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Sample records for incremental reaction modeling

  1. Massive sulfide deposits and hydrothermal solutions: incremental reaction modeling of mineral precipitation and sulfur isotopic evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Incremental reaction path modeling of chemical and sulfur isotopic reactions occurring in active hydrothermal vents on the seafloor, in combination with chemical and petrographic data from sulfide samples from the seafloor and massive sulfide ore deposits, allows a detailed examination of the processes involved. This paper presents theoretical models of reactions of two types: (1) adiabatic mixing between hydrothermal solution and seawater, and (2) reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit materials. In addition, reaction of hydrothermal solution with sulfide deposit minerals and basalt in feeder zones is discussed.

  2. A Fast Incremental Gaussian Mixture Model

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Rafael Coimbra; Engel, Paulo Martins

    2015-01-01

    This work builds upon previous efforts in online incremental learning, namely the Incremental Gaussian Mixture Network (IGMN). The IGMN is capable of learning from data streams in a single-pass by improving its model after analyzing each data point and discarding it thereafter. Nevertheless, it suffers from the scalability point-of-view, due to its asymptotic time complexity of O(NKD3) for N data points, K Gaussian components and D dimensions, rendering it inadequate for high-dimensional data. In this work, we manage to reduce this complexity to O(NKD2) by deriving formulas for working directly with precision matrices instead of covariance matrices. The final result is a much faster and scalable algorithm which can be applied to high dimensional tasks. This is confirmed by applying the modified algorithm to high-dimensional classification datasets. PMID:26444880

  3. Kinetic Modeling of Incremental Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Exchanges.

    PubMed

    Guest, Steven; Leypoldt, John K; Cassin, Michelle; Schreiber, Martin

    2017-01-01

    ♦ BACKGROUND: Incremental peritoneal dialysis (PD), the gradual introduction of dialysate exchanges at less than full-dose therapy, has been infrequently described in clinical reports. One concern with less than full-dose dialysis is whether urea clearance targets are achievable with an incremental regimen. In this report, we used a large database of PD patients, across all membrane transport types, and performed urea kinetic modeling determinations of possible incremental regimens for an individual membrane type. ♦ METHODS: Using a modified 3-pore model of peritoneal transport, various incremental manual continuous ambulatory PD (CAPD) exchanges employing glucose and/or icodextrin were evaluated. Peritoneal urea clearances from those simulations were added to residual kidney urea clearance for patients with various glomerular filtration rates (GFRs), and the total weekly urea clearance was then compared to the total weekly urea Kt/V target of 1.7. All 4 peritoneal membrane types were modeled. For each simulated prescription, net ultrafiltration and carbohydrate absorption were also calculated. ♦ RESULTS: Incremental CAPD regimens of 2 exchanges a day met adequacy targets if the GFR was 6 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in all membrane types. For regimens employing 3 exchanges a day, Kt/V targets were achieved at GFR levels of 4 to 5 mL/min/1.73 m(2) in high transporters to low transporters but higher tonicity 2.5% glucose solutions or icodextrin were required in some regimens. ♦ CONCLUSIONS: This work demonstrates that with incremental CAPD regimens, urea kinetic targets are achievable in most new starts to PD with residual kidney function. Incremental PD may be a less intrusive, better accepted initial treatment regime and a cost-effective way to initiate chronic dialysis in the incident patient. The key role of intrinsic kidney function in incremental regimens is highlighted in this analysis and would warrant conscientious monitoring. Copyright © 2017 International

  4. Damage prediction in incremental forming by using Lemaitre damage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shenghua; Reis, Ana; Teixeira, Pedro; da Rocha, A. Barata; Lino, Jorge

    2012-09-01

    Incremental forming is an innovative flexible method used for manufacturing of the sheet metal products and brings a great insight for the small-batch-size or customized sheet products. Some experiments show that incremental sheet metal forming can undergo higher deformations than traditional sheet metal forming. The traditional method to evaluate formability like forming limit curve (FLD) etc can't give the right answer in incremental forming which is subjected to highly non-monotonic serrated strain paths. In this paper, the Lemaitre' damage model is presented and fully coupled with finite element simulation in commercial software ABAQUS to predict the failure in incremental forming. Results show that the prediction makes a great agreement with the relevant experiments.

  5. Incremental logistic regression for customizing automatic diagnostic models.

    PubMed

    Tortajada, Salvador; Robles, Montserrat; García-Gómez, Juan Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, and following the new trends in medicine, statistical learning techniques have been used for developing automatic diagnostic models for aiding the clinical experts throughout the use of Clinical Decision Support Systems. The development of these models requires a large, representative amount of data, which is commonly obtained from one hospital or a group of hospitals after an expensive and time-consuming gathering, preprocess, and validation of cases. After the model development, it has to overcome an external validation that is often carried out in a different hospital or health center. The experience is that the models show underperformed expectations. Furthermore, patient data needs ethical approval and patient consent to send and store data. For these reasons, we introduce an incremental learning algorithm base on the Bayesian inference approach that may allow us to build an initial model with a smaller number of cases and update it incrementally when new data are collected or even perform a new calibration of a model from a different center by using a reduced number of cases. The performance of our algorithm is demonstrated by employing different benchmark datasets and a real brain tumor dataset; and we compare its performance to a previous incremental algorithm and a non-incremental Bayesian model, showing that the algorithm is independent of the data model, iterative, and has a good convergence.

  6. Incremental principal component pursuit for video background modeling

    DOEpatents

    Rodriquez-Valderrama, Paul A.; Wohlberg, Brendt

    2017-03-14

    An incremental Principal Component Pursuit (PCP) algorithm for video background modeling that is able to process one frame at a time while adapting to changes in background, with a computational complexity that allows for real-time processing, having a low memory footprint and is robust to translational and rotational jitter.

  7. Optimal tree increment models for the Northeastern United Statesq

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2003-01-01

    used the potential relative increment (PRI) methodology to develop optimal tree diameter growth models for the Northeastern United States. Thirty species from the Eastwide Forest Inventory Database yielded 69,676 individuals, which were then reduced to fast-growing subsets for PRI analysis. For instance, only 14 individuals from the greater than 6,300-tree eastern...

  8. Optimal Tree Increment Models for the Northeastern United States

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2005-01-01

    I used the potential relative increment (PRI) methodology to develop optimal tree diameter growth models for the Northeastern United States. Thirty species from the Eastwide Forest Inventory Database yielded 69,676 individuals, which were then reduced to fast-growing subsets for PRI analysis. For instance, only 14 individuals from the greater than 6,300-tree eastern...

  9. An Enhanced Visualization Process Model for Incremental Visualization.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Hans-Jorg; Angelini, Marco; Santucci, Giuseppe; Schumann, Heidrun

    2016-07-01

    With today's technical possibilities, a stable visualization scenario can no longer be assumed as a matter of course, as underlying data and targeted display setup are much more in flux than in traditional scenarios. Incremental visualization approaches are a means to address this challenge, as they permit the user to interact with, steer, and change the visualization at intermediate time points and not just after it has been completed. In this paper, we put forward a model for incremental visualizations that is based on the established Data State Reference Model, but extends it in ways to also represent partitioned data and visualization operators to facilitate intermediate visualization updates. In combination, partitioned data and operators can be used independently and in combination to strike tailored compromises between output quality, shown data quantity, and responsiveness-i.e., frame rates. We showcase the new expressive power of this model by discussing the opportunities and challenges of incremental visualization in general and its usage in a real world scenario in particular.

  10. Data Stream Prediction Using Incremental Hidden Markov Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakabayashi, Kei; Miura, Takao

    In this paper, we propose a new technique for time-series prediction. Here we assume that time-series data occur depending on event which is unobserved directly, and we estimate future data as output from the most likely event which will happen at the time. In this investigation we model time-series based on event sequence by using Hidden Markov Model(HMM), and extract time-series patterns as trained HMM parameters. However, we can’t apply HMM approach to data stream prediction in a straightforward manner. This is because Baum-Welch algorithm, which is traditional unsupervised HMM training algorithm, requires many stored historical data and scan it many times. Here we apply incremental Baum-Welch algorithm which is an on-line HMM training method, and estimate HMM parameters dynamically to adapt new time-series patterns. And we show some experimental results to see the validity of our method.

  11. Prediction of height increment for models of forest growth

    Treesearch

    Albert R. Stage

    1975-01-01

    Functional forms of equations were derived for predicting 10-year periodic height increment of forest trees from height, diameter, diameter increment, and habitat type. Crown ratio was considered as an additional variable for prediction, but its contribution was negligible. Coefficients of the function were estimated for 10 species of trees growing in 10 habitat types...

  12. Incremental and unifying modelling formalism for biological interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Yartseva, Anastasia; Klaudel, Hanna; Devillers, Raymond; Képès, François

    2007-01-01

    Background An appropriate choice of the modeling formalism from the broad range of existing ones may be crucial for efficiently describing and analyzing biological systems. Results We propose a new unifying and incremental formalism for the representation and modeling of biological interaction networks. This formalism allows automated translations into other formalisms, thus enabling a thorough study of the dynamic properties of a biological system. As a first illustration, we propose a translation into the R. Thomas' multivalued logical formalism which provides a possible semantics; a methodology for constructing such models is presented on a classical benchmark: the λ phage genetic switch. We also show how to extract from our model a classical ODE description of the dynamics of a system. Conclusion This approach provides an additional level of description between the biological and mathematical ones. It yields, on the one hand, a knowledge expression in a form which is intuitive for biologists and, on the other hand, its representation in a formal and structured way. PMID:17996051

  13. A comparative study of velocity increment generation between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, Norilmi Amilia

    2016-02-01

    The motorized momentum exchange tether (MMET) is capable of generating useful velocity increments through spin–orbit coupling. This study presents a comparative study of the velocity increments between the rigid body and flexible models of MMET. The equations of motions of both models in the time domain are transformed into a function of true anomaly. The equations of motion are integrated, and the responses in terms of the velocity increment of the rigid body and flexible models are compared and analysed. Results show that the initial conditions, eccentricity, and flexibility of the tether have significant effects on the velocity increments of the tether.

  14. Modeling Mechanochemical Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Adams, Heather; Miller, Brendan P; Furlong, Octavio J; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Navarra, Gabriele; Rossi, Antonella; Xu, Yufu; Kotvis, Peter V; Tysoe, Wilfred T

    2017-08-09

    The mechanochemical reaction between copper and dimethyl disulfide is studied under well-controlled conditions in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Reaction is initiated by fast S-S bond scission to form adsorbed methyl thiolate species, and the reaction kinetics are reproduced by two subsequent elementary mechanochemical reaction steps, namely a mechanochemical decomposition of methyl thiolate to deposit sulfur on the surface and evolve small, gas-phase hydrocarbons, and sliding-induced oxidation of the copper by sulfur that regenerates vacant reaction sites. The steady-state reaction kinetics are monitored in situ from the variation in the friction force as the reaction proceeds and modeled using the elementary-step reaction rate constants found for monolayer adsorbates. The analysis yields excellent agreement between the experiment and the kinetic model, as well as correctly predicting the total amount of subsurface sulfur in the film measured using Auger spectroscopy and the sulfur depth distribution measured by angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  15. An incremental-iterative method for modeling damage evolution in voxel-based microstructure models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Qi-Zhi; Yvonnet, Julien

    2015-02-01

    Numerical methods motivated by rapid advances in image processing techniques have been intensively developed during recent years and increasingly applied to simulate heterogeneous materials with complex microstructure. The present work aims at elaborating an incremental-iterative numerical method for voxel-based modeling of damage evolution in quasi-brittle microstructures. The iterative scheme based on the Lippmann-Schwinger equation in the real space domain (Yvonnet, in Int J Numer Methods Eng 92:178-205, 2012) is first cast into an incremental form so as to implement nonlinear material models efficiently. In the proposed scheme, local strain increments at material grid points are computed iteratively by a mapping operation through a transformation array, while local stresses are determined using a constitutive model that accounts for material degradation by damage. For validation, benchmark studies and numerical simulations using microtomographic data of concrete are performed. For each test, numerical predictions by the incremental-iterative scheme and the finite element method, respectively, are presented and compared for both global responses and local damage distributions. It is emphasized that the proposed incremental-iterative formulation can be straightforwardly applied in the framework of other Lippmann-Schwinger equation-based schemes, like the fast Fourier transform method.

  16. Comparison of an incremental versus single-step retraction model for intraoperative compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platenik, Leah A.; Miga, Michael I.; Roberts, David W.; Kennedy, Francis E.; Hartov, Alex; Lunn, Karen E.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2001-05-01

    Distortion between the operating field and preoperative images increases as image-guided surgery progresses. Retraction is a typical early-stage event that causes significant tissue deformation, which can be modeled as an intraoperative compensation strategy. This study compares the predictive power of incremental versus single-step retraction models in the porcine brain. In vivo porcine experiments were conducted that involved implanting markers in the brain whose trajectories were tracked in CT scans following known incremental deformations induced by a retractor blade placed interhemispherically. Studies were performed using a 3D consolidation model of brain deformation to investigate the relative predictive benefits of incremental versus single-step retraction simulations. The results show that both models capture greater than 75% of tissue loading due to retraction. We have found that the incremental approach outperforms the single-step method with an average improvement of 1.5%-3%. More importantly it also preferentially recovers the directionality of movement, providing better correspondence to intraoperative surgical events. A new incremental approach to tissue retraction has been developed and shown to improve data-model match in retraction experiments in the porcine brain. Incremental retraction modeling is an improvement over previous single- step models, which does not incur additional computational to overhead. Results in the porcine brain show that even when the overall displacement magnitudes between the two models are similar, directional trends of the displacement field are often significantly improved with the incremental method.

  17. Product Quality Modelling Based on Incremental Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhang, W.; Qin, B.; Shi, W.

    2012-05-01

    Incremental Support vector machine (ISVM) is a new learning method developed in recent years based on the foundations of statistical learning theory. It is suitable for the problem of sequentially arriving field data and has been widely used for product quality prediction and production process optimization. However, the traditional ISVM learning does not consider the quality of the incremental data which may contain noise and redundant data; it will affect the learning speed and accuracy to a great extent. In order to improve SVM training speed and accuracy, a modified incremental support vector machine (MISVM) is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the margin vectors are extracted according to the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker (KKT) condition; then the distance from the margin vectors to the final decision hyperplane is calculated to evaluate the importance of margin vectors, where the margin vectors are removed while their distance exceed the specified value; finally, the original SVs and remaining margin vectors are used to update the SVM. The proposed MISVM can not only eliminate the unimportant samples such as noise samples, but also can preserve the important samples. The MISVM has been experimented on two public data and one field data of zinc coating weight in strip hot-dip galvanizing, and the results shows that the proposed method can improve the prediction accuracy and the training speed effectively. Furthermore, it can provide the necessary decision supports and analysis tools for auto control of product quality, and also can extend to other process industries, such as chemical process and manufacturing process.

  18. Modeling of surface reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, T.R.

    1993-01-01

    Mathematical models are used to elucidate properties of the monomer-monomer and monomer-dimer type chemical reactions on a two-dimensional surface. The authors use mean-field and lattice gas models, detailing similarities and differences due to correlations in the lattice gas model. The monomer-monomer, or AB surface reaction model, with no diffusion, is investigated for various reaction rates k. Study of the exact rate equations reveals that poisoning always occurs if the adsorption rates of the reactants are unequal. If the adsorption rates of the reactants are equal, simulations show slow poisoning, associated with clustering of reactants. This behavior is also shown for the two-dimensional voter model. The authors analyze precisely the slow poisoning kinetics by an analytic treatment for the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate, and by direct comparison with the voter model. They extend the results to incorporate the effects of place-exchange diffusion, and they compare the AB reaction with infinitesimal reaction rate and no diffusion to the voter model with diffusion at rate 1/2. They also consider the relationship of the voter model to the monomer-dimer model, and investigate the latter model for small reaction rates. The monomer-dimer, or AB[sub 2] surface reaction model is also investigated. Specifically, they consider the ZGB-model for CO-oxidation, and in generalizations of this model which include adspecies diffusion. A theory of nucleation to describe properties of non-equilibrium first-order transitions, specifically the evolution between [open quote]reactive[close quote] steady states and trivial adsorbing states, is derived. The behavior of the [open quote]epidemic[close quote] survival probability, P[sub s], for a non-poisoned patch surrounded by a poisoned background is determined below the poisoning transition.

  19. Application of a shear-modified GTN model to incremental sheet forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jacob; Malhotra, Rajiv; Liu, W. K.; Cao, Jian

    2013-12-01

    This paper investigates the effects of using a shear-modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model, which is based on the mechanics of voids, for simulating material behavior in the incremental forming process. The problem chosen for analysis is a simplified version of the NUMISHEET 2014 incremental forming benchmark test. The implications of the shear-modification of the model specifically for incremental sheet forming processes are confirmed using finite element analysis. It is shown that including the shear term has a significant effect on fracture timing in incremental forming, which is not well reflected in the observed tensile test simulations for calibration. The numerical implementation and the need for comprehensive calibration of the model are briefly discussed.

  20. Quality and Growth Implications of Incremental Costing Models for Distance Education Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, C. B.; Gould, Lawrence V.; King, Dennis; Parker, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore quality and growth implications emergent from various incremental costing models applied to distance education units. Prior research relative to costing models and three competing costing models useful in the current distance education environment are discussed. Specifically, the simple costing model, unit…

  1. Quality and Growth Implications of Incremental Costing Models for Distance Education Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, C. B.; Gould, Lawrence V.; King, Dennis; Parker, Carl

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore quality and growth implications emergent from various incremental costing models applied to distance education units. Prior research relative to costing models and three competing costing models useful in the current distance education environment are discussed. Specifically, the simple costing model, unit…

  2. Integrating Incremental Learning and Episodic Memory Models of the Hippocampal Region

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeter, M.; Myers, C. E.; Gluck, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    By integrating previous computational models of corticohippocampal function, the authors develop and test a unified theory of the neural substrates of familiarity, recollection, and classical conditioning. This approach integrates models from 2 traditions of hippocampal modeling, those of episodic memory and incremental learning, by drawing on an…

  3. The efficacy of using inventory data to develop optimal diameter increment models

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2002-01-01

    Most optimal tree diameter growth models have arisen through either the conceptualization of physiological processes or the adaptation of empirical increment models. However, surprisingly little effort has been invested in the melding of these approaches even though it is possible to develop theoretically sound, computationally efficient optimal tree growth models...

  4. A System to Derive Optimal Tree Diameter Increment Models from the Eastwide Forest Inventory Data Base (EFIDB)

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2002-01-01

    This article is an introduction to the computer software used by the Potential Relative Increment (PRI) approach to optimal tree diameter growth modeling. These DOS programs extract qualified tree and plot data from the Eastwide Forest Inventory Data Base (EFIDB), calculate relative tree increment, sort for the highest relative increments by diameter class, and...

  5. Interpreting incremental value of markers added to risk prediction models.

    PubMed

    Pencina, Michael J; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Pencina, Karol M; Janssens, A Cecile J W; Greenland, Philip

    2012-09-15

    The discrimination of a risk prediction model measures that model's ability to distinguish between subjects with and without events. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) is a popular measure of discrimination. However, the AUC has recently been criticized for its insensitivity in model comparisons in which the baseline model has performed well. Thus, 2 other measures have been proposed to capture improvement in discrimination for nested models: the integrated discrimination improvement and the continuous net reclassification improvement. In the present study, the authors use mathematical relations and numerical simulations to quantify the improvement in discrimination offered by candidate markers of different strengths as measured by their effect sizes. They demonstrate that the increase in the AUC depends on the strength of the baseline model, which is true to a lesser degree for the integrated discrimination improvement. On the other hand, the continuous net reclassification improvement depends only on the effect size of the candidate variable and its correlation with other predictors. These measures are illustrated using the Framingham model for incident atrial fibrillation. The authors conclude that the increase in the AUC, integrated discrimination improvement, and net reclassification improvement offer complementary information and thus recommend reporting all 3 alongside measures characterizing the performance of the final model.

  6. The Incremental Launching Method for Educational Virtual Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Octávio; Sampaio, A. Z.

    This paper describes the application of virtual reality technology to the development of an educational model related to the construction of a bridge. The model allow the visualization of the physical progression of the work following a planned construction sequence, the observation of details of the form of every component of the works and carry the study of the type and method of operation of the equipment applied in the construction. The model admit interaction and then some degree of collaboration between students and teachers in the analyses of aspects concerning geometric forms, working methodology or other technical issues observed using the application. The model presents distinct advantage as educational aids in first-degree courses in Civil Engineering.

  7. Adaptive object recognition model using incremental feature representation and hierarchical classification.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sungmoon; Lee, Minho

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive object recognition model based on incremental feature representation and a hierarchical feature classifier that offers plasticity to accommodate additional input data and reduces the problem of forgetting previously learned information. The incremental feature representation method applies adaptive prototype generation with a cortex-like mechanism to conventional feature representation to enable an incremental reflection of various object characteristics, such as feature dimensions in the learning process. A feature classifier based on using a hierarchical generative model recognizes various objects with variant feature dimensions during the learning process. Experimental results show that the adaptive object recognition model successfully recognizes single and multiple-object classes with enhanced stability and flexibility.

  8. The Dynamics of Perceptual Learning: An Incremental Reweighting Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrov, Alexander A.; Dosher, Barbara Anne; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    2005-01-01

    The mechanisms of perceptual learning are analyzed theoretically, probed in an orientation-discrimination experiment involving a novel nonstationary context manipulation, and instantiated in a detailed computational model. Two hypotheses are examined: modification of early cortical representations versus task-specific selective reweighting.…

  9. Recognizing and Incrementally Evolving Texture Concepts in Dynamic Environments: A Model Generalization Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    learning. While the initial acquisition of texture models is driven by a teacher, the evolution of these models is performed over a sequence of images...learning processes to improve its models. This paper presents both an outline of the iterative evolution methodology and the investigation of an incremental...model generalization approach as a part of the evolution of texture models. Experiments were run in a partially-supervised mode rather than a fully

  10. The balanced scorecard: an incremental approach model to health care management.

    PubMed

    Pineno, Charles J

    2002-01-01

    The balanced scorecard represents a technique used in strategic management to translate an organization's mission and strategy into a comprehensive set of performance measures that provide the framework for implementation of strategic management. This article develops an incremental approach for decision making by formulating a specific balanced scorecard model with an index of nonfinancial as well as financial measures. The incremental approach to costs, including profit contribution analysis and probabilities, allows decisionmakers to assess, for example, how their desire to meet different health care needs will cause changes in service design. This incremental approach to the balanced scorecard may prove to be useful in evaluating the existence of causality relationships between different objective and subjective measures to be included within the balanced scorecard.

  11. A photon counting detector model based on increment matrices to simulate statistically correct detector signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faby, Sebastian; Maier, Joscha; Simons, David; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Lell, Michael; Kachelrieß, Marc

    2015-03-01

    We present a novel increment matrix concept to simulate the correlations in an energy-selective photon counting detector. Correlations between the energy bins of neighboring detector pixels are introduced by scattered and fluorescence photons, together with the broadening of the induced charge clouds as they travel towards the electrodes, leading to charge sharing. It is important to generate statistically correct detector signals for the different energy bins to be able to realistically assess the detector's performance in various tasks, e.g. material decomposition. Our increment matrix concept describes the counter increases in neighboring pixels on a single event level. Advantages of our model are the fact that much less random numbers are required than simulating single photons and that the increment matrices together with their probabilities have to be generated only once and can be stored for later use. The different occurring increment matrix sets and the corresponding probabilities are simulated using an analytic model of the photon-matter-interactions based on the photoelectric effect and Compton scattering, and the charge cloud drift, featuring thermal diffusion and Coulomb expansion of the charge cloud. The results obtained with this model are evaluated in terms of the spectral response for different detector geometries and the resulting energy bin sensitivity. Comparisons to published measured data and a parameterized detector model show both a good qualitative and quantitative agreement. We also studied the resulting covariance of reconstructed energy bin images.

  12. A diameter increment model for Red Fir in California and Southern Oregon

    Treesearch

    K. Leroy Dolph

    1992-01-01

    Periodic (10-year) diameter increment of individual red fir trees in Califomia and southern Oregon can be predicted from initial diameter and crown ratio of each tree, site index, percent slope, and aspect of the site. The model actually predicts the natural logarithm ofthe change in squared diameter inside bark between the startand the end of a 10-year growth period....

  13. A prediction model for Atlantic named storm frequency using a year-by-year increment approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, K.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a year-by-year incremental approach to forecasting the Atlantic named storm frequency (ATSF) for the hurricane season (June 1- November 30). The year-by-year increase or decrease in the ATSF is first forecasted to yield a net ATSF prediction. Six key predictors for the year-by-year increment in the number of Atlantic named tropical storms have been identified that are available before May 1. The forecast model for the year-by-year increment of the ATSF is first established using a multi-linear regression method based on data taken from the years of 1965-1999, and the forecast model of the ATSF is then derived. The prediction model for the ATSF shows good prediction skill. Compared to the climatological average mean absolute error (MAE) of 4.1, the percentage improvement in the MAE is 29 % for the hindcast period of 2004-2009 and 46 % for the cross-validation test from 1985-2009 (26 yrs). This work demonstrates that the year-by-year incremental approach has the potential to improve operational forecasting skill for the ATSF.

  14. Situation model updating in young and older adults: Global versus incremental mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Heather R; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2015-06-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text. Activity in narrative text is dynamic, so readers must frequently update their situation models when dimensions of the situation change. Updating can be incremental, such that a change leads to updating just the dimension that changed, or global, such that the entire model is updated. Here, we asked whether older and young adults make differential use of incremental and global updating. Participants read narratives containing changes in characters and spatial location and responded to recognition probes throughout the texts. Responses were slower when probes followed a change, suggesting that situation models were updated at changes. When either dimension changed, responses to probes for both dimensions were slowed; this provides evidence for global updating. Moreover, older adults showed stronger evidence of global updating than did young adults. One possibility is that older adults perform more global updating to offset reduced ability to manipulate information in working memory.

  15. Situation Model Updating in Young and Older Adults: Global versus Incremental Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Heather R.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Readers construct mental models of situations described by text. Activity in narrative text is dynamic, so readers must frequently update their situation models when dimensions of the situation change. Updating can be incremental, such that a change leads to updating just the dimension that changed, or global, such that the entire model is updated. Here, we asked whether older and young adults make differential use of incremental and global updating. Participants read narratives containing changes in characters and spatial location and responded to recognition probes throughout the texts. Responses were slower when probes followed a change, suggesting that situation models were updated at changes. When either dimension changed, responses to probes for both dimensions were slowed; this provides evidence for global updating. Moreover, older adults showed stronger evidence of global updating than did young adults. One possibility is that older adults perform more global updating to offset reduced ability to manipulate information in working memory. PMID:25938248

  16. Sensitivity to gaze-contingent contrast increments in naturalistic movies: An exploratory report and model comparison

    PubMed Central

    Wallis, Thomas S. A.; Dorr, Michael; Bex, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitivity to luminance contrast is a prerequisite for all but the simplest visual systems. To examine contrast increment detection performance in a way that approximates the natural environmental input of the human visual system, we presented contrast increments gaze-contingently within naturalistic video freely viewed by observers. A band-limited contrast increment was applied to a local region of the video relative to the observer's current gaze point, and the observer made a forced-choice response to the location of the target (≈25,000 trials across five observers). We present exploratory analyses showing that performance improved as a function of the magnitude of the increment and depended on the direction of eye movements relative to the target location, the timing of eye movements relative to target presentation, and the spatiotemporal image structure at the target location. Contrast discrimination performance can be modeled by assuming that the underlying contrast response is an accelerating nonlinearity (arising from a nonlinear transducer or gain control). We implemented one such model and examined the posterior over model parameters, estimated using Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods. The parameters were poorly constrained by our data; parameters constrained using strong priors taken from previous research showed poor cross-validated prediction performance. Atheoretical logistic regression models were better constrained and provided similar prediction performance to the nonlinear transducer model. Finally, we explored the properties of an extended logistic regression that incorporates both eye movement and image content features. Models of contrast transduction may be better constrained by incorporating data from both artificial and natural contrast perception settings. PMID:26057546

  17. Incremental N-mode SVD for large-scale multilinear generative models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minsik; Choi, Chong-Ho

    2014-10-01

    Tensor decomposition is frequently used in image processing and machine learning for its ability to express higher order characteristics of data. Among tensor decomposition methods, N-mode singular value decomposition (SVD) is widely used owing to its simplicity. However, the data dimension often becomes too large to perform N-mode SVD directly due to memory limitation. An incremental method to N-mode SVD can be used to resolve this issue, but existing approaches only provide a result, which is just enough to solve discriminative problems, not the full factorization result. In this paper, we present a complete derivation of the incremental N-mode SVD, which can be applied to generative models, accompanied by a technique that can reduce the computational cost by reordering calculations. The proposed incremental N-mode SVD can also be used effectively to update the current result of N-mode SVD when new training data is received. The proposed method provides a very good approximation of N -mode SVD for the experimental data, and requires much less computation in updating a multilinear model.

  18. A Model Based Approach to Increase the Part Accuracy in Robot Based Incremental Sheet Metal Forming

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Horst; Laurischkat, Roman; Zhu Junhong

    2011-01-17

    One main influence on the dimensional accuracy in robot based incremental sheet metal forming results from the compliance of the involved robot structures. Compared to conventional machine tools the low stiffness of the robot's kinematic results in a significant deviation of the planned tool path and therefore in a shape of insufficient quality. To predict and compensate these deviations offline, a model based approach, consisting of a finite element approach, to simulate the sheet forming, and a multi body system, modeling the compliant robot structure, has been developed. This paper describes the implementation and experimental verification of the multi body system model and its included compensation method.

  19. Incremental Refinement of FAÇADE Models with Attribute Grammar from 3d Point Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehbi, Y.; Staat, C.; Mandtler, L.; Pl¨umer, L.

    2016-06-01

    Data acquisition using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has gotten more and more attention over the last years. Especially in the field of building reconstruction the incremental interpretation of such data is a demanding task. In this context formal grammars play an important role for the top-down identification and reconstruction of building objects. Up to now, the available approaches expect offline data in order to parse an a-priori known grammar. For mapping on demand an on the fly reconstruction based on UAV data is required. An incremental interpretation of the data stream is inevitable. This paper presents an incremental parser of grammar rules for an automatic 3D building reconstruction. The parser enables a model refinement based on new observations with respect to a weighted attribute context-free grammar (WACFG). The falsification or rejection of hypotheses is supported as well. The parser can deal with and adapt available parse trees acquired from previous interpretations or predictions. Parse trees derived so far are updated in an iterative way using transformation rules. A diagnostic step searches for mismatches between current and new nodes. Prior knowledge on façades is incorporated. It is given by probability densities as well as architectural patterns. Since we cannot always assume normal distributions, the derivation of location and shape parameters of building objects is based on a kernel density estimation (KDE). While the level of detail is continuously improved, the geometrical, semantic and topological consistency is ensured.

  20. Developing risk prediction models for kidney injury and assessing incremental value for novel biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Kathleen F; Meisner, Allison; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Coca, Steven G; Parikh, Chirag R

    2014-08-07

    The field of nephrology is actively involved in developing biomarkers and improving models for predicting patients' risks of AKI and CKD and their outcomes. However, some important aspects of evaluating biomarkers and risk models are not widely appreciated, and statistical methods are still evolving. This review describes some of the most important statistical concepts for this area of research and identifies common pitfalls. Particular attention is paid to metrics proposed within the last 5 years for quantifying the incremental predictive value of a new biomarker. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  1. Developing Risk Prediction Models for Kidney Injury and Assessing Incremental Value for Novel Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Kathleen F.; Meisner, Allison; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Coca, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The field of nephrology is actively involved in developing biomarkers and improving models for predicting patients’ risks of AKI and CKD and their outcomes. However, some important aspects of evaluating biomarkers and risk models are not widely appreciated, and statistical methods are still evolving. This review describes some of the most important statistical concepts for this area of research and identifies common pitfalls. Particular attention is paid to metrics proposed within the last 5 years for quantifying the incremental predictive value of a new biomarker. PMID:24855282

  2. Incremental checking of Master Data Management model based on contextual graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamolle, Myriam; Menet, Ludovic; Le Duc, Chan

    2015-10-01

    The validation of models is a crucial step in distributed heterogeneous systems. In this paper, an incremental validation method is proposed in the scope of a Model Driven Engineering (MDE) approach, which is used to develop a Master Data Management (MDM) field represented by XML Schema models. The MDE approach presented in this paper is based on the definition of an abstraction layer using UML class diagrams. The validation method aims to minimise the model errors and to optimisethe process of model checking. Therefore, the notion of validation contexts is introduced allowing the verification of data model views. Description logics specify constraints that the models have to check. An experimentation of the approach is presented through an application developed in ArgoUML IDE.

  3. A Viscoplastic Material Model Based on Overstress for the Simulation of Incremental Sheet Forming of Thermoplastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonan, S. Alkas; Haupt, P.; Kwiatkowski, L.; Franzen, V.; Brosius, A.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2011-05-01

    This article introduces a phenomenological material model developed for simulation of viscoplastic behavior of thermoplastics during cold forming. The model presented has no yield surface and is based on the existence of an equilibrium stress and a non-linear strain-rate dependent overstress. Within the first approach the hardening and softening are neglected. The results of specific material characterization tests on three thermoplastics (HDPE, PVC and PC) and the model response in comparison to the experiments are presented. A good accordance between model predictions and experimental results for HDPE and sufficient match for PVC and PC are observed. It is intended to apply the constitutive model to the simulation of incremental sheet forming processes (ISF).

  4. Is incremental hemodialysis ready to return on the scene? From empiricism to kinetic modelling.

    PubMed

    Basile, Carlo; Casino, Francesco Gaetano; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar

    2017-08-01

    Most people who make the transition to maintenance dialysis therapy are treated with a fixed dose thrice-weekly hemodialysis regimen without considering their residual kidney function (RKF). The RKF provides effective and naturally continuous clearance of both small and middle molecules, plays a major role in metabolic homeostasis, nutritional status, and cardiovascular health, and aids in fluid management. The RKF is associated with better patient survival and greater health-related quality of life, although these effects may be confounded by patient comorbidities. Preservation of the RKF requires a careful approach, including regular monitoring, avoidance of nephrotoxins, gentle control of blood pressure to avoid intradialytic hypotension, and an individualized dialysis prescription including the consideration of incremental hemodialysis. There is currently no standardized method for applying incremental hemodialysis in practice. Infrequent (once- to twice-weekly) hemodialysis regimens are often used arbitrarily, without knowing which patients would benefit the most from them or how to escalate the dialysis dose as RKF declines over time. The recently heightened interest in incremental hemodialysis has been hindered by the current limitations of the urea kinetic models (UKM) which tend to overestimate the dialysis dose required in the presence of substantial RKF. This is due to an erroneous extrapolation of the equivalence between renal urea clearance (Kru) and dialyser urea clearance (Kd), correctly assumed by the UKM, to the clinical domain. In this context, each ml/min of Kd clears the urea from the blood just as 1 ml/min of Kru does. By no means should such kinetic equivalence imply that 1 ml/min of Kd is clinically equivalent to 1 ml/min of urea clearance provided by the native kidneys. A recent paper by Casino and Basile suggested a variable target model (VTM) as opposed to the fixed model, because the VTM gives more clinical weight to the RKF and allows

  5. Impact of Incremental Perfusion Loss on Oxygen Transport in a Capillary Network Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Graham M; Sharpe, Michael D; Goldman, Daniel; Ellis, Christopher G

    2015-07-01

    To quantify how incremental capillary PL, such as that seen in experimental models of sepsis, affects tissue oxygenation using a computation model of oxygen transport. A computational model was applied to capillary networks with dimensions 84 × 168 × 342 (NI) and 70 × 157 × 268 (NII) μm, reconstructed in vivo from rat skeletal muscle. FCD loss was applied incrementally up to ~40% and combined with high tissue oxygen consumption to simulate severe sepsis. A loss of ~40% FCD loss decreased median tissue PO2 to 22.9 and 20.1 mmHg in NI and NII compared to 28.1 and 27.5 mmHg under resting conditions. Increasing RBC SR to baseline levels returned tissue PO2 to within 5% of baseline. HC combined with a 40% FCD loss, resulted in tissue anoxia in both network volumes and median tissue PO2 of 11.5 and 8.9 mmHg in NI and NII respectively; median tissue PO2 was recovered to baseline levels by increasing total SR 3-4 fold. These results suggest a substantial increase in total SR is required in order to compensate for impaired oxygen delivery as a result of loss of capillary perfusion and increased oxygen consumption during sepsis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Stochastic Modeling Of Biochemical Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    chemical reactions. Often for these reactions, the dynamics of the first M-order statistical moments of the species populations do not form a closed...results a stochastic model for gene expression is investigated. We show that in gene expression mechanisms , in which a protein inhibits its own...chemical reactions [7, 8, 4, 9, 10]. Since one is often interested in only the first and second order statistical moments for the number of molecules of

  7. Reduction of chemical reaction models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    An attempt is made to reconcile the different terminologies pertaining to reduction of chemical reaction models. The approaches considered include global modeling, response modeling, detailed reduction, chemical lumping, and statistical lumping. The advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods are pointed out.

  8. Evaluation of an Incremental Ventilation Energy Model for Estimating Impacts of Air Sealing and Mechanical Ventilation

    SciTech Connect

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Turner, Willliam JN; Walker, Iain S.; Singer, Brett C.

    2012-07-01

    Changing the rate of airflow through a home affects the annual thermal conditioning energy. Large-scale changes to airflow rates of the housing stock can significantly alter the energy consumption of the residential energy sector. However, the complexity of existing residential energy models hampers the ability to estimate the impact of policy changes on a state or nationwide level. The Incremental Ventilation Energy (IVE) model developed in this study was designed to combine the output of simple airflow models and a limited set of home characteristics to estimate the associated change in energy demand of homes. The IVE model was designed specifically to enable modelers to use existing databases of home characteristics to determine the impact of policy on ventilation at a population scale. In this report, we describe the IVE model and demonstrate that its estimates of energy change are comparable to the estimates of a wellvalidated, complex residential energy model when applied to homes with limited parameterization. Homes with extensive parameterization would be more accurately characterized by complex residential energy models. The demonstration included a range of home types, climates, and ventilation systems that cover a large fraction of the residential housing sector.

  9. Propulsive Reaction Control System Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul; Phan, Linh H.; Serricchio, Frederick; San Martin, Alejandro M.

    2011-01-01

    This software models a propulsive reaction control system (RCS) for guidance, navigation, and control simulation purposes. The model includes the drive electronics, the electromechanical valve dynamics, the combustion dynamics, and thrust. This innovation follows the Mars Science Laboratory entry reaction control system design, and has been created to meet the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) entry, descent, and landing simulation needs. It has been built to be plug-and-play on multiple MSL testbeds [analysis, Monte Carlo, flight software development, hardware-in-the-loop, and ATLO (assembly, test and launch operations) testbeds]. This RCS model is a C language program. It contains two main functions: the RCS electronics model function that models the RCS FPGA (field-programmable-gate-array) processing and commanding of the RCS valve, and the RCS dynamic model function that models the valve and combustion dynamics. In addition, this software provides support functions to initialize the model states, set parameters, access model telemetry, and access calculated thruster forces.

  10. Impulse processing: A dynamical systems model of incremental eye movements in the visual world paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Kukona, Anuenue; Tabor, Whitney

    2011-01-01

    The visual world paradigm presents listeners with a challenging problem: they must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a dynamical landscape of attractors corresponding to the potential eye-movement behaviors of the system. We test three unique predictions of our approach in an empirical study in the visual world paradigm, and describe an implementation in an artificial neural network. We discuss the Impulse Processing framework in relation to other models of the visual world paradigm. PMID:21609355

  11. Assessment of synthetic winds through spectral modelling, rainflow count analysis and statistics of increments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Hans Georg; Chougule, Abhijit

    2016-04-01

    While wind energy industry growing rapidly and siting of wind turbines onshore as well as offshore is increasing, many wind engineering model tools have been developed for the assessment of loads on wind turbines due to varying wind speeds. In order to have proper wind turbine design and performance analysis, it is important to have an accurate representation of the incoming wind field. To ease the analysis, tools for the generation of synthetic wind fields have been developed, e.g the widely used TurbSim procedure. We analyse respective synthetic data sets on one hand in view of the similarity of the spectral characteristics of measured and synthetic sets. In addition, second order characteristics with direct relevance to load assessment as given by the statistics of increments and rainflow count results are inspected.

  12. Impulse processing: a dynamical systems model of incremental eye movements in the visual world paradigm.

    PubMed

    Kukona, Anuenue; Tabor, Whitney

    2011-08-01

    The Visual World Paradigm (VWP) presents listeners with a challenging problem: They must integrate two disparate signals, the spoken language and the visual context, in support of action (e.g., complex movements of the eyes across a scene). We present Impulse Processing, a dynamical systems approach to incremental eye movements in the visual world that suggests a framework for integrating language, vision, and action generally. Our approach assumes that impulses driven by the language and the visual context impinge minutely on a dynamical landscape of attractors corresponding to the potential eye-movement behaviors of the system. We test three unique predictions of our approach in an empirical study in the VWP, and describe an implementation in an artificial neural network. We discuss the Impulse Processing framework in relation to other models of the VWP.

  13. Modeling the incremental cost and water conversion functions for hydro-thermal coordination studies

    SciTech Connect

    El-Hawary, M.E.; Mbamalu, G.A.N. )

    1991-01-01

    The solution of an optimization problem using variational means relies on Lagrange multiplier functions, called the adjoint variables to augment the physical constraints to the cost function. The multipliers usually have en economic interpretation, and in the optimal economic operation of an electric power system, one set of multipliers signifies the incremental cost of power delivered at a bus, and the other set relates to the water worth at a given reservoir. The solution of the optimization problem involves iterative techniques to obtain the optimal strategy in terms of power generations and water releases, as well as the adjoint variables. Good initial estimates are of paramount importance to a successful implementation of any iteration scheme specially those that are Newton based. There is an observed pattern of dependence of the adjoint variables and the system state as described by power demands and water availability. Finding such relationships is useful for generation planning activities as well as in providing initial guesses in the numerical solution of the problem. This paper proposes statistical models for predicting the incremental cost function {lambda} and the water conversion factor {nu} usually encountered in the hydro-thermal power system optimization problem. The method treats the active power demand and the volume of water available as the independent variables. The Least squares and the iteratively reweighted Least squares procedures are used to estimate model parameters. The approach treats the power system as a variable head hydro-thermal system, Kron's loss formula is used to characterize the system performance and losses. Results for an example using a 4 plant network are presented in order to demonstrate the applicability of this approach.

  14. Dynamical model of surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Aritomo, Y.; Chiba, S.; Nishio, K.

    2011-08-15

    A new dynamical model is developed to describe the whole process of surrogate reactions: Transfer of several nucleons at an initial stage, thermal equilibration of residues leading to washing out of shell effects, and decay of populated compound nuclei are treated in a unified framework. Multidimensional Langevin equations are employed to describe time evolution of collective coordinates with a time-dependent potential energy surface corresponding to different stages of surrogate reactions. The new model is capable of calculating spin distributions of the compound nuclei, one of the most important quantities in the surrogate technique. Furthermore, various observables of surrogate reactions can be calculated, for example, energy and angular distribution of ejectile and mass distributions of fission fragments. These features are important to assess validity of the proposed model itself, to understand mechanisms of the surrogate reactions, and to determine unknown parameters of the model. It is found that spin distributions of compound nuclei produced in {sup 18}O+{sup 238}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 240}*U and {sup 18}O+{sup 236}U{yields}{sup 16}O+{sup 238}*U reactions are equivalent and much less than 10({h_bar}/2{pi}) and therefore satisfy conditions proposed by Chiba and Iwamoto [Phys. Rev. C 81, 044604 (2010)] if they are used as a pair in the surrogate ratio method.

  15. An incrementally non-linear model for clays with directional stiffness and a small strain emphasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Xuxin

    In response to construction activities and loads from permanent structures, soil generally is subjected to a variety of loading modes varying both in time and location. It also has been increasingly appreciated that the strains around well-designed foundations, excavations and tunnels are mostly small, with soil responses at this strain level generally being non-linear and anisotropic. To make accurate prediction of the performance of a geo-system, it is highly desirable to understand soil behavior at small strains along multiple loading directions, and accordingly to incorporate these responses in an appropriate constitutive model implemented in a finite element analysis. This dissertation presents a model based on a series of stress probe tests with small strain measurements performed on compressible Chicago glacial clays. The proposed model is formulated in an original constitutive framework, in which the tangent stiffness matrix is constructed in accordance with the mechanical nature of frictional materials and the tangent moduli therein are described explicitly. The stiffness description includes evolution relations with regard to length of stress path, and directionality relations in terms of stress path direction. The former relations provide distinctive definitions for small-strain and large-strain behaviors, and distinguish soil responses in shearing and compression. The latter relations make this model incrementally non-linear and thus capable of modeling inelastic behavior. A new algorithm based on a classical substepping scheme is developed to numerically integrate this model. A consistent tangent matrix is derived for the proposed model with the upgraded substepping scheme. The code is written in FORTRAN and implemented in FEM via UMAT of ABAQUS. The model is exercised in a variety of applications ranging from oedometer, triaxial and biaxial test simulations to a C-class prediction for a well-instrumented excavation. The computed results indicate that

  16. The evolution of sensitive periods in a model of incremental development

    PubMed Central

    Panchanathan, Karthik; Frankenhuis, Willem E.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive periods, in which experience shapes phenotypic development to a larger extent than other periods, are widespread in nature. Despite a recent focus on neural–physiological explanation, few formal models have examined the evolutionary selection pressures that result in developmental mechanisms that produce sensitive periods. Here, we present such a model. We model development as a specialization process during which individuals incrementally adapt to local environmental conditions, while receiving a constant stream of cost-free, imperfect cues to the environmental state. We compute optimal developmental programmes across a range of ecological conditions and use these programmes to simulate developmental trajectories and obtain distributions of mature phenotypes. We highlight four main results. First, matching the empirical record, sensitive periods often result from experience or from a combination of age and experience, but rarely from age alone. Second, individual differences in sensitive periods emerge as a result of stochasticity in cues: individuals who obtain more consistent cue sets lose their plasticity at faster rates. Third, in some cases, experience shapes phenotypes only at a later life stage (lagged effects). Fourth, individuals might perseverate along developmental trajectories despite accumulating evidence suggesting the alternate trajectory is more likely to match the ecology. PMID:26817766

  17. The Crucial Role of Error Correlation for Uncertainty Modeling of CFD-Based Aerodynamics Increments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemsch, Michael J.; Walker, Eric L.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I ascent aerodynamics database for Design Cycle 3 (DAC-3) was built from wind-tunnel test results and CFD solutions. The wind tunnel results were used to build the baseline response surfaces for wind-tunnel Reynolds numbers at power-off conditions. The CFD solutions were used to build increments to account for Reynolds number effects. We calculate the validation errors for the primary CFD code results at wind tunnel Reynolds number power-off conditions and would like to be able to use those errors to predict the validation errors for the CFD increments. However, the validation errors are large compared to the increments. We suggest a way forward that is consistent with common practice in wind tunnel testing which is to assume that systematic errors in the measurement process and/or the environment will subtract out when increments are calculated, thus making increments more reliable with smaller uncertainty than absolute values of the aerodynamic coefficients. A similar practice has arisen for the use of CFD to generate aerodynamic database increments. The basis of this practice is the assumption of strong correlation of the systematic errors inherent in each of the results used to generate an increment. The assumption of strong correlation is the inferential link between the observed validation uncertainties at wind-tunnel Reynolds numbers and the uncertainties to be predicted for flight. In this paper, we suggest a way to estimate the correlation coefficient and demonstrate the approach using code-to-code differences that were obtained for quality control purposes during the Ares I CFD campaign. Finally, since we can expect the increments to be relatively small compared to the baseline response surface and to be typically of the order of the baseline uncertainty, we find that it is necessary to be able to show that the correlation coefficients are close to unity to avoid overinflating the overall database uncertainty with the addition of the increments.

  18. Methods for quasi-linear viscoelastic modeling of soft tissue: application to incremental stress-relaxation experiments.

    PubMed

    Sarver, Joseph J; Robinson, Paul S; Elliott, Dawn M

    2003-10-01

    The quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) model was applied to incremental stress-relaxation tests and an expression for the stress was derived for each step. This expression was used to compare two methods for normalizing stress data prior to estimating QLV parameters. The first and commonly used normalization method was shown to be strain-dependent. Thus, a second normalization method was proposed and shown to be strain-independent and more sensitive to QLV time constants. These analytical results agreed with representative tendon data. Therefore, this method for normalizing stress data was proposed for future studies of incremental stress-relaxation, or whenever comparing stress-relaxation at different strains.

  19. 78 FR 29157 - Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use, in Making Incremental Dental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Digital Models, Digital Data, and Treatment Plans for Use, in Making Incremental Dental Positioning Adjustment Appliances Made Therefrom, and Methods of Making the Same Investigation No. 337- TA-833...

  20. Detection of Bird Nests during Mechanical Weeding by Incremental Background Modeling and Visual Saliency

    PubMed Central

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Green, Ole; Karstoft, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical weeding is an important tool in organic farming. However, the use of mechanical weeding in conventional agriculture is increasing, due to public demands to lower the use of pesticides and an increased number of pesticide-resistant weeds. Ground nesting birds are highly susceptible to farming operations, like mechanical weeding, which may destroy the nests and reduce the survival of chicks and incubating females. This problem has limited focus within agricultural engineering. However, when the number of machines increases, destruction of nests will have an impact on various species. It is therefore necessary to explore and develop new technology in order to avoid these negative ethical consequences. This paper presents a vision-based approach to automated ground nest detection. The algorithm is based on the fusion of visual saliency, which mimics human attention, and incremental background modeling, which enables foreground detection with moving cameras. The algorithm achieves a good detection rate, as it detects 28 of 30 nests at an average distance of 3.8 m, with a true positive rate of 0.75. PMID:25738766

  1. Detection of bird nests during mechanical weeding by incremental background modeling and visual saliency.

    PubMed

    Steen, Kim Arild; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Green, Ole; Karstoft, Henrik

    2015-03-02

    Mechanical weeding is an important tool in organic farming. However, the use of mechanical weeding in conventional agriculture is increasing, due to public demands to lower the use of pesticides and an increased number of pesticide-resistant weeds. Ground nesting birds are highly susceptible to farming operations, like mechanical weeding, which may destroy the nests and reduce the survival of chicks and incubating females. This problem has limited focus within agricultural engineering. However, when the number of machines increases, destruction of nests will have an impact on various species. It is therefore necessary to explore and develop new technology in order to avoid these negative ethical consequences. This paper presents a vision-based approach to automated ground nest detection. The algorithm is based on the fusion of visual saliency, which mimics human attention, and incremental background modeling, which enables foreground detection with moving cameras. The algorithm achieves a good detection rate, as it detects 28 of 30 nests at an average distance of 3.8 m, with a true positive rate of 0.75.

  2. Comparison of heart and respiratory rate variability measures using an intermittent incremental submaximal exercise model.

    PubMed

    Barrera-Ramirez, Juliana; Bravi, Andrea; Green, Geoffrey; Seely, Andrew J; Kenny, Glen P

    2013-11-01

    To better understand the alterations in cardiorespiratory variability during exercise, the present study characterized the patterns of change in heart rate variability (HRV), respiratory rate variability (RRV), and combined cardiorespiratory variability (HRV-RRV) during an intermittent incremental submaximal exercise model. Six males and six females completed a submaximal exercise protocol consisting of an initial baseline resting period followed by three 10-min bouts of exercise at 20%, 40%, and 60% of maximal aerobic capacity (V̇O2max). The R-R interval and interbreath interval variability were measured at baseline rest and throughout the submaximal exercise. A group of 93 HRV, 83 RRV, and 28 HRV-RRV measures of variability were tracked over time through a windowed analysis using a 5-min window size and 30-s window step. A total of 91 HRV measures were able to detect the presence of exercise, whereas only 46 RRV and 3 HRV-RRV measures were able to detect the same stimulus. Moreover, there was a loss of overall HRV and RRV, loss of complexity of HRV and RRV, and loss of parasympathetic modulation of HRV (up to 40% V̇O2max) with exercise. Conflicting changes in scale-invariant structure of HRV and RRV with increases in exercise intensity were also observed. In summary, in this simultaneous evaluation of HRV and RRV, we found more consistent changes across HRV metrics compared with RRV and HRV-RRV.

  3. Incremental Change or Initial Differences? Testing Two Models of Marital Deterioration

    PubMed Central

    Lavner, Justin A.; Bradbury, Thomas N.; Karney, Benjamin R.

    2012-01-01

    Most couples begin marriage intent on maintaining a fulfilling relationship, but some newlyweds soon struggle while others continue to experience high levels of satisfaction. Do these diverse outcomes result from an incremental process that unfolds over time, as prevailing models suggest, or are they a manifestation of initial differences that are largely evident at the start of the marriage? Using eight waves of data collected over the first 4 years of marriage (N = 502 spouses, or 251 newlywed marriages), we tested these competing perspectives first by identifying three qualitatively distinct relationship satisfaction trajectory groups and then by determining the extent to which spouses in these groups were differentiated on the basis of (a) initial scores and (b) 4-year changes in a set of established predictor variables, including relationship problems, aggression, attributions, stress, and self-esteem. The majority of spouses exhibited high, stable satisfaction over the first four years of marriage, whereas declining satisfaction was isolating among couples with relatively low initial satisfaction. Across all predictor variables, initial values afforded stronger discrimination of outcome groups than did rates of change in these variables. Thus, readily-measured initial differences are potent antecedents of relationship deterioration, and studies are now needed to clarify the specific ways in which initial indices of risk come to influence changes in spouses’ judgments of relationship satisfaction. PMID:22709260

  4. Modelling Students' Visualisation of Chemical Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Maurice M. W.; Gilbert, John K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a model-based notion of "submicro representations of chemical reactions". Based on three structural models of matter (the simple particle model, the atomic model and the free electron model of metals), we suggest there are two major models of reaction in school chemistry curricula: (a) reactions that are simple…

  5. The variable target model: a paradigm shift in the incremental haemodialysis prescription.

    PubMed

    Casino, Francesco Gaetano; Basile, Carlo

    2017-01-01

    The recent interest in incremental haemodialysis (HD) is hindered by the current prescription based on a fixed target model (FTM) for the total (dialytic + renal) equivalent continuous clearance (ECC). The latter is expressed either as standard Kt/V (stdKt/V), i.e. the pre-dialysis averaged concentration of urea-based ECC, or EKRc, i.e. the time averaged concentration-based ECC, corrected for volume (V) = 40 L. Accordingly, there are two different targets: stdKt/V = 2.3 volumes per week (v/wk) and EKRc = 13 mL/min/40 L. However, fixing the total ECC necessarily implies perfect equivalence of its components-the residual renal urea clearance (Kru) and dialysis clearance (Kd). This assumption is wrong because Kru has much greater clinical weight than Kd. Here we propose that the ECC target varies as an inverse function of Kru, from a maximum value in anuria to a minimum value at Kru levels not yet requiring dialysis. The aim of the present study was to compare the current FTM with the proposed variable target model (VTM). The double pool urea kinetic model was used to model dialysis sessions for 360 virtual patients and establish equations predicting the ECC as a function of Kd, Kru and the number of sessions per week. An end-dialysis urea distribution V of 35 L (corresponding to a body surface area of 1.73 m 2 ) was used, so that the current EKRc target of 13 mL/min/40 L could be recalculated at an EKRc 35 value of 12 mL/min/35 L equal to 12 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . The latter also coincides with the maximum value of the EKRc 35 variable target in anuria. The minimum target value of EKRc 35 was assumed to coincide with Kru corrected for V = 35 L (i.e. Krc 35 = 6 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ). The corresponding target for stdKt/V was assumed to vary from 2.3 v/wk at Krc 35 = 0 to 1.7 v/wk at Krc 35 = 6 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . On this basis, the variable target values can be obtained from the following linear equations: target EKRc 35 = 12 - Krc 35 ; target stdKt/V = 2.3 - 0.1 × Krc 35 . Two

  6. Modeling the complex bromate-iodine reaction.

    PubMed

    Machado, Priscilla B; Faria, Roberto B

    2009-05-07

    In this article, it is shown that the FLEK model (ref 5 ) is able to model the experimental results of the bromate-iodine clock reaction. Five different complex chemical systems, the bromate-iodide clock and oscillating reactions, the bromite-iodide clock and oscillating reactions, and now the bromate-iodine clock reaction are adequately accounted for by the FLEK model.

  7. Incremental expansions for the ground-state energy of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect

    Malek, J.; Flach, S.; Kladko, K.

    1999-02-01

    A generalization of Faddeev{close_quote}s approach of the three-body problem to the many-body problem leads to the method of increments. This method was recently applied to account for the ground-state properties of Hubbard-Peierls chains [J. Malek, K. Kladko, and S. Flach, JETP Lett. {bold 67}, 1052 (1998)]. Here we generalize this approach to two-dimensional square lattices and explicitly treat the incremental expansion up to third order. Comparing our numerical results with various other approaches (Monte Carlo, cumulant approaches) we show that incremental expansions are very efficient because good accuracy with these approaches is achieved treating lattice segments composed of eight sites only. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Numerical modelling of hydration reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; John, Timm

    2017-04-01

    Mineral reactions are generally accompanied by volume changes. Observations in rocks and thin section indicate that this often occurred by replacement reactions involving a fluid phase. Frequently, the volume of the original rock or mineral seems to be conserved. If the density of the solid reaction products is higher than the reactants, the associated solid volume decrease generates space for a fluid phase. In other words, porosity is created. The opposite is true for an increase in solid volume during reaction, which leads to a porosity reduction. This slows down and may even stop the reaction if it needs fluid as a reactant. Understanding the progress of reactions and their rates is important because reaction generally changes geophysical and rock mechanical properties which will therefore affect geodynamical processes and seismic properties. We studied the case of hydration of eclogite to blueschist in a subduction zone setting. Eclogitized pillow basalt structures from the Tian-Shan orogeny are transformed to blueschist on the rims of the pillow (van der Straaten et al., 2008). Fluid pathways existed between the pillow structures. The preferred hypothesis of blueschist formation is to supply the fluid for hydration from the pillow margins progressing inward. Using numerical modelling we simulate this coupled reaction-diffusion process. Porosity and fluid pressure evolution are coupled to local thermodynamic equilibrium and density changes. The first rim of blueschist that forms around the eclogite pillow increases volume to such a degree that the system is clogged and the reaction stops. Nevertheless, the field evidence suggests the blueschist formation continued. To prevent the system from clogging, a high incoming pore fluid pressure on the pillow boundaries is needed along with removal of mass from the system to accommodate the volume changes. The only other possibility is to form blueschist from any remaining fluid stored in the core of the pillow

  9. Linking impulse response functions to reaction time: Rod and cone reaction time data and a computational model

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Dingcai; Zele, Andrew J.; Pokorny, Joel

    2007-01-01

    Reaction times for incremental and decremental stimuli were measured at five suprathreshold contrasts for six retinal illuminance levels where rods alone (0.002–0.2 Trolands), rods and cones (2–20 Trolands) or cones alone (200 Trolands) mediated detection. A 4-primary photostimulator allowed independent control of rod or cone excitations. This is the first report of reaction times to isolated rod or cone stimuli at mesopic light levels under the same adaptation conditions. The main findings are: 1) For rods, responses to decrements were faster than increments, but cone reaction times were closely similar. 2) At light levels where both systems were functional, rod reaction times were ~20 ms longer. The data were fitted with a computational model that incorporates rod and cone impulse response functions and a stimulus-dependent neural sensory component that triggers a motor response. Rod and cone impulse response functions were derived from published psychophysical two-pulse threshold data and temporal modulation transfer functions. The model fits were accomplished with a limited number of free parameters: two global parameters to estimate the irreducible minimum reaction time for each receptor type, and one local parameter for each reaction time versus contrast function. This is the first model to provide a neural basis for the variation in reaction time with retinal illuminance, stimulus contrast, stimulus polarity, and receptor class modulated. PMID:17346763

  10. Modeling individual tree growth by fusing diameter tape and increment core data

    Treesearch

    Erin M. Schliep; Tracy Qi Dong; Alan E. Gelfand; Fan. Li

    2014-01-01

    Tree growth estimation is a challenging task as difficulties associated with data collection and inference often result in inaccurate estimates. Two main methods for tree growth estimation are diameter tape measurements and increment cores. The former involves repeatedly measuring tree diameters with a cloth or metal tape whose scale has been adjusted to give diameter...

  11. Optimizing the Teaching-Learning Process Through a Linear Programming Model--Stage Increment Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belgard, Maria R.; Min, Leo Yoon-Gee

    An operations research method to optimize the teaching-learning process is introduced in this paper. In particular, a linear programing model is proposed which, unlike dynamic or control theory models, allows the computer to react to the responses of a learner in seconds or less. To satisfy the assumptions of linearity, the seemingly complicated…

  12. New Scaling Model for Variables and Increments with Heavy-Tailed Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riva, Monica; Guadagnini, Alberto; Neuman, Shlomo P.

    2015-04-01

    Many earth, environmental, ecological, biological, physical, social, financial and other variables, Y , exhibit (i) asymmetry in sample frequency distributions, as well as (ii) symmetry in distributions of their spatial and/or temporal increments, ΔY , at diverse separation distances (or lags), with sharp peaks and heavy tails which appear to decay asymptotically (often toward exponential tails of the Gaussian distribution) as lag increases. No model known to us captures all of these behaviors in a unique and consistent manner. We propose a new model that does so upon treating Y (x) as a random function of a coordinate x in the Euclidean (spatial) domain or time, forming a stationary random field (or process) with constant ensemble mean (expectation) . We express the zero-mean random fluctuation Y '(x) = Y (x) - in sub-Gaussian form. In the classical sub-Gaussian form, Y '(x) = UG(x), where G(x) is a zero-mean stationary Gaussian random field (or process) and the subordinator U is an independent non-negative random variable (Samorodnitsky and Taqqu, 2014). We generalize this by writing Y '(x) = U(x)G(x) in which U(x) is iid. This enables us to analyze, and synthetically generate, heavy-tailed non-Gaussian distributions of both Y and ΔY in both probability space (across an infinite ensemble of random realizations) and real space (in a single realization). We derive analytical expressions for probability distribution functions (pdf s) of Y and ΔY as well as their lead statistical moments. We show that when U is lognormal Y follows the well-known normal-lognormal distribution (NLN, of which the Gaussian distribution is a particular case) with constant parameters. The NLN pdf has been successfully used to interpret financial (Clark, 1973) and environmental (Guadagnini et al., 2014) data. However, ΔY is not NLN and forcing the latter on the former gives a false and widely accepted impression that (a) parameters of the ΔY pdf vary with lag and (b) the pdfs

  13. Substitution patterns in aromatic rings by increment analysis. Model development and application to natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Perdue, E M; Hertkorn, N; Kettrup, A

    2007-02-01

    The aromatic region of two-dimensional heteronuclear 1H, 13C NMR spectra of natural organic matter and related materials (e.g., 1H and 13C chemical shifts ranging from approximately 5 to 10 and 80 to 140 ppm, respectively) is highly complex and difficult to interpret using conventional approaches. In principle, this region of the NMR spectrum should be amenable to detailed analysis, because the effects of many common substituents on the chemical shifts of aromatic carbon and hydrogen are well documented. This paper describes the development of a model for prediction of substitution patterns in aromatic rings by increment analysis (SPARIA). In the forward mode, SPARIA is used to predict the chemical shifts of 1H and 13C on aromatic moieties containing every possible combination of eight common substituents that are likely to be representative of substituents on aromatic moieties in natural organic matter. The accuracy of SPARIA in the forward mode is evaluated for 29 aromatic compounds (100 peaks) by comparison of predicted chemical shifts for 1H and 13C with experimental values and with predictions of commercially available software for prediction of NMR spectra. The most important development in this paper is the inverse mode that is built into SPARIA. Given chemical shifts for 1H and 13C (such as may be obtained from a two-dimensional, heteronuclear NMR spectrum), the inverse mode of SPARIA calculates all possible combinations of the eight selected substituents that yield chemical shifts within a specified window of chemical shift for both 1H and 13C. Both the distribution of possible substitution patterns and simple descriptive statistics of the distribution are thus obtained. The inverse mode of SPARIA has been tested on the 29 aromatic compounds (100 peaks) that were used to evaluate its forward mode, and the dependence of the inverse process on the size of the chemical shift window has been evaluated. Finally, the inverse mode of SPARIA has been applied to

  14. Modeling Reading Development: Cumulative, Incremental Learning in a Computational Model of Word Naming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Monaghan, Padraic; Ellis, Andrew W.

    2010-01-01

    Natural reading development gradually builds up to the adult vocabulary over a period of years. This has an effect on lexical processing: early-acquired words are processed more quickly and more accurately than later-acquired words. We present a connectionist model of reading, learning to map orthography onto phonology to simulate this natural…

  15. Incremental haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jonathan; Vilar, Enric; Davenport, Andrew; Farrington, Ken

    2015-10-01

    Thrice-weekly haemodialysis schedules have become the standard default haemodialysis prescription worldwide. Whereas the measurement of residual renal function is accepted practice for peritoneal dialysis patients and the importance of residual renal function in determining technique success is well established, few centres routinely assess residual renal function in haemodialysis patients. Although intradialytic hypotension and episodes of acute kidney injury may predispose to an earlier loss of residual renal function, a significant proportion of haemodialysis patients maintain some residual function long after dialysis initiation. As such, an incremental approach to the initiation of dialysis with careful monitoring of residual renal function may potentially provide some haemodialysis patients with an improved quality of life and greater preservation of residual renal function whilst fewer dialysis sessions may reduce health care costs. Prospective trials are required to determine the optimum approach to the initiation of haemodialysis for the oliguric patient. Once residual renal function has been lost, then dialysis prescriptions should be re-examined to consider the use of longer or more frequent treatment sessions and switching from low-flux to high-flux dialysis or haemodiafiltration to offset retention of middle sized molecules and protein-bound azotaemic solutes.

  16. Modeling the Radar Return of Powerlines Using an Incremental Length Diffraction Coefficient Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macdonald, Douglas

    DIRSIG consistently underestimated the scattered return, especially away from specular observation angles. This underestimation was particularly pronounced for the dihedral targets which have a low acceptance angle in elevation, probably caused by the lack of a physical optics capability in DIRSIG. Powerlines were not apparent in the simulated data. For modeling powerlines outside of DIRSIG using a standalone approach, an Incremental Length Diffraction Coefficient (ILDC) method was used. Traditionally, this method is used to model the scattered radiation from the edge of a wedge, for example the edges on the wings of a stealth aircraft. The Physical Theory of Diffraction provides the 2D diffraction coefficient and the ILDC method performs an integral along the edge to extend this solution to three dimensions. This research takes the ILDC approach but instead of using the wedge diffraction coefficient, the exact far-field diffraction coefficient for scattering from a finite length cylinder is used. Wavenumber-diameter products are limited to less than or about 10. For typical powerline diameters, this translates to X-band frequencies and lower. The advantage of this method is it allows exact 2D solutions to be extended to powerline geometries where sag is present and it is shown to be more accurate than a pure physical optics approach for frequencies lower than millimeter wave. The Radar Cross Sections produced by this method were accurate to within the experimental uncertainty of measured RF anechoic chamber data for both X and C-band frequencies across an 80 degree arc for 5 different target types and diameters. For the X-band data, the mean error was 6.0% for data with 9.5% measurement uncertainty. For the C-band data, the mean error was 11.8% for data with 14.3% measurement uncertainty. The best results were obtained for X-band data in the HH polarization channel within a 20 degree arc about normal incidence. For this configuration, a mean error of 3.0% for data with

  17. Individual tree diameter increment model for managed even-aged stands of ponderosa pine throughout the western United States using a multilevel linear mixed effects model

    Treesearch

    Fabian C.C. Uzoh; William W. Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A diameter increment model is developed and evaluated for individual trees of ponderosa pine throughout the species range in the United States using a multilevel linear mixed model. Stochastic variability is broken down among period, locale, plot, tree and within-tree components. Covariates acting at tree and stand level, as breast height diameter, density, site index...

  18. Incremental learning of Bayesian sensorimotor models: from low-level behaviours to large-scale structure of the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diard, Julien; Gilet, Estelle; Simonin, Éva; Bessière, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    This paper concerns the incremental learning of hierarchies of representations of space in artificial or natural cognitive systems. We propose a mathematical formalism for defining space representations (Bayesian Maps) and modelling their interaction in hierarchies of representations (sensorimotor interaction operator). We illustrate our formalism with a robotic experiment. Starting from a model based on the proximity to obstacles, we learn a new one related to the direction of the light source. It provides new behaviours, like phototaxis and photophobia. We then combine these two maps so as to identify parts of the environment where the way the two modalities interact is recognisable. This classification is a basis for learning a higher level of abstraction map that describes the large-scale structure of the environment. In the final model, the perception-action cycle is modelled by a hierarchy of sensorimotor models of increasing time and space scales, which provide navigation strategies of increasing complexities.

  19. Menu modeling with MyPyramid food patterns: incremental dietary changes lead to dramatic improvements in diet quality of menus.

    PubMed

    Hornick, Betsy A; Krester, Alison J; Nicklas, Theresa A

    2008-12-01

    The MyPyramid food guidance system provides recommended food intake patterns for members of each sex at various age and activity levels. These food intake patterns are based on recommendations of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. Actual consumption patterns of American adults compared to MyPyramid recommendations indicate that substantial changes are needed to meet the goals of MyPyramid. One method for encouraging dietary change, known as the small steps approach, involves small, gradual changes to meet a desired endpoint. Menu modeling was used to evaluate the effects of gradual dietary changes on diet quality. Seven days of baseline menus were developed to model the intake of adult women aged 31 to 50 years. Incremental changes were made to each baseline menu to create a series of three transitional menus and a final target menu. Target menus met MyPyramid energy and nutrient intake goals. Diet quality was measured for each baseline, transitional, and target menu using the Healthy Eating Index-2005. The average Healthy Eating Index-2005 score for baseline menus compared to target menus increased by more than 50 points with incremental increases observed for each transitional menu. This analysis demonstrates that small, practical changes in food choices that bring consumers closer to meeting MyPyramid recommendations result in gradual and dramatic improvements in diet quality. Food and nutrition professionals can use menu modeling to provide concrete examples and specific guidance for making progressive changes in food selections to meet current dietary recommendations.

  20. Individual tree height increment model for managed even-aged stands of ponderosa pine throughout the western United States using linear mixed effects models

    Treesearch

    Fabian Uzoh; William W. Oliver

    2006-01-01

    A height increment model is developed and evaluated for individual trees of ponderosa pine throughout the species range in western United States. The data set used in this study came from long-term permanent research plots in even-aged, pure stands both planted and of natural origin. The data base consists of six levels-of-growing stock studies supplemented by initial...

  1. The dark side of incremental learning: A model of cumulative semantic interference during lexical access in speech production

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheim, Gary M.; Dell, Gary S.; Schwartz, Myrna F.

    2010-01-01

    Naming a picture of a dog primes the subsequent naming of a picture of a dog (repetition priming) and interferes with the subsequent naming of a picture of a cat (semantic interference). Behavioral studies suggest that these effects derive from persistent changes in the way that words are activated and selected for production, and some have claimed that the findings are only understandable by positing a competitive mechanism for lexical selection. We present a simple model of lexical retrieval in speech production that applies error-driven learning to its lexical activation network. This model naturally produces repetition priming and semantic interference effects. It predicts the major findings from several published experiments, demonstrating that these effects may arise from incremental learning. Furthermore, analysis of the model suggests that competition during lexical selection is not necessary for semantic interference if the learning process is itself competitive. PMID:19854436

  2. Ductile Fracture Prediction in Rotational Incremental Forming for Magnesium Alloy Sheets Using Combined Kinematic/Isotropic Hardening Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc-Toan; Park, Jin-Gee; Kim, Young-Suk

    2010-08-01

    To predict the ductile fracture of a magnesium alloy sheet when using rotational incremental forming, a combined kinematic and isotropic hardening law is implemented and evaluated from the histories of the ductile fracture value ( I) using a finite element analysis. Here, the criterion for a ductile fracture, as developed by Oyane ( J. Mech. Work. Technol., 1980, vol. 4, pp. 65-81), is applied via a user material based on a finite element analysis. To simulate the effect of the large amount of heat generation at elements in the contact area due to the friction energy of the rotational tool-specimen interface on the equivalent stress-strain evolution in incremental forming, the Johnson-Cook (JC) model was applied and the results compared with equivalent stress-strain curves obtained from tensile tests at elevated temperatures. The finite element (FE) simulation results for a ductile fracture were compared with the experimental results for a (80 mm × 80 mm × 25 mm) square shape with a 45 and 60 deg wall angle, respectively, and a (80 mm × 80 mm × 20 mm) square shape with a 70 deg wall angle. The trends of the FE simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental results. Finally, the effects of the process parameters, i.e., the tool down-step and tool radius, on the ductile fracture value and FLC at fracture (FLCF) were also investigated using the FE simulation results.

  3. Incremental Particle Swarm Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaohua; Pan, Zhoujin; Xi, Yanqiu; Chen, Ling

    By simulating the population size of the human evolution, a PSO algorithm with increment of particle size (IPPSO) was proposed. Without changing the PSO operations, IPPSO can obtain better solutions with less time cost by modifying the structure of traditional PSO. Experimental results show that IPPSO using logistic model is more efficient and requires less computation time than using linear function in solving more complex program problems.

  4. Connectionist and diffusion models of reaction time.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, R; Van Zandt, T; McKoon, G

    1999-04-01

    Two connectionist frameworks, GRAIN (J. L. McClelland, 1993) and brain-state-in-a-box (J. A. Anderson, 1991), and R. Ratcliff's (1978) diffusion model were evaluated using data from a signal detection task. Dependent variables included response probabilities, reaction times for correct and error responses, and shapes of reaction-time distributions. The diffusion model accounted for all aspects of the data, including error reaction times that had previously been a problem for all response-time models. The connectionist models accounted for many aspects of the data adequately, but each failed to a greater or lesser degree in important ways except for one model that was similar to the diffusion model. The findings advance the development of the diffusion model and show that the long tradition of reaction-time research and theory is a fertile domain for development and testing of connectionist assumptions about how decisions are generated over time.

  5. Chemical-reaction model for Mexican wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    We present a chemical-reaction model to describe the Mexican wave ( La Ola) in football stadia. The spectator's action is described in terms of chemical reactions. The model is governed by three reaction rates k 1, k 2, and k3. We study the nonlinear waves on one- and two-dimensional lattices. The Mexican wave is formulated as a clockwise forwardly propagating wave. Waves are growing or disappear, depending on the values of reaction rates. In the specific case of k1= k2= k3=1, the nonlinear-wave equation produces a propagating pulse like soliton.

  6. Incremental Benefits of Screening Colonoscopy over Sigmoidoscopy in Average-risk Populations: a model-driven analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jihyoun; Meza, Rafael; Hazelton, William D.; Renehan, Andrew G.; Luebeck, E. Georg

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Screening colonoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the magnitude and duration of protection, particularly against right-sided cancer, remain uncertain. We computed the incremental benefit of colonoscopy over FSG using a validated mathematical model, which reflects colorectal neoplasia growth characteristics while allowing uncertainty in endoscopic detection and removal of adenomas. Methods We calibrated models of CRC incidence within a multistage clonal expansion framework to data from: (i) San Francisco-Oakland SEER registry (reference population); and (ii) FSG long-term follow up data from 50,757 individuals after a negative FSG in the Kaiser Permanente system. We compared the residual CRC risks after FSG with full-length colonoscopy. Results Our model mirrors trial data with 10-year CRC risk reductions after FSG screening at age 50 years of approximately one third; the optimal age for a ‘once-only’ FSG exam was between ages 50 to 60 years; and the greater benefit was for men compared with women. There were considerable incremental gains in reduction of CRC risk by colonoscopy compared with FSG with the greatest benefit for screening colonoscopy at age 50 years. These results held up against lowering the right-sided adenoma detection sensitivity by 30%, as well as reducing the curative efficacy of polypectomy throughout the colon. Conclusions Mathematical modeling of CRC screening, which takes account of important aspects of tumor biology, demonstrates superior risk reductions by colonoscopy over FSG. Our predictions provide further rationale for recommending screening colonoscopy in average-risk populations before the age of 60. PMID:25783458

  7. Incremental benefits of screening colonoscopy over sigmoidoscopy in average-risk populations: a model-driven analysis.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jihyoun; Meza, Rafael; Hazelton, William D; Renehan, Andrew G; Luebeck, E Georg

    2015-06-01

    Screening colonoscopy and flexible sigmoidoscopy (FSG) reduce the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), but the magnitude and duration of protection, particularly against right-sided cancer, remain uncertain. We computed the incremental benefit of colonoscopy over FSG using a validated mathematical model, which reflects colorectal neoplasia growth characteristics while allowing uncertainty in endoscopic detection and removal of adenomas. We calibrated models of CRC incidence within a multistage clonal expansion framework to data from: (1) San Francisco-Oakland SEER registry (reference population) and (2) FSG long-term follow-up data from 50,757 individuals after a negative FSG in the Kaiser Permanente system. We compared the residual CRC risks after FSG with full-length colonoscopy. Our model mirrors trial data with 10-year CRC risk reductions after FSG screening at age 50 years of approximately one-third; the optimal age for a 'once-only' FSG exam was between ages 50 and 60 years; and the greater benefit was for men compared with women. There were considerable incremental gains in reduction in CRC risk by colonoscopy compared with FSG with the greatest benefit for screening colonoscopy at age 50 years. These results held up against lowering the right-sided adenoma detection sensitivity by 30%, as well as reducing the curative efficacy of polypectomy throughout the colon. Mathematical modeling of CRC screening, which takes account of important aspects of tumor biology, demonstrates superior risk reductions by colonoscopy over FSG. Our predictions provide further rationale for recommending screening colonoscopy in average-risk populations before the age of 60.

  8. Serpentinization reaction pathways: implications for modeling approach

    SciTech Connect

    Janecky, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental seawater-peridotite reaction pathways to form serpentinites at 300/sup 0/C, 500 bars, can be accurately modeled using the EQ3/6 codes in conjunction with thermodynamic and kinetic data from the literature and unpublished compilations. These models provide both confirmation of experimental interpretations and more detailed insight into hydrothermal reaction processes within the oceanic crust. The accuracy of these models depends on careful evaluation of the aqueous speciation model, use of mineral compositions that closely reproduce compositions in the experiments, and definition of realistic reactive components in terms of composition, thermodynamic data, and reaction rates.

  9. A Networks Approach to Modeling Enzymatic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Imhof, P

    2016-01-01

    Modeling enzymatic reactions is a demanding task due to the complexity of the system, the many degrees of freedom involved and the complex, chemical, and conformational transitions associated with the reaction. Consequently, enzymatic reactions are not determined by precisely one reaction pathway. Hence, it is beneficial to obtain a comprehensive picture of possible reaction paths and competing mechanisms. By combining individually generated intermediate states and chemical transition steps a network of such pathways can be constructed. Transition networks are a discretized representation of a potential energy landscape consisting of a multitude of reaction pathways connecting the end states of the reaction. The graph structure of the network allows an easy identification of the energetically most favorable pathways as well as a number of alternative routes.

  10. Model parameter estimation approach based on incremental analysis for lithium-ion batteries without using open circuit voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hongjie; Yuan, Shifei; Zhang, Xi; Yin, Chengliang; Ma, Xuerui

    2015-08-01

    To improve the suitability of lithium-ion battery model under varying scenarios, such as fluctuating temperature and SoC variation, dynamic model with parameters updated realtime should be developed. In this paper, an incremental analysis-based auto regressive exogenous (I-ARX) modeling method is proposed to eliminate the modeling error caused by the OCV effect and improve the accuracy of parameter estimation. Then, its numerical stability, modeling error, and parametric sensitivity are analyzed at different sampling rates (0.02, 0.1, 0.5 and 1 s). To identify the model parameters recursively, a bias-correction recursive least squares (CRLS) algorithm is applied. Finally, the pseudo random binary sequence (PRBS) and urban dynamic driving sequences (UDDSs) profiles are performed to verify the realtime performance and robustness of the newly proposed model and algorithm. Different sampling rates (1 Hz and 10 Hz) and multiple temperature points (5, 25, and 45 °C) are covered in our experiments. The experimental and simulation results indicate that the proposed I-ARX model can present high accuracy and suitability for parameter identification without using open circuit voltage.

  11. A model for astrophysical spallation reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W. F.; Ayres, C. L.; Merker, M.; Shen, B. S. P.

    1974-01-01

    A Monte-Carlo model (RENO) for spallation reactions is described which can treat both the spallations induced by a free nucleon and those induced by a complex nucleus. It differs from other such models in that it employs a discrete-nucleon representation of the nucleus and allows clusters of nucleons to form and to participate in the reaction. The RENO model is particularly suited for spallations involving the relatively light nuclei of astrophysical and cosmic-ray interest.

  12. Modeling of turbulent chemical reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.-Y.

    1995-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on modeling turbulent reacting flows, regimes of turbulent combustion, regimes of premixed and regimes of non-premixed turbulent combustion, chemical closure models, flamelet model, conditional moment closure (CMC), NO(x) emissions from turbulent H2 jet flames, probability density function (PDF), departures from chemical equilibrium, mixing models for PDF methods, comparison of predicted and measured H2O mass fractions in turbulent nonpremixed jet flames, experimental evidence of preferential diffusion in turbulent jet flames, and computation of turbulent reacting flows.

  13. Incremental Testing of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) Modeling System Version 4.7

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the scientific and structural updates to the latest release of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system version 4.7 (v4.7) and points the reader to additional resources for further details. The model updates were evaluated relative to obse...

  14. TRW’s Ada Process Model for Incremental Development of Large Software Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    TRW’s Ada Process Model has proven to be key to the Command Center Processing and Display System-Replacement (CCPDS-R) project’s success to data in...developing over 3000,000 lines of Ada source code executing in a distributed VAX VMS environment. The Ada Process Model is, in simplest terms, a...software progress metrics. This paper provides an overview of the techniques and benefits of the Ada Process Model and describes some of the experience and

  15. A Self-Organizing Incremental Spatiotemporal Associative Memory Networks Model for Problems with Hidden State

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the hidden state is important for solving problems with hidden state. We prove any deterministic partially observable Markov decision processes (POMDP) can be represented by a minimal, looping hidden state transition model and propose a heuristic state transition model constructing algorithm. A new spatiotemporal associative memory network (STAMN) is proposed to realize the minimal, looping hidden state transition model. STAMN utilizes the neuroactivity decay to realize the short-term memory, connection weights between different nodes to represent long-term memory, presynaptic potentials, and synchronized activation mechanism to complete identifying and recalling simultaneously. Finally, we give the empirical illustrations of the STAMN and compare the performance of the STAMN model with that of other methods. PMID:27891146

  16. Calibrating reaction rates for the CREST model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Caroline A.; Christie, Michael A.

    2017-01-01

    The CREST reactive-burn model uses entropy-dependent reaction rates that, until now, have been manually tuned to fit shock-initiation and detonation data in hydrocode simulations. This paper describes the initial development of an automatic method for calibrating CREST reaction-rate coefficients, using particle swarm optimisation. The automatic method is applied to EDC32, to help develop the first CREST model for this conventional high explosive.

  17. Animal models of idiosyncratic drug reactions.

    PubMed

    Ng, Winnie; Lobach, Alexandra R M; Zhu, Xu; Chen, Xin; Liu, Feng; Metushi, Imir G; Sharma, Amy; Li, Jinze; Cai, Ping; Ip, Julia; Novalen, Maria; Popovic, Marija; Zhang, Xiaochu; Tanino, Tadatoshi; Nakagawa, Tetsuya; Li, Yan; Uetrecht, Jack

    2012-01-01

    If we could predict and prevent idiosyncratic drug reactions (IDRs) it would have a profound effect on drug development and therapy. Given our present lack of mechanistic understanding, this goal remains elusive. Hypothesis testing requires valid animal models with characteristics similar to the idiosyncratic reactions that occur in patients. Although it has not been conclusively demonstrated, it appears that almost all IDRs are immune-mediated, and a dominant characteristic is a delay between starting the drug and the onset of the adverse reaction. In contrast, most animal models are acute and therefore involve a different mechanism than idiosyncratic reactions. There are, however, a few animal models such as the nevirapine-induced skin rash in rats that have characteristics very similar to the idiosyncratic reaction that occurs in humans and presumably have a very similar mechanism. These models have allowed testing hypotheses that would be impossible to test in any other way. In addition there are models in which there is a delayed onset of mild hepatic injury that resolves despite continued treatment similar to the "adaptation" reactions that are more common than severe idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity in humans. This probably represents the development of immune tolerance. However, most attempts to develop animal models by stimulating the immune system have been failures. A specific combination of MHC and T cell receptor may be required, but it is likely more complex. Animal studies that determine the requirements for an immune response would provide vital clues about risk factors for IDRs in patients.

  18. Nuclear reaction modeling for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick

    2008-10-01

    We discuss how nuclear reaction theories are utilized in the nuclear energy applications. The neutron-induced compound nuclear reactions, which take place from in the sub-eV energy range up to tens of MeV, are the most important mechanism to analyze the experimental data, to predict unknown reaction cross-sections, to evaluate the nuclear data for databases such as ENDF (Evaluated Nuclear Data File), and (4) to reduce the uncertainties. To improve the predictive-power of nuclear reaction theories in future, further development of compound nuclear reaction theories for fission and radiative capture processes is crucial, since these reaction cross sections are especially important for nuclear technology. An acceptable accuracy of these cross-sections has been achieved only if they were experimentally confirmed. However, the compound reaction theory is getting more important nowadays as many rare nuclides, such as americium, are involved in applications. We outline future challenges of nuclear reaction modeling in the GNASH/McGNASH code, which may yield great improvements in prediction of nuclear reaction cross-sections.

  19. Mixed Integer Programming Model and Incremental Optimization for Delivery and Storage Planning Using Truck Terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Kazutoshi; Tian, Yajie; Nishikawa, Ikuko

    We discuss the planning of transportation by trucks over a multi-day period. Each truck collects loads from suppliers and delivers them to assembly plants or a truck terminal. By exploiting the truck terminal as a temporal storage, we aim to increase the load ratio of each truck and to minimize the lead time for transportation. In this paper, we show a mixed integer programming model which represents each product explicitly, and discuss the decomposition of the problem into a problem of delivery and storage, and a problem of vehicle routing. Based on this model, we propose a relax-and-fix type heuristic in which decision variables are fixed one by one by mathematical programming techniques such as branch-and-bound methods.

  20. Modeling Incremental Initial Active Duty Continuation Probabilities in the Selected Marine Corps Reserve

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    Military Manpower, last modified November 21, 2003, 2, http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/d11451p.pdf. 26 Figure 5. AFQT Score...http://biotech.law.lsu.edu/ blaw /dodd/corres/pdf2/d11451p.pdf. Erhardt, Bruce J. Jr. “Development of a Markov Model for Forecasting Continuation...Technical Information Center Ft. Belvoir, Virginia 2. Dudley Knox Library Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California

  1. Incremental Model-Based Clustering for Large Datasets With Small Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-12-10

    Paulia Flower Image Data These data describe an RGB (3-band) image of a St. Paulia flower shown in Figure 4. There are 46,656 pixels after background...removal. The small yellow flower centers are particularly eyecatching. Figure 4: RGB Image of a St. Paulia flower . There are 46,656 data pixels after...background removal. Note the small yellow flower centers. Results for the model-based clustering strategies on the flower image of Figure 4 are summarized

  2. Effect of elliptical deformation on molecular polarizabilities of model carbon nanotubes from atomic increments.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Francisco

    2003-08-01

    The interacting induced dipole polarization model implemented in our program POLAR is used for the calculation of the dipole-dipole polarizability alpha. The method is tested with single-wall carbon nanotube models as a function of nanotube radius and elliptical deformation. The results for polarizability follow the same trend as reference calculations performed with our version of the program PAPID. For the zigzag tubes, the polarizability is found to follow a remarkably simple law, that is, it varies as the inverse of the radius. A dramatic effect is also found with elliptical deformation. It is found that the polarizability and related properties can be modified continuously and reversibly by the external radial deformation. These results suggest an interesting technology in which mechanical deformation can control chemical properties of the carbon nanotubes. POLAR calculations differentiate more effectively than PAPID computations among single-wall nanotube models with increasing radial deformation. Different effective polarizabilities are calculated for the atoms at the highest and lowest curvature sites. POLAR calculations discriminate more efficiently than PAPID computations between the effective polarizabilities of the highest and lowest curvature sites. This remarkable and significant tunable polarizability can have important implications for metal coverage of metals on nanotubes and selective adsorption and desorption of foreign atoms and molecules on nanotubes and can lead to a wide variety of technological applications, such as catalysts, hydrogen storage, magnetic tubes, etc.

  3. Quasiglobal reaction model for ethylene combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Jachimowski, Casimir J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a reduced mechanism for ethylene oxidation. The authors are interested in a model with a minimum number of species and reactions that still models the chemistry with reasonable accuracy for the expected combustor conditions. The model will be validated by comparing the results to those calculated with a detailed kinetic model that has been validated against the experimental data.

  4. Quasiglobal reaction model for ethylene combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D. J.; Jachimowski, Casimir J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a reduced mechanism for ethylene oxidation. The authors are interested in a model with a minimum number of species and reactions that still models the chemistry with reasonable accuracy for the expected combustor conditions. The model will be validated by comparing the results to those calculated with a detailed kinetic model that has been validated against the experimental data.

  5. QGSM development for spallation reactions modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baznat, M. I.; Chigrinov, S. E.; Gudima, K. K.

    2012-12-01

    The growing interest in spallation neutron sources, accelerator-driven systems, R&D of rare isotope beams, and development of external beam radiation therapy necessitated the improvement of nuclear reaction models for both stand-alone codes for the analysis of nuclear reactions and event generators within the Monte Carlo transport systems for calculations of interactions of high-energy particles with matter in a wide range of energy and in arbitrary 3D geometry of multicomponent targets. The exclusive approach to the description of nuclear reactions is the most effective for detailed calculation of inelastic interactions with atomic nuclei. It provides the correct description of particle production, single- and double-differential spectra, recoil, and fission product yields. This approach has been realized in the Quark Gluon String Model (QGSM) for nuclear reactions induced by photons, hadrons, and high energy heavy ions. In this article, improved versions of the QGSM model and a corresponding code have been developed tested and bench marked against experimental data for neutron production in spallation reactions on thin and thick targets in the energy range from a few MeV to several GeV/nucleon.

  6. Experimental study of incremental hydrocarbon reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Carter, W.P.; Atkinson, R.

    1987-07-01

    A series of environmental chamber experiments have been carried out to investigate the incremental reactivities of selected organics with respect to ozone formation in simulated photochemical smog systems. Varying amounts of a test organic were added to or subtracted from a standard four-hydrocarbon minisurrogate - NO/sub x/ - air mixture to determine, as a function of irradiation time, the resulting changes in the amount of ozone formed and NO consumed, relative to the amount of the organic added. The incremental reactivities of toluene, trans-2-butene, and propene decreased significantly with reaction time, with toluene ultimately becoming negatively reactive; n-butane, ethanol, and tert-butyl methyl ether were always positively reactive; and benzaldehyde was always negatively reactive. The results are reasonably consistent with computer model simulations and indicate that the effect of regulating emissions of an organic on ambient ozone will depend not only on the organics reaction rate but also on its reaction mechanism and the conditions under which it is emitted. 33 references, 8 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Turbulent group reaction model of spray dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, H.K.; Huang, H.S.; Chiu, H.H.

    1987-01-01

    A turbulent group reaction model consisting of several sub-models was developed for the prediction of SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency in spray dryers. Mathematical models are developed on the basis of Eulerian-type turbulent Navier-Stokes equations for both gas and condensed phases with interphase transport considerations. The group reaction number, G, is defined as the ratio of the SO/sub 2/ absorption rate to a reference convective mass flux. This number represents the fraction of SO/sub 2/ absorbed into the lime slurry. The model is incorporated into a computer code which permits the investigation of spray dryer design concepts and operating conditions. Hence, it provides a theoretical basis for spray dryer performance optimization and scale-up. This investigation can be a practical guide to achieve high SO/sub 2/ removal efficiency in a spray dryer.

  8. DSMC modeling of flows with recombination reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimelshein, Sergey; Wysong, Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    An empirical microscopic recombination model is developed for the direct simulation Monte Carlo method that complements the extended weak vibrational bias model of dissociation. The model maintains the correct equilibrium reaction constant in a wide range of temperatures by using the collision theory to enforce the number of recombination events. It also strictly follows the detailed balance requirement for equilibrium gas. The model and its implementation are verified with oxygen and nitrogen heat bath relaxation and compared with available experimental data on atomic oxygen recombination in argon and molecular nitrogen.

  9. Theory and modeling of stereoselective organic reactions.

    PubMed

    Houk, K N; Paddon-Row, M N; Rondan, N G; Wu, Y D; Brown, F K; Spellmeyer, D C; Metz, J T; Li, Y; Loncharich, R J

    1986-03-07

    Theoretical investigations of the transition structures of additions and cycloadditions reveal details about the geometries of bond-forming processes that are not directly accessible by experiment. The conformational analysis of transition states has been developed from theoretical generalizations about the preferred angle of attack by reagents on multiple bonds and predictions of conformations with respect to partially formed bonds. Qualitative rules for the prediction of the stereochemistries of organic reactions have been devised, and semi-empirical computational models have also been developed to predict the stereoselectivities of reactions of large organic molecules, such as nucleophilic additions to carbonyls, electrophilic hydroborations and cycloadditions, and intramolecular radical additions and cycloadditions.

  10. Reaction Wheel Disturbance Model Extraction Software - RWDMES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaurock, Carl

    2009-01-01

    The RWDMES is a tool for modeling the disturbances imparted on spacecraft by spinning reaction wheels. Reaction wheels are usually the largest disturbance source on a precision pointing spacecraft, and can be the dominating source of pointing error. Accurate knowledge of the disturbance environment is critical to accurate prediction of the pointing performance. In the past, it has been difficult to extract an accurate wheel disturbance model since the forcing mechanisms are difficult to model physically, and the forcing amplitudes are filtered by the dynamics of the reaction wheel. RWDMES captures the wheel-induced disturbances using a hybrid physical/empirical model that is extracted directly from measured forcing data. The empirical models capture the tonal forces that occur at harmonics of the spin rate, and the broadband forces that arise from random effects. The empirical forcing functions are filtered by a physical model of the wheel structure that includes spin-rate-dependent moments (gyroscopic terms). The resulting hybrid model creates a highly accurate prediction of wheel-induced forces. It accounts for variation in disturbance frequency, as well as the shifts in structural amplification by the whirl modes, as the spin rate changes. This software provides a point-and-click environment for producing accurate models with minimal user effort. Where conventional approaches may take weeks to produce a model of variable quality, RWDMES can create a demonstrably high accuracy model in two hours. The software consists of a graphical user interface (GUI) that enables the user to specify all analysis parameters, to evaluate analysis results and to iteratively refine the model. Underlying algorithms automatically extract disturbance harmonics, initialize and tune harmonic models, and initialize and tune broadband noise models. The component steps are described in the RWDMES user s guide and include: converting time domain data to waterfall PSDs (power spectral

  11. Theory and Modeling of Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yu-Hong; Grayson, Matthew N; Holland, Mareike C; Simon, Adam; Houk, K N

    2016-04-19

    Modern density functional theory and powerful contemporary computers have made it possible to explore complex reactions of value in organic synthesis. We describe recent explorations of mechanisms and origins of stereoselectivities with density functional theory calculations. The specific functionals and basis sets that are routinely used in computational studies of stereoselectivities of organic and organometallic reactions in our group are described, followed by our recent studies that uncovered the origins of stereocontrol in reactions catalyzed by (1) vicinal diamines, including cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines, (2) vicinal amidophosphines, and (3) organo-transition-metal complexes. Two common cyclic models account for the stereoselectivity of aldol reactions of metal enolates (Zimmerman-Traxler) or those catalyzed by the organocatalyst proline (Houk-List). Three other models were derived from computational studies described in this Account. Cinchona alkaloid-derived primary amines and other vicinal diamines are venerable asymmetric organocatalysts. For α-fluorinations and a variety of aldol reactions, vicinal diamines form enamines at one terminal amine and activate electrophilically with NH(+) or NF(+) at the other. We found that the stereocontrolling transition states are cyclic and that their conformational preferences are responsible for the observed stereoselectivity. In fluorinations, the chair seven-membered cyclic transition states is highly favored, just as the Zimmerman-Traxler chair six-membered aldol transition state controls stereoselectivity. In aldol reactions with vicinal diamine catalysts, the crown transition states are favored, both in the prototype and in an experimental example, shown in the graphic. We found that low-energy conformations of cyclic transition states occur and control stereoselectivities in these reactions. Another class of bifunctional organocatalysts, the vicinal amidophosphines, catalyzes the (3 + 2) annulation

  12. Cortical and trabecular bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model.

    PubMed

    Weatherholt, Alyssa M; Fuchs, Robyn K; Warden, Stuart J

    2013-01-01

    The mouse tibial axial compression loading model has recently been described to allow simultaneous exploration of cortical and trabecular bone adaptation within the same loaded element. However, the model frequently induces cortical woven bone formation and has produced inconsistent results with regards to trabecular bone adaptation. The aim of this study was to investigate bone adaptation to incremental load magnitudes using the mouse tibial axial compression loading model, with the ultimate goal of revealing a load that simultaneously induced lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation. Adult (16 weeks old) female C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into three load magnitude groups (5, 7 and 9N), and had their right tibia axially loaded using a continuous 2-Hz haversine waveform for 360 cycles/day, 3 days/week for 4 consecutive weeks. In vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography was used to longitudinally assess midshaft tibia cortical bone adaptation, while ex vivo micro-computed tomography and histomorphometry were used to assess both midshaft tibia cortical and proximal tibia trabecular bone adaptation. A dose response to loading magnitude was observed within cortical bone, with increasing load magnitude inducing increasing levels of lamellar cortical bone adaptation within the upper two thirds of the tibial diaphysis. Greatest cortical bone adaptation was observed at the midshaft where there was a 42% increase in estimated mechanical properties (polar moment of inertia) in the highest (9N) load group. A dose response to load magnitude was not clearly evident within trabecular bone, with only the highest load (9N) being able to induce measureable adaptation (31% increase in trabecular bone volume fraction at the proximal tibia). The ultimate finding was that a load of 9N (engendering a tensile strain of 1833 με on medial surface of the midshaft tibia) was able to simultaneously induce measurable lamellar cortical and trabecular bone adaptation

  13. Source Apportionment of the Anthropogenic Increment to Ozone, Formaldehyde, and Nitrogen Dioxide by the Path-Integral Method in a 3D Model.

    PubMed

    Dunker, Alan M; Koo, Bonyoung; Yarwood, Greg

    2015-06-02

    The anthropogenic increment of a species is the difference in concentration between a base-case simulation with all emissions included and a background simulation without the anthropogenic emissions. The Path-Integral Method (PIM) is a new technique that can determine the contributions of individual anthropogenic sources to this increment. The PIM was applied to a simulation of O3 formation in July 2030 in the U.S., using the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions and assuming advanced controls on light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and other sources. The PIM determines the source contributions by integrating first-order sensitivity coefficients over a range of emissions, a path, from the background case to the base case. There are many potential paths, with each representing a specific emission-control strategy leading to zero anthropogenic emissions, i.e., controlling all sources together versus controlling some source(s) preferentially are different paths. Three paths were considered, and the O3, formaldehyde, and NO2 anthropogenic increments were apportioned to five source categories. At rural and urban sites in the eastern U.S. and for all three paths, point sources typically have the largest contribution to the O3 and NO2 anthropogenic increments, and either LDVs or area sources, the smallest. Results for formaldehyde are more complex.

  14. Global Microscopic Models for Nuclear Reaction Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Goriely, S.

    2005-05-24

    Important effort has been devoted in the last decades to measuring reaction cross sections. Despite such effort, many nuclear applications still require the use of theoretical predictions to estimate experimentally unknown cross sections. Most of the nuclear ingredients in the calculations of reaction cross sections need to be extrapolated in an energy and/or mass domain out of reach of laboratory simulations. In addition, some applications often involve a large number of unstable nuclei, so that only global approaches can be used. For these reasons, when the nuclear ingredients to the reaction models cannot be determined from experimental data, it is highly recommended to consider preferentially microscopic or semi-microscopic global predictions based on sound and reliable nuclear models which, in turn, can compete with more phenomenological highly-parameterized models in the reproduction of experimental data. The latest developments made in deriving such microscopic models for practical applications are reviewed. It mainly concerns nuclear structure properties (masses, deformations, radii, etc.), level densities at the equilibrium deformation, {gamma}-ray strength, as well as fission barriers and level densities at the fission saddle points.

  15. CT findings for intracerebral hemorrhage have little incremental impact on post-stroke mortality prediction model performance

    PubMed Central

    Zahuranec, Darin B.; Sánchez, Brisa N.; Brown, Devin L.; Wing, Jeffrey J.; Smith, Melinda A.; Garcia, Nelda M.; Meurer, William J.; Morgenstern, Lewis B.; Lisabeth, Lynda D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Stroke outcome studies often combine cases of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and ischemic stroke (IS). These studies of mixed stroke typically ignore computed tomography (CT) findings for ICH cases, though the impact of omitting these traditional predictors of ICH mortality is unknown. We investigated the incremental impact of ICH CT findings on mortality prediction model performance. Methods Cases of ICH and IS (2000–2003) were identified from the Brain Attack Surveillance in Corpus Christi (BASIC) project. Base models predicting 30-day mortality included demographics, stroke type, and clinical findings (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) +/− Glasgow coma scale (GCS)). The impact of adding CT data (volume, intraventricular hemorrhage, infratentorial location) was assessed with the area under the curve (AUC), unweighted sum of squared residuals (Ŝ), and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI). The model assessment was performed first for the mixed case of IS and ICH, and then repeated for ICH cases alone to determine whether any lack of improvement in model performance with CT data for mixed stroke type was due to IS cases naturally forming a larger proportion of the total sample than ICH. Results A total of 1,256 cases were included (86% IS, 14% ICH). Thirty-day mortality was 16% overall (11% for IS; 43% for ICH). When both clinical scales (NIHSS and GCS) were included, none of the model performance measures showed improvement with the addition of CT findings whether considering IS and ICH together (ΔAUC: 0.002, 95% CI −0.01, 0.02; ΔŜ: −3.0, 95% CI −9.1, 2.6; IDI: 0.017, 95% CI −0.004, 0.05) or considering ICH cases alone (ΔAUC: 0.02, 95% CI −0.02, 0.08; Δ Ŝ: −2.0, 95% CI −9.7, 3.4); IDI 0.065, 95% CI −0.03, 0.21). If NIHSS was the only clinical scale included, there was still no improvement in AUC or Ŝ when CT findings were added for the sample with IS/ICH combined (ΔAUC: 0.005, 95%CI −0.01, 0.02;

  16. Thermal models, stable isotopes and cooling ages from the incrementally constructed Tuolumne batholith, Sierra Nevada: why large chambers did exist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, S. R.; Okaya, D. A.; Memeti, V.; Mundil, R.; Lackey, J.; Clemens-Knott, D.

    2009-12-01

    Our studies of the zoned, 1100 km2, 95-85 Ma Tuolumne batholith are in part designed to evaluate the thermal evolution of normally zoned, large magma bodies formed by the amalgamation of a few to many magma pulses. We use finite difference models with full spatial heterogeneity of rock properties, fine-scale internal grid spacing allowing for rock geometries at scales between sub-m to km’s, small internal time steps for runs over durations of days to millions of years and latent heat of fusion. Our initial stable isotopic studies, including δ18O variation in zircon (6-6.5‰), titanite (4.5-5.2‰), quartz (9-10‰), and whole rock (7-9 ‰) (Lackey et al. 2008, J. Pet.) and of the dD of biotites (-65 to -75‰) reveal isotopic exchange during magmatic cooling but the absence of a pervasive hydrothermal circulation system. We thus excluded advective cooling from our models. A range of incremental chamber construction scenarios are modeled including (1) repeated intrusions of rectangular or elliptical geometry (sills, dikes, or blobs); (2) a sequence of intrusions emplaced at specified but arbitrary times or according to a time rate with pulse shapes fixed or set to randomly vary within a range of dimensions and aspect ratios; (3) sheeted dike complexes in which the thermal model expands according to an extension rate to accommodate the emplacement of new dikes with width and time between dikes coupled to growth rate; (4) nested diapiric pulses; and (5) nested, irregularly shaped bodies based on maps or cross-sections that are digitally rendered into rock types, assigned thermal properties and intruded at specified times as new magma pulses. This wide range of batholith construction scenarios naturally results in a wide range of length and timescales of magma chambers. However, many likely scenarios for the TB, based on flux rates constrained by mapping and geochronology indicate that (1) the lobes of the Tuolumne batholith will crystallize in 100

  17. Reaction-contingency based bipartite Boolean modelling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intracellular signalling systems are highly complex, rendering mathematical modelling of large signalling networks infeasible or impractical. Boolean modelling provides one feasible approach to whole-network modelling, but at the cost of dequantification and decontextualisation of activation. That is, these models cannot distinguish between different downstream roles played by the same component activated in different contexts. Results Here, we address this with a bipartite Boolean modelling approach. Briefly, we use a state oriented approach with separate update rules based on reactions and contingencies. This approach retains contextual activation information and distinguishes distinct signals passing through a single component. Furthermore, we integrate this approach in the rxncon framework to support automatic model generation and iterative model definition and validation. We benchmark this method with the previously mapped MAP kinase network in yeast, showing that minor adjustments suffice to produce a functional network description. Conclusions Taken together, we (i) present a bipartite Boolean modelling approach that retains contextual activation information, (ii) provide software support for automatic model generation, visualisation and simulation, and (iii) demonstrate its use for iterative model generation and validation. PMID:23835289

  18. Incremental validity of the PID-5 in relation to the five factor model and traditional polythetic personality criteria of the DSM-5.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J Christopher; Patriquin, Michelle A; Madan, Alok; Allen, Jon G; Frueh, B Christopher; Oldham, John M

    2017-06-01

    This study assessed the incremental validity of the Personality Inventory for DSM-5 (PID-5) beyond the impact of demographic, burden of illness, five-factor model of personality, and DSM-5 personality disorder criteria with respect to associations with admission psychiatric symptoms and functional disability. Psychiatric inpatients (N = 927) were administered the Big Five Inventory, PID-5, and personality disorder criteria counts. Prior treatment utilization, as well as baseline depression, anxiety, emotion regulation, and functional disability were administered within two days of the personality measures. Hierarchical regression models were used to explore the association of personality functioning with symptom functioning, emotion regulation and disability. Neuroticism was associated with all symptom measures, providing further support for its relevance in clinical populations. Personality trait domains (negative affect, detachment, and psychoticism) from the PID-5 demonstrated incremental validity in predicting baseline symptom and disability functioning over and above demographic, burden of illness, and psychiatric comorbidity and five-factor model (FFM) personality traits. Dimensional measures of personality functioning were consistently associated with baseline symptom functioning, supporting the relevance of personality functioning as it relates to psychiatric symptoms. The PID-5 uniquely contributed to the prediction of baseline symptom functioning, thus providing incremental validity over gold-standard personality trait measures. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Relative effects of increment and pedestal duration on the detection of intensity increments a

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Daniel L.; Patra, Harisadhan; Jesteadt, Walt

    2011-01-01

    The detection of a brief increment in the intensity of a longer duration pedestal is commonly used as a measure of intensity-resolution. Increment detection is known to improve with increasing duration of the increment and also with increasing duration of the pedestal, but the relative effects of these two parameters have not been explored in the same study. In several past studies of the effects of increment duration, pedestal duration was increased as increment duration increased. In the present study, increment and pedestal duration were independently manipulated. Increment-detection thresholds were determined for four subjects with normal-hearing using a 500- or 4000-Hz pedestal presented at 60 dB sound pressure level (SPL). Increment durations were 10, 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 ms. Pedestal durations were 20, 40, 80, 160, and 320 ms. Each increment duration was combined with all pedestals of equal or greater duration. Multiple-regression analyses indicate that increment detection under these conditions is determined primarily by pedestal duration. Follow-up experiments ruled out effects of off-frequency listening or overshoot. The results suggest that effects of increment duration have been confounded by effects of pedestal duration in studies that co-varied increment and pedestal duration. Implications for models of temporal integration are discussed. PMID:21476665

  20. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, Petr; Ormand, W. Erich; Caurier, Etienne; Bertulani, Carlos

    2005-10-14

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+6Li and 6He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important 7Be(p,{gamma})8B S-factor.

  1. No-Core Shell Model and Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Caurier, E; Bertulani, C

    2005-04-29

    There has been a significant progress in ab initio approaches to the structure of light nuclei. Starting from realistic two- and three-nucleon interactions the ab initio no-core shell model (NCSM) can predict low-lying levels in p-shell nuclei. It is a challenging task to extend ab initio methods to describe nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we present a brief overview of the NCSM with examples of recent applications as well as the first steps taken toward nuclear reaction applications. In particular, we discuss cross section calculations of p+{sup 6}Li and {sup 6}He+p scattering as well as a calculation of the astrophysically important {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B S-factor.

  2. Theory and modeling of stereoselective organic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Houk, K.N.; Paddon-Row, M.N.; Rondan, N.G.; Wu, Y.D.; Brown, F.K.; Spellmeyer, D.C.; Metz, J.T.; Li, Y.; Loncharich, R.J.

    1986-03-07

    Theoretical investigations of the transition structures of additions and cycloadditions reveal details about the geometrics of bond-forming processes that are not directly accessible by experiment. The conformational analysis of transition states has been developed from theoretical generalizations about the preferred angle of attack by reagents on multiple bonds and predictions of conformations with respect to partially formed bonds. Qualitative rules for the prediction of the stereochemistries of organic reactions have been devised, and semi-empirical computational models have also been developed to predict the stereoselectivities of reactions of large organic molecules, such as nucleophilic additions to carbonyls, electrophilic hydroborations and cycloadditions, and intramolecular radical additions and cycloadditions. 52 references, 7 figures.

  3. Increments toward what?

    PubMed

    Weil, A

    2001-01-01

    Incremental proposals to expand health insurance coverage, such as expansions of the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP) or creation of new tax credits, should be examined for the values that underlie them and for how they structure future options for additional incremental coverage expansions. This paper examines five design issues in incremental reform: who determines coverage options for the newly insured; what risk pool do they enter; what is the government's contribution toward their coverage; what barriers are created by efforts to encourage efficiency; and how are issues of federalism handled? Tax credits are a departure from past approaches, while an SCHIP expansion is a continuation of current policy directions.

  4. Reaction-diffusion model for pattern formation in E. coli swarming colonies with slime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zorzano, M.-P.; Hochberg, D.; Cuevas, M.-T.; Gómez-Gómez, J.-M.

    2005-03-01

    A new experimental colonial pattern and pattern transition observed in E. coli MG1655 swarming cells grown on semisolid agar are described. We present a reaction-diffusion model that, taking into account the slime generated by these cells and its influence on the bacterial differentiation and motion, reproduces the pattern and successfully predicts the observed changes when the colonial collective motility is limited. In spite of having small nonhyperflagellated swarming cells, under these experimental conditions E. coli MG1655 can very rapidly colonize a surface, with a low branching rate, thanks to a strong fluid production and a locally incremented density of motile, lubricating cells.

  5. Modelling enzyme reaction mechanisms, specificity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, Adrian J

    2005-10-15

    Modern modelling methods can now give uniquely detailed understanding of enzyme-catalyzed reactions, including the analysis of mechanisms and the identification of determinants of specificity and catalytic efficiency. A new field of computational enzymology has emerged that has the potential to contribute significantly to structure-based design and to develop predictive models of drug metabolism and, for example, of the effects of genetic polymorphisms. This review outlines important techniques in this area, including quantum-chemical model studies and combined quantum-mechanics and molecular-mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Some recent applications to enzymes of pharmacological interest are also covered, showing the types of problems that can be tackled and the insight they can give.

  6. Photochemical reactions of various model protocell systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folsome, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Models for the emergence of cellular life on the primitive Earth, and for physical environments of that era have been studied that embody these assumptions: (1) pregenetic cellular forms were phase-bounded systems primarily photosynthetic in nature, and (2) the early Earth environment was anoxic (lacking appreciable amounts of free hydrogen). It was found that organic structures can also be formed under anoxic conditions (N2, CO3=, H2O) by protracted longwavelength UV radiation. Apparently these structures form initially as organic layers upon CaCO3 crystalloids. The question remains as to whether the UV photosynthetic ability of such phase bounded structures is a curiosity, or a general property of phase bounded systems which is of direct interest to the emergence of cellular life. The question of the requirement and sailient features of a phase boundary for UV photosynthetic abilities was addressed by searching for similar general physical properties which might be manifest in a variety of other simple protocell-like structures. Since it has been shown that laboratory protocell models can effect the UV photosynthesis of low molecular weight compounds, this reaction is being used as an assay to survey other types of structures for similar UV photosynthetic reactions. Various kinds of structures surveyed are: (1) proteinoids; (2) liposomes; (3) reconstituted cell membrane spheroids; (4) coacervates; and (5) model protocells formed under anoxic conditions.

  7. Photochemical reactions of various model protocell systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folsome, C. E.

    1986-01-01

    Models for the emergence of cellular life on the primitive Earth, and for physical environments of that era have been studied that embody these assumptions: (1) pregenetic cellular forms were phase-bounded systems primarily photosynthetic in nature, and (2) the early Earth environment was anoxic (lacking appreciable amounts of free hydrogen). It was found that organic structures can also be formed under anoxic conditions (N2, CO3=, H2O) by protracted longwavelength UV radiation. Apparently these structures form initially as organic layers upon CaCO3 crystalloids. The question remains as to whether the UV photosynthetic ability of such phase bounded structures is a curiosity, or a general property of phase bounded systems which is of direct interest to the emergence of cellular life. The question of the requirement and sailient features of a phase boundary for UV photosynthetic abilities was addressed by searching for similar general physical properties which might be manifest in a variety of other simple protocell-like structures. Since it has been shown that laboratory protocell models can effect the UV photosynthesis of low molecular weight compounds, this reaction is being used as an assay to survey other types of structures for similar UV photosynthetic reactions. Various kinds of structures surveyed are: (1) proteinoids; (2) liposomes; (3) reconstituted cell membrane spheroids; (4) coacervates; and (5) model protocells formed under anoxic conditions.

  8. Data assimilation in a coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the California Current System using an incremental lognormal 4-dimensional variational approach: Part 1-Model formulation and biological data assimilation twin experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hajoon; Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.; Fiechter, Jerome

    2016-10-01

    A quadratic formulation for an incremental lognormal 4-dimensional variational assimilation method (incremental L4DVar) is introduced for assimilation of biogeochemical observations into a 3-dimensional ocean circulation model. L4DVar assumes that errors in the model state are lognormally rather than Gaussian distributed, and implicitly ensures that state estimates are positive definite, making this approach attractive for biogeochemical variables. The method is made practical for a realistic implementation having a large state vector through linear assumptions that render the cost function quadratic and allow application of existing minimization techniques. A simple nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD) model is coupled to the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) and configured for the California Current System. Quadratic incremental L4DVar is evaluated in a twin model framework in which biological fields only are in error and compared to G4DVar which assumes Gaussian distributed errors. Five-day assimilation cycles are used and statistics from four years of model integration analyzed. The quadratic incremental L4DVar results in smaller root-mean-squared errors and better statistical agreement with reference states than G4DVar while maintaining a positive state vector. The additional computational cost and implementation effort are trivial compared to the G4DVar system, making quadratic incremental L4DVar a practical and beneficial option for realistic biogeochemical state estimation in the ocean.

  9. Leveraging Modeling Approaches: Reaction Networks and Rules

    PubMed Central

    Blinov, Michael L.; Moraru, Ion I.

    2012-01-01

    We have witnessed an explosive growth in research involving mathematical models and computer simulations of intracellular molecular interactions, ranging from metabolic pathways to signaling and gene regulatory networks. Many software tools have been developed to aid in the study of such biological systems, some of which have a wealth of features for model building and visualization, and powerful capabilities for simulation and data analysis. Novel high resolution and/or high throughput experimental techniques have led to an abundance of qualitative and quantitative data related to the spatio-temporal distribution of molecules and complexes, their interactions kinetics, and functional modifications. Based on this information, computational biology researchers are attempting to build larger and more detailed models. However, this has proved to be a major challenge. Traditionally, modeling tools require the explicit specification of all molecular species and interactions in a model, which can quickly become a major limitation in the case of complex networks – the number of ways biomolecules can combine to form multimolecular complexes can be combinatorially large. Recently, a new breed of software tools has been created to address the problems faced when building models marked by combinatorial complexity. These have a different approach for model specification, using reaction rules and species patterns. Here we compare the traditional modeling approach with the new rule-based methods. We make a case for combining the capabilities of conventional simulation software with the unique features and flexibility of a rule-based approach in a single software platform for building models of molecular interaction networks. PMID:22161349

  10. Leveraging modeling approaches: reaction networks and rules.

    PubMed

    Blinov, Michael L; Moraru, Ion I

    2012-01-01

    We have witnessed an explosive growth in research involving mathematical models and computer simulations of intracellular molecular interactions, ranging from metabolic pathways to signaling and gene regulatory networks. Many software tools have been developed to aid in the study of such biological systems, some of which have a wealth of features for model building and visualization, and powerful capabilities for simulation and data analysis. Novel high-resolution and/or high-throughput experimental techniques have led to an abundance of qualitative and quantitative data related to the spatiotemporal distribution of molecules and complexes, their interactions kinetics, and functional modifications. Based on this information, computational biology researchers are attempting to build larger and more detailed models. However, this has proved to be a major challenge. Traditionally, modeling tools require the explicit specification of all molecular species and interactions in a model, which can quickly become a major limitation in the case of complex networks - the number of ways biomolecules can combine to form multimolecular complexes can be combinatorially large. Recently, a new breed of software tools has been created to address the problems faced when building models marked by combinatorial complexity. These have a different approach for model specification, using reaction rules and species patterns. Here we compare the traditional modeling approach with the new rule-based methods. We make a case for combining the capabilities of conventional simulation software with the unique features and flexibility of a rule-based approach in a single software platform for building models of molecular interaction networks.

  11. Incremental Contingency Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dearden, Richard; Meuleau, Nicolas; Ramakrishnan, Sailesh; Smith, David E.; Washington, Rich

    2003-01-01

    There has been considerable work in AI on planning under uncertainty. However, this work generally assumes an extremely simple model of action that does not consider continuous time and resources. These assumptions are not reasonable for a Mars rover, which must cope with uncertainty about the duration of tasks, the energy required, the data storage necessary, and its current position and orientation. In this paper, we outline an approach to generating contingency plans when the sources of uncertainty involve continuous quantities such as time and resources. The approach involves first constructing a "seed" plan, and then incrementally adding contingent branches to this plan in order to improve utility. The challenge is to figure out the best places to insert contingency branches. This requires an estimate of how much utility could be gained by building a contingent branch at any given place in the seed plan. Computing this utility exactly is intractable, but we outline an approximation method that back propagates utility distributions through a graph structure similar to that of a plan graph.

  12. Development and Validation of Reaction Wheel Disturbance Models: Empirical Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masterson, R. A.; Miller, D. W.; Grogan, R. L.

    2002-01-01

    Accurate disturbance models are necessary to predict the effects of vibrations on the performance of precision space-based telescopes, such as the Space Interferometry Mission (SIM). There are many possible disturbance sources on such spacecraft, but mechanical jitter from the reaction wheel assembly (RWA) is anticipated to be the largest. A method has been developed and implemented in the form of a MATLAB toolbox to extract parameters for an empirical disturbance model from RWA micro-vibration data. The disturbance model is based on one that was used to predict the vibration behaviour of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) wheels and assumes that RWA disturbances consist of discrete harmonics of the wheel speed with amplitudes proportional to the wheel speed squared. The MATLAB toolbox allows the extension of this empirical disturbance model for application to any reaction wheel given steady state vibration data. The toolbox functions are useful for analyzing RWA vibration data, and the model provides a good estimate of the disturbances over most wheel speeds. However, it is shown that the disturbances are under-predicted by a model of this form over some wheel speed ranges. The poor correlation is due to the fact that the empirical model does not account for disturbance amplifications caused by interactions between the harmonics and the structural modes of the wheel. Experimental data from an ITHACO Space Systems E-type reaction wheel are used to illustrate the model development and validation process.

  13. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  14. Model Experiment of Thermal Runaway Reactions Using the Aluminum-Hydrochloric Acid Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitabayashi, Suguru; Nakano, Masayoshi; Nishikawa, Kazuyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    A laboratory exercise for the education of students about thermal runaway reactions based on the reaction between aluminum and hydrochloric acid as a model reaction is proposed. In the introductory part of the exercise, the induction period and subsequent thermal runaway behavior are evaluated via a simple observation of hydrogen gas evolution and…

  15. Building process knowledge using inline spectroscopy, reaction calorimetry and reaction modeling--the integrated approach.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Srinivas; Shabaker, John W; Leung, Simon S W

    2005-11-01

    For over two decades, reaction engineering tools and techniques such as reaction calorimetry, inline spectroscopy and, to a more limited extent, reaction modeling, have been employed within the pharmaceutical industry to ensure safe and robust scale-up of organic reactions. Although each of these techniques has had a significant impact on the landscape of process development, an effective integrated approach is now being realized that combines calorimetry and spectroscopy with predictive modeling tools. This paper reviews some recent advances in the use of these reaction engineering tools in process development within the pharmaceutical industry and discusses their potential impact on the effective application of the integrated approach.

  16. Model for reaction kinetics in pyrolysis of wood

    SciTech Connect

    Ahuja, P.; Singh, P.C.; Upadhyay, S.N.; Kumar, S.

    1996-12-31

    A reaction model for the pyrolysis of small and large particles of wood Is developed. The chemical reactions that take place when biomass is pyrolyzed are the devolatilization reactions (primary) and due to the vapour-solid interactions (secondary). In the case of small particles, when the volatiles are immediately removed by the purge gas, only primary reactions occur and the reaction model is described by weight loss and char forming reactions. The of heterogeneous secondary reactions occur in the case of large particles due to the interaction between the volatiles and the hot nascent primary char. A chain reaction mechanism of secondary char formation is proposed. The model takes both the volatiles retention time and cracking and repolymerization reactions of the vapours with the decomposing solid as well as autocatalysis into consideration. 7 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Airborne observed and receptor-oriented modelled urban increments of anthropogenic CO2, CO and NOX concentrations in the megacity of London in summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Font Font, Anna Maria; Morguí, Josep Anton; Lee, James; McQuaid, Jim B.; Barratt, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    A better characterization of the emissions and the dynamics of anthropogenic CO2 in large-urban centres are needed to implement more effective mitigation measures to combat climate change. This study aims to establish a representative emissions ratio of anthropogenic CO2 (CO2ff) in the megacity of London using CO and NOX as tracers. Observations of CO2, CO and NOX mixing ratios obtained onboard the NERC-ARSF aircraft undertaken on 12 July 2012 over the city of London were used. Airborne observations were taken at ~380 m along four transects crossing London, two in the morning (10:30 to 12:30 GMT) and two in the afternoon (15:30-16:30 GMT). The ratio of the amounts of CO and CO2 in excess of natural abundances (denoted as ΔCO and ΔCO2, respectively) from the airborne observations was used to determine the fraction of CO2 derived from burning fossil fuels (CO2ff). Total observations of CO and CO2 were compared to NOX observations and background concentrations were determined as the intercept when NOX mixing ratios equalled zero derived from standardised major axis linear regression. Excess concentrations were calculated by subtracting total amounts minus the background. ΔCO showed good correlation with ΔCO2 in the morning transects (R=0.95) but not in the afternoon (R=-0.50). The mean (±1σ) CO/CO2ff was derived from linear regression using the morning measurements and valued 5.0±0.4 ppb ppm-1. Lagrangian Particle Dispersion (LPD) simulations in backward mode were undertaken to model urban increments of anthropogenic CO2 and CO and to calculate the emissions ratio from the emissions inventory EDGAR v4.2. The LPD model FLEXPART was run with the meteorological data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (spatial resolution of 0.2 x 0.2 degrees; 91 vertical levels) and multiplied with the EDGAR emissions inventory (spatial resolution 0.1 x 0.1 degrees) to obtain an increment at each receptor point along the transects. Annual and temporal

  18. Incremental Passivity and Incremental Passivity-Based Output Regulation for Switched Discrete-Time Systems.

    PubMed

    Jiao Li; Jun Zhao

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates incremental passivity and output regulation for switched discrete-time systems. We develop the results in two parts. First of all, a concept of incremental passivity is proposed to describe the overall incremental passivity property of a switched discrete-time system in the absence of the classic incremental passivity property of the subsystems. A condition for incremental passivity is given. A certain negative output feedback is designed to produce asymptotic stability. Incremental passivity is shown to be preserved under feedback interconnection. The second part of this paper is concerned with an application of the incremental passivity theory to the output regulation problem for switched discrete-time systems. The key idea is to construct a switched internal model with incremental passivity, which closely links the solvability of the output regulation problem. A characteristic of the switched internal model is that it does not necessarily switch synchronously with the controlled plant, which greatly increases the freedom of design. Once such a switched internal model is established, the output regulation problem is then solved by construction of the feedback interconnection between the controlled plant and the switched internal model. The main usefulness of the strategy is to get rid of the solvability of the output regulation problem for the subsystems.

  19. A Generalized Kinetic Model for Heterogeneous Gas-Solid Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhijie; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2012-08-15

    We present a generalized kinetic model for gas-solid heterogeneous reactions taking place at the interface between two phases. The model studies the reaction kinetics by taking into account the reactions at the interface, as well as the transport process within the product layer. The standard unreacted shrinking core model relies on the assumption of quasi-static diffusion that results in a steady-state concentration profile of gas reactant in the product layer. By relaxing this assumption and resolving the entire problem, general solutions can be obtained for reaction kinetics, including the reaction front velocity and the conversion (volume fraction of reacted solid). The unreacted shrinking core model is shown to be accurate and in agreement with the generalized model for slow reaction (or fast diffusion), low concentration of gas reactant, and small solid size. Otherwise, a generalized kinetic model should be used.

  20. Testing the Relations Between Impulsivity-Related Traits, Suicidality, and Nonsuicidal Self-Injury: A Test of the Incremental Validity of the UPPS Model

    PubMed Central

    Lynam, Donald R.; Miller, Joshua D.; Miller, Drew J.; Bornovalova, Marina A.; Lejuez, C. W.

    2011-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has received significant attention as a predictor of suicidal behavior (SB) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Despite significant promise, trait impulsivity has received less attention. Understanding the relations between impulsivity and SB and NSSI is confounded, unfortunately, by the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity. This study examined the relations among 4 personality pathways to impulsive behavior studied via the UPPS model of impulsivity and SB and NSSI in a residential sample of drug abusers (N = 76). In this study, we tested whether these 4 impulsivity-related traits (i.e., Negative Urgency, Sensation Seeking, Lack of Premeditation, and Lack of Perseverance) provide incremental validity in the statistical prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond BPD; they do. We also tested whether BPD symptoms provide incremental validity in the prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond these impulsivity-related traits; they do not. In addition to the main effects of Lack of Premeditation and Negative Urgency, we found evidence of a robust interaction between these 2 personality traits. The current results argue strongly for the consideration of these 2 impulsivity-related domains—alone and in interaction—when attempting to understand and predict SB and NSSI. PMID:21833346

  1. Testing the relations between impulsivity-related traits, suicidality, and nonsuicidal self-injury: a test of the incremental validity of the UPPS model.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Donald R; Miller, Joshua D; Miller, Drew J; Bornovalova, Marina A; Lejuez, C W

    2011-04-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has received significant attention as a predictor of suicidal behavior (SB) and nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI). Despite significant promise, trait impulsivity has received less attention. Understanding the relations between impulsivity and SB and NSSI is confounded, unfortunately, by the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity. This study examined the relations among 4 personality pathways to impulsive behavior studied via the UPPS model of impulsivity and SB and NSSI in a residential sample of drug abusers (N = 76). In this study, we tested whether these 4 impulsivity-related traits (i.e., Negative Urgency, Sensation Seeking, Lack of Premeditation, and Lack of Perseverance) provide incremental validity in the statistical prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond BPD; they do. We also tested whether BPD symptoms provide incremental validity in the prediction of SB and NSSI above and beyond these impulsivity-related traits; they do not. In addition to the main effects of Lack of Premeditation and Negative Urgency, we found evidence of a robust interaction between these 2 personality traits. The current results argue strongly for the consideration of these 2 impulsivity-related domains--alone and in interaction--when attempting to understand and predict SB and NSSI.

  2. A computational study of pyrolysis reactions of lignin model compounds

    Treesearch

    Thomas Elder

    2010-01-01

    Enthalpies of reaction for the initial steps in the pyrolysis of lignin have been evaluated at the CBS-4m level of theory using fully substituted b-O-4 dilignols. Values for competing unimolecular decomposition reactions are consistent with results previously published for phenethyl phenyl ether models, but with lowered selectivity. Chain propagating reactions of free...

  3. A simple reaction-rate model for turbulent diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    A simple reaction rate model is proposed for turbulent diffusion flames in which the reaction rate is proportional to the turbulence mixing rate. The reaction rate is also dependent on the mean mass fraction and the mean square fluctuation of mass fraction of each reactant. Calculations are compared with experimental data and are generally successful in predicting the measured quantities.

  4. Polymerization as a Model Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Describes the features of the free radical, anionic, and cationic mechanisms of chain addition polymerization. Indicates that the nature of chain reactions can be best taught through the study of macromolecules. (CC)

  5. Polymerization as a Model Chain Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, Maurice

    1973-01-01

    Describes the features of the free radical, anionic, and cationic mechanisms of chain addition polymerization. Indicates that the nature of chain reactions can be best taught through the study of macromolecules. (CC)

  6. Modelling Chemical Reasoning to Predict and Invent Reactions.

    PubMed

    Segler, Marwin H S; Waller, Mark P

    2016-11-11

    The ability to reason beyond established knowledge allows organic chemists to solve synthetic problems and invent novel transformations. Herein, we propose a model that mimics chemical reasoning, and formalises reaction prediction as finding missing links in a knowledge graph. We have constructed a knowledge graph containing 14.4 million molecules and 8.2 million binary reactions, which represents the bulk of all chemical reactions ever published in the scientific literature. Our model outperforms a rule-based expert system in the reaction prediction task for 180 000 randomly selected binary reactions. The data-driven model generalises even beyond known reaction types, and is thus capable of effectively (re-)discovering novel transformations (even including transition metal-catalysed reactions). Our model enables computers to infer hypotheses about reactivity and reactions by only considering the intrinsic local structure of the graph and because each single reaction prediction is typically achieved in a sub-second time frame, the model can be used as a high-throughput generator of reaction hypotheses for reaction discovery.

  7. Incremental full configuration interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, Paul M.

    2017-03-01

    The incremental expansion provides a polynomial scaling method for computing electronic correlation energies. This article details a new algorithm and implementation for the incremental expansion of full configuration interaction (FCI), called iFCI. By dividing the problem into n-body interaction terms, accurate correlation energies can be recovered at low n in a highly parallel computation. Additionally, relatively low-cost approximations are possible in iFCI by solving for each incremental energy to within a specified threshold. Herein, systematic tests show that FCI-quality energies can be asymptotically reached for cases where dynamic correlation is dominant as well as where static correlation is vital. To further reduce computational costs and allow iFCI to reach larger systems, a select-CI approach (heat-bath CI) requiring two parameters is incorporated. Finally, iFCI provides the first estimate of FCI energies for hexatriene with a polarized double zeta basis set, which has 32 electrons correlated in 118 orbitals, corresponding to a FCI dimension of over 1038.

  8. Detailed reduction of reaction mechanisms for flame modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Hai; Frenklach, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A method for reduction of detailed chemical reaction mechanisms, introduced earlier for ignition system, was extended to laminar premixed flames. The reduction is based on testing the reaction and reaction-enthalpy rates of the 'full' reaction mechanism using a zero-dimensional model with the flame temperature profile as a constraint. The technique is demonstrated with numerical tests performed on the mechanism of methane combustion.

  9. Reaction chain modeling of denitrification reactions during a push-pull test.

    PubMed

    Boisson, A; de Anna, P; Bour, O; Le Borgne, T; Labasque, T; Aquilina, L

    2013-05-01

    Field quantitative estimation of reaction kinetics is required to enhance our understanding of biogeochemical reactions in aquifers. We extended the analytical solution developed by Haggerty et al. (1998) to model an entire 1st order reaction chain and estimate the kinetic parameters for each reaction step of the denitrification process. We then assessed the ability of this reaction chain to model biogeochemical reactions by comparing it with experimental results from a push-pull test in a fractured crystalline aquifer (Ploemeur, French Brittany). Nitrates were used as the reactive tracer, since denitrification involves the sequential reduction of nitrates to nitrogen gas through a chain reaction (NO3(-)→NO2(-)→NO→N2O→N2) under anaerobic conditions. The kinetics of nitrate consumption and by-product formation (NO2(-), N2O) during autotrophic denitrification were quantified by using a reactive tracer (NO3(-)) and a non-reactive tracer (Br(-)). The formation of reaction by-products (NO2(-), N2O, N2) has not been previously considered using a reaction chain approach. Comparison of Br(-) and NO3(-) breakthrough curves showed that 10% of the injected NO3(-) molar mass was transformed during the 12 h experiment (2% into NO2(-), 1% into N2O and the rest into N2 and NO). Similar results, but with slower kinetics, were obtained from laboratory experiments in reactors. The good agreement between the model and the field data shows that the complete denitrification process can be efficiently modeled as a sequence of first order reactions. The 1st order kinetics coefficients obtained through modeling were as follows: k1=0.023 h(-1), k2=0.59 h(-1), k3=16 h(-1), and k4=5.5 h(-1). A next step will be to assess the variability of field reactivity using the methodology developed for modeling push-pull tracer tests.

  10. Modeling the isotope effect in Walden inversion reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schechter, Israel

    1991-05-01

    A simple model to explain the isotope effect in the Walden exchange reaction is suggested. It is developed in the spirit of the line-of-centers models, and considers a hard-sphere collision that transfers energy from the relative translation to the desired vibrational mode, as well as geometrical properties and steric requirements. This model reproduces the recently measured cross sections for the reactions of hydrogen with isotopic silanes and older measurements of the substitution reactions of tritium atoms with isotopic methanes. Unlike previously given explanations, this model explains the effect of the attacking atom as well as of the other participating atoms. The model provides also qualitative explanation of the measured relative yields and thresholds of CH 3T and CH 2TF from the reaction T + CH 3F. Predictions for isotope effects and cross sections of some unmeasured reactions are given.

  11. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. |; Chikin Chan; Fleming, G.; Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M.

    1992-12-31

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  12. Model photo reaction centers via genetic engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhiyu Wang; DiMagno, T.J.; Popov, M.; Norris, J.R. Chicago Univ., IL . Dept. of Chemistry); Chikin Chan; Fleming, G. . Dept. of Chemistry); Jau Tang; Hanson, D.; Schiffer, M. )

    1992-01-01

    A series of reaction centers of Rhodococcus capsulatus isolated from a set of mutated organisms modified by site-directed mutagenesis at residues M208 and L181 are described. Changes in the amino acid at these sites affect both the energetics of the systems as well as the chemical kinetics for the initial ET event. Two empirical relations among the different mutants for the reduction potential and the ET rate are presented.

  13. Freezing increment in keratophakia.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Wisnicki, H J

    In homoplastic keratomileusis, keratophakia, and epikeratophakia, the corneal tissue that provides the final refractive lenticule undergoes a conformational change when frozen. Because corneal tissue is composed primarily of water, an assumed value of 9.08% (approximate volumic percentage expansion of water when frozen) is frequently used for the increase in thickness, or freezing increment, rather than measuring it directly. We evaluated 32 cases of clinical keratophakia and found the increase in thickness to average 37 +/- 21%. In this series of 32 cases, the percentage of patients with a greater than 4 D residual refractive error was 16%. If an assumed freezing increment of 9.08% had been used, the percentage would have been 28%, with two-thirds of these 28% manifesting a marked undercorrection. Because of a lack of studies documenting the behavior of corneal tissue following cryoprotection and freezing, it is suggested that measurements be taken during homoplastic surgery to minimize the potential for significant inaccuracy in obtaining the desired optic result.

  14. Effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification with eddy dissipation concept - Sub-grid scale reaction model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juhui; Yin, Weijie; Wang, Shuai; Meng, Cheng; Li, Jiuru; Qin, Bai; Yu, Guangbin

    2016-07-01

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) approach is used for gas turbulence, and eddy dissipation concept (EDC)-sub-grid scale (SGS) reaction model is employed for reactions in small eddies. The simulated gas molar fractions are in better agreement with experimental data with EDC-SGS reaction model. The effect of reactions in small eddies on biomass gasification is emphatically analyzed with EDC-SGS reaction model. The distributions of the SGS reaction rates which represent the reactions in small eddies with particles concentration and temperature are analyzed. The distributions of SGS reaction rates have the similar trend with those of total reactions rates and the values account for about 15% of the total reactions rates. The heterogeneous reaction rates with EDC-SGS reaction model are also improved during the biomass gasification process in bubbling fluidized bed.

  15. Modelling couplings between reaction, fluid flow and deformation: Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malvoisin, Benjamin; Podladchikov, Yury Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2016-04-01

    Mineral assemblages out of equilibrium are commonly found in metamorphic rocks testifying of the critical role of kinetics for metamorphic reactions. As experimentally determined reaction rates in fluid-saturated systems generally indicate complete reaction in less than several years, i.e. several orders of magnitude faster than field-based estimates, metamorphic reaction kinetics are generally thought to be controlled by transport rather than by processes at the mineral surface. However, some geological processes like earthquakes or slow-slip events have shorter characteristic timescales, and transport processes can be intimately related to mineral surface processes. Therefore, it is important to take into account the kinetics of mineral surface processes for modelling fluid/rock interactions. Here, a model coupling reaction, fluid flow and deformation was improved by introducing a delay in the achievement of equilibrium. The classical formalism for dissolution/precipitation reactions was used to consider the influence of the distance from equilibrium and of temperature on the reaction rate, and a dependence on porosity was introduced to model evolution of reacting surface area during reaction. The fitting of experimental data for three reactions typically occurring in metamorphic systems (serpentine dehydration, muscovite dehydration and calcite decarbonation) indicates a systematic faster kinetics close from equilibrium on the dehydration side than on the hydration side. This effect is amplified through the porosity term in the reaction rate since porosity is formed during dehydration. Numerical modelling indicates that this difference in reaction rate close from equilibrium plays a key role in microtextures formation. The developed model can be used in a wide variety of geological systems where couplings between reaction, deformation and fluid flow have to be considered.

  16. Development of reaction models for ground-water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, L.N.; Parkhurst, D.L.; Thorstenson, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are described for developing geochemical reaction models from the observed chemical compositions of ground water along a hydrologic flow path. The roles of thermodynamic speciation programs, mass balance calculations, and reaction-path simulations in developing and testing reaction models are contrasted. Electron transfer is included in the mass balance equations to properly account for redox reactions in ground water. The mass balance calculations determine net mass transfer models which must be checked against the thermodynamic calculations of speciation and reaction-path programs. Although reaction-path simulations of ground-water chemistry are thermodynamically valid, they must be checked against the net mass transfer defined by the mass balance calculations. An example is given testing multiple reaction hypotheses along a flow path in the Floridan aquifer where several reaction models are eliminated. Use of carbon and sulfur isotopic data with mass balance calculations indicates a net reaction of incongruent dissolution of dolomite (dolomite dissolution with calcite precipitation) driven irreversibly by gypsum dissolution, accompanied by minor sulfate reduction, ferric hydroxide dissolution, and pyrite precipitation in central Florida. Along the flow path, the aquifer appears to be open to CO2 initially, and open to organic carbon at more distant points down gradient. ?? 1983.

  17. Modeling Second-Order Chemical Reactions using Cellular Automata

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, N. E.; Barton, C. C.; Seybold, P. G.; Rizki, M. M.

    2012-12-01

    Cellular automata (CA) are discrete, agent-based, dynamic, iterated, mathematical computational models used to describe complex physical, biological, and chemical systems. Unlike the more computationally demanding molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo approaches, which use "force fields" to model molecular interactions, CA models employ a set of local rules. The traditional approach for modeling chemical reactions is to solve a set of simultaneous differential rate equations to give deterministic outcomes. CA models yield statistical outcomes for a finite number of ingredients. The deterministic solutions appear as limiting cases for conditions such as a large number of ingredients or a finite number of ingredients and many trials. Here we present a 2-dimensional, probabilistic CA model of a second-order gas phase reaction A + B → C, using a MATLAB basis. Beginning with a random distribution of ingredients A and B, formation of C emerges as the system evolves. The reaction rate can be varied based on the probability of favorable collisions of the reagents A and B. The model permits visualization of the conversion of reagents to products, and allows one to plot concentration vs. time for A, B and C. We test hypothetical reaction conditions such as: limiting reagents, the effects of reaction probabilities, and reagent concentrations on the reaction kinetics. The deterministic solutions of the reactions emerge as statistical averages in the limit of the large number of cells in the array. Modeling results for dynamic processes in the atmosphere will be presented.

  18. Evaluation of incremental reactivity and its uncertainty in Southern California.

    PubMed

    Martien, Philip T; Harley, Robert A; Milford, Jana B; Russell, Armistead G

    2003-04-15

    The incremental reactivity (IR) and relative incremental reactivity (RIR) of carbon monoxide and 30 individual volatile organic compounds (VOC) were estimated for the South Coast Air Basin using two photochemical air quality models: a 3-D, grid-based model and a vertically resolved trajectory model. Both models include an extended version of the SAPRC99 chemical mechanism. For the 3-D modeling, the decoupled direct method (DDM-3D) was used to assess reactivities. The trajectory model was applied to estimate uncertainties in reactivities due to uncertainties in chemical rate parameters, deposition parameters, and emission rates using Monte Carlo analysis with Latin hypercube sampling. For most VOC, RIRs were found to be consistent in rankings with those produced by Carter using a box model. However, 3-D simulations show that coastal regions, upwind of most of the emissions, have comparatively low IR but higher RIR than predicted by box models for C4-C5 alkenes and carbonyls that initiate the production of HOx radicals. Biogenic VOC emissions were found to have a lower RIR than predicted by box model estimates, because emissions of these VOC were mostly downwind of the areas of primary ozone production. Uncertainties in RIR of individual VOC were found to be dominated by uncertainties in the rate parameters of their primary oxidation reactions. The coefficient of variation (COV) of most RIR values ranged from 20% to 30%, whereas the COV of absolute incremental reactivity ranged from about 30% to 40%. In general, uncertainty and variability both decreased when relative rather than absolute reactivity metrics were used.

  19. Incremental costs associated with myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: an overview for economic modeling.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Victoria K; Colosia, Ann D; Copley-Merriman, Catherine; Mauskopf, Josephine; Hass, Bastian; Palencia, Roberto

    2014-07-01

    To identify cost estimates related to myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) for use in economic models. A systematic literature review was conducted. Electronic databases and conference abstracts were screened against inclusion criteria, which included studies performed in patients who had T2DM before experiencing an MI or stroke. Primary cost studies and economic models were included. Costs were converted to 2012 pounds sterling. Fifty-four studies were identified: 13 primary cost studies and 41 economic evaluations using secondary sources for complication costs. Primary studies provided costs from 10 countries. Estimates for a fatal event ranged from £2482-£5222 for MI and from £4900-£6694 for stroke. Costs for the year a non-fatal event occurred ranged from £5071-£29,249 for MI and from £5171-£38,732 for stroke. Annual follow-up costs ranged from £945-£1616 for an MI and from £4704-£12,926 for a stroke. Economic evaluations from 12 countries were identified, and costs of complications showed similar variability to the primary studies. The costs identified within primary studies varied between and within countries. Many studies used costs estimated in studies not specific to patients with T2DM. Data gaps included a detailed breakdown of resource use, which affected the ability to compare data across countries. In the development of economic models for patients with T2DM, the use of accurate estimates of costs associated with MI and stroke is important. When country-specific costs are not available, clear justification for the choice of estimates should be provided.

  20. Quantal release, incremental detection, and long-period Ca2+ oscillations in a model based on regulatory Ca2+-binding sites along the permeation pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Dupont, G; Swillens, S

    1996-01-01

    Quantal release, incremental detection, and oscillations are three types of Ca2+ responses that can be obtained in different conditions, after stimulation of the intracellular Ca2+ stores by submaximum concentrations of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (InsP3). All three phenomena are thought to occur through the regulatory properties of the InsP3 receptor/Ca2+ channel. In the present study, we perform further analysis of the model (Swillens et al., 1994, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:10074-10078) previously proposed for transient InsP3-induced Ca2+ release, based on the bell-shaped dependence of the InsP3 receptor activity on the Ca2+ level and on the existence of an intermediate Ca2+ domain located around the mouth of the channel. We show that Ca2+ oscillations also arise in the latter model. Conditions for the occurrence of the various behaviors are investigated. Numerical simulations also show that the existence of an intermediate Ca2+ domain can markedly increase the period of oscillations. Periods on the order of 1 min can indeed be accounted for by the model when one assigns realistic values to the kinetic constants of the InsP3 receptor, which, in the absence of a domain, lead to oscillations with periods of a few seconds. Finally, theoretical support in favor of a positive cooperativity in the regulation of the InsP3 receptor by Ca2+ is presented. Images FIGURE 7 PMID:8889149

  1. Chemical reactions simulated by ground-water-quality models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent literature concerning the modeling of chemical reactions during transport in ground water is examined with emphasis on sorption reactions. The theory of transport and reactions in porous media has been well documented. Numerous equations have been developed from this theory, to provide both continuous and sequential or multistep models, with the water phase considered for both mobile and immobile phases. Chemical reactions can be either equilibrium or non-equilibrium, and can be quantified in linear or non-linear mathematical forms. Non-equilibrium reactions can be separated into kinetic and diffusional rate-limiting mechanisms. Solutions to the equations are available by either analytical expressions or numerical techniques. Saturated and unsaturated batch, column, and field studies are discussed with one-dimensional, laboratory-column experiments predominating. A summary table is presented that references the various kinds of models studied and their applications in predicting chemical concentrations in ground waters.

  2. Robust incremental condition estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Tang, P.T.P.

    1991-03-29

    This paper presents an improved version of incremental condition estimation, a technique for tracking the extremal singular values of a triangular matrix as it is being constructed one column at a time. We present a new motivation for this estimation technique using orthogonal projections. The paper focuses on an implementation of this estimation scheme in an accurate and consistent fashion. In particular, we address the subtle numerical issues arising in the computation of the eigensystem of a symmetric rank-one perturbed diagonal 2 {times} 2 matrix. Experimental results show that the resulting scheme does a good job in estimating the extremal singular values of triangular matrices, independent of matrix size and matrix condition number, and that it performs qualitatively in the same fashion as some of the commonly used nonincremental condition estimation schemes.

  3. Reactive radical facilitated reaction-diffusion modeling for holographic photopolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jianhua; Pu Haihui; Gao Bin; Gao Hongyue; Yin Dejin; Dai Haitao

    2010-02-08

    A phenomenological concentration of reactive radical is proposed to take the role of curing light intensity in explicit proportion to the reaction rate for the conventional reaction-diffusion model. This revision rationally eliminates the theoretical defect of null reaction rate in modeling of the postcuring process, and facilitates the applicability of the model in the whole process of holographic photopolymerizations in photocurable monomer and nematic liquid crystal blend system. Excellent consistencies are obtained in both curing and postcuring processes between simulated and experimentally measured evolutions of the first order diffraction efficiency of the formed composite Bragg gratings.

  4. Elementary reaction modeling of solid oxide electrolysis cells: Main zones for heterogeneous chemical/electrochemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenying; Shi, Yixiang; Luo, Yu; Cai, Ningsheng

    2015-01-01

    A theoretical model of solid oxide electrolysis cells considering the heterogeneous elementary reactions, electrochemical reactions and the transport process of mass and charge is applied to study the relative performance of H2O electrolysis, CO2 electrolysis and CO2/H2O co-electrolysis and the competitive behavior of heterogeneous chemical and electrochemical reactions. In cathode, heterogeneous chemical reactions exist near the outside surface and the electrochemical reactions occur near the electrolyte. According to the mathematical analysis, the mass transfer flux D ∇c determines the main zone size of heterogeneous chemical reactions, while the charge transfer flux σ ∇V determines the other one. When the zone size of heterogeneous chemistry is enlarged, more CO2 could react through heterogeneous chemical pathway, and polarization curves of CO2/H2O co-electrolysis could be prone to H2O electrolysis. Meanwhile, when the zone size of electrochemistry is enlarged, more CO2 could react through electrochemical pathway, and polarization curves of CO2/H2O co-electrolysis could be prone to CO2 electrolysis. The relative polarization curves, the ratio of CO2 participating in electrolysis and heterogeneous chemical reactions, the mass and charge transfer flux and heterogeneous chemical/electrochemical reaction main zones are simulated to study the effects of cathode material characteristics (porosity, particle diameter and ionic conductivity) and operating conditions (gas composition and temperature).

  5. Abundances in Astrophysical Environments: Reaction Network Simulations with Reaction Rates from Many-nucleon Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amason, Charlee; Dreyfuss, Alison; Launey, Kristina; Draayer, Jerry

    2017-01-01

    We use the ab initio (first-principle) symmetry-adapted no-core shell model (SA-NCSM) to calculate reaction rates of significance to type I X-ray burst nucleosynthesis. We consider the 18O(p,γ)19F reaction, which may influence the production of fluorine, as well as the 16O(α,γ)20Ne reaction, which is key to understanding the production of heavier elements in the universe. Results are compared to those obtained in the no-core sympletic shell model (NCSpM) with a schematic interaction. We discuss how these reaction rates affect the relevant elemental abundances. We thank the NSF for supporting this work through the REU Site in Physics & Astronomy (NSF grant #1560212) at Louisiana State University. This work was also supported by the U.S. NSF (OCI-0904874, ACI -1516338) and the U.S. DOE (DE-SC0005248).

  6. Comparison of DSMC reaction models with QCT reaction rates for nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysong, Ingrid J.; Gimelshein, Sergey F.

    2016-11-01

    Four empirical models of chemical reactions extensively used in the direct simulation Monte Carlo method in the past are analyzed via comparison of temperature and vibrational level dependent equilibrium and non-equilibrium reaction rates with available classical trajectory and direct molecular simulations for nitrogen dissociation. The considered models are total collision energy, quantum kinetic, vibration-dissociation favoring, and weak vibrational bias. The weak vibrational bias model was found to provide good agreement with benchmark vibrationally-specific dissociation rates, while significant differences were observed for the others.

  7. Heavy Ion Reaction Modeling for Hadrontherapy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Enghardt, W.; Gadioli, E.; Mairani, A.; Parodi, K.; Sommerer, F.

    2007-10-26

    A comprehensive and reliable description of nucleus-nucleus interactions represents a crucial need in different interdisciplinary fields. In particular, hadrontherapy monitoring by means of in-beam positron emission tomography (PET) requires, in addition to measuring, the capability of calculating the activity of {beta}{sup +}-decaying nuclei produced in the irradiated tissue. For this purpose, in view of treatment monitoring at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy (HIT) facility, the transport and interaction Monte Carlo code FLUKA is a promising candidate. It is provided with the description of heavy ion reactions at intermediate and low energies by two specific event generators. In-beam PET experiments performed at GSI for a few beam-target combinations have been simulated and first comparisons between the measured and calculated {beta}{sup +}-activity are available.

  8. Reading and a Diffusion Model Analysis of Reaction Time

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Adam; Katz, Leonard; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2012-01-01

    Processing speed is associated with reading performance. However, the literature is not clear either on the definition of processing speed or on why and how it contributes to reading performance. In this study we demonstrated that processing speed, as measured by reaction time, is not a unitary construct. Using the diffusion model of two-choice reaction time, we assessed processing speed in a series of same-different reaction time tasks for letter and number strings. We demonstrated that the association between reaction time and reading performance is driven by processing speed for reading-related information, but not motor or sensory encoding speed. PMID:22612543

  9. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose Ammonia Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2007-04-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate of formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  10. EMPIRE: A Reaction Model Code for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palumbo, A.; Herman, M.; Capote, R.

    2014-06-01

    The correct modeling of abundances requires knowledge of nuclear cross sections for a variety of neutron, charged particle and γ induced reactions. These involve targets far from stability and are therefore difficult (or currently impossible) to measure. Nuclear reaction theory provides the only way to estimate values of such cross sections. In this paper we present application of the EMPIRE reaction code to nuclear astrophysics. Recent measurements are compared to the calculated cross sections showing consistent agreement for n-, p- and α-induced reactions of strophysical relevance.

  11. Isolating the roles of different forcing agents in global stratospheric temperature changes using model integrations with incrementally added single forcings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquila, V.; Swartz, W. H.; Waugh, D. W.; Colarco, P. R.; Pawson, S.; Polvani, L. M.; Stolarski, R. S.

    2016-07-01

    Satellite instruments show a cooling of global stratospheric temperatures over the whole data record (1979-2014). This cooling is not linear and includes two descending steps in the early 1980s and mid-1990s. The 1979-1995 period is characterized by increasing concentrations of ozone-depleting substances (ODSs) and by the two major volcanic eruptions of El Chichón (1982) and Mount Pinatubo (1991). The 1995-present period is characterized by decreasing ODS concentrations and by the absence of major volcanic eruptions. Greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations increase over the whole time period. In order to isolate the roles of different forcing agents in the global stratospheric temperature changes, we performed a set of simulations using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry-Climate Model with prescribed sea surface temperatures. We find that in our model simulations the cooling of the stratosphere from 1979 to present is mostly driven by changes in GHG concentrations in the middle and upper stratosphere and by GHG and ODS changes in the lower stratosphere. While the cooling trend caused by increasing GHGs is roughly constant over the satellite era, changing ODS concentrations cause a significant stratospheric cooling only up to the mid-1990s, when they start to decrease because of the implementation of the Montreal Protocol. Sporadic volcanic events and the solar cycle have a distinct signature in the time series of stratospheric temperature anomalies but do not play a statistically significant role in the long-term trends from 1979 to 2014. Several factors combine to produce the step-like behavior in the stratospheric temperatures: in the lower stratosphere, the flattening starting in the mid-1990s is due to the decrease in ozone-depleting substances; Mount Pinatubo and the solar cycle cause the abrupt steps through the aerosol-associated warming and the volcanically induced ozone depletion. In the middle and upper stratosphere, changes in solar

  12. Improved bleeding scores using Gelfoam(®) Powder with incremental concentrations of bovine thrombin in a swine liver lesion model.

    PubMed

    Morse, Dennis C; Silva, Elif; Bartrom, Jolee; Young, Kelli; Bass, Eric J; Potter, David; Bieber, Trevor

    2016-10-01

    Topical hemostatic agents are used intra-operatively to prevent uncontrolled bleeding. Gelfoam(®) Powder contains a hemostatic agent prepared from purified pork skin gelatin, the efficacy of which is increased when combined with thrombin. However, the effect of increasing concentrations of thrombin on resultant hemostasis is not known. This study sought to evaluate the ability of various concentrations of thrombin in combination with Gelfoam Powder to control bleeding using a swine liver lesion model. Ten pigs underwent a midline laparotomy. Circular lesions were created in the left medial, right medial, and left lateral lobes; six lesions per lobe. Gelfoam Powder was hydrated with Thrombin-JMI(®) diluted to 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL. Each concentration was applied to two lesion sites per lobe. Bleeding scores were measured at 3, 6, 9, and 12 min using a 6-point system; comparison of bleeding scores was performed using ANOVA with the post hoc Tukey test. The bleeding scores with thrombin concentrations at 770 IU/mL were significantly lower than at 250 and 375 IU/mL at all four time points. The percentage of biopsies with a clinically acceptable bleeding score rose from 37.9, 46.6, and 71.2 % at 3 min to 55.2, 69.0, and 88.1 % at 12 min in the 250, 375, and 770 IU/mL thrombin groups, respectively. The study showed that the hemostatic response to thrombin was dose-related: using higher concentrations of thrombin with Gelfoam Powder yielded improved hemostasis, as determined by lower bleeding scores.

  13. Connecting Past to Present and Watersheds to Ocean: Modeling 165 Years of Incremental Changes to Flows into the San Francisco Bay Delta System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacVean, L. J.; Thompson, S. E.; Huttom, P. H.; Sivapalan, M.

    2016-02-01

    California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta sits at the intersection of vast agricultural and population centers, and supplies fresh water for the diverse and often competing needs of ecosystems, farmers, and millions of Californians. Managing and allocating this resource is a complex feat of economics, politics, and engineering, made increasingly contentious by the ongoing drought. The objective of this research is to augment the scientific foundation of management decisions by addressing the question of how flows into the Delta have evolved in response to human intervention since 1850. In particular, quantifying the dynamic components of water usage through vegetative uptake and evapotranspiration, groundwater recharge, flood conveyance, and water exports at incremental levels of development is a key ambition. This approach emphasizes the built environment, which is subject to the local regulatory framework, rather than climate change, which is generally considered immovable without united global effort. This work encompasses the creation of a hydrologic model representing the watersheds of the San Francisco Bay-Delta system, and quantifies the impacts of changes in land use and the gradual construction of levees, reservoirs, and diversion infrastructure. The model is run using the same climatological forcing at each level of development, thus elucidating the effects of local anthropogenic activity on the Delta and the inflows to the San Francisco Bay estuary. Our results provide a timeline of change, giving decision-makers a scientifically established baseline to aid in the sustainable management of the Bay-Delta system.

  14. Formal modeling of a system of chemical reactions under uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Krishnendu; Schlipf, John

    2014-10-01

    We describe a novel formalism representing a system of chemical reactions, with imprecise rates of reactions and concentrations of chemicals, and describe a model reduction method, pruning, based on the chemical properties. We present two algorithms, midpoint approximation and interval approximation, for construction of efficient model abstractions with uncertainty in data. We evaluate computational feasibility by posing queries in computation tree logic (CTL) on a prototype of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway.

  15. Turing patterns in a reaction-diffusion model with the Degn-Harrison reaction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shanbing; Wu, Jianhua; Dong, Yaying

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider a reaction-diffusion model with Degn-Harrison reaction scheme. Some fundamental analytic properties of nonconstant positive solutions are first investigated. We next study the stability of constant steady-state solution to both ODE and PDE models. Our result also indicates that if either the size of the reactor or the effective diffusion rate is large enough, then the system does not admit nonconstant positive solutions. Finally, we establish the global structure of steady-state bifurcations from simple eigenvalues by bifurcation theory and the local structure of the steady-state bifurcations from double eigenvalues by the techniques of space decomposition and implicit function theorem.

  16. Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Person, Suzette; Yang, Guowei; Rungta, Neha; Khurshid, Sarfraz

    2011-01-01

    The last few years have seen a resurgence of interest in the use of symbolic execution -- a program analysis technique developed more than three decades ago to analyze program execution paths. Scaling symbolic execution and other path-sensitive analysis techniques to large systems remains challenging despite recent algorithmic and technological advances. An alternative to solving the problem of scalability is to reduce the scope of the analysis. One approach that is widely studied in the context of regression analysis is to analyze the differences between two related program versions. While such an approach is intuitive in theory, finding efficient and precise ways to identify program differences, and characterize their effects on how the program executes has proved challenging in practice. In this paper, we present Directed Incremental Symbolic Execution (DiSE), a novel technique for detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes. The novelty of DiSE is to combine the efficiencies of static analysis techniques to compute program difference information with the precision of symbolic execution to explore program execution paths and generate path conditions affected by the differences. DiSE is a complementary technique to other reduction or bounding techniques developed to improve symbolic execution. Furthermore, DiSE does not require analysis results to be carried forward as the software evolves -- only the source code for two related program versions is required. A case-study of our implementation of DiSE illustrates its effectiveness at detecting and characterizing the effects of program changes.

  17. Modified version of the combined model of photonucleon reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.

    2015-07-15

    A refined version of the combined photonucleon-reaction model is described. This version makes it possible to take into account the effect of structural features of the doorway dipole state on photonucleon reactions in the energy range of E{sub γ} ≤ 30 MeV. In relation to the previous version of the model, the treatment of isospin effects at the preequilibrium and evaporation reaction stages is refined; in addition, the description of the semidirect effect caused by nucleon emission from the doorway dipole state is improved. The model in question is used to study photonucleon reactions on the isotopes {sup 35-56}Ca and {sup 102-134}Sn in the energy range indicated above.

  18. Quantum Chemical Modeling of the Dehalogenation Reaction of Haloalcohol Dehalogenase.

    PubMed

    Hopmann, Kathrin H; Himo, Fahmi

    2008-07-01

    The dehalogenation reaction of haloalcohol dehalogenase HheC from Agrobacterium radiobacter AD1 was investigated theoretically using hybrid density functional theory methods. HheC catalyzes the enantioselective conversion of halohydrins into their corresponding epoxides. The reaction is proposed to be mediated by a catalytic Ser132-Tyr145-Arg149 triad, and a distinct halide binding site is suggested to facilitate halide displacement by stabilizing the free ion. We investigated the HheC-mediated dehalogenation of (R)-2-chloro-1-phenylethanol using three quantum chemical models of various sizes. The calculated barriers and reaction energies give support to the suggested reaction mechanism. The dehalogenation occurs in a single concerted step, in which Tyr145 abstracts a proton from the halohydrin substrate and the substrate oxyanion displaces the chloride ion, forming the epoxide. Characterization of the involved stationary points is provided. Furthermore, by using three different models of the halide binding site, we are able to assess the adopted modeling methodology.

  19. NUCLEAR REACTION MODELING FOR RIA ISOL TARGET DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    S. MASHNIK; ET AL

    2001-03-01

    Los Alamos scientists are collaborating with researchers at Argonne and Oak Ridge on the development of improved nuclear reaction physics for modeling radionuclide production in ISOL targets. This is being done in the context of the MCNPX simulation code, which is a merger of MCNP and the LAHET intranuclear cascade code, and simulates both nuclear reaction cross sections and radiation transport in the target. The CINDER code is also used to calculate the time-dependent nuclear decays for estimating induced radioactivities. They give an overview of the reaction physics improvements they are addressing, including intranuclear cascade (INC) physics, where recent high-quality inverse-kinematics residue data from GSI have led to INC spallation and fission model improvements; and preequilibrium reactions important in modeling (p,xn) and (p,xnyp) cross sections for the production of nuclides far from stability.

  20. Regimes of chemical reaction waves initiated by nonuniform initial conditions for detailed chemical reaction models.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M A; Kiverin, A D; Ivanov, M F

    2012-05-01

    Regimes of chemical reaction wave propagation initiated by initial temperature nonuniformity in gaseous mixtures, whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics, are studied using a multispecies transport model and a detailed chemical model. Possible regimes of reaction wave propagation are identified for stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-air mixtures in a wide range of initial pressures and temperature levels, depending on the initial non-uniformity steepness. The limits of the regimes of reaction wave propagation depend upon the values of the spontaneous wave speed and the characteristic velocities of the problem. It is shown that one-step kinetics cannot reproduce either quantitative neither qualitative features of the ignition process in real gaseous mixtures because the difference between the induction time and the time when the exothermic reaction begins significantly affects the ignition, evolution, and coupling of the spontaneous reaction wave and the pressure wave, especially at lower temperatures. We show that all the regimes initiated by the temperature gradient occur for much shallower temperature gradients than predicted by a one-step model. The difference is very large for lower initial pressures and for slowly reacting mixtures. In this way the paper provides an answer to questions, important in practice, about the ignition energy, its distribution, and the scale of the initial nonuniformity required for ignition in one or another regime of combustion wave propagation.

  1. Regimes of chemical reaction waves initiated by nonuniform initial conditions for detailed chemical reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberman, M. A.; Kiverin, A. D.; Ivanov, M. F.

    2012-05-01

    Regimes of chemical reaction wave propagation initiated by initial temperature nonuniformity in gaseous mixtures, whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics, are studied using a multispecies transport model and a detailed chemical model. Possible regimes of reaction wave propagation are identified for stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-air mixtures in a wide range of initial pressures and temperature levels, depending on the initial non-uniformity steepness. The limits of the regimes of reaction wave propagation depend upon the values of the spontaneous wave speed and the characteristic velocities of the problem. It is shown that one-step kinetics cannot reproduce either quantitative neither qualitative features of the ignition process in real gaseous mixtures because the difference between the induction time and the time when the exothermic reaction begins significantly affects the ignition, evolution, and coupling of the spontaneous reaction wave and the pressure wave, especially at lower temperatures. We show that all the regimes initiated by the temperature gradient occur for much shallower temperature gradients than predicted by a one-step model. The difference is very large for lower initial pressures and for slowly reacting mixtures. In this way the paper provides an answer to questions, important in practice, about the ignition energy, its distribution, and the scale of the initial nonuniformity required for ignition in one or another regime of combustion wave propagation.

  2. Biogeochemical Transport and Reaction Model (BeTR) v1

    SciTech Connect

    TANG, JINYUN

    2016-04-18

    The Biogeochemical Transport and Reaction Model (BeTR) is a F90 code that enables reactive transport modeling in land modules of earth system models (e.g. CESM, ACME). The code adopts the Objective-Oriented-Design, and allows users to plug in their own biogeochemical (BGC) formulations/codes, and compare them to other existing BGC codes in those ESMs. The code takes information of soil physics variables, such as variables, such as temperature, moisture, soil density profile; water flow, etc., from a land model to track the movement of different chemicals in presence of biogeochemical reactions.

  3. Strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions: Electron drop model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravchuk, P. A.; Yakovlev, D. G.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze enhancement of thermonuclear fusion reactions due to strong plasma screening in dense matter using a simple electron drop model. In the model we assume fusion in a potential that is screened by an effective electron cloud around colliding nuclei (extended Salpeter ion-sphere model). We calculate the mean-field screened Coulomb potentials for atomic nuclei with equal and nonequal charges, appropriate astrophysical S factors, and enhancement factors of reaction rates. As a byproduct, we study the analytic behavior of the screening potential at small separations between the reactants. In this model, astrophysical S factors depend not only on nuclear physics but on plasma screening as well. The enhancement factors are in good agreement with calculations by other methods. This allows us to formulate a combined, pure analytic model of strong plasma screening in thermonuclear reactions. The results can be useful for simulating nuclear burning in white dwarfs and neutron stars.

  4. Rotating flexible disk under shaft temperature increment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pei, Yong-Chen; He, Ling; Wang, Ji-Xin

    2010-08-01

    A rotating flexible annular thin disk subjected to the temperature increment of the shaft clamping the disk was modeled in this paper. At disk top and bottom surfaces and free outer edge, the heat convection boundaries were assumed. Disk transverse deflection was considered as a function of both disk radial and circumferential coordinates, and temperature distribution was solved along disk thickness and radial directions simultaneously. As a result, the shaft temperature increment causes thermo-elastic instability of some disk modes. Effects of the shaft temperature increment, ratio of disk convective heat transfer coefficient to thermal conductivity, disk thickness, nodal circle and diameter numbers of disk mode on the natural frequencies, thermo-elastic instability and critical angular speed of the disk were discussed.

  5. Incremental Parsing with Adjoining Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Yoshihide; Matsubara, Shigeki

    This paper describes an incremental parser based on an adjoining operation. By using the operation, we can avoid the problem of infinite local ambiguity. This paper further proposes a restricted version of the adjoining operation, which preserves lexical dependencies of partial parse trees. Our experimental results showed that the restriction enhances the accuracy of the incremental parsing.

  6. Knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei for tests of structure and reaction models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchera, A. N.; Bazin, D.; Babo, M.; Baumann, T.; Bowry, M.; Bradt, J.; Brown, J.; Deyoung, P. A.; Elman, B.; Finck, J. E.; Gade, A.; Grinyer, G. F.; Jones, M. D.; Lunderberg, E.; Redpath, T.; Rogers, W. F.; Stiefel, K.; Thoennessen, M.; Weisshaar, D.; Whitmore, K.

    2015-10-01

    A series of knockout reactions on p-shell nuclei were studied to extract exclusive cross sections and to investigate the neutron knockout mechanism. The measured cross sections provide stringent tests of shell model and ab initio calculations while measurements of neutron+residual coincidences test the accuracy and validity of reaction models used to predict cross sections. Six different beams ranging from A = 7 to 12 were produced at the NSCL totaling measurements of nine different reaction settings. The reaction settings were determined by the magnetic field of the Sweeper magnet which bends the residues into charged particle detectors. The reaction target was surrounded by the high efficiency CsI array, CAESAR, to tag gamma rays for cross section measurements of low-lying excited states. Additionally, knocked out neutrons were detected with MoNA-LISA in coincidence with the charged residuals. Preliminary results will be discussed. This work is partially supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY11-02511 and the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award No. DE-NA0000979.

  7. A Lattice Boltzmann Model for Oscillating Reaction-Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Romo, Suemi; Ibañez-Orozco, Oscar; Sosa-Herrera, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    A computational algorithm based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is proposed to model reaction-diffusion systems. In this paper, we focus on how nonlinear chemical oscillators like Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) and the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (CIMA) reactions can be modeled by LBM and provide with new insight into the nature and applications of oscillating reactions. We use Gaussian pulse initial concentrations of sulfuric acid in different places of a bidimensional reactor and nondiffusive boundary walls. We clearly show how these systems evolve to a chaotic attractor and produce specific pattern images that are portrayed in the reactions trajectory to the corresponding chaotic attractor and can be used in robotic control.

  8. Designer substrate library for quantitative, predictive modeling of reaction performance

    PubMed Central

    Bess, Elizabeth N.; Bischoff, Amanda J.; Sigman, Matthew S.

    2014-01-01

    Assessment of reaction substrate scope is often a qualitative endeavor that provides general indications of substrate sensitivity to a measured reaction outcome. Unfortunately, this field standard typically falls short of enabling the quantitative prediction of new substrates’ performance. The disconnection between a reaction’s development and the quantitative prediction of new substrates’ behavior limits the applicative usefulness of many methodologies. Herein, we present a method by which substrate libraries can be systematically developed to enable quantitative modeling of reaction systems and the prediction of new reaction outcomes. Presented in the context of rhodium-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation, these models quantify the molecular features that influence enantioselection and, in so doing, lend mechanistic insight to the modes of asymmetric induction. PMID:25267648

  9. Uncertainty quantification for quantum chemical models of complex reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Proppe, Jonny; Husch, Tamara; Simm, Gregor N; Reiher, Markus

    2016-12-22

    For the quantitative understanding of complex chemical reaction mechanisms, it is, in general, necessary to accurately determine the corresponding free energy surface and to solve the resulting continuous-time reaction rate equations for a continuous state space. For a general (complex) reaction network, it is computationally hard to fulfill these two requirements. However, it is possible to approximately address these challenges in a physically consistent way. On the one hand, it may be sufficient to consider approximate free energies if a reliable uncertainty measure can be provided. On the other hand, a highly resolved time evolution may not be necessary to still determine quantitative fluxes in a reaction network if one is interested in specific time scales. In this paper, we present discrete-time kinetic simulations in discrete state space taking free energy uncertainties into account. The method builds upon thermo-chemical data obtained from electronic structure calculations in a condensed-phase model. Our kinetic approach supports the analysis of general reaction networks spanning multiple time scales, which is here demonstrated for the example of the formose reaction. An important application of our approach is the detection of regions in a reaction network which require further investigation, given the uncertainties introduced by both approximate electronic structure methods and kinetic models. Such cases can then be studied in greater detail with more sophisticated first-principles calculations and kinetic simulations.

  10. A practical guide to modelling enzyme-catalysed reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lonsdale, Richard; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Mulholland, Adrian J.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular modelling and simulation methods are increasingly at the forefront of elucidating mechanisms of enzyme-catalysed reactions, and shedding light on the determinants of specificity and efficiency of catalysis. These methods have the potential to assist in drug discovery and the design of novel protein catalysts. This Tutorial Review highlights some of the most widely used modelling methods and some successful applications. Modelling protocols commonly applied in studying enzyme-catalysed reactions are outlined here, and some practical implications are considered, with cytochrome P450 enzymes used as a specific example. PMID:22278388

  11. 39 CFR 3050.23 - Documentation supporting incremental cost estimates in the Postal Service's section 3652 report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Documentation supporting incremental cost... REGULATORY COMMISSION PERSONNEL PERIODIC REPORTING § 3050.23 Documentation supporting incremental cost... incremental cost model shall be reported. ...

  12. Computerized reduction of elementary reaction sets for CFD combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikstrom, Carl V.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling of chemistry in Computational Fluid Dynamics can be the most time-consuming aspect of many applications. If the entire set of elementary reactions is to be solved, a set of stiff ordinary differential equations must be integrated. Some of the reactions take place at very high rates, requiring short time steps, while others take place more slowly and make little progress in the short time step integration.

  13. An Investigation of Model Catalyzed Hydrocarbon Formation Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Tysoe, W. T.

    2001-05-02

    Work was focused on two areas aimed at understanding the chemistry of realistic catalytic systems: (1) The synthesis and characterization of model supported olefin metathesis catalysts. (2) Understanding the role of the carbonaceous layer present on Pd(111) single crystal model catalysts during reaction.

  14. Simple Reaction Time and Statistical Facilitation: A Parallel Grains Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jeff; Ulrich, Rolf

    2003-01-01

    A race-like model is developed to account for various phenomena arising in simple reaction time (RT) tasks. Within the model, each stimulus is represented by a number of grains of information or activation processed in parallel. The stimulus is detected when a criterion number of activated grains reaches a decision center. Using the concept of…

  15. A mathematical model for foreign body reactions in 2D

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jianzhong; Gonzales, Humberto Perez; Todorov, Michail; Kojouharov, Hristo; Tang, Liping

    2010-01-01

    The foreign body reactions are commonly referred to the network of immune and inflammatory reactions of human or animals to foreign objects placed in tissues. They are basic biological processes, and are also highly relevant to bioengineering applications in implants, as fibrotic tissue formations surrounding medical implants have been found to substantially reduce the effectiveness of devices. Despite of intensive research on determining the mechanisms governing such complex responses, few mechanistic mathematical models have been developed to study such foreign body reactions. This study focuses on a kinetics-based predictive tool in order to analyze outcomes of multiple interactive complex reactions of various cells/proteins and biochemical processes and to understand transient behavior during the entire period (up to several months). A computational model in two spatial dimensions is constructed to investigate the time dynamics as well as spatial variation of foreign body reaction kinetics. The simulation results have been consistent with experimental data and the model can facilitate quantitative insights for study of foreign body reaction process in general. PMID:21532988

  16. Molecular Modeling of the Reaction Pathway and Hydride Transfer Reactions of HMG-CoA Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Brandon E.; Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.; Wiest, Olaf

    2012-01-01

    HMG-CoA reductase catalyzes the four electron reduction of HMG-CoA to mevalonate and is an enzyme of considerable biomedical relevance due to the impact of its statin inhibitors on public health. Although the reaction has been studied extensively using x-ray crystallography, there are surprisingly no computational studies that test the mechanistic hypotheses suggested for this complex reaction. Theozyme and QM/MM calculations up to the B3LYP/6-31g(d,p)//B3LYP/6-311++g(2d,2p) level of theory were employed to generate an atomistic description of the enzymatic reaction process and its energy profile. The models generated here predict that the catalytically important Glu83 is protonated prior to hydride transfer and that it acts as the general acid/base in the reaction. With Glu83 protonated, the activation energy calculated for the sequential hydride transfer reactions, 21.8 and 19.3 kcal/mol, are in qualitative agreement with the experimentally determined rate constant for the entire reaction (1/s–1/min). When Glu83 is not protonated, the first hydride transfer reaction is predicted to be disfavored by over 20 kcal/mol, and the activation energy is predicted to be higher by over 10 kcal/mol. While not involved in the reaction as an acid/base, Lys267 is critical for stabilization of the transition state in forming an oxyanion hole with the protonated Glu83. Molecular dynamics simulations and MM/PBSA free energy calculations predict that the enzyme active site stabilizes the hemithioacetal intermediate better than the aldehyde intermediate. This suggests a mechanism where cofactor exchange occurs before the breakdown of the hemithioacetal. Slowing the conversion to aldehyde would provide the enzyme with a mechanism to protect it from solvent and explain why the free aldehyde is not observed experimentally. Our results support the hypothesis that the pKa of an active site acidic group is modulated by the redox state of the cofactor. The oxidized cofactor and

  17. Evaluation of maillard reaction variables and their effect on heterocyclic amine formation in chemical model systems.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Cara; Karim, Faris; Smith, J Scott

    2015-02-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs), highly mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic by-products, form during Maillard browning reactions, specifically in muscle-rich foods. Chemical model systems allow examination of in vitro formation of HCAs while eliminating complex matrices of meat. Limited research has evaluated the effects of Maillard reaction parameters on HCA formation. Therefore, 4 essential Maillard variables (precursors molar concentrations, water amount, sugar type, and sugar amounts) were evaluated to optimize a model system for the study of 4 HCAs: 2-amino-3-methylimidazo-[4,5-f]quinoline, 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, 2-amino-3,8-dimethylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline, and 2-amino-3,4,8-trimethyl-imidazo[4,5-f]quinoxaline. Model systems were dissolved in diethylene glycol, heated at 175 °C for 40 min, and separated using reversed-phase liquid chromatography. To define the model system, precursor amounts (threonine and creatinine) were adjusted in molar increments (0.2/0.2, 0.4/0.4, 0.6/0.6, and 0.8/0.8 mmol) and water amounts by percentage (0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). Sugars (lactose, glucose, galactose, and fructose) were evaluated in several molar amounts proportional to threonine and creatinine (quarter, half, equi, and double). The precursor levels and amounts of sugar were significantly different (P < 0.05) in regards to total HCA formation, with 0.6/0.6/1.2 mmol producing higher levels. Water concentration and sugar type also had a significant effect (P < 0.05), with 5% water and lactose producing higher total HCA amounts. A model system containing threonine (0.6 mmol), creatinine (0.6 mmol), and glucose (1.2 mmol), with 15% water was determined to be the optimal model system with glucose and 15% water being a better representation of meat systems. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Development and Calibration of Reaction Models for Multilayered Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vohra, Manav

    This dissertation focuses on the development and calibration of reaction models for multilayered nanocomposites. The nanocomposites comprise sputter deposited alternating layers of distinct metallic elements. Specifically, we focus on the equimolar Ni-Al and Zr-Al multilayered systems. Computational models are developed to capture the transient reaction phenomena as well as understand the dependence of reaction properties on the microstructure, composition and geometry of the multilayers. Together with the available experimental data, simulations are used to calibrate the models and enhance the accuracy of their predictions. Recent modeling efforts for the Ni-Al system have investigated the nature of self-propagating reactions in the multilayers. Model fidelity was enhanced by incorporating melting effects due to aluminum [Besnoin et al. (2002)]. Salloum and Knio formulated a reduced model to mitigate computational costs associated with multi-dimensional reaction simulations [Salloum and Knio (2010a)]. However, exist- ing formulations relied on a single Arrhenius correlation for diffusivity, estimated for the self-propagating reactions, and cannot be used to quantify mixing rates at lower temperatures within reasonable accuracy [Fritz (2011)]. We thus develop a thermal model for a multilayer stack comprising a reactive Ni-Al bilayer (nanocalorimeter) and exploit temperature evolution measurements to calibrate the diffusion parameters associated with solid state mixing (≈720 K - 860 K) in the bilayer. The equimolar Zr-Al multilayered system when reacted aerobically is shown to exhibit slow aerobic oxidation of zirconium (in the intermetallic), sustained for about 2-10 seconds after completion of the formation reaction. In a collaborative effort, we aim to exploit the sustained heat release for bio-agent defeat application. A simplified computational model is developed to capture the extended reaction regime characterized by oxidation of Zr-Al multilayers

  19. Chemical and mathematical modeling of asphaltene reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Salvage, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    Precipitated asphaltene was subjected to pyrolysis and hydropyrolysis, both neat and in solvents, and catalytic hydroprocessing. A solvent extraction procedure defined gas, maltene, asphaltene, and coke product fractions. The apparent first order rate constant for asphaltene conversion at 400/sup 0/C was relatively insensitive to the particular reaction scheme. The yield of gases likewise showed little variation and was always less than 10%. On the other hand, the maltene and coke yields were about 20% and 60%, respectively, from neat pyrolysis, and about 60% and less than 5%, respectively, from catalytic reactions. The temporal variations of the product fractions allowed discernment of asphaltene reaction pathways. The primary reaction of asphaltene was to residual asphaltene, maltenes, and gases. The residual asphaltene reacted thermally to coke and catalytically to maltenes at the expense of coke. Secondary degradation of these primary products led to lighter compounds. Reaction mechanism for pyrolysis of asphaltene model compounds and alkylaromstics were determined. The model compound kinetics results were combined with a stochastic description of asphaltene structure in a mathematical model of asphaltene pyrolysis. Individual molecular product were assigned to either the gas, maltene, asphaltene, or coke product fractions, and summation of the weights of each constituted the model's predictions. The temporal variation of the product fractions from simulated asphaltene pyrolysis compared favorably with experimental results.

  20. First principles based mean field model for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Jinnouchi, Ryosuke; Kodama, Kensaku; Hatanaka, Tatsuya; Morimoto, Yu

    2011-12-21

    A first principles-based mean field model was developed for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) taking account of the coverage- and material-dependent reversible potentials of the elementary steps. This model was applied to the simulation of single crystal surfaces of Pt, Pt alloy and Pt core-shell catalysts under Ar and O(2) atmospheres. The results are consistent with those shown by past experimental and theoretical studies on surface coverages under Ar atmosphere, the shape of the current-voltage curve for the ORR on Pt(111) and the material-dependence of the ORR activity. This model suggests that the oxygen associative pathway including HO(2)(ads) formation is the main pathway on Pt(111), and that the rate determining step (RDS) is the removal step of O(ads) on Pt(111). This RDS is accelerated on several highly active Pt alloys and core-shell surfaces, and this acceleration decreases the reaction intermediate O(ads). The increase in the partial pressure of O(2)(g) increases the surface coverage with O(ads) and OH(ads), and this coverage increase reduces the apparent reaction order with respect to the partial pressure to less than unity. This model shows details on how the reaction pathway, RDS, surface coverages, Tafel slope, reaction order and material-dependent activity are interrelated.

  1. Catalysis by metallic nanoparticles in aqueous solution: model reactions.

    PubMed

    Hervés, Pablo; Pérez-Lorenzo, Moisés; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Dzubiella, Joachim; Lu, Yan; Ballauff, Matthias

    2012-09-07

    Catalysis by metallic nanoparticles is certainly among the most intensely studied problems in modern nanoscience. However, reliable tests for catalytic performance of such nanoparticles are often poorly defined, which makes comparison and benchmarking rather difficult. We tackle in this tutorial review a subset of well-studied reactions that take place in aqueous phase and for which a comprehensive kinetic analysis is available. Two of these catalytic model reactions are under consideration here, namely the reduction of (i) p-nitrophenol and (ii) hexacyanoferrate (iii), both by borohydride ions. Both reactions take place at the surface of noble metal nanoparticles at room temperature and can be accurately monitored by UV-vis spectroscopy. Moreover, the total surface area of the nanoparticles in solution can be known with high precision and thus can be directly used for the kinetic analysis. Hence, these model reactions represent cases of heterogeneous catalysis that can be modelled with the accuracy typically available for homogeneous catalysis. Both model reactions allow us to discuss a number of important concepts and questions, namely the dependence of catalytic activity on the size of the nanoparticles, electrochemistry of nanoparticles, surface restructuring, the use of carrier systems and the role of diffusion control.

  2. Stability Analysis of a Model for Foreign Body Fibrotic Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Ibraguimov, A.; Owens, L.; Su, J.; Tang, L.

    2012-01-01

    Implanted medical devices often trigger immunological and inflammatory reactions from surrounding tissues. The foreign body-mediated tissue responses may result in varying degrees of fibrotic tissue formation. There is an intensive research interest in the area of wound healing modeling, and quantitative methods are proposed to systematically study the behavior of this complex system of multiple cells, proteins, and enzymes. This paper introduces a kinetics-based model for analyzing reactions of various cells/proteins and biochemical processes as well as their transient behavior during the implant healing in 2-dimensional space. In particular, we provide a detailed modeling study of different roles of macrophages (MΦ) and their effects on fibrotic reactions. The main mathematical result indicates that the stability of the inflamed steady state depends primarily on the reaction dynamics of the system. However, if the said equilibrium is unstable by its reaction-only system, the spatial diffusion and chemotactic effects can help to stabilize when the model is dominated by classical and regulatory macrophages over the inflammatory macrophages. The mathematical proof and counter examples are given for these conclusions. PMID:23193430

  3. Three Dimensional Thermal Abuse Reaction Model for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    and Ahmad Pesaran, Gi-Heon Kim

    2006-06-29

    Three dimensional computer models for simulating thermal runaway of lithium ion battery was developed. The three-dimensional model captures the shapes and dimensions of cell components and the spatial distributions of materials and temperatures, so we could consider the geometrical features, which are critical especially in large cells. An array of possible exothermic reactions, such as solid-electrolyte-interface (SEI) layer decomposition, negative active/electrolyte reaction, and positive active/electrolyte reaction, were considered and formulated to fit experimental data from accelerating rate calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry. User subroutine code was written to implement NREL developed approach and to utilize a commercially available solver. The model is proposed to use for simulation a variety of lithium-ion battery safety events including thermal heating and short circuit.

  4. Model studies of heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions with gold.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ming; Brush, Adrian J; Pozun, Zachary D; Ham, Hyung Chul; Yu, Wen-Yueh; Henkelman, Graeme; Hwang, Gyeong S; Mullins, C Buddie

    2013-06-21

    Supported gold nanoparticles have recently been shown to possess intriguing catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions, particularly for selective hydrogenation reactions. However, fundamental studies that can provide insight into the reaction mechanisms responsible for this activity have been largely lacking. In this tutorial review, we highlight several recent model experiments and theoretical calculations on a well-structured gold surface that provide some insights. In addition to the behavior of hydrogen on a model gold surface, we review the reactivity of hydrogen on a model gold surface in regards to NO2 reduction, chemoselective C=O bond hydrogenation, ether formation, and O-H bond dissociation in water and alcohols. Those studies indicate that atomic hydrogen has a weak interaction with gold surfaces which likely plays a key role in the unique hydrogenative chemistry of classical gold catalysts.

  5. Incremental Quench Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-30

    insulator semiconductor devices built onthese cytl exhibit high-frequency C-V characte stics with dark currents within one order of magnitude of the...Auger limit at 77 K. I Based on the metal insulator semiconductor device results and the electrical characteristics of oriented 20-mm-diameter crystals...P2 Is SOLIDo 2r f S0-Schematic l~iagram of the Incrementa uec re,2_1a fl’R~r e a2951 c1 Poe9 2 5Jf � (88-62) %R F 2.%.~~ I- REACTION

  6. Implementation of a vibrationally linked chemical reaction model for DSMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, A. B.; Bird, Graeme A.

    1994-01-01

    A new procedure closely linking dissociation and exchange reactions in air to the vibrational levels of the diatomic molecules has been implemented in both one- and two-dimensional versions of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) programs. The previous modeling of chemical reactions with DSMC was based on the continuum reaction rates for the various possible reactions. The new method is more closely related to the actual physics of dissociation and is more appropriate to the particle nature of DSMC. Two cases are presented: the relaxation to equilibrium of undissociated air initially at 10,000 K, and the axisymmetric calculation of shuttle forebody heating during reentry at 92.35 km and 7500 m/s. Although reaction rates are not used in determining the dissociations or exchange reactions, the new method produces rates which agree astonishingly well with the published rates derived from experiment. The results for gas properties and surface properties also agree well with the results produced by earlier DSMC models, equilibrium air calculations, and experiment.

  7. The fundamental diagram of pedestrian model with slow reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun; Qin, Zheng; Hu, Hao; Xu, Zhaohui; Li, Huan

    2012-12-01

    The slow-to-start models are a classical cellular automata model in simulating vehicle traffic. However, to our knowledge, the slow-to-start effect has not been considered in modeling pedestrian dynamics. We verify the similar behavior between pedestrian and vehicle, and propose an new lattice gas (LG) model called the slow reaction (SR) model to describe the pedestrian’s delayed reaction in single-file movement. We simulate and reproduce Seyfried’s field experiments at the Research Centre Jülich, and use its empirical data to validate our SR model. We compare the SR model with the standard LG model. We tested different probabilities of slow reaction ps in the SR model and found the simulation data of ps=0.3 fit the empirical data best. The RMS error of the mean velocity of the SR model is smaller than that of the standard LG model. In the range of ps=0.1-0.3, our fundamental diagram between velocity and density by simulation coincides with field experiments. The distribution of individual velocity in the fundamental diagram in the SR model agrees with the empirical data better than that of the standard LG model. In addition, we observe stop-and-go waves and phase separation in pedestrian flow by simulation. We reproduced the phenomena of uneven distribution of interspaces by the SR model while the standard LG model did not. The SR model can reproduce the evolution of spatio-temporal structures of pedestrian flow with higher fidelity to Seyfried’s experiments than the standard LG model.

  8. Comparison of DSMC Reaction Models with QCT Reaction Rates for Nitrogen

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-17

    Distribution A: Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited PA #16299 Non-Equilibrium Reaction Rates N2-N2, Tv≠ Tt =Tr • TCE, QK, and VFD are over an...Release, Distribution Unlimited PA #16299 Non-Equilibrium Rates for Bias Model N2-N2, Tv≠ Tt =Tr • Bias model provides much better fit than Park 2-T model...Higher vibrational favoring for lower Tt : λ>2 works better than λ=4 for Tt >20,000 K Distribution A: Approved for Public Release, Distribution

  9. Computerized reduction of elementary reaction sets for combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikstrom, Carl V.

    1991-01-01

    If the entire set of elementary reactions is to be solved in the modeling of chemistry in computational fluid dynamics, a set of stiff ordinary differential equations must be integrated. Some of the reactions take place at very high rates, requiring short time steps, while others take place more slowly and make little progress in the short time step integration. The goal is to develop a procedure to automatically obtain sets of finite rate equations, consistent with a partial equilibrium assumptions, from an elementary set appropriate to local conditions. The possibility of computerized reaction reduction was demonstrated. However, the ability to use the reduced reaction set depends on the ability of the CFD approach in incorporate partial equilibrium calculations into the computer code. Therefore, the results should be tested on a code with partial equilibrium capability.

  10. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Gary C.; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J.; Soong, Seng-jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Background Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. Results In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  11. A chain reaction approach to modelling gene pathways.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gary C; Chen, Dung-Tsa; Chen, James J; Soong, Seng-Jaw; Lamartiniere, Coral; Barnes, Stephen

    2012-08-01

    BACKGROUND: Of great interest in cancer prevention is how nutrient components affect gene pathways associated with the physiological events of puberty. Nutrient-gene interactions may cause changes in breast or prostate cells and, therefore, may result in cancer risk later in life. Analysis of gene pathways can lead to insights about nutrient-gene interactions and the development of more effective prevention approaches to reduce cancer risk. To date, researchers have relied heavily upon experimental assays (such as microarray analysis, etc.) to identify genes and their associated pathways that are affected by nutrient and diets. However, the vast number of genes and combinations of gene pathways, coupled with the expense of the experimental analyses, has delayed the progress of gene-pathway research. The development of an analytical approach based on available test data could greatly benefit the evaluation of gene pathways, and thus advance the study of nutrient-gene interactions in cancer prevention. In the present study, we have proposed a chain reaction model to simulate gene pathways, in which the gene expression changes through the pathway are represented by the species undergoing a set of chemical reactions. We have also developed a numerical tool to solve for the species changes due to the chain reactions over time. Through this approach we can examine the impact of nutrient-containing diets on the gene pathway; moreover, transformation of genes over time with a nutrient treatment can be observed numerically, which is very difficult to achieve experimentally. We apply this approach to microarray analysis data from an experiment which involved the effects of three polyphenols (nutrient treatments), epigallo-catechin-3-O-gallate (EGCG), genistein, and resveratrol, in a study of nutrient-gene interaction in the estrogen synthesis pathway during puberty. RESULTS: In this preliminary study, the estrogen synthesis pathway was simulated by a chain reaction model. By

  12. Assessing the Incremental Value of KABC-II Luria Model Scores in Predicting Achievement: What Do They Tell Us beyond the MPI?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Ryan J.; Spurgin, Angelia R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental validity of the Luria interpretive scheme for the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (KABC-II) for predicting scores on the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement-Second Edition (KTEA-II). All participants were children and adolescents (N = 2,025) drawn from the nationally…

  13. Assessing the Incremental Value of KABC-II Luria Model Scores in Predicting Achievement: What Do They Tell Us beyond the MPI?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGill, Ryan J.; Spurgin, Angelia R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the incremental validity of the Luria interpretive scheme for the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children-Second Edition (KABC-II) for predicting scores on the Kaufman Test of Educational Achievement-Second Edition (KTEA-II). All participants were children and adolescents (N = 2,025) drawn from the nationally…

  14. Modeling human behaviors and reactions under dangerous environment.

    PubMed

    Kang, J; Wright, D K; Qin, S F; Zhao, Y

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the framework of a real-time simulation system to model human behavior and reactions in dangerous environments. The system utilizes the latest 3D computer animation techniques, combined with artificial intelligence, robotics and psychology, to model human behavior, reactions and decision making under expected/unexpected dangers in real-time in virtual environments. The development of the system includes: classification on the conscious/subconscious behaviors and reactions of different people; capturing different motion postures by the Eagle Digital System; establishing 3D character animation models; establishing 3D models for the scene; planning the scenario and the contents; and programming within Virtools Dev. Programming within Virtools Dev is subdivided into modeling dangerous events, modeling character's perceptions, modeling character's decision making, modeling character's movements, modeling character's interaction with environment and setting up the virtual cameras. The real-time simulation of human reactions in hazardous environments is invaluable in military defense, fire escape, rescue operation planning, traffic safety studies, and safety planning in chemical factories, the design of buildings, airplanes, ships and trains. Currently, human motion modeling can be realized through established technology, whereas to integrate perception and intelligence into virtual human's motion is still a huge undertaking. The challenges here are the synchronization of motion and intelligence, the accurate modeling of human's vision, smell, touch and hearing, the diversity and effects of emotion and personality in decision making. There are three types of software platforms which could be employed to realize the motion and intelligence within one system, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  15. Mathematical properties of models of the reaction-diffusion type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, M.; Soliani, G.

    Nonlinear systems of the reaction-diffusion (RD) type, including Gierer-Meinhardt models of autocatalysis, are studied using Lie algebras coming from their prolongation structure. Depending on the form of the functions of the fields characterizing the reactions among them, we consider both quadratic and cubic RD equations. On the basis of the prolongation algebra associated with a given RD model, we distinguish the model as a completely linearizable or a partially linearizable system. In this classification a crucial role is played by the relative sign of the diffusion coefficients, which strongly influence the properties of the system. In correspondence to the above situations, different algebraic characterizations, together with exact and approximate solutions, are found. Interesting examples are the quadratic RD model, which admits an exact solution in terms of the elliptic Weierstrass function, and the cubic Gierer-Meinhardt model, whose prolongation algebra leads to the similitude group in the plane.

  16. A model for reaction rates in turbulent reacting flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinitz, W.; Evans, J. S.

    1984-01-01

    To account for the turbulent temperature and species-concentration fluctuations, a model is presented on the effects of chemical reaction rates in computer analyses of turbulent reacting flows. The model results in two parameters which multiply the terms in the reaction-rate equations. For these two parameters, graphs are presented as functions of the mean values and intensity of the turbulent fluctuations of the temperature and species concentrations. These graphs will facilitate incorporation of the model into existing computer programs which describe turbulent reacting flows. When the model was used in a two-dimensional parabolic-flow computer code to predict the behavior of an experimental, supersonic hydrogen jet burning in air, some improvement in agreement with the experimental data was obtained in the far field in the region near the jet centerline. Recommendations are included for further improvement of the model and for additional comparisons with experimental data.

  17. Modelling population growth with delayed nonlocal reaction in 2-dimensions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Wu, Jianhong; Zhang, Fan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the population growth of a single species living in a two-dimensional spatial domain. New reaction-difusion equation models with delayed nonlocal reaction are developed in two-dimensional bounded domains combining diferent boundary conditions. The important feature of the models is the reflection of the joint efect of the difusion dynamics and the nonlocal maturation delayed efect. We consider and ana- lyze numerical solutions of the mature population dynamics with some wellknown birth functions. In particular, we observe and study the occurrences of asymptotically stable steady state solutions and periodic waves for the two-dimensional problems with nonlocal delayed reaction. We also investigate numerically the efects of various parameters on the period, the peak and the shape of the periodic wave as well as the shape of the asymptotically stable steady state solution.

  18. Including Rebinding Reactions in Well-Mixed Models of Distributive Biochemical Reactions.

    PubMed

    Lawley, Sean D; Keener, James P

    2016-11-15

    The behavior of biochemical reactions requiring repeated enzymatic substrate modification depends critically on whether the enzymes act processively or distributively. Whereas processive enzymes bind only once to a substrate before carrying out a sequence of modifications, distributive enzymes release the substrate after each modification and thus require repeated bindings. Recent experimental and computational studies have revealed that distributive enzymes can act processively due to rapid rebindings (so-called quasi-processivity). In this study, we derive an analytical estimate of the probability of rapid rebinding and show that well-mixed ordinary differential equation models can use this probability to quantitatively replicate the behavior of spatial models. Importantly, rebinding requires that connections be added to the well-mixed reaction network; merely modifying rate constants is insufficient. We then use these well-mixed models to suggest experiments to 1) detect quasi-processivity and 2) test the theory. Finally, we show that rapid rebindings drastically alter the reaction's Michaelis-Menten rate equations.

  19. Modeling the Reaction of Fe Atoms with CCl4

    SciTech Connect

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Ginovska, Bojana; Dupuis, Michel

    2009-01-05

    The reaction of zero-valent iron with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in gas phase was studied using density functional theory. Temperature programmed desorption experiments over a range of Fe and CCl4 coverages on a FeO(111) surface, demonstrate a rich surface chemistry with several reaction products (C2Cl4, C2Cl6, OCCl2, CO, FeCl2, FeCl3) observed. The reactivity of Fe and CCl4 was studied under three stoichiometries, one Fe with one CCl4, one Fe with two CCl4 molecules and two Fe with one CCl4, modeling the environment of the experimental work. The electronic structure calculations give insight into the reactions leading to the experimentally observed products and suggest that novel Fe-C-Cl containing species are important intermediates in these reactions. The intermediate complexes are formed in highly exothermic reactions, in agreement with the experimentally observed reactivity with the surface at low temperature (30 K). This initial survey of the reactivity of Fe with CCl4 identifies some potential reaction pathways that are important in the effort to use Fe nano-particles to differentiate harmful pathways that lead to the formation of contaminants like chloroform (CHCl3) from harmless pathways that lead to products such as formate (HCO2-) or carbon oxides in water and soil. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. Calibration of Complex Subsurface Reaction Models Using a Surrogate-Model Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of model assessment techniques to complex subsurface reaction models involves numerous difficulties, including non-trivial model selection, parameter non-uniqueness, and excessive computational burden. To overcome these difficulties, this study introduces SAMM (Simult...

  1. Calibration of Complex Subsurface Reaction Models Using a Surrogate-Model Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Application of model assessment techniques to complex subsurface reaction models involves numerous difficulties, including non-trivial model selection, parameter non-uniqueness, and excessive computational burden. To overcome these difficulties, this study introduces SAMM (Simult...

  2. Examining the role of finite reaction times in swarming models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Quint, David; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Modeling collective behavior in biological and artificial systems has had much success in recent years at predicting and mimicing real systems by utilizing techniques borrowed from modelling many particle systems interacting with physical forces. However unlike inert particles interacting with instantaneous forces, living organisms have finite reaction times, and behaviors that vary from individual to individual. What constraints do these physiological effects place on the interactions between individuals in order to sustain a robust ordered state? We use a self-propelled agent based model in continuous space based on previous models by Vicsek and Couzin including alignment and separation maintaining interactions to examine the behavior of a single cohesive group of organisms. We found that for very short reaction times the system is able to form an ordered state even in the presence of heterogeneities. However for larger more physiological reaction times organisms need a buffer zone with no cohesive interactions in order to maintain an ordered state. Finally swarms with finite reaction times and behavioral heterogeneities are able to dynamically sort out individuals with impaired function and sustain order.

  3. Transactional Model of Coping, Appraisals, and Emotional Reactions to Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brack, Greg; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    A study investigated the relationship of transactional models of stress management and appraisal-emotion relationships to emotions produced by taking a new job. The participants, 231 graduate students, completed measures of cognitive appraisals, stress coping resources, and emotional reactions at the time of taking a new job and some time later.…

  4. A Multiple Reaction Modelling Framework for Microbial Electrochemical Technologies.

    PubMed

    Oyetunde, Tolutola; Sarma, Priyangshu M; Ahmad, Farrukh; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2017-01-04

    A mathematical model for the theoretical evaluation of microbial electrochemical technologies (METs) is presented that incorporates a detailed physico-chemical framework, includes multiple reactions (both at the electrodes and in the bulk phase) and involves a variety of microbial functional groups. The model is applied to two theoretical case studies: (i) A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for continuous anodic volatile fatty acids (VFA) oxidation and cathodic VFA reduction to alcohols, for which the theoretical system response to changes in applied voltage and VFA feed ratio (anode-to-cathode) as well as membrane type are investigated. This case involves multiple parallel electrode reactions in both anode and cathode compartments; (ii) A microbial fuel cell (MFC) for cathodic perchlorate reduction, in which the theoretical impact of feed flow rates and concentrations on the overall system performance are investigated. This case involves multiple electrode reactions in series in the cathode compartment. The model structure captures interactions between important system variables based on first principles and provides a platform for the dynamic description of METs involving electrode reactions both in parallel and in series and in both MFC and MEC configurations. Such a theoretical modelling approach, largely based on first principles, appears promising in the development and testing of MET control and optimization strategies.

  5. A Multiple Reaction Modelling Framework for Microbial Electrochemical Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Oyetunde, Tolutola; Sarma, Priyangshu M.; Ahmad, Farrukh; Rodríguez, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    A mathematical model for the theoretical evaluation of microbial electrochemical technologies (METs) is presented that incorporates a detailed physico-chemical framework, includes multiple reactions (both at the electrodes and in the bulk phase) and involves a variety of microbial functional groups. The model is applied to two theoretical case studies: (i) A microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) for continuous anodic volatile fatty acids (VFA) oxidation and cathodic VFA reduction to alcohols, for which the theoretical system response to changes in applied voltage and VFA feed ratio (anode-to-cathode) as well as membrane type are investigated. This case involves multiple parallel electrode reactions in both anode and cathode compartments; (ii) A microbial fuel cell (MFC) for cathodic perchlorate reduction, in which the theoretical impact of feed flow rates and concentrations on the overall system performance are investigated. This case involves multiple electrode reactions in series in the cathode compartment. The model structure captures interactions between important system variables based on first principles and provides a platform for the dynamic description of METs involving electrode reactions both in parallel and in series and in both MFC and MEC configurations. Such a theoretical modelling approach, largely based on first principles, appears promising in the development and testing of MET control and optimization strategies. PMID:28054959

  6. Renormalized reaction and relaxation rates for harmonic oscillator model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorbachev, Yuriy E.

    2017-07-01

    The thermal dissociation process is considered within the method of solving the kinetic equations for spatially inhomogeneous reactive gas mixtures developed in the previous papers. For harmonic oscillator model explicit expressions for reaction and relaxation rates in the renormalized form are derived.

  7. Modeling shock-driven reaction in low density PMDI foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brundage, Aaron; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William; Peterson, David

    Shock experiments on low density polyurethane foams reveal evidence of reaction at low impact pressures. However, these reaction thresholds are not evident over the low pressures reported for historical Hugoniot data of highly distended polyurethane at densities below 0.1 g/cc. To fill this gap, impact data given in a companion paper for polymethylene diisocyanate (PMDI) foam with a density of 0.087 g/cc were acquired for model validation. An equation of state (EOS) was developed to predict the shock response of these highly distended materials over the full range of impact conditions representing compaction of the inert material, low-pressure decomposition, and compression of the reaction products. A tabular SESAME EOS of the reaction products was generated using the JCZS database in the TIGER equilibrium code. In particular, the Arrhenius Burn EOS, a two-state model which transitions from an unreacted to a reacted state using single step Arrhenius kinetics, as implemented in the shock physics code CTH, was modified to include a statistical distribution of states. Hence, a single EOS is presented that predicts the onset to reaction due to shock loading in PMDI-based polyurethane foams. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Modeling the Dynamics of Chemical Reactions Involving Multidimensional Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Ping

    The direct dynamics approach is employed to study prototype reactions including hydrogen and hydride transfer. The dynamics are treated with variational transition state theory including multidimensional semiclassical tunneling corrections, and the force field is modeled with semiempirical molecular orbital theory. The primary kinetic isotope effect for the (1,5) sigmatropic rearrangement reaction of cis-1,3-pentadiene is predicted and compared to experiment. The force field is obtained by molecular orbital theory with the AM1, PM3, and MINDO/3 parameterizations. The kinetic isotope effects calculated with the MINDO/3 and PM3 Hamiltonians agree with those calculated by AM1 within 13%, and the latter agree with experiment within 13%. The tunneling contributions to the kinetic isotope effects are analyzed, and the nature of the vibrationally assisted tunneling process is elucidated. The kinetic isotope effects of the reactions of CF_3 with CD_3H are studied including all internal degrees of freedom. The force field necessary for the dynamics calculations is evaluated using the neglect of diatomic differential overlap (NDDO) molecular orbital theory with semiempirical specific -reaction parameters (SRP), which are based on the standard AM1 parameterization adjusted to improve the agreement between experiment and the calculated quantities such as the vibrational frequencies of reactants and products and the classical barrier. The kinetic isotope effects are calculated using two different SRP force fields, and they are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The picture of the corner cutting tunneling process that emerges is discussed graphically. The two NDDO-SRP models are further used to study the hydrogen abstraction reactions of CF_3 with CH_4, CD_4, and C_2 H_6, and very good agreement with experiment is obtained. Finally, a simple model hydride transfer reaction of formic acid is investigated usine the AM1 and PM3 Hamiltonians, and the results are

  9. Kinetic modelling of GlmU reactions - prioritization of reaction for therapeutic application.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vivek K; Das, Kaveri; Seshadri, Kothandaraman

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis(Mtu), a successful pathogen, has developed resistance against the existing anti-tubercular drugs necessitating discovery of drugs with novel action. Enzymes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis are attractive targets for antibacterial drug discovery. The bifunctional enzyme mycobacterial GlmU (Glucosamine 1-phosphate N-acetyltransferase/ N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate uridyltransferase) has been a target enzyme for drug discovery. Its C- and N- terminal domains catalyze acetyltransferase (rxn-1) and uridyltransferase (rxn-2) activities respectively and the final product is involved in peptidoglycan synthesis. However, the bifunctional nature of GlmU poses difficulty in deciding which function to be intervened for therapeutic advantage. Genetic analysis showed this as an essential gene but it is still unclear whether any one or both of the activities are critical for cell survival. Often enzymatic activity with suitable high-throughput assay is chosen for random screening, which may not be the appropriate biological function inhibited for maximal effect. Prediction of rate-limiting function by dynamic network analysis of reactions could be an option to identify the appropriate function. With a view to provide insights into biochemical assays with appropriate activity for inhibitor screening, kinetic modelling studies on GlmU were undertaken. Kinetic model of Mtu GlmU-catalyzed reactions was built based on the available kinetic data on Mtu and deduction from Escherichia coli data. Several model variants were constructed including coupled/decoupled, varying metabolite concentrations and presence/absence of product inhibitions. This study demonstrates that in coupled model at low metabolite concentrations, inhibition of either of the GlmU reactions cause significant decrement in the overall GlmU rate. However at higher metabolite concentrations, rxn-2 showed higher decrement. Moreover, with available intracellular concentration of the

  10. Implementing Kernel Methods Incrementally by Incremental Nonlinear Projection Trick.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Nojun

    2016-05-20

    Recently, the nonlinear projection trick (NPT) was introduced enabling direct computation of coordinates of samples in a reproducing kernel Hilbert space. With NPT, any machine learning algorithm can be extended to a kernel version without relying on the so called kernel trick. However, NPT is inherently difficult to be implemented incrementally because an ever increasing kernel matrix should be treated as additional training samples are introduced. In this paper, an incremental version of the NPT (INPT) is proposed based on the observation that the centerization step in NPT is unnecessary. Because the proposed INPT does not change the coordinates of the old data, the coordinates obtained by INPT can directly be used in any incremental methods to implement a kernel version of the incremental methods. The effectiveness of the INPT is shown by applying it to implement incremental versions of kernel methods such as, kernel singular value decomposition, kernel principal component analysis, and kernel discriminant analysis which are utilized for problems of kernel matrix reconstruction, letter classification, and face image retrieval, respectively.

  11. Complex reaction noise in a molecular quasispecies model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochberg, David; Zorzano, María-Paz; Morán, Federico

    2006-05-01

    We have derived exact Langevin equations for a model of quasispecies dynamics. The inherent multiplicative reaction noise is complex and its statistical properties are specified completely. The numerical simulation of the complex Langevin equations is carried out using the Cholesky decomposition for the noise covariance matrix. This internal noise, which is due to diffusion-limited reactions, produces unavoidable spatio-temporal density fluctuations about the mean field value. In two dimensions, this noise strictly vanishes only in the perfectly mixed limit, a situation difficult to attain in practice.

  12. Spatiotemporal patterns in a reaction-diffusion model with the Degn-Harrison reaction scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui; Yi, Feng-qi; Zhao, Xiao-qiang

    Spatial and temporal patterns generated in ecological and chemical systems have become a central object of research in recent decades. In this work, we are concerned with a reaction-diffusion model with the Degn-Harrison reaction scheme, which accounts for the qualitative feature of the respiratory process in a Klebsiella aerogenes bacterial culture. We study the global stability of the constant steady state, existence and nonexistence of nonconstant steady states as well as the Hopf and steady state bifurcations. In particular, our results show the existence of Turing patterns and inhomogeneous periodic oscillatory patterns while the system parameters are all spatially homogeneous. These results also exhibit the critical role of the system parameters in leading to the formation of spatiotemporal patterns.

  13. Fluid dynamic modeling of nano-thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Zyskin, Maxim; Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2014-03-14

    This paper presents a direct numerical method based on gas dynamic equations to predict pressure evolution during the discharge of nanoenergetic materials. The direct numerical method provides for modeling reflections of the shock waves from the reactor walls that generates pressure-time fluctuations. The results of gas pressure prediction are consistent with the experimental evidence and estimates based on the self-similar solution. Artificial viscosity provides sufficient smoothing of shock wave discontinuity for the numerical procedure. The direct numerical method is more computationally demanding and flexible than self-similar solution, in particular it allows study of a shock wave in its early stage of reaction and allows the investigation of “slower” reactions, which may produce weaker shock waves. Moreover, numerical results indicate that peak pressure is not very sensitive to initial density and reaction time, providing that all the material reacts well before the shock wave arrives at the end of the reactor.

  14. Simple model for lambda-doublet propensities in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael J.; Zare, Richard N.

    1990-01-01

    A simple geometric model is presented to account for lambda-doublet propensities in bimolecular reactions A + BC - AB + C. It applies to reactions in which AB is formed in a pi state, and in which the unpaired molecular orbital responsible for lambda-doubling arises from breaking the B-C bond. The lambda-doublet population ratio is predicted to be 2:1 provided that: (1) the motion of A in the transition state determines the plane of rotation of AB; (2) the unpaired pi orbital lying initially along the B-C bond may be resolved into a projection onto the AB plane of rotation and a projection perpendicular to this plane; (3) there is no preferred geometry for dissociation of ABC. The 2:1 lambda-doublet ratio is the 'unconstrained dynamics prior' lambda-doublet distribution for such reactions.

  15. Modelling biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yuanling; Burrage, Kevin; Chen, Luonan

    2016-05-07

    In this paper, we gave a new framework for modelling and simulating biochemical reaction systems by stochastic differential equations with reflection not in a heuristic way but in a mathematical way. The model is computationally efficient compared with the discrete-state Markov chain approach, and it ensures that both analytic and numerical solutions remain in a biologically plausible region. Specifically, our model mathematically ensures that species numbers lie in the domain D, which is a physical constraint for biochemical reactions, in contrast to the previous models. The domain D is actually obtained according to the structure of the corresponding chemical Langevin equations, i.e., the boundary is inherent in the biochemical reaction system. A variant of projection method was employed to solve the reflected stochastic differential equation model, and it includes three simple steps, i.e., Euler-Maruyama method was applied to the equations first, and then check whether or not the point lies within the domain D, and if not perform an orthogonal projection. It is found that the projection onto the closure D¯ is the solution to a convex quadratic programming problem. Thus, existing methods for the convex quadratic programming problem can be employed for the orthogonal projection map. Numerical tests on several important problems in biological systems confirmed the efficiency and accuracy of this approach.

  16. Classic and contemporary approaches to modeling biochemical reactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, William W.; Niepel, Mario; Sorger, Peter K.

    2010-01-01

    Recent interest in modeling biochemical networks raises questions about the relationship between often complex mathematical models and familiar arithmetic concepts from classical enzymology, and also about connections between modeling and experimental data. This review addresses both topics by familiarizing readers with key concepts (and terminology) in the construction, validation, and application of deterministic biochemical models, with particular emphasis on a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction. Networks of coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are the natural language for describing enzyme kinetics in a mass action approximation. We illustrate this point by showing how the familiar Briggs-Haldane formulation of Michaelis-Menten kinetics derives from the outer (or quasi-steady-state) solution of a dynamical system of ODEs describing a simple reaction under special conditions. We discuss how parameters in the Michaelis-Menten approximation and in the underlying ODE network can be estimated from experimental data, with a special emphasis on the origins of uncertainty. Finally, we extrapolate from a simple reaction to complex models of multiprotein biochemical networks. The concepts described in this review, hitherto of interest primarily to practitioners, are likely to become important for a much broader community of cellular and molecular biologists attempting to understand the promise and challenges of “systems biology” as applied to biochemical mechanisms. PMID:20810646

  17. EMPIRE: Nuclear Reaction Model Code System for Data Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, M.; Capote, R.; Carlson, B. V.; Obložinský, P.; Sin, M.; Trkov, A.; Wienke, H.; Zerkin, V.

    2007-12-01

    EMPIRE is a modular system of nuclear reaction codes, comprising various nuclear models, and designed for calculations over a broad range of energies and incident particles. A projectile can be a neutron, proton, any ion (including heavy-ions) or a photon. The energy range extends from the beginning of the unresolved resonance region for neutron-induced reactions (∽ keV) and goes up to several hundred MeV for heavy-ion induced reactions. The code accounts for the major nuclear reaction mechanisms, including direct, pre-equilibrium and compound nucleus ones. Direct reactions are described by a generalized optical model (ECIS03) or by the simplified coupled-channels approach (CCFUS). The pre-equilibrium mechanism can be treated by a deformation dependent multi-step direct (ORION + TRISTAN) model, by a NVWY multi-step compound one or by either a pre-equilibrium exciton model with cluster emission (PCROSS) or by another with full angular momentum coupling (DEGAS). Finally, the compound nucleus decay is described by the full featured Hauser-Feshbach model with γ-cascade and width-fluctuations. Advanced treatment of the fission channel takes into account transmission through a multiple-humped fission barrier with absorption in the wells. The fission probability is derived in the WKB approximation within the optical model of fission. Several options for nuclear level densities include the EMPIRE-specific approach, which accounts for the effects of the dynamic deformation of a fast rotating nucleus, the classical Gilbert-Cameron approach and pre-calculated tables obtained with a microscopic model based on HFB single-particle level schemes with collective enhancement. A comprehensive library of input parameters covers nuclear masses, optical model parameters, ground state deformations, discrete levels and decay schemes, level densities, fission barriers, moments of inertia and γ-ray strength functions. The results can be converted into ENDF-6 formatted files using the

  18. A model for reaction-assisted polymer dissolution in LIGA.

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Richard S.

    2004-05-01

    A new chemically-oriented mathematical model for the development step of the LIGA process is presented. The key assumption is that the developer can react with the polymeric resist material in order to increase the solubility of the latter, thereby partially overcoming the need to reduce the polymer size. The ease with which this reaction takes place is assumed to be determined by the number of side chain scissions that occur during the x-ray exposure phase of the process. The dynamics of the dissolution process are simulated by solving the reaction-diffusion equations for this three-component, two-phase system, the three species being the unreacted and reacted polymers and the solvent. The mass fluxes are described by the multicomponent diffusion (Stefan-Maxwell) equations, and the chemical potentials are assumed to be given by the Flory-Huggins theory. Sample calculations are used to determine the dependence of the dissolution rate on key system parameters such as the reaction rate constant, polymer size, solid-phase diffusivity, and Flory-Huggins interaction parameters. A simple photochemistry model is used to relate the reaction rate constant and the polymer size to the absorbed x-ray dose. The resulting formula for the dissolution rate as a function of dose and temperature is ?t to an extensive experimental data base in order to evaluate a set of unknown global parameters. The results suggest that reaction-assisted dissolution is very important at low doses and low temperatures, the solubility of the unreacted polymer being too small for it to be dissolved at an appreciable rate. However, at high doses or at higher temperatures, the solubility is such that the reaction is no longer needed, and dissolution can take place via the conventional route. These results provide an explanation for the observed dependences of both the dissolution rate and its activation energy on the absorbed dose.

  19. A model study of sequential enzyme reactions and electrostatic channeling.

    PubMed

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Metzger, Vincent T; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-03-14

    We study models of two sequential enzyme-catalyzed reactions as a basic functional building block for coupled biochemical networks. We investigate the influence of enzyme distributions and long-range molecular interactions on reaction kinetics, which have been exploited in biological systems to maximize metabolic efficiency and signaling effects. Specifically, we examine how the maximal rate of product generation in a series of sequential reactions is dependent on the enzyme distribution and the electrostatic composition of its participant enzymes and substrates. We find that close proximity between enzymes does not guarantee optimal reaction rates, as the benefit of decreasing enzyme separation is countered by the volume excluded by adjacent enzymes. We further quantify the extent to which the electrostatic potential increases the efficiency of transferring substrate between enzymes, which supports the existence of electrostatic channeling in nature. Here, a major finding is that the role of attractive electrostatic interactions in confining intermediate substrates in the vicinity of the enzymes can contribute more to net reactive throughput than the directional properties of the electrostatic fields. These findings shed light on the interplay of long-range interactions and enzyme distributions in coupled enzyme-catalyzed reactions, and their influence on signaling in biological systems.

  20. Reaction-diffusion processes and metapopulation models on duplex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Du, Fang; Yu, Li; Chen, Guanrong

    2013-03-01

    Reaction-diffusion processes, used to model various spatially distributed dynamics such as epidemics, have been studied mostly on regular lattices or complex networks with simplex links that are identical and invariant in transferring different kinds of particles. However, in many self-organized systems, different particles may have their own private channels to keep their purities. Such division of links often significantly influences the underlying reaction-diffusion dynamics and thus needs to be carefully investigated. This article studies a special reaction-diffusion process, named susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) dynamics, given by the reaction steps β→α and α+β→2β, on duplex networks where links are classified into two groups: α and β links used to transfer α and β particles, which, along with the corresponding nodes, consist of an α subnetwork and a β subnetwork, respectively. It is found that the critical point of particle density to sustain reaction activity is independent of the network topology if there is no correlation between the degree sequences of the two subnetworks, and this critical value is suppressed or extended if the two degree sequences are positively or negatively correlated, respectively. Based on the obtained results, it is predicted that epidemic spreading may be promoted on positive correlated traffic networks but may be suppressed on networks with modules composed of different types of diffusion links.

  1. Light radioactive nuclei capture reactions with phenomenological potential models

    SciTech Connect

    Guimaraes, V.; Bertulani, C. A.

    2010-05-21

    Light radioactive nuclei play an important role in many astrophysical environments. Due to very low cross sections of some neutron and proton capture reactions by these radioactive nuclei at energies of astrophysical interest, direct laboratory measurements are very difficult. For radioactive nuclei such as {sup 8}Li and {sup 8}B, the direct measurement of neutron capture reactions is impossible. Indirect methods have been applied to overcome these difficulties. In this work we will report on the results and discussion of phenomenological potential models used to determine some proton and neutron capture reactions. As a test we show the results for the {sup 16}O(p,gamma){sup 17}F{sub gs}(5/2{sup +}) and {sup 16}O(p,gamma){sup 17}F{sub ex}(1/2{sup +}) capture reactions. We also computed the nucleosynthesis cross sections for the {sup 7}Li(n,gamma){sup 8}Li{sub gs}, {sup 8}Li(n,gamma){sup 9}Li{sub gs} and {sup 8}B(p,gamma){sup 9}C{sub gs} capture reactions.

  2. A model study of sequential enzyme reactions and electrostatic channeling

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Changsun; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M.; Metzger, Vincent T.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    We study models of two sequential enzyme-catalyzed reactions as a basic functional building block for coupled biochemical networks. We investigate the influence of enzyme distributions and long-range molecular interactions on reaction kinetics, which have been exploited in biological systems to maximize metabolic efficiency and signaling effects. Specifically, we examine how the maximal rate of product generation in a series of sequential reactions is dependent on the enzyme distribution and the electrostatic composition of its participant enzymes and substrates. We find that close proximity between enzymes does not guarantee optimal reaction rates, as the benefit of decreasing enzyme separation is countered by the volume excluded by adjacent enzymes. We further quantify the extent to which the electrostatic potential increases the efficiency of transferring substrate between enzymes, which supports the existence of electrostatic channeling in nature. Here, a major finding is that the role of attractive electrostatic interactions in confining intermediate substrates in the vicinity of the enzymes can contribute more to net reactive throughput than the directional properties of the electrostatic fields. These findings shed light on the interplay of long-range interactions and enzyme distributions in coupled enzyme-catalyzed reactions, and their influence on signaling in biological systems. PMID:24628210

  3. Modeling Large Zinc Isotope Fractionations Associated with Reaction Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, J. R.; John, S.; Kavner, A.

    2009-12-01

    Often multiple processes govern isotope fractionation during a chemical reaction, such as the mass-transport, equilibrium and reaction kinetics between reactants and products. Here we use experimental electrochemical techniques to control the mass-transport and reaction kinetics of the electrodeposition reaction: Zn2+ + 2e- = Zn(s); and model the isotopic fractionation measured to resolve the underlying mechanisms of fractionation. Zn was plated on a rotating disc electrode at various applied overpotentials, rotation rates and temperatures. Electroplated Zn was recovered in acid for analysis of the stable isotope composition by multi-collector ICP-MS. The isotopic composition (66Zn/64Zn) of plated metal is reported relative to the stock solution. A large range of Δ66Znsample-stock is observed, with increasing fractionation at higher rotation rates (Fig. 1A), and lower overpotentials (Fig. 1B). Models of electrochemical kinetics, show that these variables control the relative rates of precipitation and diffusion, as defined by the Koutecky-Levich equation [Bard and Faulkner (2001), Electrochemical Methods, John Wiley & Sons]. Using this equation to interpret our data shows that all the data fall along a systematic trend (Fig. 1C) with smaller fractionations in the mass-transport limited regime and larger fractionations produced under electrochemical kinetic control. We extend the Koutecky-Levich model to predict isotope fractionation during electrochemical processes as a function of mass-dependent diffusion (Fig. 2A); standard rate constant (Fig. 2B); and transfer coefficient, describing reaction barrier symmetry (Fig. 2C). A comparison of the model and our data shows that diffusive and equilibrium fractionation alone (Fig. 2A-B) cannot reproduce the trends in our data, but a mass-dependence in α can explain our observations. However, the predicted fractionation is very sensitive to the magnitude of k0 (Fig. 2C). This model predicts how isotope fractionation

  4. Modeling reaction fronts of separated condensed phase reactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koundinyan, Sushilkumar; Stewart, D. Scott; Matalon, Moshe

    2017-01-01

    We present a Gibbs free energy approach to modeling reaction fronts in condensed phase reactive materials. The current interest is in chemical reactions of condensed phase reactants that are initially separated. In energetic materials such reactions are observed to occur extremely fast and at relatively sharp fronts. The condensed phase combustion process differs in several aspects from classical gaseous combustion due to the disparity between the characteristic thermal conductivity length and the mass diffusion lengths and a volume, temperature, stress, mass fraction equation of state that principally depends only on the component reference volumes and the current mixture composition. To retain a simple planar configuration, we consider the two reactants, in solid phase, are in motion towards each other characterized by counter-flow geometry. We apply the model to a simplified Titanium-Boron system and present the analysis of reaction zone length for various strain rates. The numerical results are validated with asymptotic approximations at the Burke-Schumann (complete combustion) limit.

  5. Modeling reaction fronts of separated condensed phase reactants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koundinyan, Sushilkumar; Matalon, Moshe; Stewart, D. Scott; Bdzil, John

    2015-06-01

    We present a Gibbs free energy approach to modeling reaction fronts in condensed phase reactive materials. The current interest is in chemical reactions of condensed phase reactants that are initially separated. In energetic materials such reactions are observed to occur extremely fast and at relatively sharp fronts. The solid-to-solid combustion process differs in several aspects from classical gaseous combustion due to the disparity between the characteristic thermal conductivity length and the mass diffusion lengths and a volume, temperature, stress, mass fraction equation of state that principally depends only on the component reference volumes and the current mixture composition. To retain a simple planar configuration, we consider the two reactants, in solid phase, are in motion towards each other characterized by counter-flow geometry. We apply the model to a simplified Titanium-Boron system and present the analysis of reaction zone length for various strain rates. The numerical results are validated with asymptotic approximations at the Burke-Schumann limit. Supported by HDTRA1-10-1-0020 (DTRA), AF Sub MO C00039417-1 (AFOSR/TRE).

  6. Towards many-body based nuclear reaction modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilaire, Stéphane; Goriely, Stéphane

    2016-06-01

    The increasing need for cross sections far from the valley of stability poses a challenge for nuclear reaction models. So far, predictions of cross sections have relied on more or less phenomenological approaches, depending on parameters adjusted to available experimental data or deduced from systematic expressions. While such predictions are expected to be reliable for nuclei not too far from the experimentally known regions, it is clearly preferable to use more fundamental approaches, based on sound physical principles, when dealing with very exotic nuclei. Thanks to the high computer power available today, all the ingredients required to model a nuclear reaction can now be (and have been) microscopically (or semi-microscopically) determined starting from the information provided by a nucleon-nucleon effective interaction. This concerns nuclear masses, optical model potential, nuclear level densities, photon strength functions, as well as fission barriers. All these nuclear model ingredients, traditionally given by phenomenological expressions, now have a microscopic counterpart implemented in the TALYS nuclear reaction code. We are thus now able to perform fully microscopic cross section calculations. The quality of these ingredients and the impact of using them instead of the usually adopted phenomenological parameters will be discussed. Perspectives for the coming years will be drawn on the improvements one can expect.

  7. Increment detection of bandlimited noises in the chinchilla.

    PubMed

    Shofner, W P; Yost, W A; Sheft, S

    1993-03-01

    A positive reinforcement, adaptive tracking procedure was used to study the intensity discrimination abilities of six chinchillas to noise signals. Increment detection thresholds were obtained using a two-down, one-up tracking rule. The effect of overall noise masker level and the effect of noise bandwidth on increment detection thresholds were studied. The continuous noise masker and the signal increment had equal bandwidths. Increment detection thresholds are independent of overall level for wideband noise; the asymptotic DL for wideband noise is 1.334 dB. In addition, increment detection thresholds decrease as the bandwidth of the noise increases. The observed slope of the bandwidth function for the chinchilla is independent of overall level and is around -2.8 dB/decade. The slope of the bandwidth function obtained for the chinchilla is similar to values reported for human subjects under similar conditions, but is less than the slope predicted by the ideal energy detector model.

  8. Boundary effects in a surface reaction model for CO oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brosilow, Benjamin J.; Gulari, Erdogan; Ziff, Robert M.

    1993-01-01

    The surface reaction model of Ziff, Gulari, and Barshad (ZGB) is investigated on finite systems with ``hard'' oxygen boundary conditions. The rate of production of CO2 is calculated as a function of y and system size. When the rate of CO adsorption y is above the first-order transition value y2, the reactive region is found to extend into the system a distance ξ which scales as (y-y2)-0.40 when y→y2.

  9. Diabatic models with transferrable parameters for generalized chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; McKemmish, Laura K.; McKenzie, Ross H.; Hush, Noel S.

    2017-05-01

    Diabatic models applied to adiabatic electron-transfer theory yield many equations involving just a few parameters that connect ground-state geometries and vibration frequencies to excited-state transition energies and vibration frequencies to the rate constants for electron-transfer reactions, utilizing properties of the conical-intersection seam linking the ground and excited states through the Pseudo Jahn-Teller effect. We review how such simplicity in basic understanding can also be obtained for general chemical reactions. The key feature that must be recognized is that electron-transfer (or hole transfer) processes typically involve one electron (hole) moving between two orbitals, whereas general reactions typically involve two electrons or even four electrons for processes in aromatic molecules. Each additional moving electron leads to new high-energy but interrelated conical-intersection seams that distort the shape of the critical lowest-energy seam. Recognizing this feature shows how conical-intersection descriptors can be transferred between systems, and how general chemical reactions can be compared using the same set of simple parameters. Mathematical relationships are presented depicting how different conical-intersection seams relate to each other, showing that complex problems can be reduced into an effective interaction between the ground-state and a critical excited state to provide the first semi-quantitative implementation of Shaik’s “twin state” concept. Applications are made (i) demonstrating why the chemistry of the first-row elements is qualitatively so different to that of the second and later rows, (ii) deducing the bond-length alternation in hypothetical cyclohexatriene from the observed UV spectroscopy of benzene, (iii) demonstrating that commonly used procedures for modelling surface hopping based on inclusion of only the first-derivative correction to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation are valid in no region of the chemical

  10. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M. A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davidkova, M.; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Mantero, A.; Nieminem, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H. N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k-d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  11. Diffusion-controlled reactions modeling in Geant4-DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Karamitros, M.; Luan, S.; Bernal, M.A.; Allison, J.; Baldacchino, G.; Davidkova, M.; Francis, Z.; Friedland, W.; Ivantchenko, V.; Ivantchenko, A.; Mantero, A.; Nieminem, P.; Santin, G.; Tran, H.N.; Stepan, V.; Incerti, S.

    2014-10-01

    Context Under irradiation, a biological system undergoes a cascade of chemical reactions that can lead to an alteration of its normal operation. There are different types of radiation and many competing reactions. As a result the kinetics of chemical species is extremely complex. The simulation becomes then a powerful tool which, by describing the basic principles of chemical reactions, can reveal the dynamics of the macroscopic system. To understand the dynamics of biological systems under radiation, since the 80s there have been on-going efforts carried out by several research groups to establish a mechanistic model that consists in describing all the physical, chemical and biological phenomena following the irradiation of single cells. This approach is generally divided into a succession of stages that follow each other in time: (1) the physical stage, where the ionizing particles interact directly with the biological material; (2) the physico-chemical stage, where the targeted molecules release their energy by dissociating, creating new chemical species; (3) the chemical stage, where the new chemical species interact with each other or with the biomolecules; (4) the biological stage, where the repairing mechanisms of the cell come into play. This article focuses on the modeling of the chemical stage. Method This article presents a general method of speeding-up chemical reaction simulations in fluids based on the Smoluchowski equation and Monte-Carlo methods, where all molecules are explicitly simulated and the solvent is treated as a continuum. The model describes diffusion-controlled reactions. This method has been implemented in Geant4-DNA. The keys to the new algorithm include: (1) the combination of a method to compute time steps dynamically with a Brownian bridge process to account for chemical reactions, which avoids costly fixed time step simulations; (2) a k–d tree data structure for quickly locating, for a given molecule, its closest reactants. The

  12. Modeling Reaction Control System Effects on Mars Odyssey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, Jill L.; Chavis, Zachary Q.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the Mars 2001 Odyssey aerobraking mission, NASA Langley Research Center performed 6 degree of freedom (6-DOF) simulations to determine rotational motion of the spacecraft. The main objective of this study was to assess the reaction control system models and their effects on the atmospheric flight of Odyssey. Based on these models, a comparison was made between data derived from flight measurements to simulated rotational motion of the spacecraft during aerobraking at Mars. The differences between the simulation and flight derived Odyssey data were then used to adjust the aerodynamic parameters to achieve a better correlation.

  13. Bifurcation Analysis of a Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoli; Chang, Yu; Xu, Dashun

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the bifurcation phenomena in a Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction model by applying Hopf bifurcation theory in frequency domain and harmonic balance method. The high accurate predictions, i.e. fourth-order harmonic balance approximation, on frequencies, amplitudes, and approximation expressions for periodic solutions emerging from Hopf bifurcation are provided. We also detect the stability and location of these periodic solutions. Numerical simulations not only confirm the theoretical analysis results but also illustrate some complex oscillations such as a cascade of period-doubling bifurcation, quasi-periodic solution, and period-doubling route to chaos. All these results improve the understanding of the dynamics of the model.

  14. Thermal maturation of incrementally assembled plutons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Coleman, D. S.; Heizler, M. T.

    2009-12-01

    The Cretaceous zoned intrusive suites of the Sierra Nevada batholith (SNB) were each assembled over 8-11 million years through incremental amalgamation of sheeted intrusions. Emplacement as small sheet-like increments inhibits development of a voluminous zone of melt bearing rock; instead the active magma body represents only a small portion of the total volume intruded. Plutons formed incrementally will have a protracted thermal history (T-t) that can be elucidated using thermochronologic techniques yielding insights into the thermal evolution of the lithosphere at magma chamber-pluton scales. Thermal histories are derived for plutons from the dike-like John Muir Intrusive Suite (JMIS) and the laccolithic Mount Whitney Intrusive Suite (MWIS), both located in the eastern-central SNB, by correlating estimated zircon saturation and argon closure temperatures with U-Pb zircon and titanite, 40Ar/39Ar amphibole, biotite, and K-feldspar ages. Close agreement among zircon and hornblende ages indicate rapid cooling following intrusion. However, hornblende and biotite ages are separated by 6-9 million years indicating slow protracted cooling. We interpret these data to reflect the thermal maturation of an incrementally assembled magma system in which temperatures cycled between ~500-300°C for millions of years. Hornblende ages were not reset by younger intrusions, therefore maximum reheating temperatures did not exceed ~500°C for geologically significant durations. T-t cooling curves from the intrusive suites are used to calibrate finite difference numerical simulations of pluton assembly. Intrusion geometries are modeled (HEAT 3D, Wohletz, 2007) by stacking horizontal increments from the top-down and bottom-up and vertical increments are emplaced syntaxially and antitaxially and are designed to generate plutons of the approximate dimensions, depth of emplacement, and age range of the Sierran suites. Numerical simulations yield the following general observations: 1) an

  15. Benchmark 3 - Incremental sheet forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elford, Michael; Saha, Pradip; Seong, Daeyong; Haque, MD Ziaul; Yoon, Jeong Whan

    2013-12-01

    Benchmark-3 is designed to predict strains, punch load and deformed profile after spring-back during single tool incremental sheet forming. AA 7075-O material has been selected. A corn shape is formed to 45 mm depth with an angle of 45°. Problem description, material properties, and simulation reports with experimental data are summarized.

  16. A discrete model to study reaction-diffusion-mechanics systems.

    PubMed

    Weise, Louis D; Nash, Martyn P; Panfilov, Alexander V

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects.

  17. A Discrete Model to Study Reaction-Diffusion-Mechanics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Louis D.; Nash, Martyn P.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a discrete reaction-diffusion-mechanics (dRDM) model to study the effects of deformation on reaction-diffusion (RD) processes. The dRDM framework employs a FitzHugh-Nagumo type RD model coupled to a mass-lattice model, that undergoes finite deformations. The dRDM model describes a material whose elastic properties are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Numerically, the dRDM approach combines a finite difference approach for the RD equations with a Verlet integration scheme for the equations of the mass-lattice system. Using this framework results were reproduced on self-organized pacemaking activity that have been previously found with a continuous RD mechanics model. Mechanisms that determine the period of pacemakers and its dependency on the medium size are identified. Finally it is shown how the drift direction of pacemakers in RDM systems is related to the spatial distribution of deformation and curvature effects. PMID:21804911

  18. Measuring individual corrective reaction time using the intermittent illumination model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ray F; Hsu, Chih-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    The corrective reaction time (tcr) is an essential motor property when modelling hand control movements. Many studies designed experiments to estimate tcr, but reported only group means with inconsistent definitions. This study proposes an alternative methodology using Drury's (1994) intermittent illumination model. A total of 24 participants performed circular tracking movements under five levels of visual information delay using a modified monitor in a darkened room. Measured movement speeds and the manipulated delays were used with the model to estimate tcr of individuals and test effects of gender and path width. The results showed excellent model fits and demonstrated individual differences of tcr, which was 273 ms on average and ranged from 87 to 441 ms. The wide range of tcr values was due to significant effects of gender and path width. Male participants required shorter tcr compared to female participants, especially for narrow path widths. This study reports the corrective reaction time (tcr) of individuals using a novel methodology. The estimated tcr ranged from 87 to 441 ms, helping model hand control movements, such as aiming and tracking. The methodology can be continuously applied to study tcr under conditions with various performers and movements.

  19. Trichloramine Removal with Activated Carbon Is Governed by Two Reductive Reactions: A Theoretical Approach with Diffusion-Reaction Models.

    PubMed

    Matsushita, Taku; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ikekame, Shohei; Sakuma, Miki; Shirasaki, Nobutaka

    2017-04-06

    Mechanisms underlying trichloramine removal with activated carbon treatment were proven by batch experiments and theoretical analysis with diffusion-reaction models. The observed values of trichloramine and free chlorine were explained only by the model in which (1) both trichloramine and free chlorine were involved as reactants, (2) the removals of reactants were affected both by the intraparticle diffusion and by the reaction with activated carbon, and (3) trichloramine decomposition was governed by two distinct reductive reactions. One reductive reaction was expressed as a first-order reaction: the reductive reaction of trichloramine with the basal plane of PAC, which consists of graphene sheets. The other reaction was expressed as a second-order reaction: the reductive reaction of trichloramine with active functional groups located on the edge of the basal plane. Free chlorine competitively reacted with both the basal plane and the active functional groups. The fact that the model prediction succeeded even in experiments with different activated carbon doses, with different initial trichloramine concentrations, and with different sizes of activated carbon particles clearly proved that the mechanisms described in the model were reasonable for explaining trichloramine removal with activated carbon treatment.

  20. Transalkylation reactions in fossil fuels and related model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Farcasiu, M.; Forbus, T.R.; LaPierre, R.B.

    1983-02-01

    The alkyl substituents of high molecular weight polycyclic aromatic constituents of petroleum residues are transferable to exogenous monocyclic aromatics (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, etc.) by acid catalyzed (CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/H) Friedel Crafts transalkylation. Analysis (GC-MS) of the volatile alkylated monocyclic aromatic products provides a method for the determination of the alkyl group content/structure of the starting fossil fuel mixture. Both model systems, using alkylated naphthalenes, phenanthrenes, pyrenes and dibenzothiophenes and demineralized shale oil or petroleum resid were studied. The model studies (alkyl chain length 2-10 carbons) revealed the following reaction pathways to predominate: (1) transalkylation rates/equilibria are independent of chain length; (2) n-alkyl groups are transfered without rearrangement or fragmentation; (3) reaction rate depends upon the aromatic moiety; (4) formation of dixylylmethanes via benzyl carbenium ions is significant (12 to 25% of product; and (5) significant minor products at longer reaction times are alkyl tetralins, tetralins, napthalenes and alkylated acceptors having a chain length reduced by (-CH/sub 2/-)/sub 4/.

  1. Coupled Disturbance Modelling And Validation Of A Reaction Wheel Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Aglietti, Gugliemo S.

    2012-07-01

    Microvibrations of a RWA are usually studied in either hard-mounted or coupled conditions, although coupled wheel-structure disturbances are more representative than the hard-mounted disturbances. The coupled analysis method of the wheel-structure is not as well developed as the hard-mounted one. A coupled disturbance analysis method is proposed in this paper. One of the most important factors in coupled disturbance analysis - the accelerance or dynamic mass of the wheel is measured and results are validated with an equivalent FE model. The wheel hard-mounted disturbances are also measured from a vibration measurement platform particularly designed for this study. Wheel structural modes are solved from its analytical disturbance model and validated with the test results. The wheel-speed dependent accelerance analysis method is proposed.

  2. Chemical reaction fouling model for single-phase heat transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1993-08-01

    A fouling model was developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermalboundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of flu id dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. The analysis was used to examine the experimental data for fouling deposition of polyperoxides produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries were analyzed. The results showed that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate would differ for the three fouling mechanisms; therefore, it is important to identify the controlling mechanism in applying the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions.

  3. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism.

    PubMed

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two π-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5'-GG-3' and 5'-GT-3'. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  4. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two π-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5'-GG-3' and 5'-GT-3'. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  5. Modelling charge transfer reactions with the frozen density embedding formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2011-12-21

    The frozen density embedding (FDE) subsystem formulation of density-functional theory is a useful tool for studying charge transfer reactions. In this work charge-localized, diabatic states are generated directly with FDE and used to calculate electronic couplings of hole transfer reactions in two {pi}-stacked nucleobase dimers of B-DNA: 5{sup '}-GG-3{sup '} and 5{sup '}-GT-3{sup '}. The calculations rely on two assumptions: the two-state model, and a small differential overlap between donor and acceptor subsystem densities. The resulting electronic couplings agree well with benchmark values for those exchange-correlation functionals that contain a high percentage of exact exchange. Instead, when semilocal GGA functionals are used the electronic couplings are grossly overestimated.

  6. Homogeneous models for mechanisms of surface reactions: Propylene ammoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, D.M.T.; Nugent, W.A.; Fultz, W.C.; Rose, D.C.; Tulip, T.H.

    1987-04-01

    The proposed active sites on the catalyst surface in heterogeneous propylene ammoxidation have been successfully modelled by structurally characterized pinacolato W(VI) tert-butylimido complexes. These compounds exist as an equilibrating mixture of amine-bis(imido) and imido-bis(amido) complexes, the position of this equilibrium is dependent on the electronic nature of the glycolate ligand. Both of the C-N bond-forming reactions proposed in recent studies by Grasselli et al. (1) have been reproduced using discrete Group VI d{sup 0} organoimido complexes under mild conditions suitable for detailed mechanistic studies. These reactions are: (1) oxidative trapping of radicals at molybdenum imido sites, and (2) migration of the allyl group from oxygen to an imido nitrogen atom.

  7. A reaction-diffusion model of cytosolic hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Lim, Joseph B; Langford, Troy F; Huang, Beijing K; Deen, William M; Sikes, Hadley D

    2016-01-01

    As a signaling molecule in mammalian cells, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) determines the thiol/disulfide oxidation state of several key proteins in the cytosol. Localization is a key concept in redox signaling; the concentrations of signaling molecules within the cell are expected to vary in time and in space in manner that is essential for function. However, as a simplification, all theoretical studies of intracellular hydrogen peroxide and many experimental studies to date have treated the cytosol as a well-mixed compartment. In this work, we incorporate our previously reported reduced kinetic model of the network of reactions that metabolize hydrogen peroxide in the cytosol into a model that explicitly treats diffusion along with reaction. We modeled a bolus addition experiment, solved the model analytically, and used the resulting equations to quantify the spatiotemporal variations in intracellular H2O2 that result from this kind of perturbation to the extracellular H2O2 concentration. We predict that micromolar bolus additions of H2O2 to suspensions of HeLa cells (0.8 × 10(9)cells/l) result in increases in the intracellular concentration that are localized near the membrane. These findings challenge the assumption that intracellular concentrations of H2O2 are increased uniformly throughout the cell during bolus addition experiments and provide a theoretical basis for differing phenotypic responses of cells to intracellular versus extracellular perturbations to H2O2 levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Pace, Molly N; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M; Watson, David B

    2007-06-16

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing N(E) equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M-N(E) kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  9. A reaction-based paradigm to model reactive chemical transport in groundwater with general kinetic and equilibrium reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C.; Pace, Molly N.; Kim, Young-Jin; Jardine, Philip M.; Watson, David B.

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents a reaction-based water quality transport model in subsurface flow systems. Transport of chemical species with a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by M partial differential equations (PDEs). Decomposition via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network transforms M species reactive transport equations into two sets of equations: a set of thermodynamic equilibrium equations representing NE equilibrium reactions and a set of reactive transport equations of M- NE kinetic-variables involving no equilibrium reactions (a kinetic-variable is a linear combination of species). The elimination of equilibrium reactions from reactive transport equations allows robust and efficient numerical integration. The model solves the PDEs of kinetic-variables rather than individual chemical species, which reduces the number of reactive transport equations and simplifies the reaction terms in the equations. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the coupled transport and reaction equations. Simulation comparisons with exact solutions were performed to verify numerical accuracy and assess the effectiveness of various numerical strategies to deal with different application circumstances. Two validation examples involving simulations of uranium transport in soil columns are presented to evaluate the ability of the model to simulate reactive transport with complex reaction networks involving both kinetic and equilibrium reactions.

  10. Examining the Ethnoracial Invariance of a Bifactor Model of Anxiety Sensitivity and the Incremental Validity of the Physical Domain-Specific Factor in a Primary-Care Patient Sample.

    PubMed

    Fergus, Thomas A; Kelley, Lance P; Griggs, Jackson O

    2016-12-19

    There is growing support for a bifactor conceptualization of the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3 (ASI-3; Taylor et al., 2007), consisting of a General factor and 3 domain-specific factors (i.e., Physical, Cognitive, Social). Earlier studies supporting a bifactor model of the ASI-3 used samples that consisted of predominantly White respondents. In addition, extant research has yet to support the incremental validity of the Physical domain-specific factor while controlling for the General factor. The present study is an examination of a bifactor model of the ASI-3 and the measurement invariance of that model among an ethnoracially diverse sample of primary-care patients (N = 533). Results from multiple-group confirmatory factor analysis supported the configural and metric/scalar invariance of the bifactor model of the ASI-3 across self-identifying Black, Latino, and White respondents. The Physical domain-specific factor accounted for unique variance in an index of health anxiety beyond the General factor. These results provide support for the generalizability of a bifactor model of the ASI-3 across 3 ethnoracial groups, as well as indication of the incremental explanatory power of the Physical domain-specific factor. Study implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Reaction times to weak test lights. [psychophysics biological model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, B. A.; Ahumada, P.; Welsh, D.

    1984-01-01

    Maloney and Wandell (1984) describe a model of the response of a single visual channel to weak test lights. The initial channel response is a linearly filtered version of the stimulus. The filter output is randomly sampled over time. Each time a sample occurs there is some probability increasing with the magnitude of the sampled response - that a discrete detection event is generated. Maloney and Wandell derive the statistics of the detection events. In this paper a test is conducted of the hypothesis that the reaction time responses to the presence of a weak test light are initiated at the first detection event. This makes it possible to extend the application of the model to lights that are slightly above threshold, but still within the linear operating range of the visual system. A parameter-free prediction of the model proposed by Maloney and Wandell for lights detected by this statistic is tested. The data are in agreement with the prediction.

  12. Internal Composite Bound States in Deterministic Reaction Diffusion Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Fred; Ghoshal, Gourab; Pawling, Alec; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2013-07-01

    By identifying potential composite states that occur in the Sel’kov-Gray-Scott (GS) model, we show that it can be considered as an effective theory at large spatiotemporal scales, arising from a more fundamental theory (which treats these composite states as fundamental chemical species obeying the diffusion equation) relevant at shorter spatiotemporal scales. When simulations in the latter model are performed as a function of a parameter M=λ-1, the generated spatial patterns evolve at late times into those of the GS model at large M, implying that the composites follow their own unique dynamics at short scales. This separation of scales is an example of dynamical decoupling in reaction diffusion systems.

  13. Modeling the Reactions of Energetic Materials in the Condensed Phase

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, L E; Manaa, M R; Lewis, J P

    2003-12-03

    High explosive (HE) materials are unique for having a strong exothermic reactivity, which has made them desirable for both military and commercial applications. Although the history of HE materials is long, condensed-phase properties are poorly understood. Understanding the condensed-phase properties of HE materials is important for determining stability and performance. Information regarding HE material properties (for example, the physical, chemical, and mechanical behaviors of the constituents in plastic-bonded explosive, or PBX, formulations) is necessary in efficiently building the next generation of explosives as the quest for more powerful energetic materials (in terms of energy per volume) moves forward. In addition, understanding the reaction mechanisms has important ramifications in disposing of such materials safely and cheaply, as there exist vast stockpiles of HE materials with corresponding contamination of earth and groundwater at these sites, as well as a military testing sites The ability to model chemical reaction processes in condensed phase energetic materials is rapidly progressing. Chemical equilibrium modeling is a mature technique with some limitations. Progress in this area continues, but is hampered by a lack of knowledge of condensed phase reaction mechanisms and rates. Atomistic modeling is much more computationally intensive, and is currently limited to very short time scales. Nonetheless, this methodology promises to yield the first reliable insights into the condensed phase processes responsible for high explosive detonation. Further work is necessary to extend the timescales involved in atomistic simulations. Recent work in implementing thermostat methods appropriate to shocks may promise to overcome some of these difficulties. Most current work on energetic material reactivity assumes that electronically adiabatic processes dominate. The role of excited states is becoming clearer, however. These states are not accessible in perfect

  14. Systematic development of reduced reaction mechanisms for dynamic modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frenklach, M.; Kailasanath, K.; Oran, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    A method for systematically developing a reduced chemical reaction mechanism for dynamic modeling of chemically reactive flows is presented. The method is based on the postulate that if a reduced reaction mechanism faithfully describes the time evolution of both thermal and chain reaction processes characteristic of a more complete mechanism, then the reduced mechanism will describe the chemical processes in a chemically reacting flow with approximately the same degree of accuracy. Here this postulate is tested by producing a series of mechanisms of reduced accuracy, which are derived from a full detailed mechanism for methane-oxygen combustion. These mechanisms were then tested in a series of reactive flow calculations in which a large-amplitude sinusoidal perturbation is applied to a system that is initially quiescent and whose temperature is high enough to start ignition processes. Comparison of the results for systems with and without convective flow show that this approach produces reduced mechanisms that are useful for calculations of explosions and detonations. Extensions and applicability to flames are discussed.

  15. Incremental learning for automated knowledge capture.

    SciTech Connect

    Benz, Zachary O.; Basilico, Justin Derrick; Davis, Warren Leon,; Dixon, Kevin R.; Jones, Brian S.; Martin, Nathaniel; Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

    2013-12-01

    People responding to high-consequence national-security situations need tools to help them make the right decision quickly. The dynamic, time-critical, and ever-changing nature of these situations, especially those involving an adversary, require models of decision support that can dynamically react as a situation unfolds and changes. Automated knowledge capture is a key part of creating individualized models of decision making in many situations because it has been demonstrated as a very robust way to populate computational models of cognition. However, existing automated knowledge capture techniques only populate a knowledge model with data prior to its use, after which the knowledge model is static and unchanging. In contrast, humans, including our national-security adversaries, continually learn, adapt, and create new knowledge as they make decisions and witness their effect. This artificial dichotomy between creation and use exists because the majority of automated knowledge capture techniques are based on traditional batch machine-learning and statistical algorithms. These algorithms are primarily designed to optimize the accuracy of their predictions and only secondarily, if at all, concerned with issues such as speed, memory use, or ability to be incrementally updated. Thus, when new data arrives, batch algorithms used for automated knowledge capture currently require significant recomputation, frequently from scratch, which makes them ill suited for use in dynamic, timecritical, high-consequence decision making environments. In this work we seek to explore and expand upon the capabilities of dynamic, incremental models that can adapt to an ever-changing feature space.

  16. ZGB surface reaction model with high diffusion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, J. W.

    1993-02-01

    The diffusionless ZGB (monomer-dimer) surface reaction model exhibits a discontinuous transition to a monomer-poisoned state when the fraction of monomer adsorption attempts exceeds 0.525. It has been claimed that this transition shifts to 2/3 with introduction of rapid diffusion of the monomer species, or of both species. We show this is not the case, 2/3 representing the spinodal rather than the transition point. For equal diffusion rates of both species, we find that the transition only shifts to 0.5951±0.0002.

  17. ZGB surface reaction model with high diffusion rates

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, J.W. )

    1993-02-01

    The diffusionless ZGB (monomer--dimer) surface reaction model exhibits a discontinuous transition to a monomer-poisoned state when the fraction of monomer adsorption attempts exceeds 0.525. It has been claimed that this transition shifts to 2/3 with introduction of rapid diffusion of the monomer species, or of both species. We show this is not the case, 2/3 representing the spinodal rather than the transition point. For equal diffusion rates of both species, we find that the transition only shifts to 0.5951[plus minus]0.0002.

  18. Reaction-diffusion-branching models of stock price fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lei-Han; Tian, Guang-Shan

    Several models of stock trading (Bak et al., Physica A 246 (1997) 430.) are analyzed in analogy with one-dimensional, two-species reaction-diffusion-branching processes. Using heuristic and scaling arguments, we show that the short-time market price variation is subdiffusive with a Hurst exponent H=1/4. Biased diffusion towards the market price and blind-eyed copying lead to crossovers to the empirically observed random-walk behavior ( H=1/2) at long times. The calculated crossover forms and diffusion constants are shown to agree well with simulation data.

  19. Model reference adaptive attitude control of spacecraft using reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sahjendra N.

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear model reference adaptive control law for large angle rotational maneuvers of spacecraft using reaction wheels in the presence of uncertainty is presented. The derivation of control law does not require any information on the values of the system parameters and the disturbance torques acting on the spacecraft. The controller includes a dynamic system in the feedback path. The control law is a nonlinear function of the attitude error, the rate of the attitude error, and the compensator state. Simulation results are prsented to show that large angle rotational maneuvers can be performed in spite of the uncertainty in the system.

  20. Stepwise kinetic equilibrium models of quantitative polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous models for use in interpreting quantitative PCR (qPCR) data are present in recent literature. The most commonly used models assume the amplification in qPCR is exponential and fit an exponential model with a constant rate of increase to a select part of the curve. Kinetic theory may be used to model the annealing phase and does not assume constant efficiency of amplification. Mechanistic models describing the annealing phase with kinetic theory offer the most potential for accurate interpretation of qPCR data. Even so, they have not been thoroughly investigated and are rarely used for interpretation of qPCR data. New results for kinetic modeling of qPCR are presented. Results Two models are presented in which the efficiency of amplification is based on equilibrium solutions for the annealing phase of the qPCR process. Model 1 assumes annealing of complementary targets strands and annealing of target and primers are both reversible reactions and reach a dynamic equilibrium. Model 2 assumes all annealing reactions are nonreversible and equilibrium is static. Both models include the effect of primer concentration during the annealing phase. Analytic formulae are given for the equilibrium values of all single and double stranded molecules at the end of the annealing step. The equilibrium values are then used in a stepwise method to describe the whole qPCR process. Rate constants of kinetic models are the same for solutions that are identical except for possibly having different initial target concentrations. Analysis of qPCR curves from such solutions are thus analyzed by simultaneous non-linear curve fitting with the same rate constant values applying to all curves and each curve having a unique value for initial target concentration. The models were fit to two data sets for which the true initial target concentrations are known. Both models give better fit to observed qPCR data than other kinetic models present in the literature. They also give

  1. Incremental Bayesian Category Learning From Natural Language.

    PubMed

    Frermann, Lea; Lapata, Mirella

    2016-08-01

    Models of category learning have been extensively studied in cognitive science and primarily tested on perceptual abstractions or artificial stimuli. In this paper, we focus on categories acquired from natural language stimuli, that is, words (e.g., chair is a member of the furniture category). We present a Bayesian model that, unlike previous work, learns both categories and their features in a single process. We model category induction as two interrelated subproblems: (a) the acquisition of features that discriminate among categories, and (b) the grouping of concepts into categories based on those features. Our model learns categories incrementally using particle filters, a sequential Monte Carlo method commonly used for approximate probabilistic inference that sequentially integrates newly observed data and can be viewed as a plausible mechanism for human learning. Experimental results show that our incremental learner obtains meaningful categories which yield a closer fit to behavioral data compared to related models while at the same time acquiring features which characterize the learned categories. (An earlier version of this work was published in Frermann and Lapata .). Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  2. Triple-{alpha} reaction rate constrained by stellar evolution models

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, Takuma; Hirschi, Raphael; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2012-11-12

    We investigate the quantitative constraint on the triple-{alpha} reaction rate based on stellar evolution theory, motivated by the recent significant revision of the rate proposed by nuclear physics calculations. Targeted stellar models were computed in order to investigate the impact of that rate in the mass range of 0.8{<=}M/M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }{<=}25 and in the metallicity range between Z= 0 and Z= 0.02. The revised rate has a significant impact on the evolution of low-and intermediate-mass stars, while its influence on the evolution of massive stars (M > 10M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }) is minimal. We find that employing the revised rate suppresses helium shell flashes on AGB phase for stars in the initial mass range 0.8{<=}M/M{sub Circled-Dot-Operator }{<=}6, which is contradictory to what is observed. The absence of helium shell flashes is due to the weak temperature dependence of the revised triple-{alpha} reaction cross section at the temperature involved. In our models, it is suggested that the temperature dependence of the cross section should have at least {nu} > 10 at T = 1-1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8}K where the cross section is proportional to T{sup {nu}}. We also derive the helium ignition curve to estimate the maximum cross section to retain the low-mass first red giants. The semi-analytically derived ignition curves suggest that the reaction rate should be less than {approx} 10{sup -29} cm{sup 6} s{sup -1} mole{sup -2} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 7.8} K, which corresponds to about three orders of magnitude larger than that of the NACRE compilation.

  3. The 136 Xe + 208 Pb reaction: A test of models of multi-nucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Spencer; Yanez, Ricardo; Loveland, Walter; Zhu, Shaofei; Janssens, Robert; Carpenter, Mike; Lauritsen, Torben; Greene, John; Albers, Michael; Ayangeakaa, Akaa; Sonzogni, Alejandro; McCutchan, Elizabeth; Chiara, Christopher; Harker, Jessica; Walters, William

    2015-04-01

    The yields of over 200 projectile-like and target-like fragments from the interaction of 136 Xe (Ec.m. = 450 MeV) with a thick target of 208 Pb were measured using Gammasphere and off-line γ-ray spectroscopy, giving a comprehensive picture of the production cross sections in this reaction. The measured yields were compared to predictions of the GRAZING model (with fission competition) and those of Zagrebaev and Greiner. There is good agreement between the measurements and the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner for nuclei near or below the target (Z = 74, 76, 78, 80, 82). However, the measured cross sections exceed the predicted values by up to an order of magnitude for neutron-rich trans-target nuclei (Z = 84, 86, 88). The GRAZING model predictions are adequate for nuclei near the target (Z = 81-83) but grossly underestimate the yields of all other products. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Grant No. DE-FG06-97ER41026 and DE-FG02-94ER40834 as well as Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 and DE-AC02-98CH10886.

  4. 136Xe+208Pb reaction: A test of models of multinucleon transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, J. S.; Loveland, W.; Yanez, R.; Zhu, S.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Greene, J. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Chiara, C. J.; Harker, J. L.; Walters, W. B.

    2015-06-01

    The yields of over 200 projectile-like fragments (PLFs) and target-like fragments (TLFs) from the interaction of (Ec .m .=450 MeV) 136Xe with a thick target of 208Pb were measured using Gammasphere and off-line γ -ray spectroscopy, giving a comprehensive picture of the production cross sections in this reaction. The measured yields were compared to predictions of the grazing model and the predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner using a quantitative metric, the theory evaluation factor t e f . The grazing model predictions are adequate for describing the yields of nuclei near the target or projectile but they grossly underestimate the yields of all other products. The predictions of Zagrebaev and Greiner correctly describe the magnitude and maxima of the observed TLF transfer cross sections for a wide range of transfers (Δ Z =-8 to Δ Z =+2 ). However, for Δ Z =+4 , the observed position of the maximum in the distribution is four neutrons richer than the predicted maximum. The predicted yields of the neutron-rich N =126 nuclei exceed the measured values by two orders of magnitude. Correlations between TLF and PLF yields are discussed.

  5. In silico strain optimization by adding reactions to metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Correia, Sara; Rocha, Miguel

    2012-07-24

    Nowadays, the concerns about the environment and the needs to increase the productivity at low costs, demand for the search of new ways to produce compounds with industrial interest. Based on the increasing knowledge of biological processes, through genome sequencing projects, and high-throughput experimental techniques as well as the available computational tools, the use of microorganisms has been considered as an approach to produce desirable compounds. However, this usually requires to manipulate these organisms by genetic engineering and/ or changing the enviromental conditions to make the production of these compounds possible. In many cases, it is necessary to enrich the genetic material of those microbes with hereologous pathways from other species and consequently adding the potential to produce novel compounds. This paper introduces a new plug-in for the OptFlux Metabolic Engineering platform, aimed at finding suitable sets of reactions to add to the genomes of selected microbes (wild type strain), as well as finding complementary sets of deletions, so that the mutant becomes able to overproduce compounds with industrial interest, while preserving their viability. The necessity of adding reactions to the metabolic model arises from existing gaps in the original model or motivated by the productions of new compounds by the organism. The optimization methods used are metaheuristics such as Evolutionary Algorithms and Simulated Annealing. The usefulness of this plug-in is demonstrated by a case study, regarding the production of vanillin by the bacterium E. coli.

  6. Geochemical controls on shale groundwaters: Results of reaction path modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Von Damm, K.L.; VandenBrook, A.J.

    1989-03-01

    The EQ3NR/EQ6 geochemical modeling code was used to simulate the reaction of several shale mineralogies with different groundwater compositions in order to elucidate changes that may occur in both the groundwater compositions, and rock mineralogies and compositions under conditions which may be encountered in a high-level radioactive waste repository. Shales with primarily illitic or smectitic compositions were the focus of this study. The reactions were run at the ambient temperatures of the groundwaters and to temperatures as high as 250/degree/C, the approximate temperature maximum expected in a repository. All modeling assumed that equilibrium was achieved and treated the rock and water assemblage as a closed system. Graphite was used as a proxy mineral for organic matter in the shales. The results show that the presence of even a very small amount of reducing mineral has a large influence on the redox state of the groundwaters, and that either pyrite or graphite provides essentially the same results, with slight differences in dissolved C, Fe and S concentrations. The thermodynamic data base is inadequate at the present time to fully evaluate the speciation of dissolved carbon, due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for organic compounds. In the illitic cases the groundwaters resulting from interaction at elevated temperatures are acid, while the smectitic cases remain alkaline, although the final equilibrium mineral assemblages are quite similar. 10 refs., 8 figs., 15 tabs.

  7. MARLEY: Model of Argon Reaction Low Energy Yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardiner, Steven; Bilton, Kyle; Grant, Christopher; Pantic, Emilija; Svoboda, Robert

    2015-10-01

    Core-collapse supernovae are sources of tremendous numbers of neutrinos with energies of up to about 50 MeV. In recent years, there has been growing interest in building detectors that are sensitive to supernova neutrinos. Such detectors can provide information about the initial stages of stellar collapse, early warning signals for light emission from supernovae, and opportunities to study neutrino oscillation physics over astronomical distances. In an effort to enable supernova neutrino detection in next-generation experiments like DUNE, the CAPTAIN collaboration plans to make the first direct measurement of cross sections for neutrino interactions on argon in the supernova energy regime. To help predict neutrino event signatures in the CAPTAIN liquid argon time projection chamber (LArTPC), we have developed a first-of-its-kind Monte Carlo event generator called MARLEY (Model of Argon Reaction Low Energy Yields). This generator attempts to model the complicated nuclear structure dependence of low-energy neutrino-nucleus reactions in sufficient detail for use in LArTPC simulations. In this talk we present some preliminary results calculated using MARLEY and discuss how the current version of the generator may be improved and expanded.

  8. MODELING OF SYNGAS REACTIONS AND HYDROGEN GENERATION OVER SULFIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Kamil Klier; Jeffery A. Spirko; Michael L. Neiman

    2004-10-01

    The objective of the research is to analyze pathways of reactions of hydrogen with oxides of carbon over sulfides, and to predict which characteristics of the sulfide catalyst (nature of metal, defect structure) give rise to the lowest barriers toward oxygenated hydrocarbon product. Reversal of these pathways entails the generation of hydrogen, which is also proposed for study. During this study, adsorption reactions of H atoms and H{sub 2} molecules with MoS{sub 2}, both in molecular and solid form, have been modeled using high-level density functional theory. The relative stabilities of pure MoS{sub 2} edges were calculated and small clusters exhibiting properties of the edges were modeled. The results were finalized and published in the journal ''Surface Science''. Hydrogen adsorption energies on both the edges and the clusters were calculated, and the thermodynamics of hydrogen adsorption on both systems were evaluated. The adsorption locations and vibrational frequencies were also determined. These additional results were published in a second paper in ''Surface Science''. Most recently, the bonding and effect of alkali and transition metal ions was investigated on the MoS{sub 2} clusters. Potassium atoms bind to the clusters and increase the binding of hydrogen to the clusters while reducing the activation barriers for hydrogen adsorption. Silver attaches to the Mo7S14 cluster and donates its odd electron to the nearby Mo atoms and should have a similar effect to hydrogen as potassium does.

  9. Analytical model for heterogeneous reactions in mixed porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Hatfield, K.; Burris, D.R.; Wolfe, N.L.

    1996-08-01

    The funnel/gate system is a developing technology for passive ground-water plume management and treatment. This technology uses sheet pilings as a funnel to force polluted ground water through a highly permeable zone of reactive porous media (the gate) where contaminants are degraded by biotic or abiotic heterogeneous reactions. This paper presents a new analytical nonequilibrium model for solute transport in saturated, nonhomogeneous or mixed porous media that could assist efforts to design funnel/gate systems and predict their performance. The model incorporates convective/dispersion transport, dissolved constituent decay, surface-mediated degradation, and time-dependent mass transfer between phases. Simulation studies of equilibrium and nonequilibrium transport conditions reveal manifestations of rate-limited degradation when mass-transfer times are longer than system hydraulic residence times, or when surface-mediated reaction rates are faster than solute mass-transfer processes (i.e., sorption, film diffusion, or intraparticle diffusion). For example, steady-state contaminant concentrations will be higher under a nonequilibrium transport scenario than would otherwise be expected when assuming equilibrium conditions. Thus, a funnel/gate system may fail to achieve desired ground-water treatment if the possibility of mass-transfer-limited degradation is not considered.

  10. The power induced effects module: A FORTRAN code which estimates lift increments due to power induced effects for V/STOL flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandlin, Doral R.; Howard, Kipp E.

    1991-01-01

    A user friendly FORTRAN code that can be used for preliminary design of V/STOL aircraft is described. The program estimates lift increments, due to power induced effects, encountered by aircraft in V/STOL flight. These lift increments are calculated using empirical relations developed from wind tunnel tests and are due to suckdown, fountain, ground vortex, jet wake, and the reaction control system. The code can be used as a preliminary design tool along with NASA Ames' Aircraft Synthesis design code or as a stand-alone program for V/STOL aircraft designers. The Power Induced Effects (PIE) module was validated using experimental data and data computed from lift increment routines. Results are presented for many flat plate models along with the McDonnell Aircraft Company's MFVT (mixed flow vectored thrust) V/STOL preliminary design and a 15 percent scale model of the YAV-8B Harrier V/STOL aircraft. Trends and magnitudes of lift increments versus aircraft height above the ground were predicted well by the PIE module. The code also provided good predictions of the magnitudes of lift increments versus aircraft forward velocity. More experimental results are needed to determine how well the code predicts lift increments as they vary with jet deflection angle and angle of attack. The FORTRAN code is provided in the appendix.

  11. A Transport Model for Nuclear Reactions Induced by Radioactive Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baoan; Chen Liewen; Das, Champak B.; Das Gupta, Subal; Gale, Charles; Ko, C.M.; Yong, G.-C.; Zuo Wei

    2005-10-14

    Major ingredients of an isospin and momentum dependent transport model for nuclear reactions induced by radioactive beams are outlined. Within the IBUU04 version of this model we study several experimental probes of the equation of state of neutron-rich matter, especially the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy. Comparing with the recent experimental data from NSCL/MSU on isospin diffusion, we found a nuclear symmetry energy of Esym({rho}) {approx_equal} 31.6({rho}/{rho}0)1.05 at subnormal densities. Predictions on several observables sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy at supranormal densities accessible at GSI and the planned Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA) are also made.

  12. Mass transfer model for two-layer TBP oxidation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1994-09-28

    To prove that two-layer, TBP-nitric acid mixtures can be safely stored in the canyon evaporators, it must be demonstrated that a runaway reaction between TBP and nitric acid will not occur. Previous bench-scale experiments showed that, at typical evaporator temperatures, this reaction is endothermic and therefore cannot run away, due to the loss of heat from evaporation of water in the organic layer. However, the reaction would be exothermic and could run away if the small amount of water in the organic layer evaporates before the nitric acid in this layer is consumed by the reaction. Provided that there is enough water in the aqueous layer, this would occur if the organic layer is sufficiently thick so that the rate of loss of water by evaporation exceeds the rate of replenishment due to mixing with the aqueous layer. This report presents measurements of mass transfer rates for the mixing of water and butanol in two-layer, TBP-aqueous mixtures, where the top layer is primarily TBP and the bottom layer is comprised of water or aqueous salt solution. Mass transfer coefficients are derived for use in the modeling of two-layer TBP-nitric acid oxidation experiments. Three cases were investigated: (1) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of both the aqueous and TBP layers, (2) transfer of water into the TBP layer with sparging of just the TBP layer, and (3) transfer of butanol into the aqueous layer with sparging of both layers. The TBP layer was comprised of 99% pure TBP (spiked with butanol for the butanol transfer experiments), and the aqueous layer was comprised of either water or an aluminum nitrate solution. The liquid layers were air sparged to simulate the mixing due to the evolution of gases generated by oxidation reactions. A plastic tube and a glass frit sparger were used to provide different size bubbles. Rates of mass transfer were measured using infrared spectrophotometers provided by SRTC/Analytical Development.

  13. Ions interacting with planar aromatic molecules: Modeling electron transfer reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, B. O.; Alexander, J. D.; Chen, T.; Pettersson, A. T.; Gatchell, M.; Cederquist, H.; Zettergren, H.

    2013-02-07

    We present theoretical absolute charge exchange cross sections for multiply charged cations interacting with the Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules pyrene C{sub 14}H{sub 10}, coronene C{sub 24}H{sub 12}, or circumcoronene C{sub 54}H{sub 18}. These planar, nearly circular, PAHs are modelled as conducting, infinitely thin, and perfectly circular discs, which are randomly oriented with respect to straight line ion trajectories. We present the analytical solution for the potential energy surface experienced by an electron in the field of such a charged disc and a point-charge at an arbitrary position. The location and height of the corresponding potential energy barrier from this simple model are in close agreement with those from much more computationally demanding Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations in a number of test cases. The model results compare favourably with available experimental data on single- and multiple electron transfer reactions and we demonstrate that it is important to include the orientation dependent polarizabilities of the molecules (model discs) in particular for the larger PAHs. PAH ionization energy sequences from DFT are tabulated and used as model inputs. Absolute cross sections for the ionization of PAH molecules, and PAH ionization energies such as the ones presented here may be useful when considering the roles of PAHs and their ions in, e.g., interstellar chemistry, stellar atmospheres, and in related photoabsorption and photoemission spectroscopies.

  14. Reaction Diffusion Modeling of Calcium Dynamics with Realistic ER Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Means, Shawn; Smith, Alexander J.; Shepherd, Jason; Shadid, John; Fowler, John; Wojcikiewicz, Richard J. H.; Mazel, Tomas; Smith, Gregory D.; Wilson, Bridget S.

    2006-01-01

    We describe a finite-element model of mast cell calcium dynamics that incorporates the endoplasmic reticulum's complex geometry. The model is built upon a three-dimensional reconstruction of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from an electron tomographic tilt series. Tetrahedral meshes provide volumetric representations of the ER lumen, ER membrane, cytoplasm, and plasma membrane. The reaction-diffusion model simultaneously tracks changes in cytoplasmic and ER intraluminal calcium concentrations and includes luminal and cytoplasmic protein buffers. Transport fluxes via PMCA, SERCA, ER leakage, and Type II IP3 receptors are also represented. Unique features of the model include stochastic behavior of IP3 receptor calcium channels and comparisons of channel open times when diffusely distributed or aggregated in clusters on the ER surface. Simulations show that IP3R channels in close proximity modulate activity of their neighbors through local Ca2+ feedback effects. Cytoplasmic calcium levels rise higher, and ER luminal calcium concentrations drop lower, after IP3-mediated release from receptors in the diffuse configuration. Simulation results also suggest that the buffering capacity of the ER, and not restricted diffusion, is the predominant factor influencing average luminal calcium concentrations. PMID:16617072

  15. A Reaction-Diffusion Model of Cholinergic Retinal Waves

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, Benjamin; Ford, Kevin; Kutz, J. Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Prior to receiving visual stimuli, spontaneous, correlated activity in the retina, called retinal waves, drives activity-dependent developmental programs. Early-stage waves mediated by acetylcholine (ACh) manifest as slow, spreading bursts of action potentials. They are believed to be initiated by the spontaneous firing of Starburst Amacrine Cells (SACs), whose dense, recurrent connectivity then propagates this activity laterally. Their inter-wave interval and shifting wave boundaries are the result of the slow after-hyperpolarization of the SACs creating an evolving mosaic of recruitable and refractory cells, which can and cannot participate in waves, respectively. Recent evidence suggests that cholinergic waves may be modulated by the extracellular concentration of ACh. Here, we construct a simplified, biophysically consistent, reaction-diffusion model of cholinergic retinal waves capable of recapitulating wave dynamics observed in mice retina recordings. The dense, recurrent connectivity of SACs is modeled through local, excitatory coupling occurring via the volume release and diffusion of ACh. In addition to simulation, we are thus able to use non-linear wave theory to connect wave features to underlying physiological parameters, making the model useful in determining appropriate pharmacological manipulations to experimentally produce waves of a prescribed spatiotemporal character. The model is used to determine how ACh mediated connectivity may modulate wave activity, and how parameters such as the spontaneous activation rate and sAHP refractory period contribute to critical wave size variability. PMID:25474327

  16. An Equilibrium-Based Model of Gas Reaction and Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Trowbridge, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    During gaseous diffusion plant operations, conditions leading to the formation of flammable gas mixtures may occasionally arise. Currently, these could consist of the evaporative coolant CFC-114 and fluorinating agents such as F2 and ClF3. Replacement of CFC-114 with a non-ozone-depleting substitute is planned. Consequently, in the future, the substitute coolant must also be considered as a potential fuel in flammable gas mixtures. Two questions of practical interest arise: (1) can a particular mixture sustain and propagate a flame if ignited, and (2) what is the maximum pressure that can be generated by the burning (and possibly exploding) gas mixture, should it ignite? Experimental data on these systems, particularly for the newer coolant candidates, are limited. To assist in answering these questions, a mathematical model was developed to serve as a tool for predicting the potential detonation pressures and for estimating the composition limits of flammability for these systems based on empirical correlations between gas mixture thermodynamics and flammability for known systems. The present model uses the thermodynamic equilibrium to determine the reaction endpoint of a reactive gas mixture and uses detonation theory to estimate an upper bound to the pressure that could be generated upon ignition. The model described and documented in this report is an extended version of related models developed in 1992 and 1999.

  17. A multi-pathway model for photosynthetic reaction center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, M.; Shen, H. Z.; Yi, X. X.

    2016-03-01

    Charge separation occurs in a pair of tightly coupled chlorophylls at the heart of photosynthetic reaction centers of both plants and bacteria. Recently it has been shown that quantum coherence can, in principle, enhance the efficiency of a solar cell, working like a quantum heat engine. Here, we propose a biological quantum heat engine (BQHE) motivated by Photosystem II reaction center (PSII RC) to describe the charge separation. Our model mainly considers two charge-separation pathways which is more than that typically considered in the published literature. We explore how these cross-couplings increase the current and power of the charge separation and discuss the effects of multiple pathways in terms of current and power. The robustness of the BQHE against the charge recombination in natural PSII RC and dephasing induced by environments is also explored, and extension from two pathways to multiple pathways is made. These results suggest that noise-induced quantum coherence helps to suppress the influence of acceptor-to-donor charge recombination, and besides, nature-mimicking architectures with engineered multiple pathways for charge separations might be better for artificial solar energy devices considering the influence of environments.

  18. MOMDIS: a Glauber model computer code for knockout reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertulani, C. A.; Gade, A.

    2006-09-01

    A computer program is described to calculate momentum distributions in stripping and diffraction dissociation reactions. A Glauber model is used with the scattering wavefunctions calculated in the eikonal approximation. The program is appropriate for knockout reactions at intermediate energy collisions ( 30 MeV⩽E/nucleon⩽2000 MeV). It is particularly useful for reactions involving unstable nuclear beams, or exotic nuclei (e.g., neutron-rich nuclei), and studies of single-particle occupancy probabilities (spectroscopic factors) and other related physical observables. Such studies are an essential part of the scientific program of radioactive beam facilities, as in for instance the proposed RIA (Rare Isotope Accelerator) facility in the US. Program summaryTitle of program: MOMDIS (MOMentum DIStributions) Catalogue identifier:ADXZ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXZ_v1_0 Computers: The code has been created on an IBM-PC, but also runs on UNIX or LINUX machines Operating systems: WINDOWS or UNIX Program language used: Fortran-77 Memory required to execute with typical data: 16 Mbytes of RAM memory and 2 MB of hard disk space No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 6255 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 63 568 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of physical problem: The program calculates bound wavefunctions, eikonal S-matrices, total cross-sections and momentum distributions of interest in nuclear knockout reactions at intermediate energies. Method of solution: Solves the radial Schrödinger equation for bound states. A Numerov integration is used outwardly and inwardly and a matching at the nuclear surface is done to obtain the energy and the bound state wavefunction with good accuracy. The S-matrices are obtained using eikonal wavefunctions and the "t- ρρ" method to obtain the eikonal phase-shifts. The momentum distributions are obtained by means of a Gaussian expansion of

  19. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  20. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  1. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  2. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  3. 18 CFR 154.309 - Incremental expansions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Incremental expansions... Changes § 154.309 Incremental expansions. (a) For every expansion for which incremental rates are charged... costs and revenues associated with the expansion, until the Commission authorizes the costs of the...

  4. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260... AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000 (a... this award. NASA contemplates making additional allotments of funds during performance of this...

  5. 14 CFR 1260.53 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Incremental funding. 1260.53 Section 1260.53... Special Conditions § 1260.53 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding October 2000 (a) Only $___ of the amount indicated on the face of this award is available for payment and allotted to this award....

  6. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  7. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  8. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  9. 14 CFR 1274.918 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Incremental funding. 1274.918 Section 1274... COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.918 Incremental funding. Incremental Funding... amount indicated on the cover page of this agreement is available for payment. NASA may supplement...

  10. Piezoelectric Driver for Incremental Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruman, Joseph R.

    1987-01-01

    Vibrating device containing two piezoelectric ceramic slabs acts as mechanical driver. Eventually substitutes for small continuous or stepping electric motors of slow to moderate speeds. Piezoelectric driver simple in construction, requires no precise dimensions, inexpensive to make, and needs no lubrication. Not damaged by stalling or overloads and safe for use in explosive atmospheres; Motion controllable in micron-size increments, and holds position when power turned off. Potential applications as positioner or mover. Used to position instrument pointers, antennas, or solar panels; to focus lenses; or operate tuners, recording instruments, or valves.

  11. High explosives reaction model and its application to booster performance

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, P.K.

    1989-01-01

    Initiation of insensitive high explosives requires a boosting system using more sensitive and usually more energetic explosives. However, problems arise if the booster material is too energetic. The initiability of some insensitive but less energetic high explosives can be enhanced by lowering the density and decreasing the grain size or by adding a sensitive component; thus these explosives can be used as booster materials. This paper presents a unified initiation and detonation reaction model and then the simulation of the development of the detonation wave in a PBX-9502 main charge using three booster explosives: low-density superfine TATB, low-density ultrafine TATB, and X-0407. The last two are found to be acceptable for booster application. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Modelling the Maillard reaction during the cooking of a model cheese.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Emmanuel; Meyer, Xuân-Mi; Machado-Maturana, Elizabeth; Berdagué, Jean-Louis; Kondjoyan, Alain

    2015-10-01

    During processing and storage of industrial processed cheese, odorous compounds are formed. Some of them are potentially unwanted for the flavour of the product. To reduce the appearance of these compounds, a methodological approach was employed. It consists of: (i) the identification of the key compounds or precursors responsible for the off-flavour observed, (ii) the monitoring of these markers during the heat treatments applied to the cheese medium, (iii) the establishment of an observable reaction scheme adapted from a literature survey to the compounds identified in the heated cheese medium (iv) the multi-responses stoichiokinetic modelling of these reaction markers. Systematic two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used for the semi-quantitation of trace compounds. Precursors were quantitated by high-performance liquid chromatography. The experimental data obtained were fitted to the model with 14 elementary linked reactions forming a multi-response observable reaction scheme.

  13. A reaction-diffusion model for long bones growth.

    PubMed

    Garzón-Alvarado, D A; García-Aznar, J M; Doblaré, M

    2009-10-01

    Bone development is characterized by differentiation and growth of chondrocytes from the proliferation zone to the hypertrophying one. These two cellular processes are controlled by a complex signalling regulatory loop between different biochemical signals, whose production depends on the current cell density, constituting a coupled cell-chemical system. In this work, a mathematical model of the process of early bone growth is presented, extending and generalizing other earlier approaches on the same topic. A reaction-diffusion regulatory loop between two chemical factors: parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) and Indian hedgehog (Ihh) is hypothesized, where PTHrP is activated by Ihh and inhibits Ihh production. Chondrocytes proliferation and hypertrophy are described by means of population equations being both regulated by the PTHrP and Ihh concentrations. In the initial stage of bone growth, these two cellular proceses are considered to be directionally dependent, modelling the well known column cell formation, characteristic of endochondral ossification. This coupled set of equations is solved within a finite element framework, getting an estimation of the chondrocytes spatial distribution, growth of the diaphysis and formation of the epiphysis of a long bone. The results obtained are qualitatively similar to the actual physiological ones and quantitatively close to some available experimental data. Finally, this extended approach allows finding important relations between the model parameters to get stability of the physiological process and getting additional insight on the spatial and directional distribution of cells and paracrine factors.

  14. Compressive tracking with incremental multivariate Gaussian distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dongdong; Wen, Gongjian; Zhu, Gao; Zeng, Qiaoling

    2016-09-01

    Various approaches have been proposed for robust visual tracking, among which compressive tracking (CT) yields promising performance. In CT, Haar-like features are efficiently extracted with a very sparse measurement matrix and modeled as an online updated naïve Bayes classifier to account for target appearance change. The naïve Bayes classifier ignores overlap between Haar-like features and assumes that Haar-like features are independently distributed, which leads to drift in complex scenario. To address this problem, we present an extended CT algorithm, which assumes that all Haar-like features are correlated with each other and have multivariate Gaussian distribution. The mean vector and covariance matrix of multivariate normal distribution are incrementally updated with constant computational complexity to adapt to target appearance change. Each frame is associated with a temporal weight to expend less modeling power on old observation. Based on temporal weight, an update scheme with changing but convergent learning rate is derived with strict mathematic proof. Compared with CT, our extended algorithm achieves a richer representation of target appearance. The incremental multivariate Gaussian distribution is integrated into the particle filter framework to achieve better tracking performance. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate that our proposed tracker achieves superior performance both qualitatively and quantitatively over several state-of-the-art trackers.

  15. Incremental dementia-related expenditures in a medicaid population.

    PubMed

    Bharmal, Murtuza F; Dedhiya, Seema; Craig, Bruce A; Weiner, Michael; Rosenman, Marc; Sands, Laura P; Modi, Ankita; Doebbeling, Caroline; Thomas, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    With the growing number of older adults, understanding expenditures associated with treating medical conditions that are more prevalent among older adults is increasingly important. The objectives of this research were to estimate incremental medical encounters and incremental Medicaid expenditures associated with dementia among Indiana Medicaid recipients 40 years or older in 2004. A retrospective cohort design analyzing Indiana Medicaid administrative claims files was used. Individuals at least 40 years of age with Indiana Medicaid eligibility during 2004 were included. Patients with dementia were identified via diagnosis codes in claims files between July 2001 and December 2004. Adjusted annual incremental medical encounters and expenditures associated with dementia in 2004 were estimated using negative binomial regression and zero-inflated negative binomial regression models. A total of 18,950 individuals (13%) with dementia were identified from 145,684 who were 40 years or older. The unadjusted mean total annualized Medicaid expenditures for the cohort with dementia ($28,758) were significantly higher than the mean expenditures for the cohort without dementia ($14,609). After adjusting for covariates, Indiana Medicaid incurred annualized incremental expenditures of $9,829 per recipient with dementia. Much of the annual incremental expenditure associated with dementia was driven by the higher number of days in nursing homes and resulting nursing-home expenditures. Drug expenditures accounted for the second largest component of the incremental expenditures. On the basis of disease prevalence and per recipient annualized incremental expenditures, projected incremental annualized Indiana Medicaid spending associated with dementia for persons 40 or more years of age was $186 million. Dementia is associated with significant expenditures among Medicaid recipients. Disease management initiatives designed to reduce nursing-home use among recipients with dementia may

  16. Chemical Reaction and Flow Modeling in Fullerene and Nanotube Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Farhat, Samir; Greendyke, Robert B.

    2004-01-01

    The development of processes to produce fullerenes and carbon nanotubes has largely been empirical. Fullerenes were first discovered in the soot produced by laser ablation of graphite [1]and then in the soot of electric arc evaporated carbon. Techniques and conditions for producing larger and larger quantities of fullerenes depended mainly on trial and error empirical variations of these processes, with attempts to scale them up by using larger electrodes and targets and higher power. Various concepts of how fullerenes and carbon nanotubes were formed were put forth, but very little was done based on chemical kinetics of the reactions. This was mainly due to the complex mixture of species and complex nature of conditions in the reactors. Temperatures in the reactors varied from several thousand degrees Kelvin down to near room temperature. There are hundreds of species possible, ranging from atomic carbon to large clusters of carbonaceous soot, and metallic catalyst atoms to metal clusters, to complexes of metals and carbon. Most of the chemical kinetics of the reactions and the thermodynamic properties of clusters and complexes have only been approximated. In addition, flow conditions in the reactors are transient or unsteady, and three dimensional, with steep spatial gradients of temperature and species concentrations. All these factors make computational simulations of reactors very complex and challenging. This article addresses the development of the chemical reaction involved in fullerene production and extends this to production of carbon nanotubes by the laser ablation/oven process and by the electric arc evaporation process. In addition, the high-pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco) process is discussed. The article is in several parts. The first one addresses the thermochemical aspects of modeling; and considers the development of chemical rate equations, estimates of reaction rates, and thermodynamic properties where they are available. The second part

  17. Model reactions and natural occurrence of furans from hypersaline environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, T.; Tubbesing, C.; Benzing, K.; Schöler, H. F.

    2014-05-01

    Volatile organic compounds like furan and its derivatives are important for atmospheric properties and reactions. In this work the known abiotic formation of furan from catechol under Fenton-like conditions with Fe3+ sulfate was revised by the use of a bispidine Fe2+ complex as a model compound for iron with well-known characteristics. While total yields were comparable to those with the Fe3+ salt, the bispidine Fe2+ complex is a better catalyst as the turnover numbers of the active iron species were higher. Additionally, the role of iron and pH is discussed in relation to furan formation from model compounds and in natural sediment and water samples collected from the Dead Sea and several salt lakes in Western Australia. Various alkylated furans and even traces of halogenated furans (3-chlorofuran and 3-bromofuran) were found in some Australian samples. 3-chlorofuran was found in three sediments and four water samples, whereas 3-bromofuran was detected in three water samples. Further, the emission of furans is compared to the abundance of several possible precursors such as isoprene and aromatic hydrocarbons as well as to the related thiophenes. It is deduced that the emissions of volatile organic compounds such as furans contribute to the formation of ultra-fine particles in the vicinity of salt lakes and are important for the local climate.

  18. Theoretical modeling of hydroxyl-radical-induced lipid peroxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Tejero, Ismael; Gonzalez-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M; Eriksson, Leif A

    2007-05-24

    The OH-radical-induced mechanism of lipid peroxidation, involving hydrogen abstraction followed by O2 addition, is explored using the kinetically corrected hybrid density functional MPWB1K in conjunction with the MG3S basis set and a polarized continuum model to mimic the membrane interior. Using a small nonadiene model of linoleic acid, it is found that hydrogen abstraction preferentially occurs at the mono-allylic methylene groups at the ends of the conjugated segment rather than at the central bis-allylic carbon, in disagreement with experimental data. Using a full linoleic acid, however, abstraction is correctly predicted to occur at the central carbon, giving a pentadienyl radical. The Gibbs free energy for abstraction at the central C11 is approximately 8 kcal/mol, compared to 9 kcal/mol at the end points (giving an allyl radical). Subsequent oxygen addition will occur at one of the terminal atoms of the pentadienyl radical fragment, giving a localized peroxy radical and a conjugated butadiene fragment, but is associated with rather high free energy barriers and low exergonicity at the CPCM-MPWB1K/MG3S level. The ZPE-corrected potential energy surfaces obtained without solvent effects, on the other hand, display considerably lower barriers and more exergonic reactions.

  19. Estimating Incremental Costs with Skew: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Polgreen, Linnea A.; Brooks, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cost data in healthcare are often skewed across patients. Thus researchers have used either a log transformation of the dependent variable or generalized linear models (GLMs) with log links. However, frequently these non-linear approaches produce non-linear incremental effects: the incremental effects differ at different levels of the covariates, and this can cause dramatic effects on predicted cost. Objectives To demonstrate that when modeling skewed data, log link functions or log transformations are not necessary and have unintended effects. Methods We simulated cost data using a linear model with a “treatment”, a covariate, and a specified number of observations with excessive cost (skewed data). We also used actual data from a pain-relief intervention among hip-replacement patients. We then estimated cost models using various functional approaches suggested to handle skew and calculated the incremental cost of treatment at various levels of the covariate(s). Results All of these methods provide unbiased estimates of the incremental effect of treatment on costs at the mean level of the covariate. However, in some log-based models the implied incremental treatment cost doubled between extreme low and high values of the covariate in a manner inconsistent with the underlying linear model. Conclusions Although specification checks are always needed, the potential of misleading incremental estimates resulting from log-based specifications is often ignored. In this era of cost containment and comparisons of treatment effectiveness, it is vital that researchers and policy-makers understand the limitation of the inferences that can be made using log-based models for patients whose characteristics differ from the sample mean. PMID:22762544

  20. Estimating incremental costs with skew: a cautionary note.

    PubMed

    Polgreen, Linnea A; Brooks, John M

    2012-09-01

    Cost data in healthcare are often skewed across patients. Thus, researchers have used either a log transformation of the dependent variable or generalized linear models with log links. However, frequently these non-linear approaches produce non-linear incremental effects: the incremental effects differ at different levels of the covariates, and this can cause dramatic effects on predicted cost. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that when modelling skewed data, log link functions or log transformations are not necessary and have unintended effects. We simulated cost data using a linear model with a 'treatment', a covariate and a specified number of observations with excessive cost (skewed data). We also used actual data from a pain-relief intervention among hip-replacement patients. We then estimated cost models using various functional approaches suggested to handle skew and calculated the incremental cost of treatment at various levels of the covariate(s). All of these methods provide unbiased estimates of the incremental effect of treatment on costs at the mean level of the covariate. However, in some log-based models the implied incremental treatment cost doubled between extreme low and high values of the covariate in a manner inconsistent with the underlying linear model. Although specification checks are always needed, the potential for misleading incremental estimates resulting from log-based specifications is often ignored. In this era of cost containment and comparisons of treatment effectiveness it is vital that researchers and policymakers understand the limitation of the inferences that can be made using log-based models for patients whose characteristics differ from the sample mean.

  1. Property Differencing for Incremental Checking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guowei; Khurshid, Sarfraz; Person, Suzette; Rungta, Neha

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces iProperty, a novel approach that facilitates incremental checking of programs based on a property di erencing technique. Speci cally, iProperty aims to reduce the cost of checking properties as they are initially developed and as they co-evolve with the program. The key novelty of iProperty is to compute the di erences between the new and old versions of expected properties to reduce the number and size of the properties that need to be checked during the initial development of the properties. Furthermore, property di erencing is used in synergy with program behavior di erencing techniques to optimize common regression scenarios, such as detecting regression errors or checking feature additions for conformance to new expected properties. Experimental results in the context of symbolic execution of Java programs annotated with properties written as assertions show the e ectiveness of iProperty in utilizing change information to enable more ecient checking.

  2. Reaction time in ankle movements: a diffusion model analysis

    PubMed Central

    Michmizos, Konstantinos P.; Krebs, Hermano Igo

    2015-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) is one of the most commonly used measures of neurological function and dysfunction. Despite the extensive studies on it, no study has ever examined the RT in the ankle. Twenty-two subjects were recruited to perform simple, 2- and 4-choice RT tasks by visually guiding a cursor inside a rectangular target with their ankle. RT did not change with spatial accuracy constraints imposed by different target widths in the direction of the movement. RT increased as a linear function of potential target stimuli, as would be predicted by Hick–Hyman law. Although the slopes of the regressions were similar, the intercept in dorsal–plantar (DP) direction was significantly smaller than the intercept in inversion–eversion (IE) direction. To explain this difference, we used a hierarchical Bayesian estimation of the Ratcliff's (Psychol Rev 85:59, 1978) diffusion model parameters and divided processing time into cognitive components. The model gave a good account of RTs, their distribution and accuracy values, and hence provided a testimony that the non-decision processing time (overlap of posterior distributions between DP and IE < 0.045), the boundary separation (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.1) and the evidence accumulation rate (overlap of the posterior distributions < 0.01) components of the RT accounted for the intercept difference between DP and IE. The model also proposed that there was no systematic change in non-decision processing time or drift rate when spatial accuracy constraints were altered. The results were in agreement with the memory drum hypothesis and could be further justified neurophysiologically by the larger innervation of the muscles controlling DP movements. This study might contribute to assessing deficits in sensorimotor control of the ankle and enlighten a possible target for correction in the framework of our on-going effort to develop robotic therapeutic interventions to the ankle of children with cerebral palsy

  3. Chemical Model Systems for Cellular Nitros(yl)ation Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Daiber, Andreas; Schildknecht, Stefan; Müller, Johanna; Bachschmid, Markus M.; Ullrich, Volker

    2014-01-01

    S-nitros(yl)ation belongs to the redox-based posttranslational modifications of proteins but the underlying chemistry is controversial. In contrast to current concepts involving the autoxidation of nitric oxide (•NO, nitrogen monoxide), we and others have proposed the formation of peroxynitrite (oxoperoxonitrate(1-)) as an essential intermediate. This requires low cellular fluxes of •NO and superoxide (•O2−), for which model systems have been introduced. We here propose two new systems for nitros(yl)ation that avoid the shortcomings of previous models. Based on the thermal decomposition of 3-morpholinosydnonimine, equal fluxes of •NO and •O2− were generated and modulated by the addition of •NO donors or Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase. As reactants for S-nitros(yl)ation, NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase and glutathione were employed, for which optimal S-nitros(yl)ation was observed at nanomolar fluxes of •NO and •O2− at a ratio of about 3:1. The previously used reactants phenol and diaminonaphthalene, (C- and N-nitrosation) demonstrated potential participation of multiple pathways for nitros(yl)ation. According to our data, neither peroxynitrite nor autoxidation of •NO was as efficient as the 3•NO/1•O2− system in mediating S-nitros(yl)ation. In theory this could lead to an elusive nitrosonium (nitrosyl cation)-like species in the first step and to N2O3 in the subsequent reaction. Which of these two species or whether both together will participate in biological S-nitros(yl)ation remains to be elucidated. Finally, we developed several hypothetical scenarios to which the described U flux model could apply, providing conditions that allow either direct electrophilic substitution at a thiolate or S-nitros(yl)ation via transnitrosation from S-nitrosoglutathione. PMID:19477267

  4. Comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    SciTech Connect

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  5. A comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  6. A simple diffusion-reaction model for resid hydroprocessing catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Adkins, B.D.; Limmer, K.R. )

    1990-08-01

    It is commonly accepted that the intraparticle diffusion characteristics of resid hydroprocessing catalysts can play an important role in determining their performance. It is also commonly accepted that diffusion characteristics are determined by properties of the catalyst which are at least partially reflected in measurements such as surface area and pore size. One approach to experimentally determine the appropriate region on the diffusion-reaction curve is to vary V{sub P}/S{sub P} for a fixed pore structure. One example (among many) of this approach is the paper of Gosselink and Stork in which the authors modeled the fixed-bed HDS performance of Shell 444 catalyst on heavy gasoil in crushed (particle diameter 0.2 mm) and uncrushed (1.5 mm) form. The method has the advantage of minimizing unaccountable differences in pore structures, but is susceptible to major variations in external mass and heat transfer. An alternative is to vary the pore structure widely while exploring only commercially meaningful variations in V{sub P}/S{sub P}. This is the approach used in the study.

  7. Mechanism of the Exchange Reaction in HRAS from Multiscale Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Abhijeet; Travesset, Alex

    2014-01-01

    HRAS regulates cell growth promoting signaling processes by cycling between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. Understanding the transition mechanism is central for the design of small molecules to inhibit the formation of RAS-driven tumors. Using a multiscale approach involving coarse-grained (CG) simulations, all-atom classical molecular dynamics (CMD; total of 3.02 µs), and steered molecular dynamics (SMD) in combination with Principal Component Analysis (PCA), we identified the structural features that determine the nucleotide (GDP) exchange reaction. We show that weakening the coupling between the SwitchI (residues 25–40) and SwitchII (residues 59–75) accelerates the opening of SwitchI; however, an open conformation of SwitchI is unstable in the absence of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and rises up towards the bound nucleotide to close the nucleotide pocket. Both I21 and Y32, play a crucial role in SwitchI transition. We show that an open SwitchI conformation is not necessary for GDP destabilization but is required for GDP/Mg escape from the HRAS. Further, we present the first simulation study showing displacement of GDP/Mg away from the nucleotide pocket. Both SwitchI and SwitchII, delays the escape of displaced GDP/Mg in the absence of GEF. Based on these results, a model for the mechanism of GEF in accelerating the exchange process is hypothesized. PMID:25272152

  8. Estimating marginal and incremental effects in the analysis of medical expenditure panel data using marginalized two-part random-effects generalized Gamma models: Evidence from China healthcare cost data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Liu, Wei; Hu, Yingyao

    2017-01-01

    Conditional two-part random-effects models have been proposed for the analysis of healthcare cost panel data that contain both zero costs from the non-users of healthcare facilities and positive costs from the users. These models have been extended to accommodate more flexible data structures when using the generalized Gamma distribution to model the positive healthcare expenditures. However, a major drawback with the extended model, which is inherited from the conditional models, is that it is fairly difficult to make direct marginal inference with respect to overall healthcare costs that includes both zeros and non-zeros, or even on positive healthcare costs. In this article, we first propose two types of marginalized two-part random-effects generalized Gamma models (m2RGGMs): Type I m2RGGMs for the inference on positive healthcare costs and Type II m2RGGMs for the inference on overall healthcare costs. Then, the concepts of marginal effect and incremental effect of a covariate on overall and positive healthcare costs are introduced, and estimation of these effects is carefully discussed. Especially, we derive the variance estimates of these effects by following the delta methods and Taylor series approximations for the purpose of making marginal inference. Parameter estimates of Type I and Type II m2RGGMs are obtained through maximum likelihood estimation. An empirical analysis of longitudinal healthcare costs collected in the China Health and Nutrition Survey is conducted using the proposed methodologies.

  9. Simulations of diffusion-reaction equations with implications to turbulent combustion modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1993-01-01

    An enhanced diffusion-reaction reaction system (DRS) is proposed as a statistical model for the evolution of multiple scalars undergoing mixing and reaction in an isotropic turbulence field. The DRS model is close enough to the scalar equations in a reacting flow that other statistical models of turbulent mixing that decouple the velocity field from scalar mixing and reaction (e.g. mapping closure model, assumed-pdf models) cannot distinguish the model equations from the original equations. Numerical simulations of DRS are performed for three scalars evolving from non-premixed initial conditions. A simple one-step reversible reaction is considered. The data from the simulations are used (1) to study the effect of chemical conversion on the evolution of scalar statistics, and (2) to evaluate other models (mapping-closure model, assumed multivariate beta-pdf model).

  10. Ares I Reaction Control System Propellant Feedline Decontamination Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasch, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the work presented here is to quantify the effects of purge gas temperature, pressure, and mass flow rate on Hydrazine (Hz) decontamination rates of the Ares I Roll Control System and Reaction Control System. A survey of experts in this field revealed the absence of any decontamination rate prediction models. Three basic decontamination methods were identified for analysis and modeling. These include low pressure eduction, high flow rate purge, and pulse purge. For each method, an approach to predict the Hz mass transfer rate, as a function of system pressure, temperature, and purge gas mass flow rate, is developed based on the applicable physics. The models show that low pressure eduction is two orders of magnitude more effective than the high velocity purge, which in turn is two orders of magnitude more effective than the pure diffusion component of pulse purging of deadheads. Eduction subjects the system to low pressure conditions that promote the extraction of Hz vapors. At 120 F, Hz is saturated at approximately 1 psia. At lower pressures and 120 F, Hz will boil, which is an extremely efficient means to remove liquid Hz. The Hz boiling rate is predicted by equating the rate at which energy is added to the saturated liquid Hz through heaters at the tube outer wall with the energy removed from the liquid through evaporation. Boil-off fluxes were predicted by iterating through the range of local pressures with limits set by the minimum allowed pressure of 0.2 psia and maximum allowed wall temperature of 120 F established by the heaters, which gives a saturation pressure of approximately 1.0 psia. Figure 1 shows the resulting boil-off fluxes as a function of local eduction pressure. As depicted in figure 1, the flux is a strong inverse function of eduction pressure, and that minimizing the eduction pressure maximizes the boil-off flux. Also, higher outer wall temperatures lead to higher boil-off fluxes and allow for boil-off over a greater range

  11. Modeling Scalable Pattern Generation in DNA Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter B.; Chen, Xi; Simpson, Zack B.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a theoretical framework for developing patterns in multiple dimensions using controllable diffusion and designed reactions implemented in DNA. This includes so-called strand displacement reactions in which one single-stranded DNA hybridizes to a hemi-duplex DNA and displaces another single-stranded DNA, reversibly or irreversibly. These reactions can be designed to proceed with designed rate and molecular specificity. By also controlling diffusion by partial complementarity to a stationary, cross-linked DNA, we can generate predictable patterns. We demonstrate this with several simulations showing deterministic, predictable shapes in space. PMID:25506295

  12. Transport Properties of a Kinetic Model for Chemical Reactions without Barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Alves, Giselle M.; Kremer, Gilberto M.; Soares, Ana Jacinta

    2011-05-20

    A kinetic model of the Boltzmann equation for chemical reactions without energy barrier is considered here with the aim of evaluating the reaction rate and characterizing the transport coefficient of shear viscosity for the reactive system. The Chapman-Enskog solution of the Boltzmann equation is used to compute the chemical reaction effects, in a flow regime for which the reaction process is close to the final equilibrium state. Some numerical results are provided illustrating that the considered chemical reaction without energy barrier can induce an appreciable influence on the reaction rate and on the transport coefficient of shear viscosity.

  13. Modeling Adsorption and Reactions of Organic Molecules at Metal Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Conspectus The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdWsurf method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  14. Modeling adsorption and reactions of organic molecules at metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Scheffler, Matthias

    2014-11-18

    CONSPECTUS: The understanding of adsorption and reactions of (large) organic molecules at metal surfaces plays an increasingly important role in modern surface science and technology. Such hybrid inorganic/organic systems (HIOS) are relevant for many applications in catalysis, light-emitting diodes, single-molecule junctions, molecular sensors and switches, and photovoltaics. Obviously, the predictive modeling and understanding of the structure and stability of such hybrid systems is an essential prerequisite for tuning their electronic properties and functions. At present, density-functional theory (DFT) is the most promising approach to study the structure, stability, and electronic properties of complex systems, because it can be applied to both molecules and solids comprising thousands of atoms. However, state-of-the-art approximations to DFT do not provide a consistent and reliable description for HIOS, which is largely due to two issues: (i) the self-interaction of the electrons with themselves arising from the Hartree term of the total energy that is not fully compensated in approximate exchange-correlation functionals, and (ii) the lack of long-range part of the ubiquitous van der Waals (vdW) interactions. The self-interaction errors sometimes lead to incorrect description of charge transfer and electronic level alignment in HIOS, although for molecules adsorbed on metals these effects will often cancel out in total energy differences. Regarding vdW interactions, several promising vdW-inclusive DFT-based methods have been recently demonstrated to yield remarkable accuracy for intermolecular interactions in the gas phase. However, the majority of these approaches neglect the nonlocal collective electron response in the vdW energy tail, an effect that is particularly strong in condensed phases and at interfaces between different materials. Here we show that the recently developed DFT+vdW(surf) method that accurately accounts for the collective electronic

  15. Empirical valence bond model of an SN2 reaction in polar and nonpolar solvents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2008-08-01

    A new model for the substitution nucleophilic reaction (SN2) in solution is described using the empirical valence bond (EVB) method. The model includes a generalization to three dimensions of a collinear gas phase EVB model developed by Mathis et al. [J. Mol. Liq. 61, 81 (1994)] and a parametrization of solute-solvent interactions of four different solvents (water, ethanol, chloroform, and carbon tetrachloride). The model is used to compute (in these four solvents) reaction free energy profiles, reaction and solvent dynamics, a two-dimensional reaction/solvent free energy map, as well as a number of other properties that in the past have mostly been estimated.

  16. A general paradigm to model reaction-based biogeochemical processes in batch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Yilin; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Burgos, William D.

    2003-04-01

    This paper presents the development and illustration of a numerical model of reaction-based geochemical and biochemical processes with mixed equilibrium and kinetic reactions. The objective is to provide a general paradigm for modeling reactive chemicals in batch systems, with expectations that it is applicable to reactive chemical transport problems. The unique aspects of the paradigm are to simultaneously (1) facilitate the segregation (isolation) of linearly independent kinetic reactions and thus enable the formulation and parameterization of individual rates one reaction by one reaction when linearly dependent kinetic reactions are absent, (2) enable the inclusion of virtually any type of equilibrium expressions and kinetic rates users want to specify, (3) reduce problem stiffness by eliminating all fast reactions from the set of ordinary differential equations governing the evolution of kinetic variables, (4) perform systematic operations to remove redundant fast reactions and irrelevant kinetic reactions, (5) systematically define chemical components and explicitly enforce mass conservation, (6) accomplish automation in decoupling fast reactions from slow reactions, and (7) increase the robustness of numerical integration of the governing equations with species switching schemes. None of the existing models to our knowledge has included these scopes simultaneously. This model (BIOGEOCHEM) is a general computer code to simulate biogeochemical processes in batch systems from a reaction-based mechanistic standpoint, and is designed to be easily coupled with transport models. To make the model applicable to a wide range of problems, programmed reaction types include aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion-exchange, oxidation-reduction, precipitation-dissolution, acid-base reactions, and microbial mediated reactions. In addition, user-specified reaction types can be programmed into the model. Any reaction can be treated as fast/equilibrium or slow

  17. Chemical reaction networks as a model to describe UVC- and radiolytically-induced reactions of simple compounds.

    PubMed

    Dondi, Daniele; Merli, Daniele; Albini, Angelo; Zeffiro, Alberto; Serpone, Nick

    2012-05-01

    When a chemical system is submitted to high energy sources (UV, ionizing radiation, plasma sparks, etc.), as is expected to be the case of prebiotic chemistry studies, a plethora of reactive intermediates could form. If oxygen is present in excess, carbon dioxide and water are the major products. More interesting is the case of reducing conditions where synthetic pathways are also possible. This article examines the theoretical modeling of such systems with random-generated chemical networks. Four types of random-generated chemical networks were considered that originated from a combination of two connection topologies (viz., Poisson and scale-free) with reversible and irreversible chemical reactions. The results were analyzed taking into account the number of the most abundant products required for reaching 50% of the total number of moles of compounds at equilibrium, as this may be related to an actual problem of complex mixture analysis. The model accounts for multi-component reaction systems with no a priori knowledge of reacting species and the intermediates involved if system components are sufficiently interconnected. The approach taken is relevant to an earlier study on reactions that may have occurred in prebiotic systems where only a few compounds were detected. A validation of the model was attained on the basis of results of UVC and radiolytic reactions of prebiotic mixtures of low molecular weight compounds likely present on the primeval Earth.

  18. Incremental Hospital Costs Associated With Comorbidities of Prematurity.

    PubMed

    Black, Libby; Hulsey, Thomas; Lee, Kwan; Parks, Daniel C; Ebeling, Myla D

    2015-12-01

    Preterm birth (PTB), defined as birth at a gestational age (GA) of less than 37 weeks, is associated with increased hospital costs. Lower GA at birth is negatively correlated with the presence of neonatal comorbidities, further increasing costs. This study evaluated incremental costs associated with comorbidities of PTB following spontaneous labor at 24-36 weeks. Birth records from January 2001 to December 2010 at the Medical University of South Carolina were screened to identify infants born at GA 23-37 weeks after uncomplicated singleton pregnancies and surviving to discharge. Comorbidities of interest and incremental costs were analyzed with a partial least squares (PLS) regression model adjusted for comorbidities and GA. Incremental comorbidity-associated costs, as well as total costs, were estimated for infants of GA 24-36 weeks. A total of 4,292 delivery visit records were analyzed. Use of the PLS regression model eliminated issues of multicollinearity and allowed derivation of stable cost estimates. Incremental costs of comorbidities at a mean GA of 34 weeks ranged from $4,529 to $23,121, and exceeded $9,000 in 6 cases. Incremental costs rangedfrom a high of $41,161 for a GA 24-week infant with a comorbidity of retinopathy of prematurity requiring surgery (ROP4) to $3,683 for a GA 36-week infant with a comorbidity of convulsions. Incremental comorbidity costs are additive, so the costs for infants with multiple comorbidities could easily exceed the high of $41,161 seen with ROP4. The PLS regression model allowed derivation of stable cost estimates from multivariate and highly collinear data and can be used in future cost analyses. Using this data set, predicted costs of all comorbidities, as well as total costs, negatively correlated with GA at birth.

  19. A reaction-based river/stream water quality model: Model development and numerical schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fan; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.

    2008-01-01

    SummaryThis paper presents the conceptual and mathematical development of a numerical model of sediment and reactive chemical transport in rivers and streams. The distribution of mobile suspended sediments and immobile bed sediments is controlled by hydrologic transport as well as erosion and deposition processes. The fate and transport of water quality constituents involving a variety of chemical and physical processes is mathematically described by a system of reaction equations for immobile constituents and advective-dispersive-reactive transport equations for mobile constituents. To circumvent stiffness associated with equilibrium reactions, matrix decomposition is performed via Gauss-Jordan column reduction. After matrix decomposition, the system of water quality constituent reactive transport equations is transformed into a set of thermodynamic equations representing equilibrium reactions and a set of transport equations involving no equilibrium reactions. The decoupling of equilibrium and kinetic reactions enables robust numerical integration of the partial differential equations (PDEs) for non-equilibrium-variables. Solving non-equilibrium-variable transport equations instead of individual water quality constituent transport equations also reduces the number of PDEs. A variety of numerical methods are investigated for solving the mixed differential and algebraic equations. Two verification examples are compared with analytical solutions to demonstrate the correctness of the code and to illustrate the importance of employing application-dependent numerical methods to solve specific problems.

  20. A variable reaction rate model for chlorine decay in drinking water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter.

    PubMed

    Hua, Pei; Vasyukova, Ekaterina; Uhl, Wolfgang

    2015-05-15

    A second order kinetic model for simulating chlorine decay in bulk water due to the reaction with dissolved organic matter (DOM) was developed. It takes into account the decreasing reactivity of dissolved organic matter using a variable reaction rate coefficient (VRRC) which decreases with an increasing conversion. The concentration of reducing species is surrogated by the maximum chlorine demand. Temperature dependency, respectively, is described by the Arrhenius-relationship. The accuracy and adequacy of the proposed model to describe chlorine decay in bulk water were evaluated and shown for very different waters and different conditions such as water mixing or rechlorination by applying statistical tests. It is thus very well suited for application in water quality modeling for distribution systems.

  1. Human Systems Integration Model Analyses in Support of the Joint Service Transportable Decontamination System - Small-Scale Increment I Acquisition Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    4.3.2 Heat Stress Model Technical Bulletin ( TB ) MED 507 (12) describes maximal exposure limits for wet bulb globe temperatures without impairing mental...preventive measures to reduce heat stress factors, as described in TB MED 507 (12), ARL-MR-346 (8), or FM 3-11.5 (5), is required to preclude serious...and Heat Casualty Management; TB MED 507; Headquarters, Washington, DC, 2003. 34 13. U.S. Department of the Army. Health Hazard Assessment Report

  2. Webpage Segments Classification with Incremental Knowledge Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Wei; Kim, Yang Sok; Kang, Byeong Ho

    This paper suggests an incremental information extraction method for social network analysis of web publications. For this purpose, we employed an incremental knowledge acquisition method, called MCRDR (Multiple Classification Ripple-Down Rules), to classify web page segments. Our experimental results show that our MCRDR-based web page segments classification system successfully supports easy acquisition and maintenance of information extraction rules.

  3. Turns and Increments: A Comparative Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luke, Kang-kwong; Thompson, Sandra A.; Ono, Tsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Recent years have seen a surge of interest in "increments" among students of conversational interaction. This article first outlines "incrementing" as an analytical problem (i.e., as turn constructional unit [TCU] extensions) by tracing its origins back to Sacks, Schegloff, and Jefferson's (1974) famous turn-taking article. Then, the article…

  4. Disrupting incrementalism in health care innovation.

    PubMed

    Soleimani, Farzad; Zenios, Stefanos

    2011-08-01

    To build enabling innovation frameworks for health care entrepreneurs to better identify, evaluate, and pursue entrepreneurial opportunities. Powerful frameworks have been developed to enable entrepreneurs and investors identify which opportunity areas are worth pursuing and which start-up ideas have the potential to succeed. These frameworks, however, have not been clearly defined and interpreted for innovations in health care. Having a better understanding of the process of innovation in health care allows physician entrepreneurs to innovate more successfully. A review of academic literature was conducted. Concepts and frameworks related to technology innovation were analyzed. A new set of health care specific frameworks was developed. These frameworks were then applied to innovations in various health care subsectors. Health care entrepreneurs would greatly benefit from distinguishing between incremental and disruptive innovations. The US regulatory and reimbursement systems favor incrementalism with a greater chance of success for established players. Small companies and individual groups, however, are more likely to thrive if they adopt a disruptive strategy. Disruption in health care occurs through various mechanisms as detailed in this article. While the main mechanism of disruption might vary across different health care subsectors, it is shown that disruptive innovations consistently require a component of contrarian interpretation to guarantee considerable payoff. If health care entrepreneurs choose to adopt an incrementalist approach, they need to build the risk of disruption into their models and also ascertain that they have a very strong intellectual property (IP) position to weather competition from established players. On the contrary, if they choose to pursue disruption in the market, albeit the competition will be less severe, they need to recognize that the regulatory and reimbursement hurdles are going to be very high. Thus, they would benefit

  5. Peaks beyond Phonology: Adolescence, Incrementation, and Language Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tagliamonte, Sali A.; D'Arcy, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    What is the mechanism by which a linguistic change advances across successive generations of speakers? We explore this question by using the model of incrementation provided in Labov 2001 and analyzing six current changes in English. Extending Labov's focus on recent and vigorous phonological changes, we target ongoing morphosyntactic(-semantic)…

  6. Data assimilation in a coupled physical-biogeochemical model of the California current system using an incremental lognormal 4-dimensional variational approach: Part 3-Assimilation in a realistic context using satellite and in situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hajoon; Edwards, Christopher A.; Moore, Andrew M.; Fiechter, Jerome

    2016-10-01

    A fully coupled physical and biogeochemical ocean data assimilation system is tested in a realistic configuration of the California Current System using the Regional Ocean Modeling System. In situ measurements for sea surface temperature and salinity as well as satellite observations for temperature, sea level and chlorophyll are used for the year 2000. Initial conditions of the combined physical and biogeochemical state are adjusted at the start of each 3-day assimilation cycle. Data assimilation results in substantial reduction of root-mean-square error (RMSE) over unconstrained model output. RMSE for physical variables is slightly lower when assimilating only physical variables than when assimilating both physical variables and surface chlorophyll. Surface chlorophyll RMSE is lowest when assimilating both physical variables and surface chlorophyll. Estimates of subsurface, nitrate and chlorophyll show modest improvements over the unconstrained model run relative to independent, unassimilated in situ data. Assimilation adjustments to the biogeochemical initial conditions are investigated within different regions of the California Current System. The incremental, lognormal 4-dimensional data assimilation method tested here represents a viable approach to coupled physical biogeochemical state estimation at practical computational cost.

  7. A new receptor model-incremental lifetime cancer risk method to quantify the carcinogenic risks associated with sources of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from Chengdu in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gui-Rong; Peng, Xing; Wang, Rong-Kang; Tian, Ying-Ze; Shi, Guo-Liang; Wu, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Pu; Zhou, Lai-Dong; Feng, Yin-Chang

    2015-01-01

    PM10 and PM2.5 samples were simultaneously collected during a one-year monitoring period in Chengdu. The concentrations of 16 particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (Σ16PAHs) were measured. Σ16PAHs concentrations varied from 16.85 to 160.24 ng m(-3) and 14.93 to 111.04ngm(-3) for PM10 and PM2.5, respectively. Three receptor models (principal component analysis (PCA), positive matrix factorization (PMF), and Multilinear Engine 2 (ME2)) were applied to investigate the sources and contributions of PAHs. The results obtained from the three receptor models were compared. Diesel emissions, gasoline emissions, and coal and wood combustion were the primary sources. Source apportionment results indicated that these models were able to track the ΣPAHs. For the first time, the cancer risks for each identified source were quantitatively calculated for ingestion and dermal contact routes by combining the incremental lifetime cancer risk (ILCR) values with the estimated source contributions. The results showed that gasoline emissions posed the highest cancer risk, even though it contributed less to Σ16PAHs. The results and method from this work can provide useful information for quantifying the toxicity of source categories and studying human health in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pokorny, Richard; Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2012-08-10

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  9. Mathematical model of reaction rate oscillations on a chain of nm-sized catalyst particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peskov, N. V.; Slinko, M. M.; Jaeger, N. I.

    2003-05-01

    The model of reaction rate oscillations over the surface of nanoparticles embedded into zeolite matrix is numerically investigated. The reaction rate oscillations on each particle are described by a lumped model. The reactions on separate particles interact via the gas diffusion through the pores, which is modeled in the frame of the Maxwell-Stefan approach. The reaction reveals a complex dynamical behavior if a nonhomogeneous distribution of reagent concentrations exists along the chain of particles with a sufficiently large gradient near the ends of the chain.

  10. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH - MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    KRUGER AA; PIERCE DA; POKORNY R; HRMA PR

    2012-02-07

    In this study, we present a model for the kinetics of multiple overlapping reactions. Mathematical representation of the kinetics of gas-evolving reactions is crucial for the modeling of the feed-to-glass conversion in a waste-glass melter. The model simulates multiple gas-evolving reactions that occur during heating of a high-alumina high-level waste melter feed. To obtain satisfactory kinetic parameters, we employed Kissinger's method combined with least-squares analysis. The power-law kinetics with variable reaction order sufficed for obtaining excellent agreement with measured thermogravimetric analysis data.

  11. Modeled Neutron Induced Nuclear Reaction Cross Sections for Radiochemistry in the region of Iriduim and Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R D; Dietrich, F S; Kelley, K; Escher, J; Bauer, R; Mustafa, M

    2008-02-26

    We have developed a set of modeled nuclear reaction cross sections for use in radiochemical diagnostics. Systematics for the input parameters required by the Hauser-Feshbach statistical model were developed and used to calculate neutron induced nuclear reaction cross sections for targets ranging from osmium (Z = 76) to gold (Z = 79). Of particular interest are the cross sections on Ir and Au including reactions on isomeric targets.

  12. Geometrical Models of the Phase Space Structures Governing Reaction Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    s.wiggins@bristol.ac.uk Abstract Hamiltonian dynamical systems possessing equilibria of saddle × centre × · · · × centre stability type display...definition of the phase space structures in the normal form coordinates . . . . . . . . 6 2.3 The foliation of the reaction region by Lagrangian ...McGehee representation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 3.4 Implications for Nonlinear Hamiltonian Vector Fields

  13. Folding model description of reactions with exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ibraheem, Awad A.; Hassanain, M. A.; Mokhtar, S. R.; Zaki, M. A.; Mahmoud, Zakaria M. M.; Farid, M. El-Azab

    2012-08-15

    Microscopic folding calculations based upon the effective M3Y nucleon-nucleon interaction and the nuclearmatter densities of the interacting nuclei have been carried out to explain recently measured experimental data of the {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn elastic scattering cross section at four different laboratory energies near the Coulomb barrier. The extracted reaction cross sections are also considered.

  14. A Joint Modeling Approach for Reaction Time and Accuracy in Psycholinguistic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeys, T.; Rosseel, Y.; Baten, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the psycholinguistic literature, reaction times and accuracy can be analyzed separately using mixed (logistic) effects models with crossed random effects for item and subject. Given the potential correlation between these two outcomes, a joint model for the reaction time and accuracy may provide further insight. In this paper, a Bayesian…

  15. A Joint Modeling Approach for Reaction Time and Accuracy in Psycholinguistic Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeys, T.; Rosseel, Y.; Baten, K.

    2011-01-01

    In the psycholinguistic literature, reaction times and accuracy can be analyzed separately using mixed (logistic) effects models with crossed random effects for item and subject. Given the potential correlation between these two outcomes, a joint model for the reaction time and accuracy may provide further insight. In this paper, a Bayesian…

  16. Delineating pMDI model reactions with loblolly pine via solution-state NMR spectroscopy. Part 1, Catalyzed reactions with wood models and wood polymers

    Treesearch

    Daniel J. Yelle; John Ralph; Charles R. Frihart

    2011-01-01

    To better understand adhesive interactions with wood, reactions between model compounds of wood and a model compound of polymeric methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (pMDI) were characterized by solution-state NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, finely ground loblolly pine sapwood, milled-wood lignin and holocellulose from the same wood were isolated and derivatized with...

  17. Processes of incremental message planning during conversation.

    PubMed

    Brown-Schmidt, Sarah; Konopka, Agnieszka E

    2015-06-01

    Speaking begins with the formulation of an intended preverbal message and linguistic encoding of this information. The transition from thought to speech occurs incrementally, with cascading planning at subsequent levels of production. In this article, we aim to specify the mechanisms that support incremental message preparation. We contrast two hypotheses about the mechanisms responsible for incorporating message-level information into a linguistic plan. According to the Initial Preparation view, messages can be encoded as fluent utterances if all information is ready before speaking begins. By contrast, on the Continuous Incrementality view, messages can be continually prepared and updated throughout the production process, allowing for fluent production even if new information is added to the message while speaking is underway. Testing these hypotheses, eye-tracked speakers in two experiments produced unscripted, conjoined noun phrases with modifiers. Both experiments showed that new message elements can be incrementally incorporated into the utterance even after articulation begins, consistent with a Continuous Incrementality view of message planning, in which messages percolate to linguistic encoding immediately as that information becomes available in the mind of the speaker. We conclude by discussing the functional role of incremental message planning in conversational speech and the situations in which this continuous incremental planning would be most likely to be observed.

  18. Model Adherend Surface Effects on Epoxy Cure Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    of X-ray photoelectro spectroscopy and reflection absorption infrarcd spectroscopy. They concluded that the catalytic action of the acidic hydroxyl...that an acidic carbon surface (produced by oxidation) resulted in selective amine adsorption and the catalytic acceleration of its reaction with the...subject of this report. EXPERIMENTAL The epoxy resins used in this study consisted of Epon 826, a diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A ( DGEBA ) resin (Shell

  19. Modelling Charge Transfer Reactions and Excitations with Subsystem DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavanello, Michele; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    The subsystem formulation of DFT known as Frozen Density Embedding (FDE) offers an excellent platform for studying charge transfer reactions in solvated systems, such as biosystems. We present the necessary theory developments for the calculation of the electronic couplings as well as the charge transfer excitations from FDE derived densities. We present preliminary calculations on DNA oligomers radical cations that include donor-bridge, donor-bridge-acceptor, and fully solvated systems.

  20. Incremental Discriminant Analysis in Tensor Space

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Liu; Weidong, Zhao; Tao, Yan; Qiang, Pu; Xiaodan, Du

    2015-01-01

    To study incremental machine learning in tensor space, this paper proposes incremental tensor discriminant analysis. The algorithm employs tensor representation to carry on discriminant analysis and combine incremental learning to alleviate the computational cost. This paper proves that the algorithm can be unified into the graph framework theoretically and analyzes the time and space complexity in detail. The experiments on facial image detection have shown that the algorithm not only achieves sound performance compared with other algorithms, but also reduces the computational issues apparently. PMID:26339229

  1. A C library for retrieving specific reactions from the BioModels database

    PubMed Central

    Neal, M. L.; Galdzicki, M.; Gallimore, J. T.; Sauro, H. M.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: We describe libSBMLReactionFinder, a C library for retrieving specific biochemical reactions from the curated systems biology markup language models contained in the BioModels database. The library leverages semantic annotations in the database to associate reactions with human-readable descriptions, making the reactions retrievable through simple string searches. Our goal is to provide a useful tool for quantitative modelers who seek to accelerate modeling efforts through the reuse of previously published representations of specific chemical reactions. Availability and implementation: The library is open-source and dual licensed under the Mozilla Public License Version 2.0 and GNU General Public License Version 2.0. Project source code, downloads and documentation are available at http://code.google.com/p/lib-sbml-reaction-finder. Contact: mneal@uw.edu PMID:24078714

  2. SurfKin: an ab initio kinetic code for modeling surface reactions.

    PubMed

    Le, Thong Nguyen-Minh; Liu, Bin; Huynh, Lam K

    2014-10-05

    In this article, we describe a C/C++ program called SurfKin (Surface Kinetics) to construct microkinetic mechanisms for modeling gas-surface reactions. Thermodynamic properties of reaction species are estimated based on density functional theory calculations and statistical mechanics. Rate constants for elementary steps (including adsorption, desorption, and chemical reactions on surfaces) are calculated using the classical collision theory and transition state theory. Methane decomposition and water-gas shift reaction on Ni(111) surface were chosen as test cases to validate the code implementations. The good agreement with literature data suggests this is a powerful tool to facilitate the analysis of complex reactions on surfaces, and thus it helps to effectively construct detailed microkinetic mechanisms for such surface reactions. SurfKin also opens a possibility for designing nanoscale model catalysts.

  3. The modeling of chemical reactions and thermochemical nonequilibrium in particle simulation computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallis, Michael A.; Harvey, John K.

    1998-06-01

    The treatment of chemical reactions and nonequilibrium energy exchange in Direct Simulation Monte Carlo calculations is examined. Details of a Maximum Entropy chemical reaction model are presented that is based on the classical scheme devised by Levine and Bernstein. Data are given for all of the significant reactions that occur in hypersonic reentry flight into the atmospheres of the Earth, Mars, and Venus. The method is an extension of that described and used previously by the authors (Gallis and Harvey [J. Fluid Mech. 312, 149 (1996); AIAA J. 34(7), 1378 (1996)]) and now includes carbon dioxide/nitrogen and ionic reactions. The model allows an appropriate dependence of each reaction on its controlling energy mode and avoids inappropriate use of equilibrium distributions to determine the reaction probabilities and post-collision energy reallocation. Sample flow solutions are given and comparisons are made with results obtained using continuum solvers.

  4. Generalized Holstein model for spin-dependent electron-transfer reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li-Ping; Ai, Qing; Sun, C. P.

    2012-03-01

    Some chemical reactions are described by electron transfer (ET) processes. The underlying mechanism could be modeled as a polaron motion in the molecular crystal—the Holstein model. By taking spin degrees of freedom into consideration, we generalize the Holstein model (molecular crystal model) to microscopically describe an ET chemical reaction. In our model, the electron spins in the radical pair simultaneously interact with a magnetic field and their nuclear-spin environments. By virtue of the perturbation approach, we obtain the chemical reaction rates for different initial states. It is discovered that the chemical reaction rate of the triplet state demonstrates its dependence on the direction of the magnetic field while the counterpart of the singlet state does not. This difference is attributed to the explicit dependence of the triplet state on the direction when the axis is rotated. Our model may provide a possible candidate for the microscopic origin of the avian compass.

  5. A Gibbs Energy Minimization Approach for Modeling of Chemical Reactions in a Basic Oxygen Furnace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruskopf, Ari; Visuri, Ville-Valtteri

    2017-08-01

    In modern steelmaking, the decarburization of hot metal is converted into steel primarily in converter processes, such as the basic oxygen furnace. The objective of this work was to develop a new mathematical model for top blown steel converter, which accounts for the complex reaction equilibria in the impact zone, also known as the hot spot, as well as the associated mass and heat transport. An in-house computer code of the model has been developed in Matlab. The main assumption of the model is that all reactions take place in a specified reaction zone. The mass transfer between the reaction volume, bulk slag, and metal determine the reaction rates for the species. The thermodynamic equilibrium is calculated using the partitioning of Gibbs energy (PGE) method. The activity model for the liquid metal is the unified interaction parameter model and for the liquid slag the modified quasichemical model (MQM). The MQM was validated by calculating iso-activity lines for the liquid slag components. The PGE method together with the MQM was validated by calculating liquidus lines for solid components. The results were compared with measurements from literature. The full chemical reaction model was validated by comparing the metal and slag compositions to measurements from industrial scale converter. The predictions were found to be in good agreement with the measured values. Furthermore, the accuracy of the model was found to compare favorably with the models proposed in the literature. The real-time capability of the proposed model was confirmed in test calculations.

  6. Building Program Models Incrementally from Informal Descriptions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    have the same input/output behavior , but the code will be designed and optimized for the particular environment. Further details of approaches to the...intentions (or plan). Then the program is executed to see if it matches the intentions. Hobbs catalogs a number of completeness and consistency inferences and...canonizing program transformations, many of which PMB can do [ Hobbs -77A, Hobbs .77B]. But he is more interested in dealing with them at an earlier

  7. Reactions of Trimethylaluminium: Modelling the Chemical Degradation of Synthetic Lubricants.

    PubMed

    Slaughter, Jonathan; Peel, Andrew J; Wheatley, Andrew E H

    2017-01-01

    In investigating and seeking to mimic the reactivity of trimethylaluminium (TMA) with synthetic, ester-based lubricating oils, the reaction of methyl propionate 1 was explored with 1, 2 and 3 equivalents of the organoaluminium reagent. Spectroscopic analysis points to the formation of the adduct 1(TMA) accompanied only by the low level 1:1 production of Me2 AlOCEtMe2 2 and Me2 AlOMe 3 when an equimolar amount of TMA is applied. The deployment of excess TMA favours reaction to give 2 and 3 over 1(TMA) adduct formation and spectroscopy reveals that in hydrocarbon solution substitution product 2 traps unreacted TMA to yield 2(TMA). The (1) H NMR spectroscopic observation of two Al-Me signals not attributable to free TMA and in the ratio 1:4 suggests the formation of a previously only postulated, symmetrical metallacycle in Me4 Al2 (μ(2) -Me)(μ(2) -OCEtMe2 ). In the presence of 3, 2(TMA) undergoes thermally induced exchange to yield Me4 Al2 (μ(2) -OMe)(μ(2) -OCEtMe2 ) 4 and TMA. The reaction of methyl phenylacetate 5 with TMA allows isolation of the crystalline product Me2 AlOCBnMe2 (TMA) 6(TMA), which allows the first observation of the Me4 Al2 (μ(2) -Me)(μ(2) -OR) motif in the solid state. Distances of 2.133(3) Å (Al-Mebridging ) and 1.951 Å (mean Al-Meterminal ) are recorded. The abstraction of TMA from 6(TMA) by the introduction of Et2 O has yielded 6, which exists as a dimer. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  8. Reaction Cross Sections for Two DSMC Models: Accuracy and Sensitivity Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-15

    trajectory (QCT) cross sections for N2+N dissociation and for N2+O endothermic exchange pro- vide a good test case. A DSMC simulation of a simple... endothermic reactions considered here, we have made the common simplifying assumption that Ea is equal to the heat of reaction. However, since some reactions...especially exothermic ones) have a non- negligible energy barrier, the QK model (like all others) in these cases would have to use an adjustable input

  9. Amplitude equation for a diffusion-reaction system: The reversible Sel'kov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    For a model glycolytic diffusion-reaction system, an amplitude equation has been derived in the framework of a weakly nonlinear theory. The linear stability analysis of this amplitude equation interprets the structural transitions and stability of various forms of Turing structures. This amplitude equation also conforms to the expectation that time-invariant amplitudes in Turing structures are independent of complexing reaction with the activator species, whereas complexing reaction strongly influences Hopf-wave bifurcation.

  10. Effects of spatial and temporal noise on a cubic-autocatalytic reaction-diffusion model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Jean-Sébastien; Hochberg, David; Pérez-Mercader, Juan

    2017-03-01

    We characterize the influence that external noise, with both spatial and temporal correlations, has on the scale dependence of the reaction parameters of a cubic autocatalytic reaction diffusion (CARD) system. Interpreting the CARD model as a primitive reaction scheme for a living system, the results indicate that power-law correlations in environmental fluctuations can either decrease or increase the rates of nutrient decay and the rate of autocatalysis (replication) on small spatial and temporal scales.

  11. Comparison of the Incremental Validity of the Old and New MCAT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Fredric M.; And Others

    The predictive and incremental validity of both the Old and New Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) was examined and compared with a sample of over 300 medical students. Results of zero order and incremental validity coefficients, as well as prediction models resulting from all possible subsets regression analyses using Mallow's Cp criterion,…

  12. Subjective and nystagmus reactions considered in relation to models of vestibular function. [dynamic models for prediction human physiological reactions to angular accelerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guedry, F. E., Jr.; Gilson, R. D.; Stockwell, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Modelling will become increasingly important as more knowledge is accumulated, because it offers advantages in predicting reactions of individuals in a variety of situations, including novel aerospace environments, and in specifying a few parameters which should have considerable clinical significance. However, the need for continuing experimental crosschecks of these models has been illustrated by several sets of results which would not have been predicted by any existing models.

  13. A Reaction-based Diagonalization Approach to Modeling Surface Water Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Yeh, G.; Zhang, F.; Wu, T.; Hu, G.

    2005-12-01

    There are many water quality models (e.g., WASP, QAUL2E/QUAL2K, CE-QUAL-ICM, RCA, RMA11, etc.) that have been employed by practitioners in surface water quality modeling. All of these models are similar to each others. The major differences among them are the number of water quality parameters included and the number of biogeochemical processes considered. Because of the limitation on the number of biogeochemical processes considered and, in a lesser extent, on the number of water quality parameters included, these models often perform only fairly in validation and their predictions may be unreliable, even though they can be adequately calibrated in most occasions and excellently in some occasions. Obviously, there is a need to develop a model that would allow the inclusion of any number of water quality parameters and enable the hypothesis of any number of biogeochemical processes. This paper presents the development of a numerical water quality model using a general paradigm of reaction-based approaches. In a reaction-based approach, all conceptualized biogoechemical processes are transformed into a reaction network. Through the decomposition of species governing equations via Gauss-Jordan column reduction of the reaction network, (1) redundant fast reactions and irrelevant kinetic reactions are removed from the system, which alleviates the problem of unnecessary and erroneous formulation and parameterization of these reactions, and (2) fast reactions and slow reactions are decoupled, which enables robust numerical integrations. The system of species governing equations is transformed into two sets: algebraic equations (either mass action equations or users' specified) of equilibrium variables and differential equations of kinetic variables. As a result, the model alleviates the needs of using simple partitions for fast reactions and uses kinetic-variables instead of biogeochemical species as primary dependent variables. With the diagonalization strategy, it

  14. Separate and combined effects of gabapentin and [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol in humans discriminating [INCREMENT]9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Lile, Joshua A; Wesley, Michael J; Kelly, Thomas H; Hays, Lon R

    2016-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine a potential mechanism of action of gabapentin to manage cannabis-use disorders by determining the interoceptive effects of gabapentin in cannabis users discriminating [INCREMENT]-tetrahydrocannabinol ([INCREMENT]-THC) using a pharmacologically selective drug-discrimination procedure. Eight cannabis users learned to discriminate 30 mg oral [INCREMENT]-THC from placebo and then received gabapentin (600 and 1200 mg), [INCREMENT]-THC (5, 15, and 30 mg), and placebo alone and in combination. Self-report, task performance, and physiological measures were also collected. [INCREMENT]-THC served as a discriminative stimulus, produced positive subjective effects, elevated heart rate, and impaired psychomotor performance. Both doses of gabapentin substituted for the [INCREMENT]-THC discriminative stimulus and engendered subjective and performance-impairing effects that overlapped with those of [INCREMENT]-THC when administered alone. When administered concurrently, gabapentin shifted the discriminative-stimulus effects of [INCREMENT]-THC leftward/upward, and combinations of [INCREMENT]-THC and gabapentin generally produced larger effects on cannabinoid-sensitive outcomes relative to [INCREMENT]-THC alone. These results suggest that one mechanism by which gabapentin might facilitate cannabis abstinence is by producing effects that overlap with those of cannabinoids.

  15. External Device to Incrementally Skid the Habitat (E-DISH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazell, J. W.; Introne, Steve; Bedell, Lisa; Credle, Ben; Holp, Graham; Ly, Siao; Tait, Terry

    1994-01-01

    A Mars habitat transport system was designed as part of the NASA Mars exploration program. The transport system, the External Device to Incrementally Skid the Habitat (E - DISH), will be used to transport Mars habitats from their landing sites to the colony base and will be detached after unloading. The system requirements for Mars were calculated and scaled for model purposes. Specific model materials are commonly found and recommendations for materials for the Mars design are included.

  16. Large Deviations for Processes with Independent Increments.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    generating function of the increments exists and thus the sample paths of such stochastic processes lie in the space of functions of bounded variation . The...BV[O,1], the space of functions of bounded variation and the topology is that of weak*-convergence. Varadhan (1966) studied the LDP for similar...increments and no Gaussian component which are considered as elements of BV[0,1], the space of functions of bounded variation . The final section

  17. Structure-reactivity modeling using mixture-based representation of chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polishchuk, Pavel; Madzhidov, Timur; Gimadiev, Timur; Bodrov, Andrey; Nugmanov, Ramil; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-07-01

    We describe a novel approach of reaction representation as a combination of two mixtures: a mixture of reactants and a mixture of products. In turn, each mixture can be encoded using an earlier reported approach involving simplex descriptors (SiRMS). The feature vector representing these two mixtures results from either concatenated product and reactant descriptors or the difference between descriptors of products and reactants. This reaction representation doesn't need an explicit labeling of a reaction center. The rigorous "product-out" cross-validation (CV) strategy has been suggested. Unlike the naïve "reaction-out" CV approach based on a random selection of items, the proposed one provides with more realistic estimation of prediction accuracy for reactions resulting in novel products. The new methodology has been applied to model rate constants of E2 reactions. It has been demonstrated that the use of the fragment control domain applicability approach significantly increases prediction accuracy of the models. The models obtained with new "mixture" approach performed better than those required either explicit (Condensed Graph of Reaction) or implicit (reaction fingerprints) reaction center labeling.

  18. Structure-reactivity modeling using mixture-based representation of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Polishchuk, Pavel; Madzhidov, Timur; Gimadiev, Timur; Bodrov, Andrey; Nugmanov, Ramil; Varnek, Alexandre

    2017-07-27

    We describe a novel approach of reaction representation as a combination of two mixtures: a mixture of reactants and a mixture of products. In turn, each mixture can be encoded using an earlier reported approach involving simplex descriptors (SiRMS). The feature vector representing these two mixtures results from either concatenated product and reactant descriptors or the difference between descriptors of products and reactants. This reaction representation doesn't need an explicit labeling of a reaction center. The rigorous "product-out" cross-validation (CV) strategy has been suggested. Unlike the naïve "reaction-out" CV approach based on a random selection of items, the proposed one provides with more realistic estimation of prediction accuracy for reactions resulting in novel products. The new methodology has been applied to model rate constants of E2 reactions. It has been demonstrated that the use of the fragment control domain applicability approach significantly increases prediction accuracy of the models. The models obtained with new "mixture" approach performed better than those required either explicit (Condensed Graph of Reaction) or implicit (reaction fingerprints) reaction center labeling.

  19. PhreeqcRM: A reaction module for transport simulators based on the geochemical model PHREEQC

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, David L.; Wissmeier, Laurin

    2015-01-01

    PhreeqcRM is a geochemical reaction module designed specifically to perform equilibrium and kinetic reaction calculations for reactive transport simulators that use an operator-splitting approach. The basic function of the reaction module is to take component concentrations from the model cells of the transport simulator, run geochemical reactions, and return updated component concentrations to the transport simulator. If multicomponent diffusion is modeled (e.g., Nernst–Planck equation), then aqueous species concentrations can be used instead of component concentrations. The reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of the reaction capabilities of PHREEQC. In each cell, the reaction module maintains the composition of all of the reactants, which may include minerals, exchangers, surface complexers, gas phases, solid solutions, and user-defined kinetic reactants.PhreeqcRM assigns initial and boundary conditions for model cells based on standard PHREEQC input definitions (files or strings) of chemical compositions of solutions and reactants. Additional PhreeqcRM capabilities include methods to eliminate reaction calculations for inactive parts of a model domain, transfer concentrations and other model properties, and retrieve selected results. The module demonstrates good scalability for parallel processing by using multiprocessing with MPI (message passing interface) on distributed memory systems, and limited scalability using multithreading with OpenMP on shared memory systems. PhreeqcRM is written in C++, but interfaces allow methods to be called from C or Fortran. By using the PhreeqcRM reaction module, an existing multicomponent transport simulator can be extended to simulate a wide range of geochemical reactions. Results of the implementation of PhreeqcRM as the reaction engine for transport simulators PHAST and FEFLOW are shown by using an analytical solution and the reactive transport benchmark of MoMaS.

  20. PhreeqcRM: A reaction module for transport simulators based on the geochemical model PHREEQC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhurst, David L.; Wissmeier, Laurin

    2015-09-01

    PhreeqcRM is a geochemical reaction module designed specifically to perform equilibrium and kinetic reaction calculations for reactive transport simulators that use an operator-splitting approach. The basic function of the reaction module is to take component concentrations from the model cells of the transport simulator, run geochemical reactions, and return updated component concentrations to the transport simulator. If multicomponent diffusion is modeled (e.g., Nernst-Planck equation), then aqueous species concentrations can be used instead of component concentrations. The reaction capabilities are a complete implementation of the reaction capabilities of PHREEQC. In each cell, the reaction module maintains the composition of all of the reactants, which may include minerals, exchangers, surface complexers, gas phases, solid solutions, and user-defined kinetic reactants. PhreeqcRM assigns initial and boundary conditions for model cells based on standard PHREEQC input definitions (files or strings) of chemical compositions of solutions and reactants. Additional PhreeqcRM capabilities include methods to eliminate reaction calculations for inactive parts of a model domain, transfer concentrations and other model properties, and retrieve selected results. The module demonstrates good scalability for parallel processing by using multiprocessing with MPI (message passing interface) on distributed memory systems, and limited scalability using multithreading with OpenMP on shared memory systems. PhreeqcRM is written in C++, but interfaces allow methods to be called from C or Fortran. By using the PhreeqcRM reaction module, an existing multicomponent transport simulator can be extended to simulate a wide range of geochemical reactions. Results of the implementation of PhreeqcRM as the reaction engine for transport simulators PHAST and FEFLOW are shown by using an analytical solution and the reactive transport benchmark of MoMaS.

  1. A model for lignin alteration - Part I: A kinetic reaction-network model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payne, D.F.; Ortoleva, P.J.

    2001-01-01

    A new quantitative model is presented which simulates the maturation of lignin-derived sedimentary organic matter under geologic conditions. In this model, compositionally specific reactants evolve to specific intermediate and mobile products through balanced, nth order processes, by way of a network of sequential and parallel reactions. The chemical kinetic approach is based primarily on published observed structural transformations of naturally matured, lignin-derived, sedimentary organic matter. Assuming that Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork coal in the Piceance Basin is primarily lignin-derived, the model is calibrated for the Multi-Well Experiment(MWX) Site in this basin. This kind of approach may be applied to other selectively preserved chemical components of sedimentary organic matter. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Computational study of a model system of enzyme-mediated [4+2] cycloaddition reaction.

    PubMed

    Gordeev, Evgeniy G; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2015-01-01

    A possible mechanistic pathway related to an enzyme-catalyzed [4+2] cycloaddition reaction was studied by theoretical calculations at density functional (B3LYP, O3LYP, M062X) and semiempirical levels (PM6-DH2, PM6) performed on a model system. The calculations were carried out for the key [4+2] cycloaddition step considering enzyme-catalyzed biosynthesis of Spinosyn A in a model reaction, where a reliable example of a biological Diels-Alder reaction was reported experimentally. In the present study it was demonstrated that the [4+2] cycloaddition reaction may benefit from moving along the energetically balanced reaction coordinate, which enabled the catalytic rate enhancement of the [4+2] cycloaddition pathway involving a single transition state. Modeling of such a system with coordination of three amino acids indicated a reliable decrease of activation energy by ~18.0 kcal/mol as compared to a non-catalytic transformation.

  3. Modeling of chemical reactions between polyatomic molecules for atmospheric entry simulations with direct simulation Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nizenkov, P.; Pfeiffer, M.; Mirza, A.; Fasoulas, S.

    2017-07-01

    For the simulation of atmospheric entry maneuvers at Mars and Saturn's Titan, the chemistry modeling of polyatomic molecules is implemented in the direct simulation Monte Carlo method within the reactive plasma flow solver PICLas. An additional reaction condition as well as the consideration of the vibrational degrees of freedom is described in the context of the total collision energy model. The treatment of reverse exchange and recombination reactions is discussed, where the low temperature exponent of the Arrhenius fit for methane dissociation limited the calculation of the reaction probability at relevant temperatures. An alternative method based on the equilibrium constant is devised. The post-reaction energy redistribution is performed under the assumption of equipartition of the remaining collisional energy. The implementation is verified for several reaction paths with simple reservoir simulations. Finally, the feasibility of the new chemistry model is demonstrated by a simulation of a trajectory point of Huygens probe at Titan.

  4. Modeling reaction and transport of multiple species in water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Shang, Feng; Uber, James G; Rossman, Lewis A

    2008-02-01

    A general framework for modeling the reaction and transport of multiple, interacting chemical species in drinking water distribution systems is developed. It accommodates reactions between constituents in both the bulk flow (through pipes and storage tanks) and those attached to pipe walls. The framework has been implemented as an extension to the well-known EPANET programmer's toolkit (a library of functions that simulates hydraulic behavior and water quality transport in pipe networks). The implementation allows modelers to define the particular species of interest and their chemical equilibrium and reaction rate equations in a natural fashion using standard functional notation. It also employs several different numerical methods, including a stiff differential equation solver, to solve the reaction/equilibrium system throughout the pipe network using the standard EPANET transport algorithm. The flexibility and power of the framework is demonstrated with two examples that model water quality dynamics governed by different reaction/equilibrium systems.

  5. Efficient Calculation of Accurate Reaction Energies-Assessment of Different Models in Electronic Structure Theory.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Joachim

    2015-08-11

    In this work we analyze the accuracy and the efficiency of different schemes to obtain the complete basis set limit for CCSD(T). It is found that composite schemes using an MP2 increment to reach the basis set limit provide high accuracy combined with high efficiency. In these composite schemes the MP2-F12/cc-pVTZ-F12 method is suitable to compute the MP2 contribution at the basis set limit. We propose to use the def2-TZVP or the TZVPP basis sets at the coupled cluster level in combination with the cc-pVTZ-F12 basis set at the MP2 level to compute reaction energies close to the basis set limit, if high accuracy methods like CCSD(T)(F12*) or 56-extrapolations are no longer feasible due to the computational effort. The standard deviation of CCSD(T)+ΔMP2/cc-pVTZ-F12/def2-TZVP and CCSD(T)+ΔMP2/cc-pVTZ-F12/TZVPP is found to be only 0.93 and 0.65 kJ/mol for a test set of 51 closed shell reactions. Furthermore, we provide a comprehensive list of different computational strategies to obtain CCSD(T) reaction energies with an efficiency and accuracy measure. Finally we analyze how different choices of the exponent in the correlation factor (γ) change the results when using explicitly correlated methods. The statistical results in this study are based on a set of 51 reaction energies in the range of 0.7 to 631.5 kJ/mol.

  6. Understanding the incremental value of novel diagnostic tests for tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Dowdy, David

    2015-12-03

    Tuberculosis is a major source of global mortality caused by infection, partly because of a tremendous ongoing burden of undiagnosed disease. Improved diagnostic technology may play an increasingly crucial part in global efforts to end tuberculosis, but the ability of diagnostic tests to curb tuberculosis transmission is dependent on multiple factors, including the time taken by a patient to seek health care, the patient's symptoms, and the patterns of transmission before diagnosis. Novel diagnostic assays for tuberculosis have conventionally been evaluated on the basis of characteristics such as sensitivity and specificity, using assumptions that probably overestimate the impact of diagnostic tests on transmission. We argue for a shift in focus to the evaluation of such tests' incremental value, defining outcomes that reflect each test's purpose (for example, transmissions averted) and comparing systems with the test against those without, in terms of those outcomes. Incremental value can also be measured in units of outcome per incremental unit of resource (for example, money or human capacity). Using a novel, simplified model of tuberculosis transmission that addresses some of the limitations of earlier tuberculosis diagnostic models, we demonstrate that the incremental value of any novel test depends not just on its accuracy, but also on elements such as patient behaviour, tuberculosis natural history and health systems. By integrating these factors into a single unified framework, we advance an approach to the evaluation of new diagnostic tests for tuberculosis that considers the incremental value at the population level and demonstrates how additional data could inform more-effective implementation of tuberculosis diagnostic tests under various conditions.

  7. Stability of convective patterns in reaction fronts: a comparison of three models.

    PubMed

    Vasquez, Desiderio A; Coroian, Dan I

    2010-09-01

    Autocatalytic reaction fronts generate density gradients that may lead to convection. Fronts propagating in vertical tubes can be flat, axisymmetric, or nonaxisymmetric, depending on the diameter of the tube. In this paper, we study the transitions to convection as well as the stability of different types of fronts. We analyze the stability of the convective reaction fronts using three different models for front propagation. We use a model based on a reaction-diffusion-advection equation coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for fluid flow. A second model replaces the reaction-diffusion equation with a thin front approximation where the front speed depends on the front curvature. We also introduce a new low-dimensional model based on a finite mode truncation. This model allows a complete analysis of all stable and unstable fronts.

  8. Stability of convective patterns in reaction fronts: A comparison of three models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Desiderio A.; Coroian, Dan I.

    2010-09-01

    Autocatalytic reaction fronts generate density gradients that may lead to convection. Fronts propagating in vertical tubes can be flat, axisymmetric, or nonaxisymmetric, depending on the diameter of the tube. In this paper, we study the transitions to convection as well as the stability of different types of fronts. We analyze the stability of the convective reaction fronts using three different models for front propagation. We use a model based on a reaction-diffusion-advection equation coupled to the Navier-Stokes equations to account for fluid flow. A second model replaces the reaction-diffusion equation with a thin front approximation where the front speed depends on the front curvature. We also introduce a new low-dimensional model based on a finite mode truncation. This model allows a complete analysis of all stable and unstable fronts.

  9. The spatiotemporal master equation: Approximation of reaction-diffusion dynamics via Markov state modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Stefanie; Schütte, Christof

    2016-12-01

    Accurate modeling and numerical simulation of reaction kinetics is a topic of steady interest. We consider the spatiotemporal chemical master equation (ST-CME) as a model for stochastic reaction-diffusion systems that exhibit properties of metastability. The space of motion is decomposed into metastable compartments, and diffusive motion is approximated by jumps between these compartments. Treating these jumps as first-order reactions, simulation of the resulting stochastic system is possible by the Gillespie method. We present the theory of Markov state models as a theoretical foundation of this intuitive approach. By means of Markov state modeling, both the number and shape of compartments and the transition rates between them can be determined. We consider the ST-CME for two reaction-diffusion systems and compare it to more detailed models. Moreover, a rigorous formal justification of the ST-CME by Galerkin projection methods is presented.

  10. Modeling Reaction Time and Accuracy of Multiple-Alternative Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Fábio P.; Ratcliff, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Several sequential sampling models using racing diffusion processes for multiple-alternative decisions were evaluated using data from two perceptual discrimination experiments. The structures of the models differed on a number of dimensions, including whether there was lateral inhibition between accumulators, whether there was decay in evidence, whether evidence could be negative, and whether there was variability in starting points. Data were collected from a letter discrimination task in which stimulus difficulty and probability of the response alternatives were varied along with number of response alternatives. Model fitting results ruled out a large number of model classes in favor of a smaller number of specific models, most of which showed a moderate to high degree of mimicking. The best-fitting models had zero to moderate values of decay, no inhibition, and assumed that the addition of alternatives either affected the subprocesses contributing to the nondecisional time, the degree of caution, or the quality of evidence extracted from stimuli. PMID:20045893

  11. Realistic parameters for simple models of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Gorecki, Jerzy; Szymanski, Jan; Gorecka, Joanna Natalia

    2011-08-18

    We use experimental results to estimate the values of parameters of simple models describing the time evolution of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction proceeding in droplets surrounded by hydrocarbons. The equations with fitted parameters correctly describe the period of oscillations for a large class of experimental conditions at which the reaction is performed. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  12. Reactions to Discrimination, Stigmatization, Ostracism, and Other Forms of Interpersonal Rejection: A Multimotive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Laura Smart; Leary, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people's reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People's immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of…

  13. A mesoscopic reaction rate model for shock initiation of multi-component PBX explosives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y R; Duan, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Ou, Z C; Huang, F L

    2016-11-05

    The primary goal of this research is to develop a three-term mesoscopic reaction rate model that consists of a hot-spot ignition, a low-pressure slow burning and a high-pressure fast reaction terms for shock initiation of multi-component Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX). Thereinto, based on the DZK hot-spot model for a single-component PBX explosive, the hot-spot ignition term as well as its reaction rate is obtained through a "mixing rule" of the explosive components; new expressions for both the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term are also obtained by establishing the relationships between the reaction rate of the multi-component PBX explosive and that of its explosive components, based on the low-pressure slow burning term and the high-pressure fast reaction term of a mesoscopic reaction rate model. Furthermore, for verification, the new reaction rate model is incorporated into the DYNA2D code to simulate numerically the shock initiation process of the PBXC03 and the PBXC10 multi-component PBX explosives, and the numerical results of the pressure histories at different Lagrange locations in explosive are found to be in good agreements with previous experimental data.

  14. Stochastic modeling of biochemical systems with multistep reactions using state-dependent time delay

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qianqian; Tian, Tianhai

    2016-01-01

    To deal with the growing scale of molecular systems, sophisticated modelling techniques have been designed in recent years to reduce the complexity of mathematical models. Among them, a widely used approach is delayed reaction for simplifying multistep reactions. However, recent research results suggest that a delayed reaction with constant time delay is unable to describe multistep reactions accurately. To address this issue, we propose a novel approach using state-dependent time delay to approximate multistep reactions. We first use stochastic simulations to calculate time delay arising from multistep reactions exactly. Then we design algorithms to calculate time delay based on system dynamics precisely. To demonstrate the power of proposed method, two processes of mRNA degradation are used to investigate the function of time delay in determining system dynamics. In addition, a multistep pathway of metabolic synthesis is used to explore the potential of the proposed method to simplify multistep reactions with nonlinear reaction rates. Simulation results suggest that the state-dependent time delay is a promising and accurate approach to reduce model complexity and decrease the number of unknown parameters in the models. PMID:27553753

  15. Consistent post-reaction vibrational energy redistribution in DSMC simulations using TCE model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges Sebastião, Israel; Alexeenko, Alina

    2016-10-01

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method has been widely applied to study shockwaves, hypersonic reentry flows, and other nonequilibrium flow phenomena. Although there is currently active research on high-fidelity models based on ab initio data, the total collision energy (TCE) and Larsen-Borgnakke (LB) models remain the most often used chemistry and relaxation models in DSMC simulations, respectively. The conventional implementation of the discrete LB model, however, may not satisfy detailed balance when recombination and exchange reactions play an important role in the flow energy balance. This issue can become even more critical in reacting mixtures involving polyatomic molecules, such as in combustion. In this work, this important shortcoming is addressed and an empirical approach to consistently specify the post-reaction vibrational states close to thermochemical equilibrium conditions is proposed within the TCE framework. Following Bird's quantum-kinetic (QK) methodology for populating post-reaction states, the new TCE-based approach involves two main steps. The state-specific TCE reaction probabilities for a forward reaction are first pre-computed from equilibrium 0-D simulations. These probabilities are then employed to populate the post-reaction vibrational states of the corresponding reverse reaction. The new approach is illustrated by application to exchange and recombination reactions relevant to H2-O2 combustion processes.

  16. Reactions to Discrimination, Stigmatization, Ostracism, and Other Forms of Interpersonal Rejection: A Multimotive Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Laura Smart; Leary, Mark R.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people's reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People's immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of…

  17. Modeling Proton- and Light Ion-Induced Reactions at Low Energies in the MARS15 Code

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhno, I. L.; Mokhov, N. V.; Gudima, K. K.

    2015-04-25

    An implementation of both ALICE code and TENDL evaluated nuclear data library in order to describe nuclear reactions induced by low-energy projectiles in the Monte Carlo code MARS15 is presented. Comparisons between results of modeling and experimental data on reaction cross sections and secondary particle distributions are shown.

  18. Importance of cytochromes in cyclization reactions: quantum chemical study on a model reaction of proguanil to cycloguanil.

    PubMed

    Arfeen, Minhajul; Patel, Dhilon S; Abbat, Sheenu; Taxak, Nikhil; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2014-10-30

    Proguanil, an anti-malarial prodrug, undergoes cytochrome P450 catalyzed biotransformation to the pharmacologically active triazine metabolite (cycloguanil), which inhibits plasmodial dihydrofolate reductase. This cyclization is catalyzed by CYP2C19 and many anti-malarial lead compounds are being designed and synthesized to exploit this pathway. Quantum chemical calculations were performed using the model species (Cpd I for active species of cytochrome and N4-isopropyl-N6-methylbiguanide for proguanil) to elucidate the mechanism of the cyclization pathway. The overall reaction involves the loss of a water molecule, and is exothermic by approximately 55 kcal/mol, and involves a barrier of approximately 17 kcal/mol. The plausible reaction pathway involves the initial H-radical abstraction from the isopropyl group by Cpd I, followed by two alternative paths- (i) oxygen rebound to provide hydroxyl derivative and (ii) loss of additional H-radical to yield 1,3,5-triazatriene, which undergoes cyclization. This study helped in understanding the role of the active species of cytochromes in this important cyclization reaction.

  19. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-03-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter's L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R(2)) for their absorbance, Hunter's L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter's b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter's b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine.

  20. Optimization of Maillard Reaction in Model System of Glucosamine and Cysteine Using Response Surface Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Arachchi, Shanika Jeewantha Thewarapperuma; Kim, Ye-Joo; Kim, Dae-Wook; Oh, Sang-Chul; Lee, Yang-Bong

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur-containing amino acids play important roles in good flavor generation in Maillard reaction of non-enzymatic browning, so aqueous model systems of glucosamine and cysteine were studied to investigate the effects of reaction temperature, initial pH, reaction time, and concentration ratio of glucosamine and cysteine. Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the independent reaction parameters of cysteine and glucosamine in Maillard reaction. Box-Behnken factorial design was used with 30 runs of 16 factorial levels, 8 axial levels and 6 central levels. The degree of Maillard reaction was determined by reading absorption at 425 nm in a spectrophotometer and Hunter’s L, a, and b values. ΔE was consequently set as the fifth response factor. In the statistical analyses, determination coefficients (R2) for their absorbance, Hunter’s L, a, b values, and ΔE were 0.94, 0.79, 0.73, 0.96, and 0.79, respectively, showing that the absorbance and Hunter’s b value were good dependent variables for this model system. The optimum processing parameters were determined to yield glucosamine-cysteine Maillard reaction product with higher absorbance and higher colour change. The optimum estimated absorbance was achieved at the condition of initial pH 8.0, 111°C reaction temperature, 2.47 h reaction time, and 1.30 concentration ratio. The optimum condition for colour change measured by Hunter’s b value was 2.41 h reaction time, 114°C reaction temperature, initial pH 8.3, and 1.26 concentration ratio. These results can provide the basic information for Maillard reaction of aqueous model system between glucosamine and cysteine. PMID:28401086

  1. Calibration of model constants in a biological reaction model for sewage treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Amano, Ken; Kageyama, Kohji; Watanabe, Shoji; Takemoto, Takeshi

    2002-02-01

    Various biological reaction models have been proposed which estimate concentrations of soluble and insoluble components in effluent of sewage treatment plants. These models should be effective to develop a better operation system and plant design, but their formulas consist of nonlinear equations, and there are many model constants, which are not easy to calibrate. A technique has been proposed to decide the model constants by precise experiments, but it is not practical for design engineers or process operators to perform these experiments regularly. Other approaches which calibrate the model constants by mathematical techniques should be used. In this paper, the optimal regulator method of modern control theory is applied as a mathematical technique to calibrate the model constants. This method is applied in a small sewage treatment testing facility. Calibration of the model constants is examined to decrease the deviations between calculated and measured concentrations. Results show that calculated values of component concentrations approach measured values and the method is useful for actual plants.

  2. A Comparative Study of Failure with Incremental Forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. H.; Song, N. N.; Pires, F. M. Andrade

    2016-08-01

    Incremental forming (ISF) is an innovative flexible sheet metal forming process which can be used to manufacture complex shapes from various materials. Due to its flexibility, it has attracted more and more attention over recent decades. Localized deformation and shear through the thickness are essential characteristics of ISF. These lead to specific failure modes and formability of ISF that are different from the conventional stamping process. In this contribution, three continuum damage models (Lemaitre, Gurson, extended GTN models) are formulated and fully coupled with the finite element simulation in a commercial software ABAQUS to predict failure in incremental forming. A comparative investigation of these three damage models has been carried out to analyze both the deformation behavior and failure mechanisms.

  3. Modeling the formation and reactions of benzene metabolites.

    PubMed

    Golding, Bernard T; Barnes, Martine L; Bleasdale, Christine; Henderson, Alistair P; Jiang, Dong; Li, Xin; Mutlu, Esra; Petty, Hannah J; Sadeghi, Majid M

    2010-03-19

    One or more of the muconaldehyde isomers is a putative product of benzene metabolism. As muconaldehydes are highly reactive dienals and potentially mutagenic they might be relevant to the carcinogenicity of benzene. Muconaldehydes may be derived through the action of a cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase on benzene oxide-oxepin, which are established metabolites of benzene. Oxidation of benzene oxide-oxepin either by the one-electron oxidant cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate (CAN) or by iron(III) tris(1,10-phenanthroline) hexafluorophosphate in acetone at -78 degrees C or acetonitrile at -40 degrees C gave (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, which was a single diastereoisomer according to analysis by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Reaction of toluene-1,2-oxide/2-methyloxepin with CAN gave (2E,4Z)-6-oxo-hepta-2,4-dienal. Similarly, the action of CAN on 1,6-dimethylbenzene oxide-2,7-dimethyloxepin gave (3Z,5E)-octa-3,5-diene-2,7-dione. In vivo, benzene oxide-oxepin could suffer one-electron oxidation by cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase giving (E,Z)-muconaldehyde. The observations presented may be relevant to the toxicology of benzene oxide-oxepin and other arene oxide-oxepins as we have previously shown that (E,Z)-muconaldehyde, analogously to (Z,Z)-muconaldehyde, affords pyrrole adducts with the exocyclic amino groups of the DNA bases adenine and guanine. Independent of their possible toxicological significance, the experiments described provide preparatively useful routes to (E,Z)-muconaldehyde and its congeners. Methods are also described for the trapping and analysis of reactive benzene metabolites, e.g. using the Diels-Alder reaction with the dienophile 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione to trap arene oxides and with the diene 1,3-diphenylisobenzofuran to trap enals.

  4. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose-Ammonia Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose-ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose-ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  5. The Sugar Model: Autocatalytic Activity of the Triose-Ammonia Reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, Arthur L.

    2006-01-01

    Reaction of triose sugars with ammonia under anaerobic conditions yielded autocatalytic products. The autocatalytic behavior of the products was examined by measuring the effect of the crude triose-ammonia reaction product on the kinetics of a second identical triose-ammonia reaction. The reaction product showed autocatalytic activity by increasing both the rate of disappearance of triose and the rate formation of pyruvaldehyde, the product of triose dehydration. This synthetic process is considered a reasonable model of origin-of-life chemistry because it uses plausible prebiotic substrates, and resembles modern biosynthesis by employing the energized carbon groups of sugars to drive the synthesis of autocatalytic molecules.

  6. (Process Models of Counselor Judgment: Proposal and Reactions.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmer, Douglas C.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Studied competing process models of counselors' clinical judgment for their capacity to account for variance in prognostic judgments and further tested for parsimony. Patton discusses problems of logic and data analysis in the model's formulation. Provides Stromer's response to the critique. (RC)

  7. International Space Station Increment Operations Services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaelis, Horst; Sielaff, Christian

    2002-01-01

    The Industrial Operator (IO) has defined End-to-End services to perform efficiently all required operations tasks for the Manned Space Program (MSP) as agreed during the Ministerial Council in Edinburgh in November 2001. Those services are the result of a detailed task analysis based on the operations processes as derived from the Space Station Program Implementation Plans (SPIP) and defined in the Operations Processes Documents (OPD). These services are related to ISS Increment Operations and ATV Mission Operations. Each of these End-to-End services is typically characterised by the following properties: It has a clearly defined starting point, where all requirements on the end-product are fixed and associated performance metrics of the customer are well defined. It has a clearly defined ending point, when the product or service is delivered to the customer and accepted by him, according to the performance metrics defined at the start point. The implementation of the process might be restricted by external boundary conditions and constraints mutually agreed with the customer. As far as those are respected the IO has the free choice to select methods and means of implementation. The ISS Increment Operations Service (IOS) activities required for the MSP Exploitation program cover the complete increment specific cycle starting with the support to strategic planning and ending with the post increment evaluation. These activities are divided into sub-services including the following tasks: - ISS Planning Support covering the support to strategic and tactical planning up to the generation - Development &Payload Integration Support - ISS Increment Preparation - ISS Increment Execution These processes are tight together by the Increment Integration Management, which provides the planning and scheduling of all activities as well as the technical management of the overall process . The paper describes the entire End-to-End ISS Increment Operations service and the

  8. Piecewise linear and Boolean models of chemical reaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Veliz-Cuba, Alan; Kumar, Ajit; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-01-01

    Models of biochemical networks are frequently complex and high-dimensional. Reduction methods that preserve important dynamical properties are therefore essential for their study. Interactions in biochemical networks are frequently modeled using Hill functions (xn/(Jn + xn)). Reduced ODEs and Boolean approximations of such model networks have been studied extensively when the exponent n is large. However, while the case of small constant J appears in practice, it is not well understood. We provide a mathematical analysis of this limit, and show that a reduction to a set of piecewise linear ODEs and Boolean networks can be mathematically justified. The piecewise linear systems have closed form solutions that closely track those of the fully nonlinear model. The simpler, Boolean network can be used to study the qualitative behavior of the original system. We justify the reduction using geometric singular perturbation theory and compact convergence, and illustrate the results in network models of a toggle switch and an oscillator. PMID:25412739

  9. Modeling and simulation of pressure waves generated by nano-thermite reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Zyskin, Maxim; Jenkins, Charles M.; (Yuki) Horie, Yasuyuki

    2012-11-01

    This paper reports the modeling of pressure waves from the explosive reaction of nano-thermites consisting of mixtures of nanosized aluminum and oxidizer granules. Such nanostructured thermites have higher energy density (up to 26 kJ/cm3) and can generate a transient pressure pulse four times larger than that from trinitrotoluene (TNT) based on volume equivalence. A plausible explanation for the high pressure generation is that the reaction times are much shorter than the time for a shock wave to propagate away from the reagents region so that all the reaction energy is dumped into the gaseous products almost instantaneously and thereby a strong shock wave is generated. The goal of the modeling is to characterize the gas dynamic behavior for thermite reactions in a cylindrical reaction chamber and to model the experimentally measured pressure histories. To simplify the details of the initial stage of the explosive reaction, it is assumed that the reaction generates a one dimensional shock wave into an air-filled cylinder and propagates down the tube in a self-similar mode. Experimental data for Al/Bi2O3 mixtures were used to validate the model with attention focused on the ratio of specific heats and the drag coefficient. Model predictions are in good agreement with the measured pressure histories.

  10. Comparison of kinetic and equilibrium reaction models insimulating the behavior of porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalsky, Michael B.; Moridis, George J.

    2006-11-29

    In this study we compare the use of kinetic and equilibriumreaction models in the simulation of gas (methane) hydrate behavior inporous media. Our objective is to evaluate through numerical simulationthe importance of employing kinetic versus equilibrium reaction modelsfor predicting the response of hydrate-bearing systems to externalstimuli, such as changes in pressure and temperature. Specifically, we(1) analyze and compare the responses simulated using both reactionmodels for natural gas production from hydrates in various settings andfor the case of depressurization in a hydrate-bearing core duringextraction; and (2) examine the sensitivity to factors such as initialhydrate saturation, hydrate reaction surface area, and numericaldiscretization. We find that for large-scale systems undergoing thermalstimulation and depressurization, the calculated responses for bothreaction models are remarkably similar, though some differences areobserved at early times. However, for modeling short-term processes, suchas the rapid recovery of a hydrate-bearing core, kinetic limitations canbe important, and neglecting them may lead to significantunder-prediction of recoverable hydrate. Assuming validity of the mostaccurate kinetic reaction model that is currently available, the use ofthe equilibrium reaction model often appears to be justified andpreferred for simulating the behavior of gas hydrates, given that thecomputational demands for the kinetic reaction model far exceed those forthe equilibrium reaction model.

  11. A hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics coupled model for evaluating bioreactors derived from CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Ding, Jie; Guo, Wan-Qian; Ren, Nan-Qi

    2010-12-01

    Investigating how a bioreactor functions is a necessary precursor for successful reactor design and operation. Traditional methods used to investigate flow-field cannot meet this challenge accurately and economically. Hydrodynamics model can solve this problem, but to understand a bioreactor in sufficient depth, it is often insufficient. In this paper, a coupled hydrodynamics-reaction kinetics model was formulated from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code to simulate a gas-liquid-solid three-phase biotreatment system for the first time. The hydrodynamics model is used to formulate prediction of the flow field and the reaction kinetics model then portrays the reaction conversion process. The coupled model is verified and used to simulate the behavior of an expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor for biohydrogen production. The flow patterns were visualized and analyzed. The coupled model also demonstrates a qualitative relationship between hydrodynamics and biohydrogen production. The advantages and limitations of applying this coupled model are discussed.

  12. Fluorination of an Alumina Surface: Modeling Aluminum-Fluorine Reaction Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Padhye, Richa; Aquino, Adelia J A; Tunega, Daniel; Pantoya, Michelle L

    2017-07-19

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to examine exothermic surface chemistry between alumina and four fluorinated, fragmented molecules representing species from decomposing fluoropolymers: F(-), HF, CH3F, and CF4. The analysis has strong implications for the reactivity of aluminum (Al) particles passivated by an alumina shell. It was hypothesized that the alumina surface structure could be transformed due to hydrogen bonding effects from the environment that promote surface reactions with fluorinated species. In this study, the alumina surface was analyzed using model clusters as isolated systems embedded in a polar environment (i.e., acetone). The conductor-like screening model (COSMO) was used to mimic environmental effects on the alumina surface. Four defect models for specific active -OH sites were investigated including two terminal hydroxyl groups and two hydroxyl bridge groups. Reactions involving terminal bonds produce more energy than bridge bonds. Also, surface exothermic reactions between terminal -OH bonds and fluorinated species produce energy in decreasing order with the following reactant species: CF4 > HF > CH3F. Additionally, experiments were performed on aluminum powders using thermal equilibrium analysis techniques that complement the calculations. Consistently, the experimental results show a linear relationship between surface exothermic reactions and the main fluorination reaction for Al powders. These results connect molecular level reaction kinetics to macroscopic measurements of surface energy and show that optimizing energy available in surface reactions linearly correlates to maximizing energy in the main reaction.

  13. Model creation of moving redox reaction boundary in agarose gel electrophoresis by traditional potassium permanganate method.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hai-Yang; Liu, Qian; Li, Jia-Hao; Fan, Liu-Yin; Cao, Cheng-Xi

    2013-02-21

    A novel moving redox reaction boundary (MRRB) model was developed for studying electrophoretic behaviors of analytes involving redox reaction on the principle of moving reaction boundary (MRB). Traditional potassium permanganate method was used to create the boundary model in agarose gel electrophoresis because of the rapid reaction rate associated with MnO(4)(-) ions and Fe(2+) ions. MRB velocity equation was proposed to describe the general functional relationship between velocity of moving redox reaction boundary (V(MRRB)) and concentration of reactant, and can be extrapolated to similar MRB techniques. Parameters affecting the redox reaction boundary were investigated in detail. Under the selected conditions, good linear relationship between boundary movement distance and time were obtained. The potential application of MRRB in electromigration redox reaction titration was performed in two different concentration levels. The precision of the V(MRRB) was studied and the relative standard deviations were below 8.1%, illustrating the good repeatability achieved in this experiment. The proposed MRRB model enriches the MRB theory and also provides a feasible realization of manual control of redox reaction process in electrophoretic analysis.

  14. Hydrodynamic turbulence and diffusion-controlled reactions. Simulation of the effect of stirring on the oscillating Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction with the radicalator model

    SciTech Connect

    Noszticzius, Z.; Wittmann, M. ); Bodnar, Z.; Garamszegi, L. Univ. of Texas, Austin )

    1991-08-22

    Different stirring effects of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction observed by previous authors and also reported here can be explained and modeled semiquantitatively by a diffusion-controlled radical-radical reaction step of the Radicalator. It is shown that hydrodynamic turbulence can accelerate the rate of a diffusion-controlled reaction considerably provided that both reactants of the diffusion-controlled step in the mechanism of other (non-BZ) reactions as well. Finally, it is found that uniform ultrasonic stirring can substitute for the less uniform mechanical stirring in the BZ reaction.

  15. Chaos in the Showalter-Noyes-Bar-Eli model of the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindberg, David; Turner, Jack S.; Barkley, Dwight

    1990-03-01

    The observation of robust, large-scale chaos in the Showalter-Noyes-Bar-Eli model of the Belousov-Zhabotinskii reaction is reported. The chaos observed is comparable to that found in CSTR experiments at low flow rates.

  16. Dynamic order reduction of thin-film deposition kinetics models: A reaction factorization approach

    SciTech Connect

    Adomaitis, Raymond A.

    2016-01-15

    A set of numerical tools for the analysis and dynamic dimension reduction of chemical vapor and atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reaction models is developed in this work. The approach is based on a two-step process where in the first, the chemical species surface balance dynamic equations are factored to effectively decouple the (nonlinear) reaction rates, a process that eliminates redundant dynamic modes and that identifies conserved quantities. If successful, the second phase is implemented to factor out redundant dynamic modes when species relatively minor in concentration are omitted; if unsuccessful, the technique points to potential model structural problems. An alumina ALD process is used for an example consisting of 19 reactions and 23 surface and gas-phase species. Using the approach developed, the model is reduced by nineteen modes to a four-dimensional dynamic system without any knowledge of the reaction rate values. Results are interpreted in the context of potential model validation studies.

  17. A "Reaction Kinetics" Model for the Growth of Curriculum Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tebbutt, Maurice J.; Atherton, Michael A.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a model for researchers to test the mechanisms which have been claimed to operate in curriculum diffusion. The method is different from generalizations based on observations or answers to questionnaires. (Author/KC)

  18. Statistical Model Calculations for (n,γ) Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Mary; Uberseder, Ethan; Wiescher, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Hauser-Feshbach (HF) cross sections are of enormous importance for a wide range of applications, from waste transmutation and nuclear technologies, to medical applications, and nuclear astrophysics. It is a well-observed result that different nuclear input models sensitively affect HF cross section calculations. Less well known however are the effects on calculations originating from model-specific implementation details (such as level density parameter, matching energy, back-shift and giant dipole parameters), as well as effects from non-model aspects, such as experimental data truncation and transmission function energy binning. To investigate the effects or these various aspects, Maxwellian-averaged neutron capture cross sections have been calculated for approximately 340 nuclei. The relative effects of these model details will be discussed.

  19. The Coherent Flame Model for Turbulent Chemical Reactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    the strained laminar diffusion flame may be determined by analysis, numerical computation, and by experiment without significant change to the model...numerical integration of the resulting differential equations. The model predicts the flame length and superficial comparison with experiments suggest a...of Hawthorne, et al.,(3 Hottel,(4 Karlovitz, et al.(5 Wohl,(6 and others. That brief period provided some provacative experiments through (7) (8

  20. Analyzing Reaction Rates with the Distortion/Interaction‐Activation Strain Model

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The activation strain or distortion/interaction model is a tool to analyze activation barriers that determine reaction rates. For bimolecular reactions, the activation energies are the sum of the energies to distort the reactants into geometries they have in transition states plus the interaction energies between the two distorted molecules. The energy required to distort the molecules is called the activation strain or distortion energy. This energy is the principal contributor to the activation barrier. The transition state occurs when this activation strain is overcome by the stabilizing interaction energy. Following the changes in these energies along the reaction coordinate gives insights into the factors controlling reactivity. This model has been applied to reactions of all types in both organic and inorganic chemistry, including substitutions and eliminations, cycloadditions, and several types of organometallic reactions. PMID:28447369

  1. Evidence for a transition state model compound of in-plane vinylic SN2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Torahiko; Yamamoto, Yohsuke; Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Tanimoto, Yoshifumi

    2005-06-23

    [reaction: see text] To isolate a transition state model compound of an in-plane vinylic S(N)2 reaction, vinyl bromide 6 bearing a newly synthesized tridentate ligand derived from 1,8-dimethoxythioxanthen-9-one (5) was prepared as a precursor. Although irradiation of 6 gave demethylated benzofuran 12, a transient broad peak which indicates formation of the desired transition state model compound was observed in the laser flash photolytic study.

  2. Dynamical Coupled-Channel Model of Meson Production Reactions in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    T.-S. H. Lee; A. Matsuyama; T. Sato

    2006-11-15

    A dynamical coupled-channel model is presented for investigating the nucleon resonances (N*) in the meson production reactions induced by pions and photons. Our objective is to extract the N* parameters and to investigate the meson production reaction mechanisms for mapping out the quark-gluon substructure of N* from the data. The model is based on an energy-independent Hamiltonian which is derived from a set of Lagrangians by using a unitary transformation method.

  3. New model of chlorine-wall reaction for simulating chlorine concentration in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Ian; Kastl, George; Sathasivan, Arumugam

    2017-08-30

    Accurate modelling of chlorine concentrations throughout a drinking water system needs sound mathematical descriptions of decay mechanisms in bulk water and at pipe walls. Wall-reaction rates along pipelines in three different systems were calculated from differences between field chlorine profiles and accurately modelled bulk decay. Lined pipes with sufficiently large diameters (>500 mm) and higher chlorine concentrations (>0.5 mg/L) had negligible wall-decay rates, compared with bulk-decay rates. Further downstream, wall-reaction rate consistently increased (peaking around 0.15 mg/dm(2)/h) as chlorine concentration decreased, until mass-transport to the wall was controlling wall reaction. These results contradict wall-reaction models, including those incorporated in the EPANET software, which assume wall decay is of either zero-order (constant decay rate) or first-order (wall-decay rate reduces with chlorine concentration). Instead, results are consistent with facilitation of the wall reaction by biofilm activity, rather than surficial chemical reactions. A new model of wall reaction combines the effect of biofilm activity moderated by chlorine concentration and mass-transport limitation. This wall reaction model, with an accurate bulk chlorine decay model, is essential for sufficiently accurate prediction of chlorine residuals towards the end of distribution systems and therefore control of microbial contamination. Implementing this model in EPANET-MSX (or similar) software enables the accurate chlorine modelling required for improving disinfection strategies in drinking water networks. New insight into the effect of chlorine on biofilm can also assist in controlling biofilm to maintain chlorine residuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Attitude Model of a Reaction Wheel/Fixed Thruster Based Satellite Using Telemetry Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    thruster on/off indicators and reaction wheel rotor speeds, is investigated. Experimental tests using telemetry data received from the Air Force...Institute of Technology’s (AFIT) Simulated Satellite, SimSat, is used in verifying a Matlab model which outputs SimSat’s orientation from SimSat’s reaction ... wheel and thruster telemetry data. Software modeling results showed that it is possible to determine a satellite’s attitude from only the attitude

  5. A multiphysics model of in vitro transcription coupling enzymatic reaction and precipitation formation.

    PubMed

    Akama, Satoru; Yamamura, Masayuki; Kigawa, Takanori

    2012-01-18

    Multiphysics modeling, which integrates the models studied in different disciplines so far, is an indispensable approach toward a comprehensive understanding of biological systems composed of diverse phenomena. However, the variety of the models is narrower than the actual diverse phenomena because of the difficulty in coupling independent models separately studied in different disciplines for the actual coupled phenomena. In this study, we develop a mathematical model coupling an enzymatic reaction and mineralization formation. As a test case, we selected an in vitro transcription system where a transcription reaction occurs along with the precipitation formation of magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg(2)PPi). To begin, we experimentally elucidated how the transcription reaction and the precipitation formation are coupled. In the analysis, we applied a Michaelis-Menten-type equation to the transcription reaction and a semiempirical equation describing the correlation between the induction period and the supersaturation ratio to the precipitation formation, respectively. Based on the experimental results, we then integrated these two models. These models were connected by supersaturation that increases as the transcription reaction proceeds and becomes the driving force of the precipitation. We believe that our modeling approach could significantly contribute to the development of newer multiphysics models in systems biology such as bone metabolic networks. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Multiphysics Model of In Vitro Transcription Coupling Enzymatic Reaction and Precipitation Formation

    PubMed Central

    Akama, Satoru; Yamamura, Masayuki; Kigawa, Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Multiphysics modeling, which integrates the models studied in different disciplines so far, is an indispensable approach toward a comprehensive understanding of biological systems composed of diverse phenomena. However, the variety of the models is narrower than the actual diverse phenomena because of the difficulty in coupling independent models separately studied in different disciplines for the actual coupled phenomena. In this study, we develop a mathematical model coupling an enzymatic reaction and mineralization formation. As a test case, we selected an in vitro transcription system where a transcription reaction occurs along with the precipitation formation of magnesium pyrophosphate (Mg2PPi). To begin, we experimentally elucidated how the transcription reaction and the precipitation formation are coupled. In the analysis, we applied a Michaelis-Menten-type equation to the transcription reaction and a semiempirical equation describing the correlation between the induction period and the supersaturation ratio to the precipitation formation, respectively. Based on the experimental results, we then integrated these two models. These models were connected by supersaturation that increases as the transcription reaction proceeds and becomes the driving force of the precipitation. We believe that our modeling approach could significantly contribute to the development of newer multiphysics models in systems biology such as bone metabolic networks. PMID:22339858

  7. A simple recipe for modeling reaction-rate in flows with turbulent-combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, Sharath S.

    1991-01-01

    A computationally viable scheme to account for chemical reaction in turbulent flows is presented. The multivariate beta-pdf model for multiple scalar mixing forms the basis of this scheme. Using the model scalar joint pdf and a general form of the instantaneous reaction-rate, the unclosed chemical reaction terms are expressed as simple functions of scalar means and the turbulent scalar energy. The calculation procedure requires that the mean scalar equations and only one other transport equation - for the turbulent scalar energy - be solved.

  8. Thermomechanical simulations and experimental validation for high speed incremental forming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrogio, Giuseppina; Gagliardi, Francesco; Filice, Luigino; Romero, Natalia

    2016-10-01

    Incremental sheet forming (ISF) consists in deforming only a small region of the workspace through a punch driven by a NC machine. The drawback of this process is its slowness. In this study, a high speed variant has been investigated from both numerical and experimental points of view. The aim has been the design of a FEM model able to perform the material behavior during the high speed process by defining a thermomechanical model. An experimental campaign has been performed by a CNC lathe with high speed to test process feasibility. The first results have shown how the material presents the same performance than in conventional speed ISF and, in some cases, better material behavior due to the temperature increment. An accurate numerical simulation has been performed to investigate the material behavior during the high speed process confirming substantially experimental evidence.

  9. Reaction mechanism of WGS and PROX reactions catalyzed by Pt/oxide catalysts revealed by an FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingshun; Wu, Zongfang; Jin, Yuekang; Ma, Yunsheng; Huang, Weixin

    2013-08-07

    We have employed XPS and TDS to study the adsorption and surface reactions of H2O, CO and HCOOH on an FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst. The FeO(111)-Pt(111) interface of the FeO(111)/Pt(111) inverse model catalyst exposes coordination-unsaturated Fe(II) cations (Fe(II)CUS) and the Fe(II)CUS cations are capable of modifying the reactivity of neighbouring Pt sites. Water facilely dissociates on the Fe(II)CUS cations at the FeO(111)-Pt(111) interface to form hydroxyls that react to form both water and H2 upon heating. Hydroxyls on the Fe(II)CUS cations can react with CO(a) on the neighbouring Pt(111) sites to produce CO2 at low temperatures. Hydroxyls act as the co-catalyst in the CO oxidation by hydroxyls to CO2 (PROX reaction), while they act as one of the reactants in the CO oxidation by hydroxyls to CO2 and H2 (WGS reaction), and the recombinative reaction of hydroxyls to produce H2 is the rate-limiting step in the WGS reaction. A comparison of reaction behaviors between the interfacial CO(a) + OH reaction and the formate decomposition reaction suggest that formate is the likely surface intermediate of the CO(a) + OH reaction. These results provide some solid experimental evidence for the associative reaction mechanism of WGS and PROX reactions catalyzed by Pt/oxide catalysts.

  10. Development and evaluation of a high-resolution reanalysis of the East Australian Current region using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS 3.4) and Incremental Strong-Constraint 4-Dimensional Variational (IS4D-Var) data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerry, Colette; Powell, Brian; Roughan, Moninya; Oke, Peter

    2016-10-01

    As with other Western Boundary Currents globally, the East Australian Current (EAC) is highly variable making it a challenge to model and predict. For the EAC region, we combine a high-resolution state-of-the-art numerical ocean model with a variety of traditional and newly available observations using an advanced variational data assimilation scheme. The numerical model is configured using the Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS 3.4) and takes boundary forcing from the BlueLink ReANalysis (BRAN3). For the data assimilation, we use an Incremental Strong-Constraint 4-Dimensional Variational (IS4D-Var) scheme, which uses the model dynamics to perturb the initial conditions, atmospheric forcing, and boundary conditions, such that the modelled ocean state better fits and is in balance with the observations. This paper describes the data assimilative model configuration that achieves a significant reduction of the difference between the modelled solution and the observations to give a dynamically consistent "best estimate" of the ocean state over a 2-year period. The reanalysis is shown to represent both assimilated and non-assimilated observations well. It achieves mean spatially averaged root mean squared (rms) residuals with the observations of 7.6 cm for sea surface height (SSH) and 0.4 °C for sea surface temperature (SST) over the assimilation period. The time-mean rms residual for subsurface temperature measured by Argo floats is a maximum of 0.9 °C between water depths of 100 and 300 m and smaller throughout the rest of the water column. Velocities at several offshore and continental shelf moorings are well represented in the reanalysis with complex correlations between 0.8 and 1 for all observations in the upper 500 m. Surface radial velocities from a high-frequency radar array are assimilated and the reanalysis provides surface velocity estimates with complex correlations with observed velocities of 0.8-1 across the radar footprint. A comparison with

  11. Incremental Support Vector Learning for Ordinal Regression.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Sheng, Victor S; Tay, Keng Yeow; Romano, Walter; Li, Shuo

    2015-07-01

    Support vector ordinal regression (SVOR) is a popular method to tackle ordinal regression problems. However, until now there were no effective algorithms proposed to address incremental SVOR learning due to the complicated formulations of SVOR. Recently, an interesting accurate on-line algorithm was proposed for training ν -support vector classification (ν-SVC), which can handle a quadratic formulation with a pair of equality constraints. In this paper, we first present a modified SVOR formulation based on a sum-of-margins strategy. The formulation has multiple constraints, and each constraint includes a mixture of an equality and an inequality. Then, we extend the accurate on-line ν-SVC algorithm to the modified formulation, and propose an effective incremental SVOR algorithm. The algorithm can handle a quadratic formulation with multiple constraints, where each constraint is constituted of an equality and an inequality. More importantly, it tackles the conflicts between the equality and inequality constraints. We also provide the finite convergence analysis for the algorithm. Numerical experiments on the several benchmark and real-world data sets show that the incremental algorithm can converge to the optimal solution in a finite number of steps, and is faster than the existing batch and incremental SVOR algorithms. Meanwhile, the modified formulation has better accuracy than the existing incremental SVOR algorithm, and is as accurate as the sum-of-margins based formulation of Shashua and Levin.

  12. Incremental lines in mouse molar enamel.

    PubMed

    Sehic, Amer; Nirvani, Minou; Risnes, Steinar

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the occurrence and periodicity of enamel incremental lines in mouse molars in an attempt to draw attention to some key questions about the rhythm in the activity of the secreting ameloblasts during formation of mouse molar enamel. The mouse molars were ground, etched, and studied using scanning electron microscopy. Lines interpreted as incremental lines generally appeared as grooves of variable distinctness, and were only observed cervically, in the region about 50-250μm from the enamel-cementum junction. The lines were most readily observable in the outer enamel and in the superficial prism-free layer, and were difficult to identify in the deeper parts of enamel, i.e. in the inner enamel with prism decussation. However, in areas where the enamel tended to be hypomineralized the incremental lines were observed as clearly continuous from outer into inner enamel. The incremental lines in mouse molar enamel exhibited an average periodicity of about 4μm, and the distance between the lines decreased towards the enamel surface. We conclude that incremental lines are to some extent visible in mouse molar enamel. Together with data from the literature and theoretical considerations, we suggest that they probably represent a daily rhythm in enamel formation. This study witnesses the layered apposition of mouse molar enamel and supports the theory that circadian clock probably regulates enamel development. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Learning, Behaviour and Reaction Framework: A Model for Training Raters to Improve Assessment Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Chung-Yang; Chang, Huiju; Hsu, Wen-Chin; Sheen, Gwo-Ji

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a training model for raters, with the goal to improve the intra- and inter-consistency of evaluation quality for higher education curricula. The model, termed the learning, behaviour and reaction (LBR) circular training model, is an interdisciplinary application from the business and organisational training domain. The…

  14. Development of the Automatic Modeling System for Reaction Mechanisms Using REX+JGG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Takahiro; Kawai, Kohei; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Ema, Yoshinori

    The identification of appropriate reaction models is very helpful for developing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. In this study, we developed an automatic modeling system that analyzes experimental data on the cross- sectional shapes of films deposited on substrates with nanometer- or micrometer-sized trenches. The system then identifies a suitable reaction model to describe the film deposition. The inference engine used by the system to model the reaction mechanism was designed using real-coded genetic algorithms (RCGAs): a generation alternation model named "just generation gap" (JGG) and a real-coded crossover named "real-coded ensemble crossover" (REX). We studied the effect of REX+JGG on the system's performance, and found that the system with REX+JGG was the most accurate and reliable at model identification among the algorithms that we studied.

  15. MetRxn: a knowledgebase of metabolites and reactions spanning metabolic models and databases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Increasingly, metabolite and reaction information is organized in the form of genome-scale metabolic reconstructions that describe the reaction stoichiometry, directionality, and gene to protein to reaction associations. A key bottleneck in the pace of reconstruction of new, high-quality metabolic models is the inability to directly make use of metabolite/reaction information from biological databases or other models due to incompatibilities in content representation (i.e., metabolites with multiple names across databases and models), stoichiometric errors such as elemental or charge imbalances, and incomplete atomistic detail (e.g., use of generic R-group or non-explicit specification of stereo-specificity). Description MetRxn is a knowledgebase that includes standardized metabolite and reaction descriptions by integrating information from BRENDA, KEGG, MetaCyc, Reactome.org and 44 metabolic models into a single unified data set. All metabolite entries have matched synonyms, resolved protonation states, and are linked to unique structures. All reaction entries are elementally and charge balanced. This is accomplished through the use of a workflow of lexicographic, phonetic, and structural comparison algorithms. MetRxn allows for the download of standardized versions of existing genome-scale metabolic models and the use of metabolic information for the rapid reconstruction of new ones. Conclusions The standardization in description allows for the direct comparison of the metabolite and reaction content between metabolic models and databases and the exhaustive prospecting of pathways for biotechnological production. This ever-growing dataset currently consists of over 76,000 metabolites participating in more than 72,000 reactions (including unresolved entries). MetRxn is hosted on a web-based platform that uses relational database models (MySQL). PMID:22233419

  16. Reaction-to-fire testing and modeling for wood products

    Treesearch

    Mark A. Dietenberger; Robert H. White

    2001-01-01

    In this review we primarily discuss our use of the oxygen consumption calorimeter (ASTM E1354 for cone calorimeter and ISO9705 for room/corner tests) and fire growth modeling to evaluate treated wood products. With recent development towards performance-based building codes, new methodology requires engineering calculations of various fire growth scenarios. The initial...

  17. Incremental generation of answers during the comprehension of questions with quantifiers.

    PubMed

    Bott, Oliver; Augurzky, Petra; Sternefeld, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Rolf

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents a study on the online interpretation of quantified questions involving complex domain restriction, for instance, are all triangles blue that are in the circle. Two probe reaction time (RT) task experiments were conducted to study the incremental nature of answer generation while manipulating visual contexts and response hand overlap between tasks. We manipulated the contexts in such a way that the incremental answer to the question changed from 'yes' to 'no' or remained the same before and after encountering the extraposed relative clause. The findings of both experiments provide evidence for incremental answer preparation but only if the context did not involve the risk of answer revision. Our results show that preliminary output from incremental semantic interpretation results in response priming that facilitates congruent responses in the probe RT task. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Observers for Systems with Nonlinearities Satisfying an Incremental Quadratic Inequality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Ahmet Behcet; Corless, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We consider the problem of state estimation for nonlinear time-varying systems whose nonlinearities satisfy an incremental quadratic inequality. These observer results unifies earlier results in the literature; and extend it to some additional classes of nonlinearities. Observers are presented which guarantee that the state estimation error exponentially converges to zero. Observer design involves solving linear matrix inequalities for the observer gain matrices. Results are illustrated by application to a simple model of an underwater.

  19. Observers for Systems with Nonlinearities Satisfying an Incremental Quadratic Inequality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Ahmet Behcet; Corless, Martin

    2004-01-01

    We consider the problem of state estimation for nonlinear time-varying systems whose nonlinearities satisfy an incremental quadratic inequality. These observer results unifies earlier results in the literature; and extend it to some additional classes of nonlinearities. Observers are presented which guarantee that the state estimation error exponentially converges to zero. Observer design involves solving linear matrix inequalities for the observer gain matrices. Results are illustrated by application to a simple model of an underwater.

  20. Genome-scale Metabolic Reaction Modeling: a New Approach to Geomicrobial Kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKernan, S. E.; Shapiro, B.; Jin, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Geomicrobial rates, rates of microbial metabolism in natural environments, are a key parameter of theoretical and practical problems in geobiology and biogeochemistry. Both laboratory- and field-based approaches have been applied to study rates of geomicrobial processes. Laboratory-based approaches analyze geomicrobial kinetics by incubating environmental samples under controlled laboratory conditions. Field methods quantify geomicrobial rates by observing the progress of geomicrobial processes. To take advantage of recent development in biogeochemical modeling and genome-scale metabolic modeling, we suggest that geomicrobial rates can also be predicted by simulating metabolic reaction networks of microbes. To predict geomicrobial rates, we developed a genome-scale metabolic model that describes enzyme reaction networks of microbial metabolism, and simulated the network model by accounting for the kinetics and thermodynamics of enzyme reactions. The model is simulated numerically to solve cellular enzyme abundance and hence metabolic rates under the constraints of cellular physiology. The new modeling approach differs from flux balance analysis of system biology in that it accounts for the thermodynamics and kinetics of enzymatic reactions. It builds on subcellular metabolic reaction networks, and hence also differs from classical biogeochemical reaction modeling. We applied the new approach to Methanosarcina acetivorans, an anaerobic, marine methanogen capable of disproportionating acetate to carbon dioxide and methane. The input of the new model includes (1) enzyme reaction network of acetoclastic methanogenesis, and (2) representative geochemical conditions of freshwater sedimentary environments. The output of the simulation includes the proteomics, metabolomics, and energy and matter fluxes of M. acetivorans. Our simulation results demonstrate the predictive power of the new modeling approach. Specifically, the results illustrate how methanogenesis rates vary

  1. New Direction in Hydrogeochemical Transport Modeling: Incorporating Multiple Kinetic and Equilibrium Reaction Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Steefel, C.I.

    2000-02-02

    At least two distinct kinds of hydrogeochemical models have evolved historically for use in analyzing contaminant transport, but each has important limitations. One kind, focusing on organic contaminants, treats biodegradation reactions as parts of relatively simple kinetic reaction networks with no or limited coupling to aqueous and surface complexation and mineral dissolution/precipitation reactions. A second kind, evolving out of the speciation and reaction path codes, is capable of handling a comprehensive suite of multicomponent complexation (aqueous and surface) and mineral precipitation and dissolution reactions, but has not been able to treat reaction networks characterized by partial redox disequilibrium and multiple kinetic pathways. More recently, various investigators have begun to consider biodegradation reactions in the context of comprehensive equilibrium and kinetic reaction networks (e.g. Hunter et al. 1998, Mayer 1999). Here we explore two examples of multiple equilibrium and kinetic reaction pathways using the reactive transport code GIMRT98 (Steefel, in prep.): (1) a computational example involving the generation of acid mine drainage due to oxidation of pyrite, and (2) a computational/field example where the rates of chlorinated VOC degradation are linked to the rates of major redox processes occurring in organic-rich wetland sediments overlying a contaminated aerobic aquifer.

  2. Modeling the coupling of reaction kinetics and hydrodynamics in a collapsing cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Sudib; Deymier, Pierre; Muralidharan, Krishna; Frantziskonis, G.; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a model of cavitation based on the multiphase Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) that allows for coupling between the hydrodynamics of a collapsing cavity and supported solute chemical species. We demonstrate that this model can also be coupled to deterministic or stochastic chemical reactions. In a two-species model of chemical reactions (with a major and a minor specie), the major difference observed between the deterministic and stochastic reactions takes the form of random fluctuations in concentration of the minor species. We demonstrate that advection associated with the hydrodynamics of a collapsing cavity leads to highly inhomogeneous concentration of solutes. In turn these inhomogeneities in concentration may lead to significant increase in concentration-dependent reaction rates and can result in a local enhancement in the production of minor species.

  3. Nicotiana tabacum as model for ozone - plant surface reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jud, Werner; Fischer, Lukas; Wohlfahrt, Georg; Tissier, Alain; Canaval, Eva; Hansel, Armin

    2015-04-01

    Elevated tropospheric ozone concentrations are considered a toxic threat to plants, responsible for global crop losses with associated economic costs of several billion dollars per year. The ensuing injuries have been related to the uptake of ozone through the stomatal pores and oxidative effects damaging the internal leaf tissue. A striking question of current research is the environment and plant specific partitioning of ozone loss between gas phase, stomatal or plant surface sink terms. Here we show results from ozone fumigation experiments using various Nicotiana Tabacum varieties, whose surfaces are covered with different amounts of unsaturated diterpenoids exuded by their glandular trichomes. Exposure to elevated ozone levels (50 to 150 ppbv) for 5 to 15 hours in an exceptionally clean cuvette system did neither result in a reduction of photosynthesis nor caused any visible leaf damage. Both these ozone induced stress effects have been observed previously in ozone fumigation experiments with the ozone sensitive tobacco line Bel-W3. In our case ozone fumigation was accompanied by a continuous release of oxygenated volatile organic compounds, which could be clearly associated to their condensed phase precursors for the first time. Gas phase reactions of ozone were avoided by choosing a high enough gas exchange rate of the plant cuvette system. In the case of the Ambalema variety, that is known to exude only the diterpenoid cis-abienol, ozone fumigation experiments yield the volatiles formaldehyde and methyl vinyl ketone (MVK). The latter could be unequivocally separated from isomeric methacrolein (MACR) by the aid of a Selective Reagent Ion Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (SRI-ToF-MS), which was switched every six minutes from H3O+ to NO+ primary ion mode and vice versa. Consistent with the picture of an ozone protection mechanism caused by reactive diterpenoids at the leaf surface are the results from dark-light experiments. The ozone loss obtained from the

  4. Reaction-diffusion model for the growth of avascular tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, S. C.; Martins, M. L.; Vilela, M. J.

    2002-02-01

    A nutrient-limited model for avascular cancer growth including cell proliferation, motility, and death is presented. The model qualitatively reproduces commonly observed morphologies for primary tumors, and the simulated patterns are characterized by its gyration radius, total number of cancer cells, and number of cells on tumor periphery. These very distinct morphological patterns follow Gompertz growth curves, but exhibit different scaling laws for their surfaces. Also, the simulated tumors incorporate a spatial structure composed of a central necrotic core, an inner rim of quiescent cells and a narrow outer shell of proliferating cells in agreement with biological data. Finally, our results indicate that the competition for nutrients among normal and cancer cells may be a determining factor in generating papillary tumor morphology.

  5. Experiments and Reaction Models of Fundamental Combustion Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-31

    Equivalence Ratio, ¢ 16 Figure 11. Experimental and computed S~’s of methyl -, ethyl, n- propyl , and n-butyl-cyclohexane/air flames at p = I atm. Symbols...temperature chemical kinetic model of n-alkane, cyclohexane, and methyl -, ethyl-, n- propyl and n-butyl-cyclohexane oxidation at high temperatures...February 28, 2010) FOKION N. EGOLFOPOULOS and HAl WANG Department of Aerospace & Mechanical Engineering University of Southern California Los

  6. Experiments and Reaction Models of Fundamental Combustion Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-31

    flames. Flames of mono-alkylated cyclohexane compounds, i.e. methyl -, ethyl-, n- propyl -, and n-butyl- cyclohexane, were found to have similar ’s...deviations. Figure 11. Experimental and computed ’s of methyl -, ethyl, n- propyl , and n-butyl-cyclohexane/air flames at p = 1 atm. Symbols: ( ) present...temperature chemical kinetic model of n-alkane, cyclohexane, and methyl -, ethyl-, n- propyl and n-butyl-cyclohexane oxidation at high temperatures

  7. Mathematical model for describing reactions of residual chlorine with organic matter in reclaimed wastewater.

    PubMed

    Funamizu, N; Iwamoto, T; Takakuwa, T

    2004-01-01

    Among several applications of urban wastewater reuse, use of reclaimed wastewater to sustain stream flows has become attractive in the urban area. Since these rivers are used for recreational purposes and for restoring aquatic eco-system, the adequate control of residual chlorine is essential. Mathematical model for describing reactions between residual chlorine and organic matter in reclaimed wastewater has been developed. The model considers the effect of molecular weight distribution of organic matter on the reaction rate. Lab-scale experiments were performed to estimate reaction rates constants and to examine their temperature dependency. The experiments showed that 1) the smaller organic matter gave the larger reaction rate; 2) temperature effect on reaction rate was described by the Arrhenius formula; 3) decline of free chlorine had more temperature dependency than combined chlorine. The comparison of computed results with data from lab-scale experiments confirmed the validity of the model. We used the one-dimensional dispersion model with proposed reaction model and examined the seasonal variation of residual chlorine profile along the river sustained by reclaimed wastewater in Sapporo. Simulation showed that seasonal variation of nitrification performance in secondary treatment as well as change in temperature caused seasonal variation in residual chlorine profile along the river.

  8. Design and Performance Analysis of Incremental Networked Predictive Control Systems.

    PubMed

    Pang, Zhong-Hua; Liu, Guo-Ping; Zhou, Donghua

    2016-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the design and performance analysis of networked control systems with network-induced delay, packet disorder, and packet dropout. Based on the incremental form of the plant input-output model and an incremental error feedback control strategy, an incremental networked predictive control (INPC) scheme is proposed to actively compensate for the round-trip time delay resulting from the above communication constraints. The output tracking performance and closed-loop stability of the resulting INPC system are considered for two cases: 1) plant-model match case and 2) plant-model mismatch case. For the former case, the INPC system can achieve the same output tracking performance and closed-loop stability as those of the corresponding local control system. For the latter case, a sufficient condition for the stability of the closed-loop INPC system is derived using the switched system theory. Furthermore, for both cases, the INPC system can achieve a zero steady-state output tracking error for step commands. Finally, both numerical simulations and practical experiments on an Internet-based servo motor system illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  9. An approach for modeling surface reaction kinetics in chemical vapor deposition processes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y.F.; Pollard, R.

    1995-05-01

    A methodology is presented for determining the rate constants of elementary surface reactions that can take place in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes. The calculations consider well-defined surfaces that can have one or more dangling bonds at a given site and adsorbates that can take up one or more different bonding configurations. Rate constants for each reaction are obtained independently of any process data using statistical mechanics, transition state theory, and bond dissociation energies. Specifically, the reactions are divided in transition state structures and determine preexponential factors, and the requirement of thermodynamic consistency is used to estimate activation energies. The level of sophistication of the calculations is suitable for treating the large number of plausible steps that could take place in a practical CVD system. Incorporation of the calculated rate constants into a reactor model that includes the effects of fluid flow, transport phenomena, and reactions in the gas and at the growing surface enables dominant reaction pathways and rate-limiting steps to be identified. Moreover, the dependence of growth rate and species compositions on operating conditions can be predicted without fitting any parameters. The utility of the approach is illustrated by modeling low pressure deposition of tungsten from tungsten hexafluoride and silane. This model treats 35 reactions in the gas and 213 reactions at the growing surface. Results are compared with available experimental data and sensitivity studies are used to assess the limitations of the approach.

  10. A general reaction network and kinetic model of the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae Tetraselmis sp.

    PubMed

    Vo, The Ky; Kim, Seung-Soo; Ly, Hoang Vu; Lee, Eun Yeol; Lee, Choul-Gyun; Kim, Jinsoo

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of microalgal Tetraselmis sp. was conducted at various reaction temperatures (250-350°C) and reaction times (10-60min). A general reaction network and a quantitative kinetic model were proposed for the HTL of microalgae. In this reaction network, the primary decomposition of lipids, proteins, and carbohydrates generated heavy oil (HO), light oil (LO), and aqueous-phase (AP) products. Then, reversible interconversions and further decomposition of these product fractions to produce gas product were followed. The model accurately captures the trends observed in the experimental data. Analyses of the kinetic parameters (reaction rate constants and activation energies) suggested the dominant reaction pathways as well as the contribution of the biochemical compositions to the bio-oil yield. Finally, the kinetic parameters calculated from the model were utilized to explore the parameter space in order to predict the liquefaction product yields depending on the reaction time and temperature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dimension reduction for p53 protein recognition by using incremental partial least squares.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xue-Qiang; Li, Guo-Zheng

    2014-06-01

    As an important tumor suppressor protein, reactivating mutated p53 was found in many kinds of human cancers and that restoring active p53 would lead to tumor regression. In recent years, more and more data extracted from biophysical simulations, which makes the modelling of mutant p53 transcriptional activity suffering from the problems of huge amount of instances and high feature dimension. Incremental feature extraction is effective to facilitate analysis of large-scale data. However, most current incremental feature extraction methods are not suitable for processing big data with high feature dimension. Partial Least Squares (PLS) has been demonstrated to be an effective dimension reduction technique for classification. In this paper, we design a highly efficient and powerful algorithm named Incremental Partial Least Squares (IPLS), which conducts a two-stage extraction process. In the first stage, the PLS target function is adapted to be incremental with updating historical mean to extract the leading projection direction. In the last stage, the other projection directions are calculated through equivalence between the PLS vectors and the Krylov sequence. We compare IPLS with some state-of-the-arts incremental feature extraction methods like Incremental Principal Component Analysis, Incremental Maximum Margin Criterion and Incremental Inter-class Scatter on real p53 proteins data. Empirical results show IPLS performs better than other methods in terms of balanced classification accuracy.

  12. Exercise activates compensatory thermoregulatory reaction in rats: a modeling study

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Yeonjoo; LaPradd, Michelle; Kline, Hannah; Zaretskaia, Maria V.; Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Rusyniak, Daniel E.; Molkov, Yaroslav I.

    2015-01-01

    The importance of exercise is increasingly emphasized for maintaining health. However, exercise itself can pose threats to health such as the development of exertional heat shock in warm environments. Therefore, it is important to understand how the thermoregulation system adjusts during exercise and how alterations of this can contribute to heat stroke. To explore this we measured the core body temperature of rats (Tc) running for 15 min on a treadmill at various speeds in two ambient temperatures (Ta = 25°C and 32°C). We assimilated the experimental data into a mathematical model that describes temperature changes in two compartments of the body, representing the muscles and the core. In our model the core body generates heat to maintain normal body temperature, and dissipates it into the environment. The muscles produce additional heat during exercise. According to the estimation of model parameters, at Ta = 25°C, the heat generation in the core was progressively reduced with the increase of the treadmill speed to compensate for a progressive increase in heat production by the muscles. This compensation was ineffective at Ta = 32°C, which resulted in an increased rate of heat accumulation with increasing speed, as opposed to the Ta = 25°C case. Interestingly, placing an animal on a treadmill increased heat production in the muscles even when the treadmill speed was zero. Quantitatively, this “ready-to-run” phenomenon accounted for over half of the heat generation in the muscles observed at maximal treadmill speed. We speculate that this anticipatory response utilizes stress-related circuitry. PMID:26472864

  13. Chaos and fractals in dynamical models of transport and reaction.

    PubMed

    Gaspard, P; Claus, I

    2002-03-15

    This paper contains a discussion of dynamical randomness among the different methods of simulation of a fluid and its characterization by the concept of Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy per unit time. Moreover, a renormalization-group method is presented in order to construct the hydrodynamic and reactive modes of relaxation in chaotic models. The renormalization-group construction allows us to obtain the dispersion relation of these modes, i.e. their damping rate versus the wavenumber. Besides, these modes are characterized by a fractal dimension given in terms of a diffusion coefficient and a Lyapunov exponent.

  14. Optical model methods of predicting nuclide production from spallation reactions.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, C R; Townsend, L W; Tripathi, R K; Cucinotta, F A

    1998-02-01

    Quantum mechanical optical model methods for calculating isotope production cross sections from the spallation of heavy nuclei by high-energy protons are developed from a modified abrasion-ablation collision formalism. The abrasion step is treated quantum-mechanically as a knockout process which leaves the residual prefragment nucleus in an excited state. In ablation the prefragment deexcites to produce the final fragment. The excitation energies of the prefragments are estimated from a combination of liquid drop and frictional-spectator interaction considerations. Estimates of elemental and isotopic production cross sections are in good agreement with recently published cross section measurements.

  15. Incremental SSVEP analysis for BCI implementation.

    PubMed

    Torres Müller, Sandra Mara; Freire Bastos-Filho, Teodiano; Sarcinelli-Filho, Mário

    2010-01-01

    This work presents an incremental analysis of EEG records containing Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP). This analysis consists of two steps: feature extraction, performed using a statistic test, and classification, performed by a decision tree. The result is a system with high classification rate (a test with six volunteers resulted in an average classification rate of 91.2%), high Information Transfer Rate (ITR) (a test with the same six volunteers resulted in an average value of 100.2 bits/min) and processing time, for each incremental analysis, of approximately 120 ms. These are very good features for an efficient Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) implementation.

  16. A GPU Reaction Diffusion Soil-Microbial Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconer, Ruth; Houston, Alasdair; Schmidt, Sonja; Otten, Wilfred

    2014-05-01

    Parallelised algorithms are frequent in bioinformatics as a consequence of the close link to informatics - however in the field of soil science and ecology they are less prevalent. A current challenge in soil ecology is to link habitat structure to microbial dynamics. Soil science is therefore entering the 'big data' paradigm as a consequence of integrating data pertinent to the physical soil environment obtained via imaging and theoretical models describing growth and development of microbial dynamics permitting accurate analyses of spatio-temporal properties of different soil microenvironments. The microenvironment is often captured by 3D imaging (CT tomography) which yields large datasets and when used in computational studies the physical sizes of the samples that are amenable to computation are less than 1 cm3. Today's commodity graphics cards are programmable and possess a data parallel architecture that in many cases is capable of out-performing the CPU in terms of computational rates. The programmable aspect is achieved via a low-level parallel programming language (CUDA, OpenCL and DirectX). We ported a Soil-Microbial Model onto the GPU using the DirectX Compute API. We noted a significant computational speed up as well as an increase in the physical size that can be simulated. Some of the drawbacks of such an approach were concerned with numerical precision and the steep learning curve associated with GPGPU technologies.

  17. Geometrical measurement of cardiac wavelength in reaction-diffusion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupraz, Marie; Jacquemet, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The dynamics of reentrant arrhythmias often consists in multiple wavelets propagating throughout an excitable medium. An arrhythmia can be sustained only if these reentrant waves have a sufficiently short wavelength defined as the distance traveled by the excitation wave during its refractory period. In a uniform medium, wavelength may be estimated as the product of propagation velocity and refractory period (electrophysiological wavelength). In order to accurately measure wavelength in more general substrates relevant to atrial arrhythmias (heterogeneous and anisotropic), we developed a mathematical framework to define geometrical wavelength at each time instant based on the length of streamlines following the propagation velocity field within refractory regions. Two computational methods were implemented: a Lagrangian approach in which a set of streamlines were integrated, and an Eulerian approach in which wavelength was the solution of a partial differential equation. These methods were compared in 1D/2D tissues and in a model of the left atrium. An advantage of geometrical definition of wavelength is that the wavelength of a wavelet can be tracked over time with high temporal resolution and smaller temporal variability in an anisotropic and heterogeneous medium. The results showed that the average electrophysiological wavelength was consistent with geometrical measurements of wavelength. Wavelets were however often shorter than the electrophysiological wavelength due to interactions with boundaries and other wavelets. These tools may help to assess more accurately the relation between substrate properties and wavelet dynamics in computer models.

  18. MODEL STUDIES OF MODE-SPECIFICITY IN UNIMOLECULAR REACTION DYNAMICS

    SciTech Connect

    Waite, Boyd A.; Miller, William H.

    1980-06-01

    Essentially exact quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to determine the energies and lifetimes of the quasi-bound states for a system of two (non~linearly) coupled oscillators (one of which is harmonic, the other being able to dissociate). For weak coupling the system displays mode-specificity, i.e., the unimolecular rate constants are not a monotonic function of the total energy, but increased coupling and frequency degeneracy tends to destroy mode-specificity. A somewhat surprising result is that for a given coupling the degree of modespecificity is roughly independent of the energy, in marked contrast to the fact that there is an energetic threshold for the onset of "stochastic trajectories" of the corresponding classical system; i.e., there seems to be no relation between statistical/mode-specific behavior of the unimolecular rate constants and stochastic/regular classical trajectories. In order to be able to treat more physically relevant models--i.e., those with more than two degrees of freedom--a semiclassical model is constructed and seen to be able to reproduce the accurate quantum mechanical rates reasonably well.

  19. Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale

    SciTech Connect

    Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F.; Wilson, G.V.

    1997-12-01

    The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

  20. Neutron-induced reactions on AlF3 studied using the optical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Chun-Wang; Lv, Cui-Juan; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Hong-Wei; Zuo, Jia-Xu

    2015-08-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on 27Al and 19F nuclei are investigated using the optical model implemented in the TALYS 1.4 toolkit. Incident neutron energies in a wide range from 0.1 keV to 30 MeV are calculated. The cross sections for the main channels (n, np), (n, p), (n, α), (n, 2n), and (n, γ) and the total reaction cross section (n, tot) of the reactions are obtained. When the default parameters in TALYS 1.4 are adopted, the calculated results agree with the measured results. Based on the calculated results for the n + 27Al and n + 19F reactions, the results of the n + 27Al19F reactions are predicted. These results are useful both for the design of thorium-based molten salt reactors and for neutron activation analysis techniques.

  1. Modeling brain electrical activity in epilepsy by reaction-diffusion cellular neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollas, F.; Tetzlaff, R.

    2005-06-01

    Reaction-Diffusion systems can be applied to describe a broad class of nonlinear phenomena, in particular in biological systems and in the propagation of nonlinear waves in excitable media. Especially, pattern formation and chaotic behavior are observed in Reaction-Diffusion systems and can be analyzed. Due to their structure multi-layer Cellular Neural Networks (CNN) are capable of representing Reaction-Diffusion systems effectively. In this contribution Reaction-Diffusion CNN are considered for modeling dynamics of brain activity in epilepsy. Thereby the parameters of Reaction-Diffusion systems are determined in a supervised optimization process, and brain electrical activity using invasive multi-electrode EEG recordings is analyzed with the aim to detect of precursors of impending epileptic seizures. A detailed discussion of first results and potentiality of the proposed approach will be given.

  2. Generalized kinetic model of catalyzed hydroliquefaction of coal incorporating tetralin dehydrogenation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, A.K.; Prasad, G.N.; Sridhar, T.

    1987-09-01

    A three-component kinetic model previously reported for uncatalyzed liquefaction has been used to simulate hydroliquefaction of Victorian brown coal with three different types of catalysts: iron-tin; iron; and haematite. The presence of catalyst is found to enhance hydrogenation of coal as well as the equilibrium hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions involving donor solvent. The thermal dissolution and autohydrogenation reaction rates are independent of catalyst used. Iron-tin-based catalyst has been found to be most effective for the hydrogenation reaction step. The simulation shows that the reactions producing hydrogen from tetralin are much slower than the coal-hydrogen reactions; hence, efforts aimed at efficient abstraction of hydrogen from the hydrogen donors may be beneficial.

  3. Increment Threshold Functions in Retinopathy of Prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ronald M.; Moskowitz, Anne; Bush, Jennifer N.; Fulton, Anne B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess scotopic background adaptation in subjects with a history of preterm birth and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). Retinopathy of prematurity is known to have long-term effects on rod photoreceptor and rod mediated postreceptor retinal function. Methods Rod-mediated thresholds for detection of 3° diameter, 50 ms stimuli presented 20° from fixation were measured using a spatial forced choice method in 36 subjects (aged 9–17 years) with a history of preterm birth and 11 age similar term-born subjects. Thresholds were measured first in the dark-adapted condition and then in the presence of 6 steady background lights (−2.8 to +2.0 log scot td). A model of the increment threshold function was fit to each subject's thresholds to estimate the dark-adapted threshold (TDA) and the Eigengrau (A0, the background that elevates threshold 0.3 log unit above TDA). Results In subjects with a history of severe ROP, both TDA and A0 were significantly elevated relative to those in former preterms who never had ROP and term-born control subjects. Subjects who had mild ROP had normal TDA but elevated A0. Neither TDA nor A0 differed significantly between former preterms who never had ROP and term-born controls. Conclusions The results suggest that in severe ROP, threshold is affected at a preadaptation site, possibly the rod outer segment. In mild ROP, changes in the Eigengrau may reflect increased intrinsic noise in the photoreceptor or postreceptor circuitry or both. PMID:27145476

  4. Mathematical modeling of an exothermic leaching reaction system: pressure oxidation of wide size arsenopyrite participates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papangelakis, V. G.; Berk, D.; Demopoulos, G. P.

    1990-10-01

    In the design of processes involving exothermic reactions, as is the case of several sulfide leaching systems, it is desirable to utilize the energy liberated by the reaction to drive the reactor toward autogenous operation. For optimal reactor design, models which couple leaching kinetics and heat effects are needed. In this paper, the principles of modeling exothermic leaching reactions are outlined. The system investigated is the high-temperature (160 °C to 200 °C) pressure (O2) oxidation of arsenopyrite (FeAsS). The reaction system is characterized by three consecutive reactions: (1) heterogeneous dissolution of arsenopyrite particles, (2) homogeneous oxidation of iron(II) to iron(III), and (3) precipitation of scorodite (FeAsO4-2H2O). The overall kinetics is controlled by the arsenopyrite surface reaction. There was good agreement between laboratory-scale batch tests and model predictions. The model was expanded to simulate the performance of large-scale batch and single-stage continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) for the same rate-limiting regime. Emphasis is given to the identification of steady-state temperatures for autogenous processing. The effects of operating variables, such as feed temperature, slurry density, and retention time, on reactor operation and yield of leaching products are discussed.

  5. Reactions of coal model compounds in tetralin using microwave energy: Effects of catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Eray, E.; Yagmur, E.; Simsek, E.H.; Alibeyli, R.; Togrul, T.

    2006-10-01

    Reaction mechanisms of model compounds of coal in tetralin by microwave energy were investigated. Diphenylmethane (DFM), phenyl-methyl ether (anisole), and phenyl-methyl ketone (acetophenon) were chosen as model compounds. Experiments were carried out for 10 minutes of microwave energy and different catalysts were used (pyratol, zeolite, BaCl{sub 2}, AlNiMo) to find out the distribution of reaction products of the model compounds. GC and GC/MS are used to analyze the reaction products. The main reaction products from DFM and tetralin under microwave radiation with catalysts were ethyl benzene, naphthalene, 2-methyl naphthalene, 3,4-dihydronaphthaleneone, 1-1'-ethyldene 1-benzene, and 1-methyl 4-phenyl methyl benzene. The main reaction products from anisole and tetralin under microwave radiation were ethyl benzene, phenol, methyl phenol, decahydronaphthalene, and tetrahydronaphthalenol. The main reaction products from acetophenon and tetralin under microwave radiation with catalysts were ethyl benzene, methoxy benzene, decahydronaphthalene, naphthalene, tetrahydronaphthalenol, 3,4-dihydronaphthalenone and 2-butene-1-one-1,3 diphenyl. The estimated mechanism of the model compounds with tetralin is compared with the results taken from GC/MS analysis. It is obtained that the results suggested theoretically were similar with the GC/MS results.

  6. Reaction-based reactive transport modeling of Fe(III)

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, K.M.; Kelly, S.D.; Burgos, Bill; Roden, Eric

    2006-06-01

    This research project (started Fall 2004) was funded by a grant to Argonne National Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, and The University of Alabama in the Integrative Studies Element of the NABIR Program (DE-FG04-ER63914/63915/63196). Dr. Eric Roden, formerly at The University of Alabama, is now at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Our project focuses on the development of a mechanistic understanding and quantitative models of coupled Fe(III)/U(VI) reduction in FRC Area 2 sediments. This work builds on our previous studies of microbial Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, and is directly aligned with the Scheibe et al. NABIR FRC Field Project at Area 2.

  7. Ductular reaction correlates with fibrogenesis but does not contribute to liver regeneration in experimental fibrosis models.

    PubMed

    Rókusz, András; Veres, Dániel; Szücs, Armanda; Bugyik, Edina; Mózes, Miklós; Paku, Sándor; Nagy, Péter; Dezső, Katalin

    2017-01-01

    Ductular reaction is a standard component of fibrotic liver tissue but its function is largely unknown. It is supposed to interact with the matrix producing myofibroblasts and compensate the declining regenerative capacity of hepatocytes. The relationship between the extent of fibrosis-ductular reaction, proliferative activity of hepatocytes and ductular reaction were studied sequentially in experimental hepatic fibrosis models. Liver fibrosis/cirrhosis was induced in wild type and TGFβ overproducing transgenic mice by carbon tetrachloride and thioacetamide administration. The effect of thioacetamide was modulated by treatment with imatinib and erlotinib. The extent of ductular reaction and fibrosis was measured by morphometry following cytokeratin 19 immunofluorescent labeling and Picro Sirius staining respectively. The proliferative activity of hepatocytes and ductular reaction was evaluated by BrdU incorporation. The temporal distribution of the parameters was followed and compared within and between different experimental groups. There was a strong significant correlation between the extent of fibrosis and ductular reaction in each experimental group. Although imatinib and erlotinib temporarily decreased fibrosis this effect later disappeared. We could not observe negative correlation between the proliferation of hepatocytes and ductular reaction in any of the investigated models. The stringent connection between ductular reaction and fibrosis, which cannot be influenced by any of our treatment regimens, suggests that there is a close mutual interaction between them instead of a unidirectional causal relationship. Our results confirm a close connection between DR and fibrogenesis. However, since the two parameters changed together we could not establish a causal relationship and were unable to reveal which was the primary event. The lack of inverse correlation between the proliferation of hepatocytes and ductular reaction questions that ductular reaction can

  8. Thermodynamic forward modeling of retrogressive hydration reactions induced by geofluid infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwatani, Tatsu; Toriumi, Mitsuhiro

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a new methodology for forward analysis of retrogressive hydration (rehydration) reactions by an improved thermodynamic forward modeling technique based on a differential thermodynamic approach (Gibbs' method). Based on natural observations and theoretical considerations, the progress of a rehydration reaction is modeled by incorporating a change in the effective bulk composition on account of the breakdown of the non-equilibrated phase and the amount of water infiltration into the system. Forward analyses of rehydration reactions under greenschist-facies conditions show that (1) the reaction progress of rehydration is proportional to the external water supply, and (2) the mineral compositions of equilibrated minerals are mainly controlled by P- T conditions and are similar to those in the global equilibrium model. Calculated results are in accordance with natural observations of rehydration reactions in greenschist-facies rocks, which supports the validity of the proposed model. The proposed model can be used as a basic forward model for various inversion analyses and numerical simulations and thus to understand the distribution and behavior of geofluids.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Modeling of atmospheric OH reaction rates using newly developed variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markelj, Jernej; Pompe, Matevž

    2016-04-01

    A new variable distance weighted zero order connectivity index was used for development of structure-activity relationship for modeling reactivity of OH radical with alkanes and non-conjugated alkenes in the atmosphere. The proposed model is based on the assumptions that the total reaction rate can be obtained by summing all partial reaction rates and that all reaction sites are interrelated by influencing each other. The results suggest that these assumptions are justified. The model was compared with the EPA implemented model in the studied application domain and showed superior prediction capabilities. Further, optimized values of the weights that were used in our model permit some insight into mechanisms that govern the reaction OH + alkane/alkene. The most important conclusion is that the branching degree of the forming radical seems to play a major role in site specific reaction rates. Relative qualitative structural interpretation is possible, e.g. allylic site is suggested to be much more reactive than even tertiary sp3 carbon. Novel modeling software MACI, which was developed in our lab and is now available for research purposes, was used for calculations. Various variable topological indices that are again starting to be recognized because of their great potentials in simplicity, fast calculations, very good correlations and structural information, were implemented in the program.

  10. Numerical modeling of particle generation from ozone reactions with human-worn clothing in indoor environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Aakash C.; Lin, Chao-Hsin; Chen, Qingyan

    2015-02-01

    Ozone-terpene reactions are important sources of indoor ultrafine particles (UFPs), a potential health hazard for human beings. Humans themselves act as possible sites for ozone-initiated particle generation through reactions with squalene (a terpene) that is present in their skin, hair, and clothing. This investigation developed a numerical model to probe particle generation from ozone reactions with clothing worn by humans. The model was based on particle generation measured in an environmental chamber as well as physical formulations of particle nucleation, condensational growth, and deposition. In five out of the six test cases, the model was able to predict particle size distributions reasonably well. The failure in the remaining case demonstrated the fundamental limitations of nucleation models. The model that was developed was used to predict particle generation under various building and airliner cabin conditions. These predictions indicate that ozone reactions with human-worn clothing could be an important source of UFPs in densely occupied classrooms and airliner cabins. Those reactions could account for about 40% of the total UFPs measured on a Boeing 737-700 flight. The model predictions at this stage are indicative and should be improved further.

  11. A new model of reaction-driven cracking: fluid volume consumption and tensile failure during serpentinization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichenbaum-Pikser, J. M.; Spiegelman, M. W.; Kelemen, P. B.; Wilson, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    Reactive fluid flow plays an important role in a wide range of geodynamic processes, such as melt migration, formation of hydrous minerals on fault surfaces, and chemical weathering. These processes are governed by the complex coupling between fluid transport, reaction, and solid deformation. Reaction-driven cracking is a potentially critical feedback mechanism, by which volume change associated with chemical reaction drives fracture in the surrounding rock. It has been proposed to play a role in both serpentinization and carbonation of peridotite, motivating consideration of its application to mineral carbon sequestration. Previous studies of reactive cracking have focused on the increase in solid volume, and as such, have considered failure in compression. However, if the consumption of fluid is considered in the overall volume budget, the reaction can be net volume reducing, potentially leading to failure in tension. To explore these problems, we have formulated and solved a 2-D model of coupled porous flow, reaction kinetics, and elastic deformation using the finite element model assembler TerraFERMA (Wilson et al, G3 2013 submitted). The model is applied to the serpentinization of peridotite, which can be reasonably approximated as the transfer of a single reactive component (H2O) between fluid and solid phases, making it a simple test case to explore the process. The behavior of the system is controlled by the competition between the rate of volume consumption by the reaction, and the rate of volume replacement by fluid transport, as characterized by a nondimensional parameter χ, which depends on permeability, reaction rate, and the bulk modulus of the solid. Large values of χ correspond to fast fluid transport relative to reaction rate, resulting in a low stress, volume replacing regime. At smaller values of χ, fluid transport cannot keep up with the reaction, resulting in pore fluid under-pressure and tensile solid stresses. For the range of χ relevant

  12. A model reaction assesses contribution of H-tunneling and coupled motions to enzyme catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Zhao, Yu; Hammann, Blake; Eilers, James; Lu, Yun; Kohen, Amnon

    2012-08-17

    To assess the contribution of physical features to enzyme catalysis, the enzymatic reaction has to be compared to a relevant uncatalyzed reaction. While such comparisons have been conducted for some hydrolytic and radical reactions, it is most challenging for biological hydride transfer and redox reactions in general. Here, the same experimental tools used to study the H-tunneling and coupled motions for enzymatic hydride transfer between two carbons were used in the study of an uncatalyzed model reaction. The enzymatic oxidations of benzyl alcohol and its substituted analogues mediated by alcohol dehydrogenases were compared to the oxidations by 9-phenylxanthylium cation (PhXn(+)). The PhXn(+) serves as an NAD(+) model, while the solvent, acetonitrile, models the protein environment. Experimental comparisons included linear free energy relations with Hammett reaction constant (ρ) of zero versus -2.7; temperature-independent versus temperature-dependent primary KIEs; deflated secondary KIEs with deuteride transfer (i.e., primary-secondary coupled motion) versus no coupling between secondary KIEs and H- or D-transfer; and large versus small secondary KIEs for the enzymatic versus uncatalyzed alcohol oxidation. Some of the differences may come from differences in the order of microscopic steps between the catalyzed versus uncatalyzed reactions. However, several of these comparative experiments indicate that in contrast to the uncatalyzed reaction the transition state of the enzymatic reaction is better reorganized for H-tunneling and its H-donor is better rehybridized prior to the C-H→C transfer. These findings suggest an important role for these physical features in enzyme catalysis.

  13. Health level seven interoperability strategy: big data, incrementally structured.

    PubMed

    Dolin, R H; Rogers, B; Jaffe, C

    2015-01-01

    Describe how the HL7 Clinical Document Architecture (CDA), a foundational standard in US Meaningful Use, contributes to a "big data, incrementally structured" interoperability strategy, whereby data structured incrementally gets large amounts of data flowing faster. We present cases showing how this approach is leveraged for big data analysis. To support the assertion that semi-structured narrative in CDA format can be a useful adjunct in an overall big data analytic approach, we present two case studies. The first assesses an organization's ability to generate clinical quality reports using coded data alone vs. coded data supplemented by CDA narrative. The second leverages CDA to construct a network model for referral management, from which additional observations can be gleaned. The first case shows that coded data supplemented by CDA narrative resulted in significant variances in calculated performance scores. In the second case, we found that the constructed network model enables the identification of differences in patient characteristics among different referral work flows. The CDA approach goes after data indirectly, by focusing first on the flow of narrative, which is then incrementally structured. A quantitative assessment of whether this approach will lead to a greater flow of data and ultimately a greater flow of structured data vs. other approaches is planned as a future exercise. Along with growing adoption of CDA, we are now seeing the big data community explore the standard, particularly given its potential to supply analytic en- gines with volumes of data previously not possible.

  14. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  15. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  16. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  17. 48 CFR 3452.232-71 - Incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Incremental funding. 3452....232-71 Incremental funding. As prescribed in 3432.705-2, insert the following provision in solicitations if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is contemplated: Incremental Funding...

  18. 48 CFR 3432.771 - Provision for incremental funding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision for incremental... for incremental funding. The contracting officer shall insert the provision in 3452.232-71, Incremental Funding, in a solicitation if a cost-reimbursement contract using incremental funding is...

  19. Modeling photoexcited reactions of simple molecules in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing

    Photoexcited iodine in rare gas systems offer a paradigm for understanding excited state condensed phase chemistry. Solvent induced nonadiabaticity plays an important role in the dynamics of these systems and modifies electronic structure by introducing off-diagonal coupling elements to our electronic Hamiltonian matrix. A semi-empirical electronic structure method, diatomics-in-molecules (DIM), together with its extension designed for ionic systems, diatomics-in-ionic-systems (DIIS), is applied to dynamical studies of photoexcited iodine in Ar and Xe rare gas systems. Mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics implemented using a surface hopping algorithm is employed in a trajectory study which successfully describes the nonadiabatic nature of these systems. First we looked into the photoexcited I2 in its manifold of covalent states in solid Ar, focusing on the cage-bound but otherwise dissociative potential curves. Cage motions disturb the electronic structure and influence the coupling between electronic states to a large extent due to the large-scale intramolecular motion associated with stretching of the I2 bond resulting from double-photon excitation. Dynamical simulation with a surface hopping algorithm describes the cage-bound state photoexcitation dynamics which has only been simulated by other groups using classical methods that do not allow for nonadiabatic electronic transitions. A characteristic recursion time of the cage-bound state motion is found though our simulation which matches the experimental results, and our simulated pump-probe signals successfully reproduce the experimental spectrum. Finally we apply our potential model and surface hopping dynamical calculation method to the charge transfer complex Xe+2I- in xenon clusters. The states of this system are accessed at much higher energy than the covalent states. Charge transfer occurs between atoms and requires a significantly more complex potential energy model for which we use an extension

  20. Reactions to discrimination, stigmatization, ostracism, and other forms of interpersonal rejection: a multimotive model.

    PubMed

    Smart Richman, Laura; Leary, Mark R

    2009-04-01

    This article describes a new model that provides a framework for understanding people's reactions to threats to social acceptance and belonging as they occur in the context of diverse phenomena such as rejection, discrimination, ostracism, betrayal, and stigmatization. People's immediate reactions are quite similar across different forms of rejection in terms of negative affect and lowered self-esteem. However, following these immediate responses, people's reactions are influenced by construals of the rejection experience that predict 3 distinct motives for prosocial, antisocial, and socially avoidant behavioral responses. The authors describe the relational, contextual, and dispositional factors that affect which motives determine people's reactions to a rejection experience and the ways in which these 3 motives may work at cross-purposes. The multimotive model accounts for the myriad ways in which responses to rejection unfold over time and offers a basis for the next generation of research on interpersonal rejection.

  1. Monte Carlo analysis of uncertainty propagation in a stratospheric model. 2: Uncertainties due to reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolarski, R. S.; Butler, D. M.; Rundel, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    A concise stratospheric model was used in a Monte-Carlo analysis of the propagation of reaction rate uncertainties through the calculation of an ozone perturbation due to the addition of chlorine. Two thousand Monte-Carlo cases were run with 55 reaction rates being varied. Excellent convergence was obtained in the output distributions because the model is sensitive to the uncertainties in only about 10 reactions. For a 1 ppby chlorine perturbation added to a 1.5 ppby chlorine background, the resultant 1 sigma uncertainty on the ozone perturbation is a factor of 1.69 on the high side and 1.80 on the low side. The corresponding 2 sigma factors are 2.86 and 3.23. Results are also given for the uncertainties, due to reaction rates, in the ambient concentrations of stratospheric species.

  2. A measurement model for general noise reaction in response to aircraft noise.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Maarten; Schreckenberg, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a measurement model for general noise reaction (GNR) in response to aircraft noise is developed to assess the performance of aircraft noise annoyance and a direct measure of general reaction as indicators of this concept. For this purpose GNR is conceptualized as a superordinate latent construct underlying particular manifestations. This conceptualization is empirically tested through estimation of a second-order factor model. Data from a community survey at Frankfurt Airport are used for this purpose (N=2206). The data fit the hypothesized factor structure well and support the conceptualization of GNR as a superordinate construct. It is concluded that noise annoyance and a direct measure of general reaction to noise capture a large part of the negative feelings and emotions in response to aircraft noise but are unable to capture all relevant variance. The paper concludes with recommendations for the valid measurement of community reaction and several directions for further research.

  3. Multicomponent transport with coupled geochemical and microbiological reactions: model description and example simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tebes-Stevens, Caroline; J. Valocchi, Albert; VanBriesen, Jeanne M.; Rittmann, Bruce E.

    1998-08-01

    A reactive transport code (FEREACT) has been developed to examine the coupled effects of two-dimensional steady-state groundwater flow, equilibrium aqueous speciation reactions, and kinetically-controlled interphase reactions. The model uses an iterative two-step (SIA-1) solution algorithm to incorporate the effects of the geochemical and microbial reaction processes in the governing equation for solute transport in the subsurface. This SIA-1 method improves upon the convergence behavior of the traditional sequential iterative approach (SIA) through the inclusion of an additional first-order term from the Taylor Series expansion of the kinetic reaction rate expressions. The ability of FEREACT to simulate coupled reactive processes was demonstrated by modeling the transport of a radionuclide (cobalt, 60Co 2+) and an organic ligand (ethylenediaminetetraacetate, EDTA 4-) through a column packed with an iron oxide-coated sand. The reaction processes considered in this analysis included equilibrium aqueous speciation reactions and three types of kinetic reactions: adsorption, surface dissolution, and biodegradation.

  4. Modeling of the self-propagating reactions of nickel and aluminum multilayered foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunduz, Ibrahim Emre; Fadenberger, Konrad; Kokonou, Maria; Rebholz, Claus; Doumanidis, Charalabos C.; Ando, Teiichi

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we performed simulations of self-propagating reactions of nanoscale nickel-aluminum multilayers using numerical methods. The model employs two-dimensional heat transfer equations coupled with heat generation terms from, (1) 1D parabolic growth of intermetallic phases Ni2Al3 and NiAl in the thickness direction and (2) phase transformations such as melting and peritectic reactions. The model uses temperature dependent physical and chemical data, such as interdiffusion coefficients, specific heat capacities, and enthalpy of reactions obtained from previous independent work. The equations are discretized using a lagged Crank-Nicolson method. The results show that initially, the reaction front velocity is determined by the rapid growth of Ni2Al3 and the front temperature is limited by the peritectic reaction at ˜1406 K. After the front completely traverses the foil and the temperature reaches the peritectic point, the reaction slows down and the temperature rises by the growth of NiAl which is the only stable phase at these temperatures. The reaction is completed when the initial constituents are consumed and the temperature reaches the melting point of NiAl. Subsequently, the foil cools and solidifies to the final phase dictated by the overall composition. The computational results show excellent fit to experimental velocity and temperature measurements.

  5. A Computational Approach to Increase Time Scales in Brownian Dynamics–Based Reaction-Diffusion Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Frazier, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Particle-based Brownian dynamics simulations offer the opportunity to not only simulate diffusion of particles but also the reactions between them. They therefore provide an opportunity to integrate varied biological data into spatially explicit models of biological processes, such as signal transduction or mitosis. However, particle based reaction-diffusion methods often are hampered by the relatively small time step needed for accurate description of the reaction-diffusion framework. Such small time steps often prevent simulation times that are relevant for biological processes. It is therefore of great importance to develop reaction-diffusion methods that tolerate larger time steps while maintaining relatively high accuracy. Here, we provide an algorithm, which detects potential particle collisions prior to a BD-based particle displacement and at the same time rigorously obeys the detailed balance rule of equilibrium reactions. We can show that for reaction-diffusion processes of particles mimicking proteins, the method can increase the typical BD time step by an order of magnitude while maintaining similar accuracy in the reaction diffusion modelling. PMID:22697237

  6. Dynamic Analysis of a Reaction-Diffusion Rumor Propagation Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hongyong; Zhu, Linhe

    2016-06-01

    The rapid development of the Internet, especially the emergence of the social networks, leads rumor propagation into a new media era. Rumor propagation in social networks has brought new challenges to network security and social stability. This paper, based on partial differential equations (PDEs), proposes a new SIS rumor propagation model by considering the effect of the communication between the different rumor infected users on rumor propagation. The stabilities of a nonrumor equilibrium point and a rumor-spreading equilibrium point are discussed by linearization technique and the upper and lower solutions method, and the existence of a traveling wave solution is established by the cross-iteration scheme accompanied by the technique of upper and lower solutions and Schauder’s fixed point theorem. Furthermore, we add the time delay to rumor propagation and deduce the conditions of Hopf bifurcation and stability switches for the rumor-spreading equilibrium point by taking the time delay as the bifurcation parameter. Finally, numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the theoretical results.

  7. The mineralogic evolution of the Martian surface through time: Implications from chemical reaction path modeling studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumlee, G. S.; Ridley, W. I.; Debraal, J. D.; Reed, M. H.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical reaction path calculations were used to model the minerals that might have formed at or near the Martian surface as a result of volcano or meteorite impact driven hydrothermal systems; weathering at the Martian surface during an early warm, wet climate; and near-zero or sub-zero C brine-regolith reactions in the current cold climate. Although the chemical reaction path calculations carried out do not define the exact mineralogical evolution of the Martian surface over time, they do place valuable geochemical constraints on the types of minerals that formed from an aqueous phase under various surficial and geochemically complex conditions.

  8. Temperature dependence of the Oregonator model for the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction.

    PubMed

    Pullela, Srinivasa R; Cristancho, Diego; He, Peng; Luo, Dawei; Hall, Kenneth R; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2009-06-07

    It is well known that temperature plays an important role in the chemical dynamics of Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions. The five-step Oregonator model of the BZ reaction has been elaborated here to investigate the temperature effect. The bifurcation dynamics has been calculated in the phase space spanned by initial reagents concentration ratio, stoichiometric factor and temperature. The combination of activation energies of the individual reaction steps governs the dependence of oscillation period and amplitude with temperature. The analysis reveals the existence of temperature limits beyond which no oscillations occur.

  9. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Andrés; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; Sadow, Aaron D.; Evans, James W.

    2016-05-01

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A →Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Furthermore, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A .

  10. ENZO: A Web Tool for Derivation and Evaluation of Kinetic Models of Enzyme Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Bevc, Staš; Konc, Janez; Stojan, Jure; Hodošček, Milan; Penca, Matej; Praprotnik, Matej; Janežič, Dušanka

    2011-01-01

    We describe a web tool ENZO (Enzyme Kinetics), a graphical interface for building kinetic models of enzyme catalyzed reactions. ENZO automatically generates the corresponding differential equations from a stipulated enzyme reaction scheme. These differential equations are processed by a numerical solver and a regression algorithm which fits the coefficients of differential equations to experimentally observed time course curves. ENZO allows rapid evaluation of rival reaction schemes and can be used for routine tests in enzyme kinetics. It is freely available as a web tool, at http://enzo.cmm.ki.si. PMID:21818304

  11. Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

    1999-03-21

    Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

  12. Catalytic conversion reactions in nanoporous systems with concentration-dependent selectivity: Statistical mechanical modeling

    DOE PAGES

    Garcia, Andres; Wang, Jing; Windus, Theresa L.; ...

    2016-05-20

    Statistical mechanical modeling is developed to describe a catalytic conversion reaction A → Bc or Bt with concentration-dependent selectivity of the products, Bc or Bt, where reaction occurs inside catalytic particles traversed by narrow linear nanopores. The associated restricted diffusive transport, which in the extreme case is described by single-file diffusion, naturally induces strong concentration gradients. Hence, by comparing kinetic Monte Carlo simulation results with analytic treatments, selectivity is shown to be impacted by strong spatial correlations induced by restricted diffusivity in the presence of reaction and also by a subtle clustering of reactants, A.

  13. Disproportionation of rosin on an industrial Pd/C catalyst: reaction pathway and kinetic model discrimination.

    PubMed

    Souto, Juan Carlos; Yustos, Pedro; Ladero, Miguel; Garcia-Ochoa, Felix

    2011-02-01

    In this work, a phenomenological study of the isomerisation and disproportionation of rosin acids using an industrial 5% Pd on charcoal catalyst from 200 to 240°C is carried out. Medium composition is determined by elemental microanalysis, GC-MS and GC-FID. Dehydrogenated and hydrogenated acid species molar amounts in the final product show that dehydrogenation is the main reaction. Moreover, both hydrogen and non-hydrogen concentration considering kinetic models are fitted to experimental data using a multivariable non-linear technique. Statistical discrimination among the proposed kinetic models lead to the conclusion hydrogen considering models fit much better to experimental results. The final kinetic model involves first-order isomerisation reactions of neoabietic and palustric acids to abietic acid, first-order dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of this latter acid, and hydrogenation of pimaric acids. Hydrogenation reactions are partial first-order regarding the acid and hydrogen.

  14. Modelling and simulating reaction-diffusion systems using coloured Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Blätke, Mary-Ann; Heiner, Monika; Yang, Ming

    2014-10-01

    Reaction-diffusion systems often play an important role in systems biology when developmental processes are involved. Traditional methods of modelling and simulating such systems require substantial prior knowledge of mathematics and/or simulation algorithms. Such skills may impose a challenge for biologists, when they are not equally well-trained in mathematics and computer science. Coloured Petri nets as a high-level and graphical language offer an attractive alternative, which is easily approachable. In this paper, we investigate a coloured Petri net framework integrating deterministic, stochastic and hybrid modelling formalisms and corresponding simulation algorithms for the modelling and simulation of reaction-diffusion processes that may be closely coupled with signalling pathways, metabolic reactions and/or gene expression. Such systems often manifest multiscaleness in time, space and/or concentration. We introduce our approach by means of some basic diffusion scenarios, and test it against an established case study, the Brusselator model.

  15. Characterization of initial cure reactions in propargyl and nadic end capped model compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    Imide model compounds containing propargyl and nadic groups were studied to obtain a fundamental understanding of the reaction of these groups attached to imide oligomers. The initial cure reactions were examined by a variety of characterization techniques including high pressure liquid chromatography, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, and mass spectroscopy. The initial step in the cure of propargyl end capped model compounds probably involved the formation of a new terminal acetylenic group. Configurational changes involving endo/exo isomerism was found in the nadimide model compounds. Nadimide compounds heated in air and in nitrogen appeared to cure by different mechanisms.

  16. The affects on Titan atmospheric modeling by variable molecular reaction rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamel, Mark D.

    The main effort of this thesis is to study the production and loss of molecular ions in the ionosphere of Saturn's largest moon Titan. Titan's atmosphere is subject to complex photochemical processes that can lead to the production of higher order hydrocarbons and nitriles. Ion-molecule chemistry plays an important role in this process but remains poorly understood. In particular, current models that simulate the photochemistry of Titan's atmosphere overpredict the abundance of the ionosphere's main ions suggesting a flaw in the modeling process. The objective of this thesis is to determine which reactions are most important for production and loss of the two primary ions, C2H5+ and HCNH+, and what is the impact of uncertainty in the reaction rates on the production and loss of these ions. In reviewing the literature, there is a contention about what reactions are really necessary to illuminate what is occurring in the atmosphere. Approximately seven hundred reactions are included in the model used in this discussion (INT16). This paper studies what reactions are fundamental to the atmospheric processes in Titan's upper atmosphere, and also to the reactions that occur in the lower bounds of the ionosphere which are used to set a baseline molecular density for all species, and reflects what is expected at those altitudes on Titan. This research was conducted through evaluating reaction rates and cross sections available in the scientific literature and through conducting model simulations of the photochemistry in Titan's atmosphere under a range of conditions constrained by the literature source. The objective of this study is to determine the dependence of ion densities of C2H5+ and HCNH+ on the uncertainty in the reaction rates that involve these two ions in Titan's atmosphere.

  17. Stabilization of helices in glycine and alanine dipeptides in a reaction field model of solvent

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, H.S. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Head-Gordon, T. )

    1994-02-23

    We present molecular orbital calculations of the full conformational space of blocked glycine and alanine dipeptide in the presence of a reaction field representation of water. Secondary structures of right- and left-handed helices are found, in contrast to recent gas-phase results, indicating that the origin of helical stabilization in dipeptides is strictly due to environment. Limitations of the reaction field model and the various implications of stabilization due to environment are discussed. 43 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. 12 CFR 324.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the FDIC-supervised institution's measure of potential losses due to incremental risk over a one-year.... An FDIC-supervised institution may not include correlation trading positions or securitization... the impact of correlations between default and migration events among obligors. (3) Reflect the effect...

  19. 12 CFR 217.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the Board-regulated institution's measure of potential losses due to incremental risk over a one-year.... A Board-regulated institution may not include correlation trading positions or securitization.... (2) Recognize the impact of correlations between default and migration events among obligors. (3...

  20. 12 CFR 3.208 - Incremental risk.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... association's measure of potential losses due to incremental risk over a one-year time horizon at a one-tail.... A national bank or Federal savings association may not include correlation trading positions or.... (2) Recognize the impact of correlations between default and migration events among obligors. (3...