimate of the discretization error. The proposed approach is highly appropriate for solving problems for which the user has no a priori estimate of the step size to use.

  9. Incremental Multi-Scale Search Algorithm for Dynamic Path Planning With Low Worst-Case Complexity.

    PubMed

    Yibiao Lu; Xiaoming Huo; Arslan, O; Tsiotras, P

    2011-12-01

    Path-planning (equivalently, path-finding) problems are fundamental in many applications, such as transportation, VLSI design, robot navigation, and many more. In this paper, we consider dynamic shortest path-planning problems on a graph with a single endpoint pair and with potentially changing edge weights over time. Several algorithms exist in the literature that solve this problem, notably among them the Lifelong Planning algorithm. The algorithm is an incremental search algorithm that replans the path when there are changes in the environment. In numerical experiments, however, it was observed that the performance of is sensitive in the number of vertex expansions required to update the graph when an edge weight value changes or when a vertex is added or deleted. Although, in most cases, the classical requires a relatively small number of updates, in some other cases the amount of work required by the to find the optimal path can be overwhelming. To address this issue, in this paper, we propose an extension of the baseline algorithm, by making efficient use of a multiscale representation of the environment. This multiscale representation allows one to quickly localize the changed edges, and subsequently update the priority queue efficiently. This incremental multiscale ( for short) algorithm leads to an improvement both in terms of robustness and computational complexity-in the worst case-when compared to the classical . Numerical experiments validate the aforementioned claims.

  10. Dynamic Rotor Deformation and Vibration Monitoring Using a Non-Incremental Laser Doppler Distance Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Pfister, Thorsten; Guenther, Philipp; Dreier, Florian; Czarske, Juergen

    2010-05-28

    Monitoring rotor deformations and vibrations dynamically is an important task for improving the safety and the lifetime as well as the energy efficiency of motors and turbo machines. However, due to the high rotor speed encountered in particular at turbo machines, this requires concurrently a high measurement rate and high accuracy, which can not be fulfilled by most commercially available sensors. To solve this problem, we developed a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is able to measure simultaneously the in-plane velocity and the out-of-plane position of moving rough solid objects with micrometer precision. In addition, this sensor concurrently offers a high temporal resolution in the microsecond range, because its position uncertainty is in principle independent of the object velocity in contrast to conventional distance sensors, which is a unique feature of the LDDS. Consequently, this novel sensor enables precise and dynamic in-process deformation and vibration measurements on rotating objects, such as turbo machine rotors, even at very high speed. In order to evidence the capability of the LDDS, measurements of rotor deformations (radial expansion), vibrations and wobbling motions are presented at up to 50,000 rpm rotor speed.

  11. Dynamic Rotor Deformation and Vibration Monitoring Using a Non-Incremental Laser Doppler Distance Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Thorsten; Günther, Philipp; Dreier, Florian; Czarske, Jürgen

    2010-05-01

    Monitoring rotor deformations and vibrations dynamically is an important task for improving the safety and the lifetime as well as the energy efficiency of motors and turbo machines. However, due to the high rotor speed encountered in particular at turbo machines, this requires concurrently a high measurement rate and high accuracy, which can not be fulfilled by most commercially available sensors. To solve this problem, we developed a non-incremental laser Doppler distance sensor (LDDS), which is able to measure simultaneously the in-plane velocity and the out-of-plane position of moving rough solid objects with micrometer precision. In addition, this sensor concurrently offers a high temporal resolution in the microsecond range, because its position uncertainty is in principle independent of the object velocity in contrast to conventional distance sensors, which is a unique feature of the LDDS. Consequently, this novel sensor enables precise and dynamic in-process deformation and vibration measurements on rotating objects, such as turbo machine rotors, even at very high speed. In order to evidence the capability of the LDDS, measurements of rotor deformations (radial expansion), vibrations and wobbling motions are presented at up to 50,000 rpm rotor speed.

  12. Temperature Humidity and Sea Level Pressure Increments Induced by 1DVAR Analysis of GPS Refractivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Kursinski, Emil Robert; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) transmitted signals are affected by the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, where a receiver is placed on a low-Earth-orbiting platform. it is possible to perform soundings. by measuring the bending angles of the rays. The information can be converted into atmospheric refractivity. We have developed a one dimensional variational (1DVAR) analysis that uses GPS/MET 1995 refractivity and 6-hour FVDAS (Finite Volume Data Assimilation System) forecasts as background information to constrain the retrievals. The analysis increments are defined as 1DVAR minus background temperature, humidity and sea level pressure. Before assimilating the 1DVAR profiles into the FVDAS. the increments need to be understood. First, some bias could be induced in the retrievals when confronted with actual biased data: second. bias in the back-round could create undesired bias in the retrievals. Anv bias in the analyses will ultimately change the climatology of the model the retrievals will be assimilated into. We relate the increments to the reduction of the difference between observed minus computed refractivity profiles. We also point out the difference in the mean increments using backgrounds which have assimilated either NESDIS TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) operational retrievals or Data Assimilation Office (DAO) TOVS interactive retrievals. The climatology of the model in terms of refractivity is significantly different and this impacts the GPS 1DVAR increments. This testifies that changing the basic load of assimilated data has an influence on the impact the GPS data may have in a DAS.

  13. Temperature Humidity and Sea Level Pressure Increments Induced by 1DVAR Analysis of GPS Refractivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Kursinski, Emil Robert; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) transmitted signals are affected by the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, where a receiver is placed on a low-Earth-orbiting platform. it is possible to perform soundings. by measuring the bending angles of the rays. The information can be converted into atmospheric refractivity. We have developed a one dimensional variational (1DVAR) analysis that uses GPS/MET 1995 refractivity and 6-hour FVDAS (Finite Volume Data Assimilation System) forecasts as background information to constrain the retrievals. The analysis increments are defined as 1DVAR minus background temperature, humidity and sea level pressure. Before assimilating the 1DVAR profiles into the FVDAS. the increments need to be understood. First, some bias could be induced in the retrievals when confronted with actual biased data: second. bias in the back-round could create undesired bias in the retrievals. Anv bias in the analyses will ultimately change the climatology of the model the retrievals will be assimilated into. We relate the increments to the reduction of the difference between observed minus computed refractivity profiles. We also point out the difference in the mean increments using backgrounds which have assimilated either NESDIS TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) operational retrievals or Data Assimilation Office (DAO) TOVS interactive retrievals. The climatology of the model in terms of refractivity is significantly different and this impacts the GPS 1DVAR increments. This testifies that changing the basic load of assimilated data has an influence on the impact the GPS data may have in a DAS.

  14. Structure and dynamics of surface uplift induced by incremental sill emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian; Jackson, Christopher; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; Hetherington, Rachel; Hagos, Miruts; Hoggett, Murray

    2017-04-01

    Ground deformation commonly heralds eruptions at active volcanoes, providing real-time insight into the location and geometry of subsurface intrusions that are critical to volcanic hazard assessment. To constrain the evolution of ground deformation beyond dynamic events captured by geodetic data, we examine the structural and extrusive history of the Alu dome, Ethiopia. Surface uplift and subsidence in 2008, recorded by InSAR during a nearby eruption, demonstrates that Alu is actively deforming; these ground deformation patterns were attributed to deformation of a shield volcano above a tabular sill. We contend that Alu is actually a forced fold developed above an incrementally emplaced saucer-shaped sill, which fed surrounding lava flows and spatter cones, because: (1) there is no central vent or evidence of construction from lava flow build-up, meaning Alu is not a shield volcano; (2) surrounding lava flows deflect around Alu, indicating that it had a topographic expression prior to their extrusion; (3) the boundary of Alu directly overlies the lateral termination of a sill modelled from ground deformation data, similar to sill-fold relationships observed elsewhere; (4) the normal faults that cross-cut Alu are compatible with outer-arc extension during doming; (5) the disposition of lava flows radiating from Alu and emanating from vents and/or spatter cones distributed around the periphery of the dome is consistent with their being fed by a saucer-shaped sill; and (6) the scale and timespan of ground deformation during the 2008 eruption suggests that Alu may have formed through the incremental injection of distinct magma pulses. Whilst the size and shape of Alu resembles that of a laccolith, we show that forced folds above sills and laccoliths are commonly indistinguishable. Intrusion geometries interpreted from the topographic expression of long-lived magma bodies, like those modelled from geodetic data, are therefore non-unique. Through integrating geodetic

  15. Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Screening Strategies in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pin Yu; Finkelstein, Eric A; Ng, Mor Jack; Yap, Fabian; Yeo, George S H; Rajadurai, Victor Samuel; Chong, Yap Seng; Gluckman, Peter D; Saw, Seang Mei; Kwek, Kenneth Y C; Tan, Kok Hian

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct an incremental cost-effectiveness analysis from the payer's perspective in Singapore of 3 gestational diabetes mellitus screening strategies: universal, targeted, or no screening. A decision tree model assessed the primary outcome: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. Probabilities, costs, and utilities were derived from the literature, the Growing Up in Singapore Towards healthy Outcomes (GUSTO) birth cohort study, and the KK Women's and Children's Hospital's database. Relative to targeted screening using risk factors, universal screening generates an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $USD10,630/QALY gained. Sensitivity analyses show that disease prevalence rates and intervention effectiveness of glycemic management have the biggest impacts on the ICERs. Based on the model and best available data, universal screening is a cost-effective approach for reducing the complications of gestational diabetes mellitus in Singapore as compared with the targeted screening approach or no screening.

  16. Integrated Strategic Planning and Analysis Network Increment 5 (ISPAN Inc 5)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Integrated Strategic Planning and Analysis Network Increment 5 (ISPAN Inc 5) Defense...Acquisition Management Information Retrieval (DAMIR) UNCLASSIFIED ISPAN Inc 5 2016 MAR UNCLASSIFIED 2 Table of Contents Common Acronyms and...of Dollars MAIS - Major Automated Information System MAIS OE - MAIS Original Estimate MAR – MAIS Annual Report MDA - Milestone Decision Authority

  17. Thermography for skin temperature evaluation during dynamic exercise: a case study on an incremental maximal test in elite male cyclists.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Formenti, Damiano; Bosio, Andrea; Rampinini, Ermanno; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-12-01

    The use of thermal imaging in monitoring the dynamic of skin temperature during prolonged physical exercise is central to assess athletes' ability to dissipate heat from the skin surface to the environment. In this study, seven elite cyclists completed an incremental maximal cycling test to evaluate their skin temperature response under controlled-environment conditions. Thermal images have been analyzed using a method based on maxima detection (Tmax). Data confirmed a reduction in skin temperature due to vasoconstriction during the exercise, followed by a temperature increment after exhaustion. A characteristic hot-spotted thermal pattern was found over the skin surface in all subjects. This research confirmed also the notable ability by highly trained cyclists to modify skin temperature during an incremental muscular effort. This study gives additional contributions for understanding the capability of the Tmax method applied to the thermoregulatory physiological processes.

  18. Comparing dynamic hyperinflation and associated dyspnea induced by metronome-paced tachypnea versus incremental exercise.

    PubMed

    Calligaro, Gregory L; Raine, Richard I; Bateman, Mary E; Bateman, Eric D; Cooper, Christopher B

    2014-02-01

    Dynamic hyperinflation (DH) during exercise is associated with both dyspnea and exercise limitation in COPD. Metronome-paced tachypnoea (MPT) is a simple alternative for studying DH. We compared MPT with exercise testing (XT) as methods of provoking DH, and assessed their relationship with dyspnea. We studied 24 patients with moderate COPD (FEV1 59 ± 9% predicted) after inhalation of ipratropium/salbutamol combination or placebo in a double-blind, crossover design. Inspiratory capacity (IC) was measured at baseline and after 30 seconds of MPT with breathing frequencies (fR) of 20, 30 and 40 breaths/min and metronome-defined I:E ratios of 1:1 and 1:2, in random sequence, followed by incremental cycle ergometry with interval determinations of IC. DH was defined as a decline in IC from baseline (∆IC) for both methods. Dyspnea was assessed using a Borg CR-10 scale. ∆IC during MPT was greater with higher fR and I:E ratio of 1:1 versus 1:2, and less when patients were treated with bronchodilator rather than placebo (P = 0.032). DH occurred during 19 (40%) XTs, and during 35 (73%) tests using MPT. Eleven of 18 (61%) non-congruent XTs (where DH occurred on MPT but not XT) terminated before fR of 40 breaths/min was reached. Although greater during XT, the intensity of dyspnea bore no relationship to DH during either MPT and XT. MPT at 40 breaths/min and I:E of 1:1 elicits the greatest ∆IC, and is a more sensitive method for demonstrating DH. The relationship between DH and dyspnea is complex and not determined by DH alone.

  19. Chronotropic and pressor effects of water ingestion at rest and in response to incremental dynamic exercise.

    PubMed

    Mendonca, Goncalo V; Teixeira, Micael S; Heffernan, Kevin S; Fernhall, Bo

    2013-06-01

    Ingestion of water attenuates the chronotropic response to submaximal exercise. However, it is not known whether this effect is equally manifested during dynamic exercise below and above the ventilatory threshold (VT). We explored the effects of water ingestion on the heart rate response to an incremental cycle-ergometer protocol. In a randomized fashion, 19 healthy adults (10 men and nine women, age 20.9 ± 1.8 years) ingested 50 and 500 ml of water before completing a cycle-ergometer protocol on two separate days. The heart rate and oxygen uptake ( ) responses to water ingestion were analysed both at rest and during exercise performed below and above the VT. The effects of water intake on brachial blood pressure were measured only at rest. Resting mean arterial pressure increased and resting heart rate decreased, but only after 500 ml of water (P < 0.05). Compared with that seen after 50 ml of water, the 500 ml volume elicited an overall decrease in submaximal heart rate (P < 0.05). In contrast, drinking 500 ml of water did not affect submaximal . The participants' maximal heart rate, maximal and VT were similar between conditions. Our results therefore indicate that, owing to its effects on submaximal heart rate over a broad spectrum of intensities, the drinking of water should be recognized as a potential confounder in cardiovascular exercise studies. However, by showing no differences between conditions for submaximal , they also suggest that the magnitude of heart rate reduction after drinking 500 ml of water may be of minimal physiological significance for exercise cardiorespiratory capacity.

  20. Development of the Nonstationary Incremental Analysis Update Algorithm for Sequential Data Assimilation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Song, Hyo-Jong; Jung, Jaehee; Lim, Gyu-Ho

    2017-04-01

    This study introduces a altered version of the incremental analysis updates (IAU), called the nonstationary IAU (NIAU) method, to enhance the assimilation accuracy of the IAU while retaining the continuity of the analysis. Analogous to the IAU, the NIAU is designed to add analysis increments at every model time step to improve the continuity in the intermittent data assimilation. Still, unlike the IAU, the NIAU method applies time-evolved forcing employing the forward operator as rectifications to the model. The solution of the NIAU is better than that of the IAU, of which analysis is performed at the start of the time window for adding the IAU forcing, in terms of the accuracy of the analysis field. It is because, in the linear systems, the NIAU solution equals that in an intermittent data assimilation method at the end of the assimilation interval. To have the filtering property in the NIAU, a forward operator to propagate the increment is reconstructed with only dominant singular vectors. An illustration of those advantages of the NIAU is given using the simple 40-variable Lorenz model.

  1. Incremental nature of anterior eye grading scales determined by objective image analysis.

    PubMed

    Wolffsohn, J S

    2004-11-01

    To use previously validated image analysis techniques to determine the incremental nature of printed subjective anterior eye grading scales. A purpose designed computer program was written to detect edges using a 3 x 3 kernal and to extract colour planes in the selected area of an image. Annunziato and Efron pictorial, and CCLRU and Vistakon-Synoptik photographic grades of bulbar hyperaemia, palpebral hyperaemia roughness, and corneal staining were analysed. The increments of the grading scales were best described by a quadratic rather than a linear function. Edge detection and colour extraction image analysis for bulbar hyperaemia (r2 = 0.35-0.99), palpebral hyperaemia (r2 = 0.71-0.99), palpebral roughness (r2 = 0.30-0.94), and corneal staining (r2 = 0.57-0.99) correlated well with scale grades, although the increments varied in magnitude and direction between different scales. Repeated image analysis measures had a 95% confidence interval of between 0.02 (colour extraction) and 0.10 (edge detection) scale units (on a 0-4 scale). The printed grading scales were more sensitive for grading features of low severity, but grades were not comparable between grading scales. Palpebral hyperaemia and staining grading is complicated by the variable presentations possible. Image analysis techniques are 6-35 times more repeatable than subjective grading, with a sensitivity of 1.2-2.8% of the scale.

  2. Incremental development and prototyping in current laboratory software development projects: Preliminary analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griesel, Martha Ann

    1988-01-01

    Several Laboratory software development projects that followed nonstandard development processes, which were hybrids of incremental development and prototyping, are being studied. Factors in the project environment leading to the decision to use a nonstandard development process and affecting its success are analyzed. A simple characterization of project environment based on this analysis is proposed, together with software development approaches which have been found effective for each category. These approaches include both documentation and review requirements.

  3. On the use of two hardening rules of plasticity in incremental and pseudo force analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunsaker, B., Jr.; Haisler, W. E.; Stricklin, J. A.

    1976-01-01

    The tangent stiffness and pseudo force forms of the equations of motion are first derived within the context of a total Lagrangian formulation. After a brief discussion of available incremental theory plasticity models, the small strain formulations and computational procedures of the mechanical sublayer model and combined kinematic-isotropic hardening as used in the general purpose structural analysis program AGGIE I are presented. Several sample problems are then presented along with recommended guidelines for use of the two plasticity models.

  4. Multiscale Analysis of Surface Topography from Single Point Incremental Forming using an Acetal Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, M.; Powers, B. M.; Loiselle, J.

    2014-03-01

    Single point incremental forming (SPIF) is a sheet metal manufacturing process that forms a part by incrementally applying point loads to the material to achieve the desired deformations and final part geometry. This paper investigates the differences in surface topography between a carbide tool and an acetal-tipped tool. Area-scale analysis is performed on the confocal areal surface measurements per ASME B46. The objective of this paper is to determine at which scales surfaces formed by two different tool materials can be differentiated. It is found that the surfaces in contact with the acetal forming tool have greater relative areas at all scales greater than 5 × 104 μm2 than the surfaces in contact with the carbide tools. The surfaces not in contact with the tools during forming, also referred to as the free surface, are unaffected by the tool material.

  5. Basal area increment and growth efficiency as functions of canopy dynamics and stem mechanics

    Treesearch

    Thomas J. Dean

    2004-01-01

    Crown and canopy structurecorrelate with growth efficiency and also determine stem size and taper as described by the uniform stress principle of stem formation. A regression model was derived from this principle that expresses basal area increment in terms of the amount and vertical distribution of leaf area and change in these variables during a growth period. This...

  6. The mathematical analysis of the heart rate and blood lactate curves during incremental exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Rosic, Mirko; Ilic, V; Obradovic, Z; Pantovic, S; Rosic, G

    2011-12-01

    This paper describes a new mathematical approach for the analysis of HR (heart rate) and BL (blood lactate) curves during incremental exercise testing using a HR/BL curve and its derivatives, taking into account the native shape of all curves, without any linear approximation. Using this approach the results indicate the appearance of three characteristic points (A, B and C) on the HR/BL curve. The point A on the HR/BL curve which is the value that corresponds to the load (12.73 ± 0.46 km h-1) at which BL starts to increase above the resting levels (0.9 ± 0.06 mM), and is analogous to Lactate Turn Point 1 (LTP1). The point C on the HR/BL curve which corresponds to a BL of approximately 4mM, and is analogous to LTP2. The point B on the HR/BL curve, which corresponds to the load (16.32 ± 0.49 km h-1) at which the moderate increase turns into a more pronounced increase in BL. This point has not been previously recognized in literature. We speculate this point represents attenuation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) increase, accompanied by the decrease in diastolic time duration during incremental exercise testing. Proposed mathematical approach allows precise determination of lactate turnpoints during incremental exercise testing.

  7. Can Aerosol Direct Radiative Effects Account for Analysis Increments of Temperature in the Tropical Atlantic?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    da Silva, Arlindo M.; Alpert, Pinhas

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1990's, prior to the launch of the Terra satellite, atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) did not include aerosol processes because aerosols were not properly monitored on a global scale and their spatial distributions were not known well enough for their incorporation in operational GCMs. At the time of the first GEOS Reanalysis (Schubert et al. 1993), long time series of analysis increments (the corrections to the atmospheric state by all available meteorological observations) became readily available, enabling detailed analysis of the GEOS-1 errors on a global scale. Such analysis revealed that temperature biases were particularly pronounced in the Tropical Atlantic region, with patterns depicting a remarkable similarity to dust plumes emanating from the African continent as evidenced by TOMS aerosol index maps. Yoram Kaufman was instrumental encouraging us to pursue this issue further, resulting in the study reported in Alpert et al. (1998) where we attempted to assess aerosol forcing by studying the errors of a the GEOS-1 GCM without aerosol physics within a data assimilation system. Based on this analysis, Alpert et al. (1998) put forward that dust aerosols are an important source of inaccuracies in numerical weather-prediction models in the Tropical Atlantic region, although a direct verification of this hypothesis was not possible back then. Nearly 20 years later, numerical prediction models have increased in resolution and complexity of physical parameterizations, including the representation of aerosols and their interactions with the circulation. Moreover, with the advent of NASA's EOS program and subsequent satellites, atmospheric aerosols are now monitored globally on a routine basis, and their assimilation in global models are becoming well established. In this talk we will reexamine the Alpert et al. (1998) hypothesis using the most recent version of the GEOS-5 Data Assimilation System with assimilation of aerosols. We will

  8. Hierarchical incremental path planning and situation-dependent optimized dynamic motion planning considering accelerations.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xue-Cheng; Ge, Shuzhi Sam; Al Mamun, Abdullah

    2007-12-01

    This paper studies a hierarchical approach for incrementally driving a nonholonomic mobile robot to its destination in unknown environments. The A* algorithm is modified to handle a map containing unknown information. Based on it, optimal (discrete) paths are incrementally generated with a periodically updated map. Next, accelerations in varying velocities are taken into account in predicting the robot pose and the robot trajectory resulting from a motion command. Obstacle constraints are transformed to suitable velocity limits so that the robot can move as fast as possible while avoiding collisions when needed. Then, to trace the discrete path, the system searches for a waypoint-directed optimized motion in a reduced 1-D translation or rotation velocity space. Various situations of navigation are dealt with by using different strategies rather than a single objective function. Extensive simulations and experiments verified the efficacy of the proposed approach.

  9. Incremental nature of anterior eye grading scales determined by objective image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wolffsohn, J S

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To use previously validated image analysis techniques to determine the incremental nature of printed subjective anterior eye grading scales. Methods: A purpose designed computer program was written to detect edges using a 3×3 kernal and to extract colour planes in the selected area of an image. Annunziato and Efron pictorial, and CCLRU and Vistakon-Synoptik photographic grades of bulbar hyperaemia, palpebral hyperaemia roughness, and corneal staining were analysed. Results: The increments of the grading scales were best described by a quadratic rather than a linear function. Edge detection and colour extraction image analysis for bulbar hyperaemia (r2 = 0.35−0.99), palpebral hyperaemia (r2 = 0.71−0.99), palpebral roughness (r2 = 0.30−0.94), and corneal staining (r2 = 0.57−0.99) correlated well with scale grades, although the increments varied in magnitude and direction between different scales. Repeated image analysis measures had a 95% confidence interval of between 0.02 (colour extraction) and 0.10 (edge detection) scale units (on a 0–4 scale). Conclusion: The printed grading scales were more sensitive for grading features of low severity, but grades were not comparable between grading scales. Palpebral hyperaemia and staining grading is complicated by the variable presentations possible. Image analysis techniques are 6–35 times more repeatable than subjective grading, with a sensitivity of 1.2–2.8% of the scale. PMID:15489489

  10. Recognizing and Incrementally Evolving Texture Concepts in Dynamic Environments: A Model Generalization Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    learning. While the initial acquisition of texture models is driven by a teacher, the evolution of these models is performed over a sequence of images...learning processes to improve its models. This paper presents both an outline of the iterative evolution methodology and the investigation of an incremental...model generalization approach as a part of the evolution of texture models. Experiments were run in a partially-supervised mode rather than a fully

  11. The effect of carrying a portable respiratory gas analysis system on energy expenditure during incremental running.

    PubMed

    Sparks, S Andy; Orme, Duncan; Mc Naughton, Lars R

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of portable gas analysis system carriage on energy expenditure (EE) during incremental treadmill running. Eight males (Mean ± SD) age 25.0 ± 9.47 y, body mass 78.5 ± 8.39 kg, completed an experimental trial (PT) during which they wore the system in a chest harness and a control trial (CT) when the system was externally supported. Each protocol consisted of 4 min stages at speeds of 0, 4, 7, 10, 12, 14 km h(-1). Increments continued until volitional exhaustion. The EE was greater (3.95 and 7.02% at 7 and 14 km h(-1) respectively) during PT (p < 0.05) but no significant differences were observed during standing, walking or VO(2max.) (4.10 ± 0.53, and 4.28 ± 0.75 l min(-1) for CT and PT respectively), HR or RPE. Portable gas analysis systems therefore only increase EE when running sub-maximally, but VO(2max) is unaffected, suggesting that using portable gas analysis systems in field-based situations is appropriate for maximal aerobic capacity measurement, but the effects of prolonged use on EE remains unclear. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  12. Piecewise-linear Bonhoeffer-van der Pol dynamics explaining mixed-mode oscillation-incrementing bifurcations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kuniyasu; Inaba, Naohiko

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) generated by weakly driven piecewise-linear Bonhoeffer-van der Pol and Fitzhugh-Nagumo dynamics. Such a simple piecewise-linear oscillator can generate extremely complex MMO bifurcations such as mixed-mode oscillation-incrementing bifurcations (MMOIBs) and intermittently chaotic MMOs. These remarkable bifurcations are confirmed using explicit solutions of the piecewise-linear differential equation. Moreover, Lorenz plots are introduced, which strongly suggest that MMOIBs occur successively many times, and show that each MMO sequence is surrounded by chaos.

  13. Dynamics of incremental motion devices associated with planetary exploration spacecraft. [Mariner Jupiter Saturn 1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, R. O.

    1975-01-01

    Incremental motion devices provide accurate and rapid movement of spacecraft science platforms, antennas and related mechanisms. The paper considers the computerized simulation of a stepper motor/gear train/ science platform system that will be launched on the Mariner Jupiter Saturn 1977. It was determined that a smaller stepper motor could be used as the prime mover for the science platform, and it was concluded that the existing digital controller was unable to achieve the required pointing accuracy, and a new controller design was necessary.

  14. Vibration analysis of nonlinear systems with the bilinear hysteretic oscillator by using incremental harmonic balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Huai; Kong, Xianren; Li, Haiqin; Yang, Zhenguo

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers dynamics of bilinear hysteretic systems, which are widely used for vibration control and vibration absorption such as magneto-rheological damper, metal-rubber. The method of incremental harmonic balance (IHB) technique that hysteresis is considered in the corrective term is improved in order to determine periodic solutions of bilinear hysteretic systems. The improved continuation method called two points tracing algorithm which is stable to the turning point makes the calculation more efficient for tracing amplitude-frequency response. Precise Hsu's method for analysing the stability of periodic solutions is introduced. The effects of different parameters of bilinear hysteretic oscillator on the response are discussed numerically. Some numerical simulations of considered bilinear hysteretic systems, including a single DOF and a 2DOF system, are effectively obtained by the modified IHB method and the results compare very well with the 4-oder Runge-Kutta method.

  15. iPGA: Incremental Principal Geodesic Analysis with Applications to Movement Disorder Classification★

    PubMed Central

    Salehian, Hesamoddin; Vaillancourt, David

    2014-01-01

    The nonlinear version of the well known PCA called the Principal Geodesic Analysis (PGA) was introduced in the past decade for statistical analysis of shapes as well as diffusion tensors. PGA of diffusion tensor fields or any other manifold-valued fields can be a computationally demanding task due to the dimensionality of the problem and thus establishing motivation for an incremental PGA (iPGA) algorithm. In this paper, we present a novel iPGA algorithm that incrementally updates the current Karcher mean and the principal sub-manifolds with any newly introduced data into the pool without having to recompute the PGA from scratch. We demonstrate substantial computational and memory savings of iPGA over the batch mode PGA for diffusion tensor fields via synthetic and real data examples. Further, we use the iPGA derived representation in an NN classifier to automatically discriminate between controls, Parkinson’s Disease and Essential Tremor patients, given their HARDI brain scans. PMID:25485449

  16. An Improved Incremental Learning Approach for KPI Prognosis of Dynamic Fuel Cell System.

    PubMed

    Yin, Shen; Xie, Xiaochen; Lam, James; Cheung, Kie Chung; Gao, Huijun

    2016-12-01

    The key performance indicator (KPI) has an important practical value with respect to the product quality and economic benefits for modern industry. To cope with the KPI prognosis issue under nonlinear conditions, this paper presents an improved incremental learning approach based on available process measurements. The proposed approach takes advantage of the algorithm overlapping of locally weighted projection regression (LWPR) and partial least squares (PLS), implementing the PLS-based prognosis in each locally linear model produced by the incremental learning process of LWPR. The global prognosis results including KPI prediction and process monitoring are obtained from the corresponding normalized weighted means of all the local models. The statistical indicators for prognosis are enhanced as well by the design of novel KPI-related and KPI-unrelated statistics with suitable control limits for non-Gaussian data. For application-oriented purpose, the process measurements from real datasets of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell system are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of KPI prognosis. The proposed approach is finally extended to a long-term voltage prediction for potential reference of further fuel cell applications.

  17. Reproducibility of an incremental treadmill VO(2)max test with gas exchange analysis for runners.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Thiago Fernando; Martins, Luiz Eduardo Barreto; Tessutti, Lucas Samuel; Brenzikofer, Rene; Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2011-07-01

    The evaluation of performance through the application of adequate physical tests during a sportive season may be a useful tool to evaluate training adaptations and determine training intensities. For runners, treadmill incremental VO(2)max tests with gas exchange analysis have been widely used to determine maximal and submaximal parameters such as the ventilatory threshold (VT) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) running speed. However, these tests often differ in methodological characteristics (e.g., stage duration, grade, and speed increment size), and few studies have examined the reproducibility of their protocol. Therefore, the aim of this study was to verify the reproducibility and determine the running speeds related to maximal and submaximal parameters of a specific incremental maximum effort treadmill protocol for amateur runners. Eleven amateur male runners underwent 4 repetitions of the protocol (25-second stages, each increasing by 0.3 km·h in running speed while the treadmill grade remained fixed at 1%) after 3 minutes of warm-up at 8-8.5 km·h. We found no significant differences in any of the analyzed parameters, including VT, RCP, and VO(2)max during the 4 repetitions (p > 0.05). Further, the results related to running speed showed high within-subject reproducibility (coefficient of variation < 5.2%). The typical error (TE) values for running speed related to VT (TE = 0.62 km·h), RCP (TE = 0.35 km·h), and VO(2)max (TE = 0.43 km·h) indicated high sensitivity and reproducibility of this protocol. We conclude that this VO(2)max protocol facilitates a clear determination of the running speeds related to VT, RCP, and VO(2)max and has the potential to enable the evaluation of small training effects on maximal and submaximal parameters.

  18. Incremental Principal Component Analysis Based Outlier Detection Methods for Spatiotemporal Data Streams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, A.; Sharker, M. H.; Karimi, H. A.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we address outliers in spatiotemporal data streams obtained from sensors placed across geographically distributed locations. Outliers may appear in such sensor data due to various reasons such as instrumental error and environmental change. Real-time detection of these outliers is essential to prevent propagation of errors in subsequent analyses and results. Incremental Principal Component Analysis (IPCA) is one possible approach for detecting outliers in such type of spatiotemporal data streams. IPCA has been widely used in many real-time applications such as credit card fraud detection, pattern recognition, and image analysis. However, the suitability of applying IPCA for outlier detection in spatiotemporal data streams is unknown and needs to be investigated. To fill this research gap, this paper contributes by presenting two new IPCA-based outlier detection methods and performing a comparative analysis with the existing IPCA-based outlier detection methods to assess their suitability for spatiotemporal sensor data streams.

  19. Energy engineering analysis program, Anniston Army Depot, Increment B, final report; executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1988-01-01

    In July 1985, the Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, modified their existing contract to include the performance of an additional energy study. The contractual Scope of Work calls for an Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP) study to be conducted at Anniston Army Depot (AAD). This report covers the Energy Monitoring and Control System (EMCS) portion of Increment B of the EEAP study. The Scope of Work calls for the systematic evaluation of the cost effectiveness of an EMCS that will result in the reduction of the installation`s energy use. The general Scope of Work for the EMCS portion of Increment B can be summarized as follows: (1) Review and make effective use of existing energy studies in preparing the EMCS project; (2) Field trips should be used to obtain information on facilities to develop the requirements necessary for the EMCS; (3) Determine the feasibility of an EMCS for building electrical, mechanical, and utility distribution systems; (4) Prepare Project Development Brochures (PDBs), DD Form 1391`s, and supporting documentation for the proposed EMCS project if it meets ECIP criteria; and (5) Detailed recommendations are to be generated and a final report will be provided.

  20. Incremental genetic K-means algorithm and its application in gene expression data analysis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Lu, Shiyong; Fotouhi, Farshad; Deng, Youping; Brown, Susan J

    2004-10-28

    In recent years, clustering algorithms have been effectively applied in molecular biology for gene expression data analysis. With the help of clustering algorithms such as K-means, hierarchical clustering, SOM, etc, genes are partitioned into groups based on the similarity between their expression profiles. In this way, functionally related genes are identified. As the amount of laboratory data in molecular biology grows exponentially each year due to advanced technologies such as Microarray, new efficient and effective methods for clustering must be developed to process this growing amount of biological data. In this paper, we propose a new clustering algorithm, Incremental Genetic K-means Algorithm (IGKA). IGKA is an extension to our previously proposed clustering algorithm, the Fast Genetic K-means Algorithm (FGKA). IGKA outperforms FGKA when the mutation probability is small. The main idea of IGKA is to calculate the objective value Total Within-Cluster Variation (TWCV) and to cluster centroids incrementally whenever the mutation probability is small. IGKA inherits the salient feature of FGKA of always converging to the global optimum. C program is freely available at http://database.cs.wayne.edu/proj/FGKA/index.htm. Our experiments indicate that, while the IGKA algorithm has a convergence pattern similar to FGKA, it has a better time performance when the mutation probability decreases to some point. Finally, we used IGKA to cluster a yeast dataset and found that it increased the enrichment of genes of similar function within the cluster.

  1. Assessment of synthetic winds through spectral modelling, rainflow count analysis and statistics of increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Hans Georg; Chougule, Abhijit

    2016-04-01

    While wind energy industry growing rapidly and siting of wind turbines onshore as well as offshore is increasing, many wind engineering model tools have been developed for the assessment of loads on wind turbines due to varying wind speeds. In order to have proper wind turbine design and performance analysis, it is important to have an accurate representation of the incoming wind field. To ease the analysis, tools for the generation of synthetic wind fields have been developed, e.g the widely used TurbSim procedure. We analyse respective synthetic data sets on one hand in view of the similarity of the spectral characteristics of measured and synthetic sets. In addition, second order characteristics with direct relevance to load assessment as given by the statistics of increments and rainflow count results are inspected.

  2. Evidence of increment of efficiency of the Mexican Stock Market through the analysis of its variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coronel-Brizio, H. F.; Hernández-Montoya, A. R.; Huerta-Quintanilla, R.; Rodríguez-Achach, M.

    2007-07-01

    It is well known that there exist statistical and structural differences between the stock markets of developed and emerging countries. In this work, and in order to find out if the efficiency of the Mexican Stock Market has been changing over time, we have performed and compared several analyses of the variations of the Mexican Stock Market index (IPC) and Dow Jones industrial average index (DJIA) for different periods of their historical daily data. We have analyzed the returns autocorrelation function (ACF) and used detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to study returns variations. We also analyze the volatility, mean value and standard deviation of both markets and compare their evolution. We conclude from the overall result of these studies, that they show compelling evidence of the increment of efficiency of the Mexican Stock Market over time. The data samples analyzed here, correspond to daily values of the IPC and DJIA for the period 10/30/1978-02/28/2006.

  3. Improving greenhouse gas reduction calculations for bioenergy systems: Incremental life cycle analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ney, Richard A.

    There are many scales that can be employed to calculate net greenhouse gas emissions from bioenergy systems, ranging from single point source (stack gas) measurement, to full, multi-layered life cycle analyses considering all of the inputs and outputs throughout the economy. At an appropriate scale within these extremes, a method can be selected to support verification activities related to project-based trading of greenhouse gas emissions. The boundaries of the analysis must be carefully selected in order to meet the twin goals of the verification activity: (1) to meet scientific standards for emission balance quantification; and (2) to meet cost-effectiveness criteria of the emission trading community. The Incremental Life Cycle Analysis (ILCA) methodology is proposed and implemented for the quantification of greenhouse gas emission reductions arising from substitution of switchgrass for coal in electricity generation. The method utilizes an incremental progression through the fuel life cycle, evaluating each level of the life cycle for the quality the emission estimate produced. The method also reviews the scientific uncertainty underlying emission estimation procedures so that areas of relative weakness can be targeted and improved. The ILCA methodology is applied to the Chariton Valley Biomass Project (CVBP) for case study and evaluation. The CVBP is seeking to replace coal combustion in an existing 650-MW generation facility with switchgrass, cofired at a rate of 5 percent switchgrass to 95 percent coal. When the project reaches full capacity, the ILCA estimates that 239 pounds of carbon dioxide-equivalent (CO2-eq) emissions will be reduced and/or removed from the atmosphere for every million Btu of switchgrass utilized, generating annual greenhouse gas reductions of 305,000 tons CO2-eq, leading to revenue for the project totaling over $1.5 million annually through trading of greenhouse gas emission reduction credits.

  4. Learn ++.NC: combining ensemble of classifiers with dynamically weighted consult-and-vote for efficient incremental learning of new classes.

    PubMed

    Muhlbaier, Michael D; Topalis, Apostolos; Polikar, Robi

    2009-01-01

    We have previously introduced an incremental learning algorithm Learn(++), which learns novel information from consecutive data sets by generating an ensemble of classifiers with each data set, and combining them by weighted majority voting. However, Learn(++) suffers from an inherent "outvoting" problem when asked to learn a new class omega(new) introduced by a subsequent data set, as earlier classifiers not trained on this class are guaranteed to misclassify omega(new) instances. The collective votes of earlier classifiers, for an inevitably incorrect decision, then outweigh the votes of the new classifiers' correct decision on omega(new) instances--until there are enough new classifiers to counteract the unfair outvoting. This forces Learn(++) to generate an unnecessarily large number of classifiers. This paper describes Learn(++).NC, specifically designed for efficient incremental learning of multiple new classes using significantly fewer classifiers. To do so, Learn (++).NC introduces dynamically weighted consult and vote (DW-CAV), a novel voting mechanism for combining classifiers: individual classifiers consult with each other to determine which ones are most qualified to classify a given instance, and decide how much weight, if any, each classifier's decision should carry. Experiments on real-world problems indicate that the new algorithm performs remarkably well with substantially fewer classifiers, not only as compared to its predecessor Learn(++), but also as compared to several other algorithms recently proposed for similar problems.

  5. Model parameter estimation approach based on incremental analysis for lithium-ion batteries without using open circuit voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongjie; Yuan, Shifei; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Chengliang; Ma, Xuerui

    2015-08-01

    To improve the suitability of lithium-ion battery model under varying scenarios, such as fluctuating temperature and SoC variation, dynamic model with parameters updated realtime should be developed. In this paper, an incremental analysis-based auto regressive exogenous (I-ARX) modeling method is proposed to eliminate the modeling error caused by the OCV effect and improve the accuracy of parameter estimation. Then, its numerical stability, modeling error, and parametric sensitivity are analyzed at different sampling rates (0.02, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 s). To identify the model parameters recursively, a bias-correction recursive least squares (CRLS) algorithm is applied. Finally, the pseudo random binary sequence (PRBS) and urban dynamic driving sequences (UDDSs) profiles are performed to verify the realtime performance and robustness of the newly proposed model and algorithm. Different sampling rates (1 Hz and 10 Hz) and multiple temperature points (5, 25, and 45 °C) are covered in our experiments. The experimental and simulation results indicate that the proposed I-ARX model can present high accuracy and suitability for parameter identification without using open circuit voltage.

  6. Cytotype differences in radial increment provide novel insight into aspen reproductive ecology and stand dynamics

    Treesearch

    R. Justin DeRose; Karen E. Mock; James N. Long

    2015-01-01

    High rates of triploidy have recently been described in quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) of the Intermountain West, raising questions about the contributions of triploidy to stand persistence and dynamics. In this study, we investigated cytotype differences between diploid and triploid aspen clones using dendrochronological techniques. We used tree-ring data...

  7. The p-version of the finite element method in incremental elasto-plastic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzer, Stefan M.; Yosibash, Zohar

    1993-01-01

    Whereas the higher-order versions of the finite elements method (the p- and hp-version) are fairly well established as highly efficient methods for monitoring and controlling the discretization error in linear problems, little has been done to exploit their benefits in elasto-plastic structural analysis. Aspects of incremental elasto-plastic finite element analysis which are particularly amenable to improvements by the p-version is discussed. These theoretical considerations are supported by several numerical experiments. First, an example for which an analytical solution is available is studied. It is demonstrated that the p-version performs very well even in cycles of elasto-plastic loading and unloading, not only as compared to the traditional h-version but also in respect to the exact solution. Finally, an example of considerable practical importance - the analysis of a cold-worked lug - is presented which demonstrates how the modeling tools offered by higher-order finite element techniques can contribute to an improved approximation of practical problems.

  8. Express analysis of explosives, chemical warfare agents and drugs with multicapillary column gas chromatography and ion mobility increment spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buryakov, Igor A

    2004-02-05

    Description of a gas chromatograph designed for express analysis of explosives (2,4-dinitrotoluene, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, pentaerythritol tetranitrate), chemical warfare agents (mustard gas, lewisite, sarin) and drugs (heroin, cocaine hydrochloride, crack) is given. The devices comprises a multicapillary chromatographic column and an ion mobility increment spectrometer (MCC-IMIS). The main analytical characteristics of an IMIS (estimated detection limit (DL), linear dynamic range (LDR), speed of response) and a chromatographic column (separation power, degree of separation, a number of possible peaks at a chromatogram section, divided by analysis time) are determined. The maximum value of DL equal to 5 pg/ml was registered for cis-alpha-LW, and the lowest one of 0.001 pg/ml was for cocaine. The maximum value of LDR equal to 1000 was registered for sarin and the lowest one of 150 was for the ions of lewisite. Speed of response of one compound detection with the IMIS was 0.7 s.

  9. Chemical data visualization and analysis with incremental generative topographic mapping: big data challenge.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Héléna A; Baskin, Igor I; Marcou, Gilles; Horvath, Dragos; Varnek, Alexandre

    2015-01-26

    This paper is devoted to the analysis and visualization in 2-dimensional space of large data sets of millions of compounds using the incremental version of generative topographic mapping (iGTM). The iGTM algorithm implemented in the in-house ISIDA-GTM program was applied to a database of more than 2 million compounds combining data sets of 36 chemicals suppliers and the NCI collection, encoded either by MOE descriptors or by MACCS keys. Taking advantage of the probabilistic nature of GTM, several approaches to data analysis were proposed. The chemical space coverage was evaluated using the normalized Shannon entropy. Different views of the data (property landscapes) were obtained by mapping various physical and chemical properties (molecular weight, aqueous solubility, LogP, etc.) onto the iGTM map. The superposition of these views helped to identify the regions in the chemical space populated by compounds with desirable physicochemical profiles and the suppliers providing them. The data sets similarity in the latent space was assessed by applying several metrics (Euclidean distance, Tanimoto and Bhattacharyya coefficients) to data probability distributions based on cumulated responsibility vectors. As a complementary approach, data sets were compared by considering them as individual objects on a meta-GTM map, built on cumulated responsibility vectors or property landscapes produced with iGTM. We believe that the iGTM methodology described in this article represents a fast and reliable way to analyze and visualize large chemical databases.

  10. Mammography screening: an incremental cost effectiveness analysis of two view versus one view procedures in London.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, S; Brown, J; Warren, R

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--To compare the costs and effects of routine mammography screening by a single mediolateral-oblique view and two views (mediolateral-oblique plus craniocaudal) of each breast. DESIGN--A cost effectiveness analysis of a prospective non-randomised trial comparing one and two view mammography screening was carried out at St Margaret's Hospital, Epping. All women in the study had two view mammography. The mediolateral-oblique view was always the first image read by the radiologist. After reading the films for a clinic session, the same radiologist then went back and read both the mediolateral-oblique and craniocaudal views together. Each set of films was read by two radiologists. The main outcome measures were recall rates, number of cancers detected, screening and assessment costs, and cost effectiveness ratios. SUBJECTS--A total of 26,430 women who attended for breast screening using both one and two view mammography participated. A sample of 132 women attending for assessment provided data on the private costs incurred in attending for assessment. RESULTS--There was a reduction in the recall rate from 9.1% (2404 of 26,430) after one view screening to 6.7% (1760 of 26,430) after two view screening. The results also suggest that for every 10,000 women screened an additional five cancers would be detected earlier with two view screening. The additional health service screening cost associated with two view screening was estimated to be 3.63 pounds: the costs associated with one and two view screening policies were estimated to be 41.49 pounds and 32.99 pounds respectively. Private costs incurred were estimated to be 0.35 pounds per woman screened and 32.75 pounds per woman assessed. Two cost effectiveness ratios were calculated: an incremental health service cost per additional cancer detected of 4129 pounds and an incremental health service plus private cost per additional cancer detected of 2742 pounds. The sensitivity analysis suggested that the

  11. Beyond static and dynamic risk factors: the incremental validity of release planning for predicting sex offender recidivism.

    PubMed

    Scoones, Carwyn D; Willis, Gwenda M; Grace, Randolph C

    2012-01-01

    Both desistance research and strengths-based approaches to offender rehabilitation suggest that attempts to reduce sex offender recidivism should attend to an offender's release environment. Recent research has demonstrated that better quality release planning is associated with reduced recidivism; however, whether release planning contributes significant incremental validity in predicting recidivism over and above static and dynamic risk factors is unclear. In the present study, release planning was retrospectively assessed for a sample of child molesters (n = 196) who had been released into the community following completion of a prison-based treatment program and its relative contribution to recidivism risk prediction was investigated. The average follow-up period was 11.08 years, during which 13.3% of the sample were convicted of a new sexual offence. Hierarchical Cox regression analyses showed that release planning contributed additional predictive validity for sexual recidivism after controlling for static and dynamic risk factors. Findings suggest that assessment of release planning might improve accuracy of sex offender risk assessments and that improved release planning should contribute to reductions in recidivism.

  12. Mathematical analysis of the heart rate performance curve during incremental exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Rosic, G; Pantovic, S; Niciforovic, J; Colovic, V; Rankovic, V; Obradovic, Z; Rosic, Mirko

    2011-03-01

    In this study we performed laboratory treadmill protocols of increasing load. Heart rate was continuously recorded and blood lactate concentration was measured for determination of lactate threshold by means of LTD-max and LT4.0 methods.Our results indicate that the shape of heart rate performance curve (HRPC) during incremental testing depends on the applied exercise protocol (change of initial speed and the step of running speed increase, with the constant stage duration). Depending on the applied protocol, the HRPC can be described by linear, polynomial (S-shaped), and exponential mathematical expression.We presented mathematical procedure for estimation of heart rate threshold points at the level of LTD-max and LT4.0, by means of exponential curve and its relative deflection from the initial trend line (tangent line to exponential curve at the point of starting heart rate). The relative deflection of exponential curve from the initial trend line at the level of LTD-max and/or LT4.0 can be defined, based on the slope of the initial trend line. Using originally developed software that allows mathematical analysis of heart rate-load relation, LTD-max and/or LT4.0 can be estimated without direct measurement of blood lactate concentration.

  13. Incremental retinal-defocus theory of myopia development--schematic analysis and computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Hung, George K; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2007-07-01

    Previous theories of myopia development involved subtle and complex processes such as the sensing and analyzing of chromatic aberration, spherical aberration, spatial gradient of blur, or spatial frequency content of the retinal image, but they have not been able to explain satisfactorily the diverse experimental results reported in the literature. On the other hand, our newly proposed incremental retinal-defocus theory (IRDT) has been able to explain all of these results. This theory is based on a relatively simple and direct mechanism for the regulation of ocular growth. It states that a time-averaged decrease in retinal-image defocus area decreases the rate of release of retinal neuromodulators, which decreases the rate of retinal proteoglycan synthesis with an associated decrease in scleral structural integrity. This increases the rate of scleral growth, and in turn the eye's axial length, which leads to myopia. Our schematic analysis has provided a clear explanation for the eye's ability to grow in the appropriate direction under a wide range of experimental conditions. In addition, the theory has been able to explain how repeated cycles of nearwork-induced transient myopia leads to repeated periods of decreased retinal-image defocus, whose cumulative effect over an extended period of time results in an increase in axial growth that leads to permanent myopia. Thus, this unifying theory forms the basis for understanding the underlying retinal and scleral mechanisms of myopia development.

  14. The Incremental Validity of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue): A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Andrei, Federica; Siegling, A B; Aloe, Ariel M; Baldaro, Bruno; Petrides, K V

    2016-01-01

    A criticism leveled against the conceptualization of emotional intelligence (EI) as a personality trait is that it overlaps considerably with the higher order personality dimensions and, therefore, has weak utility. To investigate this criticism, a systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted to synthesize the literature examining the incremental validity of the 2 adult self-report forms of the Trait Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire (TEIQue). Twenty-four articles reporting 114 incremental validity analyses of the TEIQue were reviewed according to the studies' methodological features. Additionally, data from 18 studies (providing 105 effect sizes) were pooled in a meta-analysis. Results suggest that the TEIQue consistently explains incremental variance in criteria pertaining to different areas of functioning, beyond higher order personality dimensions and other emotion-related variables. The pooled effect size was relatively small, but statistically and practically significant (ΔR(2) = .06, SE = .0116; 95% CI [.03, .08]). The number of covariates controlled for, the form of the TEIQue, and the focus on higher order personality dimensions versus other individual-difference constructs as baseline predictors did not affect the effect size. Analyses conducted at the factor level indicated that the incremental contribution is mainly due to the well-being and self-control factors of trait EI. Methodological issues and directions for future research are discussed.

  15. Substitution patterns in aromatic rings by increment analysis. Model development and application to natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Perdue, E M; Hertkorn, N; Kettrup, A

    2007-02-01

    The aromatic region of two-dimensional heteronuclear 1H, 13C NMR spectra of natural organic matter and related materials (e.g., 1H and 13C chemical shifts ranging from approximately 5 to 10 and 80 to 140 ppm, respectively) is highly complex and difficult to interpret using conventional approaches. In principle, this region of the NMR spectrum should be amenable to detailed analysis, because the effects of many common substituents on the chemical shifts of aromatic carbon and hydrogen are well documented. This paper describes the development of a model for prediction of substitution patterns in aromatic rings by increment analysis (SPARIA). In the forward mode, SPARIA is used to predict the chemical shifts of 1H and 13C on aromatic moieties containing every possible combination of eight common substituents that are likely to be representative of substituents on aromatic moieties in natural organic matter. The accuracy of SPARIA in the forward mode is evaluated for 29 aromatic compounds (100 peaks) by comparison of predicted chemical shifts for 1H and 13C with experimental values and with predictions of commercially available software for prediction of NMR spectra. The most important development in this paper is the inverse mode that is built into SPARIA. Given chemical shifts for 1H and 13C (such as may be obtained from a two-dimensional, heteronuclear NMR spectrum), the inverse mode of SPARIA calculates all possible combinations of the eight selected substituents that yield chemical shifts within a specified window of chemical shift for both 1H and 13C. Both the distribution of possible substitution patterns and simple descriptive statistics of the distribution are thus obtained. The inverse mode of SPARIA has been tested on the 29 aromatic compounds (100 peaks) that were used to evaluate its forward mode, and the dependence of the inverse process on the size of the chemical shift window has been evaluated. Finally, the inverse mode of SPARIA has been applied to

  16. A numerical analysis on forming limits during spiral and concentric single point incremental forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipiela, M. L.; Amauri, V.; Nikhare, C.; Marcondes, P. V. P.

    2017-01-01

    Sheet metal forming is one of the major manufacturing industries, which are building numerous parts for aerospace, automotive and medical industry. Due to the high demand in vehicle industry and environmental regulations on less fuel consumption on other hand, researchers are innovating new methods to build these parts with energy efficient sheet metal forming process instead of conventionally used punch and die to form the parts to achieve the lightweight parts. One of the most recognized manufacturing process in this category is Single Point Incremental Forming (SPIF). SPIF is the die-less sheet metal forming process in which the single point tool incrementally forces any single point of sheet metal at any process time to plastic deformation zone. In the present work, finite element method (FEM) is applied to analyze the forming limits of high strength low alloy steel formed by single point incremental forming (SPIF) by spiral and concentric tool path. SPIF numerical simulations were model with 24 and 29 mm cup depth, and the results were compare with Nakajima results obtained by experiments and FEM. It was found that the cup formed with Nakajima tool failed at 24 mm while cups formed by SPIF surpassed the limit for both depths with both profiles. It was also notice that the strain achieved in concentric profile are lower than that in spiral profile.

  17. Incremental haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan; Vilar, Enric; Davenport, Andrew; Farrington, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Thrice-weekly haemodialysis schedules have become the standard default haemodialysis prescription worldwide. Whereas the measurement of residual renal function is accepted practice for peritoneal dialysis patients and the importance of residual renal function in determining technique success is well established, few centres routinely assess residual renal function in haemodialysis patients. Although intradialytic hypotension and episodes of acute kidney injury may predispose to an earlier loss of residual renal function, a significant proportion of haemodialysis patients maintain some residual function long after dialysis initiation. As such, an incremental approach to the initiation of dialysis with careful monitoring of residual renal function may potentially provide some haemodialysis patients with an improved quality of life and greater preservation of residual renal function whilst fewer dialysis sessions may reduce health care costs. Prospective trials are required to determine the optimum approach to the initiation of haemodialysis for the oliguric patient. Once residual renal function has been lost, then dialysis prescriptions should be re-examined to consider the use of longer or more frequent treatment sessions and switching from low-flux to high-flux dialysis or haemodiafiltration to offset retention of middle sized molecules and protein-bound azotaemic solutes.

  18. Predicting caries by measuring its activity using quantitative light-induced fluorescence in vivo: a 2-year caries increment analysis.

    PubMed

    Meller, C; Santamaria, R M; Connert, T; Splieth, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the predictive power of several clinical baseline parameters and the de-/remineralisation properties of in vivo etched sites measured with quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) for subsequent 2-year caries increment. At baseline, in 44 children (8.23 ± 1.5 years) two areas (diameter 2 mm) of the buccal surface of a primary posterior tooth were etched with 36% phosphoric acid gel for 1 and 4 min, respectively. The etched sites were analysed immediately after etching (ΔQ1) and 24 h (ΔQ2) later by QLF. Additionally, caries status (deft/DMFT and initial caries), approximal plaque, bleeding on probing, and the patient's current use of fluorides were recorded. In the 2-year follow-up, 29 children were re-assessed. After clinical examination, the caries increment was calculated (ΔDMFT) and correlated with the baseline clinical variables and the QLF readings. Results showed a significant positive correlation between ΔQ(1 min) and the ΔDMFT (r = 0.44, p = 0.02). The ΔDMFT was significantly correlated with the baseline deft (r = 0.56, p = 0.002), cavitated active caries lesions (r = 0.52, p = 0.003), and filled teeth (r = 0.53, p = 0.003). In a regression analysis the use of fluoridated salt (SC = -0.10) and fluoride gel (SC = -0.14) were negatively associated with ΔDMFT. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the demineralisation properties of the etched sites and the outcome of the 24-hour measurements with QLF are significantly associated with caries increment. Previous caries experience strongly correlated with caries increment in this group of children.

  19. Dynamics in Epistasis Analysis.

    PubMed

    Awdeh, Aseel; Phenix, Hilary; Kaern, Mads; Perkins, Theodore

    2017-01-16

    Finding regulatory relationships between genes, including the direction and nature of influence between them, is a fundamental challenge in the field of molecular genetics. One classical approach to this problem is epistasis analysis. Broadly speaking, epistasis analysis infers the regulatory relationships between a pair of genes in a genetic pathway by considering the patterns of change in an observable trait resulting from single and double deletion of genes. While classical epistasis analysis has yielded deep insights on numerous genetic pathways, it is not without limitations. Here, we explore the possibility of dynamic epistasis analysis, in which, in addition to performing genetic perturbations of a pathway, we drive the pathway by a time-varying upstream signal. We explore the theoretical power of dynamical epistasis analysis by conducting an identifiability analysis of Boolean models of genetic pathways, comparing static and dynamic approaches. We find that even relatively simple input dynamics greatly increases the power of epistasis analysis to discriminate alternative network structures. Further, we explore the question of experiment design, and show that a subset of short time-varying signals, which we call dynamic primitives, allow maximum discriminative power with a reduced number of experiments.

  20. Incremental full configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Paul M.

    2017-03-01

    The incremental expansion provides a polynomial scaling method for computing electronic correlation energies. This article details a new algorithm and implementation for the incremental expansion of full configuration interaction (FCI), called iFCI. By dividing the problem into n-body interaction terms, accurate correlation energies can be recovered at low n in a highly parallel computation. Additionally, relatively low-cost approximations are possible in iFCI by solving for each incremental energy to within a specified threshold. Herein, systematic tests show that FCI-quality energies can be asymptotically reached for cases where dynamic correlation is dominant as well as where static correlation is vital. To further reduce computational costs and allow iFCI to reach larger systems, a select-CI approach (heat-bath CI) requiring two parameters is incorporated. Finally, iFCI provides the first estimate of FCI energies for hexatriene with a polarized double zeta basis set, which has 32 electrons correlated in 118 orbitals, corresponding to a FCI dimension of over 1038.

  1. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Tom; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in fiscal year 2000. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics, spacecraft trajectory, attitude analysis, and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  2. Performance analysis of ‘Perturb and Observe’ and ‘Incremental Conductance’ MPPT algorithms for PV system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodhi, Ehtisham; Lodhi, Zeeshan; Noman Shafqat, Rana; Chen, Fieda

    2017-07-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system usually employed The Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) techniques for increasing its efficiency. The performance of the PV system perhaps boosts by controlling at its apex point of power, in this way maximal power can be given to load. The proficiency of a PV system usually depends upon irradiance, temperature and array architecture. PV array shows a non-linear style for V-I curve and maximal power point on V-P curve also varies with changing environmental conditions. MPPT methods grantees that a PV module is regulated at reference voltage and to produce entire usage of the maximal output power. This paper gives analysis between two widely employed Perturb and Observe (P&O) and Incremental Conductance (INC) MPPT techniques. Their performance is evaluated and compared through theoretical analysis and digital simulation on the basis of response time and efficiency under varying irradiance and temperature condition using Matlab/Simulink.

  3. Prediction of nucleosome DNA formation potential and nucleosome positioning using increment of diversity combined with quadratic discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiujuan; Pei, Zhiyong; Liu, Jia; Qin, Sheng; Cai, Lu

    2010-11-01

    In this work, a novel method was developed to distinguish nucleosome DNA and linker DNA based on increment of diversity combined with quadratic discriminant analysis (IDQD), using k-mer frequency of nucleotides in genome. When used to predict DNA potential for forming nucleosomes, the model achieved a high accuracy of 94.94%, 77.60%, and 86.81%, respectively, for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens, and Drosophila melanogaster. The area under the receiver operator characteristics curve of our classifier was 0.982 for S. cerevisiae. Our results indicate that DNA sequence preference is critical for nucleosome formation potential and is likely conserved across eukaryotes. The model successfully identified nucleosome-enriched or nucleosome-depleted regions in S. cerevisiae genome, suggesting nucleosome positioning depends on DNA sequence preference. Thus, IDQD classifier is useful for predicting nucleosome positioning.

  4. Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-04-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  5. Structural dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housner, J. M.; Anderson, M.; Belvin, W.; Horner, G.

    1985-01-01

    Dynamic analysis of large space antenna systems must treat the deployment as well as vibration and control of the deployed antenna. Candidate computer programs for deployment dynamics, and issues and needs for future program developments are reviewed. Some results for mast and hoop deployment are also presented. Modeling of complex antenna geometry with conventional finite element methods and with repetitive exact elements is considered. Analytical comparisons with experimental results for a 15 meter hoop/column antenna revealed the importance of accurate structural properties including nonlinear joints. Slackening of cables in this antenna is also a consideration. The technology of designing actively damped structures through analytical optimization is discussed and results are presented.

  6. Magnetic resonance cinematography of the fingers: a 3.0 Tesla feasibility study with comparison of incremental and continuous dynamic protocols.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Thomas; Adler, Werner; Janka, Rolf; Uder, Michael; Roemer, Frank

    2017-08-19

    To study the feasibility of magnetic resonance cinematography of the fingers (MRCF) with comparison of image quality of different protocols for depicting the finger anatomy during motion. MRCF was performed during a full flexion and extension movement in 14 healthy volunteers using a finger-gating device. Three real-time sequences (frame rates 17-59 images/min) and one proton density (PD) sequence (3 images/min) were acquired during incremental and continuous motion. Analyses were performed independently by three readers. Qualitative image analysis included Likert-scale grading from 0 (useless) to 5 (excellent) and specific visual analog scale (VAS) grading from 0 (insufficient) to 100 (excellent). Signal-to-noise calculation was performed. Overall percentage agreement and mean absolute disagreement were calculated. Within the real-time sequences a high frame-rate true fast imaging with steady-state free precession (TRUFI) yielded the best image quality with Likert and overall VAS scores of 3.0 ± 0.2 and 60.4 ± 25.3, respectively. The best sequence regarding image quality was an incremental PD with mean values of 4.8 ± 0.2 and 91.2 ± 9.4, respectively. Overall percentage agreement and mean absolute disagreement were 47.9 and 0.7, respectively. No statistically significant SNR differences were found between continuous and incremental motion for the real-time protocols. MRCF is feasible with appropriate image quality during continuous motion using a finger-gating device. Almost perfect image quality is achievable with incremental PD imaging, which represents a compromise for MRCF with the drawback of prolonged scanning time.

  7. Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect

    2016-01-14

    The Dynamic Contingency Analysis Tool (DCAT) is an open-platform and publicly available methodology to help develop applications that aim to improve the capabilities of power system planning engineers to assess the impact and likelihood of extreme contingencies and potential cascading events across their systems and interconnections. Outputs from the DCAT will help find mitigation solutions to reduce the risk of cascading outages in technically sound and effective ways. The current prototype DCAT implementation has been developed as a Python code that accesses the simulation functions of the Siemens PSS/E planning tool (PSS/E). It has the following features: It uses a hybrid dynamic and steady-state approach to simulating the cascading outage sequences that includes fast dynamic and slower steady-state events. It integrates dynamic models with protection scheme models for generation, transmission, and load. It models special protection systems (SPSs)/remedial action schemes (RASs) and automatic and manual corrective actions. Overall, the DCAT attempts to bridge multiple gaps in cascading-outage analysis in a single, unique prototype tool capable of automatically simulating and analyzing cascading sequences in real systems using multiprocessor computers.While the DCAT has been implemented using PSS/E in Phase I of the study, other commercial software packages with similar capabilities can be used within the DCAT framework.

  8. Motorcycle dynamics by multibody dynamics analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Imaizumi, Hirohide; Fujioka, Takehiko

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to construct simulation models of a motorcycle with a rider by use of multibody dynamics analysis (MDA). Three types of MDA models are developed for evaluation of the effectiveness of MDA for motorcycle dynamics. Impulse responses with parameter study and lane change maneuvers are calculated. The results of simulations agree with that of experiments well and effectiveness of MDA to the motorcycle dynamics field is shown.

  9. Retrospective incremental cost analysis of a hospital-based COPD Disease Management Programme in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Tunsäter, Alf; Moutakis, Mikael; Borg, Sixten; Persson, Ulf; Strömberg, Leif; Nielsen, Anders Lassen

    2007-05-01

    This paper reports on a retrospective analysis of hospital-based healthcare costs associated with the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). During the second half of 2001, Simrishamn Hospital, Sweden, implemented a structured Disease Management Programme (DMP) for COPD and a total of 784 patients with COPD, enrolled in the DMP, were included in the analysis. The goal was to reduce the number of clinical events, such as severe exacerbations by early intervention, aggressive drug treatment, specialists easy available for advice, improved support for smoking cessation, increased number of scheduled follow-ups and closer tracking of high-risk COPD patients. The hospital administrative system provided data on resource consumption, such as outpatient care, inpatient care and drugs and unit cost, used in the economic analysis. The total cost of COPD drugs doubled (from euro 14,133 to euro 30,855 per year) as did the total number of outpatient visits (from 580 to 996 visits per year). The number of hospitalizations for acute COPD exacerbations and COPD with acute lower respiratory infection decreased from 67 to 25 per year. Total COPD-related healthcare costs decreased. The results presented here support the hypothesis that a COPD DMP can offer substantial overall direct cost savings.

  10. Comparative analysis of the performance of laser Doppler systems using maximum likelihood and phase increment methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, V. S.; Zhuravel', F. A.; Kashcheeva, G. A.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents a comparative analysis of the errors of two alternative methods of estimating the central frequency of signals of laser Doppler systems, one of which is based on the maximum likelihood criterion and the other on the so-called pulse-pair technique. Using computer simulation, the standard deviations of the Doppler signal frequency from its true values are determined for both methods and plots of the ratios of these deviations as a measure of the accuracy gain of one of them are constructed. The results can be used by developers of appropriate systems to choose an optimal algorithm of signal processing based on a compromise between the accuracy and speed of the systems as well as the labor intensity of calculations.

  11. Detailed Surface Analysis Of Incremental Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) Of Single-Crystal Niobium Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Palczewski, Ari D.; Tian, Hui; Trofimova, Olga; Reece, Charles E.

    2011-07-01

    We performed Centrifugal Barrel Polishing (CBP) on single crystal niobium samples/coupons housed in a stainless steel sample holder following the polishing recipe developed at Fermi Lab (FNAL) in 2011 \\cite{C. A. Cooper 2011}. Post CBP, the sample coupons were analyzed for surface roughness, crystal composition and structure, and particle contamination. Following the initial analysis each coupon was high pressure rinsed (HRP) and analyzed for the effectiveness of contamination removal. We were able to obtain the mirror like surface finish after the final stage of tumbling, although some defects and embedded particles remained. In addition, standard HPR appears to have little effect on removing embedded particles which remain after each tumbling step, although final polishing media removal was partially affected by standard/extended HPR.

  12. The incremental benefit of EUS for identifying unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    James, Paul D.; Zhang, Mei; Belletrutti, Paul J.; Mohamed, Rachid; Ghali, William; Roberts, Derek J.; Martel, Guillaume; Heitman, Steven J.

    2017-01-01

    Background and study aims It is unclear to what extent EUS influences the surgical management of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This systematic review sought to determine if EUS evaluation improves the identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Patients and methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, bibliographies of included articles and conference proceedings for studies reporting original data regarding surgical management and/or survival among patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, from inception to January 7th 2017. Our main outcome was the incremental benefit of EUS for the identification of unresectable disease (IBEUS). The pooled IBEUS were calculated using random effects models. Heterogeneity was explored using stratified meta-analysis and meta-regression. Results Among 4,903 citations identified, we included 8 cohort studies (study periods from 1992 to 2007) that examined the identification of unresectable disease (n = 795). Random effects meta-analysis suggested that EUS alone identified unresectable disease in 19% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 10–33%). Among those studies that considered portal or mesenteric vein invasion as potentially resectable, EUS alone was able to identify unresectable disease in 14% of patients (95% CI 8–24%) after a CT scan was performed. Limitations The majority of the included studies were retrospective. Conclusions EUS evaluation is associated with increased identification of unresectable disease among adults with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PMID:28319148

  13. Disrupted actin dynamics trigger an increment in the reactive oxygen species levels in the Arabidopsis root under salt stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shang Gang; Zhu, Dong Zi; Chen, Guang Hui; Gao, Xin-Qi; Zhang, Xian Sheng

    2012-07-01

    Changes in actin dynamics represent the primary response of the plant cell to extracellular signaling. Recent studies have now revealed that actin remodeling is involved in abiotic stress tolerance in plants. In our current study, the relationship between the changes in actin dynamics and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level at the initial stages of salt stress was investigated in the elongation zone of the Arabidopsis root tip. We found that a 200 mM NaCl treatment disrupted the dynamics of the actin filaments within 10 min and increased the ROS levels in the elongation zone cells of the Arabidopsis root tip. We further found that the NADPH oxidase activity inhibitor, diphenyleneiodonium, treatment blocked this ROS increase under salt stress conditions. The roles of actin dynamics and the NADPH oxidases in ROS generation were further analyzed using the actin-specific agents, latrunculin B (Lat-B) and jasplakinolide (Jasp), and mutants of Arabidopsis NADPH oxidase AtrbohC. Lat-B and Jasp promote actin depolymerization and polymerization, respectively, and both were found to enhance the ROS levels following NaCl treatment. However, this response was abolished in the atrbohC mutants. Our present results thus demonstrate that actin dynamics are involved in regulating the ROS level in Arabidopsis root under salt stress conditions. Salt stress disrupts the dynamics of the actin filaments in Arabidopsis in the short term which are involved in regulating the ROS levels that arise under salt stress conditions via the actions of the AtrbohC.

  14. Incremental analysis of the reengineering of an outpatient billing process: an empirical study in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    Chu, Kuan-Yu; Huang, Chunmin

    2013-06-13

    A smartcard is an integrated circuit card that provides identification, authentication, data storage, and application processing. Among other functions, smartcards can serve as credit and ATM cards and can be used to pay various invoices using a 'reader'. This study looks at the unit cost and activity time of both a traditional cash billing service and a newly introduced smartcard billing service in an outpatient department in a hospital in Taipei, Taiwan. The activity time required in using the cash billing service was determined via a time and motion study. A cost analysis was used to compare the unit costs of the two services. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to determine the effect of smartcard use and number of cashier windows on incremental cost and waiting time. Overall, the smartcard system had a higher unit cost because of the additional service fees and business tax, but it reduced patient waiting time by at least 8 minutes. Thus, it is a convenient service for patients. In addition, if half of all outpatients used smartcards to pay their invoices, along with four cashier windows for cash payments, then the waiting time of cash service users could be reduced by approximately 3 minutes and the incremental cost would be close to breaking even (even though it has a higher overall unit cost that the traditional service). Traditional cash billing services are time consuming and require patients to carry large sums of money. Smartcard services enable patients to pay their bill immediately in the outpatient clinic and offer greater security and convenience. The idle time of nurses could also be reduced as they help to process smartcard payments. A reduction in idle time reduces hospital costs. However, the cost of the smartcard service is higher than the cash service and, as such, hospital administrators must weigh the costs and benefits of introducing a smartcard service. In addition to the obvious benefits of the smartcard service, there is also scope

  15. Incremental analysis of the reengineering of an outpatient billing process: an empirical study in a public hospital

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A smartcard is an integrated circuit card that provides identification, authentication, data storage, and application processing. Among other functions, smartcards can serve as credit and ATM cards and can be used to pay various invoices using a ‘reader’. This study looks at the unit cost and activity time of both a traditional cash billing service and a newly introduced smartcard billing service in an outpatient department in a hospital in Taipei, Taiwan. Methods The activity time required in using the cash billing service was determined via a time and motion study. A cost analysis was used to compare the unit costs of the two services. A sensitivity analysis was also performed to determine the effect of smartcard use and number of cashier windows on incremental cost and waiting time. Results Overall, the smartcard system had a higher unit cost because of the additional service fees and business tax, but it reduced patient waiting time by at least 8 minutes. Thus, it is a convenient service for patients. In addition, if half of all outpatients used smartcards to pay their invoices, along with four cashier windows for cash payments, then the waiting time of cash service users could be reduced by approximately 3 minutes and the incremental cost would be close to breaking even (even though it has a higher overall unit cost that the traditional service). Conclusions Traditional cash billing services are time consuming and require patients to carry large sums of money. Smartcard services enable patients to pay their bill immediately in the outpatient clinic and offer greater security and convenience. The idle time of nurses could also be reduced as they help to process smartcard payments. A reduction in idle time reduces hospital costs. However, the cost of the smartcard service is higher than the cash service and, as such, hospital administrators must weigh the costs and benefits of introducing a smartcard service. In addition to the obvious benefits

  16. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  17. Dynamic Assessment of Reading Difficulties: Predictive and Incremental Validity on Attitude toward Reading and the Use of Dialogue/Participation Strategies in Classroom Activities.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Juan-José; Lara, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Assessment (DA) has been shown to have more predictive value than conventional tests for academic performance. However, in relation to reading difficulties, further research is needed to determine the predictive validity of DA for specific aspects of the different processes involved in reading and the differential validity of DA for different subgroups of students with an academic disadvantage. This paper analyzes the implementation of a DA device that evaluates processes involved in reading (EDPL) among 60 students with reading comprehension difficulties between 9 and 16 years of age, of whom 20 have intellectual disabilities, 24 have reading-related learning disabilities, and 16 have socio-cultural disadvantages. We specifically analyze the predictive validity of the EDPL device over attitude toward reading, and the use of dialogue/participation strategies in reading activities in the classroom during the implementation stage. We also analyze if the EDPL device provides additional information to that obtained with a conventionally applied personal-social adjustment scale (APSL). Results showed that dynamic scores, obtained from the implementation of the EDPL device, significantly predict the studied variables. Moreover, dynamic scores showed a significant incremental validity in relation to predictions based on an APSL scale. In relation to differential validity, the results indicated the superior predictive validity for DA for students with intellectual disabilities and reading disabilities than for students with socio-cultural disadvantages. Furthermore, the role of metacognition and its relation to the processes of personal-social adjustment in explaining the results is discussed.

  18. Dynamic Assessment of Reading Difficulties: Predictive and Incremental Validity on Attitude toward Reading and the Use of Dialogue/Participation Strategies in Classroom Activities

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Juan-José; Lara, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic Assessment (DA) has been shown to have more predictive value than conventional tests for academic performance. However, in relation to reading difficulties, further research is needed to determine the predictive validity of DA for specific aspects of the different processes involved in reading and the differential validity of DA for different subgroups of students with an academic disadvantage. This paper analyzes the implementation of a DA device that evaluates processes involved in reading (EDPL) among 60 students with reading comprehension difficulties between 9 and 16 years of age, of whom 20 have intellectual disabilities, 24 have reading-related learning disabilities, and 16 have socio-cultural disadvantages. We specifically analyze the predictive validity of the EDPL device over attitude toward reading, and the use of dialogue/participation strategies in reading activities in the classroom during the implementation stage. We also analyze if the EDPL device provides additional information to that obtained with a conventionally applied personal-social adjustment scale (APSL). Results showed that dynamic scores, obtained from the implementation of the EDPL device, significantly predict the studied variables. Moreover, dynamic scores showed a significant incremental validity in relation to predictions based on an APSL scale. In relation to differential validity, the results indicated the superior predictive validity for DA for students with intellectual disabilities and reading disabilities than for students with socio-cultural disadvantages. Furthermore, the role of metacognition and its relation to the processes of personal-social adjustment in explaining the results is discussed. PMID:28243215

  19. Site index equations and mean annual increment equations for Pacific Northwest Research Station forest inventory and analysis inventories, 1985-2001.

    Treesearch

    Erica J. Hanson; David L. Azuma; Bruce A. Hiserote

    2003-01-01

    Site index equations and mean annual increment equations used by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program at the Portland Forestry Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture. The equations are for 24 tree species in California, Oregon, and Washington.

  20. A study on using pre-forming blank in single point incremental forming process by finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abass, K. I.

    2016-11-01

    Single Point Incremental Forming process (SPIF) is a forming technique of sheet material based on layered manufacturing principles. The edges of sheet material are clamped while the forming tool is moved along the tool path. The CNC milling machine is used to manufacturing the product. SPIF involves extensive plastic deformation and the description of the process is more complicated by highly nonlinear boundary conditions, namely contact and frictional effects have been accomplished. However, due to the complex nature of these models, numerical approaches dominated by Finite Element Analysis (FEA) are now in widespread use. The paper presents the data and main results of a study on effect of using preforming blank in SPIF through FEA. The considered SPIF has been studied under certain process conditions referring to the test work piece, tool, etc., applying ANSYS 11. The results show that the simulation model can predict an ideal profile of processing track, the behaviour of contact tool-workpiece, the product accuracy by evaluation its thickness, surface strain and the stress distribution along the deformed blank section during the deformation stages.

  1. DIDA - Dynamic Image Disparity Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-12-31

    Understanding, Dynamic Image Analysis , Disparity Analysis, Optical Flow, Real-Time Processing ___ 20. ABSTRACT (Continue on revere side If necessary aid identify...three aspects of dynamic image analysis must be studied: effectiveness, generality, and efficiency. In addition, efforts must be made to understand the...environment. A better understanding of the need for these Limiting constraints is required. Efficiency is obviously important if dynamic image analysis is

  2. Implementing Kernel Methods Incrementally by Incremental Nonlinear Projection Trick.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Nojun

    2016-05-20

    Recently, the nonlinear projection trick (NPT) was introduced enabling direct computation of coordinates of samples in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. With NPT, any machine learning algorithm can be extended to a kernel version without relying on the so called kernel trick. However, NPT is inherently difficult to be implemented incrementally because an ever increasing kernel matrix should be treated as additional training samples are introduced. In this paper, an incremental version of the NPT (INPT) is proposed based on the observation that the centerization step in NPT is unnecessary. Because the proposed INPT does not change the coordinates of the old data, the coordinates obtained by INPT can directly be used in any incremental methods to implement a kernel version of the incremental methods. The effectiveness of the INPT is shown by applying it to implement incremental versions of kernel methods such as, kernel singular value decomposition, kernel principal component analysis, and kernel discriminant analysis which are utilized for problems of kernel matrix reconstruction, letter classification, and face image retrieval, respectively.

  3. Local dynamic mechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Foschia, Raphael; Jobin, Marc; Hengsberger, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    While new materials with tailored properties appear every day, the need of appropriate characterization tools is still an important concern. Analyses of thin films on thick substrate are often highly influenced by the substrate properties. A dynamical nanoindentation system has been designed and built through the integration of a nanoindenter head equipped with capacitive displacement sensing, scanning probe microscope with related XYZ scanning electronics and an additional transducer for sample actuation. Our Local-Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (L-DMA) setup allows for both, tip and sample modulation mode what somehow contrasts with commercially available systems. This issue allows for direct comparison between both techniques and therefore for consistent quantitative mechanical measurements. The system offers two distinctive measurement techniques, local mechanical spectroscopy and mechanical imaging modes. Bulk materials as well as thin films of ceramics and polymers have been used for testing and validating the setup. The instrument has been modeled in sample modulation mode and experimental results obtained for different materials were compared with simulation data.

  4. Incremental k-core decomposition: Algorithms and evaluation

    DOE PAGES

    Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem; Gedik, Bugra; Jacques-SIlva, Gabriela; ...

    2016-02-01

    A k-core of a graph is a maximal connected subgraph in which every vertex is connected to at least k vertices in the subgraph. k-core decomposition is often used in large-scale network analysis, such as community detection, protein function prediction, visualization, and solving NP-hard problems on real networks efficiently, like maximal clique finding. In many real-world applications, networks change over time. As a result, it is essential to develop efficient incremental algorithms for dynamic graph data. In this paper, we propose a suite of incremental k-core decomposition algorithms for dynamic graph data. These algorithms locate a small subgraph that ismore » guaranteed to contain the list of vertices whose maximum k-core values have changed and efficiently process this subgraph to update the k-core decomposition. We present incremental algorithms for both insertion and deletion operations, and propose auxiliary vertex state maintenance techniques that can further accelerate these operations. Our results show a significant reduction in runtime compared to non-incremental alternatives. We illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms on different types of real and synthetic graphs, at varying scales. Furthermore, for a graph of 16 million vertices, we observe relative throughputs reaching a million times, relative to the non-incremental algorithms.« less

  5. Incremental k-core decomposition: Algorithms and evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Sariyuce, Ahmet Erdem; Gedik, Bugra; Jacques-SIlva, Gabriela; Wu, Kun -Lung; Catalyurek, Umit V.

    2016-02-01

    A k-core of a graph is a maximal connected subgraph in which every vertex is connected to at least k vertices in the subgraph. k-core decomposition is often used in large-scale network analysis, such as community detection, protein function prediction, visualization, and solving NP-hard problems on real networks efficiently, like maximal clique finding. In many real-world applications, networks change over time. As a result, it is essential to develop efficient incremental algorithms for dynamic graph data. In this paper, we propose a suite of incremental k-core decomposition algorithms for dynamic graph data. These algorithms locate a small subgraph that is guaranteed to contain the list of vertices whose maximum k-core values have changed and efficiently process this subgraph to update the k-core decomposition. We present incremental algorithms for both insertion and deletion operations, and propose auxiliary vertex state maintenance techniques that can further accelerate these operations. Our results show a significant reduction in runtime compared to non-incremental alternatives. We illustrate the efficiency of our algorithms on different types of real and synthetic graphs, at varying scales. Furthermore, for a graph of 16 million vertices, we observe relative throughputs reaching a million times, relative to the non-incremental algorithms.

  6. Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, Suzette; Yang, Guowei; Rungta, Neha; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    2011-01-01

    The last few years have seen a resurgence of interest in the use of symbolic execution -- a program analysis technique developed more than three decades ago to analyze program execution paths. Scaling symbolic execution and other path-sensitive analysis techniques to large systems remains challenging despite recent algorithmic and technological advances. An alternative to solving the problem of scalability is to reduce the scope of the analysis. One approach that is widely studied in the context of regression analysis is to analyze the differences between two related program versions. While such an approach is intuitive in theory, finding efficient and precise ways to identify program differences, and characterize their effects on how the program executes has proved challenging in practice. In this paper, we present Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution (DiSE), a novel technique for detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes. The novelty of DiSE is to combine the efficiencies of static analysis techniques to compute program difference information with the precision of symbolic execution to explore program execution paths and generate path conditions affected by the differences. DiSE is a complementary technique to other reduction or bounding techniques developed to improve symbolic execution. Furthermore, DiSE does not require analysis results to be carried forward as the software evolves -- only the source code for two related program versions is required. A case-study of our implementation of DiSE illustrates its effectiveness at detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes.

  7. High-resolution analysis of stem increment and sap flow for loblolly pine trees attacked by southern pine beetle

    Treesearch

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Samuel B. McLaughlin; Matthew P. Ayres

    2004-01-01

    Manual and automated dendrometers, and thermal dissipation probes were used to measure stem increment and sap flow for loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) trees attacked by southern pine beetle (Dendroctonus frontalis Zimm.) in east Tennessee, USA. Seasonal-long measurements with manual dendrometers indicated linear increases in stem...

  8. Discriminant and Incremental Validity of Self-Concept and Academic Self-Efficacy: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined the discriminant and incremental validity of self-concept and academic self-efficacy. Study 1, which meta-analysed 64 studies comprising 74 independent samples (N = 24,773), found a strong mean correlation of 0.43 between self-concept and academic self-efficacy. The domains of self-concept and self-efficacy, and the domain…

  9. Limitations of Spectral Electromyogramic Analysis to Determine the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue Threshold during Incremental Ergometer Cycling

    PubMed Central

    Latasa, Iban; Cordova, Alfredo; Malanda, Armando; Navallas, Javier; Lavilla-Oiz, Ana; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a new method has been proposed to detect the onset of neuromuscular fatigue during an incremental cycling test by assessing the changes in spectral electromyographic (sEMG) frequencies within individual exercise periods of the test. The method consists on determining the highest power output that can be sustained without a significant decrease in spectral frequencies. This study evaluated the validity of the new approach by assessing the changes in spectral indicators both throughout the whole test and within individual exercise periods of the test. Fourteen cyclists performed incremental cycle ergometer rides to exhaustion with bipolar surface EMG signals recorded from the vastus lateralis. The mean and median frequencies (Fmean and Fmedian, respectively) of the sEMG power spectrum were calculated. The main findings were: (1) Examination of spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test showed that neither Fmean nor Fmedian decreased significantly during the last (most fatiguing) exercise periods. (2) Examination of the whole incremental test showed that the behaviour of Fmean and Fmedian with increasing power output was highly inconsistent and varied greatly among subjects. (3) Over the whole incremental test, half of the participants exhibited a positive relation between spectral indicators and workload, whereas the other half demonstrated the opposite behavior. Collectively, these findings indicate that spectral sEMG indexes do not provide a reliable measure of the fatigue state of the muscle during an incremental cycling test. Moreover, it is concluded that it is not possible to determine the onset of neuromuscular fatigue during an incremental cycling test by examining spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test. Key points The behaviour of spectral EMG indicators during the incremental test exhibited a high heterogeneity among individuals, with approximately half of the participants showing a positive

  10. Limitations of Spectral Electromyogramic Analysis to Determine the Onset of Neuromuscular Fatigue Threshold during Incremental Ergometer Cycling.

    PubMed

    Latasa, Iban; Cordova, Alfredo; Malanda, Armando; Navallas, Javier; Lavilla-Oiz, Ana; Rodriguez-Falces, Javier

    2016-03-01

    Recently, a new method has been proposed to detect the onset of neuromuscular fatigue during an incremental cycling test by assessing the changes in spectral electromyographic (sEMG) frequencies within individual exercise periods of the test. The method consists on determining the highest power output that can be sustained without a significant decrease in spectral frequencies. This study evaluated the validity of the new approach by assessing the changes in spectral indicators both throughout the whole test and within individual exercise periods of the test. Fourteen cyclists performed incremental cycle ergometer rides to exhaustion with bipolar surface EMG signals recorded from the vastus lateralis. The mean and median frequencies (Fmean and Fmedian, respectively) of the sEMG power spectrum were calculated. The main findings were: (1) Examination of spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test showed that neither Fmean nor Fmedian decreased significantly during the last (most fatiguing) exercise periods. (2) Examination of the whole incremental test showed that the behaviour of Fmean and Fmedian with increasing power output was highly inconsistent and varied greatly among subjects. (3) Over the whole incremental test, half of the participants exhibited a positive relation between spectral indicators and workload, whereas the other half demonstrated the opposite behavior. Collectively, these findings indicate that spectral sEMG indexes do not provide a reliable measure of the fatigue state of the muscle during an incremental cycling test. Moreover, it is concluded that it is not possible to determine the onset of neuromuscular fatigue during an incremental cycling test by examining spectral indicators within individual exercise periods of the test. Key pointsThe behaviour of spectral EMG indicators during the incremental test exhibited a high heterogeneity among individuals, with approximately half of the participants showing a positive

  11. A kinematic analysis incorporating incremental strain data for the Frontal Pennine Zones of the western French Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, Sara

    1992-06-01

    An incremental and finite-strain study of the zones adjacent to the Frontal Pennine Thrust (FPT) has been undertaken, using syntectonic fibres taken from veins, pyrite-type pressure shadows and similar fringes from around pebbles in conglomeratic rocks. The resultant strain data, together with detailed mapping of local deformational geometries and regional trends has shown that the Pennine Zones show a more complex structural history than previously envisaged. The structural analysis divides the Pennine Zones into two regions, north and south of Crevé Tête (the southern termination of the Valais basin). The zones to the south of Creve Tête (Mont Fut, Valbuche, Nielard and Aiguille d'Arves) show an essentially piggy-back thrust sequence directed towards the foreland in which the elongation of the strain ellipse initially parallels the transport direction (WNW), but finally rotates to become sub-parallel to the tectonic strike (NNE-SSW). The structures of the Valais Zone to the north of Crevé Tête are more complex, with both N- and WNW-verging folds, thrusts and strike-slip faults. Here the long axis of the strain ellipse appears initially to parallel the tectonic strike (NE-SW). This is followed by a rotation into the late transport direction (WNW). This localised alternation between strike and transport parallelism is problematic. Specific examples of strike-parallel extension may be explained in terms of radial transport, buttressing against earlier extensional structures, strike-slip motion and/or stretching over lateral culmination walls. The major division in fibre pattern north and south of Crevé Tête, however, is best explained as being a function of compartmentalization of deformation styles between adjacent areas. Models which invoke a dominant deformation mechanism e.g., thrust tectonics along the entirety of the Alpine chain, thus need to be rethought. Similarly, the recognition of widespread strike-parallel extension suggests that two

  12. Meta-Analysis of Incremental Rehearsal Using Phi Coefficients to Compare Single-Case and Group Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Matthew K.; Zaslofsky, Anne F.; Kanive, Rebecca; Parker, David C.

    2012-01-01

    The current study meta-analyzed single-case design (SCD) and group research regarding incremental rehearsal (IR). We used phi to meta-analyze data from 19 IR studies. Data from the SCD studies resulted in a nonoverlap of all pairs (NAP) score of 98.9% (95% CI = 97.6-100%), which resulted in a weighted phi of 0.77 (95% CI = 0.69-0.83). The group…

  13. Operational Dynamic Configuration Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Chok Fung; Zelinski, Shannon

    2010-01-01

    Sectors may combine or split within areas of specialization in response to changing traffic patterns. This method of managing capacity and controller workload could be made more flexible by dynamically modifying sector boundaries. Much work has been done on methods for dynamically creating new sector boundaries [1-5]. Many assessments of dynamic configuration methods assume the current day baseline configuration remains fixed [6-7]. A challenging question is how to select a dynamic configuration baseline to assess potential benefits of proposed dynamic configuration concepts. Bloem used operational sector reconfigurations as a baseline [8]. The main difficulty is that operational reconfiguration data is noisy. Reconfigurations often occur frequently to accommodate staff training or breaks, or to complete a more complicated reconfiguration through a rapid sequence of simpler reconfigurations. Gupta quantified a few aspects of airspace boundary changes from this data [9]. Most of these metrics are unique to sector combining operations and not applicable to more flexible dynamic configuration concepts. To better understand what sort of reconfigurations are acceptable or beneficial, more configuration change metrics should be developed and their distribution in current practice should be computed. This paper proposes a method to select a simple sequence of configurations among operational configurations to serve as a dynamic configuration baseline for future dynamic configuration concept assessments. New configuration change metrics are applied to the operational data to establish current day thresholds for these metrics. These thresholds are then corroborated, refined, or dismissed based on airspace practitioner feedback. The dynamic configuration baseline selection method uses a k-means clustering algorithm to select the sequence of configurations and trigger times from a given day of operational sector combination data. The clustering algorithm selects a simplified

  14. Increments toward what?

    PubMed

    Weil, A

    2001-01-01

    Incremental proposals to expand health insurance coverage, such as expansions of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) or creation of new tax credits, should be examined for the values that underlie them and for how they structure future options for additional incremental coverage expansions. This paper examines five design issues in incremental reform: who determines coverage options for the newly insured; what risk pool do they enter; what is the government's contribution toward their coverage; what barriers are created by efforts to encourage efficiency; and how are issues of federalism handled? Tax credits are a departure from past approaches, while an SCHIP expansion is a continuation of current policy directions.

  15. Webpage Segments Classification with Incremental Knowledge Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Kim, Yang Sok; Kang, Byeong Ho

    This paper suggests an incremental information extraction method for social network analysis of web publications. For this purpose, we employed an incremental knowledge acquisition method, called MCRDR (Multiple Classification Ripple-Down Rules), to classify web page segments. Our experimental results show that our MCRDR-based web page segments classification system successfully supports easy acquisition and maintenance of information extraction rules.

  16. Toward Capturing Momentary Changes of Heart Rate Variability by a Dynamic Analysis Method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haoshi; Zhu, Mingxing; Zheng, Yue; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has been performed on long-term electrocardiography (ECG) recordings (12~24 hours) and short-term recordings (2~5 minutes), which may not capture momentary change of HRV. In this study, we present a new method to analyze the momentary HRV (mHRV). The ECG recordings were segmented into a series of overlapped HRV analysis windows with a window length of 5 minutes and different time increments. The performance of the proposed method in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV measurement was evaluated with four commonly used time courses of HRV measures on both synthetic time series and real ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs. Our results showed that a smaller time increment could capture more dynamical information on transient changes. Considering a too short increment such as 10 s would cause the indented time courses of the four measures, a 1-min time increment (4-min overlapping) was suggested in the analysis of mHRV in the study. ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs were used to further assess the effectiveness of the proposed method. The pilot study demonstrated that the proposed analysis of mHRV could provide more accurate assessment of the dynamical changes in cardiac activity than the conventional measures of HRV (without time overlapping). The proposed method may provide an efficient means in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV and it would be worthy performing more investigations.

  17. Toward Capturing Momentary Changes of Heart Rate Variability by a Dynamic Analysis Method

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haoshi; Zhu, Mingxing; Zheng, Yue; Li, Guanglin

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) has been performed on long-term electrocardiography (ECG) recordings (12~24 hours) and short-term recordings (2~5 minutes), which may not capture momentary change of HRV. In this study, we present a new method to analyze the momentary HRV (mHRV). The ECG recordings were segmented into a series of overlapped HRV analysis windows with a window length of 5 minutes and different time increments. The performance of the proposed method in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV measurement was evaluated with four commonly used time courses of HRV measures on both synthetic time series and real ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs. Our results showed that a smaller time increment could capture more dynamical information on transient changes. Considering a too short increment such as 10 s would cause the indented time courses of the four measures, a 1-min time increment (4-min overlapping) was suggested in the analysis of mHRV in the study. ECG recordings from human subjects and dogs were used to further assess the effectiveness of the proposed method. The pilot study demonstrated that the proposed analysis of mHRV could provide more accurate assessment of the dynamical changes in cardiac activity than the conventional measures of HRV (without time overlapping). The proposed method may provide an efficient means in delineating the dynamics of momentary HRV and it would be worthy performing more investigations. PMID:26172953

  18. Optimal set of grid size and angular increment for practical dose calculation using the dynamic conformal arc technique: a systematic evaluation of the dosimetric effects in lung stereotactic body radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Siyong; Park, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Yeon-Sil; Suh, Tae-Suk

    2014-01-04

    To recommend the optimal plan parameter set of grid size and angular increment for dose calculations in treatment planning for lung stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) using dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT) considering both accuracy and computational efficiency. Dose variations with varying grid sizes (2, 3, and 4 mm) and angular increments (2°, 4°, 6°, and 10°) were analyzed in a thorax phantom for 3 spherical target volumes and in 9 patient cases. A 2-mm grid size and 2° angular increment are assumed sufficient to serve as reference values. The dosimetric effect was evaluated using dose-volume histograms, monitor units (MUs), and dose to organs at risk (OARs) for a definite volume corresponding to the dose-volume constraint in lung SBRT. The times required for dose calculations using each parameter set were compared for clinical practicality. Larger grid sizes caused a dose increase to the structures and required higher MUs to achieve the target coverage. The discrete beam arrangements at each angular increment led to over- and under-estimated OARs doses due to the undulating dose distribution. When a 2° angular increment was used in both studies, a 4-mm grid size changed the dose variation by up to 3-4% (50 cGy) for the heart and the spinal cord, while a 3-mm grid size produced a dose difference of <1% (12 cGy) in all tested OARs. When a 3-mm grid size was employed, angular increments of 6° and 10° caused maximum dose variations of 3% (23 cGy) and 10% (61 cGy) in the spinal cord, respectively, while a 4° increment resulted in a dose difference of <1% (8 cGy) in all cases except for that of one patient. The 3-mm grid size and 4° angular increment enabled a 78% savings in computation time without making any critical sacrifices to dose accuracy. A parameter set with a 3-mm grid size and a 4° angular increment is found to be appropriate for predicting patient dose distributions with a dose difference below 1% while reducing the computation time

  19. Dynamical pathway analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Hao; Choe, Yoonsuck

    2008-01-01

    Background Although a great deal is known about one gene or protein and its functions under different environmental conditions, little information is available about the complex behaviour of biological networks subject to different environmental perturbations. Observing differential expressions of one or more genes between normal and abnormal cells has been a mainstream method of discovering pertinent genes in diseases and therefore valuable drug targets. However, to date, no such method exists for elucidating and quantifying the differential dynamical behaviour of genetic regulatory networks, which can have greater impact on phenotypes than individual genes. Results We propose to redress the deficiency by formulating the functional study of biological networks as a control problem of dynamical systems. We developed mathematical methods to study the stability, the controllability, and the steady-state behaviour, as well as the transient responses of biological networks under different environmental perturbations. We applied our framework to three real-world datasets: the SOS DNA repair network in E. coli under different dosages of radiation, the GSH redox cycle in mice lung exposed to either poisonous air or normal air, and the MAPK pathway in mammalian cell lines exposed to three types of HIV type I Vpr, a wild type and two mutant types; and we found that the three genetic networks exhibited fundamentally different dynamical properties in normal and abnormal cells. Conclusion Difference in stability, relative stability, degrees of controllability, and transient responses between normal and abnormal cells means considerable difference in dynamical behaviours and different functioning of cells. Therefore differential dynamical properties can be a valuable tool in biomedical research. PMID:18221557

  20. Dynamic analysis of process reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Shadle, L.J.; Lawson, L.O.; Noel, S.D.

    1995-06-01

    The approach and methodology of conducting a dynamic analysis is presented in this poster session in order to describe how this type of analysis can be used to evaluate the operation and control of process reactors. Dynamic analysis of the PyGas{trademark} gasification process is used to illustrate the utility of this approach. PyGas{trademark} is the gasifier being developed for the Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF) by Jacobs-Siffine Engineering and Riley Stoker. In the first step of the analysis, process models are used to calculate the steady-state conditions and associated sensitivities for the process. For the PyGas{trademark} gasifier, the process models are non-linear mechanistic models of the jetting fluidized-bed pyrolyzer and the fixed-bed gasifier. These process sensitivities are key input, in the form of gain parameters or transfer functions, to the dynamic engineering models.

  1. Comparative analysis on thermal non-destructive testing imagery applying Candid Covariance-Free Incremental Principal Component Thermography (CCIPCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Bardia; Sfarra, Stefano; Ibarra Castanedo, Clemente; Maldague, Xavier P. V.

    2017-09-01

    Thermal and infrared imagery creates considerable developments in Non-Destructive Testing (NDT) area. Here, a thermography method for NDT specimens inspection is addressed by applying a technique for computation of eigen-decomposition which refers as Candid Covariance-Free Incremental Principal Component Thermography (CCIPCT). The proposed approach uses a shorter computational alternative to estimate covariance matrix and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to obtain the result of Principal Component Thermography (PCT) and ultimately segments the defects in the specimens applying color based K-medoids clustering approach. The problem of computational expenses for high-dimensional thermal image acquisition is also investigated. Three types of specimens (CFRP, Plexiglas and Aluminium) have been used for comparative benchmarking. The results conclusively indicate the promising performance and demonstrate a confirmation for the outlined properties.

  2. Incremental Benefits of Screening Colonoscopy over Sigmoidoscopy in Average-risk Populations: a model-driven analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jihyoun; Meza, Rafael; Hazelton, William D.; Renehan, Andrew G.; Luebeck, E. Georg

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Screening colonoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the magnitude and duration of protection, particularly against right-sided cancer, remain uncertain. We computed the incremental benefit of colonoscopy over FSG using a validated mathematical model, which reflects colorectal neoplasia growth characteristics while allowing uncertainty in endoscopic detection and removal of adenomas. Methods We calibrated models of CRC incidence within a multistage clonal expansion framework to data from: (i) San Francisco-Oakland SEER registry (reference population); and (ii) FSG long-term follow up data from 50,757 individuals after a negative FSG in the Kaiser Permanente system. We compared the residual CRC risks after FSG with full-length colonoscopy. Results Our model mirrors trial data with 10-year CRC risk reductions after FSG screening at age 50 years of approximately one third; the optimal age for a ‘once-only’ FSG exam was between ages 50 to 60 years; and the greater benefit was for men compared with women. There were considerable incremental gains in reduction of CRC risk by colonoscopy compared with FSG with the greatest benefit for screening colonoscopy at age 50 years. These results held up against lowering the right-sided adenoma detection sensitivity by 30%, as well as reducing the curative efficacy of polypectomy throughout the colon. Conclusions Mathematical modeling of CRC screening, which takes account of important aspects of tumor biology, demonstrates superior risk reductions by colonoscopy over FSG. Our predictions provide further rationale for recommending screening colonoscopy in average-risk populations before the age of 60. PMID:25783458

  3. Incremental benefits of screening colonoscopy over sigmoidoscopy in average-risk populations: a model-driven analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jihyoun; Meza, Rafael; Hazelton, William D; Renehan, Andrew G; Luebeck, E Georg

    2015-06-01

    Screening colonoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the magnitude and duration of protection, particularly against right-sided cancer, remain uncertain. We computed the incremental benefit of colonoscopy over FSG using a validated mathematical model, which reflects colorectal neoplasia growth characteristics while allowing uncertainty in endoscopic detection and removal of adenomas. We calibrated models of CRC incidence within a multistage clonal expansion framework to data from: (1) San Francisco-Oakland SEER registry (reference population) and (2) FSG long-term follow-up data from 50,757 individuals after a negative FSG in the Kaiser Permanente system. We compared the residual CRC risks after FSG with full-length colonoscopy. Our model mirrors trial data with 10-year CRC risk reductions after FSG screening at age 50 years of approximately one-third; the optimal age for a 'once-only' FSG exam was between ages 50 and 60 years; and the greater benefit was for men compared with women. There were considerable incremental gains in reduction in CRC risk by colonoscopy compared with FSG with the greatest benefit for screening colonoscopy at age 50 years. These results held up against lowering the right-sided adenoma detection sensitivity by 30%, as well as reducing the curative efficacy of polypectomy throughout the colon. Mathematical modeling of CRC screening, which takes account of important aspects of tumor biology, demonstrates superior risk reductions by colonoscopy over FSG. Our predictions provide further rationale for recommending screening colonoscopy in average-risk populations before the age of 60.

  4. Flexible rotor dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, F. A.

    1973-01-01

    A digital computer program was developed to analyze the general nonaxisymmetric and nonsynchronous transient and steady-state rotor dynamic performance of a bending- and shear-wise flexible rotor-bearing system under various operating conditions. The effects of rotor material mechanical hysteresis, rotor torsion flexibility, transverse effects of rotor axial and torsional loading and the anisotropic, in-phase and out-of-phase bearing stiffness and damping force and moment coefficients were included in the program to broaden its capability. An optimum solution method was found and incorporated in the computer program. Computer simulation of experimental data was made and qualitative agreements observed. The mathematical formulations, computer program verification, test data simulation, and user instruction was presented and discussed.

  5. Attempt to distinguish long-range temporal correlations from the statistics of the increments by natural time analysis.

    PubMed

    Varotsos, P A; Sarlis, N V; Skordas, E S; Tanaka, H K; Lazaridou, M S

    2006-08-01

    Self-similarity may originate from two origins: i.e., the process memory and the process' increments "infinite" variance. A distinction is attempted by employing the natural time chi . Concerning the first origin, we analyze recent data on seismic electric signals, which support the view that they exhibit infinitely ranged temporal correlations. Concerning the second, slowly driven systems that emit bursts of various energies E obeying the power-law distribution--i.e., P(E) approximately E(-gamma)--are studied. An interrelation between the exponent gamma and the variance kappa1(identical with - ) is obtained for the shuffled (randomized) data. For real earthquake data, the most probable value of kappa1 of the shuffled data is found to be approximately equal to that of the original data, the difference most likely arising from temporal correlation. Finally, it is found that the differential entropy associated with the probability P(kappa1) maximizes for gamma around gamma approximately 1.6-1.7 , which is comparable to the value determined experimentally in diverse phenomena: e.g., solar flares, icequakes, dislocation glide in stressed single crystals of ice, etc. It also agrees with the b value in the Gutenberg-Richter law of earthquakes. In addition, the case of multiplicative cascades is studied in the natural time domain.

  6. Attempt to distinguish long-range temporal correlations from the statistics of the increments by natural time analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Varotsos, P. A.; Sarlis, N. V.; Lazaridou, M. S.; Skordas, E. S.; Tanaka, H. K.

    2006-08-15

    Self-similarity may originate from two origins: i.e., the process memory and the process' increments 'infinite' variance. A distinction is attempted by employing the natural time {chi}. Concerning the first origin, we analyze recent data on seismic electric signals, which support the view that they exhibit infinitely ranged temporal correlations. Concerning the second, slowly driven systems that emit bursts of various energies E obeying the power-law distribution--i.e., P(E){approx}E{sup -{gamma}}--are studied. An interrelation between the exponent {gamma} and the variance {kappa}{sub 1}({identical_to}<{chi}{sup 2}>-<{chi}>{sup 2}) is obtained for the shuffled (randomized) data. For real earthquake data, the most probable value of {kappa}{sub 1} of the shuffled data is found to be approximately equal to that of the original data, the difference most likely arising from temporal correlation. Finally, it is found that the differential entropy associated with the probability P({kappa}{sub 1}) maximizes for {gamma} around {gamma}{approx_equal}1.6-1.7, which is comparable to the value determined experimentally in diverse phenomena: e.g., solar flares, icequakes, dislocation glide in stressed single crystals of ice, etc. It also agrees with the b value in the Gutenberg-Richter law of earthquakes. In addition, the case of multiplicative cascades is studied in the natural time domain.

  7. Analysis and prediction of drug-drug interaction by minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lili; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Yu-Hang; Wei, Lai; Cheng, Shiwen; Kong, Xiangyin; Zheng, Mingyue; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-02-01

    Drug-drug interaction (DDI) defines a situation in which one drug affects the activity of another when both are administered together. DDI is a common cause of adverse drug reactions and sometimes also leads to improved therapeutic effects. Therefore, it is of great interest to discover novel DDIs according to their molecular properties and mechanisms in a robust and rigorous way. This paper attempts to predict effective DDIs using the following properties: (1) chemical interaction between drugs; (2) protein interactions between the targets of drugs; and (3) target enrichment of KEGG pathways. The data consisted of 7323 pairs of DDIs collected from the DrugBank and 36,615 pairs of drugs constructed by randomly combining two drugs. Each drug pair was represented by 465 features derived from the aforementioned three categories of properties. The random forest algorithm was adopted to train the prediction model. Some feature selection techniques, including minimum redundancy maximum relevance and incremental feature selection, were used to extract key features as the optimal input for the prediction model. The extracted key features may help to gain insights into the mechanisms of DDIs and provide some guidelines for the relevant clinical medication developments, and the prediction model can give new clues for identification of novel DDIs.

  8. Nonstationary increments, scaling distributions, and variable diffusion processes in financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bassler, Kevin E.; McCauley, Joseph L.; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2007-10-01

    Fat-tailed distributions have been reported in fluctuations of financial markets for more than a decade. Sliding interval techniques used in these studies implicitly assume that the underlying stochastic process has stationary increments. Through an analysis of intraday increments, we explicitly show that this assumption is invalid for the Euro-Dollar exchange rate. We find several time intervals during the day where the standard deviation of increments exhibits power law behavior in time. Stochastic dynamics during these intervals is shown to be given by diffusion processes with a diffusion coefficient that depends on time and the exchange rate. We introduce methods to evaluate the dynamical scaling index and the scaling function empirically. In general, the scaling index is significantly smaller than previously reported values close to 0.5. We show how the latter as well as apparent fat-tailed distributions can occur only as artifacts of the sliding interval analysis.

  9. Incremental Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Pan, Zhoujin; Xi, Yanqiu; Chen, Ling

    By simulating the population size of the human evolution, a PSO algorithm with increment of particle size (IPPSO) was proposed. Without changing the PSO operations, IPPSO can obtain better solutions with less time cost by modifying the structure of traditional PSO. Experimental results show that IPPSO using logistic model is more efficient and requires less computation time than using linear function in solving more complex program problems.

  10. Static Implicit vs. Dynamic Explicit Finite Element Analysis for Ring Rolling Process Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauskar, P. M.; Sawamiphakdi, K.; Jin, D. Q.

    2004-06-01

    Over the past two decades, various finite element formulations and solution techniques for metal forming analysis have been developed. Most finite element codes for bulk metal forming used in the industry today are based on static implicit solution schemes wherein a non-linear system of equations is solved iteratively for each time increment. For simple 2D problems, static implicit analysis models are generally known to be more accurate and efficient than dynamic explicit analysis models. However, for complex 3D forming problems, the static implicit procedures encounter a number of inherent difficulties especially in incremental forming processes such as ring rolling in which several surface nodes repeatedly make contact with and separate from the dies. Static implicit finite element formulations require a very long computational time for the analysis of ring rolling. Several solution techniques have been developed to reduce the computational time of static implicit finite element analysis, namely the dual mesh technique, Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) technique, etc. The dynamic explicit method on the other hand appears to be very effective in analyzing complex incremental forming problems. In this paper, a comparison of the analysis results obtained using dynamic explicit finite element method and static implicit method using a dual mesh approach is presented.

  11. Analysis of the aerobic-anaerobic transition in elite cyclists during incremental exercise with the use of electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Lucia, A.; Sanchez, O.; Carvajal, A.; Chicharro, J. L.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the validity and reliability of surface electromyography (EMG) as a new non-invasive determinant of the metabolic response to incremental exercise in elite cyclists. The relation between EMG activity and other more conventional methods for analysing the aerobic-anaerobic transition such as blood lactate measurements (lactate threshold (LT) and onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA)) and ventilatory parameters (ventilatory thresholds 1 and 2 (VT1 and VT2)) was studied. METHODS: Twenty eight elite road cyclists (age 24 (4) years; VO2MAX 69.9 (6.4) ml/kg/min; values mean (SD)) were selected as subjects. Each of them performed a ramp protocol (starting at 0 W, with increases of 5 W every 12 seconds) on a cycle ergometer (validity study). In addition, 15 of them performed the same test twice (reliability study). During the tests, data on gas exchange and blood lactate levels were collected to determine VT1, VT2, LT, and OBLA. The root mean squares of EMG signals (rms-EMG) were recorded from both the vastus lateralis and the rectus femoris at each intensity using surface electrodes. RESULTS: A two threshold response was detected in the rms-EMG recordings from both muscles in 90% of subjects, with two breakpoints, EMGT1 and EMGT2, at around 60-70% and 80-90% of VO2MAX respectively. The results of the reliability study showed no significant differences (p > 0.05) between mean values of EMGT1 and EMGT2 obtained in both tests. Furthermore, no significant differences (p > 0.05) existed between mean values of EMGT1, in the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, and VT1 and LT (62.8 (14.5) and 69.0 (6.2) and 64.6 (6.4) and 68.7 (8.2)% of VO2MAX respectively), or between mean values of EMGT2, in the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris, and VT2 and OBLA (86.9 (9.0) and 88.0 (6.2) and 84.6 (6.5) and 87.7 (6.4)% of VO2MAX respectively). CONCLUSION: rms-EMG may be a useful complementary non-invasive method for analysing the aerobic- anaerobic transition

  12. Nonlinear analysis of dynamic signature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashidi, S.; Fallah, A.; Towhidkhah, F.

    2013-12-01

    Signature is a long trained motor skill resulting in well combination of segments like strokes and loops. It is a physical manifestation of complex motor processes. The problem, generally stated, is that how relative simplicity in behavior emerges from considerable complexity of perception-action system that produces behavior within an infinitely variable biomechanical and environmental context. To solve this problem, we present evidences which indicate that motor control dynamic in signing process is a chaotic process. This chaotic dynamic may explain a richer array of time series behavior in motor skill of signature. Nonlinear analysis is a powerful approach and suitable tool which seeks for characterizing dynamical systems through concepts such as fractal dimension and Lyapunov exponent. As a result, they can be analyzed in both horizontal and vertical for time series of position and velocity. We observed from the results that noninteger values for the correlation dimension indicates low dimensional deterministic dynamics. This result could be confirmed by using surrogate data tests. We have also used time series to calculate the largest Lyapunov exponent and obtain a positive value. These results constitute significant evidence that signature data are outcome of chaos in a nonlinear dynamical system of motor control.

  13. Dynamic analysis of nonlinear rotor-housing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noah, Sherif T.

    1988-01-01

    Nonlinear analysis methods are developed which will enable the reliable prediction of the dynamic behavior of the space shuttle main engine (SSME) turbopumps in the presence of bearing clearances and other local nonlinearities. A computationally efficient convolution method, based on discretized Duhamel and transition matrix integral formulations, is developed for the transient analysis. In the formulation, the coupling forces due to the nonlinearities are treated as external forces acting on the coupled subsystems. Iteration is utilized to determine their magnitudes at each time increment. The method is applied to a nonlinear generic model of the high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP). As compared to the fourth order Runge-Kutta numerical integration methods, the convolution approach proved to be more accurate and more highly efficient. For determining the nonlinear, steady-state periodic responses, an incremental harmonic balance method was also developed. The method was successfully used to determine dominantly harmonic and subharmonic responses fo the HPOTP generic model with bearing clearances. A reduction method similar to the impedance formulation utilized with linear systems is used to reduce the housing-rotor models to their coordinates at the bearing clearances. Recommendations are included for further development of the method, for extending the analysis to aperiodic and chaotic regimes and for conducting critical parameteric studies of the nonlinear response of the current SSME turbopumps.

  14. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  15. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  16. Understanding Detection Limits in Fluid Inclusion Analysis Using an Incremental Crush Fast Scan Method for Planetary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blamey, N. J. F.; Parnell, J.; Longerich, H. P.

    2012-03-01

    We propose formulae for the determination of the detection and reporting limits applied to fluid inclusion volatile analysis, adapted from LA-ICP-MS formulae, and applicable to samples of limited size that are available in planetary science studies.

  17. Final submittal: Increments A, B, F, G, Fort Story, Energy Engineering Analysis Program: Executive summary. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1985-12-31

    The objective of this is a summary of an Energy Engineering Analysis, conducted to provide a Basewide Energy Savings Plan at Fort Story, Virginia. This Plan includes recommendations for energy conservation Projects to reduce the installation`s present energy consumption, as well as a description of other energy-related factors which affect consumption. It is important to note that savings figures presented in this summary can only be realized after all Projects have been implemented. MMM Design Group has developed Projects that meet the funding requirements for the D.O.D.`s Energy Conservation Investment Program. Furthermore, the recommended Projects provide compliance with the Army Facilities Energy Plan. This summary presents data relative to the following chronological period: (A) 1975 Energy Consumption (baseline). (B) 1985 Energy Use (projection). The programmed projects developed in this analysis, along with other energy use factors described further in the Basewide Energy Savings Plan, have resulted in a 43% projected reduction in Fort Story`s energy consumption by FY 1985. This Analysis Program was conducted in accordance with the DAEN-MPE-E scope of work for Energy Engineering Analysis Program (EEAP), revised 4 May 1981. The analysis conforms with the NAOEN-MA Norfolk District Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) guidance, dated 10 November 1980. Further Addenda are provided to update the analysis results in accordance with Energy Conservation Investment Program (ECIP) guidance, revised 31 December 1982.

  18. Freezing increment in keratophakia.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Wisnicki, H J

    In homoplastic keratomileusis, keratophakia, and epikeratophakia, the corneal tissue that provides the final refractive lenticule undergoes a conformational change when frozen. Because corneal tissue is composed primarily of water, an assumed value of 9.08% (approximate volumic percentage expansion of water when frozen) is frequently used for the increase in thickness, or freezing increment, rather than measuring it directly. We evaluated 32 cases of clinical keratophakia and found the increase in thickness to average 37 +/- 21%. In this series of 32 cases, the percentage of patients with a greater than 4 D residual refractive error was 16%. If an assumed freezing increment of 9.08% had been used, the percentage would have been 28%, with two-thirds of these 28% manifesting a marked undercorrection. Because of a lack of studies documenting the behavior of corneal tissue following cryoprotection and freezing, it is suggested that measurements be taken during homoplastic surgery to minimize the potential for significant inaccuracy in obtaining the desired optic result.

  19. Inelastic transient dynamic analysis of three-dimensional problems by BEM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, S.; Banerjee, P. K.

    1990-01-01

    A general direct boundary element formulation and its numerical implementation for solving transient dynamic problems of three-dimensional isotropic homogeneous or piecewise homogeneous solids involving material nonlinearities are presented. The algorithm produces accurate results for static nonlinear problems by using large time steps. When a large value of yield stress is selected, the incremental inelastic transient algorithm produces results identical to those obtained by elastodynamic analysis.

  20. An incremental strategy for calculating consistent discrete CFD sensitivity derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korivi, Vamshi Mohan; Taylor, Arthur C., III; Newman, Perry A.; Hou, Gene W.; Jones, Henry E.

    1992-01-01

    In this preliminary study involving advanced computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes, an incremental formulation, also known as the 'delta' or 'correction' form, is presented for solving the very large sparse systems of linear equations which are associated with aerodynamic sensitivity analysis. For typical problems in 2D, a direct solution method can be applied to these linear equations which are associated with aerodynamic sensitivity analysis. For typical problems in 2D, a direct solution method can be applied to these linear equations in either the standard or the incremental form, in which case the two are equivalent. Iterative methods appear to be needed for future 3D applications; however, because direct solver methods require much more computer memory than is currently available. Iterative methods for solving these equations in the standard form result in certain difficulties, such as ill-conditioning of the coefficient matrix, which can be overcome when these equations are cast in the incremental form; these and other benefits are discussed. The methodology is successfully implemented and tested in 2D using an upwind, cell-centered, finite volume formulation applied to the thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations. Results are presented for two laminar sample problems: (1) transonic flow through a double-throat nozzle; and (2) flow over an isolated airfoil.

  1. Robust incremental condition estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Tang, P.T.P.

    1991-03-29

    This paper presents an improved version of incremental condition estimation, a technique for tracking the extremal singular values of a triangular matrix as it is being constructed one column at a time. We present a new motivation for this estimation technique using orthogonal projections. The paper focuses on an implementation of this estimation scheme in an accurate and consistent fashion. In particular, we address the subtle numerical issues arising in the computation of the eigensystem of a symmetric rank-one perturbed diagonal 2 {times} 2 matrix. Experimental results show that the resulting scheme does a good job in estimating the extremal singular values of triangular matrices, independent of matrix size and matrix condition number, and that it performs qualitatively in the same fashion as some of the commonly used nonincremental condition estimation schemes.

  2. Value-Driven Incremental Development (Poster)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-27

    rework during development. Multi-dimensional Analysis What is the design implication of a release decision? Architecting for Incremental Assurance...measures are needed to make good release decisions? Selected FY14 Results • Improved rework analysis by making architectural dependency information...studies and surveys with organizations revealed architectural rework occurs in such context and can be managed by better quantification of technical

  3. Nonlinear analysis of drought dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, M.

    2015-12-01

    Drought is an extreme natural hazard and becomes a severe problem in the world. It arises as a result of interactions between climate input and human activity, displaying the nonlinearity and complexity. Nonlinear time series analyses open a way to study the underlying dynamic characteristics of drought, and then provide the forward knowledge to understanding the physical mechanism of drought event. The rationale behind this idea is that information about the representation of nonlinear properties could be used as an additional quality indicator. To that end, the correlation dimension method, a powerful nonlinear time series analysis method based on the chaos theory, has been suggested to assess the intrinsic dimensionality or degree of freedom of time series according to Takens (1981). It can provide an assessment of the dominant processes that is required to map the observed dynamics. In this study, daily discharge and hourly groundwater level data of 63 catchments in Germany and China were investigated with correlation dimension method. The results indicated that the correlation dimension values of studied discharge exhibited none clear spatial patterns, but showed significant correlations with the spatial heterogeneity within the catchments. In contrast, the correlation dimension values of groundwater level displayed spatial patterns due to the different aquifer conditions (confined or unconfined). High correlation dimension values indicate partly confined conditions. In addition, Hurst analysis was involved to qualify the persistence of drought. It seems that drought mechanisms can be learnt from the data themselves in an inverse manner.

  4. Mine design using column analysis: a tool for the incremental evaluation of open-pit mining deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Tracy, L.N.

    1984-04-01

    Column analysis is a method whereby down-hole drill data can be assessed for open-pit mining potential. This technique enables a single hole to be evaluated as a small pit, and can serve as a basis for preliminary mine design. Specific operating costs are assigned to intervals of material as they are encountered from the surface to the base of mining. Summed operating costs are then divided by the units of recoverable product anticipated. The resulting value (on a per unit basis) is then assigned to the individual hole being evaluated, and can be used directly in preliminary mine planning. Profitability can also be determined for each hole by multiplying the difference between the unit cost and the market value of the recovered product by the amount of recovered product. Mine planning can then proceed by evaluating the quantity of favorable holes within a given area, their continuity, and the overall cost and profitability relative to desired or available market and production conditions.

  5. Correlation Analysis of Exercise-Induced Changes in Plasma Trace Element and Hormone Levels During Incremental Exercise in Well-Trained Athletes.

    PubMed

    Soria, Marisol; Anson, Miguel; Escanero, Jesús F

    2016-03-01

    This study analyzes the relationship between hormonal changes induced by exercise and variations in trace elements associated with oxidative stress during incremental exercise. Nineteen well-trained endurance athletes performed a cycle ergometer test: after a warm-up of 10 min at 2.0 W kg(-1), workload increased by 0.5 W kg(-1) every 10 min until exhaustion. The analysis was controlled for prior diet and activity patterns, levels of exercise training, and time of day (circadian rhythms). Whole blood lactate concentration and plasma concentrations of ions (Zn, Se, Mn, and Co), insulin, glucagon, aldosterone, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), calcitonin, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were measured at rest; at the end of each stage; and 3, 5, and 7 min post-exercise. The statistical analysis involved paired non-parametric tests and correlation coefficients. No significant differences were found in Mn or Co levels as a function of exercise intensity. Zn and Se levels at the end of the exercise protocol and over the recovery time were significantly different to baseline. Further, Zn levels were significantly correlated with aldosterone, calcitonin, and PTH levels, while Se levels were associated with aldosterone, calcitonin, and TSH levels. Our results indicate several different patterns of association between acute changes in hormone concentrations and variations in trace element concentrations related to oxidative stress during submaximal exercise.

  6. International Space Station Increment Operations Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Horst; Sielaff, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The Industrial Operator (IO) has defined End-to-End services to perform efficiently all required operations tasks for the Manned Space Program (MSP) as agreed during the Ministerial Council in Edinburgh in November 2001. Those services are the result of a detailed task analysis based on the operations processes as derived from the Space Station Program Implementation Plans (SPIP) and defined in the Operations Processes Documents (OPD). These services are related to ISS Increment Operations and ATV Mission Operations. Each of these End-to-End services is typically characterised by the following properties: It has a clearly defined starting point, where all requirements on the end-product are fixed and associated performance metrics of the customer are well defined. It has a clearly defined ending point, when the product or service is delivered to the customer and accepted by him, according to the performance metrics defined at the start point. The implementation of the process might be restricted by external boundary conditions and constraints mutually agreed with the customer. As far as those are respected the IO has the free choice to select methods and means of implementation. The ISS Increment Operations Service (IOS) activities required for the MSP Exploitation program cover the complete increment specific cycle starting with the support to strategic planning and ending with the post increment evaluation. These activities are divided into sub-services including the following tasks: - ISS Planning Support covering the support to strategic and tactical planning up to the generation - Development &Payload Integration Support - ISS Increment Preparation - ISS Increment Execution These processes are tight together by the Increment Integration Management, which provides the planning and scheduling of all activities as well as the technical management of the overall process . The paper describes the entire End-to-End ISS Increment Operations service and the

  7. Analysis of sea ice dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwally, J.

    1988-01-01

    The ongoing work has established the basis for using multiyear sea ice concentrations from SMMR passive microwave for studies of largescale advection and convergence/divergence of the Arctic sea ice pack. Comparisons were made with numerical model simulations and buoy data showing qualitative agreement on daily to interannual time scales. Analysis of the 7-year SMMR data set shows significant interannual variations in the total area of multiyear ice. The scientific objective is to investigate the dynamics, mass balance, and interannual variability of the Arctic sea ice pack. The research emphasizes the direct application of sea ice parameters derived from passive microwave data (SMMR and SSMI) and collaborative studies using a sea ice dynamics model. The possible causes of observed interannual variations in the multiyear ice area are being examined. The relative effects of variations in the large scale advection and convergence/divergence within the ice pack on a regional and seasonal basis are investigated. The effects of anomolous atmospheric forcings are being examined, including the long-lived effects of synoptic events and monthly variations in the mean geostrophic winds. Estimates to be made will include the amount of new ice production within the ice pack during winter and the amount of ice exported from the pack.

  8. Does the use of bilateral internal mammary artery (IMA) grafts provide incremental benefit relative to the use of a single IMA graft? A meta-analysis approach.

    PubMed

    Rizzoli, Giulio; Schiavon, Laura; Bellini, Pierantonio

    2002-11-01

    Does the use of bilateral internal mammary artery (IMA) grafts provide incremental benefit relative to the use of a single IMA graft? Meta-analysis by qualitative and quantitative protocol of the studies published in the literature in the last 15 years. Only eight, out of 149 observational studies found, met our criteria: surgical results of bilateral versus single IMA, patient age range from 20 to 89 years, exclusion of emergency and diabetic patients, study group larger than 100 patients, minimal follow-up time. The final sample size included 16362 patients. Late survival was evaluated at 5 and 10 years. The hazard ratio (HR) was calculated from seven studies, the difference of survival was from six and five studies, respectively. The effect size was summarized using a random effect model, suggested by the results of statistical test for homogeneity of the HR (P < 0.05) and of the survival difference at 5 (P < 0.05) and at 10 years (P < 0.05). The bilateral IMA estimate of combined HR was 0.79 (95% confidence limits, C.L. = 0.66/0.91). The combined difference of survival probability at 5 years was 0.014 (95% C.L. = -0.03/0.06) and at 10 years was 0.07 (95% C.L. = 0.003/0.170). There is significant evidence in favor of decreasing death risk of bilateral versus single IMA procedure. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science B.V.

  9. Descriptive analysis and comparison of strategic incremental rehearsal to "Business as Usual" sight-word instruction for an adult nonreader with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Richman, David M; Grubb, Laura; Thompson, Samuel

    2016-10-28

    Strategic Incremental Rehearsal (SIR) is an effective method for teaching sight-word acquisition, but has neither been evaluated for use in adults with an intellectual disability, nor directly compared to the ongoing instruction in the natural environment. Experimental analysis of sight word acquisition via an alternating treatment design was conducted with a 23-year-old woman with Down syndrome. SIR was compared to the current reading instruction (CRI) in a classroom for young adults with intellectual disabilities. CRI procedures included non-contingent praise, receptive touch prompts ("touch the word bat"), echoic prompts ("say bat"), textual prompts ("read the word"), and pre-determined introduction of new words. SIR procedures included textual prompts on flash cards, contingent praise, corrective feedback, and mastery-based introduction of new words. The results indicated that SIR was associated with more rapid acquisition of sight words than CRI. Directions for future research could include systematic comparisons to other procedures, and evaluations of procedural permutations of SIR.

  10. Recognition of battery aging variations for LiFePO4 batteries in 2nd use applications combining incremental capacity analysis and statistical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan; Jiang, Jiuchun; Zhang, Caiping; Zhang, Weige; Gao, Yang; Guo, Qipei

    2017-08-01

    To assess the economic benefits of battery reuse, the consistency and aging characteristics of a retired LiFePO4 battery pack are studied in this paper. The consistency of battery modules is analyzed from the perspective of the capacity and the internal resistance. Test results indicate that battery module parameter dispersion increases along with battery aging. However, battery modules with better capacity consistency doesn't ensure better resistance consistency. Then the aging characteristics of the battery pack are analyzed and the main results are as follow: (1) Weibull and normal distribution are feasible to fit the capacity and resistance distribution of battery modules respectively; (2) SOC imbalance is the dominating factor in the capacity fading process of the battery pack; (3) By employing the incremental capacity (IC) and IC peak area analysis, a consistency evaluation method representing the aging mechanism variations of the battery modules is proposed and then an accurate battery screening strategy is put forward. This study not only provides data support for evaluating economic benefits of retired batteries but also presents a method to recognize the battery aging variations, which is helpful for rapid evaluation and screening of retired batteries for 2nd use.

  11. Incremental Contingency Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearden, Richard; Meuleau, Nicolas; Ramakrishnan, Sailesh; Smith, David E.; Washington, Rich

    2003-01-01

    There has been considerable work in AI on planning under uncertainty. However, this work generally assumes an extremely simple model of action that does not consider continuous time and resources. These assumptions are not reasonable for a Mars rover, which must cope with uncertainty about the duration of tasks, the energy required, the data storage necessary, and its current position and orientation. In this paper, we outline an approach to generating contingency plans when the sources of uncertainty involve continuous quantities such as time and resources. The approach involves first constructing a "seed" plan, and then incrementally adding contingent branches to this plan in order to improve utility. The challenge is to figure out the best places to insert contingency branches. This requires an estimate of how much utility could be gained by building a contingent branch at any given place in the seed plan. Computing this utility exactly is intractable, but we outline an approximation method that back propagates utility distributions through a graph structure similar to that of a plan graph.

  12. Incremental Support Vector Learning for Ordinal Regression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Sheng, Victor S; Tay, Keng Yeow; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2015-07-01

    Support vector ordinal regression (SVOR) is a popular method to tackle ordinal regression problems. However, until now there were no effective algorithms proposed to address incremental SVOR learning due to the complicated formulations of SVOR. Recently, an interesting accurate on-line algorithm was proposed for training ν -support vector classification (ν-SVC), which can handle a quadratic formulation with a pair of equality constraints. In this paper, we first present a modified SVOR formulation based on a sum-of-margins strategy. The formulation has multiple constraints, and each constraint includes a mixture of an equality and an inequality. Then, we extend the accurate on-line ν-SVC algorithm to the modified formulation, and propose an effective incremental SVOR algorithm. The algorithm can handle a quadratic formulation with multiple constraints, where each constraint is constituted of an equality and an inequality. More importantly, it tackles the conflicts between the equality and inequality constraints. We also provide the finite convergence analysis for the algorithm. Numerical experiments on the several benchmark and real-world data sets show that the incremental algorithm can converge to the optimal solution in a finite number of steps, and is faster than the existing batch and incremental SVOR algorithms. Meanwhile, the modified formulation has better accuracy than the existing incremental SVOR algorithm, and is as accurate as the sum-of-margins based formulation of Shashua and Levin.

  13. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, M.E.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  14. Vehicle systems: coupled and interactive dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vantsevich, Vladimir V.

    2014-11-01

    This article formulates a new direction in vehicle dynamics, described as coupled and interactive vehicle system dynamics. Formalised procedures and analysis of case studies are presented. An analytical consideration, which explains the physics of coupled system dynamics and its consequences for dynamics of a vehicle, is given for several sets of systems including: (i) driveline and suspension of a 6×6 truck, (ii) a brake mechanism and a limited slip differential of a drive axle and (iii) a 4×4 vehicle steering system and driveline system. The article introduces a formal procedure to turn coupled system dynamics into interactive dynamics of systems. A new research direction in interactive dynamics of an active steering and a hybrid-electric power transmitting unit is presented and analysed to control power distribution between the drive axles of a 4×4 vehicle. A control strategy integrates energy efficiency and lateral dynamics by decoupling dynamics of the two systems thus forming their interactive dynamics.

  15. Withholding Increments. Focus on School Law Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weger, Christine D.; Galante, Susan

    Local boards of education in New Jersey are authorized by law to withhold increments of staff members in certain circumstances. The purpose of this publication is to provide an analysis and summary of decisions involving a board's exercise of this authority, and it is intended to serve as a guide and a reference tool to be used in determining when…

  16. Incremental Parsing with Adjoining Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yoshihide; Matsubara, Shigeki

    This paper describes an incremental parser based on an adjoining operation. By using the operation, we can avoid the problem of infinite local ambiguity. This paper further proposes a restricted version of the adjoining operation, which preserves lexical dependencies of partial parse trees. Our experimental results showed that the restriction enhances the accuracy of the incremental parsing.

  17. Dynamics Analysis of Wind Energy Production Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berg, V. I.; Zakirzakov, A. G.; Gordievskaya, E. F.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of the introduction experience and dynamics development of the world wind energy production. Calculated the amount of wind energy sources investments and the production capacity growth dynamics of the wind turbines. The studies have shown that the introduction dynamics of new wind energy sources is higher than any other energy source.

  18. BAX: a toolbox for the dynamic analysis of functional MRI datasets.

    PubMed

    Bagarinao, Epifanio; Matsuo, Kayako; Nakai, Toshiharu; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2008-01-01

    We developed a toolbox called BAX (brain activation explorer) for the dynamic analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) datasets using the general linear model. The toolbox provides a graphical user interface where several routines can be accessed to extract different sets of information from a given series of functional images. The dynamic analysis can be implemented using either an incremental approach or a sliding window approach. In particular, BAX can be used to construct dynamic activation maps that can be used to assess the contribution of newly added volumes in the final activation map, detect problematic segments in the dataset, or localize in time dynamic changes in brain activity. Consistency maps, which graphically represent the number of times voxels are consecutively detected as active in a given analysis, can also be constructed using either incremental or sliding window analysis. BAX runs under Matlab (MathWorks, Inc.) and requires some routines from SPM2 (Wellcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, London, UK) for its operation. It can be freely downloaded at http://www.medgrid.org/ website.

  19. Dynamic Hurricane Data Analysis Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knosp, Brian W.; Li, Peggy; Vu, Quoc A.

    2009-01-01

    A dynamic hurricane data analysis tool allows users of the JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) to analyze data over a Web medium. The TCIS software is described in the previous article, Tropical Cyclone Information System (TCIS) (NPO-45748). This tool interfaces with the TCIS database to pull in data from several different atmospheric and oceanic data sets, both observed by instruments. Users can use this information to generate histograms, maps, and profile plots for specific storms. The tool also displays statistical values for the user-selected parameter for the mean, standard deviation, median, minimum, and maximum values. There is little wait time, allowing for fast data plots over date and spatial ranges. Users may also zoom-in for a closer look at a particular spatial range. This is version 1 of the software. Researchers will use the data and tools on the TCIS to understand hurricane processes, improve hurricane forecast models and identify what types of measurements the next generation of instruments will need to collect.

  20. Metabolic syndrome cluster does not provide incremental prognostic information in patients with stable cardiovascular disease: A post hoc analysis of the AIM-HIGH trial.

    PubMed

    Lyubarova, Radmila; Robinson, Jennifer G; Miller, Michael; Simmons, Debra L; Xu, Ping; Abramson, Beth L; Elam, Marshall B; Brown, Todd M; McBride, Ruth; Fleg, Jerome L; Desvigne-Nickens, Patrice; Ayenew, Woubeshet; Boden, William E

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a well-known risk factor for the development of cardiovascular (CV) disease; yet, controversy persists whether it adds incremental prognostic value in patients with established CV disease. This study was performed to determine if MS is associated with worse CV outcomes in patients with established CV disease treated intensively with statins. We performed a post hoc analysis of the Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides and Impact on Global Health Outcomes trial, in which patients with established CV disease and atherogenic dyslipidemia (n = 3414) were randomly assigned to receive extended release niacin or placebo during a mean 36-month follow-up, to assess whether the presence of MS or the number of MS components contributed to CV outcomes. The composite primary end point of CV events occurred in 15.1% of patients without MS vs 13.8%, 16.9%, and 16.8% of patients with MS in the subsets with 3, 4, and 5 MS components, respectively (corresponding adjusted hazard ratios 0.9, 1.1, and 1.1 relative to patients without MS), P = .55. Comparing subgroups with 3 vs 4 or 5 MS components, there was no significant difference in either the composite primary end point or secondary end points. Patients with diabetes mellitus had higher event rates, with or without the presence of MS. The presence of MS was not associated with worse CV outcomes in the AIM-HIGH population. The rate of CV events in statin-treated Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome with Low HDL/High Triglycerides and Impact on Global Health Outcomes patients with MS was not significantly influenced by the number of MS components. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  2. Systems-Dynamic Analysis for Neighborhood Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systems-dynamic analysis (or system dynamics (SD)) helps planners identify interrelated impacts of transportation and land-use policies on neighborhood-scale economic outcomes for households and businesses, among other applications. This form of analysis can show benefits and tr...

  3. Bayesian Analysis of Individual Level Personality Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Cripps, Edward; Wood, Robert E; Beckmann, Nadin; Lau, John; Beckmann, Jens F; Cripps, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian technique with analyses of within-person processes at the level of the individual is presented. The approach is used to examine whether the patterns of within-person responses on a 12-trial simulation task are consistent with the predictions of ITA theory (Dweck, 1999). ITA theory states that the performance of an individual with an entity theory of ability is more likely to spiral down following a failure experience than the performance of an individual with an incremental theory of ability. This is because entity theorists interpret failure experiences as evidence of a lack of ability which they believe is largely innate and therefore relatively fixed; whilst incremental theorists believe in the malleability of abilities and interpret failure experiences as evidence of more controllable factors such as poor strategy or lack of effort. The results of our analyses support ITA theory at both the within- and between-person levels of analyses and demonstrate the benefits of Bayesian techniques for the analysis of within-person processes. These include more formal specification of the theory and the ability to draw inferences about each individual, which allows for more nuanced interpretations of individuals within a personality category, such as differences in the individual probabilities of spiraling. While Bayesian techniques have many potential advantages for the analyses of processes at the level of the individual, ease of use is not one of them for psychologists trained in traditional frequentist statistical techniques.

  4. Bayesian Analysis of Individual Level Personality Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, Edward; Wood, Robert E.; Beckmann, Nadin; Lau, John; Beckmann, Jens F.; Cripps, Sally Ann

    2016-01-01

    A Bayesian technique with analyses of within-person processes at the level of the individual is presented. The approach is used to examine whether the patterns of within-person responses on a 12-trial simulation task are consistent with the predictions of ITA theory (Dweck, 1999). ITA theory states that the performance of an individual with an entity theory of ability is more likely to spiral down following a failure experience than the performance of an individual with an incremental theory of ability. This is because entity theorists interpret failure experiences as evidence of a lack of ability which they believe is largely innate and therefore relatively fixed; whilst incremental theorists believe in the malleability of abilities and interpret failure experiences as evidence of more controllable factors such as poor strategy or lack of effort. The results of our analyses support ITA theory at both the within- and between-person levels of analyses and demonstrate the benefits of Bayesian techniques for the analysis of within-person processes. These include more formal specification of the theory and the ability to draw inferences about each individual, which allows for more nuanced interpretations of individuals within a personality category, such as differences in the individual probabilities of spiraling. While Bayesian techniques have many potential advantages for the analyses of processes at the level of the individual, ease of use is not one of them for psychologists trained in traditional frequentist statistical techniques. PMID:27486415

  5. Incremental learning for automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Zachary O.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Davis, Warren Leon,; Dixon, Kevin R.; Jones, Brian S.; Martin, Nathaniel; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2013-12-01

    People responding to high-consequence national-security situations need tools to help them make the right decision quickly. The dynamic, time-critical, and ever-changing nature of these situations, especially those involving an adversary, require models of decision support that can dynamically react as a situation unfolds and changes. Automated knowledge capture is a key part of creating individualized models of decision making in many situations because it has been demonstrated as a very robust way to populate computational models of cognition. However, existing automated knowledge capture techniques only populate a knowledge model with data prior to its use, after which the knowledge model is static and unchanging. In contrast, humans, including our national-security adversaries, continually learn, adapt, and create new knowledge as they make decisions and witness their effect. This artificial dichotomy between creation and use exists because the majority of automated knowledge capture techniques are based on traditional batch machine-learning and statistical algorithms. These algorithms are primarily designed to optimize the accuracy of their predictions and only secondarily, if at all, concerned with issues such as speed, memory use, or ability to be incrementally updated. Thus, when new data arrives, batch algorithms used for automated knowledge capture currently require significant recomputation, frequently from scratch, which makes them ill suited for use in dynamic, timecritical, high-consequence decision making environments. In this work we seek to explore and expand upon the capabilities of dynamic, incremental models that can adapt to an ever-changing feature space.

  6. Dynamic Blowout Risk Analysis Using Loss Functions.

    PubMed

    Abimbola, Majeed; Khan, Faisal

    2017-08-11

    Most risk analysis approaches are static; failing to capture evolving conditions. Blowout, the most feared accident during a drilling operation, is a complex and dynamic event. The traditional risk analysis methods are useful in the early design stage of drilling operation while falling short during evolving operational decision making. A new dynamic risk analysis approach is presented to capture evolving situations through dynamic probability and consequence models. The dynamic consequence models, the focus of this study, are developed in terms of loss functions. These models are subsequently integrated with the probability to estimate operational risk, providing a real-time risk analysis. The real-time evolving situation is considered dependent on the changing bottom-hole pressure as drilling progresses. The application of the methodology and models are demonstrated with a case study of an offshore drilling operation evolving to a blowout. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  7. Effectiveness of and Financial Returns to Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in South Africa: An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    PubMed

    Haacker, Markus; Fraser-Hurt, Nicole; Gorgens, Marelize

    2016-05-01

    Empirical studies and population-level policy simulations show the importance of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in generalized epidemics. This paper complements available scenario-based studies (projecting costs and outcomes over some policy period, typically spanning decades) by adopting an incremental approach-analyzing the expected consequences of circumcising one male individual with specific characteristics in a specific year. This approach yields more precise estimates of VMMC's cost-effectiveness and identifies the outcomes of current investments in VMMC (e.g., within a fiscal budget period) rather than of investments spread over the entire policy period. The model has three components. We adapted the ASSA2008 model, a demographic and epidemiological model of the HIV epidemic in South Africa, to analyze the impact of one VMMC on HIV incidence over time and across the population. A costing module tracked the costs of VMMC and the resulting financial savings owing to reduced HIV incidence over time. Then, we used several financial indicators to assess the cost-effectiveness of and financial return on investments in VMMC. One circumcision of a young man up to age 20 prevents on average over 0.2 HIV infections, but this effect declines steeply with age, e.g., to 0.08 by age 30. Net financial savings from one VMMC at age 20 are estimated at US$617 at a discount rate of 5% and are lower for circumcisions both at younger ages (because the savings occur later and are discounted more) and at older ages (because male circumcision becomes less effective). Investments in male circumcision carry a financial rate of return of up to 14.5% (for circumcisions at age 20). The cost of a male circumcision is refinanced fastest, after 13 y, for circumcisions at ages 20 to 25. Principal limitations of the analysis arise from the long time (decades) over which the effects of VMMC unfold-the results are therefore sensitive to the discount rate applied, and more

  8. Effectiveness of and Financial Returns to Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision for HIV Prevention in South Africa: An Incremental Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haacker, Markus; Gorgens, Marelize

    2016-01-01

    Background Empirical studies and population-level policy simulations show the importance of voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC) in generalized epidemics. This paper complements available scenario-based studies (projecting costs and outcomes over some policy period, typically spanning decades) by adopting an incremental approach—analyzing the expected consequences of circumcising one male individual with specific characteristics in a specific year. This approach yields more precise estimates of VMMC’s cost-effectiveness and identifies the outcomes of current investments in VMMC (e.g., within a fiscal budget period) rather than of investments spread over the entire policy period. Methods/Findings The model has three components. We adapted the ASSA2008 model, a demographic and epidemiological model of the HIV epidemic in South Africa, to analyze the impact of one VMMC on HIV incidence over time and across the population. A costing module tracked the costs of VMMC and the resulting financial savings owing to reduced HIV incidence over time. Then, we used several financial indicators to assess the cost-effectiveness of and financial return on investments in VMMC. One circumcision of a young man up to age 20 prevents on average over 0.2 HIV infections, but this effect declines steeply with age, e.g., to 0.08 by age 30. Net financial savings from one VMMC at age 20 are estimated at US$617 at a discount rate of 5% and are lower for circumcisions both at younger ages (because the savings occur later and are discounted more) and at older ages (because male circumcision becomes less effective). Investments in male circumcision carry a financial rate of return of up to 14.5% (for circumcisions at age 20). The cost of a male circumcision is refinanced fastest, after 13 y, for circumcisions at ages 20 to 25. Principal limitations of the analysis arise from the long time (decades) over which the effects of VMMC unfold—the results are therefore sensitive to the

  9. Dynamic Analysis of AN Automatic Dynamic Balancer for Rotating Mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHUNG, J.; RO, D. S.

    1999-12-01

    Dynamic stability and behavior of an automatic dynamic balance (ADB) are analyzed by a theoretical approach. Using Lagrange's equation, we derive the non-linear equations of motion for an autonomous system with respect to the polar co-ordinate system. From the equations of motion for the autonomous system, the equilibrium positions and the linear variational equations are obtained by the perturbation method. Based on the variational equations, the dynamic stability of the system in the neighborhood of the equilibrium positions is investigated by the Routh-Hurwitz criteria. The results of the stability analysis provide the design requirements for the ADB to achieve balancing of the system. In addition, in order to verify the stability of the system, time responses are computed by the generalized-α method. We also investigate the dynamic behavior of the system and the effects of damping on balancing.

  10. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  11. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-01-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  12. Guidelines for dynamic data acquisition and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piersol, Allan G.

    1992-10-01

    The recommendations concerning pyroshock data presented in the final draft of a proposed military handbook on Guidelines for Dynamic Data Acquisition and Analysis are reviewed. The structural responses produced by pyroshocks are considered to be one of the most difficult types of dynamic data to accurately measure and analyze.

  13. Incremental costs of introducing jet injection technology for delivery of routine childhood vaccinations: comparative analysis from Brazil, India, and South Africa.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Ulla K; Santos, Andreia C; Nundy, Neeti; Jacoby, Erica; Matthias, Dipika

    2011-01-29

    Disposable-syringe jet injectors (DSJIs) have the potential to deliver vaccines safely and affordably to millions of children around the world. We estimated the incremental costs of transitioning from needles and syringes to delivering childhood vaccines with DSJIs in Brazil, India, and South Africa. Two scenarios were assessed: (1) DSJI delivery of all vaccines at current dose and depth; (2) a change to intradermal (ID) delivery with DSJIs for hepatitis B and yellow fever vaccines, while the other vaccines are delivered by DSJIs at current dose and depth. The main advantage of ID delivery is that only a small fraction of the standard dose may be needed to obtain an immune response similar to that of subcutaneous or intramuscular injection. Cost categories included were vaccines, injection equipment, waste management, and vaccine transport. Some delivery cost items, such as training and personnel were excluded as were treatment cost savings caused by a reduction in diseases transmitted due to unsafe injections. In the standard dose and depth scenario, the incremental costs of introducing DSJIs per fully vaccinated child amount to US$ 0.57 in Brazil, US$ 0.65 in India and US$ 1.24 in South Africa. In the ID scenario, there are cost savings of US$ 0.11 per child in Brazil, and added costs of US$ 0.45 and US$ 0.76 per child in India and South Africa, respectively. The most important incremental cost item is jet injector disposable syringes. The incremental costs should be evaluated against other vaccine delivery technologies that can deliver the same benefits to patients, health care workers, and the community. DSJIs deserve consideration by global and national decision-makers as a means to expand access to ID delivery and to enhance safety at marginal additional cost. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dynamic Wireless Power Transfer - Grid Impacts Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Markel, Tony; Meintz, Andrew; Gonder, Jeff

    2015-12-04

    This presentation discusses the current status of analysis of the electricity grid impacts of a dynamic wireless power transfer system deployed to the Atlanta region on select high traffic roadway segments.

  15. Bimolecular dynamics by computer analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Eilbeck, J.C.; Lomdahl, P.S.; Scott, A.C.

    1984-01-01

    As numerical tools (computers and display equipment) become more powerful and the atomic structures of important biological molecules become known, the importance of detailed computation of nonequilibrium biomolecular dynamics increases. In this manuscript we report results from a well developed study of the hydrogen bonded polypeptide crystal acetanilide, a model protein. Directions for future research are suggested. 9 references, 6 figures.

  16. Random Matrix Theory in molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Palese, Luigi Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that, in some situations, principal component analysis (PCA) carried out on molecular dynamics data results in the appearance of cosine-shaped low index projections. Because this is reminiscent of the results obtained by performing PCA on a multidimensional Brownian dynamics, it has been suggested that short-time protein dynamics is essentially nothing more than a noisy signal. Here we use Random Matrix Theory to analyze a series of short-time molecular dynamics experiments which are specifically designed to be simulations with high cosine content. We use as a model system the protein apoCox17, a mitochondrial copper chaperone. Spectral analysis on correlation matrices allows to easily differentiate random correlations, simply deriving from the finite length of the process, from non-random signals reflecting the intrinsic system properties. Our results clearly show that protein dynamics is not really Brownian also in presence of the cosine-shaped low index projections on principal axes.

  17. Determining the Optimum Number of Increments in Composite Sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Hathaway, John E.; Schaalje, G Bruce; Gilbert, Richard O.; Pulsipher, Brent A.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2008-09-30

    Composite sampling can be more cost effective than simple random sampling. This paper considers how to determine the optimum number of increments to use in composite sampling. Composite sampling can be more cost effective than simple random sampling. This paper considers how to determine the optimum number of increments to use in composite sampling. Composite sampling terminology and theory are outlined and a method is developed which accounts for different sources of variation in compositing and data analysis. This method is used to define and understand the process of determining the optimum number of increments that should be used in forming a composite. The blending variance is shown to have a smaller range of possible values than previously reported when estimating the number of increments in a composite sample. Accounting for differing levels of the blending variance significantly affects the estimated number of increments.

  18. Coupled dynamics analysis of wind energy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A qualitative description of all key elements of a complete wind energy system computer analysis code is presented. The analysis system addresses the coupled dynamics characteristics of wind energy systems, including the interactions of the rotor, tower, nacelle, power train, control system, and electrical network. The coupled dynamics are analyzed in both the frequency and time domain to provide the basic motions and loads data required for design, performance verification and operations analysis activities. Elements of the coupled analysis code were used to design and analyze candidate rotor articulation concepts. Fundamental results and conclusions derived from these studies are presented.

  19. Session 6: Dynamic Modeling and Systems Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey; Chapman, Jeffryes; May, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    These presentations cover some of the ongoing work in dynamic modeling and dynamic systems analysis. The first presentation discusses dynamic systems analysis and how to integrate dynamic performance information into the systems analysis. The ability to evaluate the dynamic performance of an engine design may allow tradeoffs between the dynamic performance and operability of a design resulting in a more efficient engine design. The second presentation discusses the Toolbox for Modeling and Analysis of Thermodynamic Systems (T-MATS). T-MATS is a Simulation system with a library containing the basic building blocks that can be used to create dynamic Thermodynamic Systems. Some of the key features include Turbo machinery components, such as turbines, compressors, etc., and basic control system blocks. T-MAT is written in the Matlab-Simulink environment and is open source software. The third presentation focuses on getting additional performance from the engine by allowing the limit regulators only to be active when a limit is danger of being violated. Typical aircraft engine control architecture is based on MINMAX scheme, which is designed to keep engine operating within prescribed mechanical/operational safety limits. Using a conditionally active min-max limit regulator scheme, additional performance can be gained by disabling non-relevant limit regulators

  20. Mathematical analysis of vortex dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Russel E.

    This review paper discusses the mathematical theory of vortex dynamics for incompressible, inviscid flow in two and three dimensions. The surveyed results include existence and uniqueness of time-dependent solutions, instability and singularity formation, convergence of numerical methods, and existence and stability of steady states. A simple integral formulation for the evolution of a three dimensional vortex sheet and a variational principle for the Batchelor flow problem are presented.

  1. Incremental Relaying, Fresh Signal Makes Better Decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tin, Luu Quoc; Kong, Hyung Yun

    In terms of outage behavior, it has been shown that incremental relaying achieves the best performance among cooperative diversity protocols such as: Amplify-And-Forward (AF), Decode-And-Forward (DF), and Selection Decode-And-Forward (SDF). Exploiting a limited feedback from the destination, incremental relaying lets the relay forward the signal received from the source whenever an error happens at the destination, then, the signals from both the source and the relay are combined to make a decision. Noticing that the signal from the source, indicated by the error, is detrimental, we propose a new scheme not using that signal but only making a decision based on the fresh signal from the relay. Large performance improvement and complexity reduction are attained as we show in the analysis and simulation results. Theoretical results are derived and shown to match with the simulation counterparts.

  2. STEP Tether Dynamics Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, John R.

    2000-01-01

    The General Tethered Object Simulation System (GTOSS) has been successfully converted to the PC environment. GTOSS has been run under Microsoft Windows 95, 98 and NT4.0 with no problems noted. Adaptation to the PC environment and definition of the 3 three body configuration required resizing some of the GTOSS internal data arrays. To allow studies of the tether dynamics accompanying electrodynamic thrust, a tether current flow model has also been developed for GTOSS. This model includes effects due to the earth's magnetic field and ionosphere, tether conductivity, temperature, motion, shape and available power. Sample cases have been defined for a proposed STEP-AIRSEDS (Space Transfer using Electrodynamic Propulsion-The Michigan Technic Corporation proposed tether missions for commercial applications) three body configuration. This required definition of a 6th power scenario for GTOSS. This power scenario allows a user to specify whether orbit raising or orbit lowering is to be performed by selecting the number of the tether. Orbit raising and orbit lowering sample cases have been run successfully. Results from these runs have been included in this report. Results have only been generated so far for a three body configuration. Only point end masses have been represented. No attitude dynamics have been included. Initial results suggest that tether current can have significant and detrimental effects on tether dynamics and provisions will have to be made for control of it. This control will have to be considered in connection with desired target orbits for electrodynamic thrusting, as well as end body attitude control, momentum management of proposed control moment gyros, solar array pointing. All of these items will interact and thus, any system simulation will have to have each of these effects modeled in sufficient detail to display these interactions.

  3. Predictive structural dynamic network analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Herskovits, Edward H

    2015-04-30

    Classifying individuals based on magnetic resonance data is an important task in neuroscience. Existing brain network-based methods to classify subjects analyze data from a cross-sectional study and these methods cannot classify subjects based on longitudinal data. We propose a network-based predictive modeling method to classify subjects based on longitudinal magnetic resonance data. Our method generates a dynamic Bayesian network model for each group which represents complex spatiotemporal interactions among brain regions, and then calculates a score representing that subject's deviation from expected network patterns. This network-derived score, along with other candidate predictors, are used to construct predictive models. We validated the proposed method based on simulated data and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study. For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study, we built a predictive model based on the baseline biomarker characterizing the baseline state and the network-based score which was constructed based on the state transition probability matrix. We found that this combined model achieved 0.86 accuracy, 0.85 sensitivity, and 0.87 specificity. For the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative study, the model based on the baseline biomarkers achieved 0.77 accuracy. The accuracy of our model is significantly better than the model based on the baseline biomarkers (p-value=0.002). We have presented a method to classify subjects based on structural dynamic network model based scores. This method is of great importance to distinguish subjects based on structural network dynamics and the understanding of the network architecture of brain processes and disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis of Fibrillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerin, John A.; Sporrer, Justin M.; Egolf, David A.

    2013-03-01

    The development of spatiotemporal chaotic behavior in heart tissue, termed fibrillation, is a devastating, life-threatening condition. The chaotic behavior of electrochemical signals, in the form of spiral waves, causes the muscles of the heart to contract in an incoherent manner, hindering the heart's ability to pump blood. We have applied the mathematical tools of nonlinear dynamics to large-scale simulations of a model of fibrillating heart tissue to uncover the dynamical modes driving this chaos. By studying the evolution of Lyapunov vectors and exponents over short times, we have found that the fibrillating tissue is sensitive to electrical perturbations only in narrow regions immediately in front of the leading edges of spiral waves, especially when these waves collide, break apart, or hit the edges of the tissue sample. Using this knowledge, we have applied small stimuli to areas of varying sensitivity. By studying the evolution of the effects of these perturbations, we have made progress toward controlling the electrochemical patterns associated with heart fibrillation. This work was supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation (DMR-0094178) and Research Corporation.

  5. Contextual analysis framework for bursty dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Pan, Raj Kumar; Perotti, Juan I.; Kaski, Kimmo

    2013-06-01

    To understand the origin of bursty dynamics in natural and social processes we provide a general analysis framework in which the temporal process is decomposed into subprocesses and then the bursts in subprocesses, called contextual bursts, are combined to collective bursts in the original process. For the combination of subprocesses, it is required to consider the distribution of different contexts over the original process. Based on minimal assumptions for interevent time statistics, we present a theoretical analysis for the relationship between contextual and collective interevent time distributions. Our analysis framework helps to exploit contextual information available in decomposable bursty dynamics.

  6. Benchmark 3 - Incremental sheet forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, Michael; Saha, Pradip; Seong, Daeyong; Haque, MD Ziaul; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2013-12-01

    Benchmark-3 is designed to predict strains, punch load and deformed profile after spring-back during single tool incremental sheet forming. AA 7075-O material has been selected. A corn shape is formed to 45 mm depth with an angle of 45°. Problem description, material properties, and simulation reports with experimental data are summarized.

  7. Visual Analysis of Dynamic Data Streams

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, George; Singhal, Mudita; Nakamura, Grant C.; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Freeman-Cadoret, Natalie A.

    2009-09-01

    For scientific data visualizations, real-time data streams present many interesting challenges when compared to static data. Real-time data are dynamic, transient, high-volume, and temporal. Effective visualizations need to be able to accommodate dynamic data behavior as well as abstract and present the data in ways that make sense to and are usable by humans. The Visual Content Analysis of Real-Time Data Streams project at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is researching and prototyping dynamic visualization techniques and tools to help facilitate human understanding and comprehension of high-volume, real-time data. The general strategy of the project is to develop and evolve visual contexts that will organize and orient complex dynamic data in conceptual and perceptive views. The goal is to allow users to quickly grasp dynamic data in forms that are intuitive and natural without requiring intensive training in the use of specific visualization or analysis tools and methods. Thus far, the project has prototyped four different visualization prototypes that represents and convey dynamic data through human-recognizable contexts and paradigms such as hierarchies, relationships, time, and geography. We describe the design considerations and unique features of these dynamic visualization prototypes as well as our findings in the exploration and evaluation of their use.

  8. Mechanical properties of kenaf composites using dynamic mechanical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loveless, Thomas A.

    Natural fibers show potential to replace glass fibers in thermoset and thermoplastic composites. Kenaf is a bast-type fiber with high specific strength and great potential to compete with glass fibers. In this research kenaf/epoxy composites were analyzed using Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). A three-point bend apparatus was used in the DMA testing. The samples were tested at 1 hertz, at a displacement of 10 ?m, and at room temperature. The fiber volume content of the kenaf was varied from 20% - 40% in 5% increments. Ten samples of each fiber volume fraction were manufactured and tested. The flexural storage modulus, the flexural loss modulus, and the loss factor were reported. Generally as the fiber volume fraction of kenaf increased, the flexural storage and flexural loss modulus increased. The loss factor remained relatively constant with increasing fiber volume fraction. Woven and chopped fiberglass/epoxy composites were manufactured and tested to be compared with the kenaf/epoxy composites. Both of the fiberglass/epoxy composites reported higher flexural storage and flexural loss modulus values. The kenaf/epoxy composites reported higher loss factor values. The specific flexural storage and specific flexural loss modulus were calculated for both the fiberglass and kenaf fiber composites. Even though the kenaf composites reported a lower density, the fiberglass composites reported higher specific mechanical properties.

  9. Analytical signal analysis of strange nonchaotic dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Kopal; Prasad, Awadhesh; Singh, Harinder P; Ramaswamy, Ramakrishna

    2008-04-01

    We apply an analytical signal analysis to strange nonchaotic dynamics. Through this technique it is possible to obtain the spectrum of instantaneous intrinsic mode frequencies that are present in a given signal. We find that the second-mode frequency and its variance are good order parameters for dynamical transitions from quasiperiodic tori to strange nonchaotic attractors (SNAs) and from SNAs to chaotic attractors. Phase fluctuation analysis shows that SNAs and chaotic attractors behave identically within short time windows as a consequence of local instabilities in the dynamics. In longer time windows, however, the globally stable character of SNAs becomes apparent. This methodology can be of great utility in the analysis of experimental time series, and representative applications are made to signals obtained from Rössler and Duffing oscillators.

  10. Dynamic Event Tree Analysis Through RAVEN

    SciTech Connect

    A. Alfonsi; C. Rabiti; D. Mandelli; J. Cogliati; R. A. Kinoshita; A. Naviglio

    2013-09-01

    Conventional Event-Tree (ET) based methodologies are extensively used as tools to perform reliability and safety assessment of complex and critical engineering systems. One of the disadvantages of these methods is that timing/sequencing of events and system dynamics is not explicitly accounted for in the analysis. In order to overcome these limitations several techniques, also know as Dynamic Probabilistic Risk Assessment (D-PRA), have been developed. Monte-Carlo (MC) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) are two of the most widely used D-PRA methodologies to perform safety assessment of Nuclear Power Plants (NPP). In the past two years, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed its own tool to perform Dynamic PRA: RAVEN (Reactor Analysis and Virtual control ENvironment). RAVEN has been designed in a high modular and pluggable way in order to enable easy integration of different programming languages (i.e., C++, Python) and coupling with other application including the ones based on the MOOSE framework, developed by INL as well. RAVEN performs two main tasks: 1) control logic driver for the new Thermo-Hydraulic code RELAP-7 and 2) post-processing tool. In the first task, RAVEN acts as a deterministic controller in which the set of control logic laws (user defined) monitors the RELAP-7 simulation and controls the activation of specific systems. Moreover, RAVEN also models stochastic events, such as components failures, and performs uncertainty quantification. Such stochastic modeling is employed by using both MC and DET algorithms. In the second task, RAVEN processes the large amount of data generated by RELAP-7 using data-mining based algorithms. This paper focuses on the first task and shows how it is possible to perform the analysis of dynamic stochastic systems using the newly developed RAVEN DET capability. As an example, the Dynamic PRA analysis, using Dynamic Event Tree, of a simplified pressurized water reactor for a Station Black-Out scenario is presented.

  11. Application Analysis and Decision with Dynamic Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    debugging tool, “ adb ”. The tool, adb , is used several times to interact with the mobile VM, by capturing the screenshot, sending SMS messages, executing...and logcat to watch log files. Analysis is ready to begin in earnest. The application is installed on the phone and then launched, all via adb

  12. Structural Dynamics and Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luthman, Briana L.

    2013-01-01

    This project consists of two parts, the first will be the post-flight analysis of data from a Delta IV launch vehicle, and the second will be a Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. Shock and vibration data was collected on WGS-5 (Wideband Global SATCOM- 5) which was launched on a Delta IV launch vehicle. Using CAM (CAlculation with Matrices) software, the data is to be plotted into Time History, Shock Response Spectrum, and SPL (Sound Pressure Level) curves. In this format the data is to be reviewed and compared to flight instrumentation data from previous flights of the same launch vehicle. This is done to ensure the current mission environments, such as shock, random vibration, and acoustics, are not out of family with existing flight experience. In family means the peaks on the SRS curve for WGS-5 are similar to the peaks from the previous flights and there are no major outliers. The curves from the data will then be compiled into a useful format so that is can be peer reviewed then presented before an engineering review board if required. Also, the reviewed data will be uploaded to the Engineering Review Board Information System (ERBIS) to archive. The second part of this project is conducting Finite Element Analysis of a CubeSat. In 2010, Merritt Island High School partnered with NASA to design, build and launch a CubeSat. The team is now called StangSat in honor of their mascot, the mustang. Over the past few years, the StangSat team has built a satellite and has now been manifested for flight on a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch in 2014. To prepare for the final launch, a test flight was conducted in Mojave, California. StangSat was launched on a Prospector 18D, a high altitude rocket made by Garvey Spacecraft Corporation, along with their sister satellite CP9 built by California Polytechnic University. However, StangSat was damaged during an off nominal landing and this project will give beneficial insights into what loads the CubeSat experienced during the crash

  13. Dynamical analysis of tachyonic chameleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banijamali, Ali; Solbi, Milad

    2017-08-01

    In the present paper we investigate tachyonic chameleon scalar field and present the phase space analysis for four different combinations of the tachyonic potential V(φ ) and the coupling function f(φ ) of the chameleon field with matter. We find some stable solution in which accelerated expansion of the universe is satisfied. In one case where both f(φ ) and V(φ ) are exponential a scaling attractor was found that can give rise to the late-time acceleration of the universe and alleviate the coincidence problem.

  14. Assessing Sex Differences in the Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality per Increment in Systolic Blood Pressure: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Follow-Up Studies in the United States

    PubMed Central

    George, Nysia I.; Chang, Ching-Wei; Hicks, Karen A.

    2017-01-01

    In the United States (US), cardiovascular (CV) disease accounts for nearly 20% of national health care expenses. Since costs are expected to increase with the aging population, informative research is necessary to address the growing burden of CV disease and sex-related differences in diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes. Hypertension is a major risk factor for CV disease and mortality. To evaluate whether there are sex-related differences in the effect of systolic blood pressure (SBP) on the risk of CV disease and mortality, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis. We conducted a comprehensive search using PubMed and Google Scholar to identify US-based studies published prior to 31 December, 2015. We identified eight publications for CV disease risk, which provided 9 female and 8 male effect size (ES) observations. We also identified twelve publications for CV mortality, which provided 10 female and 18 male ES estimates. Our meta-analysis estimated that the pooled ES for increased risk of CV disease per 10 mmHg increment in SBP was 25% for women (95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.18, 1.32) and 15% for men (95% CI: 1.11, 1.19). The pooled increase in CV mortality per 10 mm Hg SBP increment was similar for both women and men (Women: 1.16; 95% CI: 1.10, 1.23; Men: 1.17; 95% CI: 1.12, 1.22). After adjusting for age and baseline SBP, the results demonstrated that the risk of CV disease per 10 mm Hg SBP increment for women was 1.1-fold higher than men (P<0.01; 95% CI: 1.04, 1.17). Heterogeneity was moderate but significant. There was no significant sex difference in CV mortality. PMID:28122035

  15. Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Approach for Estimating Exposures and Incremental Health Effects from Lead During Renovation, Repair, and Painting Activities in Public and Commercial Buildings” (Technical Approach Document). Also available for public review and comment are two supplementary documents: the detailed appendices for the Technical Approach Document and a supplementary report entitled “Developing a Concentration-Response Function for Pb Exposure and Cardiovascular Disease-Related Mortality.” Together, these documents describes an analysis for estimating exposures and incremental health effects created by renovations of public and commercial buildings (P&CBs). This analysis could be used to identify and evaluate hazards from renovation, repair, and painting activities in P&CBs. A general overview of how this analysis can be used to inform EPA’s hazard finding is described in the Framework document that was previously made available for public comment (79 FR 31072; FRL9910-44). The analysis can be used in any proposed rulemaking to estimate the reduction in deleterious health effects that would result from any proposed regulatory requirements to mitigate exposure from P&CB renovation activities. The Technical Approach Document describes in detail how the analyses under this approach have been performed and presents the results – expected changes in blood lead levels and health effects due to lead exposure from renovation activities.

  16. SWECS tower dynamics analysis methods and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, A. D.; Sexton, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.; Thresher, R. M.

    1981-01-01

    Several different tower dynamics analysis methods and computer codes were used to determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes of both guyed and freestanding wind turbine towers. These analysis methods are described and the results for two types of towers, a guyed tower and a freestanding tower, are shown. The advantages and disadvantages in the use of and the accuracy of each method are also described.

  17. Final Report Computational Analysis of Dynamical Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Guckenheimer, John

    2012-05-08

    This is the final report for DOE Grant DE-FG02-93ER25164, initiated in 1993. This grant supported research of John Guckenheimer on computational analysis of dynamical systems. During that period, seventeen individuals received PhD degrees under the supervision of Guckenheimer and over fifty publications related to the grant were produced. This document contains copies of these publications.

  18. A New Sheet Metal Forming System Based on Incremental Punching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuanxin

    Stamping is one of the most commonly used manufacturing processes. Everyday, millions of parts are formed by this process. The conventional stamping is to form a part in one or several operations with a press machine and a set/sets of dies. It is very efficient but is not cost effective for small batch production parts and prototypes as the dies are expensive and time consuming to make. Recently, with the increasing demands for low-volume and customer-made products, a die-less forming method, Incremental Sheet Metal Forming (ISMF), has become one of the leading R&D topics in the industry. ISMF uses a small generic tool to apply a sequence of operations along the given path to deform the sheet incrementally. These small deformations accumulate to form the final shape of the part. As a result, different parts can be made by the same setup. Despite of some 30 years of research and development, however, ISMF technology is still premature for industrial applications due to the following reasons: The accuracy of the part is limited; the surface roughness is poor; and the productivity is low. This motivates the presented research. In this research, a new incremental forming system based on incremental punching is designed and built. The system consists of a 3-axes CNC platform, a high speed hydraulic cylinder with a hemispherical forming tool, and a PC-based CNC control system. The hydraulic system provides the forming force to deform the sheet metal with constant stokes, while the CNC system positions the part. When forming a part, the forming tool punches the sheet metal along the given contour of the part punch by punch; when one layer of the part is completed, the forming tool moves down to the next layer; and the process is finished till all layers are completed. The CNC control system works with standard NC code, and hence, is easy to use. In order to ensure the desirable performance of the machine, dynamic analysis of the machine is necessary. The analysis is

  19. An incremental approach to automated protein localisation

    PubMed Central

    Tscherepanow, Marko; Jensen, Nickels; Kummert, Franz

    2008-01-01

    Background The subcellular localisation of proteins in intact living cells is an important means for gaining information about protein functions. Even dynamic processes can be captured, which can barely be predicted based on amino acid sequences. Besides increasing our knowledge about intracellular processes, this information facilitates the development of innovative therapies and new diagnostic methods. In order to perform such a localisation, the proteins under analysis are usually fused with a fluorescent protein. So, they can be observed by means of a fluorescence microscope and analysed. In recent years, several automated methods have been proposed for performing such analyses. Here, two different types of approaches can be distinguished: techniques which enable the recognition of a fixed set of protein locations and methods that identify new ones. To our knowledge, a combination of both approaches – i.e. a technique, which enables supervised learning using a known set of protein locations and is able to identify and incorporate new protein locations afterwards – has not been presented yet. Furthermore, associated problems, e.g. the recognition of cells to be analysed, have usually been neglected. Results We introduce a novel approach to automated protein localisation in living cells. In contrast to well-known techniques, the protein localisation technique presented in this article aims at combining the two types of approaches described above: After an automatic identification of unknown protein locations, a potential user is enabled to incorporate them into the pre-trained system. An incremental neural network allows the classification of a fixed set of protein location as well as the detection, clustering and incorporation of additional patterns that occur during an experiment. Here, the proposed technique achieves promising results with respect to both tasks. In addition, the protein localisation procedure has been adapted to an existing cell

  20. Nonlinear dynamics and quantitative EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Jansen, B H

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative, computerized electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis appears to be based on a phenomenological approach to EEG interpretation, and is primarily rooted in linear systems theory. A fundamentally different approach to computerized EEG analysis, however, is making its way into the laboratories. The basic idea, inspired by recent advances in the area of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory, is to view an EEG as the output of a deterministic system of relatively simple complexity, but containing nonlinearities. This suggests that studying the geometrical dynamics of EEGs, and the development of neurophysiologically realistic models of EEG generation may produce more successful automated EEG analysis techniques than the classical, stochastic methods. A review of the fundamentals of chaos theory is provided. Evidence supporting the nonlinear dynamics paradigm to EEG interpretation is presented, and the kind of new information that can be extracted from the EEG is discussed. A case is made that a nonlinear dynamic systems viewpoint to EEG generation will profoundly affect the way EEG interpretation is currently done.

  1. Dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N. E-mail: Emmanuel_Saridakis@baylor.edu

    2013-03-01

    We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of generalized Galileon cosmology, incorporating also the requirements of ghost and instabilities absence. We find that there are not any new stable late-time solutions apart from those of standard quintessence. Furthermore, depending on the model parameters the Galileons may survive at late times or they may completely disappear by the dynamics, however the corresponding observables are always independent of the Galileon terms, determined only by the usual action terms. Thus, although the Galileons can play an important role at inflationary or at recent times, in the future, when the universe will asymptotically reach its stable state, they will not have any effect on its evolution.

  2. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch 2005 Technical Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based); spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning; attitude analysis; attitude determination and sensor calibration; and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  3. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  4. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  5. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  6. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  7. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  8. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000 (a... this award. NASA contemplates making additional allotments of funds during performance of this...

  9. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260.53... Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000 (a) Only $___ of the amount indicated on the face of this award is available for payment and allotted to this award....

  10. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  11. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  12. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  13. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  14. Piezoelectric Driver for Incremental Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruman, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    Vibrating device containing two piezoelectric ceramic slabs acts as mechanical driver. Eventually substitutes for small continuous or stepping electric motors of slow to moderate speeds. Piezoelectric driver simple in construction, requires no precise dimensions, inexpensive to make, and needs no lubrication. Not damaged by stalling or overloads and safe for use in explosive atmospheres; Motion controllable in micron-size increments, and holds position when power turned off. Potential applications as positioner or mover. Used to position instrument pointers, antennas, or solar panels; to focus lenses; or operate tuners, recording instruments, or valves.

  15. Cluster analysis of word frequency dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu S.; Bochkarev, V. V.; Belashova, I. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis and modelling of word usage frequency time series. During one of previous studies, an assumption was put forward that all word usage frequencies have uniform dynamics approaching the shape of a Gaussian function. This assumption can be checked using the frequency dictionaries of the Google Books Ngram database. This database includes 5.2 million books published between 1500 and 2008. The corpus contains over 500 billion words in American English, British English, French, German, Spanish, Russian, Hebrew, and Chinese. We clustered time series of word usage frequencies using a Kohonen neural network. The similarity between input vectors was estimated using several algorithms. As a result of the neural network training procedure, more than ten different forms of time series were found. They describe the dynamics of word usage frequencies from birth to death of individual words. Different groups of word forms were found to have different dynamics of word usage frequency variations.

  16. Precise Analysis of Polymer Rotational Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Mo; Baig, Chunggi

    2016-01-01

    Through the analysis of individual chain dynamics alongside the corresponding molecular structures under shear via nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of C178H358 linear and short-chain branched polyethylene melts under shear flow, we observed that the conventional method based on the chain end-to-end vector (and/or the gyration tensor of chain) is susceptible to quantitatively inaccurate measurements and often misleading information in describing the rotational dynamics of polymers. Identifying the flaw as attributed to strong irregular Brownian fluctuations inherent to the chain ends associated with their large free volume and strong molecular collisions, we propose a simple, robust way based on the chain center-to-center vector connecting the two centers of mass of the bisected chain, which is shown to adequately describe polymer rotational dynamics without such shortcomings. We present further consideration that the proposed method can be useful in accurately measuring the overall chain structure and dynamics of polymeric materials with various molecular architectures, including branched and ring polymers. PMID:26743689

  17. Intensive lipid lowering in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and previous myocardial infarction: an explorative analysis from the incremental decrease in endpoints through aggressive lipid lowering (IDEAL) trial.

    PubMed

    Semb, Anne G; Holme, Ingar; Kvien, Tore K; Pedersen, Terje R

    2011-02-01

    Documentation on secondary prevention with statins in RA patients with coronary heart disease (CHD) is limited, despite the increased risk of CHD in RA. Our objective was to describe the effect of statin treatment on lipid levels and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events in patients with RA who participated in the incremental decrease in endpoints through aggressive lipid lowering (IDEAL) study. Patients with previous myocardial infarction (MI) were randomly assigned to atorvastatin 80 mg daily or simvastatin 20-40 mg daily and followed for 4.8 years. We focused on changes in lipid levels in the current exploratory analyses and used the composite secondary endpoint in the IDEAL study: any CVD event. Out of the 8888 patients in the IDEAL study, 87 had RA. RA patients had significantly lower baseline levels of total- and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol than patients without RA; 4.8 + 1.0 vs 5.1 + 1.0 (P = 0.023) and 2.9 + 0.9 vs 3.1 + 0.9 mmol/l (P = 0.034) for total cholesterol and LDL, respectively. The lipid reductions with either simvastatin or atorvastatin were comparable. Cardiovascular events occurred in 23/87 (26.4%) of the RA patients compared with 2523/8801 (28.7%; P = 0.70) in the general IDEAL population. The occurrence of these events was not related to the duration of RA, age, gender or treatment assignment. Patients with RA and previous MI had comparable lipid-lowering effect and similar rates of cardiovascular events as those without RA, although the RA patients had lower baseline cholesterol levels than patients without RA.

  18. Epock: rapid analysis of protein pocket dynamics.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Benoist; Chavent, Matthieu; Cragnolini, Tristan; Dahl, Anna Caroline E; Pasquali, Samuela; Derreumaux, Philippe; Sansom, Mark S P; Baaden, Marc

    2015-05-01

    The volume of an internal protein pocket is fundamental to ligand accessibility. Few programs that compute such volumes manage dynamic data from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Limited performance often prohibits analysis of large datasets. We present Epock, an efficient command-line tool that calculates pocket volumes from MD trajectories. A plugin for the VMD program provides a graphical user interface to facilitate input creation, run Epock and analyse the results. Epock C++ source code, Python analysis scripts, VMD Tcl plugin, documentation and installation instructions are freely available at http://epock.bitbucket.org. benoist.laurent@gmail.com or baaden@smplinux.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Kinetic Modeling of Incremental Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Guest, Steven; Leypoldt, John K; Cassin, Michelle; Schreiber, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Incremental peritoneal dialysis (PD), the gradual introduction of dialysate exchanges at less than full-dose therapy, has been infrequently described in clinical reports. One concern with less than full-dose dialysis is whether urea clearance targets are achievable with an incremental regimen. In this report, we used a large database of PD patients, across all membrane transport types, and performed urea kinetic modeling determinations of possible incremental regimens for an individual membrane type. ♦ METHODS: Using a modified 3-pore model of peritoneal transport, various incremental manual continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) exchanges employing glucose and/or icodextrin were evaluated. Peritoneal urea clearances from those simulations were added to residual kidney urea clearance for patients with various glomerular filtration rates (GFRs), and the total weekly urea clearance was then compared to the total weekly urea Kt/V target of 1.7. All 4 peritoneal membrane types were modeled. For each simulated prescription, net ultrafiltration and carbohydrate absorption were also calculated. ♦ RESULTS: Incremental CAPD regimens of 2 exchanges a day met adequacy targets if the GFR was 6 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in all membrane types. For regimens employing 3 exchanges a day, Kt/V targets were achieved at GFR levels of 4 to 5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in high transporters to low transporters but higher tonicity 2.5% glucose solutions or icodextrin were required in some regimens. ♦ CONCLUSIONS: This work demonstrates that with incremental CAPD regimens, urea kinetic targets are achievable in most new starts to PD with residual kidney function. Incremental PD may be a less intrusive, better accepted initial treatment regime and a cost-effective way to initiate chronic dialysis in the incident patient. The key role of intrinsic kidney function in incremental regimens is highlighted in this analysis and would warrant conscientious monitoring. Copyright © 2017 International

  20. Dynamic analysis of dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Bai-Xiang; Mueller, Ralf; Theis, Anika; Klassen, Markus; Gross, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    An analytical model is proposed for the dynamic analysis of a homogeneously deformed dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA) with a standard sandwich structure. The equation of motion for the DEA is obtained by the Euler-Lagrange equation. Numerical results of the model are presented to show the vibration and oscillation behaviour of the system. Resonance phenomenon and damping effects are investigated. Results are discussed in comparison with those of the related topics in the literature.

  1. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  2. Vehicle dynamic analysis using neuronal network algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oloeriu, Florin; Mocian, Oana

    2014-06-01

    Theoretical developments of certain engineering areas, the emergence of new investigation tools, which are better and more precise and their implementation on-board the everyday vehicles, all these represent main influence factors that impact the theoretical and experimental study of vehicle's dynamic behavior. Once the implementation of these new technologies onto the vehicle's construction had been achieved, it had led to more and more complex systems. Some of the most important, such as the electronic control of engine, transmission, suspension, steering, braking and traction had a positive impact onto the vehicle's dynamic behavior. The existence of CPU on-board vehicles allows data acquisition and storage and it leads to a more accurate and better experimental and theoretical study of vehicle dynamics. It uses the information offered directly by the already on-board built-in elements of electronic control systems. The technical literature that studies vehicle dynamics is entirely focused onto parametric analysis. This kind of approach adopts two simplifying assumptions. Functional parameters obey certain distribution laws, which are known in classical statistics theory. The second assumption states that the mathematical models are previously known and have coefficients that are not time-dependent. Both the mentioned assumptions are not confirmed in real situations: the functional parameters do not follow any known statistical repartition laws and the mathematical laws aren't previously known and contain families of parameters and are mostly time-dependent. The purpose of the paper is to present a more accurate analysis methodology that can be applied when studying vehicle's dynamic behavior. A method that provides the setting of non-parametrical mathematical models for vehicle's dynamic behavior is relying on neuronal networks. This method contains coefficients that are time-dependent. Neuronal networks are mostly used in various types' system controls, thus

  3. Dynamic feature analysis in bidirectional pedestrian flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao-Xia, Yang; Winnie, Daamen; Serge, Paul Hoogendoorn; Hai-Rong, Dong; Xiu-Ming, Yao

    2016-02-01

    Analysis of dynamic features of pedestrian flows is one of the most exciting topics in pedestrian dynamics. This paper focuses on the effect of homogeneity and heterogeneity in three parameters of the social force model, namely desired velocity, reaction time, and body size, on the moving dynamics of bidirectional pedestrian flows in the corridors. The speed and its deviation in free flows are investigated. Simulation results show that the homogeneous higher desired speed which is less than a critical threshold, shorter reaction time or smaller body size results in higher speed of flows. The free dynamics is more sensitive to the heterogeneity in desired speed than that in reaction time or in body size. In particular, an inner lane formation is observed in normal lanes. Furthermore, the breakdown probability and the start time of breakdown are focused on. This study reveals that the sizes of homogeneous desired speed, reaction time or body size play more important roles in affecting the breakdown than the heterogeneities in these three parameters do. Project supported jointly by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61233001) and the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities of China (Grant No. 2013JBZ007).

  4. Expansion of epicyclic gear dynamic analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Linda Smith; Pike, James A.

    1987-01-01

    The multiple mesh/single stage dynamics program is a gear tooth analysis program which determines detailed geometry, dynamic loads, stresses, and surface damage factors. The program can analyze a variety of both epicyclic and single mesh systems with spur or helical gear teeth including internal, external, and buttress tooth forms. The modifications refine the options for the flexible carrier and flexible ring gear rim and adds three options: a floating Sun gear option; a natural frequency option; and a finite element compliance formulation for helical gear teeth. The option for a floating Sun incorporates two additional degrees of freedom at the Sun center. The natural frequency option evaluates the frequencies of planetary, star, or differential systems as well as the effect of additional springs at the Sun center and those due to a flexible carrier and/or ring gear rim. The helical tooth pair finite element calculated compliance is obtained from an automated element breakup of the helical teeth and then is used with the basic gear dynamic solution and stress postprocessing routines. The flexible carrier or ring gear rim option for planetary and star spur gear systems allows the output torque per carrier and ring gear rim segment to vary based on the dynamic response of the entire system, while the total output torque remains constant.

  5. Incremental Carcass Theory of Polycrystalline Media at Large Elastic and Plastic Deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhundov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    A two-level carcass theory as applied to media with a polycrystalline structure at large elastic and plastic deformation of crystals (crystal grains) is presented. The theory is incremental, in accordance with the incremental nature of governing equations of a crystal, which take into account the prehistory of its deformation in the medium. The theory is based on the field of carcass (macroscopic) displacements, which determines the material displacements of carcass points and carcass (macroscopic) deformations of the medium. At the macromechanical level, the equations of macroscopic deformation and motion are given in an incremental form. At the micromechanical (locally structural) level, incremental microboundary-value problems for nodal presentation blocks of the polycrystalline material are solved on the basis of carcass displacements and their increments. From the internal fields of nodal blocks and their increments found, the incremental macroscopic stresses are determined, which allow one to close the system of equations of the macromechanical level of analysis.

  6. Property Differencing for Incremental Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guowei; Khurshid, Sarfraz; Person, Suzette; Rungta, Neha

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces iProperty, a novel approach that facilitates incremental checking of programs based on a property di erencing technique. Speci cally, iProperty aims to reduce the cost of checking properties as they are initially developed and as they co-evolve with the program. The key novelty of iProperty is to compute the di erences between the new and old versions of expected properties to reduce the number and size of the properties that need to be checked during the initial development of the properties. Furthermore, property di erencing is used in synergy with program behavior di erencing techniques to optimize common regression scenarios, such as detecting regression errors or checking feature additions for conformance to new expected properties. Experimental results in the context of symbolic execution of Java programs annotated with properties written as assertions show the e ectiveness of iProperty in utilizing change information to enable more ecient checking.

  7. Structural dynamic analysis of composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, J. K.; Venkatesan, C.; Ramamurti, V.

    1990-12-01

    In the treatment of the structural dynamic problem of composite materials, two alternate types of formulations, based on the elastic modulus and compliance quantities, exist in the literature. The definitions of the various rigidities are observed to differ in these two approaches. Following these two types of formulation, the structural dynamic characteristics of a composite beam are analyzed. The results of the analysis are compared with those available in the literature. Based on the comparison, the influence of the warping function in defining the coupling terms in the modulus approach and also on the natural frequencies of the beam has been identified. It is found from the analysis that, in certain cases, the difference between the results of the two approaches is appreciable. These differences may be attributed to the constraints imposed on the deformation and flexibility of the beam by the choice of the description of the warping behaviour. Finally, the influence of material properties on the structural dynamic characteristics of the beam is studied for different composites for various angles of orthotropy.

  8. Velocity fluctuation analysis via dynamic programming

    SciTech Connect

    Schlossberg, D. J.; Gupta, D. K.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Shafer, M. W.

    2006-10-15

    A new method of calculating one-dimensional velocity fluctuations from spatially resolved density fluctuation measurements is presented. The algorithm uses vector-matching methods of dynamic programming that match structures, such as turbulent fluctuations, in two data sets. The associated time delay between data sets is estimated by determining an optimal path to transform one vector to another. This time-delay-estimation (TDE) method establishes a new benchmark for velocity analysis by achieving higher sensitivity and frequency response than previously developed methods, such as time-resolved cross correlations and wavelets. TDE has been successfully applied to beam emission spectroscopy measurements of density fluctuations to obtain poloidal flow fluctuations associated with such phenomena as the geodesic acoustic mode. The dynamic programming algorithm should allow extension to high frequency velocity fluctuations associated with underlying electrostatic potential and resulting ExB fluctuations.

  9. Cross-correlation of instantaneous phase increments in pressure-flow fluctuations: Applications to cerebral autoregulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi; Hu, Kun; Stanley, H. Eugene; Novak, Vera; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.

    2006-03-01

    We investigate the relationship between the blood flow velocities (BFV) in the middle cerebral arteries and beat-to-beat blood pressure (BP) recorded from a finger in healthy and post-stroke subjects during the quasisteady state after perturbation for four different physiologic conditions: supine rest, head-up tilt, hyperventilation, and CO2 rebreathing in upright position. To evaluate whether instantaneous BP changes in the steady state are coupled with instantaneous changes in the BFV, we compare dynamical patterns in the instantaneous phases of these signals, obtained from the Hilbert transform, as a function of time. We find that in post-stroke subjects the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV exhibit well-pronounced patterns that remain stable in time for all four physiologic conditions, while in healthy subjects these patterns are different, less pronounced, and more variable. We propose an approach based on the cross-correlation of the instantaneous phase increments to quantify the coupling between BP and BFV signals. We find that the maximum correlation strength is different for the two groups and for the different conditions. For healthy subjects the amplitude of the cross-correlation between the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV is small and attenuates within 3-5 heartbeats. In contrast, for post-stroke subjects, this amplitude is significantly larger and cross-correlations persist up to 20 heartbeats. Further, we show that the instantaneous phase increments of BP and BFV are cross-correlated even within a single heartbeat cycle. We compare the results of our approach with three complementary methods: direct BP-BFV cross-correlation, transfer function analysis, and phase synchronization analysis. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism of cerebral vascular control in healthy subjects, suggesting that this control mechanism may involve rapid adjustments (within a heartbeat) of the cerebral vessels, so that BFV remains steady in

  10. Martingales, nonstationary increments, and the efficient market hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCauley, Joseph L.; Bassler, Kevin E.; Gunaratne, Gemunu H.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the deep connection between nonstationary increments, martingales, and the efficient market hypothesis for stochastic processes x(t) with arbitrary diffusion coefficients D(x,t). We explain why a test for a martingale is generally a test for uncorrelated increments. We explain why martingales look Markovian at the level of both simple averages and 2-point correlations. But while a Markovian market has no memory to exploit and cannot be beaten systematically, a martingale admits memory that might be exploitable in higher order correlations. We also use the analysis of this paper to correct a misstatement of the ‘fair game’ condition in terms of serial correlations in Fama’s paper on the EMH. We emphasize that the use of the log increment as a variable in data analysis generates spurious fat tails and spurious Hurst exponents.

  11. Computational stability analysis of dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikishkov, Yuri Gennadievich

    2000-10-01

    Due to increased available computer power, the analysis of nonlinear flexible multi-body systems, fixed-wing aircraft and rotary-wing vehicles is relying on increasingly complex, large scale models. An important aspect of the dynamic response of flexible multi-body systems is the potential presence of instabilities. Stability analysis is typically performed on simplified models with the smallest number of degrees of freedom required to capture the physical phenomena that cause the instability. The system stability boundaries are then evaluated using the characteristic exponent method or Floquet theory for systems with constant or periodic coefficients, respectively. As the number of degrees of freedom used to represent the system increases, these methods become increasingly cumbersome, and quickly unmanageable. In this work, a novel approach is proposed, the Implicit Floquet Analysis, which evaluates the largest eigenvalues of the transition matrix using the Arnoldi algorithm, without the explicit computation of this matrix. This method is far more computationally efficient than the classical approach and is ideally suited for systems involving a large number of degrees of freedom. The proposed approach is conveniently implemented as a postprocessing step to any existing simulation tool. The application of the method to a geometrically nonlinear multi-body dynamics code is presented. This work also focuses on the implementation of trimming algorithms and the development of tools for the graphical representation of numerical simulations and stability information for multi-body systems.

  12. Architectural Analysis of Dynamically Reconfigurable Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindvall, Mikael; Godfrey, Sally; Ackermann, Chris; Ray, Arnab; Yonkwa, Lyly

    2010-01-01

    oTpics include: the problem (increased flexibility of architectural styles decrease analyzability, behavior emerges and varies depending on the configuration, does the resulting system run according to the intended design, and architectural decisions can impede or facilitate testing); top down approach to architecture analysis, detection of defects and deviations, and architecture and its testability; currently targeted projects GMSEC and CFS; analyzing software architectures; analyzing runtime events; actual architecture recognition; GMPUB in Dynamic SAVE; sample output from new approach; taking message timing delays into account; CFS examples of architecture and testability; some recommendations for improved testablity; and CFS examples of abstract interfaces and testability; CFS example of opening some internal details.

  13. Stock index dynamics worldwide: a comparative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortines, A. A. G.; Anteneodo, C.; Riera, R.

    2008-09-01

    We perform a comparative analysis of twenty-four daily stock indices across the world, encompassing developed and emerging markets. We compute, directly from the return empirical time series, the Kramers-Moyal (KM) expansion coefficients that govern the evolution of the probability density function of returns throughout timelags. Our study discloses universal patterns of the KM coefficients, which can be described in terms of a few microscopic parameters. These parameters allow to quantify features such as deviations from Gaussianity or from efficiency, providing a tool to discriminate market dynamics.

  14. HL-20 computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weilmuenster, K. James; Greene, Francis A.

    1993-09-01

    The essential elements of a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the HL-20/personnel launch system aerothermal environment at hypersonic speeds including surface definition, grid generation, solution techniques, and visual representation of results are presented. Examples of solution technique validation through comparison with data from ground-based facilities are presented, along with results from computations at flight conditions. Computations at flight points indicate that real-gas effects have little or no effect on vehicle aerodynamics and, at these conditions, results from approximate techniques for determining surface heating are comparable with those obtained from Navier-Stokes solutions.

  15. HL-20 computational fluid dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. J.; Greene, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    The essential elements of a computational fluid dynamics analysis of the HL-20/personnel launch system aerothermal environment at hypersonic speeds including surface definition, grid generation, solution techniques, and visual representation of results are presented. Examples of solution technique validation through comparison with data from ground-based facilities are presented, along with results from computations at flight conditions. Computations at flight points indicate that real-gas effects have little or no effect on vehicle aerodynamics and, at these conditions, results from approximate techniques for determining surface heating are comparable with those obtained from Navier-Stokes solutions.

  16. Perturbation analysis for patch occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; Nichols, James D.; McIntyre, Carol L.; Ferraz, Goncalo; Hines, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Perturbation analysis is a powerful tool to study population and community dynamics. This article describes expressions for sensitivity metrics reflecting changes in equilibrium occupancy resulting from small changes in the vital rates of patch occupancy dynamics (i.e., probabilities of local patch colonization and extinction). We illustrate our approach with a case study of occupancy dynamics of Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nesting territories. Examination of the hypothesis of system equilibrium suggests that the system satisfies equilibrium conditions. Estimates of vital rates obtained using patch occupancy models are used to estimate equilibrium patch occupancy of eagles. We then compute estimates of sensitivity metrics and discuss their implications for eagle population ecology and management. Finally, we discuss the intuition underlying our sensitivity metrics and then provide examples of ecological questions that can be addressed using perturbation analyses. For instance, the sensitivity metrics lead to predictions about the relative importance of local colonization and local extinction probabilities in influencing equilibrium occupancy for rare and common species.

  17. Dynamic Factor Analysis Models with Time-Varying Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Zu, Jiyun; Shifren, Kim; Zhang, Guangjian

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis models with time-varying parameters offer a valuable tool for evaluating multivariate time series data with time-varying dynamics and/or measurement properties. We use the Dynamic Model of Activation proposed by Zautra and colleagues (Zautra, Potter, & Reich, 1997) as a motivating example to construct a dynamic factor…

  18. Dynamic Factor Analysis Models with Time-Varying Parameters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chow, Sy-Miin; Zu, Jiyun; Shifren, Kim; Zhang, Guangjian

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis models with time-varying parameters offer a valuable tool for evaluating multivariate time series data with time-varying dynamics and/or measurement properties. We use the Dynamic Model of Activation proposed by Zautra and colleagues (Zautra, Potter, & Reich, 1997) as a motivating example to construct a dynamic factor…

  19. Dynamic analysis of the Milad Tower

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Edwin; Ford, Mitchell; Coelho, Darren; Lawler, Lachlan; Ansourian, Peter; Alonso-Marroquin, Fernando; Tahmasebinia, Faham

    2016-08-01

    This report involves the modelling of the Milad Tower using the finite element analysis program Strand7. A dynamic analysis was performed on the structure in order to understand the deflections and stresses as a result of earthquake and wind loading. In particular, Linear Static as well as Natural Frequency and Spectral Response solvers were used to determine the behaviour of the structure under loading. The findings of the report highlight that the structure was modelled accurately with the outputs representing realistic values. The report suggests that the design of the beams, columns, slabs and all structural members was sufficient enough to support the tower during maximum loading cases. The governing load case was earthquake loading.

  20. Mytoe: automatic analysis of mitochondrial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lihavainen, Eero; Mäkelä, Jarno; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Ribeiro, Andre S

    2012-04-01

    We present Mytoe, a tool for analyzing mitochondrial morphology and dynamics from fluorescence microscope images. The tool provides automated quantitative analysis of mitochondrial motion by optical flow estimation and of morphology by segmentation of individual branches of the network-like structure of the organelles. Mytoe quantifies several features of individual branches, such as length, tortuosity and speed, and of the macroscopic structure, such as mitochondrial area and degree of clustering. We validate the methods and apply them to the analysis of sequences of images of U2OS human cells with fluorescently labeled mitochondria. Source code, Windows software and Manual available at http://www.cs.tut.fi/%7Esanchesr/mito Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. eero.lihavainen@tut.fi; andre.ribeiro@tut.fi.

  1. Dynamic Numerical Analysis of Steel Footbridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Maciej; Minda, Izabela; Major, Izabela

    2017-06-01

    The study presents a numerical analysis of the arched footbridge designed in two variants, made of steel and aluminium. The first part presents the criteria for evaluation of the comfort of using the footbridges. The study examined the footbridge with arched design with span in the axis of 24 m and width of 1.4 m. Arch geometry was made as a part of the circle with radius of r = 20 m cut off with a chord with length equal to the calculation length of the girders. The model of the analysed footbridge was subjected to the dynamic effect of wind and the pedestrian traffic with variable flexibility. The analyses used Robot Structural Analysis software.

  2. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  3. Dynamic characterization and analysis of space shuttle SRM solid propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hufferd, W. L.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response properties of the space shuttle solid rocket moter (TP-H1148) propellant were characterized and the expected limits of propellant variability were established. Dynamic shear modulus tests conducted on six production batches of TP-H1148 at various static and dynamic strain levels over the temperature range from 40 F to 90 F. A heat conduction analysis and dynamic response analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor (SRM) were also conducted. The dynamic test results show significant dependence on static and dynamic strain levels and considerable batch-to-batch and within-batch variability. However, the results of the SRM dynamic response analyses clearly demonstrate that the stiffness of the propellant has no consequential on the overall SRM dynamic response. Only the mass of the propellant needs to be considered in the dynamic analysis of the space shuttle SRM.

  4. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-01-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis. PMID:27412335

  5. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-14

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  6. Aero-Thermo-Dynamic Mass Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kota; Yoshikawa, Genki

    2016-07-01

    Each gas molecule has its own molecular weight, while such a microscopic characteristic is generally inaccessible, and thus, it is measured indirectly through e.g. ionization in conventional mass analysis. Here, we present a novel approach to the direct measurement of molecular weight through a nanoarchitectonic combination of aerodynamics, thermodynamics, and mechanics, transducing microscopic events into macroscopic phenomena. It is confirmed that this approach can provide molecular weight of virtually any gas or vaporizable liquid sample in real-time without ionization. Demonstrations through analytical calculations, numerical simulations, and experiments verify the validity and versatility of the novel mass analysis realized by a simple setup with a flexible object (e.g. with a bare cantilever and even with a business card) placed in a laminar jet. Owing to its unique and simple working principle, this aero-thermo-dynamic mass analysis (AMA) can be integrated into various analytical devices, production lines, and consumer mobile platforms, opening new chapters in aerodynamics, thermodynamics, mechanics, and mass analysis.

  7. Retroactive Operations: On "Increments" in Mandarin Chinese Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Ni Eng

    2014-01-01

    Conversation Analysis (CA) has established repair (Schegloff, Jefferson & Sacks 1977; Schegloff 1979; Kitzinger 2013) as a conversational mechanism for managing contingencies of talk-in-interaction. In this dissertation, I look at a particular sort of "repair" termed TCU-continuations (or otherwise known increments in other…

  8. Optimal tree increment models for the Northeastern United Statesq

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2003-01-01

    used the potential relative increment (PRI) methodology to develop optimal tree diameter growth models for the Northeastern United States. Thirty species from the Eastwide Forest Inventory Database yielded 69,676 individuals, which were then reduced to fast-growing subsets for PRI analysis. For instance, only 14 individuals from the greater than 6,300-tree eastern...

  9. Optimal Tree Increment Models for the Northeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2005-01-01

    I used the potential relative increment (PRI) methodology to develop optimal tree diameter growth models for the Northeastern United States. Thirty species from the Eastwide Forest Inventory Database yielded 69,676 individuals, which were then reduced to fast-growing subsets for PRI analysis. For instance, only 14 individuals from the greater than 6,300-tree eastern...

  10. Retroactive Operations: On "Increments" in Mandarin Chinese Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Ni Eng

    2014-01-01

    Conversation Analysis (CA) has established repair (Schegloff, Jefferson & Sacks 1977; Schegloff 1979; Kitzinger 2013) as a conversational mechanism for managing contingencies of talk-in-interaction. In this dissertation, I look at a particular sort of "repair" termed TCU-continuations (or otherwise known increments in other…

  11. Turns and Increments: A Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Kang-kwong; Thompson, Sandra A.; Ono, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a surge of interest in "increments" among students of conversational interaction. This article first outlines "incrementing" as an analytical problem (i.e., as turn constructional unit [TCU] extensions) by tracing its origins back to Sacks, Schegloff, and Jefferson's (1974) famous turn-taking article. Then, the article…

  12. Summary of EOS flight dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Lauri Kraft; Folta, David C.

    1995-01-01

    From a flight dynamics perspective, the Earth Observing System (EOS) spacecraft present a number of challenges to mission designers. The Flight Dynamics Support Branch of NASA GSFC has examined a number of these challenges, including managing the EOS constellation, disposing of the spacecraft at the end-of-life (EOL), and achieving the appropriate mission orbit given launch vehicle and ascent propulsion constraints. The EOS program consists of a number of spacecraft including EOS-AM, an ascending node spacecraft, EOS-PM, a descending node spacecraft, the EOS Chemistry mission (EOS-CHEM), the EOS Altimetry Laser (EOS-LALT), and the EOS-Altimetry Radar (EOS-RALT). The orbit characteristics of these missions are presented. In order to assure that downlinking data from each spacecraft will be possible without interference between any two spacecraft, a careful examination of the relationships between spacecraft and how to maintain the spacecraft in a configuration which would minimize these communications problems must be made. The FDSB has performed various analyses to determine whether the spacecraft will be in a position to interfere with each other, how the orbit dynamics will change the relative positioning of the spacecraft over their lifetimes, and how maintenance maneuvers could be performed, if needed, to minimize communications problems. Prompted by an activity at NASA HQ to set guidelines for spacecraft regarding their end-of-life dispositions, much analysis has also been performed to determine the spacecraft lifetime of EOS-AM1 under various conditions, and to make suggestions regarding the spacecraft disposal. In performing this analysis, some general trends have been observed in lifetime calculations. The paper will present the EOS-AM1 lifetime results, comment on general reentry conclusions, and discuss how these analyses reflect on the HQ NMI. Placing the EOS spacecraft into their respective mission orbits involves some intricate maneuver planning to

  13. Dynamic smile analysis: changes with age.

    PubMed

    Desai, Shyam; Upadhyay, Madhur; Nanda, Ravindra

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to define age-related changes in the smile. The areas of interest were upper lip length at smile and repose, upper lip thickness at smile and repose, maxillary incisal display at smile, interlabial gap height at smile, smile index, percentage of buccal corridors, intercommissural width at rest, smile height, and smile arc. A secondary objective was to study the perioral changes from rest to smile and compare them on the basis of age. Video equipment was used to capture images of 261 subjects, who were divided into 5 groups by age. Two frames for each subject were selected, 1 frame representing the lips at rest and the other representing the widest smile. After 40 subjects were excluded, the data for the remaining 221 were analyzed by using 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with the Fisher LSD post-hoc test. There was a decrease of 1.5 to 2 mm in maxillary incisor display during smile with increasing age, but the smile index showed a significant increase. In accordance with some other studies, most subjects (78%) had average smile height. No subject in the 50 and over age group had a high smile, and no subject in the 15-to-19 year group had a low smile. All dynamic measurements indicated a pattern of decreasing change from rest to smile, especially evident after ages 30 to 39 years. This study helps to establish age-related dynamic norms. As a person ages, the smile gets narrower vertically and wider transversely. The dynamic measures indicate that the muscles' ability to create a smile decreases with increasing age.

  14. Relative effects of increment and pedestal duration on the detection of intensity increments a

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Daniel L.; Patra, Harisadhan; Jesteadt, Walt

    2011-01-01

    The detection of a brief increment in the intensity of a longer duration pedestal is commonly used as a measure of intensity-resolution. Increment detection is known to improve with increasing duration of the increment and also with increasing duration of the pedestal, but the relative effects of these two parameters have not been explored in the same study. In several past studies of the effects of increment duration, pedestal duration was increased as increment duration increased. In the present study, increment and pedestal duration were independently manipulated. Increment-detection thresholds were determined for four subjects with normal-hearing using a 500- or 4000-Hz pedestal presented at 60 dB sound pressure level (SPL). Increment durations were 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 ms. Pedestal durations were 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 ms. Each increment duration was combined with all pedestals of equal or greater duration. Multiple-regression analyses indicate that increment detection under these conditions is determined primarily by pedestal duration. Follow-up experiments ruled out effects of off-frequency listening or overshoot. The results suggest that effects of increment duration have been confounded by effects of pedestal duration in studies that co-varied increment and pedestal duration. Implications for models of temporal integration are discussed. PMID:21476665

  15. The Predictive Properties of Dynamic Sex Offender Risk Assessment Instruments: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Jan Willem; Smid, Wineke; Schepers, Klaartje; Wever, Edwin; van Beek, Daan; Janssen, Erick; Gijs, Luk

    2017-04-03

    This meta-analysis is the first to our knowledge to evaluate the predictive properties of dynamic sex offender risk assessment instruments, which are designed to assess factors associated with recidivism that are amenable to change. Based on 52 studies (N = 13,446), we found that dynamic risk assessment instruments have small-to-moderate predictive properties, with Cohen's d ranging between 0.71 for sexual recidivism (41 studies, 22 unique samples, N = 5,699) and 0.43 for violent (including sexual) recidivism (27 studies, 14 unique samples, N = 10,368). Incremental predictive validity of dynamic over static risk assessment instruments was significant but modest; Cox hazard ratios varied between 1.08 for sexual recidivism (19 studies, 13 unique samples, N = 3,747) and 1.05 for any recidivism (11 studies, 8 unique samples, N = 2,511). Cox hazard ratios for the predictive validity of change scores on dynamic risk assessment instruments, controlling for static and initial dynamic scores, varied between 0.91 for sexual recidivism (6 studies, 6 unique samples, n = 1,980) and 0.95 for any recidivism (3 studies, 3 unique samples, n = 1,172). These findings indicate that dynamic risk assessment instruments can, in terms of Andrews and Bonta's (2010) risk and need principles, be a useful tool for improving sex offender treatment. They have the potential to contribute to the selection of appropriate, more individually tailored treatment approaches (focusing on individually relevant criminogenic need factors) and can assist in the evaluation of treatment effects. Considering this, further development of dynamic risk assessment instruments is warranted. (PsycINFO Database Record

  16. Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Device Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Corey Thuen

    2013-01-01

    The On-Device Dynamic Analysis of Mobile Applications (ODAMA) project was started in an effort to protect mobile devices used in Industrial Control Systems (ICS) from cyber attack. Because mobile devices hide as much of the “computer” as possible, the user’s ability to assess the software running on their system is limited. The research team chose Google’s Android platform for this initial research because it is open source and it would give us freedom in our approach, including the ability to modify the mobile device’s operating system itself. The research team concluded that a Privileged Application was the right approach, and the result was ODAMA. This project is an important piece of the work to secure the expanding use of mobile devices with our nation’s critical infrastructure.

  17. Pharmaceutical applications of dynamic mechanical thermal analysis.

    PubMed

    Jones, David S; Tian, Yiwei; Abu-Diak, Osama; Andrews, Gavin P

    2012-04-01

    The successful development of polymeric drug delivery and biomedical devices requires a comprehensive understanding of the viscoleastic properties of polymers as these have been shown to directly affect clinical efficacy. Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) is an accessible and versatile analytical technique in which an oscillating stress or strain is applied to a sample as a function of oscillatory frequency and temperature. Through cyclic application of a non-destructive stress or strain, a comprehensive understanding of the viscoelastic properties of polymers may be obtained. In this review, we provide a concise overview of the theory of DMTA and the basic instrumental/operating principles. Moreover, the application of DMTA for the characterization of solid pharmaceutical and biomedical systems has been discussed in detail. In particular we have described the potential of DMTA to measure and understand relaxation transitions and miscibility in binary and higher-order systems and describe the more recent applications of the technique for this purpose.

  18. Manufacturing in space: Fluid dynamics numerical analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.; Nicholson, L. A.; Spradley, L. W.

    1981-01-01

    Natural convection in a spherical container with cooling at the center was numerically simulated using the Lockheed-developed General Interpolants Method (GIM) numerical fluid dynamic computer program. The numerical analysis was simplified by assuming axisymmetric flow in the spherical container, with the symmetry axis being a sphere diagonal parallel to the gravity vector. This axisymmetric spherical geometry was intended as an idealization of the proposed Lal/Kroes growing experiments to be performed on board Spacelab. Results were obtained for a range of Rayleigh numbers from 25 to 10,000. For a temperature difference of 10 C from the cooling sting at the center to the container surface, and a gravitional loading of 0.000001 g a computed maximum fluid velocity of about 2.4 x 0.00001 cm/sec was reached after about 250 sec. The computed velocities were found to be approximately proportional to the Rayleigh number over the range of Rayleigh numbers investigated.

  19. Estimating marginal and incremental effects in the analysis of medical expenditure panel data using marginalized two-part random-effects generalized Gamma models: Evidence from China healthcare cost data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Wei; Hu, Yingyao

    2017-01-01

    Conditional two-part random-effects models have been proposed for the analysis of healthcare cost panel data that contain both zero costs from the non-users of healthcare facilities and positive costs from the users. These models have been extended to accommodate more flexible data structures when using the generalized Gamma distribution to model the positive healthcare expenditures. However, a major drawback with the extended model, which is inherited from the conditional models, is that it is fairly difficult to make direct marginal inference with respect to overall healthcare costs that includes both zeros and non-zeros, or even on positive healthcare costs. In this article, we first propose two types of marginalized two-part random-effects generalized Gamma models (m2RGGMs): Type I m2RGGMs for the inference on positive healthcare costs and Type II m2RGGMs for the inference on overall healthcare costs. Then, the concepts of marginal effect and incremental effect of a covariate on overall and positive healthcare costs are introduced, and estimation of these effects is carefully discussed. Especially, we derive the variance estimates of these effects by following the delta methods and Taylor series approximations for the purpose of making marginal inference. Parameter estimates of Type I and Type II m2RGGMs are obtained through maximum likelihood estimation. An empirical analysis of longitudinal healthcare costs collected in the China Health and Nutrition Survey is conducted using the proposed methodologies.

  20. Incremental multidimensional scaling method for database visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basalaj, Wojciech

    1999-03-01

    A collection of entity descriptions may be conveniently represented by a set of tuples or a set of objects with appropriate attributes. The utility of relational and object databases is based on this premise. Methods of multivariate analysis can naturally be applied to such a representation. Multidimensional Scaling deserves particular attention because of its suitability for visualization. The advantage of using Multidimensional Scaling is its generality. Provided that one can judge or calculate the dissimilarity between any pair of data objects, this method can be applied. This makes it invariant to the number and types of object attributes. To take advantage of this method for visualizing large collections of data, however, its inherent computational complexity needs to be alleviated. This is particularly the case for least squares scaling, which involves numerical minimization of a loss function; on the other hand the technique gives better configurations than analytical classical scaling. Numerical optimization requires selection of a convergence criterion, i.e. deciding when to stop. A common solution is to stop after a predetermined number of iterations has been performed. Such an approach, while guaranteed to terminate, may prematurely abort the optimization. The incremental Multidimensional Scaling method presented here solves these problems. It uses cluster analysis techniques to assess the structural significance of groups of data objects. This creates an opportunity to ignore dissimilarities between closely associated objects, thus greatly reducing input size. To detect convergence it maintains a compact representation of all intermediate optimization results. This method has been applied to the analysis of database tables.

  1. Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of foraminifera and growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study from a Pb and Zn mining region in western Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, C.; Asmund, G.; Elberling, B.; Frei, D.; Knudsen, C.; Rasmussen, P.

    2011-12-01

    Annual monitoring of heavy metal concentrations in the fjords (sea water, seaweed, lichens, blue mussels, shorthorn sculpin and Northern prawn) adjacent to the Black Angel lead-zinc mine (active 1973-1990) at Maarmorilik, western Greenland was initiated during operation of the mine and continues through to today. This pilot study tests whether the calcareous shells of bivalves and foraminifera register these known variations in heavy metal concentrations. Live individuals of Mytilus edulis were collected through a transect of monitoring stations in 2009 and PB-Zn concentrations were measured at multiple points within the yearly increments using LA-ICP-MS. Individuals aged between 12 and 28 years were measured and demonstrated a clear signal of mine closure even at 40 km distance from the plant. Foraminifera (Melonis barleeanus) from a sediment core dating from 1880 AD to present have previously been shown to display a greater percentage of deformities during the period of mining activity (Elberling et al. 2003) possibly suggesting a correlation between heavy metal concentrations in sea water and morphological development. LA-ICP-MS analysis of individual foraminifera confirms an increase in Pb-Zn uptake during mining operations. Although it could therefore be expected that Pb-Zn concentrations would be enhanced in the 'deformed' foraminifera relative to the 'non-deformed', no difference in Pb-Zn was concentrations was detected. This short pilot study (Jessen et al.2010) demonstrates the potential of calcareous material as indicators of environmental pollution and their applicability as a monitoring tool in remote regions. Jessen CA, Asmund G, Elberling B, Frei D, Knudsen C and Rasmussen P. 2010 Monitoring marine heavy metal contamination via the chemical analysis of growth increments in bivalves - a pilot study. Danmarks og Grønlands Geologiske Undersøgelse Rapport 2010/86. 1-20 Elberling, B., Knudsen, K. L., Kristensen, P. H., and Asmund, G. (2003) Applying

  2. Dynamic modelling and analysis of space webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Baoyin, HeXi; Li, JunFeng

    2011-04-01

    Future space missions demand operations on large flexible structures, for example, space webs, the lightweight cable nets deployable in space, which can serve as platforms for very large structures or be used to capture orbital objects. The interest in research on space webs is likely to increase in the future with the development of promising applications such as Furoshiki sat-ellite of JAXA, Robotic Geostationary Orbit Restorer (ROGER) of ESA and Grapple, Retrieve And Secure Payload (GRASP) of NASA. Unlike high-tensioned nets in civil engineering, space webs may be low-tensioned or tensionless, and extremely flexible, owing to the microgravity in the orbit and the lack of support components, which may cause computational difficulties. Mathematical models are necessary in the analysis of space webs, especially in the conceptual design and evaluation for prototypes. A full three-dimensional finite element (FE) model was developed in this work. Trivial truss elements were adopted to reduce the computational complexity. Considering cable is a compression-free material and its tensile stiffness is also variable, we introduced the cable material constitutive relationship to work out an accurate and feasible model for prototype analysis and design. In the static analysis, the stress distribution and global deformation of the webs were discussed to get access to the knowledge of strength of webs with different types of meshes. In the dynamic analysis, special attention was paid to the impact problem. The max stress and global deformation were investigated. The simulation results indicate the interesting phenomenon which may be worth further research.

  3. Processes of incremental message planning during conversation.

    PubMed

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Konopka, Agnieszka E

    2015-06-01

    Speaking begins with the formulation of an intended preverbal message and linguistic encoding of this information. The transition from thought to speech occurs incrementally, with cascading planning at subsequent levels of production. In this article, we aim to specify the mechanisms that support incremental message preparation. We contrast two hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for incorporating message-level information into a linguistic plan. According to the Initial Preparation view, messages can be encoded as fluent utterances if all information is ready before speaking begins. By contrast, on the Continuous Incrementality view, messages can be continually prepared and updated throughout the production process, allowing for fluent production even if new information is added to the message while speaking is underway. Testing these hypotheses, eye-tracked speakers in two experiments produced unscripted, conjoined noun phrases with modifiers. Both experiments showed that new message elements can be incrementally incorporated into the utterance even after articulation begins, consistent with a Continuous Incrementality view of message planning, in which messages percolate to linguistic encoding immediately as that information becomes available in the mind of the speaker. We conclude by discussing the functional role of incremental message planning in conversational speech and the situations in which this continuous incremental planning would be most likely to be observed.

  4. Passivhaus: indoor comfort and energy dynamic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, Antonella; Pagliuca, Antonello; Cardinale, Nicola; Rospi, Gianluca

    2013-04-01

    The research aims to verify the energy performance as well as the indoor comfort of an energy class A+ building, built so that the sum of the heat passive contributions of solar radiation, transmitted through the windows, and the heat generated inside the building, are adeguate to compensate for the envelope loss during the cold season. The building, located in Emilia Romagna (Italy), was built using a wooden structure, an envelope realized using a pinewood sandwich panels (transmittance U = 0.250 W/m2K) and, inside, a wool flax insulation layer and thermal window frame with low-emissivity glass (U = 0524 W/m2K). The building design and construction process has followed the guidelines set by "CasaClima". The building has been modeled in the code of dynamic calculation "Energy Plus" by the Design Builder application and divided it into homogenous thermal zones, characterized by winter indoor temperature set at 20 ° (+ / - 1 °) and summer indoor temperature set at 26 ° (+ / - 1 °). It has modeled: the envelope, as described above, the "free" heat contributions, the air conditioning system, the Mechanical Ventilation system as well as home automation solutions. The air conditioning system is an heat pump, able to guarantee an optimization of energy consumption (in fact, it uses the "free" heat offered by the external environment for conditioning indoor environment). As regards the air recirculation system, it has been used a mechanical ventilation system with internal heat cross-flow exchanger, with an efficiency equal to 50%. The domotic solutions, instead, regard a system for the control of windows external screening using reeds, adjustable as a function of incident solar radiation and a lighting management system adjusted automatically using a dimmer. A so realized building meets the requirement imposed from Italian standard UNI/TS 11300 1, UNI/TS 11300 2 and UNI/TS 11300 3. The analysis was performed according to two different configurations: in "spontaneous

  5. Pattern dynamics analysis of seismic catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiampo, K.; Rundle, J.; Klein, W.; McGinnis, S.; Posadas, A.; Fernàndez, J.; Luzòn, F.

    2003-04-01

    The historical earthquake record, while not complete, spans hundreds to thousands of years of human history. As a result, large, extended fault systems such as those in California are known to demonstrate complex space-time seismicity patterns, which include, but are not limited to, repetitive events, precursory activity and quiescence, and aftershock sequences ((Mogi, 1969; Keilis-Borok et al., 1980; Kanamori, 1981; Kagan and Jackson, 1992; Saleur et al., 1996; Ellsworth and Cole, 1997; Pollitz and Sacks, 1997; Bowman et al., 1998; Nanjo et al., 1998; Wyss and Wiemer, 1999). Although the characteristics of these patterns can be qualitatively described, a systematic quantitative analysis remains elusive (Kanamori, 1981; Turcotte, 1991; Geller et al., 1997). Here we describe a new technique, formulated based on new developments in the physical and theoretical understanding of these complex, nonlinear fault systems that isolates emergent regions of coherent, correlated seismicity (Bak and Tang, 1989; Rundle, 1989; Sornette and Sornette, 1989; Rundle and Klein, 1995; Sammis et al., 1996; 1997; Fisher et al., 1997; Jaume and Sykes, 1999; Rundle et al., 1999; Tiampo et al., 2002). Analysis of data taken prior to large events reveals that the appearance of the coherent correlated regions is often associated with the future occurrence of major earthquakes in the same areas or other tectonic mechanisms such as aseismic slip events (Tiampo et al., 2002). We proceed to detail this pattern dynamics methodology and then identify systematic space-time variations in the seismicity from several tectonic regions.

  6. Fusion metrics for dynamic situation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik P.; Pribilski, Mike; Daughtery, Bryan; Roscoe, Brian; Gunsett, Josh

    2004-08-01

    To design information fusion systems, it is important to develop metrics as part of a test and evaluation strategy. In many cases, fusion systems are designed to (1) meet a specific set of user information needs (IN), (2) continuously validate information pedigree and updates, and (3) maintain this performance under changing conditions. A fusion system"s performance is evaluated in many ways. However, developing a consistent set of metrics is important for standardization. For example, many track and identification metrics have been proposed for fusion analysis. To evaluate a complete fusion system performance, level 4 sensor management and level 5 user refinement metrics need to be developed simultaneously to determine whether or not the fusion system is meeting information needs. To describe fusion performance, the fusion community needs to agree on a minimum set of metrics for user assessment and algorithm comparison. We suggest that such a minimum set should include feasible metrics of accuracy, confidence, throughput, timeliness, and cost. These metrics can be computed as confidence (probability), accuracy (error), timeliness (delay), throughput (amount) and cost (dollars). In this paper, we explore an aggregate set of metrics for fusion evaluation and demonstrate with information need metrics for dynamic situation analysis.

  7. Introducing Dynamic Analysis Using Malthus's Principle of Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pingle, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Declares the use of dynamic models is increasing in macroeconomics. Explains how to introduce dynamic models to students whose technical skills are modest or varied. Chooses Malthus's Principle of Population as a natural context for introducing dynamic analysis because it provides a method for reviewing the mathematical tools and theoretical…

  8. Incremental soil sampling root water uptake, or be great through others

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ray Allmaras pursued several research topics in relation to residue and tillage research. He looked for new tools to help explain soil responses to tillage, including disk permeameters and image analysis. The incremental sampler developed by Pikul and Allmaras allowed small-depth increment, volumetr...

  9. Dynamic analysis of news streams: institutional versus environmental effects.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Kevin; Corman, Steven

    2004-07-01

    Many societal phenomena are studied through analysis of their representation in media-related texts, such as news articles. The dynamics of such data reflect the phenomenon's underlying generative mechanism. Media artifacts are assumed to mirror the social activity occurring in the environment, thus observed dynamics are assumed to reflect environmental dynamics. The institutional mechanics of media production also affect the observed dynamics however. In this study we examine the extent to which institutional versus environmental effects explain the observed dynamics of media content, in particular focusing on semi-continuous "news streams". We examine the dynamics of news streams produced by the electronic news organization Reuters, immediately following the events of September 11, 2001. We find that many of the observed dynamics appear institutionally generated. We conclude with methodological suggestions concerning the dynamic analysis of media content.

  10. Insights to urban dynamics through landscape spatial pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TV, Ramachandra; Aithal, Bharath H.; Sanna, Durgappa D.

    2012-08-01

    Urbanisation is a dynamic complex phenomenon involving large scale changes in the land uses at local levels. Analyses of changes in land uses in urban environments provide a historical perspective of land use and give an opportunity to assess the spatial patterns, correlation, trends, rate and impacts of the change, which would help in better regional planning and good governance of the region. Main objective of this research is to quantify the urban dynamics using temporal remote sensing data with the help of well-established landscape metrics. Bangalore being one of the rapidly urbanising landscapes in India has been chosen for this investigation. Complex process of urban sprawl was modelled using spatio temporal analysis. Land use analyses show 584% growth in built-up area during the last four decades with the decline of vegetation by 66% and water bodies by 74%. Analyses of the temporal data reveals an increase in urban built up area of 342.83% (during 1973-1992), 129.56% (during 1992-1999), 106.7% (1999-2002), 114.51% (2002-2006) and 126.19% from 2006 to 2010. The Study area was divided into four zones and each zone is further divided into 17 concentric circles of 1 km incrementing radius to understand the patterns and extent of the urbanisation at local levels. The urban density gradient illustrates radial pattern of urbanisation for the period 1973-2010. Bangalore grew radially from 1973 to 2010 indicating that the urbanisation is intensifying from the central core and has reached the periphery of the Greater Bangalore. Shannon's entropy, alpha and beta population densities were computed to understand the level of urbanisation at local levels. Shannon's entropy values of recent time confirms dispersed haphazard urban growth in the city, particularly in the outskirts of the city. This also illustrates the extent of influence of drivers of urbanisation in various directions. Landscape metrics provided in depth knowledge about the sprawl. Principal component

  11. Engine dynamic analysis with general nonlinear finite element codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A general engine dynamic analysis as a standard design study computational tool is described for the prediction and understanding of complex engine dynamic behavior. Improved definition of engine dynamic response provides valuable information and insights leading to reduced maintenance and overhaul costs on existing engine configurations. Application of advanced engine dynamic simulation methods provides a considerable cost reduction in the development of new engine designs by eliminating some of the trial and error process done with engine hardware development.

  12. Separate and combined effects of gabapentin and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol in humans discriminating [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Wesley, Michael J; Kelly, Thomas H; Hays, Lon R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine a potential mechanism of action of gabapentin to manage cannabis-use disorders by determining the interoceptive effects of gabapentin in cannabis users discriminating [INCREMENT]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([INCREMENT]-THC) using a pharmacologically selective drug-discrimination procedure. Eight cannabis users learned to discriminate 30 mg oral [INCREMENT]-THC from placebo and then received gabapentin (600 and 1200 mg), [INCREMENT]-THC (5, 15, and 30 mg), and placebo alone and in combination. Self-report, task performance, and physiological measures were also collected. [INCREMENT]-THC served as a discriminative stimulus, produced positive subjective effects, elevated heart rate, and impaired psychomotor performance. Both doses of gabapentin substituted for the [INCREMENT]-THC discriminative stimulus and engendered subjective and performance-impairing effects that overlapped with those of [INCREMENT]-THC when administered alone. When administered concurrently, gabapentin shifted the discriminative-stimulus effects of [INCREMENT]-THC leftward/upward, and combinations of [INCREMENT]-THC and gabapentin generally produced larger effects on cannabinoid-sensitive outcomes relative to [INCREMENT]-THC alone. These results suggest that one mechanism by which gabapentin might facilitate cannabis abstinence is by producing effects that overlap with those of cannabinoids.

  13. Subspace dynamic mode decomposition for stochastic Koopman analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeishi, Naoya; Kawahara, Yoshinobu; Yairi, Takehisa

    2017-09-01

    The analysis of nonlinear dynamical systems based on the Koopman operator is attracting attention in various applications. Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a data-driven algorithm for Koopman spectral analysis, and several variants with a wide range of applications have been proposed. However, popular implementations of DMD suffer from observation noise on random dynamical systems and generate inaccurate estimation of the spectra of the stochastic Koopman operator. In this paper, we propose subspace DMD as an algorithm for the Koopman analysis of random dynamical systems with observation noise. Subspace DMD first computes the orthogonal projection of future snapshots to the space of past snapshots and then estimates the spectra of a linear model, and its output converges to the spectra of the stochastic Koopman operator under standard assumptions. We investigate the empirical performance of subspace DMD with several dynamical systems and show its utility for the Koopman analysis of random dynamical systems.

  14. Large Deviations for Processes with Independent Increments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    generating function of the increments exists and thus the sample paths of such stochastic processes lie in the space of functions of bounded variation . The...BV[O,1], the space of functions of bounded variation and the topology is that of weak*-convergence. Varadhan (1966) studied the LDP for similar...increments and no Gaussian component which are considered as elements of BV[0,1], the space of functions of bounded variation . The final section

  15. Interacting dark energy: Dynamical system analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golchin, Hanif; Jamali, Sara; Ebrahimi, Esmaeil

    We investigate the impacts of interaction between dark matter (DM) and dark energy (DE) in the context of two DE models, holographic (HDE) and ghost dark energy (GDE). In fact, using the dynamical system analysis, we obtain the cosmological consequence of several interactions, considering all relevant component of universe, i.e. matter (dark and luminous), radiation and DE. Studying the phase space for all interactions in detail, we show the existence of unstable matter-dominated and stable DE-dominated phases. We also show that linear interactions suffer from the absence of standard radiation-dominated epoch. Interestingly, this failure resolved by adding the nonlinear interactions to the models. We find an upper bound for the value of the coupling constant of the interaction between DM and DE as b < 0.57in the case of holographic model, and b < 0.61 in the case of GDE model, to result in a cosmological viable matter-dominated epoch. More specifically, this bound is vital to satisfy instability and deceleration of matter-dominated epoch.

  16. Analysis of uterine contractions: a dynamical approach.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, R; Eswaran, H; Wilson, J D; Murphy, P; Lowery, C; Preissl, H

    2003-07-01

    The development of suitable techniques for quantifying mechanical and electrophysiological aspects of uterine contractions has been an active area of research. The uterus is a physiological system consisting of a large number of interacting muscle cells. The activity of these cells evolves with time, a trait characteristic of a dynamical system. While such complex physiological systems are non-linear by their very nature, whether this non-linearity is exhibited in the external recording is far from trivial. Traditional techniques such as spectral analysis have been used in the past, but these techniques implicitly assume that the process generating the contractions is linear and hence may be biased. In this tutorial review, a systematic approach using a hierarchy of surrogate algorithms is used to determine the nature of the process generating the contractions produced during labor. The results reveal that uterine contractions are probably generated by non-linear processes. The contraction segments were obtained through simultaneous recordings of the electrical and magnetic signals corresponding to the electrophysiological activity of the uterus and then analyzed. The electrical activity was recorded by placement of non-invasive electrodes onto the maternal abdomen and magnetic activity was recorded non-invasively using a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID).

  17. A dynamic human motion: coordination analysis.

    PubMed

    Pchelkin, Stepan; Shiriaev, Anton S; Freidovich, Leonid B; Mettin, Uwe; Gusev, Sergei V; Kwon, Woong; Paramonov, Leonid

    2015-02-01

    This article is concerned with the generic structure of the motion coordination system resulting from the application of the method of virtual holonomic constraints (VHCs) to the problem of the generation and robust execution of a dynamic humanlike motion by a humanoid robot. The motion coordination developed using VHCs is based on a motion generator equation, which is a scalar nonlinear differential equation of second order. It can be considered equivalent in function to a central pattern generator in living organisms. The relative time evolution of the degrees of freedom of a humanoid robot during a typical motion are specified by a set of coordination functions that uniquely define the overall pattern of the motion. This is comparable to a hypothesis on the existence of motion patterns in biomechanics. A robust control is derived based on a transverse linearization along the configuration manifold defined by the coordination functions. It is shown that the derived coordination and control architecture possesses excellent robustness properties. The analysis is performed on an example of a real human motion recorded in test experiments.

  18. Double symbolic joint entropy in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wenpo; Wang, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Symbolizations, the base of symbolic dynamic analysis, are classified as global static and local dynamic approaches which are combined by joint entropy in our works for nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis. Two global static methods, symbolic transformations of Wessel N. symbolic entropy and base-scale entropy, and two local ones, namely symbolizations of permutation and differential entropy, constitute four double symbolic joint entropies that have accurate complexity detections in chaotic models, logistic and Henon map series. In nonlinear dynamical analysis of different kinds of heart rate variability, heartbeats of healthy young have higher complexity than those of the healthy elderly, and congestive heart failure (CHF) patients are lowest in heartbeats' joint entropy values. Each individual symbolic entropy is improved by double symbolic joint entropy among which the combination of base-scale and differential symbolizations have best complexity analysis. Test results prove that double symbolic joint entropy is feasible in nonlinear dynamic complexity analysis.

  19. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of {sup 4}He nanodroplets on surfaces: {sup 4}He/graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Castells, María Pilar de; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-21

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He–surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on {sup 4}He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of {sup 4}He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the {sup 4}He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  20. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of 4He nanodroplets on surfaces: 4He/graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O.; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-01

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He-surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on 4He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of 4He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the 4He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  1. Communication: A combined periodic density functional and incremental wave-function-based approach for the dispersion-accounting time-resolved dynamics of ⁴He nanodroplets on surfaces: ⁴He/graphene.

    PubMed

    de Lara-Castells, María Pilar; Stoll, Hermann; Civalleri, Bartolomeo; Causà, Mauro; Voloshina, Elena; Mitrushchenkov, Alexander O; Pi, Martí

    2014-10-21

    In this work we propose a general strategy to calculate accurate He-surface interaction potentials. It extends the dispersionless density functional approach recently developed by Pernal et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 263201 (2009)] to adsorbate-surface interactions by including periodic boundary conditions. We also introduce a scheme to parametrize the dispersion interaction by calculating two- and three-body dispersion terms at coupled cluster singles and doubles and perturbative triples (CCSD(T)) level via the method of increments [H. Stoll, J. Chem. Phys. 97, 8449 (1992)]. The performance of the composite approach is tested on (4)He/graphene by determining the energies of the low-lying selective adsorption states, finding an excellent agreement with the best available theoretical data. Second, the capability of the approach to describe dispersionless correlation effects realistically is used to extract dispersion effects in time-dependent density functional simulations on the collision of (4)He droplets with a single graphene sheet. It is found that dispersion effects play a key role in the fast spreading of the (4)He nanodroplet, the evaporation-like process of helium atoms, and the formation of solid-like helium structures. These characteristics are expected to be quite general and highly relevant to explain experimental measurements with the newly developed helium droplet mediated deposition technique.

  2. Robot Training Through Incremental Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-18

    Intelligence Review 11(1), 11-73 (1997). [8] B. Martin , “Instance-based learning: nearest neighbor with generalization,” Master’s Thesis, University of...Balasko, J. Abonyi and B. Feil , “Fuzzy clustering and data analysis toolbox,” (2008). (www.fmt.vein.hu/softcomp/fclusttoolbox). [15] P. Hore, L.O

  3. Dynamical Analysis of Motorcycle by Multibody Dynamics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shaopeng; Nishimura, Hidekazu; Iwamatsu, Shunsuke; Tajima, Hiroshi

    In this paper, a dynamical model of a motorcycle, which consists of four rigid bodies with nine degrees of freedom, is presented. In this model, the cross-sectional shape of the tire is described as a half-circle and its deformation is taken into account. By taking account of the tire slip condition or the tire nonslip condition in the longitudinal direction of the wheels, each equation of motion is derived. Also, by carrying out simulations, it is verified that the responses to the front steering impulsive torque are in good agreement with the results obtained using commercial software. Moreover, the longitudinal friction force and the lateral force in a turning maneuver are analyzed.

  4. A Novel Classification Algorithm Based on Incremental Semi-Supervised Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Mei, Jingyuan; Sun, Jinping; Wang, Jun; Yang, Erfu; Hussain, Amir

    2015-01-01

    For current computational intelligence techniques, a major challenge is how to learn new concepts in changing environment. Traditional learning schemes could not adequately address this problem due to a lack of dynamic data selection mechanism. In this paper, inspired by human learning process, a novel classification algorithm based on incremental semi-supervised support vector machine (SVM) is proposed. Through the analysis of prediction confidence of samples and data distribution in a changing environment, a “soft-start” approach, a data selection mechanism and a data cleaning mechanism are designed, which complete the construction of our incremental semi-supervised learning system. Noticeably, with the ingenious design procedure of our proposed algorithm, the computation complexity is reduced effectively. In addition, for the possible appearance of some new labeled samples in the learning process, a detailed analysis is also carried out. The results show that our algorithm does not rely on the model of sample distribution, has an extremely low rate of introducing wrong semi-labeled samples and can effectively make use of the unlabeled samples to enrich the knowledge system of classifier and improve the accuracy rate. Moreover, our method also has outstanding generalization performance and the ability to overcome the concept drift in a changing environment. PMID:26275294

  5. Dimension reduction for p53 protein recognition by using incremental partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xue-Qiang; Li, Guo-Zheng

    2014-06-01

    As an important tumor suppressor protein, reactivating mutated p53 was found in many kinds of human cancers and that restoring active p53 would lead to tumor regression. In recent years, more and more data extracted from biophysical simulations, which makes the modelling of mutant p53 transcriptional activity suffering from the problems of huge amount of instances and high feature dimension. Incremental feature extraction is effective to facilitate analysis of large-scale data. However, most current incremental feature extraction methods are not suitable for processing big data with high feature dimension. Partial Least Squares (PLS) has been demonstrated to be an effective dimension reduction technique for classification. In this paper, we design a highly efficient and powerful algorithm named Incremental Partial Least Squares (IPLS), which conducts a two-stage extraction process. In the first stage, the PLS target function is adapted to be incremental with updating historical mean to extract the leading projection direction. In the last stage, the other projection directions are calculated through equivalence between the PLS vectors and the Krylov sequence. We compare IPLS with some state-of-the-arts incremental feature extraction methods like Incremental Principal Component Analysis, Incremental Maximum Margin Criterion and Incremental Inter-class Scatter on real p53 proteins data. Empirical results show IPLS performs better than other methods in terms of balanced classification accuracy.

  6. Dynamic Analysis of Fuel Cycle Transitioning

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Dixon; Steve Piet; David Shropshire; Gretchen Matthern

    2009-09-01

    This paper examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. The once-through system involves only Light Water Reactors (LWRs) operating on uranium oxide fuel UOX), while the closed cycle includes both LWRs and fast spectrum reactors (FRs) in either a single-tier system or two-tier fuel system. The single-tier system includes full transuranic recycle in FRs while the two-tier system adds one pass of mixed oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX U-Pu) fuel in the LWR. While the analysis primarily focuses on burner fast reactors, transuranic conversion ratios up to 1.0 are assessed and many of the findings apply to any fuel cycle transitioning from a thermal once-through system to a synergistic thermal-fast recycle system. These findings include uranium requirements for a range of nuclear electricity growth rates, the importance of back end fuel cycle facility timing and magnitude, the impact of employing a range of fast reactor conversion ratios, system sensitivity to used fuel cooling time prior to recycle, impacts on a range of waste management indicators, and projected electricity cost ranges for once-through, single-tier and two-tier systems. The study confirmed that significant waste management benefits can be realized as soon as recycling is initiated, but natural uranium savings are minimal in this century. The use of MOX in LWRs decouples the development of recycle facilities from fast reactor fielding, but also significantly delays and limits fast reactor deployment. In all cases, fast reactor deployment was significantly below than predicted by static equilibrium analyses.

  7. Arrhythmic dynamics from singularity analysis of electrocardiographic maps.

    PubMed

    Pont, Oriol; Yahia, Hussein; Xu, Binbin

    2013-01-01

    From a point view of nonlinear dynamics, the electrical activity of the heart is a complex dynamical system, whose dynamics reflects the actual state of health of the heart. Nonlinear signal-processing methods are needed in order to accurately characterize these signals and improve understanding of cardiac arrhythmias. Recent developments on reconstructible signals and multiscale information content show that an analysis in terms of singularity exponents provides compact and meaningful descriptors of the structure and dynamics of the system. Such approach gives a compact representation atrial arrhythmic dynamics, which can sharply highlight regime transitions and arrhythmogenic areas.

  8. Static and Dynamics of a Pump Impeller with a Balancing Device Part II: Dynamic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martsinkovsky, V. A.; Zhulyov, A.; Kundera, C.

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents the theoretical study of the system comprising an impeller and a balancing device. It deals with the dynamic analysis of the system, i.e., the axial vibrations of the impeller, and the system stability. The dynamic analysis took into account linearized hydrodynamic forces and moments generated in the longitudinal clearances of the seals of the impeller. The theoretical analysis was supplemented with a numerical example with characteristics determined for a real single-stage centrifugal pump

  9. Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with Applications to Dynamic Contact of Solids, Nonlinear Elastodynamics and Fluid-Structure Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-12-01

    NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF CONSTRAINED DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS, WITH APPLICATIONS TO DYNAMIC CONTACT OF SOLIDS, NONLINEAR ELASTODYNAMICS AND FLUID-STRUCTURE...2000 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Numerical Analysis of Constrained Dynamical Systems, with 5b. GRANT NUMBER Applications to Dynamic...This extension allows the analysis of fluid-structure interfaces through the Lagrangian contact logic previously developed. Similarly, we have developed

  10. Superiorization of incremental optimization algorithms for statistical tomographic image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helou, E. S.; Zibetti, M. V. W.; Miqueles, E. X.

    2017-04-01

    We propose the superiorization of incremental algorithms for tomographic image reconstruction. The resulting methods follow a better path in its way to finding the optimal solution for the maximum likelihood problem in the sense that they are closer to the Pareto optimal curve than the non-superiorized techniques. A new scaled gradient iteration is proposed and three superiorization schemes are evaluated. Theoretical analysis of the methods as well as computational experiments with both synthetic and real data are provided.

  11. Visibility graph analysis on heartbeat dynamics of meditation training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Sen; Bian, Chunhua; Ning, Xinbao; Ma, Qianli D. Y.

    2013-06-01

    We apply the visibility graph analysis to human heartbeat dynamics by constructing the complex networks of heartbeat interval time series and investigating the statistical properties of the network before and during chi and yoga meditation. The experiment results show that visibility graph analysis can reveal the dynamical changes caused by meditation training manifested as regular heartbeat, which is closely related to the adjustment of autonomous neural system, and visibility graph analysis is effective to evaluate the effect of meditation.

  12. Genetic analysis for dynamic changes of egg weight in 2 chicken lines.

    PubMed

    Yi, Guoqiang; Liu, Wenbo; Li, Junying; Zheng, Jiangxia; Qu, Lujiang; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2014-12-01

    One of the main concerns for poultry producers is how to maintain egg uniformity and stability in size and weight following the rapid growth during the early laying period. In this study, we aimed to investigate the increase in egg weight with advancing hen age, and to estimate genetic parameters of these increment traits in 2 pure lines of chickens (i.e., 2,010 White Leghorn and 1,200 brown-egg dwarf hens), using the restricted maximum likelihood method with the DMU procedure. We collected age at first egg (AFE), first egg weight (FEW) and kept records of egg weight per 10 wk from 30 to 60 wk of age. Meanwhile, the increments of egg weight were calculated for the evaluation of age-dependent dynamic changes. The increment of egg weight gained dramatically before 30 wk of age and became slower with the advance of age. Heritability estimates of AFE were larger than 0.32, and the low to moderate genetic correlations between AFE and FEW were observed in the 2 lines. The FEW showed high variation level compared with egg weights at later ages in the 2 lines, and had moderate heritability estimates in White Leghorns (0.20) and dwarf hens (0.33). Egg weights at different ages were highly heritable in the 2 lines (h(2) ≥ 0.35), and had strong genetic and phenotypic correlations among different ages. The estimates of heritability for most increment traits were low to moderate, especially those increments for 10-wk intervals ranging from 0.00 to 0.14. The genetic correlations among 3 consecutive egg weight increments for 10-wk intervals were low to moderate. Our results in the 2 lines should provide important insights into the genetic architecture of increment traits and offer some suggestions for producing uniform and stable eggs in response to advancing age.

  13. Incremental lines in mouse molar enamel.

    PubMed

    Sehic, Amer; Nirvani, Minou; Risnes, Steinar

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and periodicity of enamel incremental lines in mouse molars in an attempt to draw attention to some key questions about the rhythm in the activity of the secreting ameloblasts during formation of mouse molar enamel. The mouse molars were ground, etched, and studied using scanning electron microscopy. Lines interpreted as incremental lines generally appeared as grooves of variable distinctness, and were only observed cervically, in the region about 50-250μm from the enamel-cementum junction. The lines were most readily observable in the outer enamel and in the superficial prism-free layer, and were difficult to identify in the deeper parts of enamel, i.e. in the inner enamel with prism decussation. However, in areas where the enamel tended to be hypomineralized the incremental lines were observed as clearly continuous from outer into inner enamel. The incremental lines in mouse molar enamel exhibited an average periodicity of about 4μm, and the distance between the lines decreased towards the enamel surface. We conclude that incremental lines are to some extent visible in mouse molar enamel. Together with data from the literature and theoretical considerations, we suggest that they probably represent a daily rhythm in enamel formation. This study witnesses the layered apposition of mouse molar enamel and supports the theory that circadian clock probably regulates enamel development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Surrogate model reduction for linear dynamic systems based on a frequency domain modal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, T.

    2015-10-01

    A novel model reduction methodology for linear dynamic systems with parameter variations is presented based on a frequency domain formulation and use of the proper orthogonal decomposition. For an efficient treatment of parameter variations, the system matrices are divided into a nominal and an incremental part. It is shown that the perturbed part is modally equivalent to a new system where the incremental matrices are isolated into the forcing term. To account for the continuous changes in the parameters, the single-composite-input is invoked with a finite number of predetermined incremental matrices. The frequency-domain Karhunen-Loeve procedure is used to calculate a rich set of basis modes accounting for the variations. For demonstration, the new procedure is applied to a finite element model of the Goland wing undergoing oscillations and shown to produce extremely accurate reduced-order surrogate model for a wide range of parameter variations.

  15. Dynamic analysis for robot arm control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Explicit state equations provide detailed analytic insight into the dynamic behavior of a robot arm and facilitate the understanding of the control problem. The analytic strength of explicit state equations is exemplified for a given robot arm. In fact, for the quoted example, the explicit and exact state equations involve considerably less computation than the use of the known most efficient general-purpose computational algorithm for robot arm dynamics.

  16. Development of methodology for horizontal axis wind turbine dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugundji, J.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal axis wind turbine dynamics were studied. The following findings are summarized: (1) review of the MOSTAS computer programs for dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines; (2) review of various analysis methods for rotating systems with periodic coefficients; (3) review of structural dynamics analysis tools for large wind turbine; (4) experiments for yaw characteristics of a rotating rotor; (5) development of a finite element model for rotors; (6) development of simple models for aeroelastics; and (7) development of simple models for stability and response of wind turbines on flexible towers.

  17. Rotating flexible disk under shaft temperature increment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yong-Chen; He, Ling; Wang, Ji-Xin

    2010-08-01

    A rotating flexible annular thin disk subjected to the temperature increment of the shaft clamping the disk was modeled in this paper. At disk top and bottom surfaces and free outer edge, the heat convection boundaries were assumed. Disk transverse deflection was considered as a function of both disk radial and circumferential coordinates, and temperature distribution was solved along disk thickness and radial directions simultaneously. As a result, the shaft temperature increment causes thermo-elastic instability of some disk modes. Effects of the shaft temperature increment, ratio of disk convective heat transfer coefficient to thermal conductivity, disk thickness, nodal circle and diameter numbers of disk mode on the natural frequencies, thermo-elastic instability and critical angular speed of the disk were discussed.

  18. Incremental Passivity and Incremental Passivity-Based Output Regulation for Switched Discrete-Time Systems.

    PubMed

    Jiao Li; Jun Zhao

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates incremental passivity and output regulation for switched discrete-time systems. We develop the results in two parts. First of all, a concept of incremental passivity is proposed to describe the overall incremental passivity property of a switched discrete-time system in the absence of the classic incremental passivity property of the subsystems. A condition for incremental passivity is given. A certain negative output feedback is designed to produce asymptotic stability. Incremental passivity is shown to be preserved under feedback interconnection. The second part of this paper is concerned with an application of the incremental passivity theory to the output regulation problem for switched discrete-time systems. The key idea is to construct a switched internal model with incremental passivity, which closely links the solvability of the output regulation problem. A characteristic of the switched internal model is that it does not necessarily switch synchronously with the controlled plant, which greatly increases the freedom of design. Once such a switched internal model is established, the output regulation problem is then solved by construction of the feedback interconnection between the controlled plant and the switched internal model. The main usefulness of the strategy is to get rid of the solvability of the output regulation problem for the subsystems.

  19. Potential Flow Analysis of Dynamic Ground Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feifel, W. M.

    1999-01-01

    Interpretation of some flight test data suggests the presence of a 'dynamic ground effect'. The lift of an aircraft approaching the ground depends on the rate of descent and is lower than the aircraft steady state lift at a same height above the ground. Such a lift deficiency under dynamic conditions could have a serious impact on the overall aircraft layout. For example, the increased pitch angle needed to compensate for the temporary loss in lift would reduce the tail strike margin or require an increase in landing gear length. Under HSR2 an effort is under way to clarify the dynamic ground effect issue using a multi-pronged approach. A dynamic ground effect test has been run in the NASA Langley 14x22 ft wind tunnel. Northup-Grumman is conducting time accurate CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) Euler analyses on the National Aerodynamic Simulator facility. Boeing has been using linear potential flow methodology which are thought to provide much needed insight in, physics of this very complex problem. The present report summarizes the results of these potential flow studies.

  20. Aeroservoelastic and Flight Dynamics Analysis Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    This document in large part is based on the Masters Thesis of Cole Stephens. The document encompasses a variety of technical and practical issues involved when using the STARS codes for Aeroservoelastic analysis of vehicles. The document covers in great detail a number of technical issues and step-by-step details involved in the simulation of a system where aerodynamics, structures and controls are tightly coupled. Comparisons are made to a benchmark experimental program conducted at NASA Langley. One of the significant advantages of the methodology detailed is that as a result of the technique used to accelerate the CFD-based simulation, a systems model is produced which is very useful for developing the control law strategy, and subsequent high-speed simulations.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic analysis for elastic robotic arms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Rahimi, H. N.

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the paper is to analyze the nonlinear dynamics of robotic arms with elastic links and joints. The main contribution of the paper is the comparative assessment of assumed modes and finite element methods as more convenient approaches for computing the nonlinear dynamic of robotic systems. Numerical simulations comprising both methods are carried out and results are discussed. Hence, advantages and disadvantages of each method are illustrated. Then, adding the joint flexibility to the system is dealt with and the obtained model is demonstrated. Finally, a brief description of the optimal motion generation is presented and the simulation is carried out to investigate the role of robot dynamic modeling in the control of robots.

  2. TERPRED: A Dynamic Structural Data Analysis Tool

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Karl; Cramer, Carole L.; Jennings, Steven F.; Huang, Xiuzhen

    2012-01-01

    Computational protein structure prediction mainly involves the main-chain prediction and the side-chain confirmation determination. In this research, we developed a new structural bioinformatics tool, TERPRED for generating dynamic protein side-chain rotamer libraries. Compared with current various rotamer sampling methods, our work is unique in that it provides a method to generate a rotamer library dynamically based on small sequence fragments of a target protein. The Rotamer Generator provides a means for existing side-chain sampling methods using static pre-existing rotamer libraries, to sample from dynamic target-dependent libraries. Also, existing side-chain packing algorithms that require large rotamer libraries for optimal performance, could possibly utilize smaller, target-relevant libraries for improved speed. PMID:25302339

  3. What Oracle doesn`t tell you about CASE: An incremental approach

    SciTech Connect

    Weinstein, A.M.

    1995-04-04

    Oracle CASE is a very large, complex software tool. The incremental-approach method described here helps developers break the analysis paralysis syndrome by using a group of rules of thumb to build more and better applications faster.

  4. Strategic Planning vs. Disjointed Incrementalism: An Institutional Research Perspective. SAIR Conference Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jean, Paul M.; And Others

    Strategic planning in higher education is discussed from the perspective of institutional research. Attention is directed to: institutional mission, institutional assessment, institutional leadership, environmental assessment, market analysis, and competitive position. Strategic planning merges incrementalism, which focuses on flexibility,…

  5. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  6. DynamicBC: A MATLAB Toolbox for Dynamic Brain Connectome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiang; Ji, Gong-Jun; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zang, Yu-Feng; Lu, Guangming

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The brain connectome collects the complex network architectures, looking at both static and dynamic functional connectivity. The former normally requires stationary signals and connections. However, the human brain activity and connections are most likely time dependent and dynamic, and related to ongoing rhythmic activity. We developed an open-source MATLAB toolbox DynamicBC with user-friendly graphical user interfaces, implementing both dynamic functional and effective connectivity for tracking brain dynamics from functional MRI. We provided two strategies for dynamic analysis: (1) the commonly utilized sliding-window analysis and (2) the flexible least squares based time-varying parameter regression strategy. The toolbox also implements multiple functional measures including seed-to-voxel analysis, region of interest (ROI)-to-ROI analysis, and voxel-to-voxel analysis. We describe the principles of the implemented algorithms, and then present representative results from simulations and empirical data applications. We believe that this toolbox will help neuroscientists and neurologists to easily map dynamic brain connectomics. PMID:25083734

  7. Dynamical scaling analysis of plant callus growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeano, J.; Buceta, J.; Juarez, K.; Pumariño, B.; de la Torre, J.; Iriondo, J. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present experimental results for the dynamical scaling properties of the development of plant calli. We have assayed two different species of plant calli, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa, under different growth conditions, and show that their dynamical scalings share a universality class. From a theoretical point of view, we introduce a scaling hypothesis for systems whose size evolves in time. We expect our work to be relevant for the understanding and characterization of other systems that undergo growth due to cell division and differentiation, such as, for example, tumor development.

  8. Dynamic analysis of noncontacting face seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a noncontacting coned face seal is analyzed taking into account various design parameters and operating conditions. The primary seal ring motion is expressed by a set of nonlinear equations for three degrees of freedom. These equations, which are solved numerically, allow identification of two dimensionless groups of parameters that affect the seal dynamic behavior. Stability maps for various seals are presented. These maps contain a stable-to-unstable transition region in which the ring wobbles at half the shaft frequency. The effect of various parameters on seal stability is discussed and an empirical expression for critical stability is offered.

  9. The Space Station decision - Incremental politics and technological choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, Howard E.

    1990-01-01

    Using primary documents and interviews with participants, this book describes the events that led up to the 1984 decision that NASA should build a permanently occupied, international space station in low earth orbit. The role that civil servants in NASA played in initiating the program is highlighted. The trail of the Space Station proposal as its advocates devised strategies to push it through the White House policy review process is followed. The critical analysis focuses on the way in which 'incrementalism' (the tendency of policy makers to introduce incremental changes once projects are under way) operated in connection with the Space Station program. The book calls for a commitment to a long-range space policy.

  10. The Space Station decision - Incremental politics and technological choice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccurdy, Howard E.

    1990-01-01

    Using primary documents and interviews with participants, this book describes the events that led up to the 1984 decision that NASA should build a permanently occupied, international space station in low earth orbit. The role that civil servants in NASA played in initiating the program is highlighted. The trail of the Space Station proposal as its advocates devised strategies to push it through the White House policy review process is followed. The critical analysis focuses on the way in which 'incrementalism' (the tendency of policy makers to introduce incremental changes once projects are under way) operated in connection with the Space Station program. The book calls for a commitment to a long-range space policy.

  11. International Space Station Increment-2 Microgravity Environment Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric; McPherson, Kevin; Reckart, Timothy

    2002-01-01

    This summary report presents the results of some of the processed acceleration data, collected aboard the International Space Station during the period of May to August 2001, the Increment-2 phase of the station. Two accelerometer systems were used to measure the acceleration levels during activities that took place during the Increment-2 segment. However, not all of the activities were analyzed for this report due to time constraints, lack of precise information regarding some payload operations and other station activities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration sponsors the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Microgravity System to support microgravity science experiments, which require microgravity acceleration measurements. On April 19, 2001, both the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Measurement System units were launched on STS-100 from the Kennedy Space Center for installation on the International Space Station. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to the station in support of science experiments requiring quasi-steady acceleration measurements, while the Space Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to support experiments requiring vibratory acceleration measurement. Both acceleration systems are also used in support of vehicle microgravity requirements verification. The International Space Station Increment-2 reduced gravity environment analysis presented in this report uses acceleration data collected by both sets of accelerometer systems: 1) The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System, which consists of two sensors: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment Sensor Subsystem, a low frequency range sensor (up to 1 Hz), is used to characterize the quasi-steady environment for payloads and the vehicle, and the High Resolution Accelerometer Package, which is used to characterize the vibratory environment up to 100 Hz. 2) The Space

  12. A Dynamic Analysis of Piezoelectric Strained Elements.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    of Piezoelectricity , Oxford Univ.Press, Oxford (1990). E38] T.C.Ting, "Dynamic response of composites", Appl. Mechs.Rev., vol. 33, no.12, Dp.1629-16...Plenum Press, New York (1969). 276 [36] J.Zelenka, Piezoelectric Resonators and their Applications, Elsevier, Amsterdam (1986). [37] T.Ikeda, Fundamentals

  13. NPV Sensitivity Analysis: A Dynamic Excel Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiero, George A.; Kraten, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Financial analysts generally create static formulas for the computation of NPV. When they do so, however, it is not readily apparent how sensitive the value of NPV is to changes in multiple interdependent and interrelated variables. It is the aim of this paper to analyze this variability by employing a dynamic, visually graphic presentation using…

  14. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  15. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  16. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  17. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  18. 48 CFR 3432.771 - Provision for incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision for incremental... for incremental funding. The contracting officer shall insert the provision in 3452.232-71, Incremental Funding, in a solicitation if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is...

  19. Characterization of sleep stages by correlations in the magnitude and sign of heartbeat increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantelhardt, Jan W.; Ashkenazy, Yosef; Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Bunde, Armin; Havlin, Shlomo; Penzel, Thomas; Peter, Jörg-Hermann; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2002-05-01

    We study correlation properties of the magnitude and the sign of the increments in the time intervals between successive heartbeats during light sleep, deep sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep using the detrended fluctuation analysis method. We find short-range anticorrelations in the sign time series, which are strong during deep sleep, weaker during light sleep, and even weaker during REM sleep. In contrast, we find long-range positive correlations in the magnitude time series, which are strong during REM sleep and weaker during light sleep. We observe uncorrelated behavior for the magnitude during deep sleep. Since the magnitude series relates to the nonlinear properties of the original time series, while the sign series relates to the linear properties, our findings suggest that the nonlinear properties of the heartbeat dynamics are more pronounced during REM sleep. Thus, the sign and the magnitude series provide information which is useful in distinguishing between the sleep stages.

  20. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity

    PubMed Central

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:26075210

  1. Integrating atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, experiments, and network analysis to study protein dynamics: strength in unity.

    PubMed

    Papaleo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    In the last years, we have been observing remarkable improvements in the field of protein dynamics. Indeed, we can now study protein dynamics in atomistic details over several timescales with a rich portfolio of experimental and computational techniques. On one side, this provides us with the possibility to validate simulation methods and physical models against a broad range of experimental observables. On the other side, it also allows a complementary and comprehensive view on protein structure and dynamics. What is needed now is a better understanding of the link between the dynamic properties that we observe and the functional properties of these important cellular machines. To make progresses in this direction, we need to improve the physical models used to describe proteins and solvent in molecular dynamics, as well as to strengthen the integration of experiments and simulations to overcome their own limitations. Moreover, now that we have the means to study protein dynamics in great details, we need new tools to understand the information embedded in the protein ensembles and in their dynamic signature. With this aim in mind, we should enrich the current tools for analysis of biomolecular simulations with attention to the effects that can be propagated over long distances and are often associated to important biological functions. In this context, approaches inspired by network analysis can make an important contribution to the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations.

  2. Dynamic Analysis of Capture Devices for Momentum Exchange with Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    One of the significant challenges in developing a momentum exchange / electrodynamic reboost tether system is in the analysis and design of the capture device and its effects on the overall dynamics of the system. The goal of this work is to develop appropriate tether momentum exchange models that can simulate and evaluate the requirements of such a system, and be used to create specifications on the design of a capture device. This report briefly describes dynamic model development, simulation of the momentum exchange process, evaluation of dynamic effects of errors in the momentum exchange process, and the development of guidelines in selecting dynamic properties in the design of a capture device.

  3. Theoretical and software considerations for nonlinear dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. J.; Dodds, R. H., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In the finite element method for structural analysis, it is generally necessary to discretize the structural model into a very large number of elements to accurately evaluate displacements, strains, and stresses. As the complexity of the model increases, the number of degrees of freedom can easily exceed the capacity of present-day software system. Improvements of structural analysis software including more efficient use of existing hardware and improved structural modeling techniques are discussed. One modeling technique that is used successfully in static linear and nonlinear analysis is multilevel substructuring. This research extends the use of multilevel substructure modeling to include dynamic analysis and defines the requirements for a general purpose software system capable of efficient nonlinear dynamic analysis. The multilevel substructuring technique is presented, the analytical formulations and computational procedures for dynamic analysis and nonlinear mechanics are reviewed, and an approach to the design and implementation of a general purpose structural software system is presented.

  4. Interpolating dynamical systems: Applications to experimental data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ecke, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental data from Rayleigh-Benard convection is used to demonstrate new techniques in data analysis. The data, in the form of Poincare sections, are fit to a map of the plane as a function of a system control parameter. This provides a very useful method for interpolating experimental low-dimensional dynamical systems. The fitted map can then be studied using numerical bifurcation methods or other nonlinear dynamics analysis techniques. 16 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  6. Elementary Applications of a Rotorcraft Dynamic Stability Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1976-01-01

    A number of applications of a rotorcraft aeroelastic analysis are presented to verify that the analysis encompasses the classical solutions of rotor dynamics, and to examine the influence of certain features of the model. Results are given for the following topics: flapping frequency response to pitch control; forward flight flapping stability; pitch/flap flutter and divergence; ground resonance instability; and the flight dynamics of several representative helicopters.

  7. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  8. 12 CFR 324.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the FDIC-supervised institution's measure of potential losses due to incremental risk over a one-year.... An FDIC-supervised institution may not include correlation trading positions or securitization... the impact of correlations between default and migration events among obligors. (3) Reflect the effect...

  9. 12 CFR 217.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the Board-regulated institution's measure of potential losses due to incremental risk over a one-year.... A Board-regulated institution may not include correlation trading positions or securitization.... (2) Recognize the impact of correlations between default and migration events among obligors. (3...

  10. 12 CFR 3.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... association's measure of potential losses due to incremental risk over a one-year time horizon at a one-tail.... A national bank or Federal savings association may not include correlation trading positions or.... (2) Recognize the impact of correlations between default and migration events among obligors. (3...

  11. Incremental social learning in particle swarms.

    PubMed

    de Oca, Marco A Montes; Stutzle, Thomas; Van den Enden, Ken; Dorigo, Marco

    2011-04-01

    Incremental social learning (ISL) was proposed as a way to improve the scalability of systems composed of multiple learning agents. In this paper, we show that ISL can be very useful to improve the performance of population-based optimization algorithms. Our study focuses on two particle swarm optimization (PSO) algorithms: a) the incremental particle swarm optimizer (IPSO), which is a PSO algorithm with a growing population size in which the initial position of new particles is biased toward the best-so-far solution, and b) the incremental particle swarm optimizer with local search (IPSOLS), in which solutions are further improved through a local search procedure. We first derive analytically the probability density function induced by the proposed initialization rule applied to new particles. Then, we compare the performance of IPSO and IPSOLS on a set of benchmark functions with that of other PSO algorithms (with and without local search) and a random restart local search algorithm. Finally, we measure the benefits of using incremental social learning on PSO algorithms by running IPSO and IPSOLS on problems with different fitness distance correlations.

  12. Damage From Increment Borings in Bottomland Hardwoods

    Treesearch

    E. Richard Toole; John L. Gammage

    1959-01-01

    THIS PAPER REPORTS a study of the amount of stain and decay that developed from increment-borer holes in five species of bottomland hardwoods. Though the 0.2-inch holes made by conventional borers are often considered insignificant, it appears that they may result in serious defect.

  13. Existing School Buildings: Incremental Seismic Retrofit Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC.

    The intent of this document is to provide technical guidance to school district facility managers for linking specific incremental seismic retrofit opportunities to specific maintenance and capital improvement projects. The linkages are based on logical affinities, such as technical fit, location of the work within the building, cost saving…

  14. The Cognitive Underpinnings of Incremental Rehearsal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varma, Sashank; Schleisman, Katrina B.

    2014-01-01

    Incremental rehearsal (IR) is a flashcard technique that has been developed and evaluated by school psychologists. We discuss potential learning and memory effects from cognitive psychology that may explain the observed superiority of IR over other flashcard techniques. First, we propose that IR is a form of "spaced practice" that…

  15. Input-Based Incremental Vocabulary Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barcroft, Joe

    2012-01-01

    This fascinating presentation of current research undoes numerous myths about how we most effectively learn new words in a second language. In clear, reader-friendly text, the author details the successful approach of IBI vocabulary instruction, which emphasizes the presentation of target vocabulary as input early on and the incremental (gradual)…

  16. Using Dynamic Sensitivity Analysis to Assess Testability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voas, Jeffrey; Morell, Larry; Miller, Keith

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses sensitivity analysis and its relationship to random black box testing. Sensitivity analysis estimates the impact that a programming fault at a particular location would have on the program's input/output behavior. Locations that are relatively \\"insensitive" to faults can render random black box testing unlikely to uncover programming faults. Therefore, sensitivity analysis gives new insight when interpreting random black box testing results. Although sensitivity analysis is computationally intensive, it requires no oracle and no human intervention.

  17. Single Molecule Cluster Analysis dissects splicing pathway conformational dynamics.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Mario R; Martin, Joshua S; Kahlscheuer, Matthew L; Krishnan, Ramya; Abelson, John; Laederach, Alain; Walter, Nils G

    2015-11-01

    We report Single Molecule Cluster Analysis (SiMCAn), which utilizes hierarchical clustering of hidden Markov modeling-fitted single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) trajectories to dissect the complex conformational dynamics of biomolecular machines. We used this method to study the conformational dynamics of a precursor mRNA during the splicing cycle as carried out by the spliceosome. By clustering common dynamic behaviors derived from selectively blocked splicing reactions, SiMCAn was able to identify the signature conformations and dynamic behaviors of multiple ATP-dependent intermediates. In addition, it identified an open conformation adopted late in splicing by a 3' splice-site mutant, invoking a mechanism for substrate proofreading. SiMCAn enables rapid interpretation of complex single-molecule behaviors and should prove useful for the comprehensive analysis of a plethora of dynamic cellular machines.

  18. Dynamics analysis of space robot manipulator with joint clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Bai, Zheng Feng

    2011-04-01

    A computational methodology for analysis of space robot manipulator systems, considering the effects of the clearances in the joint, is presented. The contact dynamics model in joint clearance is established using the nonlinear equivalent spring-damp model and the friction effect is considered using the Coulomb friction model. The space robot system dynamic equation of manipulator with clearance is established. Then the dynamics simulation is presented and the dynamics characteristics of robot manipulator with clearance are analyzed. This work provides a practical method to analyze the dynamics characteristics of space robot manipulator with joint clearance and improves the engineering application. The computational methodology can predict the effects of clearance on space robot manipulator preferably, which is the basis of space robot manipulator design, precision analysis and ground test.

  19. Structural dynamic analysis of the Space Shuttle Main Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, L. P.; Jamison, G. T.; Mccutcheon, W. A.; Price, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    This structural dynamic analysis supports development of the SSME by evaluating components subjected to critical dynamic loads, identifying significant parameters, and evaluating solution methods. Engine operating parameters at both rated and full power levels are considered. Detailed structural dynamic analyses of operationally critical and life limited components support the assessment of engine design modifications and environmental changes. Engine system test results are utilized to verify analytic model simulations. The SSME main chamber injector assembly is an assembly of 600 injector elements which are called LOX posts. The overall LOX post analysis procedure is shown.

  20. Dynamic mechanical analysis: A practical introduction to techniques and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, K.

    1999-03-01

    This introduction provides the chemist, chemical engineer, or materials scientists with a starting point to understand the applications of dynamic mechanical analysis, its workings, and its advantages and limitations. This book serves as a systematic study of manufacturing polymeric materials and components as well as for developing new materials. Contents include: introduction to dynamic mechanical analysis; basic rheological concepts: stress, strain, and flow; rheology basic: creep-recovery and stress relaxation; dynamic testing; time-temperature scans part 1: transitions in polymers; time and temperature studies part 2: thermosets; frequency scans; DMA applications to real problems: guidelines; and appendix: sample experiments for the DMA.

  1. Incremental learning of skill collections based on intrinsic motivation

    PubMed Central

    Metzen, Jan H.; Kirchner, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Life-long learning of reusable, versatile skills is a key prerequisite for embodied agents that act in a complex, dynamic environment and are faced with different tasks over their lifetime. We address the question of how an agent can learn useful skills efficiently during a developmental period, i.e., when no task is imposed on him and no external reward signal is provided. Learning of skills in a developmental period needs to be incremental and self-motivated. We propose a new incremental, task-independent skill discovery approach that is suited for continuous domains. Furthermore, the agent learns specific skills based on intrinsic motivation mechanisms that determine on which skills learning is focused at a given point in time. We evaluate the approach in a reinforcement learning setup in two continuous domains with complex dynamics. We show that an intrinsically motivated, skill learning agent outperforms an agent which learns task solutions from scratch. Furthermore, we compare different intrinsic motivation mechanisms and how efficiently they make use of the agent's developmental period. PMID:23898265

  2. SAMS Acceleration Measurements on Mir (NASA Increment 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLombard, Richard

    1998-01-01

    During NASA Increment 4 (January to May 1997), about 5 gigabytes of acceleration data were collected by the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS) onboard the Russian Space Station, Mir. The data were recorded on 28 optical disks which were returned to Earth on STS-84. During this increment, SAMS data were collected in the Priroda module to support the Mir Structural Dynamics Experiment (MiSDE), the Binary Colloidal Alloy Tests (BCAT), Angular Liquid Bridge (ALB), Candle Flames in Microgravity (CFM), Diffusion Controlled Apparatus Module (DCAM), Enhanced Dynamic Load Sensors (EDLS), Forced Flow Flame Spreading Test (FFFr), Liquid Metal Diffusion (LMD), Protein Crystal Growth in Dewar (PCG/Dewar), Queen's University Experiments in Liquid Diffusion (QUELD), and Technical Evaluation of MIM (TEM). This report points out some of the salient features of the microgravity environment to which these experiments were exposed. Also documented are mission events of interest such as the docked phase of STS-84 operations, a Progress engine bum, Soyuz vehicle docking and undocking, and Progress vehicle docking. This report presents an overview of the SAMS acceleration measurements recorded by 10 Hz and 100 Hz sensor heads. The analyses included herein complement those presented in previous summary reports prepared by the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services (PIMS) group.

  3. Incremental learning of skill collections based on intrinsic motivation.

    PubMed

    Metzen, Jan H; Kirchner, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Life-long learning of reusable, versatile skills is a key prerequisite for embodied agents that act in a complex, dynamic environment and are faced with different tasks over their lifetime. We address the question of how an agent can learn useful skills efficiently during a developmental period, i.e., when no task is imposed on him and no external reward signal is provided. Learning of skills in a developmental period needs to be incremental and self-motivated. We propose a new incremental, task-independent skill discovery approach that is suited for continuous domains. Furthermore, the agent learns specific skills based on intrinsic motivation mechanisms that determine on which skills learning is focused at a given point in time. We evaluate the approach in a reinforcement learning setup in two continuous domains with complex dynamics. We show that an intrinsically motivated, skill learning agent outperforms an agent which learns task solutions from scratch. Furthermore, we compare different intrinsic motivation mechanisms and how efficiently they make use of the agent's developmental period.

  4. Three-dimensional dynamic response analysis of earth dams

    SciTech Connect

    Mejia, L.H.

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the present work has been to develop numerical techniques for the three-dimensional dynamic analysis of earth and rockfill dams and to study the dynamic behavior of embankment dams in three dimensions. A computer program suitable for the three-dimensional dynamic response analysis of earth dams was used to back-calculate the dynamic material properties of Oroville Dam from the recorded response of the dam to the August 1, 1975 Oroville earthquake. The dynamic response characteristics of earth dams which exhibit considerable three-dimensional behavior have been studied and the applicability of two-dimensional analysis to the computation of the dynamic response of such structures has been evaluated. Additionally, the effects that the degree of discretization in the cross-valley direction has on the computed three-dimensional dynamic response of earth dams have been studied. A K/sub 2/max value of 170 was found to be representative of the in-situ dynamic characteristics of the Oroville gravels. The three-dimensional effects of canyon geometry on the dynamic response of dams in triangular canyons were found to depend on the crest length to height ratio, L/H, of the dam. For dams with L/H greater than 7, these effects are small. The dynamic characteristics of these dams can, therefore, be simulated reasonably well using two-dimensional analyses. However, 2-D analyses cannot simulate correctly the dynamic response of dams in narrower canyons since the effects of canyon geometry for these dams are very pronounced.

  5. A Wigner Distribution Analysis of Scattering Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, David; Lacy, Brent

    2009-04-01

    Using the time dependent Channel Packet Method (CPM),ootnotetextD.E.Weeks, T.A.Niday, S.H.Yang, J Chem Phys. 125, 164301 (2006). a Fourier transformation of the correlation function between evolving wave packets is used to compute scattering matrix elements. The correlation function can also be used to compute a Wigner distribution as a function of time and energy. This scattering Wigner distribution is then used to investigate times at which various energetic contributions to the scattering matrix are made during a molecular collision. We compute scattering Wigner distributions for a variety of molecular systems and use them to characterize the associated molecular dynamics. In particular, the square well provides a simple and easily modified potential to study the relationship between the scattering Wigner distribution and wave packet dynamics. Additional systems that are being studied include the collinear H + H2 molecular reaction, and the non-adiabatic B + H2 molecular collision.

  6. Dynamic network analysis of protein interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almaas, Eivind; Deri, Joya

    2007-03-01

    Network approaches have recently become a popular tool to study complex systems such as cellular metabolism and protein interactions. A substantial number of analyses of the protein interaction network (PIN) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have considered this network as a static entity, not taking the network's dynamic nature into account. Here, we examine the time-variation of gene regulation superimposed on the PIN by defining mRNA expression profiles throughout the cell cycle as node weights. To characterize these network dynamics, we have both developed a set of novel network measures as well as studied previously published measures for weighted networks. We expect that our approach will provide a deeper understanding of protein regulation during the cell cycle.

  7. Dynamic data analysis in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Karunajeewa, Asela S; Abeyratne, Udantha R; Rathnayake, Suren I; Swarnkar, V

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea (OSA) is a serious disease caused by the collapse of upper airways during sleep. The present method of measuring the severity of OSA is the Apnea Hypopnea Index (AHI). The AHI is defined as the average number of Obstructive events (Apnea and Hypopnea, OAH-events) during the total sleep period. The number of occurrence of OAH events during each hour of sleep is a random variable with an unknown probability density function. Thus the measure AHI alone is insufficient to describe its true nature. We propose a new measure Dynamic Apnea Hypopnea Index Time Series (DAHI), which captures the temporal density of Apnea event over shorter time intervals, and use its higher moments to obtain a dynamic characterization of OSA.

  8. Fluid Dynamic Analysis of Volcanic Tremor,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    analytical potential of the fluid dynamic theory, we consider a single-phase fluid, a melt of Mount Hood andesite at 1250C, in which significant pressure...existing steady condition. A likely Volcanic earthquakes are known to occur at ba- mechanism, important during pre-eruptive periods, saltic, andesitic and...melts can be large. of Mount Hood andesite composed of 60% SiO2 . A numerical solution of the free vibrational eigen- The melt was totally fluid at

  9. Influence Diagrams: Automated Analysis with Dynamic Programming

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-01

    demonstrating both the efficiency of the dynamic programming features and the limitations of influence diagrams in modeling problems with significant...Introduction 1.1 General Background Influence diagrams are a -eccntly developed graphical modeling tool for repre- senting both the conceptual elements and the...the model [9:10]. The types of node included in basic influence diagrams are (see Figure 1): Chance Node The chance node represents a random variable

  10. Network analysis of human heartbeat dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Zhi-Gang

    2010-02-01

    We construct the complex networks of human heartbeat dynamics and investigate their statistical properties, using the visibility algorithm proposed by Lacasa and co-workers [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 105, 4972 (2008)]. Our results show that the associated networks for the time series of heartbeat interval are always scale-free, high clustering, hierarchy, and assortative mixing. In particular, the assortative coefficient of associated networks could distinguish between healthy subjects and patients with congestive heart failure.

  11. Dynamic analysis of a parasite population model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibona, G. J.; Condat, C. A.

    2002-03-01

    We study the dynamics of a model that describes the competitive interaction between an invading species (a parasite) and its antibodies in an living being. This model was recently used to examine the dynamical competition between Tripanosoma cruzi and its antibodies during the acute phase of Chagas' disease. Depending on the antibody properties, the model yields three types of outcomes, corresponding, respectively, to healing, chronic disease, and host death. Here, we study the dynamics of the parasite-antibody interaction with the help of simulations, obtaining phase trajectories and phase diagrams for the system. We show that, under certain conditions, the size of the parasite inoculation can be crucial for the infection outcome and that a retardation in the stimulated production of an antibody species may result in the parasite gaining a definitive advantage. We also find a criterion for the relative sizes of the parameters that are required if parasite-generated decoys are indeed to help the invasion. Decoys may also induce a qualitatively different outcome: a limit cycle for the antibody-parasite population phase trajectories.

  12. Incremental learning for ν-Support Vector Regression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Sheng, Victor S; Wang, Zhijie; Ho, Derek; Osman, Said; Li, Shuo

    2015-07-01

    The ν-Support Vector Regression (ν-SVR) is an effective regression learning algorithm, which has the advantage of using a parameter ν on controlling the number of support vectors and adjusting the width of the tube automatically. However, compared to ν-Support Vector Classification (ν-SVC) (Schölkopf et al., 2000), ν-SVR introduces an additional linear term into its objective function. Thus, directly applying the accurate on-line ν-SVC algorithm (AONSVM) to ν-SVR will not generate an effective initial solution. It is the main challenge to design an incremental ν-SVR learning algorithm. To overcome this challenge, we propose a special procedure called initial adjustments in this paper. This procedure adjusts the weights of ν-SVC based on the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) conditions to prepare an initial solution for the incremental learning. Combining the initial adjustments with the two steps of AONSVM produces an exact and effective incremental ν-SVR learning algorithm (INSVR). Theoretical analysis has proven the existence of the three key inverse matrices, which are the cornerstones of the three steps of INSVR (including the initial adjustments), respectively. The experiments on benchmark datasets demonstrate that INSVR can avoid the infeasible updating paths as far as possible, and successfully converges to the optimal solution. The results also show that INSVR is faster than batch ν-SVR algorithms with both cold and warm starts.

  13. Health level seven interoperability strategy: big data, incrementally structured.

    PubMed

    Dolin, R H; Rogers, B; Jaffe, C

    2015-01-01

    Describe how the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a foundational standard in US Meaningful Use, contributes to a "big data, incrementally structured" interoperability strategy, whereby data structured incrementally gets large amounts of data flowing faster. We present cases showing how this approach is leveraged for big data analysis. To support the assertion that semi-structured narrative in CDA format can be a useful adjunct in an overall big data analytic approach, we present two case studies. The first assesses an organization's ability to generate clinical quality reports using coded data alone vs. coded data supplemented by CDA narrative. The second leverages CDA to construct a network model for referral management, from which additional observations can be gleaned. The first case shows that coded data supplemented by CDA narrative resulted in significant variances in calculated performance scores. In the second case, we found that the constructed network model enables the identification of differences in patient characteristics among different referral work flows. The CDA approach goes after data indirectly, by focusing first on the flow of narrative, which is then incrementally structured. A quantitative assessment of whether this approach will lead to a greater flow of data and ultimately a greater flow of structured data vs. other approaches is planned as a future exercise. Along with growing adoption of CDA, we are now seeing the big data community explore the standard, particularly given its potential to supply analytic en- gines with volumes of data previously not possible.

  14. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  15. Unsupervised analysis of small animal dynamic Cerenkov luminescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinelli, Antonello E.; Boschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Clustering analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA) were applied to dynamic Cerenkov luminescence images (dCLI). In order to investigate the performances of the proposed approaches, two distinct dynamic data sets obtained by injecting mice with 32P-ATP and 18F-FDG were acquired using the IVIS 200 optical imager. The k-means clustering algorithm has been applied to dCLI and was implemented using interactive data language 8.1. We show that cluster analysis allows us to obtain good agreement between the clustered and the corresponding emission regions like the bladder, the liver, and the tumor. We also show a good correspondence between the time activity curves of the different regions obtained by using CA and manual region of interest analysis on dCLIT and PCA images. We conclude that CA provides an automatic unsupervised method for the analysis of preclinical dynamic Cerenkov luminescence image data.

  16. Assessment of aerodynamic and dynamic models in a comprehensive analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The history, status, and lessons of a comprehensive analysis for rotorcraft are reviewed. The development, features, and capabilities of the analysis are summarized, including the aerodynamic and dynamic models that were used. Examples of correlation of the computational results with experimental data are given, extensions of the analysis for research in several topics of helicopter technology are discussed, and the experiences of outside users are summarized. Finally, the required capabilities and approach for the next comprehensive analysis are described.

  17. Literal algebra for satellite dynamics. [perturbation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaposchkin, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A description of the rather general class of operations available is given and the operations are related to problems in satellite dynamics. The implementation of an algebra processor is discussed. The four main categories of symbol processors are related to list processing, string manipulation, symbol manipulation, and formula manipulation. Fundamental required operations for an algebra processor are considered. It is pointed out that algebra programs have been used for a number of problems in celestial mechanics with great success. The advantage of computer algebra is its accuracy and speed.

  18. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  19. Dynamic analysis of grinding using the population balance model

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C. |

    1995-12-31

    The dynamic behavior of batch mill, CSTR mill, and a closed grinding network consisting of a mill, sump, and cyclone was analyzed using the dynamic population balance model (PBM). The dynamic solution of the PBM of a batch, CSTR and a closed grinding network consisting of a mill, sump, and cyclone forms the basis of the dynamic analysis presented here. Two numerical dynamic solution approaches were used. These are: (1) providing additional constraints on breakage selection functions or (2) performing the Arbiter-Bhrany (or other) normalization of the selection functions. Actual experimental anthracite batch grinding data was used to obtain the functionality of the batch dynamic mill selection and breakage functions for a real physical system. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm for systems of constrained non-linear equations is used to solve the batch dynamic PBM grinding equations to obtain the grinding selection and breakage rate functions. The mill, sump and hydrocyclone were modeled as a CSTR operating at various retention times. Batch dynamic PBM data was used to provide the mill kinetic and breakage selection function data. Different dynamic solutions were obtained depending on the numerical approach used. Each solution approach to a dynamic PBM with transport, while giving the same prediction for a single batch grinding time, gives different solutions or predictions for mill composition for other grinding times. This fact makes dynamic nodal analysis and control problematic. The fact that the constraint solution approach gives a solution may suggest that normalization for closed networks is not necessary. Differences in solutions to the PBM cannot be excused away by inaccuracies in the data used to model the grinding phenomenon.

  20. Space-time quantitative source apportionment of soil heavy metal concentration increments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Christakos, George; Guo, Mingwu; Xiao, Lu; Huang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the space-time trends and detecting the sources of heavy metal accumulation in soils have important consequences in the prevention and treatment of soil heavy metal pollution. In this study, we collected soil samples in the eastern part of the Qingshan district, Wuhan city, Hubei Province, China, during the period 2010-2014. The Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations in soils exhibited a significant accumulation during 2010-2014. The spatiotemporal Kriging technique, based on a quantitative characterization of soil heavy metal concentration variations in terms of non-separable variogram models, was employed to estimate the spatiotemporal soil heavy metal distribution in the study region. Our findings showed that the Cd, Cu, and Zn concentrations have an obvious incremental tendency from the southwestern to the central part of the study region. However, the Pb concentrations exhibited an obvious tendency from the northern part to the central part of the region. Then, spatial overlay analysis was used to obtain absolute and relative concentration increments of adjacent 1- or 5-year periods during 2010-2014. The spatial distribution of soil heavy metal concentration increments showed that the larger increments occurred in the center of the study region. Lastly, the principal component analysis combined with the multiple linear regression method were employed to quantify the source apportionment of the soil heavy metal concentration increments in the region. Our results led to the conclusion that the sources of soil heavy metal concentration increments should be ascribed to industry, agriculture and traffic. In particular, 82.5% of soil heavy metal concentration increment during 2010-2014 was ascribed to industrial/agricultural activities sources. Using STK and SOA to obtain the spatial distribution of heavy metal concentration increments in soils. Using PCA-MLR to quantify the source apportionment of soil heavy metal concentration increments. Copyright © 2017

  1. Thermal maturation of incrementally assembled plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Coleman, D. S.; Heizler, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Cretaceous zoned intrusive suites of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) were each assembled over 8-11 million years through incremental amalgamation of sheeted intrusions. Emplacement as small sheet-like increments inhibits development of a voluminous zone of melt bearing rock; instead the active magma body represents only a small portion of the total volume intruded. Plutons formed incrementally will have a protracted thermal history (T-t) that can be elucidated using thermochronologic techniques yielding insights into the thermal evolution of the lithosphere at magma chamber-pluton scales. Thermal histories are derived for plutons from the dike-like John Muir Intrusive Suite (JMIS) and the laccolithic Mount Whitney Intrusive Suite (MWIS), both located in the eastern-central SNB, by correlating estimated zircon saturation and argon closure temperatures with U-Pb zircon and titanite, 40Ar/39Ar amphibole, biotite, and K-feldspar ages. Close agreement among zircon and hornblende ages indicate rapid cooling following intrusion. However, hornblende and biotite ages are separated by 6-9 million years indicating slow protracted cooling. We interpret these data to reflect the thermal maturation of an incrementally assembled magma system in which temperatures cycled between ~500-300°C for millions of years. Hornblende ages were not reset by younger intrusions, therefore maximum reheating temperatures did not exceed ~500°C for geologically significant durations. T-t cooling curves from the intrusive suites are used to calibrate finite difference numerical simulations of pluton assembly. Intrusion geometries are modeled (HEAT 3D, Wohletz, 2007) by stacking horizontal increments from the top-down and bottom-up and vertical increments are emplaced syntaxially and antitaxially and are designed to generate plutons of the approximate dimensions, depth of emplacement, and age range of the Sierran suites. Numerical simulations yield the following general observations: 1) an

  2. International Space Station Increment-2 Quick Look Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this quick look report is to disseminate the International Space Station (ISS) Increment-2 reduced gravity environment preliminary analysis in a timely manner to the microgravity scientific community. This report is a quick look at the processed acceleration data collected by the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System (MAMS) during the period of May 3 to June 8, 2001. The report is by no means an exhaustive examination of all the relevant activities, which occurred during the time span mentioned above for two reasons. First, the time span being considered in this report is rather short since the MAMS was not active throughout the time span being considered to allow a detailed characterization. Second, as the name of the report implied, it is a quick look at the acceleration data. Consequently, a more comprehensive report, the ISS Increment-2 report, will be published following the conclusion of the Increment-2 tour of duty. NASA sponsors the MAMS and the Space Acceleration Microgravity System (SAMS) to support microgravity science experiments, which require microgravity acceleration measurements. On April 19, 2001, both the MAMS and the SAMS units were launched on STS-100 from the Kennedy Space Center for installation on the ISS. The MAMS unit was flown to the station in support of science experiments requiring quasisteady acceleration data measurements, while the SAMS unit was flown to support experiments requiring vibratory acceleration data measurement. Both acceleration systems are also used in support of the vehicle microgravity requirements verification. The ISS reduced gravity environment analysis presented in this report uses mostly the MAMS acceleration data measurements (the Increment-2 report will cover both systems). The MAMS has two sensors. The MAMS Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment Sensor Subsystem, which is a low frequency range sensor (up to 1 Hz), is used to characterize the quasi-steady environment for payloads and

  3. Application of a shear-modified GTN model to incremental sheet forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Malhotra, Rajiv; Liu, W. K.; Cao, Jian

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates the effects of using a shear-modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model, which is based on the mechanics of voids, for simulating material behavior in the incremental forming process. The problem chosen for analysis is a simplified version of the NUMISHEET 2014 incremental forming benchmark test. The implications of the shear-modification of the model specifically for incremental sheet forming processes are confirmed using finite element analysis. It is shown that including the shear term has a significant effect on fracture timing in incremental forming, which is not well reflected in the observed tensile test simulations for calibration. The numerical implementation and the need for comprehensive calibration of the model are briefly discussed.

  4. Bootstrap Standard Error Estimates in Dynamic Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Browne, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis summarizes changes in scores on a battery of manifest variables over repeated measurements in terms of a time series in a substantially smaller number of latent factors. Algebraic formulae for standard errors of parameter estimates are more difficult to obtain than in the usual intersubject factor analysis because of the…

  5. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2003-01-01

    TD64, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, is one of several groups with high-fidelity fluids design and analysis expertise in the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). TD64 assists personnel working on other programs. The group participates in projects in the following areas: turbomachinery activities, nozzle activities, combustion devices, and the Columbia accident investigation.

  6. Bootstrap Standard Error Estimates in Dynamic Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Guangjian; Browne, Michael W.

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic factor analysis summarizes changes in scores on a battery of manifest variables over repeated measurements in terms of a time series in a substantially smaller number of latent factors. Algebraic formulae for standard errors of parameter estimates are more difficult to obtain than in the usual intersubject factor analysis because of the…

  7. Automatic A-set selection for dynamics analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A method for selecting optimum NASTRAN analysis set degrees of freedom for the dynamic eigenvalue problem is described. Theoretical development of the Guyan reduction procedure on which the method is based is first summarized. The algorithm used to select the analysis set degrees of freedom is then developed. Two example problems are provided to demonstrate the accuracy of the algorithm.

  8. Conducting Qualitative Data Analysis: Managing Dynamic Tensions within

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chenail, Ronald J.

    2012-01-01

    In the third of a series of "how-to" essays on conducting qualitative data analysis, Ron Chenail examines the dynamic tensions within the process of qualitative data analysis that qualitative researchers must manage in order to produce credible and creative results. These tensions include (a) the qualities of the data and the qualitative data…

  9. Learning dynamics from nonstationary time series: Analysis of electroencephalograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, Dmitrii; Gribkova, Valentina

    2000-06-01

    We propose an empirical modeling technique for a nonstationary time series analysis. Proposed methods include a high-dimensional (N>3) dynamical model construction in the form of delay differential equations, a nonparametric method of respective time delay calculation, the detection of quasistationary regions of the process by reccurence analysis in the space of model coefficients, and final fitting of the model to quasistationary segments of observed time series. We also demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach for nonstationary signal classification in the space of model coefficients. Applying the empirical modeling technique to electroencephalogram (EEG) records analysis, we find evidence of high-dimensional nonlinear dynamics in quasistationary EEG segments. Reccurence analysis of model parameters reveals long-term correlations in nonstationary EEG records. Using the dynamical model as a nonlinear filter, we find that different emotional states of subjects can be clearly distinguished in the space of model coefficients.

  10. Do otolith increments allow correct inferences about age and growth of coral reef fishes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Otolith increment structure is widely used to estimate age and growth of marine fishes. Here, I test the accuracy of the long-term otolith increment analysis of the lemon damselfish Pomacentrus moluccensis to describe age and growth characteristics. I compare the number of putative annual otolith increments (as a proxy for actual age) and widths of these increments (as proxies for somatic growth) with actual tagged fish-length data, based on a 6-year dataset, the longest time course for a coral reef fish. Estimated age from otoliths corresponded closely with actual age in all cases, confirming annual increment formation. However, otolith increment widths were poor proxies for actual growth in length [linear regression r 2 = 0.44-0.90, n = 6 fish] and were clearly of limited value in estimating annual growth. Up to 60 % of the annual growth variation was missed using otolith increments, suggesting the long-term back calculations of otolith growth characteristics of reef fish populations should be interpreted with caution.

  11. Generalization of the logistic law of distribution in the statistical analysis of wind-direction dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplya, E. V.

    2016-11-01

    The statistical regularity in the chaotic dynamics of wind direction is established. The distribution density of the increment in a wind-direction angle is approximated by generalizing the logistic law of distribution. Parameters of the approximation function are calculated by the least square method using the experimental data. The conformity between the function proposed and the meteorological data is verified by the Pearson's chi-squared test and the Kolmogorov test.

  12. [Macroeconomic analysis: agro-nutritional dynamics].

    PubMed

    Coussy, J

    1992-01-01

    This reflection on the renewed prominence of macroeconomic analysis in the area of food and agriculture, especially in Africa, assesses the history, limitations, and potential of the discipline as applied in formulation of agricultural policy. It begins by tracing the development and history of macroeconomic analysis from the emergence of liberal political economy in the late 18th century. The evolution of macroeconomic analysis applied to food and agriculture has not been linear; periods of eclipse have alternated with periods of influence. Most recently, in the 1960s, macroeconomic analysis was important in attempts to understand the place of agriculture in national economies, but the misuse of its vocabulary to justify a number of controversial policy actions created lasting distrust. The questions addressed by macroeconomic analysis and the potential contributions of its use in the 1960s are discussed, followed by an analysis of the reasons for renewed attention to the macroeconomic viewpoint beginning with the balance of payments crisis of the 1980s. The recent growth of institutional demand for macroeconomic analysis and policy has been accompanied by misunderstanding and inflated expectations as to its usefulness, while suspicions linger. The pressures encouraging broadened use of macroeconomic analysis are identified, including the growing influence of purely macroeconomic processes such as urbanization, the demographic transition, and the debt crisis; the intensifying of national and international market constraints affecting food and agriculture; and the legitimation of macroeconomic terminology by the large international organizations. Misapplications of macroeconomic analysis are identified, such as an erroneous equating of "macroeconomy" with "global economy". The lack of consensus among macroeconomic theorists about policies ostensibly based on macroeconomic analysis is discussed, as is the sometimes strained relationship between them and specialists

  13. Analysis of dynamic brain imaging data.

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, P P; Pesaran, B

    1999-01-01

    Modern imaging techniques for probing brain function, including functional magnetic resonance imaging, intrinsic and extrinsic contrast optical imaging, and magnetoencephalography, generate large data sets with complex content. In this paper we develop appropriate techniques for analysis and visualization of such imaging data to separate the signal from the noise and characterize the signal. The techniques developed fall into the general category of multivariate time series analysis, and in particular we extensively use the multitaper framework of spectral analysis. We develop specific protocols for the analysis of fMRI, optical imaging, and MEG data, and illustrate the techniques by applications to real data sets generated by these imaging modalities. In general, the analysis protocols involve two distinct stages: "noise" characterization and suppression, and "signal" characterization and visualization. An important general conclusion of our study is the utility of a frequency-based representation, with short, moving analysis windows to account for nonstationarity in the data. Of particular note are 1) the development of a decomposition technique (space-frequency singular value decomposition) that is shown to be a useful means of characterizing the image data, and 2) the development of an algorithm, based on multitaper methods, for the removal of approximately periodic physiological artifacts arising from cardiac and respiratory sources. PMID:9929474

  14. A Fast Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rafael Coimbra; Engel, Paulo Martins

    2015-01-01

    This work builds upon previous efforts in online incremental learning, namely the Incremental Gaussian Mixture Network (IGMN). The IGMN is capable of learning from data streams in a single-pass by improving its model after analyzing each data point and discarding it thereafter. Nevertheless, it suffers from the scalability point-of-view, due to its asymptotic time complexity of O(NKD3) for N data points, K Gaussian components and D dimensions, rendering it inadequate for high-dimensional data. In this work, we manage to reduce this complexity to O(NKD2) by deriving formulas for working directly with precision matrices instead of covariance matrices. The final result is a much faster and scalable algorithm which can be applied to high dimensional tasks. This is confirmed by applying the modified algorithm to high-dimensional classification datasets. PMID:26444880

  15. Nonlinear dynamic analysis of flexible multibody systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauchau, Olivier A.; Kang, Nam Kook

    1991-01-01

    Two approaches are developed to analyze the dynamic behavior of flexible multibody systems. In the first approach each body is modeled with a modal methodology in a local non-inertial frame of reference, whereas in the second approach, each body is modeled with a finite element methodology in the inertial frame. In both cases, the interaction among the various elastic bodies is represented by constraint equations. The two approaches were compared for accuracy and efficiency: the first approach is preferable when the nonlinearities are not too strong but it becomes cumbersome and expensive to use when many modes must be used. The second approach is more general and easier to implement but could result in high computation costs for a large system. The constraints should be enforced in a time derivative fashion for better accuracy and stability.

  16. Dynamic asset trees and portfolio analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onnela, J.-P.; Chakraborti, A.; Kaski, K.; Kertiész, J.

    2002-12-01

    The minimum spanning tree, based on the concept of ultrametricity, is constructed from the correlation matrix of stock returns and provides a meaningful economic taxonomy of the stock market. In order to study the dynamics of this asset tree we characterise it by its normalised length and by the mean occupation layer, as measured from an appropriately chosen centre called the `central node'. We show how the tree evolves over time, and how it shrinks strongly, in particular, during a stock market crisis. We then demonstrate that the assets of the optimal Markowitz portfolio lie practically at all times on the outskirts of the tree. We also show that the normalised tree length and the investment diversification potential are very strongly correlated.

  17. Crustal Dynamics Project data analysis, 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caprette, D. S.; Ma, C.; Ryan, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The Goddard Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) group reports the results of analyzing 1073 Mark 3 data sets acquired from fixed and mobile observing sites through the end of 1989 and available to the Crustal Dynamics Project. Two large solutions, GLB656 and GLB657, were used to establish a VLBI reference frame with an origin coincident with the ITRF89. Another large solution, GLB658, was used to obtain Earth rotation parameters, nutation offsets, and global source positions. Site velocities were obtained from another large solution, GLB659. A fifth large solution, GLB660, was used to obtain baseline evolution. Site positions are tabulated on a yearly basis from 1979 through 1992. Site velocities are presented in both Cartesian and topocentric coordinates. The results include 76 sources, 80 sites, and 422 baselines.

  18. Spectrum analysis with quantum dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, Shilin; Ang, Shan Zheng; Wheatley, Trevor A.; Yonezawa, Hidehiro; Furusawa, Akira; Huntington, Elanor H.; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the power spectral density of a stochastic process, such as a stochastic force or magnetic field, is a fundamental task in many sensing applications. Quantum noise is becoming a major limiting factor to such a task in future technology, especially in optomechanics for temperature, stochastic gravitational wave, and decoherence measurements. Motivated by this concern, here we prove a measurement-independent quantum limit to the accuracy of estimating the spectrum parameters of a classical stochastic process coupled to a quantum dynamical system. We demonstrate our results by analyzing the data from a continuous-optical-phase-estimation experiment and showing that the experimental performance with homodyne detection is close to the quantum limit. We further propose a spectral photon-counting method that can attain quantum-optimal performance for weak modulation and a coherent-state input, with an error scaling superior to that of homodyne detection at low signal-to-noise ratios.

  19. Dynamic mechanical analysis of fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, K. E.

    1979-01-01

    Dynamic mechanical and thermal properties were determined for unidirectional epoxy/glass composites at various fiber orientation angles. Resonant frequency and relative logarithmic decrement were measured as functions of temperature. In low angle and longitudinal specimens a transition was observed above the resin glass transition temperature which was manifested mechanically as an additional damping peak and thermally as a change in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The new transition was attributed to a heterogeneous resin matrix induced by the fiber. The temperature span of the glass-rubber relaxation was found to broaden with decreasing orientation angle, reflecting the growth of fiber contribution and exhibiting behavior similar to that of Young's modulus. The change in resonant frequency through the glass transition was greatest for samples of intermediate fiber angle, demonstrating behavior similar to that of the longitudinal shear modulus.

  20. Decision Analysis of Dynamic Spectrum Access Rules

    SciTech Connect

    Juan D. Deaton; Luiz A. DaSilva; Christian Wernz

    2011-12-01

    A current trend in spectrum regulation is to incorporate spectrum sharing through the design of spectrum access rules that support Dynamic Spectrum Access (DSA). This paper develops a decision-theoretic framework for regulators to assess the impacts of different decision rules on both primary and secondary operators. We analyze access rules based on sensing and exclusion areas, which in practice can be enforced through geolocation databases. Our results show that receiver-only sensing provides insufficient protection for primary and co-existing secondary users and overall low social welfare. On the other hand, using sensing information between the transmitter and receiver of a communication link, provides dramatic increases in system performance. The performance of using these link end points is relatively close to that of using many cooperative sensing nodes associated to the same access point and large link exclusion areas. These results are useful to regulators and network developers in understanding in developing rules for future DSA regulation.

  1. Dynamic headspace analysis of fresh tomato juices.

    PubMed

    Sucan, M K; Russell, G F

    2001-01-01

    The methods used to isolate volatile compounds for GC analyses can cause profound effects on the quantitative and qualitative composition of the injected sample, and exert a great influence in the resultant bioactivity of volatiles. Especially with plant tissues like tomatoes, the isolation of volatile constituents using classical methods may yield results which are not representative of the chemicals present in the natural material. Headspace sampling methods may be advantageous in capturing the same volatile compounds emitted from tomatoes that are detected by the human nose. This study utilized an extremely sensitive dynamic headspace sampling with thermal desorption method to determine volatile components of fresh tomato juices. The method proved very sensitive for the isolation of tomato volatiles and concentrations of flavor compounds were much greater than related literature studies.

  2. Baryon Spectrum Analysis using Covariant Constraint Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, Joshua; Crater, Horace

    2012-03-01

    The energy spectrum of the baryons is determined by treating each of them as a three-body system with the interacting forces coming from a set of two-body potentials that depend on both the distance between the quarks and the spin and orbital angular momentum coupling terms. The Two Body Dirac equations of constraint dynamics derived by Crater and Van Alstine, matched with the quasipotential formalism of Todorov as the underlying two-body formalism are used, as well as the three-body constraint formalism of Sazdjian to integrate the three two-body equations into a single relativistically covariant three body equation for the bound state energies. The results are analyzed and compared to experiment using a best fit method and several different algorithms, including a gradient approach, and Monte Carlo method. Results for all well-known baryons are presented and compared to experiment, with good accuracy.

  3. Ion mobility analysis of molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wyttenbach, Thomas; Pierson, Nicholas A; Clemmer, David E; Bowers, Michael T

    2014-01-01

    The combination of mass spectrometry and ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) employing a temperature-variable drift cell or a drift tube divided into sections to make IMS-IMS experiments possible allows information to be obtained about the molecular dynamics of polyatomic ions in the absence of a solvent. The experiments allow the investigation of structural changes of both activated and native ion populations on a timescale of 1-100 ms. Five different systems representing small and large, polar and nonpolar molecules, as well as noncovalent assemblies, are discussed in detail: a dinucleotide, a sodiated polyethylene glycol chain, the peptide bradykinin, the protein ubiquitin, and two types of peptide oligomers. Barriers to conformational interconversion can be obtained in favorable cases. In other cases, solution-like native structures can be observed, but care must be taken in the experimental protocols. The power of theoretical modeling is demonstrated.

  4. Wheat yield dynamics: a structural econometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Afsin; Akdi, Yilmaz; Arslan, Fahrettin

    2007-10-15

    In this study we initially have tried to explore the wheat situation in Turkey, which has a small-open economy and in the member countries of European Union (EU). We have observed that increasing the wheat yield is fundamental to obtain comparative advantage among countries by depressing domestic prices. Also the changing structure of supporting schemes in Turkey makes it necessary to increase its wheat yield level. For this purpose, we have used available data to determine the dynamics of wheat yield by Ordinary Least Square Regression methods. In order to find out whether there is a linear relationship among these series we have checked each series whether they are integrated at the same order or not. Consequently, we have pointed out that fertilizer usage and precipitation level are substantial inputs for producing high wheat yield. Furthermore, in respect for our model, fertilizer usage affects wheat yield more than precipitation level.

  5. Invariance of specific mass increment in the case of non-equilibrium growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, L. M.; Sergeev, A. P.; Terentiev, P. S.

    2015-09-01

    The invariance of specific mass increments of crystalline structures that co-exist in the case of non-equilibrium growth is grounded for the first time by using the maximum entropy production principle. Based on the hypothesis of the existence of a universal growth equation, and through the dimensional analysis, an explicit form of the time-dependent specific mass increment is proposed. The applicability of the obtained results for describing growth in animate nature is discussed.

  6. Human deciduous mandibular molar incremental enamel development.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Patrick

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative studies of incremental markings retained within human enamel have reconstructed the duration and rate (crown and cusp formation times, initiation and completion, daily enamel secretion rates) of permanent tooth development. This approach has provided one way of estimating human age-at-death, and facilitated comparative dental studies of primate evolution. Similar applications from deciduous enamel are inhibited because developmental reconstructions from incremental markings for these teeth are less frequently reported in the literature. This study quantified the duration and rate of enamel development for mesial (protoconid, metaconid) and distal cusps (hypoconid, entoconid) for first (dm1) and second (dm2) deciduous mandibular molars from an archaeological sample of modern human juveniles. Crown formation time can be calculated from the dm1 protoconid because growth initiates and completes in this cusp, and from the dm2 protoconid combined with the final period of hypoconid growth. The dm1 postnatal crown formation time included the time taken for the tubercle of Zuckerkandl to develop, and differed slightly compared to radiographic methods. The majority of dm1 protoconid cuspal (occlusal region) enamel formed before birth. The dm2 entoconid enamel formed mainly after birth. Birth reduced daily enamel secretion rates, changed the visibility of incremental markings, and disrupted enamel growth for 3 to 8 days. Findings presented here can contribute to age-at-death estimates for human infants aged 13-postnatal months or less, and should facilitate comparisons of primate deciduous incremental enamel development in an evolutionary context. Regression equations are included so that cuspal formation time can be estimated from enamel thickness. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Sustained mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) plantation heartwood increment.

    Treesearch

    Frank H. Wadsworth; Edgardo. Gonzalez

    2008-01-01

    In a search for an increment-based rotation for plantation mahogany(Swietenia macrophylla King), heartwood volume per tree was regressed on DBH (trunk diameter outside bark at 1.4 m above the ground) and merchantable height measurements. We updated a previous study [Wadsworth, F.H., González González, E., Figuera Colón, J.C., Lugo P...

  8. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  9. Incremental grouping of image elements in vision.

    PubMed

    Roelfsema, Pieter R; Houtkamp, Roos

    2011-11-01

    One important task for the visual system is to group image elements that belong to an object and to segregate them from other objects and the background. We here present an incremental grouping theory (IGT) that addresses the role of object-based attention in perceptual grouping at a psychological level and, at the same time, outlines the mechanisms for grouping at the neurophysiological level. The IGT proposes that there are two processes for perceptual grouping. The first process is base grouping and relies on neurons that are tuned to feature conjunctions. Base grouping is fast and occurs in parallel across the visual scene, but not all possible feature conjunctions can be coded as base groupings. If there are no neurons tuned to the relevant feature conjunctions, a second process called incremental grouping comes into play. Incremental grouping is a time-consuming and capacity-limited process that requires the gradual spread of enhanced neuronal activity across the representation of an object in the visual cortex. The spread of enhanced neuronal activity corresponds to the labeling of image elements with object-based attention.

  10. Molecular energies from an incremental fragmentation method.

    PubMed

    Meitei, Oinam Romesh; Heßelmann, Andreas

    2016-02-28

    The systematic molecular fragmentation method by Collins and Deev [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 104104 (2006)] has been used to calculate total energies and relative conformational energies for a number of small and extended molecular systems. In contrast to the original approach by Collins, we have tested the accuracy of the fragmentation method by utilising an incremental scheme in which the energies at the lowest level of the fragmentation are calculated on an accurate quantum chemistry level while lower-cost methods are used to correct the low-level energies through a high-level fragmentation. In this work, the fragment energies at the lowest level of fragmentation were calculated using the random-phase approximation (RPA) and two recently developed extensions to the RPA while the incremental corrections at higher levels of the fragmentation were calculated using standard density functional theory (DFT) methods. The complete incremental fragmentation method has been shown to reproduce the supermolecule results with a very good accuracy, almost independent on the molecular type, size, or type of decomposition. The fragmentation method has also been used in conjunction with the DFT-SAPT (symmetry-adapted perturbation theory) method which enables a breakdown of the total nonbonding energy contributions into individual interaction energy terms. Finally, the potential problems of the method connected with the use of capping hydrogen atoms are analysed and two possible solutions are supplied.

  11. Dynamic fracture mechanics analysis for an edge delamination crack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Doyle, James F.

    1994-01-01

    A global/local analysis is applied to the problem of a panel with an edge delamination crack subject to an impulse loading to ascertain the dynamic J integral. The approach uses the spectral element method to obtain the global dynamic response and local resultants to obtain the J integral. The variation of J integral along the crack front is shown. The crack behavior is mixed mode (Mode 2 and Mode 3), but is dominated by the Mode 2 behavior.

  12. Coagulation dynamics of a blood sample by multiple scattering analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faivre, Magalie; Peltié, Philippe; Planat-Chrétien, Anne; Cosnier, Marie-Line; Cubizolles, Myriam; Nougier, Christophe; Négrier, Claude; Pouteau, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    We report a new technique to measure coagulation dynamics on whole-blood samples. The method relies on the analysis of the speckle figure resulting from a whole-blood sample mixed with coagulation reagent and introduced in a thin chamber illuminated with a coherent light. A dynamic study of the speckle reveals a typical behavior due to coagulation. We compare our measured coagulation times to a reference method obtained in a medical laboratory.

  13. Movement Characteristics Analysis and Dynamic Simulation of Collaborative Measuring Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    guoqing, MA; li, LIU; zhenglin, YU; guohua, CAO; yanbin, ZHENG

    2017-03-01

    Human-machine collaboration is becoming increasingly more necessary, and so collaborative robot applications are also in high demand. We selected a UR10 robot as our research subject for this study. First, we applied D-H coordinate transformation of the robot to establish a link system, and we then used inverse transformation to solve the robot’s inverse kinematics and find all the joints. Use Lagrange method to analysis UR robot dynamics; use ADAMS multibody dynamics simulation software to dynamic simulation; verifying the correctness of the derived kinetic models.

  14. Blade loss transient dynamic analysis of turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallone, M. J.; Gallardo, V.; Storace, A. F.; Bach, L. J.; Black, G.; Gaffney, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on work completed to develop an analytical method for predicting the transient non-linear response of a complete aircraft engine system due to the loss of a fan blade, and to validate the analysis by comparing the results against actual blade loss test data. The solution, which is based on the component element method, accounts for rotor-to-casing rubs, high damping and rapid deceleration rates associated with the blade loss event. A comparison of test results and predicted response show good agreement except for an initial overshoot spike not observed in test. The method is effective for analysis of large systems.

  15. Blade loss transient dynamic analysis of turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallone, M. J.; Gallardo, V.; Storace, A. F.; Bach, L. J.; Black, G.; Gaffney, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reports on work completed to develop an analytical method for predicting the transient non-linear response of a complete aircraft engine system due to the loss of a fan blade, and to validate the analysis by comparing the results against actual blade loss test data. The solution, which is based on the component element method, accounts for rotor-to-casing rubs, high damping and rapid deceleration rates associated with the blade loss event. A comparison of test results and predicted response show good agreement except for an initial overshoot spike not observed in test. The method is effective for analysis of large systems.

  16. A NASTRAN-based computer program for structural dynamic analysis of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobitz, Don W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a computer program developed for structural dynamic analysis of horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT's). It is based on the finite element method through its reliance on NASTRAN for the development of mass, stiffness, and damping matrices of the tower end rotor, which are treated in NASTRAN as separate structures. The tower is modeled in a stationary frame and the rotor in one rotating at a constant angular velocity. The two structures are subsequently joined together (external to NASTRAN) using a time-dependent transformation consistent with the hub configuration. Aerodynamic loads are computed with an established flow model based on strip theory. Aeroelastic effects are included by incorporating the local velocity and twisting deformation of the blade in the load computation. The turbulent nature of the wind, both in space and time, is modeled by adding in stochastic wind increments. The resulting equations of motion are solved in the time domain using the implicit Newmark-Beta integrator. Preliminary comparisons with data from the Boeing/NASA MOD2 HAWT indicate that the code is capable of accurately and efficiently predicting the response of HAWT's driven by turbulent winds.

  17. DANPOS: Dynamic analysis of nucleosome position and occupancy by sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kaifu; Xi, Yuanxin; Pan, Xuewen; Li, Zhaoyu; Kaestner, Klaus; Tyler, Jessica; Dent, Sharon; He, Xiangwei; Li, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in next-generation sequencing have enabled whole-genome profiling of nucleosome organizations. Although several algorithms for inferring nucleosome position from a single experimental condition have been available, it remains a challenge to accurately define dynamic nucleosomes associated with environmental changes. Here, we report a comprehensive bioinformatics pipeline, DANPOS, explicitly designed for dynamic nucleosome analysis at single-nucleotide resolution. Using both simulated and real nucleosome data, we demonstrated that bias correction in preliminary data processing and optimal statistical testing significantly enhances the functional interpretation of dynamic nucleosomes. The single-nucleotide resolution analysis of DANPOS allows us to detect all three categories of nucleosome dynamics, such as position shift, fuzziness change, and occupancy change, using a uniform statistical framework. Pathway analysis indicates that each category is involved in distinct biological functions. We also analyzed the influence of sequencing depth and suggest that even 200-fold coverage is probably not enough to identify all the dynamic nucleosomes. Finally, based on nucleosome data from the human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), we demonstrated that DANPOS is also robust in defining functional dynamic nucleosomes, not only in promoters, but also in distal regulatory regions in the mammalian genome. PMID:23193179

  18. When to choose dynamic versus static social network analysis.

    PubMed

    Farine, Damien R

    2017-10-09

    1.There is increasing interest in using dynamic social networks in the study of animal sociality and its consequences. However, there is a general lack of guidance on the when and how such an approach will be valuable. 2.The aim of this paper is to provide a guide on when to choose dynamic versus static social network analysis, and how to choose the appropriate temporal scale for the dynamic network. 3.I first discuss the motivations for using dynamic animal social networks. I then provide guidance on how to choose between dynamic networks and the 'standard' approach of using static networks. I discuss this in the context of the temporal scale of changes observed, of their predictability, and of the data availability. 4.Dynamic networks are important in a number of scenarios. First, if the network data are being compared to independent processes, such as the spread of information or disease or environmental changes, then dynamics networks will provide more accurate estimates of spreading rates. Second, if the network has predictable patterns of change, for example diel cycles or seasonal changes, then dynamic networks should be used to capture these changes. Third, dynamic networks are important for studies of spread through networks when the relationship between edge weight and transmission probability is non-linear. Finally, dynamic social networks are also useful in situations where interactions among individuals are dense, such as in studies of captive groups. 5.The use of static versus dynamic network requires careful consideration, both from a research question perspective and from a data perspective, and this paper provides a guide on how to evaluate the relative importance of these. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. IPSILON: incremental parsing for semantic indexing of latent concepts.

    PubMed

    Bae, Soo Hyun; Juang, Biing-Hwang

    2010-07-01

    A new framework for content-based image retrieval, which takes advantage of the source characterization property of a universal source coding scheme, is investigated. Based upon a new class of multidimensional incremental parsing algorithm, extended from the Lempel-Ziv incremental parsing code, the proposed method captures the occurrence pattern of visual elements from a given image. A linguistic processing technique, namely the latent semantic analysis (LSA) method, is then employed to identify associative ensembles of visual elements, which lay the foundation for intelligent visual information analysis. In 2-D applications, incremental parsing decomposes an image into elementary patches that are different from the conventional fixed square-block type patches. When used in compressive representations, it is amenable in schemes that do not rely on average distortion criteria, a methodology that is a departure from the conventional vector quantization. We call this methodology a parsed representation. In this article, we present our implementations of an image retrieval system, called IPSILON, with parsed representations induced by different perceptual distortion thresholds. We evaluate the effectiveness of the use of the parsed representations by comparing their performance with that of four image retrieval systems, one using the conventional vector quantization for visual information analysis under the same LSA paradigm, another using a method called SIMPLIcity which is based upon an image segmentation and integrated region matching, and the other two based upon query-by-semantic-example and query-by-visual-example. The first two of them were tested with 20,000 images of natural scenes, and the others were tested with a portion of the images. The experimental results show that the proposed parsed representation efficiently captures the salient features in visual images and the IPSILON systems outperform other systems in terms of retrieval precision and distortion

  20. Traffic chaotic dynamics modeling and analysis of deterministic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Weiqiang; Huang, Ning; Wu, Zhitao

    2016-07-01

    Network traffic is an important and direct acting factor of network reliability and performance. To understand the behaviors of network traffic, chaotic dynamics models were proposed and helped to analyze nondeterministic network a lot. The previous research thought that the chaotic dynamics behavior was caused by random factors, and the deterministic networks would not exhibit chaotic dynamics behavior because of lacking of random factors. In this paper, we first adopted chaos theory to analyze traffic data collected from a typical deterministic network testbed — avionics full duplex switched Ethernet (AFDX, a typical deterministic network) testbed, and found that the chaotic dynamics behavior also existed in deterministic network. Then in order to explore the chaos generating mechanism, we applied the mean field theory to construct the traffic dynamics equation (TDE) for deterministic network traffic modeling without any network random factors. Through studying the derived TDE, we proposed that chaotic dynamics was one of the nature properties of network traffic, and it also could be looked as the action effect of TDE control parameters. A network simulation was performed and the results verified that the network congestion resulted in the chaotic dynamics for a deterministic network, which was identical with expectation of TDE. Our research will be helpful to analyze the traffic complicated dynamics behavior for deterministic network and contribute to network reliability designing and analysis.

  1. Generalized neural networks for spectral analysis: dynamics and Liapunov functions.

    PubMed

    Vegas, José M; Zufiria, Pedro J

    2004-03-01

    This paper analyzes local and global behavior of several dynamical systems which generalize some artificial neural network (ANN) semilinear models originally designed for principal component analysis (PCA) in the characterization of random vectors. These systems implicitly performed the spectral analysis of correlation (i.e. symmetric positive definite) matrices. Here, the proposed generalizations cover both nonsymmetric matrices as well as fully nonlinear models. Local stability analysis is performed via linearization and global behavior is analyzed by constructing several Liapunov functions.

  2. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-04-21

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map

  3. Solar Dynamic Power System Stability Analysis and Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momoh, James A.; Wang, Yanchun

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this research is to conduct dynamic analysis, control design, and control performance test of solar power system. Solar power system consists of generation system and distribution network system. A bench mark system is used in this research, which includes a generator with excitation system and governor, an ac/dc converter, six DDCU's and forty-eight loads. A detailed model is used for modeling generator. Excitation system is represented by a third order model. DDCU is represented by a seventh order system. The load is modeled by the combination of constant power and constant impedance. Eigen-analysis and eigen-sensitivity analysis are used for system dynamic analysis. The effects of excitation system, governor, ac/dc converter control, and the type of load on system stability are discussed. In order to improve system transient stability, nonlinear ac/dc converter control is introduced. The direct linearization method is used for control design. The dynamic analysis results show that these controls affect system stability in different ways. The parameter coordination of controllers are recommended based on the dynamic analysis. It is concluded from the present studies that system stability is improved by the coordination of control parameters and the nonlinear ac/dc converter control stabilize system oscillation caused by the load change and system fault efficiently.

  4. Incremental learning of concept drift in nonstationary environments.

    PubMed

    Elwell, Ryan; Polikar, Robi

    2011-10-01

    We introduce an ensemble of classifiers-based approach for incremental learning of concept drift, characterized by nonstationary environments (NSEs), where the underlying data distributions change over time. The proposed algorithm, named Learn(++). NSE, learns from consecutive batches of data without making any assumptions on the nature or rate of drift; it can learn from such environments that experience constant or variable rate of drift, addition or deletion of concept classes, as well as cyclical drift. The algorithm learns incrementally, as other members of the Learn(++) family of algorithms, that is, without requiring access to previously seen data. Learn(++). NSE trains one new classifier for each batch of data it receives, and combines these classifiers using a dynamically weighted majority voting. The novelty of the approach is in determining the voting weights, based on each classifier's time-adjusted accuracy on current and past environments. This approach allows the algorithm to recognize, and act accordingly, to the changes in underlying data distributions, as well as to a possible reoccurrence of an earlier distribution. We evaluate the algorithm on several synthetic datasets designed to simulate a variety of nonstationary environments, as well as a real-world weather prediction dataset. Comparisons with several other approaches are also included. Results indicate that Learn(++). NSE can track the changing environments very closely, regardless of the type of concept drift. To allow future use, comparison and benchmarking by interested researchers, we also release our data used in this paper. © 2011 IEEE

  5. Structural dynamic analysis of a ball joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Kwon-Hee

    2012-11-01

    Ball joint is a rotating and swiveling element that is typically installed at the interface between two parts. In an automobile, the ball joint is the component that connects the control arms to the steering knuckle. The ball joint can also be installed in linkage systems for motion control applications. This paper describes the simulation strategy for a ball joint analysis, considering manufacturing process. Its manufacturing process can be divided into plugging and spinning. Then, the interested responses is selected as the stress distribution generated between its ball and bearing. In this paper, a commercial code of NX DAFUL using an implicit integration method is introduced to calculate the response. In addition, the gap analysis is performed to investigate the fitness, focusing on the response of the displacement of a ball stud. Also, the optimum design is suggested through case studies.

  6. Interactive Visual Analysis within Dynamic Ocean Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butkiewicz, T.

    2012-12-01

    The many observation and simulation based ocean models available today can provide crucial insights for all fields of marine research and can serve as valuable references when planning data collection missions. However, the increasing size and complexity of these models makes leveraging their contents difficult for end users. Through a combination of data visualization techniques, interactive analysis tools, and new hardware technologies, the data within these models can be made more accessible to domain scientists. We present an interactive system that supports exploratory visual analysis within large-scale ocean flow models. The currents and eddies within the models are illustrated using effective, particle-based flow visualization techniques. Stereoscopic displays and rendering methods are employed to ensure that the user can correctly perceive the complex 3D structures of depth-dependent flow patterns. Interactive analysis tools are provided which allow the user to experiment through the introduction of their customizable virtual dye particles into the models to explore regions of interest. A multi-touch interface provides natural, efficient interaction, with custom multi-touch gestures simplifying the otherwise challenging tasks of navigating and positioning tools within a 3D environment. We demonstrate the potential applications of our visual analysis environment with two examples of real-world significance: Firstly, an example of using customized particles with physics-based behaviors to simulate pollutant release scenarios, including predicting the oil plume path for the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill disaster. Secondly, an interactive tool for plotting and revising proposed autonomous underwater vehicle mission pathlines with respect to the surrounding flow patterns predicted by the model; as these survey vessels have extremely limited energy budgets, designing more efficient paths allows for greater survey areas.

  7. Dynamic competitive probabilistic principal components analysis.

    PubMed

    López-Rubio, Ezequiel; Ortiz-DE-Lazcano-Lobato, Juan Miguel

    2009-04-01

    We present a new neural model which extends the classical competitive learning (CL) by performing a Probabilistic Principal Components Analysis (PPCA) at each neuron. The model also has the ability to learn the number of basis vectors required to represent the principal directions of each cluster, so it overcomes a drawback of most local PCA models, where the dimensionality of a cluster must be fixed a priori. Experimental results are presented to show the performance of the network with multispectral image data.

  8. Rocketdyne automated dynamics data analysis and management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarn, Robert B.

    1988-01-01

    An automated dynamics data analysis and management systems implemented on a DEC VAX minicomputer cluster is described. Multichannel acquisition, Fast Fourier Transformation analysis, and an online database have significantly improved the analysis of wideband transducer responses from Space Shuttle Main Engine testing. Leakage error correction to recover sinusoid amplitudes and correct for frequency slewing is described. The phase errors caused by FM recorder/playback head misalignment are automatically measured and used to correct the data. Data compression methods are described and compared. The system hardware is described. Applications using the data base are introduced, including software for power spectral density, instantaneous time history, amplitude histogram, fatigue analysis, and rotordynamics expert system analysis.

  9. Dynamic Network-Based Epistasis Analysis: Boolean Examples

    PubMed Central

    Azpeitia, Eugenio; Benítez, Mariana; Padilla-Longoria, Pablo; Espinosa-Soto, Carlos; Alvarez-Buylla, Elena R.

    2011-01-01

    In this article we focus on how the hierarchical and single-path assumptions of epistasis analysis can bias the inference of gene regulatory networks. Here we emphasize the critical importance of dynamic analyses, and specifically illustrate the use of Boolean network models. Epistasis in a broad sense refers to gene interactions, however, as originally proposed by Bateson, epistasis is defined as the blocking of a particular allelic effect due to the effect of another allele at a different locus (herein, classical epistasis). Classical epistasis analysis has proven powerful and useful, allowing researchers to infer and assign directionality to gene interactions. As larger data sets are becoming available, the analysis of classical epistasis is being complemented with computer science tools and system biology approaches. We show that when the hierarchical and single-path assumptions are not met in classical epistasis analysis, the access to relevant information and the correct inference of gene interaction topologies is hindered, and it becomes necessary to consider the temporal dynamics of gene interactions. The use of dynamical networks can overcome these limitations. We particularly focus on the use of Boolean networks that, like classical epistasis analysis, relies on logical formalisms, and hence can complement classical epistasis analysis and relax its assumptions. We develop a couple of theoretical examples and analyze them from a dynamic Boolean network model perspective. Boolean networks could help to guide additional experiments and discern among alternative regulatory schemes that would be impossible or difficult to infer without the elimination of these assumption from the classical epistasis analysis. We also use examples from the literature to show how a Boolean network-based approach has resolved ambiguities and guided epistasis analysis. Our article complements previous accounts, not only by focusing on the implications of the hierarchical and

  10. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark; Gera, Dinesh

    2001-11-06

    In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

  11. AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2010-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

  12. Dynamic analysis of a submerged thick-section composite cylinder

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, R.W.; Sun, C.T.

    1995-12-31

    The dynamic response of a thick-section hollow composite cylinder, under plane strain conditions, subjected to an external blast loading, with and without fluid coupling effects, is investigated using finite element analysis and effective modulus theory. The blast loading profile is representative of the primary pressure pulse of an underwater explosion occurring at a distance far from the cylinder. In this analysis, fluid-coupling effects were included by employing a loading routine in the finite element analysis. A plane incident pressure wave impacting the cylinder and propagating around it with a fixed velocity, is considered. The effects of reflected and radiated pressure components are included. The accuracy of effective modulus theory in dynamic stress analysis is briefly explored. A commercial finite element code, ABAQUS, was used for this analysis.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    respect to the nominal alloy composition at the center of weld surface (Point 6 of Figure 7) -21 - U CO 2000 - * cE axc -2000 o" "....". . -401.11𔃺 1󈧄...Final Report Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street Arlington...3/31/05 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Sensitivity Analysis for Dynamic Failure and Damage in Metallic Structures Sb. GRANT NUMBER N000

  14. Oxygen uptake kinetics during incremental- and decremental-ramp cycle ergometry.

    PubMed

    Ozyener, Fadil; Rossiter, Harry B; Ward, Susan A; Whipp, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    The pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) response to incremental-ramp cycle ergometry typically demonstrates lagged-linear first-order kinetics with a slope of ~10-11 ml·min(-1)·W(-1), both above and below the lactate threshold (θL), i.e. there is no discernible VO2 slow component (or "excess" VO2) above θL. We were interested in determining whether a reverse ramp profile would yield the same response dynamics. Ten healthy males performed a maximum incremental -ramp (15-30 W·min(-1), depending on fitness). On another day, the work rate (WR) was increased abruptly to the incremental maximum and then decremented at the same rate of 15-30 W.min(-1) (step-decremental ramp). Five subjects also performed a sub-maximal ramp-decremental test from 90% of θL. VO2 was determined breath-by-breath from continuous monitoring of respired volumes (turbine) and gas concentrations (mass spectrometer). The incremental-ramp VO2-WR slope was 10.3 ± 0.7 ml·min(-1)·W(-1), whereas that of the descending limb of the decremental ramp was 14.2 ± 1.1 ml·min(-1)·W(-1) (p < 0.005). The sub-maximal decremental-ramp slope, however, was only 9. 8 ± 0.9 ml·min(-1)·W(-1): not significantly different from that of the incremental-ramp. This suggests that the VO2 response in the supra-θL domain of incremental-ramp exercise manifest not actual, but pseudo, first-order kinetics. Key pointsThe slope of the decremental-ramp response is appreciably greater than that of the incremental.The response dynamics in supra-θL domain of the incremental-ramp appear not to manifest actual first-order kinetics.The mechanisms underlying the different dynamic response behaviour for incremental and decremental ramps are presently unclear.

  15. An efficient incremental learning mechanism for tracking concept drift in spam filtering

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Jyh-Jian; Chu, Ko-Tsung; Li, Nien-Feng; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2017-01-01

    This research manages in-depth analysis on the knowledge about spams and expects to propose an efficient spam filtering method with the ability of adapting to the dynamic environment. We focus on the analysis of email’s header and apply decision tree data mining technique to look for the association rules about spams. Then, we propose an efficient systematic filtering method based on these association rules. Our systematic method has the following major advantages: (1) Checking only the header sections of emails, which is different from those spam filtering methods at present that have to analyze fully the email’s content. Meanwhile, the email filtering accuracy is expected to be enhanced. (2) Regarding the solution to the problem of concept drift, we propose a window-based technique to estimate for the condition of concept drift for each unknown email, which will help our filtering method in recognizing the occurrence of spam. (3) We propose an incremental learning mechanism for our filtering method to strengthen the ability of adapting to the dynamic environment. PMID:28182691

  16. An efficient incremental learning mechanism for tracking concept drift in spam filtering.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Jyh-Jian; Chu, Ko-Tsung; Li, Nien-Feng; Lee, Cheng-Chi

    2017-01-01

    This research manages in-depth analysis on the knowledge about spams and expects to propose an efficient spam filtering method with the ability of adapting to the dynamic environment. We focus on the analysis of email's header and apply decision tree data mining technique to look for the association rules about spams. Then, we propose an efficient systematic filtering method based on these association rules. Our systematic method has the following major advantages: (1) Checking only the header sections of emails, which is different from those spam filtering methods at present that have to analyze fully the email's content. Meanwhile, the email filtering accuracy is expected to be enhanced. (2) Regarding the solution to the problem of concept drift, we propose a window-based technique to estimate for the condition of concept drift for each unknown email, which will help our filtering method in recognizing the occurrence of spam. (3) We propose an incremental learning mechanism for our filtering method to strengthen the ability of adapting to the dynamic environment.

  17. Dynamic social network analysis using conversational dynamics in social networking and microblogging environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocco, Gabriel; Savell, Robert; Cybenko, George

    2010-04-01

    In many security environments, the textual content of communications may be unavailable. In these instances, it is often desirable to infer the status of the network and its component entities from patterns of communication flow. Conversational dynamics among entities in the network may provide insight into important aspects of the underlying social network such as the formational dynamics of group structures, the active state of these groups, individuals' roles within groups, and the likelihood of individual participation in conversations. To gain insight into the use of conversational dynamics to facilitate Dynamic Social Network Analysis, we explore the use of interevent timings to associate entities in the Twitter social networking and micro-blogging environment. Specifically, we use message timings to establish inter-nodal relationships among participants. In addition, we demonstrate a new visualization technique for tracking levels of coordination or synchronization within the community via measures of socio-temporal coherence of the participants.

  18. International Space Station Increment-3 Microgravity Environment Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jules, Kenol; Hrovat, Kenneth; Kelly, Eric; McPherson, Kevin; Reckart, Timothy; Grodsinksy, Carlos

    2002-01-01

    This summary report presents the results of some of the processed acceleration data measured aboard the International Space Station during the period of August to December 2001. Two accelerometer systems were used to measure the acceleration levels for the activities that took place during Increment-3. However, not all of the activities were analyzed for this report due to time constraint and lack of precise timeline information regarding some payload operations and station activities. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration sponsors the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Microgravity System to support microgravity science experiments which require microgravity acceleration measurements. On April 19, 2001, both the Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System and the Space Acceleration Measurement System units were launched on STS-100 from the Kennedy Space Center for installation on the International Space Station. The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to the station in support of science experiments requiring quasi-steady acceleration measurements, while the Space Acceleration Measurement System unit was flown to support experiments requiring vibratory acceleration measurement. Both acceleration systems are also used in support of the vehicle microgravity requirements verification. The International Space Station Increment-3 reduced gravity environment analysis presented in this report uses acceleration data collected by both sets of accelerometer systems: (1) The Microgravity Acceleration Measurement System, which consists of two sensors: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment Sensor Subsystem, a low frequency range sensor (up to 1 Hz), is used to characterize the quasi-steady environment for payloads and vehicle, and the High Resolution Accelerometer Package, which is used to characterize the vibratory environment up to 100 Hz. (2) The Space Acceleration Measurement System, which is

  19. Dynamic performances analysis of a real vehicle driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. A.; Jamil, J. F.; Salim, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Vehicle dynamic is the effects of movement of a vehicle generated from the acceleration, braking, ride and handling activities. The dynamic behaviours are determined by the forces from tire, gravity and aerodynamic which acting on the vehicle. This paper emphasizes the analysis of vehicle dynamic performance of a real vehicle. Real driving experiment on the vehicle is conducted to determine the effect of vehicle based on roll, pitch, and yaw, longitudinal, lateral and vertical acceleration. The experiment is done using the accelerometer to record the reading of the vehicle dynamic performance when the vehicle is driven on the road. The experiment starts with weighing a car model to get the center of gravity (COG) to place the accelerometer sensor for data acquisition (DAQ). The COG of the vehicle is determined by using the weight of the vehicle. A rural route is set to launch the experiment and the road conditions are determined for the test. The dynamic performance of the vehicle are depends on the road conditions and driving maneuver. The stability of a vehicle can be controlled by the dynamic performance analysis.

  20. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Thomas; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    1999-01-01

    This document summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC)'s Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The document is intended to serve as both an introduction to the type of support carried out by the FDAB (Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch), as well as a concise reference summarizing key analysis results and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles assumed over the past year. The major accomplishments in the FDAB in FY99 were: 1) Provided flight dynamics support to the Lunar Prospector and TRIANA missions among a variety of spacecraft missions; 2) Sponsored the Flight Mechanics Symposium; 3) Supported the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) workshops; 4) Performed numerous analyses and studies for future missions; 5) Started the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch Lab for in-house mission analysis and support; and 6) Complied with all requirements in support of GSFC IS09000 certification.

  1. Nonlinear dynamic characteristic analysis of jointed beam with clearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Guo, Hong-Wei; Liu, Rong-Qiang; Wu, Juan; Kou, Zi-Ming; Deng, Zong-Quan

    2016-12-01

    The impact and elasticity of discontinuous beams with clearance frequently affect the dynamic response of structures used in space missions. This study investigates the dynamic response of jointed beams which are the periodic units of deployable structures. The vibration process of jointed beams includes free-play and impact stages. A method for the dynamic analysis of jointed beams with clearance is proposed based on mode superposition and instantaneous static deformation. Transfer matrix, which expresses the relationship of the responses before and after the impact of jointed beams, is derived to calculate the response of the jointed beams after a critical position. The dynamic responses of jointed beams are then simulated. The effects of various parameters on the displacement and velocity of beams are investigated.

  2. Trajectory analysis of the rotational dynamics of molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, S. V. Lokshtanov, S. E.

    2015-08-15

    A method for analysis of the rotational dynamics of molecular systems has been proposed on the basis of the calculation of the set of exact classical vibrational–rotational trajectories. It has been proposed to compose and to numerically solve the complete system of dynamic equations consisting of Hamilton’s equations and generalized Euler equations for an arbitrary system. The computer algebra system can be applied to automatize the process of derivation and subsequent solution of dynamic equations. The variation of the picture of known bifurcation in the rotational dynamics of symmetric triatomic hydride molecules with an increase in vibrational excitation has been studied within the proposed approach. It has been shown that manifestations of bifurcation completely disappear at a quite high level of vibrational excitations.

  3. A Dynamical Analysis of Sea Breeze Hodograph Rotation on Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, Nadya; Steyn, Douw

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of diurnal sea-breeze rotation over coastal Sardinia using realistic and idealized model runs and historical observations. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anticlockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days. WRF accurately captures the sea breeze circulation on all coasts, as depicted in station data. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island of similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia, but with dramatically simplified topography. Dynamical analysis of the idealized runs reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  4. Operationalizing sustainability in urban coastal systems: a system dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavrommati, Georgia; Bithas, Kostas; Panayiotidis, Panayiotis

    2013-12-15

    We propose a system dynamics approach for Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) in urban coastal systems. A systematic analysis based on theoretical considerations, policy analysis and experts' knowledge is followed in order to define the concept of ESD. The principles underlying ESD feed the development of a System Dynamics Model (SDM) that connects the pollutant loads produced by urban systems' socioeconomic activities with the ecological condition of the coastal ecosystem that it is delineated in operational terms through key biological elements defined by the EU Water Framework Directive. The receiving waters of the Athens Metropolitan area, which bears the elements of typical high population density Mediterranean coastal city but which currently has also new dynamics induced by the ongoing financial crisis, are used as an experimental system for testing a system dynamics approach to apply the concept of ESD. Systems' thinking is employed to represent the complex relationships among the components of the system. Interconnections and dependencies that determine the potentials for achieving ESD are revealed. The proposed system dynamics analysis can facilitate decision makers to define paths of development that comply with the principles of ESD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preliminary analysis of turbochargers rotors dynamic behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monoranu, R.; Ştirbu, C.; Bujoreanu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Turbocharger rotors for the spark and compression ignition engines are resistant steels manufactured in order to support the exhaust gas temperatures exceeding 1200 K. In fact, the mechanical stress is not large as the power consumption of these systems is up to 10 kW, but the operating speeds are high, ranging between 30000 ÷ 250000 rpm. Therefore, the correct turbochargers functioning involves, even from the design stage, the accurate evaluation of the temperature effects, of the turbine torque due to the engine exhaust gases and of the vibration system behaviour caused by very high operating speeds. In addition, the turbocharger lubrication complicates the model, because the classical hydrodynamic theory cannot be applied to evaluate the floating bush bearings. The paper proposes a FEM study using CATIA environment, both as modeling medium and as tool for the numerical analysis, in order to highlight the turbocharger complex behaviour. An accurate design may prevent some major issues which can occur during its operation.

  6. Digital data processing system dynamic loading analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lagas, J. J.; Peterka, J. J.; Tucker, A. E.

    1976-01-01

    Simulation and analysis of the Space Shuttle Orbiter Digital Data Processing System (DDPS) are reported. The mated flight and postseparation flight phases of the space shuttle's approach and landing test configuration were modeled utilizing the Information Management System Interpretative Model (IMSIM) in a computerized simulation modeling of the ALT hardware, software, and workload. System requirements simulated for the ALT configuration were defined. Sensitivity analyses determined areas of potential data flow problems in DDPS operation. Based on the defined system requirements and the sensitivity analyses, a test design is described for adapting, parameterizing, and executing the IMSIM. Varying load and stress conditions for the model execution are given. The analyses of the computer simulation runs were documented as results, conclusions, and recommendations for DDPS improvements.

  7. Dynamic analysis of the GEOS satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meirovitch, L.; Juang, J. N.; Chang, C. P.

    1975-01-01

    The assumed modes method is used to investigate the stability of the GEOS satellite. The system is discretized by representing the continuous displacement by finite series of space-dependent admissible functions multiplied by time-dependent generalized coordinates. The spatial dependence is eliminated by integration over the elastic domains, so that the testing functional reduces to a testing function. The sign properties of the testing function are then tested and the equilibrium defined as nontrivial. In considering the stability of small motions about nontrivial equilibrium, it is shown that if the analysis performed by ignoring the motion of the mass center indicates stability, then the system remains stable if the motion of the mass center is included.

  8. Increment cores : how to collect, handle and use them

    Treesearch

    Robert R. Maeglin

    1979-01-01

    This paper describes increment cores (a useful tool in forestry and wood technology) and their uses which include age determination, growth increment, specific gravity determination, fiber length measurements, fibril angle measurements, cell measurements, and pathological investigations. Also described is the use and care of the increment borer which is essential in...

  9. 14 CFR § 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Incremental funding. § 1274.918 Section Â... WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding July 2002 (a) Of the award amount indicated on the cover page of this Agreement, only...

  10. Data Stream Prediction Using Incremental Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Kei; Miura, Takao

    In this paper, we propose a new technique for time-series prediction. Here we assume that time-series data occur depending on event which is unobserved directly, and we estimate future data as output from the most likely event which will happen at the time. In this investigation we model time-series based on event sequence by using Hidden Markov Model(HMM), and extract time-series patterns as trained HMM parameters. However, we can’t apply HMM approach to data stream prediction in a straightforward manner. This is because Baum-Welch algorithm, which is traditional unsupervised HMM training algorithm, requires many stored historical data and scan it many times. Here we apply incremental Baum-Welch algorithm which is an on-line HMM training method, and estimate HMM parameters dynamically to adapt new time-series patterns. And we show some experimental results to see the validity of our method.

  11. Dynamic analysis of spur gears using computer program DANST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Liou, Chuen-Huei; Valco, Mark J.

    1993-06-01

    DANST is a computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the effect on dynamic load and tooth bending stress of spur gears due to operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratio ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use, and it is extensively documented by comments in the source code. This report describes the installation and use of DANST. It covers input data requirements and presents examples. The report also compares DANST predictions for gear tooth loads and bending stress to experimental and finite element results.

  12. Dynamic analysis of spur gears using computer program DANST

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.; Lin, Hsiang Hsi; Liou, Chuen-Huei; Valco, Mark J.

    1993-01-01

    DANST is a computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the effect on dynamic load and tooth bending stress of spur gears due to operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratio ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use, and it is extensively documented by comments in the source code. This report describes the installation and use of DANST. It covers input data requirements and presents examples. The report also compares DANST predictions for gear tooth loads and bending stress to experimental and finite element results.

  13. Theoretical analysis of dynamic processes for interacting molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-01

    Biological transport is supported by the collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by carrying out an analysis of a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes, in which interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. This allows us to explicitly connect microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. A theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that the dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on the interactions, and that the correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motor transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  14. Dynamic analysis of spur gears using computer program DANST

    SciTech Connect

    Oswald, F.B.; Lin, H.H.; Liou, Chuenheui; Valco, M.J.

    1993-06-01

    DANST is a computer program for static and dynamic analysis of spur gear systems. The program can be used for parametric studies to predict the effect on dynamic load and tooth bending stress of spur gears due to operating speed, torque, stiffness, damping, inertia, and tooth profile. DANST performs geometric modeling and dynamic analysis for low- or high-contact-ratio spur gears. DANST can simulate gear systems with contact ratio ranging from one to three. It was designed to be easy to use, and it is extensively documented by comments in the source code. This report describes the installation and use of DANST. It covers input data requirements and presents examples. The report also compares DANST predictions for gear tooth loads and bending stress to experimental and finite element results. 14 refs.

  15. Enabling dynamic network analysis through visualization in TVNViewer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many biological processes are context-dependent or temporally specific. As a result, relationships between molecular constituents evolve across time and environments. While cutting-edge machine learning techniques can recover these networks, exploring and interpreting the rewiring behavior is challenging. Information visualization shines in this type of exploratory analysis, motivating the development ofTVNViewer (http://sailing.cs.cmu.edu/tvnviewer), a visualization tool for dynamic network analysis. Results In this paper, we demonstrate visualization techniques for dynamic network analysis by using TVNViewer to analyze yeast cell cycle and breast cancer progression datasets. Conclusions TVNViewer is a powerful new visualization tool for the analysis of biological networks that change across time or space. PMID:22897913

  16. Multidimensional (OLAP) Analysis for Designing Dynamic Learning Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozeva, A.; Deliyska, B.

    2010-10-01

    Learning strategy in an intelligent learning system is generally elaborated on the basis of assessment of the following factors: learner's time for reaction, content of the learning object, amount of learning material in a learning object, learning object specification, e-learning medium and performance control. Current work proposes architecture for dynamic learning strategy design by implementing multidimensional analysis model of learning factors. The analysis model concerns on-line analytical processing (OLAP) of learner's data structured as multidimensional cube. Main components of the architecture are analysis agent for performing the OLAP operations on learner data cube, adaptation generator and knowledge selection agent for performing adaptive navigation in the learning object repository. The output of the analysis agent is involved in dynamic elaboration of learning strategy that fits best to learners profile and behavior. As a result an adaptive learning path for individual learner and for learner groups is generated.

  17. Conformational analysis of oligosaccharides and polysaccharides using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Frank, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates usually have a large number of rotatable bonds and consequently a large number of theoretically possible conformations can be generated (combinatorial explosion). The application of systematic search methods for conformational analysis of carbohydrates is therefore limited to disaccharides and trisaccharides in a routine analysis. An alternative approach is to use Monte-Carlo methods or (high-temperature) molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the conformational space of complex carbohydrates. This chapter describes how to use MD simulation data to perform a conformational analysis (conformational maps, hydrogen bonds) of oligosaccharides and how to build realistic 3D structures of large polysaccharides using Conformational Analysis Tools (CAT).

  18. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS FOR OSCILLATING DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    WILKINS, A. KATHARINA; TIDOR, BRUCE; WHITE, JACOB; BARTON, PAUL I.

    2012-01-01

    Boundary value formulations are presented for exact and efficient sensitivity analysis, with respect to model parameters and initial conditions, of different classes of oscillating systems. Methods for the computation of sensitivities of derived quantities of oscillations such as period, amplitude and different types of phases are first developed for limit-cycle oscillators. In particular, a novel decomposition of the state sensitivities into three parts is proposed to provide an intuitive classification of the influence of parameter changes on period, amplitude and relative phase. The importance of the choice of time reference, i.e., the phase locking condition, is demonstrated and discussed, and its influence on the sensitivity solution is quantified. The methods are then extended to other classes of oscillatory systems in a general formulation. Numerical techniques are presented to facilitate the solution of the boundary value problem, and the computation of different types of sensitivities. Numerical results are verified by demonstrating consistency with finite difference approximations and are superior both in computational efficiency and in numerical precision to existing partial methods. PMID:23296349

  19. Empirical analysis of online human dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Zhou, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Patterns of human activities have attracted increasing academic interests, since the quantitative understanding of human behavior is helpful to uncover the origins of many socioeconomic phenomena. This paper focuses on behaviors of Internet users. Six large-scale systems are studied in our experiments, including the movie-watching in Netflix and MovieLens, the transaction in Ebay, the bookmark-collecting in Delicious, and the posting in FreindFeed and Twitter. Empirical analysis reveals some common statistical features of online human behavior: (1) The total number of user's actions, the user's activity, and the interevent time all follow heavy-tailed distributions. (2) There exists a strongly positive correlation between user's activity and the total number of user's actions, and a significantly negative correlation between the user's activity and the width of the interevent time distribution. We further study the rescaling method and show that this method could to some extent eliminate the different statistics among users caused by the different activities, yet the effectiveness depends on the data sets.

  20. Application of Ritz vectors for dynamic analysis of large structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, R. R.; Citerley, R. L.; Chargin, M.; Galant, D.

    1985-01-01

    The use of an orthogonal set of specially selected Ritz vectors is shown to be very effective in reducing the cost of dynamic analysis by modal superposition. Several mechanical structures are examined, and the Ritz vector approach is compared to the classical eigenvector approach on the basis of cost, accuracy and elapsed analysis (throughput) time. Mathematical proof of the completeness of orthogonal Ritz vectors is provided for the case of a positive definite mass matrix and a symmetric stiffness matrix.

  1. A dynamic force and moment analysis system for brachiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Y H; Bertram, J E; Ruina, A

    1997-12-01

    We describe a transducer system and analysis strategy that allows the determination of dynamic forces and moments applied by an arm-swinging animal during locomotion. We have employed readily available technology and analysis procedures to produce a low-cost but effective system. The solutions to several problems in the design of the system are provided, and the functional characteristics of the system are demonstrated using both an inert pendulum and an actively brachiating gibbon (Hylobates lar).

  2. A Model of Practice in Special Education: Dynamic Ecological Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannant, Barbara; Lim, Eng Leong; McAllum, Ruth

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic Ecological Analysis (DEA) is a model of practice which increases a teams' efficacy by enabling the development of more effective interventions through collaboration and collective reflection. This process has proved to be useful in: a) clarifying thinking and problem-solving, b) transferring knowledge and thinking to significant parties,…

  3. Methodologies for launcher-payload coupled dynamic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fransen, S. H. J. A.

    2012-06-01

    An important step in the design and verification process of spacecraft structures is the coupled dynamic analysis with the launch vehicle in the low-frequency domain, also referred to as coupled loads analysis (CLA). The objective of such analyses is the computation of the dynamic environment of the spacecraft (payload) in terms of interface accelerations, interface forces, center of gravity (CoG) accelerations as well as the internal state of stress. In order to perform an efficient, fast and accurate launcher-payload coupled dynamic analysis, various methodologies have been applied and developed. The methods are related to substructuring techniques, data recovery techniques, the effects of prestress and fluids and time integration problems. The aim of this paper was to give an overview of these methodologies and to show why, how and where these techniques can be used in the process of launcher-payload coupled dynamic analysis. In addition, it will be shown how these methodologies fit together in a library of procedures which can be used with the MSC.Nastran™ solution sequences.

  4. SPAR improved structure-fluid dynamic analysis capability, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, M. L.

    1984-01-01

    An efficient and general method of analyzing a coupled dynamic system of fluid flow and elastic structures is investigated. The improvement of Structural Performance Analysis and Redesign (SPAR) code is summarized. All error codes are documented and the SPAR processor/subroutine cross reference is included.

  5. A review of substructure coupling methods for dynamic analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craig, R. R., Jr.; Chang, C. J.

    1976-01-01

    The state of the art is assessed in substructure coupling for dynamic analysis. A general formulation, which permits all previously described methods to be characterized by a few constituent matrices, is developed. Limited results comparing the accuracy of various methods are presented.

  6. Onsite analysis of data from the Dynamics Explorer (DE) spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, Shing F.; Candey, Robert M.; Humphreys, Josephine N.

    1992-01-01

    The tasks performed by ARC Professional Services Group, Inc. fell into five parts: (1) dynamics explorer (DE) data analysis and modeling; (2) DE project support; (3) chemical release observations support; (4) VLF emissions and plasma instability studies; and (5) modeling of planetary radio emissions. Some recommendations for future considerations are also addressed.

  7. Potential applications of computational fluid dynamics to biofluid analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwak, D.; Chang, J. L. C.; Rogers, S. E.; Rosenfeld, M.; Kwak, D.

    1988-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics was developed to the stage where it has become an indispensable part of aerospace research and design. In view of advances made in aerospace applications, the computational approach can be used for biofluid mechanics research. Several flow simulation methods developed for aerospace problems are briefly discussed for potential applications to biofluids, especially to blood flow analysis.

  8. Product Quality Modelling Based on Incremental Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, W.; Qin, B.; Shi, W.

    2012-05-01

    Incremental Support vector machine (ISVM) is a new learning method developed in recent years based on the foundations of statistical learning theory. It is suitable for the problem of sequentially arriving field data and has been widely used for product quality prediction and production process optimization. However, the traditional ISVM learning does not consider the quality of the incremental data which may contain noise and redundant data; it will affect the learning speed and accuracy to a great extent. In order to improve SVM training speed and accuracy, a modified incremental support vector machine (MISVM) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the margin vectors are extracted according to the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) condition; then the distance from the margin vectors to the final decision hyperplane is calculated to evaluate the importance of margin vectors, where the margin vectors are removed while their distance exceed the specified value; finally, the original SVs and remaining margin vectors are used to update the SVM. The proposed MISVM can not only eliminate the unimportant samples such as noise samples, but also can preserve the important samples. The MISVM has been experimented on two public data and one field data of zinc coating weight in strip hot-dip galvanizing, and the results shows that the proposed method can improve the prediction accuracy and the training speed effectively. Furthermore, it can provide the necessary decision supports and analysis tools for auto control of product quality, and also can extend to other process industries, such as chemical process and manufacturing process.

  9. Evaluation of incremental reactivity and its uncertainty in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Martien, Philip T; Harley, Robert A; Milford, Jana B; Russell, Armistead G

    2003-04-15

    The incremental reactivity (IR) and relative incremental reactivity (RIR) of carbon monoxide and 30 individual volatile organic compounds (VOC) were estimated for the South Coast Air Basin using two photochemical air quality models: a 3-D, grid-based model and a vertically resolved trajectory model. Both models include an extended version of the SAPRC99 chemical mechanism. For the 3-D modeling, the decoupled direct method (DDM-3D) was used to assess reactivities. The trajectory model was applied to estimate uncertainties in reactivities due to uncertainties in chemical rate parameters, deposition parameters, and emission rates using Monte Carlo analysis with Latin hypercube sampling. For most VOC, RIRs were found to be consistent in rankings with those produced by Carter using a box model. However, 3-D simulations show that coastal regions, upwind of most of the emissions, have comparatively low IR but higher RIR than predicted by box models for C4-C5 alkenes and carbonyls that initiate the production of HOx radicals. Biogenic VOC emissions were found to have a lower RIR than predicted by box model estimates, because emissions of these VOC were mostly downwind of the areas of primary ozone production. Uncertainties in RIR of individual VOC were found to be dominated by uncertainties in the rate parameters of their primary oxidation reactions. The coefficient of variation (COV) of most RIR values ranged from 20% to 30%, whereas the COV of absolute incremental reactivity ranged from about 30% to 40%. In general, uncertainty and variability both decreased when relative rather than absolute reactivity metrics were used.

  10. Dynamic Analysis of Mcfc Porous Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Gwo-Lin Kevin

    1992-01-01

    The intent of this work is to develop AC impedance measurements, in combination with other methods, as a tool to determine the relative importance of various resistance sources in the multi-step process occurring at a gas-diffusion porous electrode. In particular, the case of a MCFC cathode is studied. The goals of this study are: (1) elucidation of electrode mechanism; (2) analysis of the porous electrode performance for the purpose of optimizing design; and (3) developing the capabilities of AC impedance as an index of long-term cell performance decay. The oxygen reduction reaction of molten carbonate fuel cell and the corresponding kinetic as well as transport parameters were tried to be estimated by using impedance techniques combining with other electrochemical methods from flag, wire and rotating disk electrodes in pot cell as well as porous electrode in lab cell. The dominant pathway for oxygen reduction in 62%Li _2CO_3/38%K _2CO_3 melt at 650^circC is via superoxide ions. This follows from flag electrode impedance results indicating that O_sp{2}{ -}/CO_2 mixed diffusion is the dominant source of resistance. The polarization behavior of gas-diffusion porous electrodes has been analyzed in terms of individual voltage loss and overall voltage loss. In most cases, the optimal electrolyte filling will be obtained when the dominant source of voltage loss switches from ohmic or mass transfer resistances to kinetic activation resistance, and similar behavior for optimal electrode thickness. Pressurized operation is favorable for performance if the reaction mechanism follows the superoxide mechanism, but not if the peroxide path dominates. A distributed-network approach has been developed and it is concluded that a digital simulation of AC-superimposed -on-DC impedance of a porous electrode is possible and helpful. Kinetic activation and mass transfer resistances are extracted separate and conclude that both peroxide and superoxide contribute the oxygen reduction

  11. Incremental Bayesian Category Learning From Natural Language.

    PubMed

    Frermann, Lea; Lapata, Mirella

    2016-08-01

    Models of category learning have been extensively studied in cognitive science and primarily tested on perceptual abstractions or artificial stimuli. In this paper, we focus on categories acquired from natural language stimuli, that is, words (e.g., chair is a member of the furniture category). We present a Bayesian model that, unlike previous work, learns both categories and their features in a single process. We model category induction as two interrelated subproblems: (a) the acquisition of features that discriminate among categories, and (b) the grouping of concepts into categories based on those features. Our model learns categories incrementally using particle filters, a sequential Monte Carlo method commonly used for approximate probabilistic inference that sequentially integrates newly observed data and can be viewed as a plausible mechanism for human learning. Experimental results show that our incremental learner obtains meaningful categories which yield a closer fit to behavioral data compared to related models while at the same time acquiring features which characterize the learned categories. (An earlier version of this work was published in Frermann and Lapata .). Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  12. Incremental Scheduling Engines: Cost Savings through Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Phillips, Shaun

    2005-01-01

    As humankind embarks on longer space missions farther from home, the requirements and environments for scheduling the activities performed on these missions are changing. As we begin to prepare for these missions it is appropriate to evaluate the merits and applicability of the different types of scheduling engines. Scheduling engines temporally arrange tasks onto a timeline so that all constraints and ob.jectives are met and resources are not over-booked. Scheduling engines used to schedule space missions fall into three general categories: batch, mixed-initiative, and incremental. This paper, presents an assessment of the engine types, a discussion of the impact of human exploration of the moon and Mars on planning and scheduling, and the applicability of the different types of scheduling engines. This paper will pursue the hypothesis that incremental scheduling engines may have a place in the new environment; they have the potential to reduce cost, to improve the satisfaction of those who execute or benefit from a particular timeline (the customers), and to allow astronauts to plan their own tasks and those of their companion robots.

  13. Enabling Incremental Query Re-Optimization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengmeng; Ives, Zachary G; Loo, Boon Thau

    2016-01-01

    As declarative query processing techniques expand to the Web, data streams, network routers, and cloud platforms, there is an increasing need to re-plan execution in the presence of unanticipated performance changes. New runtime information may affect which query plan we prefer to run. Adaptive techniques require innovation both in terms of the algorithms used to estimate costs, and in terms of the search algorithm that finds the best plan. We investigate how to build a cost-based optimizer that recomputes the optimal plan incrementally given new cost information, much as a stream engine constantly updates its outputs given new data. Our implementation especially shows benefits for stream processing workloads. It lays the foundations upon which a variety of novel adaptive optimization algorithms can be built. We start by leveraging the recently proposed approach of formulating query plan enumeration as a set of recursive datalog queries; we develop a variety of novel optimization approaches to ensure effective pruning in both static and incremental cases. We further show that the lessons learned in the declarative implementation can be equally applied to more traditional optimizer implementations.

  14. Enabling Incremental Query Re-Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengmeng; Ives, Zachary G.; Loo, Boon Thau

    2017-01-01

    As declarative query processing techniques expand to the Web, data streams, network routers, and cloud platforms, there is an increasing need to re-plan execution in the presence of unanticipated performance changes. New runtime information may affect which query plan we prefer to run. Adaptive techniques require innovation both in terms of the algorithms used to estimate costs, and in terms of the search algorithm that finds the best plan. We investigate how to build a cost-based optimizer that recomputes the optimal plan incrementally given new cost information, much as a stream engine constantly updates its outputs given new data. Our implementation especially shows benefits for stream processing workloads. It lays the foundations upon which a variety of novel adaptive optimization algorithms can be built. We start by leveraging the recently proposed approach of formulating query plan enumeration as a set of recursive datalog queries; we develop a variety of novel optimization approaches to ensure effective pruning in both static and incremental cases. We further show that the lessons learned in the declarative implementation can be equally applied to more traditional optimizer implementations. PMID:28659658

  15. Experimental study of incremental hydrocarbon reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.; Atkinson, R.

    1987-07-01

    A series of environmental chamber experiments have been carried out to investigate the incremental reactivities of selected organics with respect to ozone formation in simulated photochemical smog systems. Varying amounts of a test organic were added to or subtracted from a standard four-hydrocarbon minisurrogate - NO/sub x/ - air mixture to determine, as a function of irradiation time, the resulting changes in the amount of ozone formed and NO consumed, relative to the amount of the organic added. The incremental reactivities of toluene, trans-2-butene, and propene decreased significantly with reaction time, with toluene ultimately becoming negatively reactive; n-butane, ethanol, and tert-butyl methyl ether were always positively reactive; and benzaldehyde was always negatively reactive. The results are reasonably consistent with computer model simulations and indicate that the effect of regulating emissions of an organic on ambient ozone will depend not only on the organics reaction rate but also on its reaction mechanism and the conditions under which it is emitted. 33 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  16. Compressive tracking with incremental multivariate Gaussian distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Wen, Gongjian; Zhu, Gao; Zeng, Qiaoling

    2016-09-01

    Various approaches have been proposed for robust visual tracking, among which compressive tracking (CT) yields promising performance. In CT, Haar-like features are efficiently extracted with a very sparse measurement matrix and modeled as an online updated naïve Bayes classifier to account for target appearance change. The naïve Bayes classifier ignores overlap between Haar-like features and assumes that Haar-like features are independently distributed, which leads to drift in complex scenario. To address this problem, we present an extended CT algorithm, which assumes that all Haar-like features are correlated with each other and have multivariate Gaussian distribution. The mean vector and covariance matrix of multivariate normal distribution are incrementally updated with constant computational complexity to adapt to target appearance change. Each frame is associated with a temporal weight to expend less modeling power on old observation. Based on temporal weight, an update scheme with changing but convergent learning rate is derived with strict mathematic proof. Compared with CT, our extended algorithm achieves a richer representation of target appearance. The incremental multivariate Gaussian distribution is integrated into the particle filter framework to achieve better tracking performance. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate that our proposed tracker achieves superior performance both qualitatively and quantitatively over several state-of-the-art trackers.

  17. Higher order SVD analysis for dynamic texture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Roberto; Sbaiz, Luciano; Süsstrunk, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Videos representing flames, water, smoke, etc., are often defined as dynamic textures: "textures" because they are characterized by the redundant repetition of a pattern and "dynamic" because this repetition is also in time and not only in space. Dynamic textures have been modeled as linear dynamic systems by unfolding the video frames into column vectors and describing their trajectory as time evolves. After the projection of the vectors onto a lower dimensional space by a singular value decomposition (SVD), the trajectory is modeled using system identification techniques. Synthesis is obtained by driving the system with random noise. In this paper, we show that the standard SVD can be replaced by a higher order SVD (HOSVD), originally known as Tucker decomposition. HOSVD decomposes the dynamic texture as a multidimensional signal (tensor) without unfolding the video frames on column vectors. This is a more natural and flexible decomposition, since it permits us to perform dimension reduction in the spatial, temporal, and chromatic domain, while standard SVD allows for temporal reduction only. We show that for a comparable synthesis quality, the HOSVD approach requires, on average, five times less parameters than the standard SVD approach. The analysis part is more expensive, but the synthesis has the same cost as existing algorithms. Our technique is, thus, well suited to dynamic texture synthesis on devices limited by memory and computational power, such as PDAs or mobile phones.

  18. Major component analysis of dynamic networks of physiologic organ interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kang K. L.; Bartsch, Ronny P.; Ma, Qianli D. Y.; Ivanov, Plamen Ch

    2015-09-01

    The human organism is a complex network of interconnected organ systems, where the behavior of one system affects the dynamics of other systems. Identifying and quantifying dynamical networks of diverse physiologic systems under varied conditions is a challenge due to the complexity in the output dynamics of the individual systems and the transient and nonlinear characteristics of their coupling. We introduce a novel computational method based on the concept of time delay stability and major component analysis to investigate how organ systems interact as a network to coordinate their functions. We analyze a large database of continuously recorded multi-channel physiologic signals from healthy young subjects during night-time sleep. We identify a network of dynamic interactions between key physiologic systems in the human organism. Further, we find that each physiologic state is characterized by a distinct network structure with different relative contribution from individual organ systems to the global network dynamics. Specifically, we observe a gradual decrease in the strength of coupling of heart and respiration to the rest of the network with transition from wake to deep sleep, and in contrast, an increased relative contribution to network dynamics from chin and leg muscle tone and eye movement, demonstrating a robust association between network topology and physiologic function.

  19. Dynamic analysis and control of novel moving mass flight vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jianqing; Gao, Changsheng; Jing, Wuxing; Wei, Pengxin

    2017-02-01

    In terms of the moving mass control technology, the configuration of internal moving masses is a key challenge. In order to reduce the complexity of configuring these moving masses in a flight vehicle, a combination bank-to-turn control mode with the single moving mass and reaction jet is proposed in this paper. To investigate the dynamics and the potential of the control mechanism, an attitude dynamic model with single moving mass is generated. The dynamic analysis indicates that the control stability, control authority and dynamic behavior of the pitch channel are determined by the mass ratio of the moving mass to the system and the difference between the mass center of the moving mass and the mass center of the vehicle body. Interestingly, control authority increases proportionally with increasing mass ratio and also with decreasing the magnitude of the static margin. To deal with the coupling caused by the additional inertia moment which is generated by the motion of the moving mass, an adaptive control law by using dynamic inversion theory and the extended state observer is designed. Also, a compensator is designed for eliminating the influence of the servo actuator's dynamics on attitude of the flight vehicle. Finally, the simulation results validate the quality of the proposed adaptive controller which ensures a good performance in the novel configuration with internal moving mass.

  20. Acceleration of dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography with principal component analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guanglei; He, Wei; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Maomao; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an attractive imaging technique for three-dimensionally resolving the metabolic process of fluorescent biomarkers in small animal. When combined with compartmental modeling, dynamic FMT can be used to obtain parametric images which can provide quantitative pharmacokinetic information for drug development and metabolic research. However, the computational burden of dynamic FMT is extremely huge due to its large data sets arising from the long measurement process and the densely sampling device. In this work, we propose to accelerate the reconstruction process of dynamic FMT based on principal component analysis (PCA). Taking advantage of the compression property of PCA, the dimension of the sub weight matrix used for solving the inverse problem is reduced by retaining only a few principal components which can retain most of the effective information of the sub weight matrix. Therefore, the reconstruction process of dynamic FMT can be accelerated by solving the smaller scale inverse problem. Numerical simulation and mouse experiment are performed to validate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can greatly accelerate the reconstruction of parametric images in dynamic FMT almost without degradation in image quality. PMID:26114027

  1. Acceleration of dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography with principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guanglei; He, Wei; Pu, Huangsheng; Liu, Fei; Chen, Maomao; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-06-01

    Dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) is an attractive imaging technique for three-dimensionally resolving the metabolic process of fluorescent biomarkers in small animal. When combined with compartmental modeling, dynamic FMT can be used to obtain parametric images which can provide quantitative pharmacokinetic information for drug development and metabolic research. However, the computational burden of dynamic FMT is extremely huge due to its large data sets arising from the long measurement process and the densely sampling device. In this work, we propose to accelerate the reconstruction process of dynamic FMT based on principal component analysis (PCA). Taking advantage of the compression property of PCA, the dimension of the sub weight matrix used for solving the inverse problem is reduced by retaining only a few principal components which can retain most of the effective information of the sub weight matrix. Therefore, the reconstruction process of dynamic FMT can be accelerated by solving the smaller scale inverse problem. Numerical simulation and mouse experiment are performed to validate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can greatly accelerate the reconstruction of parametric images in dynamic FMT almost without degradation in image quality.

  2. Strategy Formation in Virtual Education: The Case for Dynamic Incrementalism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edelson, Paul Jay

    Despite the setbacks of many virtual education programs at the collegiate level, the public's widespread, growing acceptance of electronic learning (e-learning) argues for continued expansion of virtual education. When designing virtual programs, colleges and universities typically follow an administrative model that is hierarchical, bureaucratic,…

  3. The Dynamics of Perceptual Learning: An Incremental Reweighting Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrov, Alexander A.; Dosher, Barbara Anne; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of perceptual learning are analyzed theoretically, probed in an orientation-discrimination experiment involving a novel nonstationary context manipulation, and instantiated in a detailed computational model. Two hypotheses are examined: modification of early cortical representations versus task-specific selective reweighting.…

  4. An Incremental Multigrid Strategy for the Fluid Dynamics Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    conditions such that the exact solution of the differential problem was given as exp(iry/2) sin(frx/2). A standard line Gauss- Seidel method was used as...considered as a much more severe test for the present method. The numerical method of Ref. 6, namely a line Gauss- Seidel method sweeping in alternate... Seidel method for the Navier- Stokes Equations, AIAA Paper 85-0033. 7 Napolitano, M. and Dadone, A., "Three-Dimensional Implicit Lambda MethodsO

  5. A reliable simulator for dynamic flux balance analysis.

    PubMed

    Höffner, K; Harwood, S M; Barton, P I

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic flux balance analysis (DFBA) provides a platform for detailed design, control and optimization of biochemical process technologies. It is a promising modeling framework that combines genome-scale metabolic network analysis with dynamic simulation of the extracellular environment. Dynamic flux balance analysis assumes that the intracellular species concentrations are in equilibrium with the extracellular environment. The resulting underdetermined stoichiometric model is solved under the assumption of a biochemical objective such as growth rate maximization. The model of the metabolism is coupled with the dynamic mass balance equations of the extracellular environment via expressions for the rates of substrate uptake and product excretion, which imposes additional constraints on the linear program (LP) defined by growth rate maximization of the metabolism. The linear program is embedded into the dynamic model of the bioreactor, and together with the additional constraints this provides an accurate model of the substrate consumption, product secretion, and biomass production during operation. A DFBA model consists of a system of ordinary differential equations for which the evaluation of the right-hand side requires not only function evaluations, but also the solution of one or more linear programs. The numerical tool presented here accurately and efficiently simulates large-scale dynamic flux balance models. The main advantages that this approach has over existing implementation are that the integration scheme has a variable step size, that the linear program only has to be solved when qualitative changes in the optimal flux distribution of the metabolic network occur, and that it can reliably simulate behavior near the boundary of the domain where the model is defined. This is illustrated through large-scale examples taken from the literature.

  6. Dynamic investigation of static divergence: Analysis and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeg, Jennifer

    2000-10-01

    The phenomenon known as aeroelastic divergence is the focus of this work. The analyses and experiment presented here show that divergence can occur without a structural dynamic mode losing its oscillatory nature. Aeroelastic divergence occurs when the structural restorative capability or stiffness of a structure is overwhelmed by the static aerodynamic moment. This static aeroelastic coupling does not require the structural dynamic system behavior to cease, however. Aeroelastic changes in the dynamic mode behavior are governed not only by the stiffness, but by damping and inertial properties. The work presented here supports these fundamental assertions by examining a simple system: a typical section airfoil with only a rotational structural degree of freedom. Aeroelastic stability analysis is performed in the discrete time domain. The aerodynamic, structural dynamic, and downwash relationships are cast as time-marching equations and combined to form aeroelastic state space equations. The discrete time eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the coupled system are computed. This method is advantageous because the exact roots and the degree of stability of the system are determined, within the framework of the aerodynamic and structural dynamic representations. The discrete-time eigenvalues are transformed into the continuous time domain to facilitate their interpretation. Results from the analysis have identified configurations of a simple model that exhibit different types of dynamic mode behavior as the system encounters divergence. For the simple configuration examined, these results indicate that low inertial properties and elastic axis location near the center of pressure promote divergence while the dynamic mode persists. Large inertias and large separation between elastic axis and center of pressure promote divergence where the dynamic mode becomes a static mode. A wind tunnel model was designed and tested to examine divergence experimentally. The experimental

  7. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze rotation over an island in the mid-latitudes. Earlier research on sea-breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anti-clockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously-studied sea-breeze days and is shown to accurately capture the circulation on all coasts. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined and patterns of clockwise and anti-clockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography, yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with complex topography and/or coastline.

  8. Dynamical analysis of sea-breeze hodograph rotation in Sardinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moisseeva, N.; Steyn, D. G.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the diurnal evolution of sea-breeze (SB) rotation over an island at the middle latitudes. Earlier research on sea breezes in Sardinia shows that the onshore winds around various coasts of the island exhibit both the theoretically predicted clockwise rotation as well as seemingly anomalous anticlockwise rotation. A non-hydrostatic fully compressible numerical model (WRF) is used to simulate wind fields on and around the island on previously studied sea-breeze days, and is shown to capture the circulation on all coasts accurately. Diurnal rotation of wind is examined, and patterns of clockwise and anticlockwise rotation are identified. A dynamical analysis is performed by extracting individual forcing terms from the horizontal momentum equations. Analysis of several regions around the island shows that the direction of rotation is a result of a complex interaction between near-surface and synoptic pressure gradient, Coriolis and advection forcings. An idealized simulation is performed over an artificial island with dramatically simplified topography yet similar dimensions and latitude to Sardinia. Dynamical analysis of the idealized case reveals a rather different pattern of hodograph rotation to the real Sardinia, yet similar underlying dynamics. The research provides new insights into the dynamics underlying sea-breeze hodograph rotation, especially in coastal zones with a complex topography and/or coastline.

  9. Propellant Slosh Analysis for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A. C.; Starin, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) mission, part of the Living With a Star program, is a geosynchronous satellite with tight pointing requirements. Due to a large amount of liquid propellant, a detailed slosh analysis is required to ensure the tight pointing budget can be satisfied. Much of the high fidelity slosh analysis and simulation has been performed via computational fluid dynamics. Even though this method of simulation is very accurate, it requires significant computational effort and specialized knowledge, limiting the ability of the SDO project to access fluid dynamics simulations at will. Furthermore, it is very difficult to incorporate most of these models into simulations of the overall spacecraft and its environment. Ultimately, the effects of the propellant slosh on the attitude stability and pointing performance of the entire spacecraft are of great interest to attitude control engineers. Equivalent mechanical models, such as models that approximate the fluid slosh effects by analogy to the movements of a point-mass pendulum, are important tools in simulating propellant slosh dynamics as part of the entire attitude determination and control system. This paper describes some of the current methods used to analyze and model slosh. It focuses on equivalent mechanical models and their incorporation into control-based analysis tools such as Simulink. The SDO mission is used as the case study for this work.

  10. Dynamic heave-pitch analysis of air cushion landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, K. M.; Boghani, A. B.; Wormley, D. N.

    1975-01-01

    A program to develop analytical tools for evaluating the dynamic performance of Air Cushion Landing Systems (ACLS) is described. The heave (vertical) motion of the ACLS was analyzed, and the analysis was extended to cover coupled heave-pitch motions. The mathematical models developed are based on a fundamental analysis of the body dynamics and fluid mechanics of the aircraft-cushion-runway interaction. The air source characteristics, flow losses in the feeding ducts, trunk and cushion, the effects of fluid compressibility, and dynamic trunk deflections, including ground contact are considered. A computer program, based on the heave-pitch analysis, was developed to simulate the dynamic behavior of an ACLS during landing impact and taxi over an irregular runway. The program outputs include ACLS motions, loadings, pressures, and flows as a function of time. To illustrate program use, three basic types of simulations were carried out. The results provide an initial indication of ACLS performance during (1) a static drop, (2) landing impact, and (3) taxi over a runway irregularity.

  11. A new technique for dynamic analysis of bladder compliance.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, R F; Churchill, B M; Steckler, R E; Houle, A M; Khoury, A E; McLorie, G A

    1993-10-01

    We propose an alternative method of measuring compliance that takes into account the multiple phases of bladder filling. We describe our new technique, dynamic compliance analysis, and evaluate its clinical applicability. To perform the analysis we digitized a cystometrogram curve at a sampling rate of 2 samples per second using an MS-DOS computer system. A program designed to retrieve the stored data was used to analyze the subtracted bladder pressure. The result yielded a value of compliance every half second that was then plotted on an x-y graph, with instantaneous compliance as the dependent variable and per cent of total volume infused as the independent variable. To determine the clinical applicability of this technique we chose 63 curves from clinically normal patients. The results of the dynamic compliance analyses were predictable. The dynamic compliance values for the normal group had a minimum that was always greater than 10 ml./cm. water throughout the tonus limb (phase 2) of the cystometrogram. We conclude that dynamic compliance analysis yields more information about bladder response during filling, similar to the stress-strain curve used in the study of solid mechanics.

  12. Dynamics analysis on adhesive bonds of tilt mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shang; Ruan, Ping; Wang, Chao; Xu, Guangzhou

    2014-09-01

    Adhesive bonding technology has been widely applied in the field of space remote sensing. In order to make the adhesive bonds connecting the mirror and the fixed structures in a satellite launch or operation of dynamic environment without damage, the finite element model of the tilt mirror is essential to be established for dynamic analysis, as well as the experimental verification . There are detailed model and the equivalent stiffness model on the adhesive bonds. The modal, frequency response - random vibration and shock response are analyzed through the detailed model of the bonds. The stress of the three point mirror bonds is compared with the six point support mirror. The mechanics experiment is carried out based on the dynamics analysis. The results of calculation demonstrates that the impact of frequency response and random vibration on adhesive bonds is relatively little, while the impact of the shock response is large. The experimental verification shows that the stress of bonds with three points support mirror under shock response exceeds the shear strength, which leads to the separation of the mirror and the fixed structure and the improved six point support mirror is satisfied to the requirements. The dynamics analysis on adhesive bonds of tilt mirror makes sense for designing, assembling and mechanics experiment.

  13. Improved dynamic analysis method using load-dependent Ritz vectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Escobedo-Torres, J.; Ricles, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic analysis of large space structures is important in order to predict their behavior under operating conditions. Computer models of large space structures are characterized by having a large number of degrees of freedom, and the computational effort required to carry out the analysis is very large. Conventional methods of solution utilize a subset of the eigenvectors of the system, but for systems with many degrees of freedom, the solution of the eigenproblem is in many cases the most costly phase of the analysis. For this reason, alternate solution methods need to be considered. It is important that the method chosen for the analysis be efficient and that accurate results be obtainable. It is important that the method chosen for the analysis be efficient and that accurate results be obtainable. The load dependent Ritz vector method is presented as an alternative to the classical normal mode methods for obtaining dynamic responses of large space structures. A simplified model of a space station is used to compare results. Results show that the load dependent Ritz vector method predicts the dynamic response better than the classical normal mode method. Even though this alternate method is very promising, further studies are necessary to fully understand its attributes and limitations.

  14. Dynamic Systems Analysis for Turbine Based Aero Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.

    2016-01-01

    The aircraft engine design process seeks to optimize the overall system-level performance, weight, and cost for a given concept. Steady-state simulations and data are used to identify trade-offs that should be balanced to optimize the system in a process known as systems analysis. These systems analysis simulations and data may not adequately capture the true performance trade-offs that exist during transient operation. Dynamic systems analysis provides the capability for assessing the dynamic tradeoffs at an earlier stage of the engine design process. The dynamic systems analysis concept, developed tools, and potential benefit are presented in this paper. To provide this capability, the Tool for Turbine Engine Closed-loop Transient Analysis (TTECTrA) was developed to provide the user with an estimate of the closed-loop performance (response time) and operability (high pressure compressor surge margin) for a given engine design and set of control design requirements. TTECTrA along with engine deterioration information, can be used to develop a more generic relationship between performance and operability that can impact the engine design constraints and potentially lead to a more efficient engine.

  15. Multifractal analysis of dynamic infrared imaging of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimova, E.; Audit, B.; Roux, S. G.; Khalil, A.; Argoul, F.; Naimark, O.; Arneodo, A.

    2013-12-01

    The wavelet transform modulus maxima (WTMM) method was used in a multifractal analysis of skin breast temperature time-series recorded using dynamic infrared (IR) thermography. Multifractal scaling was found for healthy breasts as the signature of a continuous change in the shape of the probability density function (pdf) of temperature fluctuations across time scales from \\sim0.3 to 3 s. In contrast, temperature time-series from breasts with malignant tumors showed homogeneous monofractal temperature fluctuations statistics. These results highlight dynamic IR imaging as a very valuable non-invasive technique for preliminary screening in asymptomatic women to identify those with risk of breast cancer.

  16. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of [open quotes]rough-handling[close quotes]-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  17. Dynamic impact analysis of the M1 105mm projectile

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.

    1993-06-01

    Evaluation of the effects of {open_quotes}rough-handling{close_quotes}-induced stresses in the nose region of a 105mm artillery projectile was performed to determine if these stresses could have contributed to the premature explosion of a projectile during a Desert Shield training mission of the 101st Army Airborne in Saudi Arabia. The rough-handling evaluations were simulated by dynamic impact analysis. It was concluded that the combined residual stress and dynamic impact-induced stress would not be of sufficient magnitude to cause cracking of the projectile in the nose region.

  18. Fast Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis for dynamic sensing.

    PubMed

    Peled, Yair; Motil, Avi; Tur, Moshe

    2012-04-09

    A new technique for the fast implementation of Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) is proposed and demonstrated, carrying the classical BOTDA method to the dynamic sensing domain. By using a digital signal generator which enables fast switching among 100 scanning frequencies, we demonstrate a truly distributed and dynamic measurement of a 100 m long fiber with a sampling rate of ~10 kHz, limited only by the fiber length and the frequency granularity. With 10 averages the standard deviation of the measured strain was ~5 µε.

  19. Interactive Finite Elements for General Engine Dynamics Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Padovan, J.; Fertis, D. G.

    1984-01-01

    General nonlinear finite element codes were adapted for the purpose of analyzing the dynamics of gas turbine engines. In particular, this adaptation required the development of a squeeze-film damper element software package and its implantation into a representative current generation code. The ADINA code was selected because of prior use of it and familiarity with its internal structure and logic. This objective was met and the results indicate that such use of general purpose codes is viable alternative to specialized codes for general dynamics analysis of engines.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Analysis of a Liquid Explosive Reaction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soulard, L.; Crouzet, B.

    2006-07-01

    We present an analysis of the reaction zone of a stationary planar detonation by a equilibrium molecular dynamics method (EMD). We particularly focus on the influence of chemical characteristics such as the reactions reversibility and endothermicity. First, equilibrium and unreacted Hugoniot of the reactive system are calculated by EMD. These results are then used to predict the detonation characteristics such as the thermodynamic properties of ZND spike and the sonic point. We observe in particular the influence of the preliminary endothermic phase on the detonation velocity and its stability. The comparison between these predictions and non equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations validate the EMD method.

  1. Dynamic Characteristics Analysis of Analogue Networks Design Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemliak, Alexander M.

    The process of designing analogue circuits is formulated as a controlled dynamic system. For analysis of such system's properties it is suggested to use the concept of Lyapunov's function for a dynamic system. Various forms of Lyapunov's function are suggested. Analyzing the behavior of Lyapunov's function and its first derivative allowed us to determine significant correlation between this function's properties and processor time used to design the circuit. Numerical results prove the possibility of forecasting the behavior of various designing strategies and processor time based on the properties of Lyapunov's function for the process of designing the circuit.

  2. Analysis of microtubule polymerization dynamics in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Gierke, Sarah; Kumar, Praveen; Wittmann, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Intracellular microtubule polymerization dynamics are spatiotemporally controlled by numerous microtubule-associated proteins and other mechanisms, and this regulation is central to many cell processes. Here, we give an overview and practical guide on how to acquire and analyze time-lapse sequences of dynamic microtubules in live cells by either fluorescently labeling entire microtubules or by utilizing proteins that specifically associate only with growing microtubule ends, and summarize the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches. We give practical recommendations for imaging conditions, and we also discuss important limitations of such analysis that are dictated by the maximal achievable spatial and temporal sampling frequencies. PMID:20719263

  3. Impacts of frequency increment errors on frequency diverse array beampattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Kuandong; Chen, Hui; Shao, Huaizong; Cai, Jingye; Wang, Wen-Qin

    2015-12-01

    Different from conventional phased array, which provides only angle-dependent beampattern, frequency diverse array (FDA) employs a small frequency increment across the antenna elements and thus results in a range angle-dependent beampattern. However, due to imperfect electronic devices, it is difficult to ensure accurate frequency increments, and consequently, the array performance will be degraded by unavoidable frequency increment errors. In this paper, we investigate the impacts of frequency increment errors on FDA beampattern. We derive the beampattern errors caused by deterministic frequency increment errors. For stochastic frequency increment errors, the corresponding upper and lower bounds of FDA beampattern error are derived. They are verified by numerical results. Furthermore, the statistical characteristics of FDA beampattern with random frequency increment errors, which obey Gaussian distribution and uniform distribution, are also investigated.

  4. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 1999 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, T.; Flores-Amaya, F.

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 1999. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key analysis results and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the discipline of flight dynamics, which involves spacecraft trajectory (orbit) and attitude analysis, as well as orbit and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions involving NASA, government, university, and commercial space missions, at various stages in the mission life cycle.

  5. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2005 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2005. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based), spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning, attitude analysis, attitude determination and sensor calibration, and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  6. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch End of Fiscal Year 2004 Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLion, Anne (Editor); Stengle, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 595, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in Fiscal Year (FY) 2004. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics including spacecraft navigation (autonomous and ground based); spacecraft trajectory design and maneuver planning; attitude analysis; attitude determination and sensor calibration; and attitude control subsystem (ACS) analysis and design. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, other government agencies, academia, and private industry.

  7. Dynamic and still microcirculatory image analysis for quantitative microcirculation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiaoyou; Xiu, Rui-juan

    1994-05-01

    Based on analyses of various types of digital microcirculatory image (DMCI), we summed up the image features of DMCI, the digitizing demands for digital microcirculatory imaging, and the basic characteristics of the DMCI processing. A dynamic and still imaging separation processing (DSISP) mode was designed for developing a DMCI workstation and the DMCI processing. Original images in this study were clinical microcirculatory images from human finger nail-bed and conjunctiva microvasculature, and intravital microvascular network images from animal tissue or organs. A series of dynamic and still microcirculatory image analysis functions were developed in this study. The experimental results indicate most of the established analog video image analysis methods for microcirculatory measurement could be realized in a more flexible way based on the DMCI. More information can be rapidly extracted from the quality improved DMCI by employing intelligence digital image analysis methods. The DSISP mode is very suitable for building a DMCI workstation.

  8. Nonlinear dynamical analysis of turbulence in a stable cloud layer

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, A.J. )

    1995-03-01

    An eight mode truncated spectral model based on Burgers' approximation to the one-dimensional Navier--Stokes equations is used to compute the Lyapunov dimension of the dynamical attractor for turbulence in a stable cloud layer. The model results are compared with the correlation dimension obtained earlier from a time series of radar Doppler and reflectivity signals from a turbulent layer in a marine stratus cloud. The analysis supports a weak coupling explanation for the lower correlation dimension found for the reflectivity time series compared with that for the Doppler time series. Turbulent Prandtl number emerges from the analysis as a flow parameter which can enlarge the dimension of the model's dynamical attractor, but the attractor dimension computed for the model remains lower than the radar Doppler correlation dimension. Linear stability analysis of the model's equilibrium states suggests that a nontruncated version of the model will possess an attractor which is also of lower dimension than the radar Doppler correlation dimension.

  9. Integrative Analysis of Metabolic Models – from Structure to Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Anja; Schreiber, Falk

    2015-01-01

    The characterization of biological systems with respect to their behavior and functionality based on versatile biochemical interactions is a major challenge. To understand these complex mechanisms at systems level modeling approaches are investigated. Different modeling formalisms allow metabolic models to be analyzed depending on the question to be solved, the biochemical knowledge and the availability of experimental data. Here, we describe a method for an integrative analysis of the structure and dynamics represented by qualitative and quantitative metabolic models. Using various formalisms, the metabolic model is analyzed from different perspectives. Determined structural and dynamic properties are visualized in the context of the metabolic model. Interaction techniques allow the exploration and visual analysis thereby leading to a broader understanding of the behavior and functionality of the underlying biological system. The System Biology Metabolic Model Framework (SBM2 – Framework) implements the developed method and, as an example, is applied for the integrative analysis of the crop plant potato. PMID:25674560

  10. Increment of specific heat capacity of solar salt with SiO2 nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable. PACS 65.: Thermal properties of condensed matter; 65.20.-w: Thermal properties of liquids; 65.20.Jk: Studies of thermodynamic properties of specific liquids PMID:25346648

  11. Increment of specific heat capacity of solar salt with SiO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable. 65.: Thermal properties of condensed matter; 65.20.-w: Thermal properties of liquids; 65.20.Jk: Studies of thermodynamic properties of specific liquids.

  12. Incremental Sampling Methodology (ISM). Part 1, Section 4: Statistical Design. Aspects of Incremental Sampling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-26

    1 Statistical Aspects of Incremental Sampling Kelly Black Neptune and Company, Inc. kblack@neptuneinc.org EMDQ – La Jolla, CA March 26, 2012 Report...NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Neptune and Company, Inc,1435 Garrison St Ste 110,Denver,CO,80215 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING

  13. Dynamic Analysis of a Spur Gear by the Dynamic Stiffness Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HUANG, K. J.; LIU, T. S.

    2000-07-01

    This study treats a spur gear tooth as a variable cross-section Timoshenko beam to construct a dynamic model, being able to obtain transient response for spur gears of involute profiles. The dynamic responses of a single tooth and a gear pair are investigated. Firstly, polynomials are used to represent the gear blank and the tooth profile. The dynamic stiffness matrix and natural frequencies of the gear are in turn calculated. The forced response of a tooth subject to a shaft-driven transmission torque is calculated by performing modal analysis. This study takes into account time-varying stiffness and mass matrices and the gear meshing forces at moving meshing points. The forced response at arbitrary points in a gear tooth can be obtained. Calculation results of fillet stresses and strains are compared with those in the literature to verify the proposed method.

  14. Dynamic test/analysis correlation using reduced analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Angelucci, A. F.; Javeed, Mehzad

    1992-01-01

    Test/analysis correlation is an important aspect of the verification of analysis models which are used to predict on-orbit response characteristics of large space structures. This paper presents results of a study using reduced analysis models for performing dynamic test/analysis correlation. The reduced test-analysis model (TAM) has the same number and orientation of DOF as the test measurements. Two reduction methods, static (Guyan) reduction and the Improved Reduced System reduction, are applied to the test/analysis correlation of a laboratory truss structure. Simulated test results and modal test data are used to examine the performance of each method. It is shown that selection of DOF to be retained in the TAM is critical when large structural masses are involved. In addition, the use of modal test results may provide difficulties in TAM accuracy even if a large number of DOF are retained in the TAM.

  15. Dynamic test/analysis correlation using reduced analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Angelucci, A. Filippo; Javeed, Mehzad

    1992-01-01

    Test/analysis correlation is an important aspect of the verification of analysis models which are used to predict on-orbit response characteristics of large space structures. This paper presents results of a study using reduced analysis models for performing dynamic test/analysis correlation. The reduced test-analysis model (TAM) has the same number and orientation of DOF as the test measurements. Two reduction methods, static (Guyan) reduction and the Improved Reduced System (IRS) reduction, are applied to the test/analysis correlation of a laboratory truss structure. Simulated test results and modal test data are used to examine the performance of each method. It is shown that selection of DOF to be retained in the TAM is critical when large structural masses are involved. In addition, the use of modal test results may provide difficulties in TAM accuracy even if a large number of DOF are retained in the TAM.

  16. Segmentation based on motion: an incremental approach using temporal Kalman filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germain, Florence; Baudois, Daniel

    1993-06-01

    There is an increasing interest for image motion analysis, driven by several application fields ranging from dynamic scene analysis, up to image encoding for transmission purposes. In the context of scene analysis, the image motion information is of crucial help for segmentation and qualitative interpretation. In the case of unstructured, inhomogeneous images, motion information is carried by the spatio-temporal variations of the light intensity function. The apparent distribution inferred from this information is a dense vector field, called optical flow. Assuming the spatial continuity of the field to be estimated, a local determination of optical flow is possible. The main difficulty lies in the handling of motion discontinuities. Usually, the localization of motion frontiers is handled as a binary problem, and thus leads to instabilities during the estimation process. We propose an incremental process, evaluating the optical flow from a sequence of images, using temporal Kalman filtering. Our approach is based on a continuous handling of motion frontiers. The evolution model acts as a temporal low band filter on the estimated field. To cope with motion discontinuities, the filter is continuously adapted according to local motion homogeneity, via the covariance of the model noise. The result is a progressive cancelation of temporal regularization in the neighborhood of motion frontiers, allowing a better convergence of the filter in case of such a discontinuity. Such a continuous handling of motion frontiers leads to a great robustness in the estimation process.

  17. Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis of Virgin TR-55 Silicone Rubber

    SciTech Connect

    Small IV, W; Wilson, T S

    2009-10-09

    Dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) of virgin TR-55 silicone rubber specimens was conducted. Dynamic frequency/temperature sweep tests were conducted over the ranges 0.1-100 rad/s and 30-100 C using a parallel plate test geometry. A strain of 0.2% was used, which was near the upper limit of the linear viscoelastic region of the material based on initial dynamic strain sweep tests. Master curves of G{prime} and G{double_prime} as a function of frequency were generated using time-temperature superposition (horizontal shift with initial vertical correction). The activation energy calculated from an Arrhenius fit to the horizontal shift factors was 178-355 kJ/mol. The calculated percent load retention at {approx}50 years was 61-68%.

  18. Theoretical Analysis of Dynamic Processes for Interacting Molecular Motors.

    PubMed

    Teimouri, Hamid; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Mehrabiani, Kareem

    2015-02-13

    Biological transport is supported by collective dynamics of enzymatic molecules that are called motor proteins or molecular motors. Experiments suggest that motor proteins interact locally via short-range potentials. We investigate the fundamental role of these interactions by analyzing a new class of totally asymmetric exclusion processes where interactions are accounted for in a thermodynamically consistent fashion. It allows us to connect explicitly microscopic features of motor proteins with their collective dynamic properties. Theoretical analysis that combines various mean-field calculations and computer simulations suggests that dynamic properties of molecular motors strongly depend on interactions, and correlations are stronger for interacting motor proteins. Surprisingly, it is found that there is an optimal strength of interactions (weak repulsion) that leads to a maximal particle flux. It is also argued that molecular motors transport is more sensitive to attractive interactions. Applications of these results for kinesin motor proteins are discussed.

  19. Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis of Scalp EEG Epileptic Signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, Susana A.; Creso, Judith; Figliola, Alejandra; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Rosso, Osvaldo A.

    Noisy signals obtained during a tonic-clonic epileptic seizure, are usually neglected for visual inspection by the physicians due to the presence of muscle artifacts. Although noise obscures completely the recording, information about the underlying brain activity can be obtained by filtering, through the Orthogonal Wavelet Transforms, those frequencies bands associated with muscle activity. After generating a "noise free" signal by removing the muscle artifacts with wavelets, a dynamical analysis of the brain behavior will be performed by using nonlinear dynamics methods. The values for nonlinear metric invariants, like the correlation dimension and the maximum Lyapunov exponent, confirm that the brain dynamical behavior is more ordered during the epileptic seizure than pre-seizure stage.

  20. Numerical Study about the Influence of Wall Angle about Main Strains, Thickness Reduction and Forces on Single Point Incremental Forming Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleksik, Valentin

    2016-12-01

    The current paper aims to study, using numerical simulation, the influence of the wall angle on the single point incremental forming process. For the analysis there has been used the LS-Dyna software and three explicit dynamic analyses were run for three parts with wall angles of 450, 550 and 650. The factors taken into account are the main strains, the thickness reduction and the forces on three directions. The material data introduced into the simulation were determined based on an uniaxial traction test on an Instron 5587 testing machine and the Aramis system was used as optical extensometer.