Science.gov

Sample records for independent case-control studies

  1. Opium could be considered an independent risk factor for lung cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Masjedi, Mohammad Reza; Naghan, Parisa Adimi; Taslimi, Shervin; Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Ebrahimi, Seyyed Meisam; Khosravi, Adnan; Karimi, Shirin; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mortaz, Esmaeil

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and half of all incident lung cancers are believed to occur in the developing countries, including Iran. We investigated the association of opium with the risk of lung cancer in a case-control study. We enrolled 242 cases and 484 matched controls in this study. A questionnaire was developed, containing questions on basic demographic characteristics, as well as lifelong history of smoking cigarettes, exposure to passive smoking, opium use and alcohol consumption. For smoking cigarettes and opium and also oral opium intake frequency, duration and cumulative use were categorized into three groups: no use, low use and high use. Conditional logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Multivariate analysis in men showed that after adjusting for the effect of ethnicity, education and pack years of smoking cigarettes, smoking opium remained as a significant independent risk factor with an OR of 3.1 (95% CI 1.2-8.1). In addition, concomitant heavy smoking of cigarettes and opium dramatically increased the risk of lung cancer to an OR of 35.0 (95% CI 11.4-107.9). This study demonstrated that smoking opium is associated with a high risk of lung cancer as an independent risk factor. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Consumption of groundwater as an independent risk factor of Salmonella choleraesuis infection: a case-control study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Li, Tsung-Hsien; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Wan-Ching; Chen, Chih-Ming; Hsu, Yuan-Man; Chiou, Shyan-Song; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chang, Chao-Chin

    2009-12-01

    Infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Choleraesuis (S. Choleraesuis) in humans can be considered as an endemic disease in certain regions of Taiwan, and the number of cases has increased in recent years. The goal of the case-control study discussed in this article was to identify the possible demographic and environmental risk factors associated with S. Choleraesuis infection in Taiwan. During the period of December 2005 to March 2007, the case-control study was conducted in human patients with Salmonella infection from two medical centers. Structured questionnaires were applied to collect information of relevant risk factors after interviewing 13 culture-confirmed S. Choleraesuis cases and 84 controls with other Salmonella serotype infection. After evaluation by univariate and multivariate statistical models, the results suggested that consumption of groundwater could be an independent risk factor associated with S. Choleraesuis in Taiwan. Therefore, appropriate health education needs to be conducted especially in areas where groundwater is used.

  3. Meta-analysis of gene-environment interaction exploiting gene-environment independence across multiple case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Estes, Jason P; Rice, John D; Li, Shi; Stringham, Heather M; Boehnke, Michael; Mukherjee, Bhramar

    2017-10-30

    Multiple papers have studied the use of gene-environment (G-E) independence to enhance power for testing gene-environment interaction in case-control studies. However, studies that evaluate the role of G-E independence in a meta-analysis framework are limited. In this paper, we extend the single-study empirical Bayes type shrinkage estimators proposed by Mukherjee and Chatterjee (2008) to a meta-analysis setting that adjusts for uncertainty regarding the assumption of G-E independence across studies. We use the retrospective likelihood framework to derive an adaptive combination of estimators obtained under the constrained model (assuming G-E independence) and unconstrained model (without assumptions of G-E independence) with weights determined by measures of G-E association derived from multiple studies. Our simulation studies indicate that this newly proposed estimator has improved average performance across different simulation scenarios than the standard alternative of using inverse variance (covariance) weighted estimators that combines study-specific constrained, unconstrained, or empirical Bayes estimators. The results are illustrated by meta-analyzing 6 different studies of type 2 diabetes investigating interactions between genetic markers on the obesity related FTO gene and environmental factors body mass index and age. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Ability of independently ambulant children with cerebral palsy to ride a two-wheel bicycle: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Toovey, Rachel; Reid, Susan M; Rawicki, Barry; Harvey, Adrienne R; Watt, Kerrianne

    2017-04-01

    Limited information exists on the ability of children with cerebral palsy (CP) to ride a two-wheel bicycle, an activity that may improve health and participation. We aimed to describe bicycle-riding ability and variables associated with ability to ride in children with CP (Gross Motor Functional Classification System [GMFCS] levels I-II) compared with children with typical development. This case-control study surveyed parents of 114 children with CP and 87 children with typical development aged 6 to 15 years (115 males, mean age 9y 11mo, standard deviation [SD] 2y 10mo). Kaplan-Meier methods were used to compare proportions able to ride at any given age between the two groups. Logistic regression was used to assess variables associated with ability to ride for children with CP and typical development separately. The proportion of children with CP able to ride at each level of bicycle-riding ability was substantially lower at each age than peers with typical development (p<0.001). While most children with typical development were able to ride independently by 10 years of age, 51% of children with CP classified as GMFCS level I and 3% of those classified as GMFCS level II had obtained independent riding in the community by 15 years of age. Variables associated with ability to ride for children classified as GMFCS level I were age and parent-rated importance of their child being able to ride. Some independently ambulant children with CP can learn to ride a bicycle, in particular if they are classified as GMFCS level I. Variables associated with ability to ride deserve consideration in shaping future efforts for the majority of this population who are not yet able to ride. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  5. Joint and independent effects of alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking on oral cancer: a large case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ferreira Antunes, José Leopoldo; Toporcov, Tatiana Natasha; Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye; Boing, Antonio Fernando; Scully, Crispian; Petti, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol drinking and tobacco smoking are assumed to have significant independent and joint effects on oral cancer (OC) development. This assumption is based on consistent reports from observational studies, which, however, overestimated the independent effects of smoking and drinking, because they did not account for the interaction effect in multivariable analyses. This case-control study sought to investigate the independent and the joint effects of smoking and drinking on OC in a homogeneous sample of adults. Case patients (N = 1,144) were affected by invasive oral/oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma confirmed histologically, diagnosed between 1998 and 2008 in four hospitals of São Paulo (Brazil). Control patients (N = 1,661) were not affected by drinking-, smoking-associated diseases, cancers, upper aero-digestive tract diseases. Cumulative tobacco and alcohol consumptions were assessed anamnestically. Patients were categorized into never/ever users and never/level-1/level-2 users, according to the median consumption level in controls. The effects of smoking and drinking on OC adjusted for age, gender, schooling level were assessed using logistic regression analysis; Model-1 did not account for the smoking-drinking interaction; Model-2 accounted for this interaction and included the resultant interaction terms. The models were compared using the likelihood ratio test. According to Model-1, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for smoking, drinking, smoking-drinking were 3.50 (95% confidence interval -95CI, 2.76-4.44), 3.60 (95CI, 2.86-4.53), 12.60 (95CI, 7.89-20.13), respectively. According to Model-2 these figures were 1.41 (95CI, 1.02-1.96), 0.78 (95CI, 0.48-1.27), 8.16 (95CI, 2.09-31.78). Analogous results were obtained using three levels of exposure to smoking and drinking. Model-2 showed statistically significant better goodness-of-fit statistics than Model-1. Drinking was not independently associated with OC, while the independent effect of smoking

  6. Pneumonia is an independent risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess: A population-based, nested, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sai-Wai; Yeh, Chao-Bin; Yang, Shun-Fa; Yeh, Han-Wei; Huang, Jing-Yang; Teng, Ying-Hock

    2017-01-01

    Bacteremic pneumonia is considered a potential cause of distal organ abscess formation. Therefore, we hypothesize that pneumonia is a risk factor for pyogenic liver abscess (PLA).The aim of this study is to explore the association between pneumonia and PLA. A nationwide, population-based, nested, case-control study was conducted using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. In total, 494 patients with PLA and 1,976 propensity score matched controls were enrolled. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) in patients with exposure to pneumonia before PLA. After matched and adjusted for confounding factors including age, sex, urbanization, income, chronic liver disease, alcohol-related disease, biliary stone, chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic liver disease, and cancer, hospitalization for pneumonia remained an independent risk factor for PLA with an aORs of 2.104 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.309-3.379, p = 0.0021]. Moreover, the aORs were significantly higher among patients hospitalized for pneumonia within 30 days (aORs = 10.73, 95% CI = 3.381-34.054), 30-90 days (aORs = 4.698, 95% CI = 1.541-14.327) and 90-180 (aORs = 4.000, 95% CI = 1.158-13.817) days before PLA diagnosis. Pneumonia is an independent risk factor for subsequent PLA. Moreover, hospitalization for pneumonia within 180 days before PLA diagnosis was associated with an increased risk of PLA.

  7. Nasopharyngeal Case-Control Study

    Cancer.gov

    A case-control study conducted in Taiwan between 1991-1994 among approximately 1,000 individuals to examine the role of viral, environmental, and genetic factors associated with the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma

  8. Is Lipid Lowering Therapy an Independent Risk Factor for Venous Thromboembolism? A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashrani, Aneel A.; Barsoum, Michel K.; Crusan, Daniel J.; Petterson, Tanya M.; Bailey, Kent R.; Heit, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The independent effect of lipid lowering therapy (LLT) on venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk is uncertain. Objective To test statin and non-statin LLT as potential VTE risk factors. Methods Using Rochester Epidemiology Project resources, we identified all Olmsted County, MN residents with objectively diagnosed incident VTE (cases) over the 13-year period, 1988–2000 (n=1340), and one to two matched controls (n=1538). We reviewed their complete medical records for baseline characteristics previously identified as independent VTE risk factors, and for statin and non-statin LLT. Using conditional logistic regression, we tested the overall effect of LLT on VTE risk and also separately explored the role of statin versus that of non-statin LLT, adjusting for other baseline characteristics. Results Among cases and controls, 74 and 111 received statin LLT, and 32 and 50 received non-statin LLT, respectively. Univariately, and after individually controlling for other potential VTE risk factors (i.e., BMI, trauma/fracture, leg paresis, hospitalization for surgery or medical illness, nursing home residence, active cancer, central venous catheter, varicose veins, prior superficial vein thrombosis, diabetes, congestive heart failure, angina/myocardial infarction, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, smoking, anticoagulation), LLT was associated with decreased odds of VTE (unadjusted OR= 0.73; p= 0.03). When considered separately, statin and non-statin LLT were each associated with moderate, non-significant lower odds of VTE. After adjusting for angina/myocardial infarction, each was significantly associated with decreased odds of VTE (OR= 0.63, p< 0.01 and OR= 0.61, p=0.04, respectively). Conclusions LLT is associated with decreased VTE risk after adjusting for known risk factors. PMID:25891841

  9. Exposure to organochlorine pesticides is an independent risk factor of hepatocellular carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Benhua; Shen, Heqing; Liu, Feng; Liu, Sheng; Niu, Jianjun; Guo, Fei; Sun, Xueli

    2012-11-01

    Primary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is highly prevalent in China. Although hepatitis B virus (HBV) and aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) are considered the major risk factors, among the high-risk cohorts only a small fraction develops liver cancer. Therefore, we investigated whether organochlorine pesticide exposure contributed to HCC risk in the Xiamen population. The questionnaire database was built from 346 HCC cases and 961 healthy controls during 2007-2009. The serum levels of α-, β-, γ-, δ-HCH, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane (p,p'-DDT), (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene (p,p'-DDE), 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (o-chlorophenyl) ethane and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane were measured by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer, and statistical analysis was done using SPSS16. Significantly, we observed p,p'-DDT and p,p'-DDE, and at the first time β-HCH displayed quartile dose-dependent HCC risk trends; p,p'-DDT showed positive (i.e., synergistic) interactions with HBV, diabetes mellitus, AFB1 and polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure, but negative (i.e., antagonistic) interaction with heavy drinking; p,p'-DDE had positive interaction with PAH but negative interaction with HBV and p,p'-DDT; and β-HCH positively interacted with p,p'-DDT but negatively interacted with heavy drinking and diabetes. p,p'-DDT, p,p'-DDE and β-HCH were independent HCC risk factors. Because of their synergistic interactions with other factors, the high-level exposure combined with common AFB1 and HBV exposure in the investigated area may greatly enhance the risk of HCC.

  10. Association of Inflammatory and Other Immune Markers with Gallbladder Cancer: Results from Two Independent Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Koshiol, Jill; Castro, Felipe; Kemp, Troy J; Gao, Yu-Tang; Roa, Juan Carlos; Wang, Bingsheng; Nogueira, Leticia; Araya, Juan Carlos; Shen, Ming-Chang; Rashid, Asif; Hsing, Ann W; Hildesheim, Allan; Ferreccio, Catterina; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Pinto, Ligia A

    2016-01-01

    Most gallbladder cancer (GBC) cases arise in the context of gallstones, which cause inflammation, but few gallstone patients develop GBC. We explored inflammation/immune-related markers measured in bile and serum in GBC cases compared to gallstone patients to better understand how inflammatory patterns in these two conditions differ. We measured 65 immune-related markers in serum and bile from 41 GBC cases and 127 gallstone patients from Shanghai, China, and calculated age- and sex-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) for GBC versus gallstones. We then focused on the markers that were significantly elevated in bile and serum to replicate in serum from 35 GBC cases and 31 gallstone controls from Chile. Comparing the highest versus lowest quantile, 15 markers (23%) were elevated in both serum and bile from GBC versus gallstone patients in the Shanghai study (p<0.05). The strongest OR was for CXCL8 (interleukin-8) in serum (96.8, 95% CI: 11.9–790.2). Of these 15 markers, 6 were also significantly elevated in serum from Chile (CCL20, C-reactive protein, CXCL8, CXCL10, resistin, serum amyloid A). Pooled ORs from Shanghai and Chile for these 6 markers ranged from 7.2 (95% CI: 2.8–18.4) for CXCL10 to 58.2 (95% CI: 12.4–273.0) for CXCL8. GBC is associated with inflammation above and beyond that generated by gallstones alone. This local inflammatory process is reflected systemically. Future longitudinal studies are needed to identify the key players in cancer development, which may guide translational efforts to identify individuals at high risk of developing GBC. PMID:27173614

  11. The glu298asp polymorphism in the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene is associated with the risk of ischemic stroke in two large independent case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Berger, Klaus; Stögbauer, Florian; Stoll, Monika; Wellmann, Juergen; Huge, Andreas; Cheng, Suzanne; Kessler, Christof; John, Ulrich; Assmann, Gerd; Ringelstein, E Bernd; Funke, Harald

    2007-04-01

    The search for genes involved in the pathogenesis of stroke has been highlighted as a field of needs. We followed the concept, that stroke represents a complex genetic disorder, and analyzed the contribution of 106 informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 63 candidate genes for cardiovascular diseases for the risk of stroke. We conducted two independent case-control studies in two different German regions and recruited a total of 1,901 hospitalized stroke cases and 1,747 regional population controls. The smaller of both studies was used as the replication study. Multiplex PCR in combination with allele-specific hybridization was used for genotype determination. Descriptive statistics, permutations and multivariable logistic regression were used in the analyses. After permutation testing 5 SNPs, located in the nitric oxide synthase 3, the alpha 2 integrin, the interleukin 13, the selectin P and the chemokine receptor 2 genes, had a significant allele difference between cases and controls in the larger study. For one of these SNPs, the glu298asp polymorphism in the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene, an association with ischemic stroke was replicated in the second study and also in a combined analysis of both studies. This association was independent of age, gender, hypertension, diabetes and hypercholesterolemia in both studies. Using large sample sizes and a replication study approach, we found evidence for a role of a polymorphism in the nitric oxide synthase 3 gene in stroke onset.

  12. Independent and joint effects of tea and milk consumption on oral cancer among non-smokers and non-drinkers: a case-control study in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fa; Yan, Lingjun; Lin, Lisong; Liu, Fengqiong; Qiu, Yu; Liu, Fangping; Huang, Jiangfeng; Wu, Junfeng; Cai, Lin; Cai, Guoxi; Aoyagi, Kiyoshi; He, Baochang

    2017-02-04

    This study aims to evaluate the independent and joint effects of tea and milk consumption on oral cancer risk among non-smokers and non-drinkers (NS/ND). A hospital-based case-control study was performed in Fujian, China. 421 cases and frequency-matched 1398 controls were included without tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking habits. Unconditional logistic regression model was used to assess the relationship of tea and milk consumption with oral cancer risk. Tea and milk consumption were significantly associated with decreased risk of oral cancer, the adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were 0.73 (95% CI: 0.54-0.97) and 0.69 (95% CI: 0.55-0.88), respectively. According to subgroup analysis, the inverse associations between tea consumption and oral cancer risk were only observed among the elders (>60 years) and urban residents. While the protect effect of milk drinking was more obvious in males, normal body mass index population (18.5-23.9), urban residents and those age ≤ 60 years. Additionally, a significantly multiplicative interaction between tea and milk consumption was observed for oral cancer risk (P = 0.001). The present study is the first to simultaneously assess the association of tea consumption and milk drinking with oral cancer risk. The results suggest that tea and milk consumption are independent protective factors for oral cancer among NS/ND, with a joint effect between them.

  13. Independent and joint exposure to passive smoking and cooking oil fumes on oral cancer in Chinese women: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    He, Baochang; Chen, Fa; Yan, Lingjun; Huang, Jiangfeng; Liu, Fangping; Qiu, Yu; Lin, Lisong; Zhang, Zuofeng; Cai, Lin

    2016-10-01

    Passive smoking and COF exposure are independent risk factors for oral cancer in Chinese women, with the multiplicative interactions from combined exposures. Avoiding exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and COF may contribute to the prevention of oral cancer in Chinese women. To evaluate the independent and joint effects of passive smoking and cooking oil fumes (COF) on oral cancer in Chinese women. A case-control study was performed including 238 female patients with pathologically confirmed oral cancer and 470 controls as age-matched controls. Face-to-face interviews were conducted based on a structured questionnaire. The effects of passive smoking and COF exposure were analyzed using non-conditional logistic regression models. Passive smoking significantly increased the risk of oral cancer in Chinese women: adjusted ORs were 2.12 (95% CI = 1.11-4.07) for those only exposed before age 18, 1.52 (95% CI = 1.01-2.31) for those only exposed after age 18, and 2.38 (95% CI = 1.47-3.85) for those both exposed before and after age 18. In addition, COF exposure was significantly associated with a risk of oral cancer (adjusted ORs were 1.69 (95% CI = 1.03-2.78) for light exposure and 2.06 (95% CI = 1.21-3.50) for heavy exposure). Furthermore, there was a significantly multiplicative interaction between passive smoking and COF for oral cancer.

  14. Location in the right hemi-colon is an independent risk factor for delayed post-polypectomy hemorrhage: a multi-center case-control study.

    PubMed

    Buddingh, K Tim; Herngreen, Thomas; Haringsma, Jelle; van der Zwet, Wil C; Vleggaar, Frank P; Breumelhof, Ronald; Ter Borg, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Delayed hemorrhage is an infrequent, but serious complication of colonoscopic polypectomy. Large size is the only polyp-related factor that has been unequivocally proven to increase the risk of delayed bleeding. It has been suggested that location in the right hemi-colon is also a risk factor. The objective of this study was to determine whether polyp location is an independent risk factor for delayed post-polypectomy hemorrhage. A retrospective case-control study was conducted in two university hospitals and two community hospitals. Thirty-nine cases and 117 controls were identified. In multivariate analysis, size and location were found to be independent polyp-related risk factors for delayed type hemorrhage. The risk increased by 13% for every 1 mm increase in polyp diameter (odds ratio (OR) 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05-1.20, P<0.001). Polyps located in the right hemi-colon had an OR of 4.67 (1.88-11.61, P=0.001) for delayed hemorrhage. Polyps in the cecum seemed to be especially at high risk in univariate analysis (OR 13.82, 95% CI 2.66-71.73), but this could not be assessed in multivariate analysis as the number of cases was too small. Polyp type (sessile or pedunculated) was not a risk factor. Polyp location in the right hemi-colon seems to be an independent and substantial risk factor for delayed post-polypectomy hemorrhage. A low threshold for preventive hemostatic measures is advised when removing polyps from this region.

  15. Case-control studies: basic concepts.

    PubMed

    Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Pearce, Neil

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to present in elementary mathematical and statistical terms a simple way to quickly and effectively teach and understand case-control studies, as they are commonly done in dynamic populations-without using the rare disease assumption. Our focus is on case-control studies of disease incidence ('incident case-control studies'); we will not consider the situation of case-control studies of prevalent disease, which are published much less frequently.

  16. A case-control study of MC1R variants in Greek patients with basal cell carcinoma: increased risk independently of pigmentary characteristics.

    PubMed

    Dessinioti, Clio; Sypsa, Vana; Kypreou, Katerina; Dimisianos, Gerasimos; Kodela, Elisavet; Nikolaou, Vasiliki; Antoniou, Christina; Stratigos, Alexander J

    2015-06-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) gene variants are a major contributor to pigmentation characteristics and the modulation of sporadic basal cell carcinoma (BCC) risk. This is a hospital-based, case-control study to investigate the association of MC1R variants and pigmentary characteristics with the risk of BCC development in a Southern European population in Greece. In total, 141 patients with BCC and 166 controls were studied. Increased BCC risk was found for the presence of 2 or more MC1R variants (OR:3.07, 95% CI:1.13-8.34), or 2 or more variants of which at least 1 was major function (OR:7.15, 95% CI:1.37-5.52), after adjustment for the 'red hair colour' (RHC) phenotype. Increased BCC risk persisted in the presence of 2 or more MC1R variants (OR:4.15, 95% CI:1.35-12.72), after adjustment for potential confounding factors including skin color (P:0.237) and atypical nevi (OR:9.57, 95% CI:2.19-41.81, P:0.003). MC1R genotype is a risk factor for the development of BCC in Greek patients independently of pigmentary characteristics, and the combination of MC1R variants may modulate this risk.

  17. An intron polymorphism of the fibronectin gene is associated with end-stage knee osteoarthritis in a Han Chinese population: two independent case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hsin-Yi; Su, Sui-Lung; Peng, Yi-Jen; Wang, Chih-Chien; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Salter, Donald M; Lee, Chian-Her

    2014-05-23

    Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex disease involving both biomechanical and metabolic factors that alter the tissue homeostasis of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The catabolic activities of extracellular matrix degradation products, especially fibronectin (FN), have been implicated in mediating cartilage degradation. Chondrocytes express several members of the integrin family which can serve as receptors for FN including integrins α5β1, αvβ3, and αvβ5. The purpose of this study was to determine whether polymorphisms in the FN (FN-1) and integrin genes are markers of susceptibility to, or severity of, knee OA in a Han Chinese population. Two independent case-control studies were conducted on 928 patients with knee OA and 693 healthy controls. Ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of FN-1 and the integrin αV gene (ITGAV) were detected using the ABI 7500 real-time PCR system. The AT heterozygote in FN-1 (rs940739A/T) was found to be significantly associated with knee OA (adjusted OR = 1.44; 95% CI = 1.16-1.80) in both stages of the study. FN-1 rs6725958C/A and ITGAV rs10174098A/G SNPs were only associated with knee OA when both study groups were combined. Stratifying the participants by Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) score identified significant differences in the FN-1 rs6725958C/A and rs940739 A/T genotypes between patients with grade 4 OA and controls. Haplotype analyses revealed that TGA and TAA were associated with a higher risk of OA, and that TAG conferred a lower risk of knee OA in the combined population. Our study suggests that the FN-1 rs940739A/T polymorphism may be an important risk factor of genetic susceptibility to knee OA in the Han Chinese population.

  18. Tourette Syndrome as an Independent Risk Factor for Subsequent Sleep Disorders in Children: A Nationwide Population-Based Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wang-Tso; Huang, Hui-Ling; Wong, Lee Chin; Weng, Wen-Chin; Vasylenko, Tamara; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Lin, Wei-Sheng; Ho, Shinn-Ying

    2017-03-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is associated with a variety of neuropsychiatric comorbidities. However, the relationship between TS and sleep disorders in children is less investigated. This nationwide population-based case-control study aimed to determine the correlation of TS and sleep disorders in children. Patients aged less than 18 years with newly diagnosed TS from 2001 to 2007 were collected (n = 1124) using data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database and were compared with a comparison cohort (n = 3372). The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for developing sleep disorders was calculated by multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. TS was more prevalent in boys, with a male to female ratio of 3.16:1. TS group also had significantly higher urbanization level of residence than controls (p < .001). The overall incidence rate of sleep disorders was 7.24‰ in children with TS, compared to 3.53‰ in controls. The TS group was associated with a significantly higher rate of sleep disorders, with a crude HR of 2.05 (95% confidence inerval [CI] = 1.43-2.95, p < .001). Among the comorbidities of TS, anxiety disorder was associated with the highest risk for sleep disorders (crude HR = 3.26, 95% CI = 1.52-7.00, p < .001). The aHR for TS cohort to develop sleep disorders was 1.72 (95% CI = 1.16-2.53, p = .007). The increased risk of sleep disorders in children with TS cannot be fully attributed to its comorbidities, and TS is an independent risk factor for sleep disorders in children.

  19. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  20. Case-Control Study of Writer's Cramp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roze, E.; Soumare, A.; Pironneau, I.; Sangla, S.; de Cock, V. Cochen; Teixeira, A.; Astorquiza, A.; Bonnet, C.; Bleton, J. P.; Vidailhet, M.; Elbaz, A.

    2009-01-01

    Task-specific focal dystonias are thought to be due to a combination of individual vulnerability and environmental factors. There are no case-control studies of risk factors for writer's cramp. We undertook a case-control study of 104 consecutive patients and matched controls to identify risk factors for the condition. We collected detailed data…

  1. Are nested case-control studies biased?

    PubMed Central

    Langholz, Bryan; Richardson, David

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently asserted that the nested case-control study design, in which case-control sets are sampled from cohort risk sets, can introduce bias (“study design bias”) when there are lagged exposures. The bases for this claim include a theoretic and an “empirical evaluation” argument. Both of these arguments are examined and found to be incorrect. Appropriate methods to explore the performance of nested case-control study designs, analysis methods, and compute power and sample size from an existing cohort are described. This empirical evaluation approach relies on simulating case-control outcomes from risk sets in the cohort from which the case-control study is to be performed. Because it is based on the underlying cohort structure, the empirical evaluation can provide an assessment that is tailored to the specific characteristics of the study under consideration. The methods are illustrated using samples from the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. PMID:19289963

  2. Nutrition is a powerful independent risk factor for coronary heart disease in women--The CORA study: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zyriax, B-C; Boeing, H; Windler, E

    2005-10-01

    It is still common practice to rely mostly on drug treatment for preventing cardiovascular disease, although a healthy nutrition has been defined that may prevent most premature cardiovascular events. This research raises the question of the magnitude of the effect of nutrition on cardiovascular disease independent of that of clinical risk factors, which are the targets of drug therapy. The study of coronary risk factors for atherosclerosis in women compares clinical, biochemical, and lifestyle factors in 200 consecutive pre- and postmenopausal women with incident coronary heart disease (CHD) to those in 255 age-matched population-based controls. Cases reported a higher intake of energy, predominantly through animal fat and protein reflected by a higher consumption of meat and sausage, while controls ate more fruit and vegetables. Multivariate analysis adjusted for clinical risk factors depicted a high intake of meat and sausage and a low consumption of fruit and vegetables as independent risk factors with an odds ratio of 2.5 (95% confidence interval 1.1-5.7) and 0.7 (95% confidence interval 0.5-1.0) for each 100 g per day, respectively. These dietary factors were found to be significantly more pronounced in cases with any clinical risk factor identified in this population as compared to controls with the same risk factors. The CORA-study clearly indicates a major impact of dietary habits on CHD in women independent of, and additive to, that of conventional risk factors. Thus, in clinical practice, the potential of nutrition as part of a healthy lifestyle is commonly greatly underestimated in favour of drug treatment.

  3. Case-control studies in neurosurgery.

    PubMed

    Nesvick, Cody L; Thompson, Clinton J; Boop, Frederick A; Klimo, Paul

    2014-08-01

    Observational studies, such as cohort and case-control studies, are valuable instruments in evidence-based medicine. Case-control studies, in particular, are becoming increasingly popular in the neurosurgical literature due to their low cost and relative ease of execution; however, no one has yet systematically assessed these types of studies for quality in methodology and reporting. The authors performed a literature search using PubMed/MEDLINE to identify all studies that explicitly identified themselves as "case-control" and were published in the JNS Publishing Group journals (Journal of Neurosurgery, Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, and Neurosurgical Focus) or Neurosurgery. Each paper was evaluated for 22 descriptive variables and then categorized as having either met or missed the basic definition of a case-control study. All studies that evaluated risk factors for a well-defined outcome were considered true case-control studies. The authors sought to identify key features or phrases that were or were not predictive of a true case-control study. Those papers that satisfied the definition were further evaluated using the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist. The search detected 67 papers that met the inclusion criteria, of which 32 (48%) represented true case-control studies. The frequency of true case-control studies has not changed with time. Use of odds ratios (ORs) and logistic regression (LR) analysis were strong positive predictors of true case-control studies (for odds ratios, OR 15.33 and 95% CI 4.52-51.97; for logistic regression analysis, OR 8.77 and 95% CI 2.69-28.56). Conversely, negative predictors included focus on a procedure/intervention (OR 0.35, 95% CI 0.13-0.998) and use of the word "outcome" in the Results section (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.082-0.65). After exclusion of nested case-control studies, the negative correlation between focus on a procedure

  4. Case-control studies in diabetes. Do they really use a case-control design?

    PubMed

    Ramos, Analía; Mendoza, Lilian Cristina; Rabasa, Fernanda; Bolíbar, Ignasi; Puig, Teresa; Corcoy, Rosa

    2017-07-01

    Studies defined as case-control do not always use this design. We aimed to estimate the frequency of mislabelled case-control studies in published articles in the area of diabetes and to identify the predictors of incorrect labelling. We searched Medline and Web of Science for articles with "diabetes" and "case control" in title and filtered for language (English/Romance) and period (January 2010-December 2014). Inclusion criteria were: (1) statement to use a case-control design in title, (2) to be a final full-length publication and (3) to have original data in the area of diabetes. Three independent reviewers went through titles, looked for full texts and reviewed them. Discrepancies were settled with a fourth reviewer. Expert epidemiologist advice was requested in case of doubt. case-control mislabelling; addressed predictors: publication year, journal impact factor and journal subject. proportion of mislabelled CC articles and assessment of predictors by multivariate logistic regression analysis. We retrieved 362 articles, 251 of them fulfilling inclusion criteria. The proportion of mislabelled CC studies was 43.8% (confidence interval 95% 37.7-50.0%). Most mislabelled studies had a cross-sectional design (82.7%). Predictors of mislabelling were publication year, journal impact factor and journal area. A relevant subset of studies defined as case-control in the area of diabetes correspond to mislabelled cross-sectional studies. Incorrect labelling misleads readers regarding the interpretation of results and the cause-effect hypothesis. Researchers, reviewers and editors should be aware of and commit to settle this issue.

  5. High Altitude Is an Independent Risk Factor for Postoperative Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolism After Knee Arthroscopy: A Matched Case-Control Study of Medicare Patients.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Diduch, David R; Werner, Brian C

    2017-02-01

    To use a national database of Medicare patients to evaluate the association of uncomplicated knee arthroscopy performed at high altitude with the incidence of postoperative venous thromboembolism (VTE). The 100% Medicare Standard Analytical File database was queried for all patients undergoing isolated arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and/or chondroplasty from 2005-2012. Patients with more complex open or additional arthroscopic knee procedures, a personal history of VTE, or any hypercoagulable state were excluded. The result of this query was then stratified by the altitude of the hospital ZIP code in which the procedure was performed. The appropriate patients were placed into a high-altitude group (≥4,000 ft) and matched to patients who underwent the same procedures at an altitude less than or equal to 100 ft on the basis of age, sex, and medical comorbidities. The rate of VTE was then assessed for both the high-altitude and matched low-altitude patients within 30 days and 90 days postoperatively. The rate of combined VTE (deep venous thrombosis [DVT] and/or pulmonary embolism [PE]) (odds ratio [OR], 2.0; P = .0003), the rate of PE (OR, 2.5; P = .0099), and the rate of DVT (OR, 1.7; P = .0066) within 30 days were all significantly higher in patients with procedures performed at high altitude compared with matched patients with the same procedures performed at low altitude. At 90 days postoperatively, similarly elevated risks of VTE, PE, and DVT were found in patients with procedures performed at high altitude. In this study of knee arthroscopy in Medicare patients, a procedure performed at an altitude ≥4,000 ft was a significant risk factor for the development of postoperative VTE compared with matched patients undergoing the same procedure at an altitude less than or equal to 100 ft. Level III, retrospective case-control study. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Previous gestational diabetes is independently associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness, similarly to metabolic syndrome – a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Women with previous gestational diabetes mellitus (pGDM) face a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes and, consequently, a higher cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to compare the carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) from young women with pGDM to those with metabolic syndrome (MS) and to healthy controls (CG) to verify whether a past history of pGDM could be independently associated with increased cIMT. Methods This is a cross-sectional study performed in two academic referral centers. Seventy-nine women with pGDM, 30 women with MS, and 60 CG aged between 18 and 47 years were enrolled. They all underwent physical examination and had blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc), and triglycerides determined. The cIMT was measured by ultrasound in several carotid segments. The primary endpoint was cIMT and clinically relevant parameters included as predictors were: age, systolic blood pressure, waist, BMI, total cholesterol, LDLc, triglycerides, fasting glucose, previous history of GDM as a whole group, previous history of GDM without MS, presence of DM, presence of MS, and parity. Results cIMT was significantly higher in pGDM when compared to CG in all sites of measurements (P < 0.05) except for the right common carotid. The pGDM women showed similar cIMT measurements to MS in all sites of measurements, except for the left carotid bifurcation, where it was significantly higher than MS (P < 0.001). In a multivariate analysis which included classical cardiovascular risk factors and was adjusted for confounders, pGDM was shown to be independently associated with increased composite cIMT (P < 0.01). The pGDM without risk factors further showed similar cIMT to MS (P > 0.05) and an increased cIMT when compared to controls (P < 0.05). Conclusions Previous GDM was independently associated with increased composite cIMT in this young population, similarly to those with

  7. BMI-Associated Alleles Do Not Constitute Risk Alleles for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Independently of BMI: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Louwers, Yvonne V.; Rayner, Nigel W.; Herrera, Blanca M.; Stolk, Lisette; Groves, Christopher J.; Barber, Thomas M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Franks, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) has a strong genetic background and the majority of patients with PCOS have elevated BMI levels. The aim of this study was to determine to which extent BMI-increasing alleles contribute to risk of PCOS when contemporaneous BMI is taken into consideration. Methods Patients with PCOS and controls were recruited from the United Kingdom (563 cases and 791 controls) and The Netherlands (510 cases and 2720 controls). Cases and controls were of similar BMI. SNPs mapping to 12 BMI-associated loci which have been extensively replicated across different ethnicities, i.e., BDNF, FAIM2, ETV5, FTO, GNPDA2, KCTD15, MC4R, MTCH2, NEGR1, SEC16B, SH2B1, and TMEM18, were studied in association with PCOS within each cohort using the additive genetic model followed by a combined analysis. A genetic allelic count risk score model was used to determine the risk of PCOS for individuals carrying increasing numbers of BMI-increasing alleles. Results None of the genetic variants, including FTO and MC4R, was associated with PCOS independently of BMI in the meta-analysis. Moreover, no differences were observed between cases and controls in the number of BMI-risk alleles present and no overall trend across the risk score groups was observed. Conclusion In this combined analysis of over 4,000 BMI-matched individuals from the United Kingdom and the Netherlands, we observed no association of BMI risk alleles with PCOS independent of BMI. PMID:24498077

  8. Whole exome sequencing in 75 high-risk families with validation and replication in independent case-control studies identifies TANGO2, OR5H14, and CHAD as new prostate cancer susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Karyadi, Danielle M; Geybels, Milan S; Karlins, Eric; Decker, Brennan; McIntosh, Laura; Hutchinson, Amy; Kolb, Suzanne; McDonnell, Shannon K; Hicks, Belynda; Middha, Sumit; FitzGerald, Liesel M; DeRycke, Melissa S; Yeager, Meredith; Schaid, Daniel J; Chanock, Stephen J; Thibodeau, Stephen N; Berndt, Sonja I; Stanford, Janet L; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2017-01-03

    Prostate cancer (PCa) susceptibility is defined by a continuum from rare, high-penetrance to common, low-penetrance alleles. Research to date has concentrated on identification of variants at the ends of that continuum. Taking an alternate approach, we focused on the important but elusive class of low-frequency, moderately penetrant variants by performing disease model-based variant filtering of whole exome sequence data from 75 hereditary PCa families. Analysis of 341 candidate risk variants identified nine variants significantly associated with increased PCa risk in a population-based, case-control study of 2,495 men. In an independent nested case-control study of 7,121 men, there was risk association evidence for TANGO2 p.Ser17Ter and the established HOXB13 p.Gly84Glu variant. Meta-analysis combining the case-control studies identified two additional variants suggestively associated with risk, OR5H14 p.Met59Val and CHAD p.Ala342Asp. The TANGO2 and HOXB13 variants co-occurred in cases more often than expected by chance and never in controls. Finally, TANGO2 p.Ser17Ter was associated with aggressive disease in both case-control studies separately. Our analyses identified three new PCa susceptibility alleles in the TANGO2, OR5H14 and CHAD genes that not only segregate in multiple high-risk families but are also of importance in altering disease risk for men from the general population. This is the first successful study to utilize sequencing in high-risk families for the express purpose of identifying low-frequency, moderately penetrant PCa risk mutations.

  9. Whole exome sequencing in 75 high-risk families with validation and replication in independent case-control studies identifies TANGO2, OR5H14, and CHAD as new prostate cancer susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Karyadi, Danielle M.; Geybels, Milan S.; Karlins, Eric; Decker, Brennan; McIntosh, Laura; Hutchinson, Amy; Kolb, Suzanne; McDonnell, Shannon K.; Hicks, Belynda; Middha, Sumit; FitzGerald, Liesel M.; DeRycke, Melissa S.; Yeager, Meredith; Schaid, Daniel J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Stanford, Janet L.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) susceptibility is defined by a continuum from rare, high-penetrance to common, low-penetrance alleles. Research to date has concentrated on identification of variants at the ends of that continuum. Taking an alternate approach, we focused on the important but elusive class of low-frequency, moderately penetrant variants by performing disease model-based variant filtering of whole exome sequence data from 75 hereditary PCa families. Analysis of 341 candidate risk variants identified nine variants significantly associated with increased PCa risk in a population-based, case-control study of 2,495 men. In an independent nested case-control study of 7,121 men, there was risk association evidence for TANGO2 p.Ser17Ter and the established HOXB13 p.Gly84Glu variant. Meta-analysis combining the case-control studies identified two additional variants suggestively associated with risk, OR5H14 p.Met59Val and CHAD p.Ala342Asp. The TANGO2 and HOXB13 variants co-occurred in cases more often than expected by chance and never in controls. Finally, TANGO2 p.Ser17Ter was associated with aggressive disease in both case-control studies separately. Our analyses identified three new PCa susceptibility alleles in the TANGO2, OR5H14 and CHAD genes that not only segregate in multiple high-risk families but are also of importance in altering disease risk for men from the general population. This is the first successful study to utilize sequencing in high-risk families for the express purpose of identifying low-frequency, moderately penetrant PCa risk mutations. PMID:27902461

  10. Opium addiction as an independent risk factor for coronary microvascular dysfunction: A case-control study of 250 consecutive patients with slow-flow angina.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili Nadimi, Ali; Pour Amiri, Farah; Sheikh Fathollahi, Mahmood; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossien; Ahmadi, Zahra; Sayadi, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-15

    Approximately 20% to 30% of patients who undergo coronary angiography for assessment of typical cardiac chest pain display microvascular coronary dysfunction (MCD). This study aimed to determine potential relationships between baseline clinical characteristics and likelihood of MCD diagnosis in a large group of patients with stable angina symptoms, positive exercise test and angiographic ally normal epicardial coronary arteries. This cross-sectional study included 250 Iranian with documented evidence of cardiac ischemia on exercise testing, class I or II indication for coronary angiography, and either: (1) angiographically normal coronary arteries and diagnosis of MCD with slow-flow phenomenon, or (2) normal angiogram and no evidence of MCD. All patients completed a questionnaire designed to capture key data including clinical demographics, past medical history, and social factors. Data was evaluated using single and multivariable logistic regression models to identify potential individual patient factors that might help to predict a diagnosis of MCD. 125 (11.2% of total) patients were subsequently diagnosed with MCD. 125 consecutive control subjects were selected for comparison. The mean age was similar among the two groups (52.38 vs. 53.26%, p=ns), but there was a higher proportion of men in the study group compared to control (42.4 vs. 27.2%, p=0.012). No significant relationships were observed between traditional cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia) or body mass index (BMI), and likelihood of MCD diagnosis. However, opium addiction was found to be an independent predictor of MCD on single and multivariable logistic regression model (OR=3.575, 95%CI: 1.418-9.016; p=0.0069). We observed a significant relationship between opium addiction and microvascular angina. This novel finding provides a potential mechanistic insight into the pathogenesis of MCD with slow-flow phenomenon. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  11. Genetically Abnormal Circulating Cells in Lung Cancer Patients: An Antigen Independent Fluorescence in-situ Hybridization Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ruth L.; He, Weigong; Khanna, Abha; Fernandez, Ricardo L.; Zaidi, Tanweer M.; Krebs, Matthew; Caraway, Nancy P.; Zhang, Hua-Zhong; Jiang, Feng; Spitz, Margaret R.; Blowers, David P.; Jimenez, Carlos A.; Mehran, Reza J.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Roth, Jack; Morris, Jeffrey S.; Etzel, Carol; El-Zein, Randa

    2010-01-01

    Purpose We performed a study to determine if a fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH)-based assay using isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with DNA probes targeting specific sites on chromosomes known to have abnormalities in Non Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) cases could detect circulating genetically abnormal cells (CACs). Experimental Design We evaluated 59 NSCLC cases with stage I through IV disease and 24 controls. PBMCs and matched tumors were hybridized with 2 two-color (3p22.1/CEP3 and 10q22.3 [SP-A]/CEP10) and 2 four-color (CEP3, CEP7, CEP17, and 9p21.3 [URO]) and (EGFR, c-MYC, 6p11-q11, and 5p15.2 [LAV]) FISH probes. Percentages of cytogenetically abnormal cells (CACs) in peripheral blood and in matched tumor specimens were quantified using an automated fluorescent scanner. Numbers of CACs were calculated based on the percentage of CACs (defined as PBMCs with genetic abnormalities) per mL of blood and expressed per microliter of blood. Results Patients with NSCLC had significantly higher numbers of CACs than did controls. Mean number of CACs ranged from 7.23±1.32/μl for deletions of 10q22.3/CEP10 to 45.52±7.49/μl for deletions of 3p22.1/CEP3. Numbers of CACs with deletions of 3p22.1, 10q22.3, and 9p21.3, and gains of URO, increased significantly from early to advanced stage of disease. Conclusions We have developed a sensitive and quantitative antigen-independent FISH-based test for detecting CACs in peripheral blood of patients with NSCLC which showed a significant correlation with the presence of cancer. If this pilot study can be validated in a larger study, CACs may have a role in the management of patients with NSCLC. PMID:20651054

  12. Improving statistical analysis of matched case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Conway, Aaron; Rolley, John X; Fulbrook, Paul; Page, Karen; Thompson, David R

    2013-06-01

    Matched case-control research designs can be useful because matching can increase power due to reduced variability between subjects. However, inappropriate statistical analysis of matched data could result in a change in the strength of association between the dependent and independent variables or a change in the significance of the findings. We sought to ascertain whether matched case-control studies published in the nursing literature utilized appropriate statistical analyses. Of 41 articles identified that met the inclusion criteria, 31 (76%) used an inappropriate statistical test for comparing data derived from case subjects and their matched controls. In response to this finding, we developed an algorithm to support decision-making regarding statistical tests for matched case-control studies.

  13. Effects of hyperlipidaemia on plasma apolipoprotein M levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: an independent case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Puhong; Gao, Jialin; Pu, Chun; Feng, Gang; Wang, Lizhuo; Huang, Lizhu; Tao, Qingsong; Zhang, Yao

    2016-09-15

    Apolipoprotein M (apoM) is mainly enriched in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and is slightly present in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and very low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. apoM is involved in HDL formation and HDL-mediated reverse cholesterol transport. apoM is also associated with hyperlipidaemia and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Significantly high plasma apoM levels are detected in hyperlipidaemia mice with a defective LDL receptor. By contrast, low plasma apoM levels are observed in patients with T2DM, which is often accompanied with hyperlipidaemia. However, the underlying mechanism of this condition is poorly understood. This research aims to examine the changes in apoM levels in patients with hyperlipidaemia and to determine the effects of hyperlipidaemia on plasma apoM levels in patients with T2DM. This study included patients with hyperlipidaemia (n = 79), patients with T2DM but without hyperlipidaemia (n = 125), patients with T2DM and hyperlipidaemia (n = 98), and healthy controls (n = 105). Their plasma apoM concentrations were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The average plasma apoM concentrations were 18 % higher in the hyperlipidaemia group (26.63 ± 10.35 ng/μL) than in the healthy controls (22.61 ± 10.81 ng/μL, P <0.01). The plasma apoM concentrations were lower in the T2DM without hyperlipidaemia group (18.54 ± 10.33 ng/μL, P <0.01) and the T2DM with hyperlipidaemia group (19.83 ± 7.41 ng/μL, P <0.05) than in the healthy controls. Similar to apoA-I (1.29 ± 0.33 g/L vs. 1.28 ± 0.31 g/L, P >0.05), the plasma apoM concentrations in the T2DM with hyperlipidaemia group did not significantly differ from those in the T2DM without hyperlipidaemia group (P >0.05). Multivariate linear regression analysis showed that hyperlipidaemia (β = 5.18, P = 0.007) is an independent promoting factor of plasma apoM levels and diabetes (β = -3.09, P

  14. High altitude is an independent risk factor for venous thromboembolism following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair: a matched case-control study in Medicare patients.

    PubMed

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Burrus, M Tyrrell; Diduch, David R; Werner, Brian C

    2017-01-01

    Although the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) following elective shoulder arthroscopy is low, the large volume of procedures performed each year yields a significant annual burden of patients with thromboembolic complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association of high procedural altitude with the incidence of postoperative VTE following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. A Medicare database was queried for all patients undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair from 2005 to 2012. All patients with procedures performed at an altitude of 4000 feet or higher were grouped into the "high-altitude" study cohort. Patients with procedures performed at an altitude of 100 feet or lower were then matched to patients in the high-altitude cohort on the basis of age, gender, and medical comorbidities. The rate of VTE was then assessed for both the high-altitude and matched low-altitude cohorts within 90 days postoperatively. The rates of combined VTE (odds ratio [OR], 2.6; P < .0001), pulmonary embolism (OR, 4.3; P < .0001), and lower extremity deep venous thrombosis within 90 days (OR, 2.2; P = .029) were all significantly higher in patients with procedures performed at high altitude compared with matched patients with the same procedures performed at low altitude. Procedural altitude >4000 feet is associated with significantly increased rates of postoperative VTE, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism, compared with age-, gender-, and comorbidity-matched patients undergoing the same procedures at altitudes <100 feet. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cortical Grey Matter and Subcortical White Matter Brain Microstructural Changes in Schizophrenia Are Localised and Age Independent: A Case-Control Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Fabrizio; Piras, Federica; Fagioli, Sabrina; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    It is still unknown whether the structural brain impairments that characterize schizophrenia (SZ) worsen during the lifetime. Here, we aimed to describe age-related microstructural brain changes in cortical grey matter and subcortical white matter of patients affected by SZ. In this diffusion tensor imaging study, we included 69 patients diagnosed with SZ and 69 healthy control (HC) subjects, age and gender matched. We carried out analyses of covariance, with diagnosis as fixed factor and brain diffusion-related parameters as dependent variables, and controlled for the effect of education. White matter fractional anisotropy decreased in the entire age range spanned (18–65 years) in both SZ and HC and was significantly lower in younger patients with SZ, with no interaction (age by diagnosis) effect in fiber tracts including corpus callosum, corona radiata, thalamic radiations and external capsule. Also, grey matter mean diffusivity increased in the entire age range in both SZ and HC and was significantly higher in younger patients, with no age by diagnosis interaction in the left frontal operculum cortex, left insula and left planum polare and in the right temporal pole and right intracalcarine cortex. In individuals with SZ we found that localized brain cortical and white matter subcortical microstructural impairments appear early in life but do not worsen in the 18–65 year age range. PMID:24124469

  16. Cortical grey matter and subcortical white matter brain microstructural changes in schizophrenia are localised and age independent: a case-control diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Piras, Fabrizio; Piras, Federica; Fagioli, Sabrina; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    It is still unknown whether the structural brain impairments that characterize schizophrenia (SZ) worsen during the lifetime. Here, we aimed to describe age-related microstructural brain changes in cortical grey matter and subcortical white matter of patients affected by SZ. In this diffusion tensor imaging study, we included 69 patients diagnosed with SZ and 69 healthy control (HC) subjects, age and gender matched. We carried out analyses of covariance, with diagnosis as fixed factor and brain diffusion-related parameters as dependent variables, and controlled for the effect of education. White matter fractional anisotropy decreased in the entire age range spanned (18-65 years) in both SZ and HC and was significantly lower in younger patients with SZ, with no interaction (age by diagnosis) effect in fiber tracts including corpus callosum, corona radiata, thalamic radiations and external capsule. Also, grey matter mean diffusivity increased in the entire age range in both SZ and HC and was significantly higher in younger patients, with no age by diagnosis interaction in the left frontal operculum cortex, left insula and left planum polare and in the right temporal pole and right intracalcarine cortex. In individuals with SZ we found that localized brain cortical and white matter subcortical microstructural impairments appear early in life but do not worsen in the 18-65 year age range.

  17. Early pyloric stenosis: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Demian, Marie; Nguyen, Son; Emil, Sherif

    2009-12-01

    Pyloric stenosis (PS) is rare in the first 2 weeks of life, often leading to delays in diagnosis and treatment. We conducted a case control study to delineate the characteristics of patients with early PS (EPS). In addition, we tested the hypothesis that patients with EPS present with a smaller pylorus than older patients. A database of all patients presenting with PS to a children's hospital over a 5-year period (2002-2006) was obtained. Each patient admitted during the first 2 weeks of life (subject) was matched to a patient admitted after 4 weeks of age (control), with the same gender, electrolyte status, and treating surgeon. A single pediatric radiologist, blinded to patient age, reviewed all available ultrasounds retrospectively. Demographic, clinical, diagnostic, therapeutic, and outcome data were compared. During the study period, 278 pyloromyotomies were performed for PS. Sixteen patients (5.8%) presented with EPS between 2 and 14 days of life. EPS patients had a higher prevalence of positive family history (31 vs. 0%, P = 0.043), and breast milk feeding (75 vs. 31%, P = 0.045). Sonographic measurements showed a pylorus that was of significantly less length (17.1 +/- 0.6 vs. 20.5 +/- 0.9 mm, P = 0.006) and muscle thickness (3.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 4.9 +/- 0.2 mm, P < 0.001) in patients with EPS. Hospital stay was significantly longer for EPS patients (4.3 +/- 0.9 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.1 days, P = 0.19). Babies presenting with EPS are more likely to be breast fed and to have a positive family history. EPS is associated with a longer hospital stay. Use of sonographic diagnostic measurements specific to this age group may prevent delays in diagnosis and treatment, and improve outcomes.

  18. C4BPB/C4BPA is a new susceptibility locus for venous thrombosis with unknown protein S–independent mechanism: results from genome-wide association and gene expression analyses followed by case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Buil, Alfonso; Souto, Juan Carlos; Saut, Noémie; Germain, Marine; Rotival, Maxime; Tiret, Laurence; Cambien, Françcois; Lathrop, Mark; Zeller, Tanja; Alessi, Marie-Christine; Rodriguez de Cordoba, Santiago; Münzel, Thomas; Wild, Philipp; Fontcuberta, Jordi; Gagnon, France; Emmerich, Joseph; Almasy, Laura; Blankenberg, Stefan; Soria, José-Manuel; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    Through its binding with protein S (PS), a key element of the coagulation/fibrinolysis cascade, the C4b-binding protein (C4BP) has been hypothesized to be involved in the susceptibility to venous thrombosis (VT). To identify genetic factors that may influence the plasma levels of the 3 C4BP existing isoforms, α7β1, α6β1, and α7β0, we conducted a genome-wide association study by analyzing 283 437 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Genetic Analysis of Idiopathic Thrombophilia (GAIT) study composed of 352 persons. Three SNPs at the C4BPB/C4BPA locus were found genome-wide significantly associated with α7β0 levels. One of these SNPs was further found to explain approximately 11% of the variability of mRNA C4BPA expression in the Gutenberg Heart Study composed of 1490 persons, with no effect on C4BPB mRNA expression. The allele associated with increased α7β0 plasma levels and increased C4BPA expression was further found associated with increased risk of VT (odds ratio [OR] = 1.24 [1.03-1.53]) in 2 independent case-control studies (MARseille THrombosis Association study [MARTHA] and FActeurs de RIsque et de récidives de la maladie thromboembolique VEineuse [FARIVE]) gathering 1706 cases and 1379 controls. This SNP was not associated with free PS or total PS. In conclusion, we observed strong evidence that the C4BPB/C4BPA locus is a new susceptibility locus for VT through a PS-independent mechanism that remains to be elucidated. PMID:20212171

  19. Risk factors for ovarian cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Booth, M.; Beral, V.; Smith, P.

    1989-01-01

    A hospital-based case-control study of ovarian cancer was conducted in London and Oxford between October 1978 and February 1983. Menstrual characteristics, reproductive and contraceptive history and history of exposure to various environmental factors were compared between 235 women with histologically diagnosed epithelial ovarian cancer and 451 controls. High gravidity, hysterectomy, female sterilisation and oral contraceptive use were associated with a reduced risk of ovarian cancer. Infertility and late age at menopause were associated with an increase in risk. While these factors were related, they were each found to be independently associated with ovarian cancer risk after adjusting for the effect of the other factors. PMID:2679848

  20. Risk factors associated with lipomyelomeningocele: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Esmaeili, Arash; Hanaei, Sara; Fadakar, Kaveh; Dadkhah, Sahar; Arjipour, Mahdi; Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2013-01-01

    In general, it seems that both genetic and environmental factors play important roles in the induction of neural tube defects. Lipomyelomeningocele (LipoMMC) is a rather common type of closed neural tube defect, but only limited studies have investigated the potential risk factors of this anomaly. Therefore, the purpose of this case-control study was to investigate the risk factors involved in LipoMMC formation. Various risk factors were evaluated in 35 children between 1 month and 10 years of age with LipoMMC in a hospital-based case-control study. The 2 control arms consisted of 35 children with myelomeningocele (MMC group) and 35 children with congenital anomalies other than central nervous system problems (control group). All groups were matched for age and visited the same hospital. A structured questionnaire was used for the collection of all data, including the mothers' weight and height during pregnancy, education, reproductive history, previous abortions, and socioeconomic status, as well as the parents' consanguinity and family history of the same anomalies. Univariate analysis of the children with LipoMMC compared to the control group showed that the use of periconceptional folic acid supplementation was significantly lower in the MMC and LipoMMC groups compared to the control group. In addition, comparison of the MMC and control groups revealed statistically significant differences regarding the use of folic acid and maternal obesity. In multivariate analysis, use of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester was an independent risk factor for LipoMMC and MMC. Furthermore, maternal obesity was a significantly positive risk factor for MMC. The probable risk factors for LipoMMC were investigated in this case-control study. Consumption of folic acid in the periconceptional period and during the first trimester is an independent protective factor against LipoMMC. It seems that larger studies are needed to examine other possible

  1. The Misconception of Case-Control Studies in the Plastic Surgery Literature: A Literature Audit.

    PubMed

    Hatchell, Alexandra C; Farrokhyar, Forough; Choi, Matthew

    2017-06-01

    Case-control study designs are commonly used. However, many published case-control studies are not true case-controls and are in fact mislabeled. The purpose of this study was to identify all case-control studies published in the top three plastic surgery journals over the past 10 years, assess which were truly case-control studies, clarify the actual design of the articles, and address common misconceptions. MEDLINE, Embase, and Web of Science databases were searched for case-control studies in the three highest-impact factor plastic surgery journals (2005 to 2015). Two independent reviewers screened the resulting titles, abstracts, and methods, if applicable, to identify articles labeled as case-control studies. These articles were appraised and classified as true case-control studies or non-case-control studies. The authors found 28 articles labeled as case-control studies. However, only six of these articles (21 percent) were truly case-control designs. Of the 22 incorrectly labeled studies, one (5 percent) was a randomized controlled trial, three (14 percent) were nonrandomized trials, two (9 percent) were prospective comparative cohort designs, 14 (64 percent) were retrospective comparative cohort designs, and two (9 percent) were cross-sectional designs. The mislabeling was worse in recent years, despite increases in evidence-based medicine awareness. The majority of published case-control studies are not in fact case-control studies. This misunderstanding is worsening with time. Most of these studies are actually comparative cohort designs. However, some studies are truly clinical trials and thus a higher level of evidence than originally proposed.

  2. Population-based case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Dana B; Scott, William K

    2012-07-01

    This unit provides an overview of the design and analysis of population-based case-control studies of genetic risk factors for complex disease. Considerations specific to genetic studies are emphasized. The unit reviews basic study designs differentiating case-control studies from others, presents different genetic association strategies (candidate gene, genome-wide association, and high-throughput sequencing), introduces basic methods of statistical analysis for case-control data and approaches to combining case-control studies, and discusses measures of association and impact. Admixed populations, controlling for confounding (including population stratification), consideration of multiple loci and environmental risk factors, and complementary analyses of haplotypes, genes, and pathways are briefly discussed. Readers are referred to basic texts on epidemiology for more details on general conduct of case-control studies.

  3. Risk factors for anal fistula: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Yang, G; Qiu, J; Song, Y; Wang, L; Gao, J; Wang, C

    2014-07-01

    The aim of our study was to identify potential risk factors for anal fistula in order to improve prevention and treatment of anal fistula. A retrospective case-control study for anal fistula was conducted at our unit. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify associated risk factors for anal fistula. The final model obtained by the stepwise forward logistic regression analysis method identified the following items as independent risk factors: body mass index of >25.0 kg/m(2), high daily salt intake, history of diabetes, hyperlipidemia, dermatosis, anorectal surgery, history of smoking and alcohol intake, sedentary lifestyle, excessive intake of spicy/greasy food, very infrequent participation in sports and prolonged sitting on the toilet for defecation. Our results indicate that lifestyle factors and certain medical conditions increase an individual's risk of developing anal fistula.

  4. Toxocariasis and childhood asthma: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cadore, Priscila Silva; Zhang, Linjie; Lemos, Liliam de Lima; Lorenzi, Carolina; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Dos Santos, Paula Costa; Mattos, Gabriela Torres; Vignol, Flávia Saraçol; Prietsch, Silvio O M; Berne, Maria Elisabeth Aires; Scaini, Carlos James

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the association between anti-Toxocara IgG seropositivity and asthma in children. This was a case-control study conducted in a university hospital in south Brazil between May 2012 and June 2013. Were recruited 208 children up to 12 years old of whom 156 had asthma (cases) and 52 did not have asthma (controls), with a case-control ratio of 3:1 matched by age. Children's parents or guardians were interviewed using a structured questionnaire with closed questions. Serology was performed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with excretory-secretory antigen of Toxocara canis (TES). The seroprevalence of IgG anti-T. canis antibodies was 12.8% in the cases and 7.7% in the controls. There was no significant association between seropositivity to T. canis and risk of asthma (adjusted odds ratio [OR]: 1.89, 95% CI: 0.52 to 6.89, p = 0.33). Household income < 2 minimum salaries, paternal school years < 9, allergic rhinitis in children, a positive family history of asthma and rhinitis and contact with cats were significantly associated with asthma, with adjusted ORs (95% CIs) of 3.05 (1.21 to 7.73), 2.83 (1.11 to 7.18), 10.5 (4.32 to 25.6), 2.65 (1.14 to 6.17), 2.49 (1.07 to 5.78) and 2.73 (1.03 to 7.27), respectively. This study did not find a statistically significant association between seropositivity to Toxocara sp. and risk of asthma in children. Low family income, low paternal education level, concomitant allergic rhinitis, family history of asthma and allergic rhinitis and contact with cats were independent factors associated with childhood asthma.

  5. [Depression and dementia: case-control study].

    PubMed

    Vilalta-Franch, J; Llinàs-Reglà, J; López-Pousa, S

    To know the prevalence and risk factors for depression in demented patients. From a field epidemiological study, in a double phase, door to door, in which 1,460 subjects older than 69 from a rural area participated, three groups were established: group A made up of 200 dementia diagnosed subjects; group B made up of 119 subjects without dementia but with punctuation on the screening instrument (MEC) under the cut off point; the 283 subjects on the group C were not catalogued as demented, and the MEC punctuation was over the cut off point. Both the diagnoses of dementia and depression were made in basis of CAMDEX criteria. The frequency of depression in groups A, B and C was 26.5%, 11.76% and 4.94%, respectively. The dementia is a risk factor for depression (OR: 4.81; CI: 2.93-7.91). There are no differences in the frequency of depression according to dementia subtypes. Sex, age, marital status and severity of dementia do not have an influence on the prevalence of depression. The presence of psychiatric history is a risk factor for depression on groups A and B, but not for C. Depressions are more common on subjects with cognitive impairment.

  6. Temporomandibular disorders. A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Bagán, Jose V.; Sanchis, Jose M.; Carbonell, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the risk factors and clinical manifestations of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) diagnosed according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) (axis I) versus an age and gender matched control group. Study Design: A total of 162 patients explored according to the RDC/TMD (mean age 40.6±18.8 years, range 7-90; 11.1% males and 88.9% females) were compared with 119 controls, measuring differences in TMD risk factors (sleep disturbances, stress, psychoactive medication, parafunctions, loss of posterior support, ligament hyperlaxity) and clinical variables (joint sounds, painful muscle and joint palpation, maximum aperture). Results: Myofascial pain (MFP) (single or multiple diagnoses) was the most frequent diagnosis (42%). The most common diagnostic combination was MFP plus arthralgia (16.0%). Statistically significant differences were observed in clenching (OR 2.3; 95%CI: 1.4-3.8) and in maximum active aperture (MAA) on comparing the two groups both globally (TMD vs. controls) (patients 36.7±8.6 mm, controls 43.1±5.8 mm; F=45.41, p = 0.000) and on comparing according to diagnostic categories. MFP explained most of the observed differences in the risk factors: stress perception (OR=1.98;I.C.:1.01-3.89), psychoactive medication (OR=2.21; I.C.:1.12-4.37), parafunctions (OR=2.14;I.C.:1.12-4.11), and ligament laxity (OR=2.6;I.C.:1.01-6.68). Joint sounds were more frequent in patients with MFP (39.7% vs. 24.0%; χ2=4.66; p=0.03), and painful joint palpation was more common in patients with disc displacement with reduction (DDWR)(15.9% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 5.2; p = 0.02) and osteoarthrosis (20.8% vs. 5.0%; χ2 = 7.0; p = 0.008). Conclusions: There is a high prevalence of signs and symptoms of TMDs in the general population. Significant differences are observed in clenching and MAA between patients and controls considered both globally and for each diagnostic category individually. The analyzed risk

  7. Nonparametric Bayes modeling for case control studies with many predictors.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing; Herring, Amy H; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Olshan, Andrew F; Dunson, David B

    2016-03-01

    It is common in biomedical research to run case-control studies involving high-dimensional predictors, with the main goal being detection of the sparse subset of predictors having a significant association with disease. Usual analyses rely on independent screening, considering each predictor one at a time, or in some cases on logistic regression assuming no interactions. We propose a fundamentally different approach based on a nonparametric Bayesian low rank tensor factorization model for the retrospective likelihood. Our model allows a very flexible structure in characterizing the distribution of multivariate variables as unknown and without any linear assumptions as in logistic regression. Predictors are excluded only if they have no impact on disease risk, either directly or through interactions with other predictors. Hence, we obtain an omnibus approach for screening for important predictors. Computation relies on an efficient Gibbs sampler. The methods are shown to have high power and low false discovery rates in simulation studies, and we consider an application to an epidemiology study of birth defects.

  8. Pooled exposure assessment for matched case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Saha-Chaudhuri, Paramita; Umbach, David M; Weinberg, Clarice R

    2011-09-01

    Exposure assessment using biologic specimens is important for epidemiology but may become impracticable if assays are expensive, specimen volumes are marginally adequate, or analyte levels fall below the limit of detection. Pooled exposure assessment can provide an effective remedy for these problems in unmatched case-control studies. We extend pooled exposure strategies to handle specimens collected in a matched case-control study. We show that if a logistic model applies to individuals, then a logistic model also applies to an analysis using pooled exposures. Consequently, the individual-level odds ratio can be estimated while conserving both cost and specimen. We discuss appropriate pooling strategies for a single exposure, with adjustment for multiple, possibly continuous, covariates (confounders) and assessment of effect modification by a categorical variable. We assess the performance of the approach via simulations and conclude that pooled strategies can markedly improve efficiency for matched as well as unmatched case-control studies.

  9. Nested case-control studies in cohorts with competing events.

    PubMed

    Wolkewitz, Martin; Cooper, Ben S; Palomar-Martinez, Mercedes; Olaechea-Astigarraga, Pedro; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Schumacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    In nested case-control studies, incidence density sampling is the time-dependent matching procedure to approximate hazard ratios. The cumulative incidence function can also be estimated if information from the full cohort is used. In the presence of competing events, however, the cumulative incidence function depends on the hazard of the disease of interest and on the competing events hazard. Using hospital-acquired infection as an example (full cohort), we propose a sampling method for nested case-control studies to estimate subdistribution hazard ratios. With further information on the full cohort, the cumulative incidence function for the event of interest can then be estimated as well.

  10. Smoking, the environment and meningococcal disease: a case control study.

    PubMed Central

    Stanwell-Smith, R. E.; Stuart, J. M.; Hughes, A. O.; Robinson, P.; Griffin, M. B.; Cartwright, K.

    1994-01-01

    This case control study investigated environmental factors in 74 confirmed cases of meningococcal disease (MD). In children aged under 5, passive smoking in the home (30 or more cigarettes daily) was associated with an odds ratio (OR) of 7.5 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.46-38.66). ORs increased both with the numbers of cigarettes smoked and with the number of smokers in the household, suggesting a dose-response relationship. MD in this age group was also significantly associated with household overcrowding (more than 1.5 persons per room) (OR 6.0, 95% CI 1.10-32.8), with kisses on the mouth with 4 or more contacts in the previous 2 weeks (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.09-5.56), with exposure to dust from plaster, brick or stone in the previous 2 weeks (OR 2.24, 95% CI 1.07-4.65); and with changes in residence (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.0-8.99), marital arguments (OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.26-7.17) and legal disputes in the previous 6 months (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.24-7.78). These associations were independent of social class. Public health measures to lower the prevalence of cigarette smoking by parents of young children may reduce the incidence of MD. The influence of building dust and stressful life events merits further investigation. PMID:8150006

  11. Snow sports injuries in Scotland: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Langran, M; Selvaraj, S

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the incidence and patterns of snow sports injuries at the three largest commercial ski areas in Scotland and to identify factors associated with injury risk. Methods: A prospective case-control study of all injured people at Cairngorm, Glenshee, and Nevis Range ski areas during the 1999–2000 winter season. Personal details, snow sports related variables, diagnosis, and treatment were recorded. Control data were collected at random from uninjured people at all three areas. Random counts were performed to analyse the composition of the on slope population. Results: A total of 732 injuries were recorded in 674 people. Control data were collected from 336 people. The injury rate for the study was 3.7 injuries per 1000 skier days. Alpine skiers comprised 67% of the on slope population, snowboarders 26%, skiboarders 4%, and telemark skiers 2%. Lower limb injuries and sprains were the commonest injuries in alpine skiers and skiboarders. Snowboarders sustained more injuries to the upper limb and axial areas. Skiboarders and snowboarders had a higher incidence of fractures. After adjustment for other variables, three factors were all independently associated with injury: snowboarding (odds ratio (OR) 4.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.65 to 10.08), alpine skiing (OR 3.82, CI 1.6 to 9.13), and age <16 years (OR 1.9, CI 1.14 to 3.17). More than five days of experience in the current season and at least one week of experience in total had a protective effect against injury. Conclusions: Despite a change in the composition of the alpine population at Scottish ski areas, the overall rate and pattern of injury are similar to those reported previously in comparable studies. Several factors are associated with an increased risk of injury and should be targeted in future injury prevention campaigns. PMID:11916898

  12. Female sexual dysfunction in androgenetic alopecia: Case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sancak, Eyup Burak; Oguz, Sevilay; Akbulut, Tugba; Uludag, Aysegul; Akbas, Alpaslan; Kurt, Omer; Akbulut, Mehmet Fatih

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We sought to evaluate the association of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in premenopausal women. Methods: From December 2013 to June 2015, we performed a case-control, prospective study of 115 patients with AGA and 97 age-matched control patients without AGA from among premenopausal women who visited dermatology clinics of the two reference hospitals. Comprehensive history, anthropometric measurements, and questionnaire administration were performed for each of the total of 212 women. The Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) was used to assess the key dimensions of female sexual function. AGA was assessed and graded by an experienced dermatologist according to Ludwig’s classification. The MetS assessment was made according to the NCEP-ATP III criteria. Results: In univariate analysis, age, weight, waist circumference, hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index (BMI), AGA, MetS, cardiovascular event, marital status, hypertension, high fasting plasma glucose, high triglyceride, large waist, total testosterone, and free testosterone were associated with presence of FSD. In logistic regression analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13–1.30; p<0.001), AGA (OR 3.42, 95% CI 1.31–8.94; p=0.017), MetS (OR 5.39, 95% CI 1.34–21.62; p=0.012), and free testosterone (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.09–0.37; p<0.001) were independently associated with FSD. Conclusions: Our study suggests that age, AGA, MetS, and free testosterone may have strong impact on sexual function in premenopausal women. Further studies with population-based and longitudinal design should be conducted to confirm this finding. PMID:28255417

  13. Methodology Series Module 2: Case-control Studies.

    PubMed

    Setia, Maninder Singh

    2016-01-01

    Case-Control study design is a type of observational study. In this design, participants are selected for the study based on their outcome status. Thus, some participants have the outcome of interest (referred to as cases), whereas others do not have the outcome of interest (referred to as controls). The investigator then assesses the exposure in both these groups. The investigator should define the cases as specifically as possible. Sometimes, definition of a disease may be based on multiple criteria; thus, all these points should be explicitly stated in case definition. An important aspect of selecting a control is that they should be from the same 'study base' as that of the cases. We can select controls from a variety of groups. Some of them are: General population; relatives or friends; and hospital patients. Matching is often used in case-control control studies to ensure that the cases and controls are similar in certain characteristics, and it is a useful technique to increase the efficiency of the study. Case-Control studies can usually be conducted relatively faster and are inexpensive - particularly when compared with cohort studies (prospective). It is useful to study rare outcomes and outcomes with long latent periods. This design is not very useful to study rare exposures. Furthermore, they may also be prone to certain biases - selection bias and recall bias.

  14. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Macêdo, Vilma Costa; de Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral; de Frias, Paulo Germano; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. METHODS This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. RESULTS The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. CONCLUSIONS Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. PMID:28832758

  15. Dermatological indicators of coronary risk: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mirić, D; Fabijanić, D; Giunio, L; Eterović, D; Culić, V; Bozić, I; Hozo, I

    1998-12-31

    We examined the association of dermatological signs such as baldness, thoracic hairiness, hair greying and diagonal earlobe crease with the risk of myocardial infarction in men under the age of 60 years. A hospital-based, case-control study included 842 men admitted for the first non-fatal myocardial infarction, the controls were 712 men admitted with noncardiac diagnoses, without clinical signs of coronary disease. The relative risks were estimated as odds ratios. Logistic regression was used to control for the confounding variables. Baldness, thoracic hairiness and earlobe crease were approximately 40% more prevalent in cases (P<10(-6) in each case). In both cases and controls, baldness and thoracic hairiness were frequently coexistent, as well as hair greying and earlobe crease (P<10(-4) in each case). After allowing for age and other established coronary risk factors, the relative risk of myocardial infarction for fronto-parietal baldness compared with no hair loss was 1.77 (95% CI 1.27-2.45) and it was 1.83 (95 CI 1.4-2.3) for men with thick, extended thoracic hairiness. The presence of a diagonal earlobe crease yielded a relative risk of 1.37 (95% CI 1.25-1.5), while hair greying was associated with myocardial infarction only in men under the age of 50 years. It appears that baldness, thoracic hairiness and diagonal earlobe crease indicate an additional risk of myocardial infarction in men under the age of 60 years, independently of age and other established coronary risk factors.

  16. Case-control study on analgesics and nephropathy (SAN): protocol

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Garbe, Edeltraut; Lewis, Michael; van der Woude, Fokko; Graf, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    Background The association between intake of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics and the occurrence of chronic renal failure is still controversially discussed. A new epidemiologic study was planned and conducted in Germany and Austria. Methods/design The objective of the international, multicenter case-control study was to evaluate the association between end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and use of non-phenacetin-containing analgesics with particular emphasis on combined formulations. A targeted sample of 1000 new (incident) dialysis patients, aged less than 50 years, was planned to recruit between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2004. The age limit was chosen to avoid contamination of the study population with phenacetin-containing analgesics to the extent possible. Four control subjects per ESRD case, matched by age, sex, and region were selected from the population living in the region the case came from. Lifetime exposure to analgesics and potential renal risk factors were recorded in a single face-to-face interview. A set of aids was introduced to reinforce the memory of study participants. A standardized, pre-tested interview questionnaire (participants), a medical documentation sheet (physicians in dialysis centres), a logbook for all activities (dialysis centres) were used to collect the necessary data. Quality management consisted of the standardized procedures, (re-) training and supervision of interviewers, regular checks of all incoming data for completeness and plausibility. The study is scientifically independent and governed by a international Scientific Advisory Committee that bridged the gap between the sponsoring companies and the investigators. Also other advisory groups assisted the managing committee of the study. All relevant German and Austrian nephrological associations supported the study, and the study design was carefully reviewed and approved by the Kidney Foundation of Germany. Discussion The study is expected to answer the main

  17. Survey research methods in evaluation and case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Kalton, Graham; Piesse, Andrea

    2007-04-15

    Survey research methods are widely used in two types of analytic studies: evaluation studies that measure the effects of interventions; and population-based case-control studies that investigate the effects of various risk factors on the presence of disease. This paper provides a broad overview of some design and analysis issues related to such studies, illustrated with examples. The lack of random assignment to treatment and control groups in many evaluation studies makes controlling for confounders critically important. Confounder control can be achieved by matching in the design and by various alternative methods in the analysis. One popular analytic method of controlling for confounders is propensity scoring, which bears a close resemblance to survey weighting. The use of population-based controls has become common in case-control studies. For reasons of cost, population-based controls are often identified by telephone surveys using random digit dialling (RDD) sampling methods. However, RDD surveys are now experiencing serious problems with response rates. A recent alternative approach is to select controls from frames such as driver license lists that contain valuable demographic information for use in matching. Methods of analysis developed in the survey sampling literature are applicable, at least to some degree, in the analyses of evaluation and population-based case-control studies. In particular, the effects of complex sample designs can be taken into account using survey sampling variance estimation methods. Several survey analysis software packages are available for carrying out the computations.

  18. Assessment of global phase uncertainty in case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2009-01-01

    Background In haplotype-based candidate gene studies a problem is that the genotype data are unphased, which results in haplotype ambiguity. The measure [1] quantifies haplotype predictability from genotype data. It is computed for each individual haplotype, and for a measure of global relative efficiency a minimum value is suggested. Alternatively, we developed methods directly based on the information content of haplotype frequency estimates to obtain global relative efficiency measures: and based on A- and D-optimality, respectively. All three methods are designed for single populations; they can be applied in cases only, controls only or the whole data. Therefore they are not necessarily optimal for haplotype testing in case-control studies. Results A new global relative efficiency measure was derived to maximize power of a simple test statistic that compares haplotype frequencies in cases and controls. Application to real data showed that our proposed method gave a clear and summarizing measure for the case-control study conducted. Additionally this measure might be used for selection of individuals, who have the highest potential for improving power by resolving phase ambiguity. Conclusion Instead of using relative efficiency measure for cases only, controls only or their combined data, we link uncertainty measure to case-control studies directly. Hence, our global efficiency measure might be useful to assess whether data are informative or have enough power for estimation of a specific haplotype risk. PMID:19751505

  19. Assessment of global phase uncertainty in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2009-09-14

    In haplotype-based candidate gene studies a problem is that the genotype data are unphased, which results in haplotype ambiguity. The R(h)(2) measure 1 quantifies haplotype predictability from genotype data. It is computed for each individual haplotype, and for a measure of global relative efficiency a minimum R(h)(2) value is suggested. Alternatively, we developed methods directly based on the information content of haplotype frequency estimates to obtain global relative efficiency measures: R(A)(2) and R(D)(2) based on A- and D-optimality, respectively. All three methods are designed for single populations; they can be applied in cases only, controls only or the whole data. Therefore they are not necessarily optimal for haplotype testing in case-control studies. A new global relative efficiency measure R(T)(2) was derived to maximize power of a simple test statistic that compares haplotype frequencies in cases and controls. Application to real data showed that our proposed method R(T)(2) gave a clear and summarizing measure for the case-control study conducted. Additionally this measure might be used for selection of individuals, who have the highest potential for improving power by resolving phase ambiguity. Instead of using relative efficiency measure for cases only, controls only or their combined data, we link uncertainty measure to case-control studies directly. Hence, our global efficiency measure might be useful to assess whether data are informative or have enough power for estimation of a specific haplotype risk.

  20. A case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Savettieri, G; Salemi, G; Arcara, A; Cassata, M; Castiglione, M G; Fierro, B

    1991-01-01

    A retrospective case-control study was conducted using 46 patients affected by amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and 92 closely matched healthy controls. Cases were ascertained through typical clinical and instrumental findings. Putative risk factors (bone fractures or major trauma, exposure to domestic animals, surgical operations, disease among first degree relatives and others) were investigated anamnestically using a standard questionnaire. Using Mantel-Haenzsel estimates of the odds ratio, no association was found between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and the investigated variables.

  1. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; McKinney, P A; O'Brien, C; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; Lauder, I; Darwin, C M; Bernard, S M; Bird, C C

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a case control study of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the Yorkshire Health Region. In all, 437 cases and 724 controls were interviewed. Risk factors associated with past skin conditions, family history of cancer and infectious mononucleosis, aspects of social life and contact with wood dust and epoxy glues all emerge. A comparison of high and low grade morphological forms of disease reveal contrasting risks and suggest separate aetiologies for these conditions.

  2. [Case-control studies in psychiatry: causality, design and warnings].

    PubMed

    Silva Ayçaguer, L C

    2004-01-01

    This present paper is mainly methodological and has been written with the aim of helping researchers in psychiatry to produce results with higher quality and help readers to have adequate assessment values of others. Brief reflection is made on the most important conditions that must be fulfilled to prove a causality hypothesis, regardless of the investigation design used. However, the main purpose of the text is to examine and illustrate how these conditions work under a case-control study environment. Besides outlining the basic aspects concerning design and analysis, areas extremely illustrated with examples of case and controls in psychiatry found in the literature, a number of suggestions to avoid pitfalls that can invalidate research efforts developed using case-control methodology is offered.

  3. Nested case-control studies: should one break the matching?

    PubMed

    Borgan, Ørnulf; Keogh, Ruth

    2015-10-01

    In a nested case-control study, controls are selected for each case from the individuals who are at risk at the time at which the case occurs. We say that the controls are matched on study time. To adjust for possible confounding, it is common to match on other variables as well. The standard analysis of nested case-control data is based on a partial likelihood which compares the covariates of each case to those of its matched controls. It has been suggested that one may break the matching of nested case-control data and analyse them as case-cohort data using an inverse probability weighted (IPW) pseudo likelihood. Further, when some covariates are available for all individuals in the cohort, multiple imputation (MI) makes it possible to use all available data in the cohort. In the paper we review the standard method and the IPW and MI approaches, and compare their performance using simulations that cover a range of scenarios, including one and two endpoints.

  4. 25-hydroxyvitamin D and breast cancer, colorectal cancer, and colorectal adenomas: case-control versus nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Grant, William B

    2015-02-01

    Existing literature includes concerns regarding reliability of case-control studies of breast cancer incidence with respect to 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations. For breast cancer, only case-control studies consistently find inverse correlations between 25(OH)D and breast cancer. However, for colorectal cancer, nested case-control studies find significant inverse correlations with respect to 25(OH)D concentrations at baseline for mean follow-up times of 7 years. This is a review of results currently existing in literature. I provide evidence that 25(OH)D concentration values are only useful for short follow-up times for breast cancer since it develops rapidly. To support the robust nature of breast cancer case-control studies, I show that results from 11 studies from seven countries align in a robust power-law fit to the odds ratio versus mean 25(OH)D concentrations. Case-control studies of breast cancer incidence rates provide reliable results. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  5. A case-control study of risk factors for death from 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1): is American Indian racial status an independent risk factor?

    PubMed

    Hennessy, T W; Bruden, D; Castrodale, L; Komatsu, K; Erhart, L M; Thompson, D; Bradley, K; O'Leary, D R; McLaughlin, J; Landen, M

    2016-01-01

    Historically, American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations have suffered excess morbidity and mortality from influenza. We investigated the risk factors for death from 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) in persons residing in five states with substantial AI/AN populations. We conducted a case-control investigation using pandemic influenza fatalities from 2009 in Alaska, Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Wyoming. Controls were outpatients with influenza. We reviewed medical records and interviewed case proxies and controls. We used multiple imputation to predict missing data and multivariable conditional logistic regression to determine risk factors. We included 145 fatal cases and 236 controls; 22% of cases were AI/AN. Risk factors (P 45 years vs. <18 years], pre-existing medical conditions (mOR 7·1), smoking (mOR 3·0), delayed receipt of antivirals (mOR 6·5), and barriers to healthcare access (mOR 5·3). AI/AN race was not significantly associated with death. The increased influenza mortality in AI/AN individuals was due to factors other than racial status. Prevention of influenza deaths should focus on modifiable factors (smoking, early antiviral use, access to care) and identifying high-risk persons for immunization and prompt medical attention.

  6. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R. A.; Bernard, S. M.; Bird, C. C.; Darwin, C. M.; O'Brien, C.; Richards, I. D.; Roberts, B.; McKinney, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis. PMID:3304389

  7. Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Bernard, S M; Bird, C C; Darwin, C M; O'Brien, C; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; McKinney, P A

    1987-07-01

    This is the second report of a large case control study of lymphoma/leukaemia occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84, and deals with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia presenting either in its haematological (CLL) or more solid lymphomatous (malignant lymphoma-lymphocytic or MLL) forms. In all, 330 cases and 561 controls were interviewed. The results support the concept that CLL/MLL is a condition of multiple aetiologies with evidence for genetic predisposition through an excess of family cases, immune perturbation demonstrated by excessive previous skin diseases and phenylbutazone use, and viral involvement shown by links with infectious diseases and multiple sclerosis.

  8. Metabolic Derangements in Lichen Planus - A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kar, Bikash Ranjan; Panda, Maitreyee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An association between psoriasis and metabolic syndrome has been established in previous studies. Lichen Planus (LP) is also a chronic inflammatory disease morphologically related to psoriasis and few studies have shown association of metabolic derangements in LP. Aim To study the association of metabolic derangements in LP. Materials and Methods A prospective case control study was undertaken for a period of one year. Age and sex matched patients of LP and other non-inflammatory diseases were taken as cases and controls respectively. Data on height, weight, lipid profile and fasting blood glucose levels were collected for all the patients. Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. Results A total of 80 patients were recruited, 40 cases and 40 controls. The mean values for all the lipid and glucose parameters were high in cases as compared to controls with significant p-values. Conclusion In the present study metabolic derangements were seen in patients with LP. PMID:28050485

  9. Biomass Fuel Smoke and Tuberculosis: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Haque, M A; Barman, N; Islam, M T; Mannan, M; Khan, M H; Karim, M R; Rob, M A; Hossain, M A

    2016-01-01

    This case control study was done to ascertain the association between exposures to biomass cooking fuel smoke and pulmonary tuberculosis. Cases were all newly diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis patients, randomly collected from the Hospital (DOTS centers) Registry from January 2012 to June 2012 from two Upazillas of Sirajganj district, Bangladesh. A home visitation program was done subsequently. Healthy controls were recruited from the neighbourhood of each case through a predefined procedure. Total 276 new pulmonary tuberculosis cases and 276 neighbourhood controls were enrolled. A semi-structured questionnaire containing demographic information, smoking habits, cooking place, kitchen condition, use of biomass fuel for cooking was used for interview. Crude (unadjusted) odd ratios and their corresponding 95% confidence limits for independent variables were determined by binary logistic regression. All significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model and a final fitted model was determined by backward elimination methods. In univariate analysis, member of a nuclear family {Unadjusted odd ratio (Unadj. OR) 1.570, 95% CI 1.008-2.44)}, having non-formal education (Unadj. OR 2.739, 95% CI 1.219, 6.153) or primary (Unadj. OR 3.407, 95% CI 1.492, 7.782) to secondary level (Unadj. OR 2.392, 95% CI 1.032, 5.544) education, using cow dung (Unadj. OR 3.961, 95% CI 1.267, 12.376) and biomass fuel i.e. plant origin (Unadj. OR 3.382, 95% CI 1.087, 10.518) for cooking, past smoker (Unadj. OR 2.504, 95% CI 1.061, 5.910), using open oven (Unadj. OR 3.109, 95% CI 0.995, 9.716), having small kitchen area (Unadj. OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.989, 0.999) all were significantly associated with tuberculosis. When all significant variables were entered into a multivariate conditional logistic regression model nuclear family {Adjusted odd ratio (Adj OR) 1.808, 95% CI 1.127, 2.9)}, primary level education (Adj OR 2.86, 95% CI 1.23, 6.647) and non formal

  10. Case Control Polysomnographic Studies of Sleep Disorders in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Ming-Hui; Fook-Chong, Stephanie; Pavanni, Ratnagopal; Lim, Li-Ling; Tan, Eng-King

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between a number of primary sleep disorders and Parkinson's disease (PD) is still debated. There are limited case control polysomnographic studies in PD and most of these study sample sizes are small. Methodology/Findings We conducted one of the largest case-control studies involving overnight polysomnographic evaluation, with prospective recruitment of unselected Parkinson's disease patients and healthy controls from an Asian population. The cases were recruited from the specialized movement disorder outpatient clinics in a tertiary referral center, and controls from the same geographical locations. All subjects underwent an overnight polysomnographic study and a multiple sleep latency test. A total of 124 subjects including 56 patients and 68 controls frequency-matched for age and sex were included. Multivariate analysis revealed that patients had significantly shorter total sleep time than controls (p = 0.01), lower sleep efficiency (p = 0.001) and increased REM latency (p = 0.007). In patients, multivariate analysis showed that reduced total sleep time was significantly associated with increased age (p = 0.001) and increased levodopa dose (p = 0.032). The mean Insomnia Severity Index was higher in PD patients (9.0±7.1) compared to controls (3.3±3.9, p<0.001). The mean Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was higher in PD patients (9.3±5.9 vs. 5.7±4.8, p<0.001). Nocturnal arousals, obstructive sleep apnea, periodic leg movements and objective abnormal sleepiness were not increased in our patients. Conclusions/Significance Our case-control polysomnographic study, the first-ever performed in an Asian population, revealed altered sleep architecture and reduced sleep in PD patients compared to controls. Reduced total sleep time was associated with increased age and levodopa dose. However, nocturnal arousals, primary sleep disorders and abnormal sleepiness were not increased in our PD patients suggesting that ethnic

  11. Childhood cancer and overhead powerlines: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Myers, A.; Clayden, A. D.; Cartwright, R. A.; Cartwright, S. C.

    1990-01-01

    A case-control study has been carried out to examine the occurrence of childhood cancer in relation to the proximity of overhead power lines to a child's home address at birth and to the calculated magnetic field at the address. The study included 374 cases diagnosed in the Yorkshire Health Region between 1970 and 1979, together with 588 matched controls. Magnetic-field strengths at the birth addresses due to the load currents of overhead power lines were calculated on the basis of line-network maps and load records. The results indicate no association between the occurrence of childhood malignancies and either the proximity or the magnetic fields of overhead lines, although the statistical power of the study was limited by the small numbers of children living close to overhead power lines. PMID:2257204

  12. Association between migraine and asthma: matched case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Gail; Sedgwick, Philip; Maier, Will; Visick, George; Strachan, David P; Anderson, H Ross

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier studies have suggested a link between asthma and severe headache, and also between migraine and wheezing illness. Recent analysis have also shown an increase of asthma among cases with a prior history of migraine but without a history of hay fever, allergic rhinitis or eczema. AIM: To examine whether there is an association between migraine and asthma in the United Kingdom. DESIGN OF STUDY: Matched case-control study using the General Practice Research Database (GPRD). SETTING: Practices in the United Kingdom providing data on 5,110,619 patients to the GPRD. METHOD: The subjects were the patients with one or more diagnoses of migraine plus treatment for migraine. Each case was matched by general practice, sex, and age, with one control who had never been given a diagnosis of migraine. Case and control groups were compared for prevalence of asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory symptoms treated with inhalers or hay fever. Investigations were carried out to determine whether the association between migraine and asthma was stronger among patients with hayfever or those without hayfever, and whether patients with migraine had an increased prescription of other (non-migraine and non-asthma) medications. RESULTS: Among 64 678 case-control pairs, the relative risk of asthma in patients with migraine was 1.59 (95% CI = 1.54 to 1.65) among definite cases, and 0.75 (95% CI = 0.67 to 0.83) among those whose selection as case included beta-blocker prophylaxis. Among definite migraine cases, relative risks of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, respiratory symptoms, eczema, and hay fever (pollinosis), were all raised (at 1.22, 1.85, 1.55, and 1.67, respectively). The association between migraine and asthma was stronger in patients without a diagnosis of hay fever, than in those with hayfever (relative risk = 1.32 and 1.19, respectively). The relative risk of prescription for a range of non-migraine, non-asthma medications was raised

  13. A case-control study of Alzheimer's disease in Australia.

    PubMed

    Broe, G A; Henderson, A S; Creasey, H; McCusker, E; Korten, A E; Jorm, A F; Longley, W; Anthony, J C

    1990-11-01

    We conducted a case-control study of clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (AD) on 170 cases aged 52 to 96 years, and 170 controls matched for age, sex and, where possible, the general practice of origin. Trained lay interviewers naive to the hypotheses and to the clinical status of the elderly person carried out risk-factor interviews with informants. Significant odds ratios were found for 4 variables: a history of either dementia, probable AD, or Down's syndrome in a 1st-degree relative, and underactivity as a behavioral trait in both the recent and more distant past. Previously reported or suggested associations not confirmed by this study include head injury, starvation, thyroid disease, analgesic abuse, antacid use (aluminum exposure), alcohol abuse, smoking, and being left-handed.

  14. Hodgkin's disease: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, S. M.; Cartwright, R. A.; Darwin, C. M.; Richards, I. D.; Roberts, B.; O'Brien, C.; Bird, C. C.

    1987-01-01

    This is the first report of a case-control epidemiological study on lymphomas and leukaemias occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84. This paper deals with the results of the Hodgkin's disease analysis comprising 248 cases and 489 controls. The results indicate support for previous work with respect to small family size and past history of infectious mononucleosis. Positive observations made in a previous pilot study are also confirmed and extended with respect to associations with certain chronic skin lesions, dental anaesthesia and familial factors. Negative associations are described with respect to X-ray exposures and cigarette smoking. It is proposed that these results fit into a general hypothesis that these conditions are the result of interaction between infectious agents and altered immunity in those persons genetically predisposed. PMID:3814482

  15. Hodgkin's disease: case control epidemiological study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Bernard, S M; Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C M; Richards, I D; Roberts, B; O'Brien, C; Bird, C C

    1987-01-01

    This is the first report of a case-control epidemiological study on lymphomas and leukaemias occurring in Yorkshire during 1979-84. This paper deals with the results of the Hodgkin's disease analysis comprising 248 cases and 489 controls. The results indicate support for previous work with respect to small family size and past history of infectious mononucleosis. Positive observations made in a previous pilot study are also confirmed and extended with respect to associations with certain chronic skin lesions, dental anaesthesia and familial factors. Negative associations are described with respect to X-ray exposures and cigarette smoking. It is proposed that these results fit into a general hypothesis that these conditions are the result of interaction between infectious agents and altered immunity in those persons genetically predisposed.

  16. Functional Impairment in Adult Sleepwalkers: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Regis; Jaussent, Isabelle; Scholz, Sabine; Bayard, Sophie; Montplaisir, Jacques; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the restorative quality of sleep and daytime functioning in sleepwalking adult patients in comparison with controls. Design: Prospective case-control study. Setting: Data were collected at the Sleep Disorders Center, Hôpital-Gui-de Chauliac, Montpellier, France between June 2007 and January 2011. Participants: There were 140 adult sleepwalkers (100 (median age 30 y, 55% male) in whom primary SW was diagnosed) who underwent 1 night of video polysomnography. All patients participated in a standardized clinical interview and completed a battery of questionnaires to assess clinical characteristics of parasomnia, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and health-related quality of life. Results were compared with those of 100 sex- and age-matched normal controls. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Of the sleepwalkers, 22.3% presented with daily episodes and 43.5% presented with weekly episodes. Median age at sleepwalking onset was 9 y. Familial history of sleepwalking was reported in 56.6% of sleepwalkers and violent sleep related behaviors in 57.9%, including injuries requiring medical care for at least one episode in 17%. Significant associations were found between sleepwalking and daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, depressive and anxiety symptoms, and altered quality of life. Early-onset sleepwalkers had higher frequency of violent behaviors and injuries. Sleepwalkers with violent behaviors had higher frequency of sleep terrors and triggering factors, with greater alteration in health-related quality of life. Conclusion: Adult sleepwalking is a potentially serious condition that may induce violent behaviors, self-injury or injury to bed partners, sleep disruption, excessive daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and psychological distress, all of which affect health-related quality of life. Citation: Lopez R; Jaussent I; Scholz S; Bayard S; Montplaisir J; Dauvilliers Y. Functional impairment in

  17. Leptospira Exposure and Gardeners: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Guido-Arreola, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Leptospira can be found in soil. However, it is unclear whether occupational exposure to soil may represent a risk for Leptospira infection in humans. Therefore, we sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence with the occupation of gardener, and to determine the epidemiological characteristics of gardeners associated with Leptospira exposure. Methods We performed a case-control study in 168 gardeners and 168 age- and gender-matched control subjects without gardening occupation in Durango City, Mexico. The seroprevalence of anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies in cases and controls was determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the association of Leptospira exposure and the characteristics of the gardeners. Results Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 10 (6%) of 168 gardeners and in 15 (8.9%) of 168 control subjects (odds ratio (OR): 0.64; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.28 - 1.48; P = 0.40). Multivariate analysis showed that Leptospira seropositivity was positively associated with female gender (OR: 5.82; 95% CI: 1.11 - 30.46; P = 0.03), and negatively associated with eating while working (OR: 0.21; 95% CI: 0.05 - 0.87; P = 0.03). In addition, multivariate analysis showed that high anti-Leptospira levels were associated with consumption of boar meat (OR: 28.00; 95% CI: 1.20 - 648.80; P = 0.03). Conclusions This is the first case-control study of Leptospira exposure in gardeners. Results do not support an association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of gardener. However, further studies to confirm the lack of this association are needed. The potential role of consumption of boar meat in Leptospira infection deserves further investigation. PMID:26668679

  18. Nigerian juvenile offenders: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Ogunlesi, A O

    1991-01-01

    A case-controlled study was carried out on all the 51 juvenile delinquents found in a point prevalence survey of a Nigerian Borstal Remand Centre. Mean age of the delinquents was 17-27 years. They were mostly from the low social class (70.6%) and the commonest reason for admission was for being beyond parental control (68.6%). Identified risk factors found for juvenile delinquency were death of biological mother, parental marital failure, growing up with relatives rather than parents, drug abuse and ordinal position in the family. Possible cultural explanations for some of these observations were proffered. The need to improve on the living conditions of these juveniles and their assessment procedure were highlighted. Finally, it is imperative that the obsolete Nigerian Children and Young Person's Law be updated.

  19. Case-control study of dementia of the Alzheimer type

    SciTech Connect

    French, L.R.; Schuman, L.M.; Mortimer, J.A.; Hutton, J.T.; Boatman, R.A.; Christians, B.

    1985-03-01

    A case-control study to assess factors of possible etiologic significance to dementia of the Alzheimer type was conducted with 78 male cases diagnosed in 1979-1982 at the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota and age-race-sex-matched hospital and neighborhood controls (14 of 16 autopsied cases were histopathologically confirmed). Information was obtained on variables relevant to vital, genetic, and immunologic hypotheses, and on possible occupational and environmental exposures, drug use, psychologic stress, smoking, and alcohol consumption. The only major difference between patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type and controls was a significantly greater occurrence of antecedent head trauma in the patients (odds ratio = 4.50). This finding is consistent with the literature on posttraumatic dementia but its importance is presently unclear.

  20. Uncovering selection bias in case-control studies using Bayesian post-stratification.

    PubMed

    Geneletti, S; Best, N; Toledano, M B; Elliott, P; Richardson, S

    2013-07-10

    Case-control studies are particularly prone to selection bias, which can affect odds ratio estimation. Approaches to discovering and adjusting for selection bias have been proposed in the literature using graphical and heuristic tools as well as more complex statistical methods. The approach we propose is based on a survey-weighting method termed Bayesian post-stratification and follows from the conditional independences that characterise selection bias. We use our approach to perform a selection bias sensitivity analysis by using ancillary data sources that describe the target case-control population to re-weight the odds ratio estimates obtained from the study. The method is applied to two case-control studies, the first investigating the association between exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children and the second investigating the association between maternal occupational exposure to hairspray and a congenital anomaly in male babies called hypospadias. In both case-control studies, our method showed that the odds ratios were only moderately sensitive to selection bias.

  1. Consanguinity and Neonatal Death: A Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chaman, Reza; Gholami Taramsari, Mahshid; Khosravi, Ahmad; Amiri, Mohammad; Holakouie Naieni, Kourosh; Yunesian, Masoud

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although numerous studies have found higher rates of abortion and still births following consanguinity (familial marriages), the question of whether consanguinity significantly increases the risk of neonatal death has inadequately been addressed.This study aims to evaluate familial marriage effects on neonatal death in rural areas in Iran. Materials and methods: In this nested case-control study, 6900 newbornswho were born in rural areas of Kohgiluyeh and Boyerahmad Province (South-West of Iran)were followed till the end of neonatal period, and neonatal death was the outcome of interest. Subsequently 97 cases and 97 controls were selected in study cohort by using risk set sampling model. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) were estimated by usinga conditional logistic regression model. Results: In the final model, prematurity (OR = 5.57), low birthweight (LBW) (OR = 7.68), consanguinity (first cousins) (OR = 5.23), C-section (OR = 7.27), birth rank more than 3 (OR = 6.95) and birthsinterval less than 24 months (OR = 4.65) showed significant statistical association with neonatal mortality (p < 0.05). Conclusion: According to our findings, after adjusting the effects of other significant risk factors, familial marriageto first cousins is considered asan important risk factor for neonatal death. PMID:25530772

  2. CIGARETTE SMOKING AND MALIGNANT MELANOMA: A CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Kessides, Maria C.; Wheless, Lee; Hoffman-Bolton, Judith; Clipp, Sandra; Alani, Rhoda M.; Alberg, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Several previous studies have reported inverse associations between cigarette smoking and melanoma. Often these studies have not adjusted for ultraviolet (UV) exposure history, skin type, or number of blistering sunburns, which could confound the observed associations between cigarette smoking and melanoma. Objective To assess whether this reported inverse association persists after adjusting for UV exposure, skin type, and number of blistering sunburns. Methods We conducted a population-based case-control study (82 melanoma cases, 164 controls). Two controls were matched to each case by age, sex, race, and skin type. Conditional logistic regression models were fit to assess the association between cigarette smoking history and melanoma, with additional adjustments for UV exposure and sunburns. Results Compared to never smokers, both former (OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.18–1.04) and current (OR 0.65, 95% CI 0.19–2.24) smoking were inversely associated with melanoma, but the associations were not statistically significant. Limitations The number of cutaneous nevi was not assessed in this study. Additionally, the relatively small number of cases limits the statistical precision of the observed associations. Conclusions After matching for age, sex, race, and skin type, and further adjusting for UV exposure and number of sunburns, cigarette smoking was not statistically significantly associated with melanoma risk, but the results were consistent with previous observations of an inverse association. PMID:20334951

  3. Neurocysticercotic Calcifications and Hippocampal Sclerosis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Clarissa Lin; Coan, Ana Carolina; Secolin, Rodrigo; Luiz Cunha da Costa, Alberto; Cendes, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Objective The exact role of calcified neurocysticercotic lesions (CNLs) in epilepsy is yet unknown and controversial. Although the relationship between CNLs, epilepsy and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with hippocampal sclerosis (MTLE-HS) has already been addressed, to our knowledge, no study has actually provided strong statistical evidence, nor reported the ODDS ratio for these associations. Therefore, we designed this case-control study to assess the likelihood of having MTLE-HS versus other forms of epilepsy in the presence of CNLs. Methods In this case-control study we included 119 consecutive patients with epilepsy and 106 disease controls (headache) with previous CT scans. We subdivided cases into MTLE-HS and other epilepsies. We used brain CT scans to define presence or absence of CNLs. After exploratory analyses, we used logistic regression to analyze the association between CNLs, epilepsy subgroups and disease controls. Results CNLs were found in 31.09% of cases and in 11.32% of controls (p<0.001). The initial analysis comparing epilepsy versus controls revealed a significant association between CNLs and epilepsy (OR = 5.32; 95%CI = 2.43-11.54; p<0.001). However, when we compared MTLE-HS versus other epilepsies versus controls we confirmed that CNLs were associated with MTLE-HS (OR = 11.27, 95%CI = 4.73-26.85; p<0.001) but other epilepsies were not. We found no difference in the CNLs load and no difference in the location of the CNLs when we compared patients with MTLE-HS, other epilepsies and disease controls. Significance The inclusion of controls allowed us to estimate the likelihood of having epilepsy in the presence of CNLs. We found that patients with CNLs were 11 times more likely to have MTLE-HS; however, the presence of CNLs did not change the odds of having other types of epilepsy. These findings raise the possibility of neurocysticercosis playing a role in the pathophysiology of MTLE-HS and need further confirmation in other series. PMID

  4. Baldness and testicular cancer: the EPSAM case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moirano, G; Zugna, D; Grasso, C; Lista, P; Ciuffreda, L; Segnan, N; Merletti, F; Richiardi, L

    2016-03-01

    The etiology of testicular cancer is largely unexplained. Research has mainly focused on prenatal exposures, especially to sex hormones, while less attention has been paid to exposures that may act also postnatally. As baldness has been previously associated with testicular cancer risk we focused on baldness and body hairiness, which are both associated with androgen activity. We used data of the Postnatal Exposures and Male Health (EPSAM) study, a case-control study on testicular cancer conducted in the Province of Turin, Italy, involving cases diagnosed between 1997 and 2008. Information was collected using mailed questionnaires. Analyses included 255 cases and 459 controls. We calculated ORs and 95% CIs to estimate testicular cancer risk among those who developed baldness and among those with body hairiness. We found an inverse association between testicular cancer and baldness (OR: 0.67, 95% CI: 0.46-0.98) and body hairiness (OR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.53-1.16), although the latter had wider CIs. The inverse association between baldness and testicular cancer is consistent with the results from previous studies. These results suggest that androgens activity may influence testicular cancer risk. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  5. Headaches and pineal cyst: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Christian L; Woeller, Andreas; Valet, Michael; Zimmer, Claus; Berthele, Achim; Tölle, Thomas; Sprenger, Till

    2008-03-01

    Pineal cysts have been suggested to be linked to headache pathogenesis. However, no systematic studies on this topic have been performed so far. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between pineal cysts and headache and to determine the relevance of the cyst size in this context. We conducted a case-control study of patients who consulted the neurological department between 1999 and 2006 to investigate the relationship between pineal cysts and headache and to determine the relevance of the cyst size. A total of 51 patients with pineal cyst were identified, thereby 51% were suffering from headache (half of them had migraine), whereas in the control group, only 25% had headache (thereof 31% suffered from migraine). There was a significant relationship between headache (as well as migraine) and pineal cysts (chi-square test), but no significant difference in pineal cyst diameter between the patient group with headache versus without headache (t-test). Our data provide evidence for a causal relationship between pineal cysts and headache, respectively, migraine in this patient cohort.

  6. Determinants of gestational diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Feleke, Berhanu Elfu

    2017-07-09

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is glucose intolerance first recognized during pregnancy. The objective of this study was to identify the determinant factors of GDM. An unmatched case-control study was conducted. Descriptive statistics were used to describe the profile of study participants and binary logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of GDM. GDM was associated with history of abortion (AOR 5.05 [95% CI: 2.65-9.63]), family history of diabetes mellitus (AOR 8.63 [95% CI: 5.19-14.35]), chronic hypertension (AOR 4.63 [95% CI: 1.27-16.86]), dietary diversification score (AOR 2.96 [95% CI: 2-4.46]), regular physical exercise (AOR 0.03 [95% CI: 0.01-0.04]), history of infertility (AOR 6.19 [95%CI: 1.86-20.16]), history of Caesarean section (AOR 3.24 [95% CI: 1.58-6.63]), previous history of GDM (AOR 8.21 [95% CI: 3.18-21.24]), previous history of intrauterine fetal death (AOR 3.96 [95% CI: 1.56-10.04]), literacy (AOR 0.6 [95% CI: 0.43-0.85]), body mass index (AOR 2.96 [95% CI: 2.08-4.2]), parity (AOR 1.78 [95% CI: 1.3-2.49]). Regular physical exercise should be used as the main tool in preventing GDM.

  7. Occupation and breast cancer: a Canadian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Brophy, James T; Keith, Margaret M; Gorey, Kevin M; Luginaah, Isaac; Laukkanen, Ethan; Hellyer, Deborah; Reinhartz, Abraham; Watterson, Andrew; Abu-Zahra, Hakam; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Schneider, Kenneth; Beck, Matthias; Gilbertson, Michael

    2006-09-01

    A local collaborative process was launched in Windsor, Ontario, Canada to explore the role of occupation as a risk factor for cancer. An initial hypothesis-generating study found an increased risk for breast cancer among women aged 55 years or younger who had ever worked in farming. On the basis of this result, a 2-year case-control study was undertaken to evaluate the lifetime occupational histories of women with breast cancer. The results indicate that women with breast cancer were nearly three times more likely to have worked in agriculture when compared to the controls (OR = 2.80 [95% CI, 1.6-4.8]). The risk for those who worked in agriculture and subsequently worked in automotive-related manufacturing was further elevated (OR = 4.0 [95% CI, 1.7-9.9]). The risk for those employed in agriculture and subsequently employed in health care was also elevated (OR = 2.3 [95% CI, 1.1-4.6]). Farming tended to be among the earlier jobs worked, often during adolescence. While this article has limitations including the small sample size and the lack of information regarding specific exposures, it does provide evidence of a possible association between farming and breast cancer. The findings indicate the need for further study to determine which aspects of farming may be of biological importance and to better understand the significance of timing of exposure in terms of cancer risk.

  8. Risk factors for syphilis in women: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Macêdo, Vilma Costa de; Lira, Pedro Israel Cabral de; Frias, Paulo Germano de; Romaguera, Luciana Maria Delgado; Caires, Silvana de Fátima Ferreira; Ximenes, Ricardo Arraes de Alencar

    2017-08-17

    To determine the sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors related to the occurrence of syphilis in women treated at public maternity hospitals. This is a case-control study (239 cases and 322 controls) with women admitted to seven maternity hospitals in the municipality of Recife, Brazil, from July 2013 to July 2014. Eligible women were recruited after the result of the VDRL (Venereal Disease Research Laboratory) under any titration. The selection of cases and controls was based on the result of the serology for syphilis using ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). The independent variables were grouped into: sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical and obstetric history, and health care in prenatal care and maternity hospital. Information was obtained by interview, during hospitalization, with the application of a questionnaire. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression to identify the predicting factors of the variable to be explained. The logistic regression analysis identified as determinant factors for gestational syphilis: education level of incomplete basic education or illiterate (OR = 2.02), lack of access to telephone (OR = 2.4), catholic religion (OR = 1.70 ), four or more pregnancies (OR = 2.2), three or more sexual partners in the last year (OR = 3.1), use of illicit drugs before the age of 18 (OR = 3.0), and use of illicit drugs by the current partner (OR = 1.7). Only one to three prenatal appointments (OR = 3.5) and a previous history of sexually transmitted infection (OR = 9.7) were also identified as determinant factors. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and health care factors are associated with the occurrence of syphilis in women and should be taken into account in the elaboration of universal strategies aimed at the prevention and control of syphilis, but with a focus on situations of greater vulnerability. Determinar os fatores sociodemográficos, comportamentais e de assistência à sa

  9. Violence against women and gastroschisis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ortega-García, Juan Antonio; Soldin, Offie P; Sánchez-Sauco, Miguel Felipe; Cánovas-Conesa, Alicia; Gomaríz-Peñalver, Virtudes; Jaimes-Vega, Diana Carolina; Perales, Joseph E; Cárceles-Alvarez, Alberto; Martínez-Ros, Maria Teresa; Ruiz, Daniel

    2013-10-17

    Gastroschisis, a birth defect characterized by herniated fetal abdominal wall, occurs more commonly in infants born to teenage and young mothers. Ischemia of the vascular vitelline vessels is the likely mechanism of pathogenesis. Given that chronic stress and violence against women are risk factors for cardiovascular disease we explored whether these may represent risk factors for gastroschisis, when they occur during pregnancy. A case-control study was conducted, with 15 incident cases of children born with gastroschisis in the Region of Murcia, Spain, from December 2007 to June 2013. Forty concurrent controls were recruited at gestation weeks 20-24 or post-partum. All mothers of cases and controls completed a comprehensive, in-person, 'green sheet' questionnaire on environmental exposures. Mothers of children with gastroschisis were younger, smoked more cigarettes per week relative to controls, were exposed to higher amounts of illegal drugs, and suffered from domestic violence more frequently than the controls. Multivariable logistic regression analysis highlights periconceptional 'gender-related violence' (OR: 16.6, 95% CI 2.7 to 101.7) and younger maternal age (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0-1.3). Violence against pregnant women is associated with birth defects, and should be studied in more depth as a cause-effect teratogenic. Psychosocial risk factors, including gender-based violence, are important for insuring the health and safety of the pregnant mother and the fetus.

  10. Violence against Women and Gastroschisis: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ortega-García, Juan Antonio; Soldin, Offie P.; Sánchez-Sauco, Miguel Felipe; Cánovas-Conesa, Alicia; Gomaríz-Peñalver, Virtudes; Jaimes-Vega, Diana Carolina; Perales, Joseph E.; Cárceles-Alvarez, Alberto; Martínez-Ros, Maria Teresa; Ruiz, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gastroschisis, a birth defect characterized by herniated fetal abdominal wall, occurs more commonly in infants born to teenage and young mothers. Ischemia of the vascular vitelline vessels is the likely mechanism of pathogenesis. Given that chronic stress and violence against women are risk factors for cardiovascular disease we explored whether these may represent risk factors for gastroschisis, when they occur during pregnancy. A case-control study was conducted, with 15 incident cases of children born with gastroschisis in the Region of Murcia, Spain, from December 2007 to June 2013. Forty concurrent controls were recruited at gestation weeks 20–24 or post-partum. All mothers of cases and controls completed a comprehensive, in-person, ‘green sheet’ questionnaire on environmental exposures. Results: Mothers of children with gastroschisis were younger, smoked more cigarettes per week relative to controls, were exposed to higher amounts of illegal drugs, and suffered from domestic violence more frequently than the controls. Multivariable logistic regression analysis highlights periconceptional ‘gender-related violence’ (OR: 16.6, 95% CI 2.7 to 101.7) and younger maternal age (OR 1.1, 95% CI 1.0–1.3). Conclusions: Violence against pregnant women is associated with birth defects, and should be studied in more depth as a cause-effect teratogenic. Psychosocial risk factors, including gender-based violence, are important for insuring the health and safety of the pregnant mother and the fetus. PMID:24142184

  11. Nutrient patterns and asthenozoospermia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Eslamian, G; Amirjannati, N; Rashidkhani, B; Sadeghi, M-R; Hekmatdoost, A

    2017-04-01

    The association of dietary nutrient patterns and sperm motility is not yet well elucidated, and previous studies have just focused on the isolated nutrients. This case-control study examined the association of nutrient patterns with asthenozoospermia among Iranian men. In total, 107 incident asthenozoospermic men and 235 age-matched controls were interviewed through the infertility clinics in Tehran, Iran, from January 2012 to November 2013. Semen quality data were analysed according to the fifth edition of WHO guideline. Nutrient patterns were identified using principal component analysis based on semiquantitative 168-item food frequency questionnaires. All nutrient intakes were energy-adjusted by the residual method. In principal component analysis, three dietary patterns emerged. The first pattern, which was high in vitamin E, vitamin D, vitamin C, zinc, folate, total fibre, selenium and polyunsaturated fatty acids, was significantly associated with lower risk of asthenozoospermia. After adjustment for potential confounders, participants in the highest tertile of the first pattern scores had 51% lower risk of asthenozoospermia compared with those in the lowest (p-trend: .004). Our findings suggest that adherence to the pattern comprising mainly of antioxidant nutrients may be inversely associated with asthenozoospermia.

  12. Periodontal disease and spontaneous preterm birth: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Stephen; Frydman, Albert; Cox, Stephen; Brant, Rollin; Needoba, Sheilia; Eley, Barry; Sauve, Reg

    2006-01-01

    Background Several studies have suggested an association between periodontal disease and prematurity but this finding has not been consistently observed. Methods Case control study. Cases (n = 50) were women who had delivered after spontaneous preterm labor at <35 weeks gestation. Two groups of controls (n = 101) were recruited: women who were undelivered but at a preterm gestation and women who delivered at term. A standard, clinical, periodontal examination was performed and gingival crevicular fluid was obtained from standardized locations and tested for neutrophil elastase along with the bacterial enzymes gingipain and dipeptidylpeptidase. Data were analyzed with Fisher's exact tests, ANOVA and multivariate logistic regression. Results There was no difference in the proportion of sites with significant attachment loss (≥3 mm): Cases-3.2%, Controls-2.2% p = 0.21. The gingival crevicular fluid concentrations of elastase and gingipain were elevated in cases vs. controls 238.8 uU/ul vs. 159.6 uU/ul p = .007 and 2.70 uU/ul vs. 1.56 uU/ul p = .001. On multivariate analysis, the mean log concentration of elastase, but not of gingipain, remained a significant predictor of preterm labor p = .0.015. Conclusion We found no evidence that clinical periodontal disease is associated with spontaneous preterm birth. Elevated gingival crevicular fluid levels of elastase were associated with preterm birth but further research is needed before this can be assumed to be a causal relationship. PMID:16848912

  13. A case-control study of gastric cancer in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, N; Plummer, M; Vivas, J; Moreno, V; De Sanjosé, S; Lopez, G; Oliver, W

    2001-08-01

    A case-control study to evaluate risk factors for gastric cancer was carried out among 292 cases of gastric cancer and 485 controls in a high-risk area of Venezuela. Subjects were interviewed using a structured questionnaire, which elicited information on residential history, socio-economic status, family history of gastric diseases, smoking, drinking and dietary habits. Habitual diet was estimated from a meal-structured food frequency questionnaire on 75 food items. There was a strong inverse association with social class, as measured by education and by indicators of poverty. The results of the dietary analysis suggest that a diet high in starch and low in meat, fish and fresh vegetables increases risk of gastric cancer. A protective effect was observed for frequent consumption of allium vegetables. Inverse associations were found with height, which may reflect nutritional status in childhood, and with refrigerator use in the first two decades of life. Alcohol and tobacco consumption was investigated among males only, since the prevalence of alcohol and tobacco use was very low in females. Alcohol drinkers were at higher risk than non-drinkers and there was a small excess risk for current smokers compared with never smokers. There was some evidence of familial aggregation of gastric cancer. These findings will have important implications in planning preventive strategies for gastric cancer in Venezuela.

  14. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Susan Martins; de Araújo, Gleide Santos; Santos, Carlos Antônio de Souza Teles; de Oliveira, Maeli Gomes; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. METHODS It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial), and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. RESULTS The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2) years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3) years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61%) were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04–5.42), which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12–7.94). CONCLUSIONS The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies. PMID:28099656

  15. Case-control study of a gastroschisis cluster in Nevada.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Leslie; Loomis, Dana; Lottritz, Lisa; Slotnick, Robert Nathan; Oki, Earle; Todd, Randall

    2009-11-01

    To identify potential risk factors associated with a sudden increase in gastroschisis cases in northern Nevada. Case-control study. Medical centers and a pregnancy care center in Reno, Nevada. Participants (n = 14) were women who gave birth to infants with gastroschisis at either of the 2 medical centers in Reno, Nevada, from April 5, 2007, through April 4, 2008. Controls (n = 57) were selected from the same pregnancy center providing perinatal care to the cases and were matched 4:1 to the case mothers by maternal date of birth within 1 year. Environmental exposures and illnesses during pregnancy. Association of gastroschisis with illnesses, medications, or environmental exposures. Gastroschisis was associated with the use of methamphetamine (odds ratio [OR], 7.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.35-37.99) or any vasoconstrictive recreational drug (methamphetamine, amphetamine, cocaine, ecstasy) (OR, 4.46; 95% CI, 1.21-16.44) before pregnancy. When we limited self-reported illnesses to those occurring during the first trimester of pregnancy, chest colds (OR, 16.77; 95% CI, 1.88-150.27) and sore throats (OR, 12.72; 95% CI, 1.32-122.52) were associated with gastroschisis. These findings add strength to the hypothesis that use of methamphetamine and related drugs is a risk factor for gastroschisis and raise questions about the risks associated with infections.

  16. Valid statistical inference methods for a case-control study with missing data.

    PubMed

    Tian, Guo-Liang; Zhang, Chi; Jiang, Xuejun

    2016-05-19

    The main objective of this paper is to derive the valid sampling distribution of the observed counts in a case-control study with missing data under the assumption of missing at random by employing the conditional sampling method and the mechanism augmentation method. The proposed sampling distribution, called the case-control sampling distribution, can be used to calculate the standard errors of the maximum likelihood estimates of parameters via the Fisher information matrix and to generate independent samples for constructing small-sample bootstrap confidence intervals. Theoretical comparisons of the new case-control sampling distribution with two existing sampling distributions exhibit a large difference. Simulations are conducted to investigate the influence of the three different sampling distributions on statistical inferences. One finding is that the conclusion by the Wald test for testing independency under the two existing sampling distributions could be completely different (even contradictory) from the Wald test for testing the equality of the success probabilities in control/case groups under the proposed distribution. A real cervical cancer data set is used to illustrate the proposed statistical methods.

  17. Independent Study in Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Idaho Univ., Moscow.

    This guide to independent study in Idaho begins with introductory information on the following aspects of independent study: the Independent Study in Idaho consortium, student eligibility, special needs, starting dates, registration, costs, textbooks and instructional materials, e-mail and faxing, refunds, choosing a course, time limits, speed…

  18. Childhood trauma in multiple sclerosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Spitzer, Carsten; Bouchain, Miriam; Winkler, Liza Y; Wingenfeld, Katja; Gold, Stefan M; Grabe, Hans Joergen; Barnow, Sven; Otte, Christian; Heesen, Christoph

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the association between childhood trauma and multiple sclerosis (MS) by comparing histories of child abuse and neglect between patients with MS and adults from the general population in a cross-sectional case-control study. Previous research has demonstrated a connection between MS and a variety of emotional stressors, but childhood trauma, which is known to have long-lasting negative consequences for physical health decades into adulthood, has not been studied. The self-reported Childhood Trauma Questionnaire for the assessment of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse and emotional and physical neglect was administered to 234 patients with definite MS and 885 adults from the general population. After adjusting for sociodemographic factors and current depression, patients with MS scored significantly higher in all Childhood Trauma Questionnaire subscales apart from physical abuse and neglect than adults from the general population. Adjusted odds ratios for these types of childhood trauma were higher in the MS group than in controls, ranging from 2.0 for emotional neglect (95% confidence interval = 1.3-3.2) to 3.4 for emotional abuse (95% confidence interval = 2.0-5.7). Although childhood trauma was not associated with the degree of current MS-related disability, patients with MS with histories of physical and/or sexual abuse had significantly higher relapse rates than patients without early-life stress. Our findings suggest an association between childhood trauma and MS in this cross-sectional study. Larger prospective longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the relationship between early-life stress and the risk for MS in genetically susceptible individuals.

  19. Multiple Sclerosis Associated Risk Factors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    POOROLAJAL, Jalal; MAZDEH, Mehrdokht; SAATCHI, Mohammad; TALEBI GHANE, Elaheh; BIDERAFSH, Azam; LOTFI, Bahar; FERYADRES, Mohammad; PAJOHI, Khabat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hamadan Province is one of the high-risk regions in Iran for Multiple sclerosis (MS). A majority of the epidemiological studies conducted in Iran addressing MS are descriptive. This study was conducted to assess MS and its associated risk factors in Hamadan Province, the west of Iran. Methods: This case-control study compared 100 patients with MS (case group) and 100 patients with acute infectious diseases (control group) from September 2013 to March 2014. A checklist was used to assess the demographic, medical, and family history of the patients. The Friedman-Rosenman questionnaire was also used to assess personality type. Statistical analysis was performed using logistic regression model with Stata 11 software program. Results: The adjusted odds ratio (OR) estimate of MS was 4.37 (95% CI: 2.33, 8.20) for females compared to males; 0.15 (95% CI: 0.06, 0.43) for people aged above 50 years compared to aged 14 to 29 years; 0.44 (95% CI: 0.21, 0.91) for overweight or obese people compared to normal weights. Crude OR indicated a significant association between the occurrence of MS and exclusive breast feeding, season of birth, and smoking. However, the association was not statistically significant after adjustment for other covariates. Conclusion: The risk of MS is significantly lower in male gender, obese/overweight, and old people. Furthermore, non-smoking, non-exclusive breast-feeding, and born in autumn may increase the risk of MS but need further investigation. However, long-term large prospective cohort studies are needed to investigate the true effect of the potential risk factors on MS. PMID:26744707

  20. [Oxidative stress and longevity; a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Belenguer Varea, Ángel; Mohamed Abdelaziz, Kheira; Avellana Zaragoza, Juan Antonio; Borrás Blasco, Consuelo; Sanchis Aguilar, Paula; Viña Ribes, José

    2015-01-01

    Human longevity is a complex issue influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Oxidative stress (OE) could play an important role in this process. Succesful aging could be related with the organism ability facing OE. In the present study we compared malondialdehyde (MDA) and oxidized proteins (OP) plasma levels, in elderly people older than 97 years and 70-80 years old, to better understand the effects of OE on human longevity. Population-based case control study. We considered as cases patients who were born and live on la Ribera county in Valencia (Spain) older than 97 years old and who accepted to participate in the study. Controls were from the same poblational base, chosen randomly, and 70-80 years old. We made a descriptive analysis of sociodemographic, clinic and functional variables; an odds ratio (OR) estimation of being centenarian by OP and MDA quartiles; and a tendency analysis by Mantel-Haenszel test. Twenty eight cases and 31 controls were included. Functional state and robust percentage were worse in cases. MDA (1,44±0,45 vs 1,84±0,59, p=0,005), and OP (64,29±15,73 vs. 76,52±13,44, p=0,002) levels, were significantly lower in cases. The OR of being centenarian in lower/higher quartile were 3,8 for MDA and 5,7 for OP, with a Mantel-Haenszel signification of 0,029 and 0,044 respectively. In our study OE level were lower in centenarians than in younger elderly, and the lower the OE grade, the higher were the likelihood of being centenarian. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  1. Tumor diagnosis preceding Parkinson's disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    D'Amelio, Marco; Ragonese, Paolo; Morgante, Letterio; Epifanio, Antonio; Callari, Graziella; Salemi, Giuseppe; Savettieri, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    Lower cancer risk in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared to the general population has been reported. However, most of the studies were based on death certificates. We designed a case-control study to estimate the association of tumor preceding PD onset and PD. PD patients were matched by age and gender to PD-free individuals, randomly selected from the municipalities of residence of cases. Occurrence of tumors preceding PD onset was assessed through a structured questionnaire. Neoplasms were categorized as benign, malignant, or of uncertain classification, and endocrine-related or not. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated using conditional logistic regression and adjusted for tumor categories and risk factors. We included 222 PD patients. Frequency of cancer was 6.8% for cases, 12.6% for controls. PD patients had a decreased risk for neoplasms (adjusted OR, 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-0.7). Risk was reduced only for women (adjusted OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7). PD patients had a decreased risk both for malignant (adjusted OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.1-2.5) and nonmalignant neoplasms (adjusted OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.7). Still, risk was decreased for endocrine-related tumors (adjusted OR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9) and non-endocrine-related tumors (adjusted OR, 0.4; 95% CI, 0.1-0.9). Our study confirms the inverse association between PD and neoplasms reported in previous epidemiologic studies.

  2. Zinc status in febrile seizure: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Salehiomran, Mohammad Reza; Mahzari, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Febrile seizure is the most common type of seizure in children. Their incidence is 2-5%. There are different hypotheses about relationship between neurotransmitters and trace elements (such as zinc) and febrile seizure. Zinc, as a major element of some enzymes, plays an important role in the central nervous system (CNS) and can affect some inhibitory mechanisms of CNS. The aim of the present study was to determine whether there were any changes in serum zinc level in children with febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. This case-control study was performed on 100 patients aged 6 months to 6 years. This study was conducted between January and August 2012, on 50 children with febrile seizures (case) and 50 febrile children without seizures (control), that were referred to Amirkola Children Hospital (a referral hospital in the north of Iran). Two groups were matched for age and sex. The serum zinc levels in the both groups were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. The mean serum zinc level was 0.585±0.166 mg/L and 0.704±0.179 mg/L in the case group and the control group, respectively (p=0.001). The mean serum zinc level was significantly lower in the febrile seizure group compared to the control groups. Our findings revealed that serum zinc level was significantly lower in children with simple febrile seizure in comparison with febrile children without seizure. It can emphasize the hypothesis that there is a relation between serum zinc level and febrile seizure in children.

  3. Occupational Risk Factors for COPD: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Drame, Moustapha; Lebargy, Francois; Deschamps, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this research was to examine the occupational risk factors for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Diseases (COPD) in a range of occupations. Methods Eleven occupations involving different types of exposure were observed in this multicenter case-control study. Controls and cases were matched for sex, age and smoking. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs). Results A total of 1,519 participants were initially recruited between September 2004 and September 2012. After matching, 547 pairs were obtained. The mean age was 56.3 +/- 10.4 years. Smelter workers were the only ones with an increased risk of COPD in this study (OR = 7.6, p < 0.0001, 95% CI [4.5, 12.9]). Physical activity was protective (OR = 0.7), while living in the city was a risk (OR = 1.6). The main used metals were cast iron, aluminum and alloys. Molds and cores were mainly made from sand and synthetic resins. Machine maintenance (65.2%), molding (49.6%), finishing (41.1%) and casting (41.0%) were the most common activities. Almost all workers (95.1%) cleaned the floors and machines with a brush or compressed air. Conclusions This study demonstrates the importance of occupational factors in the genesis of COPD, especially among smelter workers. As with the fight against smoking-related disease, the removal or substitution of recognized hazardous agents is the best way of preventing the onset of COPD. This is why it is essential to continue research on its occupational risk factors. PMID:27487078

  4. [Risk factors associated with trigger finger. Case-control study].

    PubMed

    De la Parra-Márquez, Miguel Leonardo; Tamez-Cavazos, Roberto; Zertuche-Cedillo, Luis; Martínez-Pérez, Juan José; Velasco-Rodríguez, Víctor; Cisneros-Pérez, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    We undertook this study to identify risk factors in our population associated with trigger finger. The study was conducted at the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, UMAE 21, Monterrey, Nuevo Leon, Mexico. This was a case-control, retrospective, and observational study. There were 250 patients in each group. For cases, patients who were operated on for trigger finger from March 2006 to August 2006 were included. Controls included patients admitted to the Emergency Department with hand injuries that fulfilled the selection criteria. Risk factors analyzed were diabetes, hypertension, smoking, sex, age, weight, and 19 different occupations. Mean age of the cases was 52 years (SE +/- 14.19 years) with a median and mode of 53 years. The right hand was the most common with the middle, thumb, ring, index and little fingers, respectively. A significant statistical relationship was found: females (OR 7.57, 95% CI 5.07-11.31); diabetes (OR 3.72, 95% CI 2.43-5.70); obesity (OR 1.49, 95% CI 1.02-2.19). With regard to occupation, a statistical relationship was found: homemaker (OR 2.44, 95% CI 1.62-3.69); seamstress (OR 4.8, 95% CI 1.3-21.6); and secretary (OR 2.74, 95% CI 1.38-5.52). Trigger finger is a common pathology in our population and is more frequent in women >53 years old. It may be related to diabetes, body mass index (obesity) and certain occupations such as secretary, seamstress and homemaker.

  5. Surgical site infections in breast surgery: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vilar-Compte, Diana; Jacquemin, Benedicte; Robles-Vidal, Carlos; Volkow, Patricia

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the frequency of surgical site infections (SSIs) and identify associated risk factors for each type of breast surgery at a cancer hospital. We used a nested case-control design. Between February 1, 2000 and July 31, 2000, all breast surgeries performed were recorded on a daily basis. After hospital discharge, we evaluated patients simultaneously with surgeons three times a week for 30 days or longer. The odds ratio (OR) was estimated using logistic regression analysis. The study followed 280 patients (298 wounds). Altogether, 77 SSIs were detected, for an overall SSI rate of 25.8% (77/298). For excisions, conservative surgery, and radical mastectomies the SSI rates were 1.4%, 18.0%, and 38.3%, respectively. Excisions were excluded ( n = 68) for risk factor analysis. After multivariate analysis, risk factors associated with SSIs were obesity [OR 2.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-4.3], concomitant chemotherapy and radiation (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.2-4.3), radical surgery (OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.1-8.6), insertion of a second drain during the late postoperative period (OR 3.7, 95% CI 1.8-7.8), and drainage duration > or = 19 days (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The bacteria most frequently isolated were Pseudomonas aeruginosa ( n = 18 ), Serratia sp. ( n = 18), Staphylococcus aureus ( n = 10), and Staphylococcus epidermidis ( n = 10). Poor compliance with infection control practices and wound management was detected throughout the study period. The overall frequency of SSIs for mastectomies was higher than the reported rates, which was principally related to the more radical surgery required for advanced-stage disease, preoperative irradiation, and inadequate wound and drain care.

  6. Melanoma and occupation: results of a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Fritschi, L; Siemiatycki, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Associations between occupational exposures and the occurrence of cutaneous melanoma were examined as part of a large population based case-control study of 19 cancer sites. METHODS: Cases were men aged 35 to 70 years old, resident in Montreal, Canada, with a new histologically confirmed cutaneous melanoma (n = 103). There were two control groups, a randomly selected population control group (n = 533), and a cancer control group (n = 533) randomly selected from among subjects with other types of cancer in the large study. Odds ratios for the occurrence of melanoma were calculated for each exposure circumstance for which there were more than four exposed cases (85 substances, 13 occupations, and 20 industries) adjusting for age, ethnicity, and number of years of schooling. RESULTS: Significantly increased risk of melanoma was found for exposure to four substances (fabric dust, plastic dust, trichloroethylene, and a group containing paints used on surfaces other than metal and varnishes used on surfaces other than wood), three occupations (warehouse clerks, salesmen, and miners and quarrymen), and two industries (clothing and non-metallic mineral products). CONCLUSIONS: Most of the occupational circumstances examined were not associated with melanoma, nor is there any strong evidence from previous research that any of those are risk factors. For the few occupational circumstances which were associated in our data with melanoma, the statistical evidence was weak, and there is little or no supporting evidence in the scientific literature. On the whole, there is no persuasive evidence of occupational risk factors for melanoma, but the studies have been too small or have involved too much misclassification of exposure for this conclusion to be definitive. PMID:8704857

  7. Facial dermatosis associated with Demodex: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ya-e; Peng, Yan; Wang, Xiang-lan; Wu, Li-ping; Wang, Mei; Yan, Hu-ling; Xiao, Sheng-xiang

    2011-12-01

    Demodex has been considered to be related with multiple skin disorders, but controversy persists. In this case-control study, a survey was conducted with 860 dermatosis patients aged 12 to 84 years in Xi'an, China to identify the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex. Amongst the patients, 539 suffered from facial dermatosis and 321 suffered from non-facial dermatosis. Demodex mites were sampled and examined using the skin pressurization method. Multivariate regression analysis was applied to analyze the association between facial dermatosis and Demodex infestation, and to identify the risk factors of Demodex infestation. The results showed that total detection rate of Demodex was 43.0%. Patients aged above 30 years had higher odds of Demodex infestation than those under 30 years. Compared to patients with neutral skin, patients with mixed, oily, or dry skin were more likely to be infested with Demodex (odds ratios (ORs) were 2.5, 2.4, and 1.6, respectively). Moreover, Demodex infestation was found to be statistically associated with rosacea (OR=8.1), steroid-induced dermatitis (OR=2.7), seborrheic dermatitis (OR=2.2), and primary irritation dermatitis (OR=2.1). In particular, ORs calculated from the severe infestation (≥5 mites/cm(2)) rate were significantly higher than those of the total rate. Therefore, we concluded that Demodex is associated with rosacea, steroid-induced dermatitis, seborrheic dermatitis, and primary irritation dermatitis. The rate of severe infestation is found to be more correlated with various dermatosis than the total infestation rate. The risk factors of Demodex infestation, age, and skin types were identified. Our study also suggested that good hygiene practice might reduce the chances of demodicosis and Demodex infestation.

  8. Risk factors for psoriasis: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Slavenka; Raznatovic, Milena; Marinkovic, Jelena; Jankovic, Janko; Maksimovic, Natasa

    2009-06-01

    A case-control study of 110 consecutive psoriatic outpatients and 200 unmatched controls was carried out in order to analyze the association of psoriasis with smoking habits, alcohol consumption, family history of psoriasis and stressful life events. Stressful life events were assessed with Paykel's Interview for Recent Life Events, a semi-structured interview covering 63 life events. According to our results, the risk of psoriasis is higher in urban dwellers (odds ratio [OR] = 3.61; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.99-13.18), patients who were divorced (OR = 5.69; 95% CI = 2.26-14.34) and those exposed to environmental tobacco smoke at home (OR = 2.29; 95% CI = 1.12-4.67). Alcohol consumption (OR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1.26-5.17), family history of psoriasis (OR = 33.96; 95% CI = 14.14-81.57) and change in work conditions (OR = 8.34; 95% CI = 1.86-37.43) are also risk factors for psoriasis. Separate analyses for men and women showed that the risk of developing psoriasis was stronger in men with a family history of psoriasis (OR = 30.39; 95% CI = 6.72-137.42) than in women (OR = 16.99; 95% CI = 7.21-40.07). The effect of environmental tobacco smoke at home was found only in women (OR = 2.44; 95% CI = 1.26-4.73). Future well-designed epidemiological studies need to be performed in order to determine whether lifestyle factors and stress could be risk factors triggering or aggravating psoriasis.

  9. Toxocariasis in Waste Pickers: A Case Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme

    2013-01-01

    Background The epidemiology of Toxocara infection in humans in Mexico has been poorly explored. There is a lack of information about Toxocara infection in waste pickers. Aims Determine the seroepidemiology of Toxocara infection in waste pickers. Methods Through a case control study design, the presence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies was determined in 90 waste pickers and 90 age- and gender-matched controls using an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Associations of Toxocara exposure with socio-demographic, work, clinical, and behavioral data of the waste pickers were also evaluated. Results The seroprevalence of anti-Toxocara IgG antibodies was significantly higher in waste pickers (12/90: 13%) than in control subjects (1/90: 1%) (OR  = 14; 95% CI: 2–288). The seroprevalence was not influenced by socio-demographic or work characteristics. In contrast, increased seroprevalence was found in waste pickers suffering from gastritis, and reflex and visual impairments. Multivariate analysis showed that Toxocara exposure was associated with a low frequency of eating out of home (OR  = 26; 95% CI: 2–363) and negatively associated with consumption of chicken meat (OR  = 0.03; 95% CI: 0.003–0.59). Other behavioral characteristics such as animal contacts or exposure to soil were not associated with Toxocara seropositivity. Conclusions 1) Waste pickers are a risk group for Toxocara infection. 2) Toxocara is impacting the health of waste pickers. This is the first report of Toxocara exposure in waste pickers and of associations of gastritis and reflex impairment with Toxocara seropositivity. Results warrant for further research. PMID:23349987

  10. Hyperhomocysteinemia among Omani autistic children: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Amanat; Waly, Mostafa I; Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Essa, Musthafa M; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M; Deth, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    High serum homocysteine (Hcy) level is regarded as an indicator for impairment of folate-dependent methionine cycle and is associated with oxidative stress. In a case control study, we evaluated eighty 3-5 years old Omani children (40 diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder and 40 their age and gender matched controls) for their fasting serum homocysteine levels as a biomarker of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Serum folate and vitamin B(12) status were also evaluated. The serum homocysteine was measured using an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique whereas folate and vitamin B(12) were measured using an automated random access immune-assay system. The results indicated that mean serum Hcy levels were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in autistic children (20.1 ± 3.3 µmol/L) as compared to controls (9.64 ± 2.1 µmol/L). Significantly (P < 0.05) lower serum folate (1.8 ± 0.4 µg/L) and vitamin B(12) (191.1 ± 0.9 pg/mL) levels were observed in autistic children as compared to controls (6.1 ± 0.6 µg/L and 288.9 ± 1.3 pg/mL, respectively). The levels of homocysteine in autistic children were also much higher as compared to normal reference values (5-15 µmol/L). The results suggest that high fasting serum homocysteine and low folate and vitamin B(12) levels could be used as clinical biomarkers for an early diagnosis and management of ASD.

  11. Determinants of Brushite Stone Formation: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Siener, Roswitha; Netzer, Linda; Hesse, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The occurrence of brushite stones has increased during recent years. However, the pathogenic factors driving the development of brushite stones remain unclear. Methods Twenty-eight brushite stone formers and 28 age-, sex- and BMI-matched healthy individuals were enrolled in this case-control study. Anthropometric, clinical, 24 h urinary parameters and dietary intake from 7-day weighed food records were assessed. Results Pure brushite stones were present in 46% of patients, while calcium oxalate was the major secondary stone component. Urinary pH and oxalate excretion were significantly higher, whereas urinary citrate was lower in patients as compared to healthy controls. Despite lower dietary intake, urinary calcium excretion was significantly higher in brushite stone patients. Binary logistic regression analysis revealed pH>6.50 (OR 7.296; p = 0.035), calcium>6.40 mmol/24 h (OR 25.213; p = 0.001) and citrate excretion <2.600 mmol/24 h (OR 15.352; p = 0.005) as urinary risk factors for brushite stone formation. A total of 56% of patients exhibited distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA). Urinary pH, calcium and citrate excretion did not significantly differ between patients with or without dRTA. Conclusions Hypercalciuria, a diminished citrate excretion and an elevated pH turned out to be the major urinary determinants of brushite stone formation. Interestingly, urinary phosphate was not associated with urolithiasis. The increased urinary oxalate excretion, possibly due to decreased calcium intake, promotes the risk of mixed stone formation with calcium oxalate. Neither dietary factors nor dRTA can account as cause for hypercalciuria, higher urinary pH and diminished citrate excretion. Further research is needed to define the role of dRTA in brushite stone formation and to evaluate the hypothesis of an acquired acidification defect. PMID:24265740

  12. [Risk factors associated with preeclampsia: case-control study].

    PubMed

    Morgan-Ortiz, Fred; Calderón-Lara, Sergio Alberto; Martínez-Félix, Jesús Israel; González-Beltrán, Aurelio; Quevedo-Castro, Everardo

    2010-03-01

    Preeclampsia is one of the most frequent and serious complication of pregnancy characterized by systemic perfusion reduction generated by vasospasm and activation of coagulation systems. To evaluate the association between preeclampsia sociodemographics and obstetrics antecedents. An unmatched case-control study was carried out in which all the clinical registries of patients with preeclampsia (cases: n = 196) assisted in the period 2003-2007 in the Hospital Civil of Culiacan, Sinaloa State of Mexico were analyzed. As controls the clinical registries of patients assisted during the same period were selected at random but that they didn't show up preeclampsia (n = 470). The association of preeclampsia with socioeconomic level, tobacco use, alcohol use, gynecologic and obstetric antecedents (sexual partners, pregnancies, deliveries and abortions number, prenatal control, contraceptive method) and previous pregnancy with preeclampsia were analyzed. There were not association between tobacco use (OR: 3.05; 95% CI: 0.81-11.48), beginning of sexual activity (p = 0.1509), number of sexual partners (OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 0.83-1.83; p = 0.3009) and sexual cohabitation less than 12 months (OR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.63-1.27). The alcoholism (OR: 5.77; 95% CI: 1.48-22.53), socioeconomic level (p < 0.05), pregnancy previous with preeclampsia (RM:14.81; 95% CI: 1.77-123.85; p = 0.0006) were associated with preeclampsia. There were differences in the use of the contraceptive method between groups (p < 0.005). Preeclampsia was significantly associated with the alcoholism, low socioeconomic level and pregnancy previous with preeclampsia.

  13. Comorbidities in rotator cuff disease: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Titchener, Andrew G; White, Jonathan J E; Hinchliffe, Sally R; Tambe, Amol A; Hubbard, Richard B; Clark, David I

    2014-09-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a common condition in the general population, but relatively little is known about its associated risk factors. We have undertaken a large case-control study using The Health Improvement Network database to assess and to quantify the relative contributions of some constitutional and environmental risk factors for rotator cuff disease in the community. Our data set included 5000 patients with rotator cuff disease who were individually matched with a single control by age, sex, and general practice (primary care practice). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years (interquartile range, 44-65 years). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk factors associated with rotator cuff disease were Achilles tendinitis (odds ratio [OR] = 1.78), trigger finger (OR = 1.99), lateral epicondylitis (OR = 1.71), and carpal tunnel syndrome (OR = 1.55). Oral corticosteroid therapy (OR = 2.03), oral antidiabetic use (OR = 1.66), insulin use (OR = 1.77), and "overweight" body mass index of 25.1 to 30 (OR = 1.15) were also significantly associated. Current or previous smoking history, body mass index of greater than 30, any alcohol intake, medial epicondylitis, de Quervain syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis were not found to be associated with rotator cuff disease. We have identified a number of comorbidities and risk factors for rotator cuff disease. These include lateral epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, trigger finger, Achilles tendinitis, oral corticosteroid use, and diabetes mellitus. The findings should alert the clinician to comorbid pathologic processes and guide future research into the etiology of this condition. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A case-control study to detect modifiable risk factors for colonization with vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    PubMed

    Loeb, M; Salama, S; Armstrong-Evans, M; Capretta, G; Olde, J

    1999-11-01

    A case-control study was conducted to determine the modifiable risk factors associated with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) colonization during a hospital outbreak. Cephalosporin use was identified as the only independent risk factor (odds ratio, 13.8; 95% confidence interval, 2.5-76.3; P = .01). Nursing work-load intensity was not associated with VRE colonization in this study.

  15. Acromegalic axial arthropathy: a clinical case-control study.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, Raffaele; De Brasi, Davide; Pivonello, Rosario; Marzullo, Paolo; Manguso, Francesco; Sodano, Antonio; Oriente, Pasquale; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria

    2004-02-01

    Arthropathy is the major cause of morbidity in acromegaly. To feature the spinal involvement, 54 patients with active acromegaly (27 men, 27 women; age range, 21-69 yr) and 54 sex-, age-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this observational analytical prospective case-control study. A questionnaire to describe onset, duration, and severity of articular symptoms; rheumatological examination, including vertebral and chest mobility, Schober test, thorax expansion, and axial radiological study; and IGF-I, GH, insulin, and glucose level measurement (baseline and after an oral glucose tolerance test) was used to investigate the prevalence of arthropathy and correlate these findings with hormonal parameters. Axial arthropathy was found in 28 patients (52%) and 12 controls (22%; chi(2) = 8.9; P = 0.003). In detail, spinal mobility was reduced in 30 patients (56%) and 10 controls (18%; chi(2) = 14.3; P < 0.0001), thoracic cage was involved in six patients (11%), alterations of spinal profile were observed in 37 patients (68%) and 15 controls (28%; chi(2) = 16.3; P < 0.0001), and increased L2 vertebra diameters were observed in 34 patients (63%) and none of the controls (chi(2) = 46.7; P < 0.0001). Narrowing and widening of L2-L3 disk space were found in 20 (37%) and seven (13%) patients, respectively. Features of diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) were found in 11 patients (20%) and none of the controls (chi(2) = 10.1; P < 0.001). Disease duration was correlated with vertebral body height (P = 0.001) or intervertebral space height (P = 0.02), and lumbar mobility with thorax expansion (P = 0.004); DISH severity was correlated with basal (P = 0.04) and peak (P = 0.01) glucose levels after glucose load. In conclusion, chronic GH and IGF-I excess typically affects the axial skeleton with development of severe alterations of spine morphology and function until features of DISH occur. An early diagnosis of acromegaly is mandatory to reduce

  16. Spatial Analysis of Childhood Cancer: A Case/Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Tamayo, Ibon; García-Pérez, Javier; Morales, Antonio; Pardo Romaguera, Elena; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Background Childhood cancer was the leading cause of death among children aged 1-14 years for 2012 in Spain. Leukemia has the highest incidence, followed by tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphomas (Hodgkin lymphoma, HL, and Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, NHL). Spatial distribution of childhood cancer cases has been under concern with the aim of identifying potential risk factors. Objective The two objectives are to study overall spatial clustering and cluster detection of cases of the three main childhood cancer causes, looking to increase etiological knowledge. Methods We ran a case-control study. The cases were children aged 0 to 14 diagnosed with leukemia, lymphomas (HL and NHL) or CNS neoplasm in five Spanish regions for the period 1996-2011. As a control group, we used a sample from the Birth Registry matching every case by year of birth, autonomous region of residence and sex with six controls. We geocoded and validated the address of the cases and controls. For our two objectives we used two different methodologies. For the first, for overall spatial clustering detection, we used the differences of K functions from the spatial point patterns perspective proposed by Diggle and Chetwynd and the second, for cluster detection, we used the spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff with a level for statistical significance of 0.05. Results We had 1062 cases of leukemia, 714 cases of CNS, 92 of HL and 246 of NHL. Accordingly we had 6 times the number of controls, 6372 controls for leukemia, 4284 controls for CNS, 552 controls for HL and 1476 controls for NHL. We found variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers, including some overall spatial clustering for specific regions and distances. We did not find statistically significant clusters. Conclusions The variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers could be partially explained by the differences in the spatial distribution of

  17. Spatial analysis of childhood cancer: a case/control study.

    PubMed

    Ramis, Rebeca; Gómez-Barroso, Diana; Tamayo, Ibon; García-Pérez, Javier; Morales, Antonio; Pardo Romaguera, Elena; López-Abente, Gonzalo

    2015-01-01

    Childhood cancer was the leading cause of death among children aged 1-14 years for 2012 in Spain. Leukemia has the highest incidence, followed by tumors of the central nervous system (CNS) and lymphomas (Hodgkin lymphoma, HL, and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, NHL). Spatial distribution of childhood cancer cases has been under concern with the aim of identifying potential risk factors. The two objectives are to study overall spatial clustering and cluster detection of cases of the three main childhood cancer causes, looking to increase etiological knowledge. We ran a case-control study. The cases were children aged 0 to 14 diagnosed with leukemia, lymphomas (HL and NHL) or CNS neoplasm in five Spanish regions for the period 1996-2011. As a control group, we used a sample from the Birth Registry matching every case by year of birth, autonomous region of residence and sex with six controls. We geocoded and validated the address of the cases and controls. For our two objectives we used two different methodologies. For the first, for overall spatial clustering detection, we used the differences of K functions from the spatial point patterns perspective proposed by Diggle and Chetwynd and the second, for cluster detection, we used the spatial scan statistic proposed by Kulldorff with a level for statistical significance of 0.05. We had 1062 cases of leukemia, 714 cases of CNS, 92 of HL and 246 of NHL. Accordingly we had 6 times the number of controls, 6372 controls for leukemia, 4284 controls for CNS, 552 controls for HL and 1476 controls for NHL. We found variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers, including some overall spatial clustering for specific regions and distances. We did not find statistically significant clusters. The variations in the estimated empirical D(s) for the different regions and cancers could be partially explained by the differences in the spatial distribution of the population; however, according to the literature

  18. Diet and cataract: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Theodoropoulou, Sofia; Samoli, Evangelia; Theodossiadis, Panagiotis G; Papathanassiou, Miltiadis; Lagiou, Areti; Lagiou, Pagona; Tzonou, Anastasia

    2014-02-01

    We conducted a case-control study to assess the association between diet and risk of cataract in Athens, Greece. Totals of 314 cases and 314 frequency-matched controls of both sexes, aged 45-85 years and attending the ophthalmology department of a major teaching hospital in Athens, Greece, were included in the study. All participants were interviewed using a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire, covering the average frequency of consumption of about 120 food items. Analyses were conducted through multiple logistic regression. The analysis was carried out taking cataract as a general outcome (all types of cataract combined) and repeated by the specific type of cataract. We found significant inverse associations of cataract with dietary consumption of fish (OR = 0.69, p < 0.001), vegetables (OR = 0.47, p < 0.001), fruits (OR = 0.53, p < 0.001), and potatoes (OR = 0.76, p = 0.004), while consumption of meat was positively associated with cataract (OR = 1.46, p = 0.001). High intake of total fat (OR = 2.00, p < 0.001) and cholesterol (OR = 1.65, p < 0.001) increased the risk of cataract. There was a protective association between cataract risk and intake of carbohydrates (OR = 0.39, p < 0.001), carotene (OR = 0.56, p < 0.001), vitamins C and E (OR = 0.50, p < 0.001 and OR = 0.50, p < 0.001 respectively). We identified an association between the risk of cataract and several food groups and nutrients. Diets rich in fruits, vegetables, fish, pulses and starchy foods may protect against cataract. In addition, high intake of vitamins C and E and carotene with reduction of intake in total fat and cholesterol may be beneficial. Dietary advice along these lines may provide adequate public health guidelines for the delay of age-related cataract.

  19. Haematopoietic cancer and medical history: a multicentre case control study

    PubMed Central

    Vineis, P.; Crosignani, P.; Sacerdote, C.; Fontana, A.; Masala, G.; Miligi, L.; Nanni, O.; Ramazzotti, V.; Rodella, S.; Stagnaro, E.; Tumino, R.; Vigano, C.; Vindigni, C.; Costantini, A. S.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Viruses (such as Epstein-Barr virus) and pathological conditions (mainly involving immunosuppression) have been shown to increase the risk of haematolymphopoietic malignancies. Other associations (diabetes, tonsillectomy, autoimmune diseases) have been inconsistently reported.
METHODS—The association between different haematolymphopoietic malignancies (lymphomas, myelomas and leukaemias) and the previous medical history has been studied in a population-based case-control investigation conducted in Italy, based on face to face interviews to 2669 cases and 1718 population controls (refusal rates 10% and 19%, respectively). Controls were a random sample of the general population.
RESULTS—Previous findings were confirmed concerning the association between non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and lupus erythematosus (odds ratio, OR=8.4; 95% CI 1.6, 45), tuberculosis (OR=1.6; 1.05, 2.5) and hepatitis (1.8; 1.4, 2.3). An association was found also between NHL and maternal (OR=2.8; 1.1, 6.9) or paternal tuberculosis (OR=1.7; 0.7, 3.9). Odds ratios of 4.0 (1.4, 11.8) and 4.4 (1.1, 6.6) were detected for the association between NHL and Hodgkin's disease, respectively, and previous infectious mononucleosis, but recall bias cannot be ruled out. No association was found with diabetes, tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy. An association with malaria at young age and "low grade" lymphatic malignancies is suggested. One interesting finding was the observation of four cases of poliomyelitis among NHL patients, one among Hodgkin's disease and one among myeloid leukaemia patients, compared with none among the controls (Fisher's exact test for NHL and Hodgkin's disease, p= 0.03, one tail).
CONCLUSIONS—Some of these findings are confirmatory of previous evidence. Other observations, such as the putative role of the polio virus and of malaria are new. A unifying theory on the mechanisms by which previous medical history may increase the risk of

  20. Epistatic Module Detection for Case-Control Studies: A Bayesian Model with a Gibbs Sampling Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wanwan; Wu, Xuebing; Jiang, Rui; Li, Yanda

    2009-01-01

    The detection of epistatic interactive effects of multiple genetic variants on the susceptibility of human complex diseases is a great challenge in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Although methods have been proposed to identify such interactions, the lack of an explicit definition of epistatic effects, together with computational difficulties, makes the development of new methods indispensable. In this paper, we introduce epistatic modules to describe epistatic interactive effects of multiple loci on diseases. On the basis of this notion, we put forward a Bayesian marker partition model to explain observed case-control data, and we develop a Gibbs sampling strategy to facilitate the detection of epistatic modules. Comparisons of the proposed approach with three existing methods on seven simulated disease models demonstrate the superior performance of our approach. When applied to a genome-wide case-control data set for Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD), the proposed approach successfully identifies two known susceptible loci and suggests that a combination of two other loci—one in the gene SGCD and the other in SCAPER—is associated with the disease. Further functional analysis supports the speculation that the interaction of these two genetic variants may be responsible for the susceptibility of AMD. When applied to a genome-wide case-control data set for Parkinson's disease, the proposed method identifies seven suspicious loci that may contribute independently to the disease. PMID:19412524

  1. Association between diabetes and tuberculosis: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Susan Martins; Araújo, Gleide Santos de; Santos, Carlos Antônio de Souza Teles; Oliveira, Maeli Gomes de; Barreto, Maurício Lima

    2016-12-22

    To test the association between diabetes and tuberculosis. It is a case-control study, matched by age and sex. We included 323 new cases of tuberculosis with positive results for bacilloscopy. The controls were 323 respiratory symptomatic patients with negative bacilloscopy, from the same health services, such as: ambulatory cases from three referral hospitals and six basic health units responsible for the notifications of new cases of tuberculosis in Salvador, Bahia. Data collection occurred between 2008 and 2010. The instruments used were structured interview, including clinical data, capillary blood glucose (during fasting or postprandial), and the CAGE questionnaire for screening of abusive consumption of alcohol. Descriptive, exploratory, and multivariate analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression. The average age of the cases was 38.5 (SD = 14.2) years and of the controls, 38.5 (SD = 14.3) years. Among cases and controls, most subjects (61%) were male. In univariate analysis we found association between the occurrence of diabetes and tuberculosis (OR = 2.37; 95%CI 1.04-5.42), which remained statistically significant after adjustment for potential confounders (OR = 3.12; 95%CI 1.12-7.94). The association between diabetes and tuberculosis can hinder the control of tuberculosis, contributing to the maintainance of the disease burden. The situation demands increasing early detection of diabetes among people with tuberculosis, in an attempt to improve disease control strategies. Testar a associação entre diabetes e tuberculose. Trata-se de estudo caso-controle, pareado por idade e sexo. Foram incluídos 323 casos novos de tuberculose com resultados positivos à baciloscopia. Os controles foram 323 sintomáticos respiratórios com baciloscopia negativa, oriundos dos mesmos serviços de saúde dos casos: ambulatórios de três hospitais de referência e seis unidades básicas de saúde responsáveis pelas notificações dos casos novos de

  2. Case-control study of respiratory cancer and employment

    SciTech Connect

    Glazer, E.R.; Chiang, M.L.

    1984-04-01

    A multiple logistic risk-analysis procedure was used to compare data from 346 case/control pairs to determine occupational/industrial risk factors for respiratory cancer. The duration of employment was considered in blue-collar production occupations. Five industrial categories were included: shipyard, petrochemical, metal-related, construction and a grouping of other occupations under a single heading. The bulk of this grouped category was made up of blue collar employees in the industries of transportation, food production, wholesale and retail trade, professional services, and public administration. Specific attention was given to asbestos exposure, cigarette smoking, educational level attained, and dietary factors such as consumption of vegetables, fruits, and alcohol. A moderately elevated risk for respiratory cancer existed among employees in the metal industry and grouped categories when employment was over 30 years duration. In the metal industry this increase was almost entirely due to a larger than expected number of cases of larynx cancer.

  3. Risk factors of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after Wenchuan earthquake: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yongzhong; Wang, Fang; Wen, Jin; Shi, Yingkang

    2014-01-01

    Few clues were found in the literature about the independent risk factors for PTSD among earthquake survivors in Sichuan province three years after the 2008 earthquake. Ours was the first case-control study with matching factors of age and distance from the epicenter among survivors age 16 years or older, three years after the catastrophe. To identify independent risk factors for PTSD among earthquake survivors. We performed a population-based matched case-control study. The cases were drawn from earthquake areas three years after the Wenchuan earthquake, including 113 cases who met positive criteria for PTSD symptoms according to the PCL-C (PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version) score and 452 controls who did not meet the criteria. Cases and controls were matched individually by birth year (+ three years) and the town they lived in when the earthquake occurred. Independent risk factors for PTSD symptoms included two-week disease prevalence (odds ratio [OR],1.92; 95% confidence interval [CI],1.18-3.13), witnessing someone being killed in the earthquake (OR, 2.04;95%CI, 1.17-3.58), having no regular income after the earthquake (OR, 0.52; 95%CI, 0.28-0.98), receiving mental health support only one time after the earthquake (OR, 2.43; 95%CI, 1.09-5.42) and lower social support (lower PSSS score) (OR, 0.95; 95%CI, 0.93-0.97). Earthquake experience, suffering from physical illnesses, lack of stable income, and lower social support were associated with PTSD symptoms.

  4. Snippets from the past: is Flint, Michigan, the birthplace of the case-control study?

    PubMed

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-12-15

    In the summer of 1924, an outbreak of scarlet fever occurred in Flint, Michigan. Unable to trace it to the usual causes, particularly fresh milk, the Michigan Department of Health used a novel approach to disentangle the enigma: The 116 cases of scarlet fever were compared with 117 "controls" selected from neighbors of the quarantined cases and from patients at the City Health Center who had been treated for ailments unrelated to scarlet fever. The extraordinary culprit was ice cream, which had a frequent/occasional/none consumption prevalence of 60%, 34%, and 6% among the cases and 24%, 51%, and 25% among the controls, respectively. The 1925 report reads, "Detailed epidemiological investigation, by means of case histories and control histories on well persons, confirmed early suspicions and established the fact that the epidemic was spread by ice cream" (Am J Hyg. 1925;5(5):669-681). This forgotten epidemiologic study is the oldest study using the case-control design to have been resurrected thus far. The case-control study design may have been conceived simultaneously, but independently and for different purposes, in England (Janet Lane-Claypon's 1926 report on the determinants of breast cancer) and the United States.

  5. Snippets From the Past: Is Flint, Michigan, the Birthplace of the Case-Control Study?

    PubMed Central

    Morabia, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    In the summer of 1924, an outbreak of scarlet fever occurred in Flint, Michigan. Unable to trace it to the usual causes, particularly fresh milk, the Michigan Department of Health used a novel approach to disentangle the enigma: The 116 cases of scarlet fever were compared with 117 “controls” selected from neighbors of the quarantined cases and from patients at the City Health Center who had been treated for ailments unrelated to scarlet fever. The extraordinary culprit was ice cream, which had a frequent/occasional/none consumption prevalence of 60%, 34%, and 6% among the cases and 24%, 51%, and 25% among the controls, respectively. The 1925 report reads, “Detailed epidemiological investigation, by means of case histories and control histories on well persons, confirmed early suspicions and established the fact that the epidemic was spread by ice cream” (Am J Hyg. 1925;5(5):669–681). This forgotten epidemiologic study is the oldest study using the case-control design to have been resurrected thus far. The case-control study design may have been conceived simultaneously, but independently and for different purposes, in England (Janet Lane-Claypon's 1926 report on the determinants of breast cancer) and the United States. PMID:24064743

  6. Association between bullous pemphigoid and neurologic diseases: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Casas-de-la-Asunción, E; Ruano-Ruiz, J; Rodríguez-Martín, A M; Vélez García-Nieto, A; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-11-01

    In the past 10 years, bullous pemphigoid has been associated with other comorbidities and neurologic and psychiatric conditions in particular. Case series, small case-control studies, and large population-based studies in different Asian populations, mainland Europe, and the United Kingdom have confirmed this association. However, no data are available for the Spanish population. This was an observational, retrospective, case-control study with 1:2 matching. Fifty-four patients with bullous pemphigoid were selected. We compared the percentage of patients in each group with concurrent neurologic conditions, ischemic heart disease, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and solid tumors using univariate logistic regression. An association model was constructed with conditional multiple logistic regression. The case group had a significantly higher percentage of patients with cerebrovascular accident and/or transient ischemic attack (odds ratio [OR], 3.06; 95% CI, 1.19-7.87], dementia (OR, 5.52; 95% CI, 2.19-13.93), and Parkinson disease (OR, 5; 95% CI, 1.57-15.94). A significantly higher percentage of cases had neurologic conditions (OR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.89-13.91). Dementia and Parkinson disease were independently associated with bullous pemphigoid in the multivariate analysis. Patients with bullous pemphigoid have a higher frequency of neurologic conditions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  7. Risk factors for campylobacter infection in infants and young children: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tenkate, T D; Stafford, R J

    2001-12-01

    Campylobacter infection has one of the highest rates of all the notifiable diseases in Australia, with a peak in children aged 0-35 months. A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate risk factors for campylobacter infection for children in this age group. Eighty-one cases and 144 controls were enrolled in the study that was conducted between 24 January 1996 and 21 January 1997. The following risk factors were found to be independently associated with illness: ownership of pet puppies (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 16.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.73-73.65) and pet chickens (OR 11.80, CI 1.37-101.75), and consumption of mayonnaise (OR 4.13, CI 1.61-10.59). We propose that children aged less than 3 years are at risk of campylobacter infection if residing in a household which has puppies or chickens as pets.

  8. Risk factors for campylobacter infection in infants and young children: a matched case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Tenkate, T. D.; Stafford, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    Campylobacter infection has one of the highest rates of all the notifiable diseases in Australia, with a peak in children aged 0-35 months. A matched case-control study was conducted to investigate risk factors for campylobacter infection for children in this age group. Eighty-one cases and 144 controls were enrolled in the study that was conducted between 24 January 1996 and 21 January 1997. The following risk factors were found to be independently associated with illness: ownership of pet puppies (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 16.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.73-73.65) and pet chickens (OR 11.80, CI 1.37-101.75), and consumption of mayonnaise (OR 4.13, CI 1.61-10.59). We propose that children aged less than 3 years are at risk of campylobacter infection if residing in a household which has puppies or chickens as pets. PMID:11811871

  9. Sequential analysis of longitudinal data in a prospective nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Park, Eunsik; Chang, Yuan-chin I

    2010-12-01

    The nested case-control design is a relatively new type of observational study whereby a case-control approach is employed within an established cohort. In this design, we observe cases and controls longitudinally by sampling all cases whenever they occur but controls at certain time points. Controls can be obtained at time points randomly scheduled or prefixed for operational convenience. This design with longitudinal observations is efficient in terms of cost and duration, especially when the disease is rare and the assessment of exposure levels is difficult. In our design, we propose sequential sampling methods and study both (group) sequential testing and estimation methods so that the study can be stopped as soon as the stopping rule is satisfied. To make such a longitudinal sampling more efficient in terms of both numbers of subjects and replications, we propose applying sequential sampling methods to subjects and replications, simultaneously, until the information criterion is fulfilled. This simultaneous sequential sampling on subjects and replicates is more flexible for practitioners designing their sampling schemes, and is different from the classical approaches used in longitudinal studies. We newly define the σ-field to accommodate our proposed sampling scheme, which contains mixtures of independent and correlated observations, and prove the asymptotic optimality of sequential estimation based on the martingale theories. We also prove that the independent increment structure is retained so that the group sequential method is applicable. Finally, we present results by employing sequential estimation and group sequential testing on both simulated data and real data on children's diarrhea. © 2009, The International Biometric Society.

  10. Case-control association study of TGOLN2 in attempted suicide.

    PubMed

    Mahon, Pamela B; Stütz, Adrian M; Seifuddin, Fayaz; Huo, Yuqing; Goes, Fernando S; Jancic, Dubravka; Judy, Jennifer T; Depaulo, J Raymond; Gershon, Elliot S; McMahon, Francis J; Zandi, Peter P; Potash, James B; Willour, Virginia L

    2010-07-01

    Family, twin, and adoption studies provide convincing evidence for a genetic contribution to suicidal behavior. The heritability for suicidal behavior depends in part on the transmission of psychiatric disorders, such as mood disorders and substance use disorders, but is also partly independent of them. Three linkage studies using the attempted suicide phenotype in pedigrees with bipolar disorder, major depression, or alcoholism have provided consistent evidence that 2p11-12 harbors a susceptibility gene for attempted suicide. A microarray expression study using postmortem brain samples has implicated a gene from the 2p11-12 candidate region, the trans-Golgi network protein 2 (TGOLN2) gene, as being consistently up-regulated in suicide cases as compared to controls. Here, we present a TGOLN2 case-control association study using nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). These nine SNPs, which include seven tag SNPs and two coding SNPs, have been genotyped in 517 mood disorder subjects with a history of attempted suicide and 515 normal controls. Allelic and genotypic analyses of the case-control sample did not provide evidence for association with the attempted suicide phenotype. Eight of the nine SNPs provided supportive evidence for association (P-values ranging from 0.008 to 0.03) when we compared the attempted suicide cases with a history of alcoholism to the attempted suicide cases without a history of alcoholism. However, this association finding was not replicated in an independent sample. Taken together, these analyses do not provide support for the hypothesis that common genetic variation in TGOLN2 contributes significantly to the risk for attempted suicide in subjects with major mood disorders.

  11. Risk factors for cellulitis in patients with lymphedema: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Teerachaisakul, M; Ekataksin, W; Durongwatana, S; Taneepanichskul, S

    2013-09-01

    Risk factors for cellulitis in lymphedema (LE) have never been evaluated in controlled studies. The objective of this study was to assess the risk factors for cellulitis in patients with LE using a case-controlled study method. Medical records of patients from November 2009 to September 2011 who met the following criteria were retrieved and analyzed: (a) clinical diagnosis of LE of the limb, (b) aged 18 or above, (c) no food allergy history and (d) no medical diagnosis of cancer metastasis. Overall, there were 179 cases of LE with cellulitis. Each case was matched by age (+/- 5 years) and gender with a patient with LE and without cellulitis for controls. Logistic regression with backward selection procedure was used to identify independent risk factors. The area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve of the final model was calculated. Independent risk factors for cellulitis in patients with LE were percentage difference in circumference of the limb (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.04-1.10), primary LE diagnosis (AOR=3.36, 95% CI=1.37-8.22), food-induced complication experiences (FIE: AOR=6.82, 95% CI=2.82-16.51) and systolic blood pressure (AOR=1.02, 95% CI=1.01-1.04). The area under the curve for the model was 0.80 (95% CI=0.75-0.85, p<0.001). No association was observed with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, body mass index and the duration of LE. This first case-controlled study highlights the important roles of dietary factors, percentage difference in circumference of the limb, and systolic blood pressure for developing cellulitis. The results suggest that controlling the percentage difference in circumference of the limb and systolic blood pressure together with restriction of fatty food and meat consumption may result in a decreased incidence of cellulitis among patients with LE.

  12. Risk factors for Enterobacter septicemia in a neonatal unit: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Fok, T F; Lee, C H; Wong, E M; Lyon, D J; Wong, W; Ng, P C; Cheung, K L; Cheng, A F

    1998-11-01

    Thirty cases of Enterobacter aerogenes or Enterobacter cloacae septicemia diagnosed over a 32-month period in a tertiary care neonatal unit were enrolled in a case-control study. Each case patient was matched with two controls (patients occupying the cots nearest the case patient when the latter developed septicemia). Of the 32 perinatal characteristics evaluated, 11 were identified by univariate analysis to be significantly associated with the infection. These included parents being residents of the Vietnamese refugee camps, respiratory distress syndrome, necrotizing enterocolitis, umbilical arterial catheterization, umbilical venous catheterization, bladder catheterization, mechanical ventilation, antibiotic treatment, peripheral venous catheterization, nasogastric intubation, and parenteral nutrition. Multivariate analysis, however, showed that preceding bladder catheterization and ongoing parenteral nutrition were the only independent risk factors for enterobacter septicemia. Strict aseptic technique in the preparation of parenteral nutrition fluid and avoidance of bladder catheterization are measures that may reduce the risk of enterobacter sepsis for newborns.

  13. Informed conditioning on clinical covariates increases power in case-control association studies.

    PubMed

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I; Friedman, David J; Field, John K; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E; Hicks, Pamela J; Hocking, Lynne J; Kolonel, Laurence N; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W; Raji, Olaide Y; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M; Wilson, Anthony G; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J; Plenge, Robert M; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C; Schaumberg, Debra A; Chasman, Daniel I; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low-BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high-BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1 × 10(-9)). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ(2) test statistics and a

  14. Risk Factors for Surgical Site Infections Following Neurosurgical Spinal Fusion Operations: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Thomas L; Querry, Ashley M; McCool, Sheila; Galdys, Alison L; Shutt, Kathleen A; Saul, Melissa I; Muto, Carlene A

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine risk factors for the development of surgical site infections (SSIs) in neurosurgery patients undergoing spinal fusion. DESIGN Retrospective case-control study. SETTING Large, academic, quaternary care center. PATIENTS The study population included all neurosurgery patients who underwent spinal fusion between August 1, 2009, and August 31, 2013. Cases were defined as patients in the study cohort who developed an SSI. Controls were patients in the study cohort who did not develop an SSI. METHODS To achieve 80% power with an ability to detect an odds ratio (OR) of 2, we performed an unmatched case-control study with equal numbers of cases and controls. RESULTS During the study period, 5,473 spinal fusion procedures were performed by neurosurgeons in our hospital. With 161 SSIs recorded during the study period, the incidence of SSIs associated with these procedures was 2.94%. While anterior surgical approach was found to be a protective factor (OR, 0.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.08-0.52), duration of procedure (OR, 1.58; 95% CI, 1.29-1.93), American Society of Anesthesiologists score of 3 or 4 (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.00-3.18), and hospitalization within the prior 30 days (OR, 5.8; 95% CI, 1.37-24.57) were found in multivariate analysis to be independent predictors of SSI following spinal fusion. Prior methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nares colonization was highly associated with odds 20 times higher of SSI following spinal fusion (OR, 20.30; 95% CI, 4.64-8.78). CONCLUSIONS In additional to nonmodifiable risk factors, prior colonization with MRSA is a modifiable risk factor very strongly associated with development of SSI following spinal fusion. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:348-352.

  15. Risk factors for mortality in ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pontes, Leonilda Giani; de Menezes, Fernando Gatti; Gonçalves, Priscila; Toniolo, Alexandra do Rosário; Silva, Claudia Vallone; Kawagoe, Julia Yaeko; dos Santos, Camila Marques; Castagna, Helena Maria Fernandes; Martino, Marinês Dalla Valle; Corrêa, Luci

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To describe the microbiological characteristics and to assess the risk factors for mortality of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis in a case-control study of intensive care patients. Methods This case-control study was conducted over a 6-year period in a 40-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary care, private hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Case patients were identified using the Nosocomial Infection Control Committee database. For the analysis of risk factors, matched control subjects were selected from the same institution at a 1:8.8 ratio, between January 2006 and December 2011. Results A total of 40 episodes of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis were evaluated in 40 patients in the intensive care unit, and 354 intensive care patients who did not experience tracheobronchitis were included as the Control Group. During the 6-year study period, a total of 42 organisms were identified (polymicrobial infections were 5%) and 88.2% of all the microorganisms identified were Gram-negative. Using a logistic regression model, we found the following independent risk factors for mortality in ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis patients: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation I score (odds ratio 1.18 per unit of score; 95%CI: 1.05-1.38; p=0.01), and duration of mechanical ventilation (odds ratio 1.09 per day of mechanical ventilation; 95%CI: 1.03-1.17; p=0.004). Conclusion Our study provided insight into the risk factors for mortality and microbiological characteristics of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. PMID:28444091

  16. [Child abuse in Tlaxcala: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Herrada-Huidobro, A; Nazar-Beutelspacher, A; Cassaball-Núñez, M; Vega-Ramos, R; Nava-Cruz, C B

    1992-01-01

    A longitudinal, retrospective and descriptive study about child abuse was carried out in the Hospitals of the Tlaxcala Secretariat of Health, Mexico. The information was obtained from hospitalized children's charts between January first and November 30, 1991. The charts included were those belonging to zero to 14 year old children with injuries, poisoning, and II-III degrees of malnutrition. Four child-abuse criteria were established: physical, sexual, non organic malnutrition and mixed (physical and non organic malnutrition). Two control groups were defined. Different patterns were observed between accidental and non accidental injuries, malnutrition and poisoning among the case and the control groups. The study provides useful information for the integral diagnosis of child abuse in hospitalized children.

  17. Nonoliguric hyperkalemia in neonates: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Yaseen, Hakam

    2009-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence, risk factors, and morbidities associated with nonoliguric hyperkalemia (NOHK) in neonates. Infants were eligible for the study if they were born at Al Qassimi Hospital and fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of NOHK (serum potassium [SK] > or = 7 mmol/L during the first 72 hours of life with urinary output > or = 1 mL/kg/h). The next admitted infant with gestational age +/- 1 week and normal SK acted as control. Exclusion criteria were severe congenital malformation, renal failure, failure of adequate urinary collection, and early blood transfusion within the first 72 hours of life. Fluid intake and urinary output were monitored. Infants who developed hyperkalemia (SK > or = 6.5 mmol/L in two nonhemolysed venous or arterial blood samples) had serum potassium measured every 4 hours until it reached below 6 mmol/L. Hyperkalemia was identified between 6 and 36 hours of age in 45 infants (peak SK 7 to 9.3 mmol/L). During the time of the study, the prevalence of NOHK was 24% among extremely-low-birth-weight infants (with birth weight < 1000 g) who comprised 83% of those identified. Of infants with NOHK, 13% developed tachycardiac arrhythmia and 17% died. NOHK was significantly associated with fetal distress, early metabolic acidosis, early hyperglycemia, and absence of antenatal steroid administration. Hyperkalemic infants had significantly lower serum calcium and higher serum phosphorous, urea, and creatinine. Early polyuric episodes and high urinary output were also more common in hyperkalemic infants. NOHK affects mainly preterm infants. Electrolyte disturbance and increased serum urea and creatinine were associated with hyperkalemia. Infants with NOHK also had high incidence of cardiac arrhythmias and mortality.

  18. Suicides following inpatient psychiatric hospitalization: A nationwide case control study.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Petr; Mladá, Karolína; Csémy, Ladislav; Nechanská, Blanka; Höschl, Cyril

    2015-09-15

    Research shows the elevated risk of suicide associated with current or recent inpatient psychiatric hospitalization. However, it is unclear whether this applies in the area of post-communist Central and Eastern Europe where mental health care has not been deinstitutionalized yet. The present study aims to examine the rates of suicides among psychiatric patients during and shortly after discharge from inpatient hospitalization in the Czech Republic. All inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and all suicides committed between 2008 and 2012 have been merged on an individual data basis. The time horizon between the admission and two months after the discharge from inpatient psychiatric facility was utilized and multiple logistic regression was performed to calculate the odds of committing suicide. A total of 137,290 inpatients were hospitalized in Czech psychiatric facilities between 2008 and 2012, and 402 of the inpatients committed suicide during the hospitalization or within the 2 months after the discharge. Highly elevated risks of suicides were found to be associated with being a male, having a history of multiple hospitalizations, and having a diagnosis of affective, anxiety, or personality disorder. Limitations are related to the design of the study, and its reliance on routinely collected data. Also, it was not possible to assess the odds of suicide associated with inpatient psychiatric hospitalization against the odds of suicide in general population. During psychiatric treatment and recovery, suicial behavior and idealiation is increased. In psychiatry, hospitalization may be a risky period for suicide behavior. Suicide rates during and soon after the psychiatric hospitalization identified in this study from Central and Eastern Europe are similar to the findings from Western Europe. Preventive strategies should be tailored accordingly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Effects of COPD on cognitive functions: a case control study].

    PubMed

    Sarınç Ulaşlı, Sevinç; Oruç, Serdar; Günay, Ersin; Aktaş, Orçun; Akar, Olcay; Koyuncu, Tülay; Ünlü, Mehmet

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of disease severity, effects of disease on health status and future events should be considered to direct treatment strategies in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. Although extrapulmonary effects of COPD are well known, effects of COPD on cognitive functions have not been evaluated sufficiently. therefore we aimed to determine cognitive functions of copd patients in the present study. 112 COPD patients with moderate, severe and very severe irreversible airway obstruction and 44 age matched healthy subjects without COPD and systemic diseases as control group were enrolled to the study. Mini mental state examination (MMSE) was performed to evaluate cognitive functions. MMSE results were compared between patient and control groups. Moreover relationship between exacerbation frequency and cognitive functions was evaluated. Total 156 subjects as 112 COPD patients and 44 healthy subjects were included to the study. Mean age of COPD patients was 65.03 ± 7.63 years, and mean age of control group was 63.63 ± 8.96 years (p= 0.364). Mean score of MMSE in COPD patients was 23.8 ± 4.39, and mean score of MMSE in control group was 26.7 ± 2.88. We determined a significant difference in terms of MMSE scores betweeen patient and control group (p< 0.0001). MMSE scores and FEV1 values were significantly different among patients with moderate, sevre and very severe airflow obstruction (p= 0.001; p< 0.0001 respectively). We found a significant negative correlation between MMSE results and exacerbation frequency during last year (p= 0.003; r= -0.239). Lower MMSE scores of COPD patients than subjects in control group indicates the impairment of cognitive functions in COPD patients. Moreover a negative relationship between MMSE scores with exacerbation frequency during last year suggests that prevention from exacerbation can decrease cognitive impairment in COPD patients. We believe that assessment of cognitive functions and preventive strategies

  20. A case-control study on the effect of hormone replacement therapy on ischaemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Hippisley-Cox, Julia; Pringle, Mike; Crown, Nicola; Coupland, Carol

    2003-03-01

    Many clinicians believe that hormone replacement therapy (HRT) protects against coronary heart disease (CHD) in women. However, recent reports have cast some doubt on this because of lack of dose-response or duration-response effects. Since CHD is common in women--about half of all postmenopausal women will get it and about a third of these will die from it--the effect of HRT on CHD is of great public health importance. To determine the degree of cardioprotection conferred by HRT, including the effect of duration, time since last issue, the addition of progestogens, route of administration, and dose. Population-based case-control study. Nine general practices recruited from the Trent Focus Collaborative Research Network. A total of 417 female cases with CHD matched by age and practice to 2435 controls with a case-control ratio of 1:5.8 were studied. The main outcome measure was the odds ratio for CHD calculated by conditional logistic regression adjusted for diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, and smoking. No evidence was found, either from univariate analysis or multivariate analysis, that use of HRT was associated with reduced risk of CHD (odds ratio = 1.32; 95% confidence interval = 0.93 to 1.87). Indeed, the trend was in the opposite direction. There was no association for different types of HRT (opposed or unopposed) or routes of administration. Similarly, there was no association for current or past use and no effect for dose or duration. This study adds to growing evidence that HRT does not confer cardioprotection. Until there is robust evidence to the contrary, general physicians need to assess risks and benefits of HRT independently of any possible reduction in risk of CHD.

  1. Metformin intake is associated with better survival in ovarian cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Meuter, Alexandra; Thapa, Prabin; Langstraat, Carrie; Giri, Shailendra; Chien, Jeremy; Rattan, Ramandeep; Cliby, William; Shridhar, Viji

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this case-control study was to identify any association of metformin intake with the survival of patients with ovarian cancer. In this retrospective case-control study, women with ovarian cancer who received metformin (cases) were compared with women with ovarian cancer who did not receive metformin (controls). A 2-layered analysis was conducted. In preliminary analysis, all cases (the OC cohort) were compared with controls at a 1:2 ratio. Subsequently, in definitive analysis, only patients who had epithelial ovarian cancer (the EOC cohort) were compared with controls at a 1:3 ratio. In the EOC cohort, cases were matched with controls for age (±5 years), International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, and residual disease. Prognostic variables and disease specific survival were compared using chi-square tests, the Kaplan-Meier (log-rank) method, and Cox proportional hazards analysis. In a preliminary analysis of the OC cohort (72 cases and 143 controls), cases had better survival (5-year disease-specific survival for cases vs controls, 73% vs 44%; P = .0002). In the definitive analysis of the EOC cohort (61 cases and 178 controls), the distribution of age, disease stage, optimal cytoreduction, serous histology, and platinum chemotherapy remained similar between cases and controls (P > .05). Despite these similarities, cases had significantly better survival (5-year disease-specific survival for cases vs controls, 67% vs 47%; P = .007). On multivariate analysis, metformin remained an independent predictor of survival (hazard ratio, 2.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.8; P = .007) after controlling for disease stage, grade, histology, chemotherapy, body mass index, and surgical cytoreduction. The results of this study indicated an association of metformin intake with survival in patients with ovarian cancer. The receipt of metformin was associated with better survival, and the authors concluded that metformin is worthy of clinical

  2. Vertebral hyperostosis and diabetes mellitus: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Daragon, A; Mejjad, O; Czernichow, P; Louvel, J P; Vittecoq, O; Durr, A; Le Loët, X

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To compare glucose metabolism in patients with vertebral hyperostosis (VH), with that in control patients. METHODS--We studied 50 patients aged 60 years or more who had VH according to Resnick's criteria, and 50 control patients without VH, matched for sex, age, weight and height. Plasma glucose was evaluated before and 120 minutes after ingestion of 75 g glucose. World Health Organisation criteria for diabetes mellitus (DM) were used. Radiographs of the pelvis and thoracic and lumbar spine were performed and read blind by two physicians. RESULTS--Statistical analysis showed no difference between cases and control patients for prevalence of DM, and plasma glucose at 0 and 120 minutes. CONCLUSION--These data suggest that glucoregulation in patients with VH does not differ from that in matched controls. PMID:7794043

  3. Alexithymia and Acne Vulgaris: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Baykir, Murat; Ateş, Gülfem; Ekşioğlu, Meral

    2011-01-01

    Objective To assess relationship between alexithymia and acne vulgaris in young people. Methods A hundred and eleven subjects between 15 and 25 years of age referred to out-patient clinic of dermatology with acne and 78 subjects applied to family physician for complaints other than acne were included in patient and control groups of the study, respectively. A questionnaire to determine demographic characteristics, an acne classification to determine severity of acne and Toronto Alexithymic Scale (TAS) to assess alexithymia were used. Results The mean scores of TAS were 52.7±10.8 and 51.7±10.7 in patient and control groups, respectively. Alexitymia was determined in 23.4% of the subjects in acne group and in 24.4% of control group. No significant differences were found between groups in terms of alexithymia, intermediate alexitymia and three-factors of TAS. Conclusion Alexithymia does not appear to be related to acne vulgaris. PMID:22216042

  4. Cognitive impairments in Hashimoto's encephalopathy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianhong; Zhang, Jun; Xu, Lan; Shi, Yunbo; Wu, Xunyi; Guo, Qihao

    2013-01-01

    Hashimoto's encephalopathy is considered as a treatable dementia, but it is often misdiagnosed. We investigated cognitive impairment and the MRI pathology of Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. The study comprised eight patients with Hashimoto's encephalopathy, 16 patients with mild Alzheimer's disease and 24 healthy subjects. A neuropsychological battery included assessments of memory, language, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability. Cranial MRI was obtained from all Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients. Hashimoto's encephalopathy and mild Alzheimer's disease showed cognitive impairments in episodic memory, attention, executive function and visuospatial ability, but naming ability was unaffected in Hashimoto's encephalopathy. The MRI of Hashimoto's encephalopathy showed leukoencephalopathy-like type or limbic encephalitis-like type; the lesions did not affect the temporal cortex which plays a role in naming ability. Except that the naming ability was retained, the impairments in cognitive functions for the Hashimoto's encephalopathy patients were similar to those of Alzheimer's disease patients. These results were consistent with the MRI findings.

  5. Risk Factors for Sporadic Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Ben, Qiwen; Zhong, Jie; Fei, Jian; Chen, Haitao; Yv, Lifen; Tan, Jihong; Yuan, Yaozong

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined risk factors for sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs), including smoking, alcohol use, first-degree family history of any cancer (FHC), and diabetes in the Han Chinese ethnic group. In this clinic-based case-control analysis on 385 patients with sporadic PNETs and 614 age- and sex-matched controls, we interviewed subjects using a specific questionnaire on demographics and potential risk factors. An unconditional multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AORs). No significant differences were found between patients and controls in terms of demographic variables. Most of the patients with PNETs had well-differentiated PNETs (G1, 62.9%) and non-advanced European Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (ENETS) stage (stage I or II, 83.9%). Ever/heavy smoking, a history of diabetes and a first-degree FHC were independent risk factors for non-functional PNETs. Only heavy drinking was found to be an independent risk factor for functional PNETs (AOR = 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01–3.51). Ever/heavy smoking was also associated with advanced ENETS staging (stage III or IV) at the time of diagnosis. This study identified first-degree FHC, ever/heavy smoking, and diabetes as risk factors for non-functional PNETs, while heavy drinking as a risk factor for functional PNETs. PMID:27782199

  6. A Case-control Study on Risk Factors for Severe Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingmei; Li, Ruolin; Zhang, Wangjian; Li, Guowei; Ma, Zhanzhong; Chen, Xiashi; Du, Zhicheng; Li, Zhiyuan; Guo, Pi; Lin, Zhuochen; Lu, Jiahai; Hao, Yuantao

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify potential risk factors for severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). In this case-control study, 459 severe HFMD patients and 246 mild HFMD patients from Guangdong province and Henan province, China were included. Data comprising demographic characteristics, clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory findings and other factors were collected. Univariate analysis revealed 30 factors associated with severe cases. Further multivariate analysis indicated four independent risk factors: fatigue (p < 0.01, odd ratio [OR] = 204.7), the use of glucocorticoids (p = 0.03, OR = 10.44), the use of dehydrant drugs (p < 0.01, OR = 73.7) and maculopapular rash (p < 0.01, OR = 84.4); and one independent protective factor: herpes or ulcers in mouth (p = 0.01, OR = 0.02). However, more systematic research and validation are needed to understand the underlying risk factors for severe HFMD. PMID:28084311

  7. Epidemiological risk factors in microscopic colitis: a prospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Bañares, Fernando; de Sousa, Monia R; Salas, Antonio; Beltrán, Belén; Piqueras, Marta; Iglesias, Eva; Gisbert, Javier P; Lobo, Beatriz; Puig-Diví, Valentí; García-Planella, Esther; Ordás, Ingrid; Andreu, Montserrat; Calvo, Marta; Montoro, Miguel; Esteve, Maria; Viver, Josep M

    2013-02-01

    The cause of collagenous colitis (CC) and lymphocytic colitis (LC) is unknown and epidemiological risk factors for CC and LC are not well studied. The aim was to evaluate in a case-control study epidemiological risk factors for CC and LC. In all, 120 patients with CC, 70 with CL, and 128 controls were included. For all cases and controls information was prospectively recorded. A binary logistic regression analysis was performed separately for CC and LC. Independent associations observed with the diagnosis of CC were: current smoking (odds ratio [OR], 2.4), history of polyarthritis (OR, 20.8), and consumption of lansoprazole (OR, 6.4), low-dose aspirin (OR, 3.8), beta-blockers (OR, 3.6), and angiotensin II receptor antagonists (OR 0.20). In the case of LC they were: current smoking (OR, 3.8), associated autoimmune diseases (OR, 8), and consumption of sertraline (OR, 17.5), omeprazole (OR 2.7), low-dose aspirin (OR, 4.7), and oral antidiabetic drugs (OR, 0.14). The consumption of drugs, current smoking, and associated autoimmune diseases were independently associated with the risk of microscopic colitis.

  8. Increased incidence of childhood leukemia in urban areas: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Malagoli, Carlotta; Malavolti, Marcella; Costanzini, Sofia; Fabbri, Sara; Tezzi, Sergio; Palazzi, Giovanni; Arcolin, Elisa; Vinceti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    We carried out a population-based case-control study to assess the possibility of an excess risk of childhood leukemia in urban areas, independently from road traffic pollution. Study subjects were the 111 cases of childhood leukemia diagnosed from 1998 to 2011 among residents of two provinces of the northern Italian Emilia-Romagna region, and 444 controls matched by age and sex. Through mapping of the region carried out by remote sensing, we examined the percentage of urban or rural area in the 100-meter circular buffer around each child's house. We also modeled annual average exposure to benzene and PM10 from vehicular traffic at each residence. In a multivariate model adjusting for benzene and PM10, the odds ratio of leukemia associated with residence in a highly urbanized area and residential area (≥95% land use of this type near the child's home) was 1.4 (95% confidence intervals 0.8-2.4) and 1.3 (0.8-2.2), respectively. An increased risk was also found in association with the proximity to «dumps, scrap yards, and building sites». No association emerged with residence in rural areas or near industrial plants. These results indicate that children living in urban areas experience an excess leukemia risk, independently from exposure to pollutants from vehicles.

  9. Trachoma and Relative Poverty: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewdie, Zebideru; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L; Mabey, David C W; Rajak, Saul N; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A; Burton, Matthew J

    2015-11-01

    Trachoma is widely considered a disease of poverty. Although there are many epidemiological studies linking trachoma to factors normally associated with poverty, formal quantitative data linking trachoma to household economic poverty within endemic communities is very limited. Two hundred people with trachomatous trichiasis were recruited through community-based screening in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. These were individually matched by age and gender to 200 controls without trichiasis, selected randomly from the same sub-village as the case. Household economic poverty was measured through (a) A broad set of asset-based wealth indicators and relative household economic poverty determined by principal component analysis (PCA, (b) Self-rated wealth, and (c) Peer-rated wealth. Activity participation data were collected using a modified 'Stylised Activity List' developed for the World Bank's Living Standards Measurement Survey. Trichiasis cases were more likely to belong to poorer households by all measures: asset-based analysis (OR = 2.79; 95%CI: 2.06-3.78; p<0.0001), self-rated wealth (OR, 4.41, 95%CI, 2.75-7.07; p<0.0001) and peer-rated wealth (OR, 8.22, 95% CI, 4.59-14.72; p<0.0001). Cases had less access to latrines (57% v 76.5%, p = <0.0001) and higher person-to-room density (4.0 v 3.31; P = 0.0204) than the controls. Compared to controls, cases were significantly less likely to participate in economically productive activities regardless of visual impairment and other health problems, more likely to report difficulty in performing activities and more likely to receive assistance in performing productive activities. This study demonstrated a strong association between trachomatous trichiasis and relative poverty, suggesting a bidirectional causative relationship possibly may exist between poverty and trachoma. Implementation of the full SAFE strategy in the context of general improvements might lead to a virtuous cycle of improving health and wealth. Trachoma is a

  10. Trachoma and Relative Poverty: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewdie, Zebideru; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M.; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.; Rajak, Saul N.; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachoma is widely considered a disease of poverty. Although there are many epidemiological studies linking trachoma to factors normally associated with poverty, formal quantitative data linking trachoma to household economic poverty within endemic communities is very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings Two hundred people with trachomatous trichiasis were recruited through community-based screening in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. These were individually matched by age and gender to 200 controls without trichiasis, selected randomly from the same sub-village as the case. Household economic poverty was measured through (a) A broad set of asset-based wealth indicators and relative household economic poverty determined by principal component analysis (PCA, (b) Self-rated wealth, and (c) Peer-rated wealth. Activity participation data were collected using a modified ‘Stylised Activity List’ developed for the World Bank’s Living Standards Measurement Survey. Trichiasis cases were more likely to belong to poorer households by all measures: asset-based analysis (OR = 2.79; 95%CI: 2.06–3.78; p<0.0001), self-rated wealth (OR, 4.41, 95%CI, 2.75–7.07; p<0.0001) and peer-rated wealth (OR, 8.22, 95% CI, 4.59–14.72; p<0.0001). Cases had less access to latrines (57% v 76.5%, p = <0.0001) and higher person-to-room density (4.0 v 3.31; P = 0.0204) than the controls. Compared to controls, cases were significantly less likely to participate in economically productive activities regardless of visual impairment and other health problems, more likely to report difficulty in performing activities and more likely to receive assistance in performing productive activities. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrated a strong association between trachomatous trichiasis and relative poverty, suggesting a bidirectional causative relationship possibly may exist between poverty and trachoma. Implementation of the full SAFE strategy in the context of general improvements

  11. Multiple myeloma--a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Cuzick, J.; De Stavola, B.

    1988-01-01

    A total of 399 patients with multiple myeloma and an equal number of match controls were interviewed about factors possibly related to the causes of their disease. Factors studied included occupation, chemical exposure, radiation exposure, prior diseases, immunizations, chronic infections and markers for defects in immune regulation. A strong risk associated with agriculture/food processing was observed (RR = 1.8, P = 0.002). The risk could not be restricted to those exposed to animals or meat products, or those exposed to pesticides. Significant excesses were also noted for reported exposures to chemicals and gases/fumes, but no specific agent or group of agents could be identified. Cases had fewer tonsillectomies above the age of 10 (P = 0.01). A large excess of shingles (herpes zoster) was observed in cases (P less than 0.001), but most of the excess cases occurred within 10 years of diagnosis, suggesting this was a preclinical manifestation of disease rather than a cause of it. PMID:3395559

  12. Case-control study of pathogens involved in piglet diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Vera L A; Bersano, Josete G; Carvalho, Aline F; Catroxo, Márcia H B; Chiebao, Daniela P; Gregori, Fábio; Miyashiro, Simone; Nassar, Alessandra F C; Oliveira, Trícia M F S; Ogata, Renato A; Scarcelli, Eliana P; Tonietti, Paloma O

    2016-01-11

    Diarrhea in piglets directly affects commercial swine production. The disease results from the interaction of pathogens with the host immune system and is also affected by management procedures. Several pathogenic agents such as Campylobacter spp., Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., group A rotavirus (RV-A), coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus; porcine epidemic diarrhea virus), as well as nematode and protozoan parasites, can be associated with disease cases. All bacterial, viral, protozoan, and parasitic agents here investigated, with the exception of Salmonella spp. as well as both coronaviruses, were detected in varying proportions in piglet fecal samples, and positive animals were equally distributed between case and control groups. A statistically significant difference between case and control groups was found only for Cystoisospora suis (p = 0.034) and Eimeria spp. (p = 0.047). When co-infections were evaluated, a statistically significant difference was found only for C. perfringens β2 and C. suis (p = 0.014). The presence of pathogens in piglets alone does not determine the occurrence of diarrhea episodes. Thus, the indiscriminate use of antibiotic and anthelminthic medication should be re-evaluated. This study also reinforces the importance of laboratory diagnosis and correct interpretation of results as well as the relevance of control and prophylactic measures.

  13. Ovarian cancer and talc: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D W; Welch, W R; Scully, R E; Wojciechowski, C A

    1982-07-15

    Opportunities for genital exposure to talc were assessed in 215 white females with epithelial ovarian cancers and in 215 control women from the general population matched by age, race, and residence. Ninety-two (42.8%) cases regularly used talc either as a dusting powder on the perineum or on sanitary napkins compared with 61 (28.4%) controls. Adjusted for parity and menopausal status, this difference yielded a relative risk of 1.92 (P less than 0.003) for ovarian cancer associated with these practices. Women who had regularly engaged in both practices had an adjusted relative risk of 3.28 (P less than 0.001) compared to women with neither exposure. This provides some support for an association between talc and ovarian cancer hypothesized because of the similarity of ovarian cancer to mesotheliomas and the chemical relation of talc to asbestos, a known cause of mesotheliomas. The authors also investigated opportunities for potential talc exposure from rubber products such as condoms or diaphragms or from pelvic surgery. No significant differences were noted between cases and controls in these exposures, although the intensity of talc exposure from these sources was likely affected by variables not assessed in this study.

  14. Panic disorder in menopause: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Claudia, Pacchierotti; Andrea, Castrogiovanni; Chiara, Cavicchioli; Stefano, Luisi; Giuseppe, Morgante; Vincenzo, De Leo; Felice, Petraglia; Paolo, Castrogiovanni

    2004-06-15

    The course of panic disorder (PD) is often influenced by the different phases of the female reproductive cycle. The aim of this study is to assess PD in the climacteric stage and single out possible correlations between symptoms of PD and clinical and demographic variables in order to identify possible risk factors. Forty-five women between 40 and 60 years of age was assessed through the SCL-90, the SCID, a "Climacteric Symptoms Questionnaire" (CSQ) devised to evaluate psychological symptoms typically associated with menopause, the Kupperman Index for the analysis of climacteric symptoms, and plasma level of allopregnanolone (ALLO). PD results in eight patients (18%). This group does not differ from the controls as far as socio-demographic data is concerned, but exhibits significantly higher values in the Kupperman Index, the SCL-90 total, and the CSQ. The plasma levels of ALLO correlate significantly inversely with the total of CSQ and, in any case, negatively with the other variables analysed. PD may arise and worsen with menopause, in correlation with greater severity of the climacteric syndrome in its physical and psychological symptoms.

  15. Case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Deapen, D.M.; Henderson, B.E.

    1986-05-01

    The authors conducted a study of 518 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients identified between 1977 and 1979 and 518 controls to investigate putative risk factors for this disease. Occupations at risk of electrical exposure were reported more often by patients (odds ratio (OR) = 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-13.0) as were electrical shocks producing unconsciousness (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0-9.9). Although an overall excess of physical trauma associated with unconsciousness was observed in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.0-2.4), the effect was inversely associated with duration of the unconscious episodes, suggesting an effect of recall bias. Only slight differences were found for surgical traumata to the nervous system. Parkinsonism was reported more often among first degree relatives of cases (OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.1-7.6). The frequencies of prior poliomyelitis or other central nervous system diseases were similar for patients and controls. Occupational exposure to selected toxic substances was similar for patients and controls except for the manufacture of plastics (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.0-20.5), although few details of these exposures were provided. No differences in occupations with exposure to animal skins or hides were observed.

  16. Risk factors in highway traffic accidents: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Hijar, M; Carrillo, C; Flores, M; Anaya, R; Lopez, V

    2000-09-01

    The objective of this study was to identify risk factors related to the driver, the vehicle and the environment, that are associated with motor vehicles accidents on highways. A case and control design was used where the case was: the driver of a motor vehicle who was involved in an accident while traveling on the Mexico-Cuernavaca highway; and the control was: the driver or a motor vehicle who, traveling on the highway, completed the trip without being involved in a traffic accident. Risk factors associated with the occurrence of a traffic accident (P > 0.05) were: age under 25 years, frequent travel, traveling to work, alcohol consumption, driving during the daylight, on a week-day, under adverse weather conditions and in the Mexico Cuernavaca direction of road. Risks adjusted by logistic regression were: age under 25 years odds ratio (OR) 3.01, confidence interval (CI) (95%) 1.46-6.18; work as a travel reason OR 1.74, CI 1.06 2.86; alcohol intake OR 4.70, Cl 1.62 13.6; driving under adverse weather conditions OR 5.70, CI 3.66-8.85; traveling on a week-day OR 1.84, CI 1.14-2.94; during daylight hours OR 4.23, CI 2.36-7.58 and in the Mexico Cuernavaca direction of road OR 2.69, CI 1.67 4.32. The identification of factors associated with the risk of being involved in a highway traffic accident allows us to propose primary prevention measures for this important public health problem.

  17. Dropped head syndrome after cervical laminoplasty: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Koda, Masao; Furuya, Takeo; Kinoshita, Tomoaki; Miyashita, Tomohiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Ijima, Yasushi; Saito, Junya; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-10-01

    Dropped head syndrome (DHS) is characterized by apparent neck extensor muscle weakness and difficulty extending the neck to raise the head against gravity. The aim of the present study was to elucidate possible risk factors for DHS after cervical laminoplasty. Five patients who developed DHS after cervical laminoplasty (DHS group) and twenty age-matched patients who underwent laminoplasty without DHS after surgery (control group) were compared. The surgical procedure was single-door laminoplasty with strut grafting using resected spinous processes or hydroxyapatite spacers from C3 to C6 or C7. Analyses of preoperative images including the C2-C7 angle, C7-T1 kyphosis, T1 tilt, center of gravity line from the head-C7 sagittal vertical axis (CGH-C7 SVA) were performed on lateral plain cervical spine radiographs. Preoperative T2-weighted MRI at the C5 vertebral level was used to measure the cross-sectional area of the deep extensor muscles. Widths of the lateral gutters were assessed postoperatively using CT scans of the C5 vertebral body. The average preoperative C2-C7 angle was significantly smaller in the DHS group compared with the control group. The average preoperative C7-T1 angle was significantly larger in the DHS group compared with the control group. The average preoperative CGH-C7 SVA was significantly larger in the DHS group compared with the control group. In conclusion, patients with more pronounced preoperative C2-C7 kyphosis, C7-T1 kyphosis, and CGH-C7 SVA are more likely to develop DHS following laminoplasty.

  18. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hadji, P; Boekhoff, J; Hahn, M; Hellmeyer, L; Hars, O; Kyvernitakis, I

    2017-04-01

    The etiology and underlying mechanisms of pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) are still unknown, since no systematic analyses exist. Our results indicate that PAO is a heterogeneous, rare but severe disease including a substantial number of fractures with a significant delay from first symptom to diagnose. Pregnancy-associated osteoporosis (PAO) is a rare but severe type of premenopausal osteoporosis. Most common symptom includes acute lower back pain due to vertebral fracture predominantly occurring in the last trimester of pregnancy or immediately postpartum. The exact underlining mechanisms and risk factors of PAO are still unknown, and up to date, there are no published systematic analyses. We identified 102 PAO patients and matched them with 102 healthy controls according to age, region, and gravidity to evaluate risk factors in a large and homogenous population of women. The baseline characteristics and anthropometric data of the two study groups were similar. Eighty-eight percent of the patients with PAO suffered from one or more fractures with a mean of 3.3 fractures per patient. The most common fracture site was the thoracolumbar spine, whereas 29, 37, 48, and 35% of the patients reported fractures at TH11, TH12, L1, and L2, respectively. PAO patients suffered more frequently from excessive dental problems in childhood (p < 0.001). The control group performed significantly more frequently sports both before (p < 0.002) and after puberty (p < 0.01). Compared to the controls, the patients with PAO reported twice as often severe diseases during pregnancy (p < 0.029). Hereby, the frequency of immobilization was twice as often in the PAO group compared to that in the control group (p < 0.005). Our results indicate that PAO is a heterogeneous, rare but severe disease including a substantial number of fractures with a significant delay from first symptom to diagnose. Increased awareness is warranted to immediately start effective treatment.

  19. Congenital anosmia and emotion recognition: A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lemogne, Cédric; Smadja, Julien; Zerdazi, El-Hadi; Soudry, Yaël; Robin, Marion; Berthoz, Sylvie; Limosin, Frédéric; Consoli, Silla M; Bonfils, Pierre

    2015-06-01

    Patients with anosmia are not able to detect volatile chemicals signaling the presence of infectious and non-infectious environmental hazards, which typically elicit disgust and fear, respectively. Social animals may compensate a loss of olfaction by taking advantage of signals of threat that are produced by their conspecifics. Among humans and other primates, body postures and facial expressions are powerful cues conveying emotional information, including fear and disgust. The aim of the present study was to examine whether humans with agenesis of the olfactory bulb, a rare disorder characterized by congenital anosmia, would be more accurate in recognizing facial expressions of fear and disgust. A total of 90 participants with no history of mental disorder or traumatic brain injury were recruited, including 17 patients with congenital anosmia (10 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.5 ± 14.8 years), 34 patients with acquired anosmia (18 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 57.2 ± 11.8 years) and 39 healthy subjects (22 men, mean age ± standard deviation: 36.7 ± 13.2 years). For each patient with congenital anosmia, the agenesis of the olfactory bulb was ascertained through magnetic resonance imaging. Emotion recognition abilities were examined with a dynamic paradigm in which a morphing technique allowed displaying emotional facial expressions increasing in intensity over time. Adjusting for age, education, depression and anxiety, patients with congenital anosmia required similar levels of intensity to correctly recognize fear and disgust than healthy subjects while they displayed decreased error rates for both fear (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -28.3% [-46.3%, -10.2%], P = 0.003) and disgust (mean difference [95% confidence interval] = -15.8% [-31.5%, -0.2%], P = 0.048). Furthermore, among patients with acquired anosmia, there was a negative correlation between duration of anosmia and the rate of errors for fearful (Spearman's ρ = -0.531, P

  20. Primary biliary cirrhosis and osteoporosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mounach, Aziza; Ouzzif, Zhor; Wariaghli, Ghizlane; Achemlal, Lahsen; Benbaghdadi, Imane; Aouragh, Aziz; Bezza, Ahmed; El Maghraoui, Abdellah

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common complication of chronic liver disease, from cholestatic disorders to autoimmune, alcoholic, and posthepatitic cirrhosis. Osteoporosis appears more striking in patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) because the disease usually affects elderly women, who are naturally prone to osteoporosis. Our aims were (1) to compare the prevalence of osteoporosis (T-score <-2.5 SD) between PBC patients and a group of age-and sex-matched controls consisting of healthy subjects from the general population; and (2) to identify the main risk factors for the development of bone loss. Thirty-three women with PBC (mean age, 47.3 +/- 10.4 years) and 66 healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. Bone mineral density (BMD) was assessed at the lumbar spine by dual-photon X-ray absorptiometry. Bone metabolism was evaluated by measuring serum calcium corrected for serum albumin, 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH vit D), parathyroid hormone, and osteocalcin. Vertebral fractures were analyzed using vertebral fracture assessment (VFA). The mean T-score was lower in the PBC group compared to healthy controls, with a significant statistical difference (-2.39 +/- 0.93 and -1.47 +/- 0.99 in lumbar spine and total hip, respectively, in the PBC group versus -0.99 +/- 0.51 and -0.56 +/- 1.14 in healthy controls (P < 0.001). The prevalence of osteoporosis was 51.5% in the PBC group versus 22.7% in healthy controls with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.004). BMD of the PBC group was significantly correlated positively with body mass index (BMI) and 25-OH vit D, and negatively with menopausal status, duration of disease, and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Vertebral fractures were present in 9% of the patients. We found that osteoporosis is more prevalent in women with PBC than in the general population. BMI, menopausal status, duration of the disease, and vitamin D deficiency are the main risk factors for osteoporosis in this liver disease.

  1. Do the poor sue more? A case-control study of malpractice claims and socioeconomic status.

    PubMed

    Burstin, H R; Johnson, W G; Lipsitz, S R; Brennan, T A

    1993-10-13

    To evaluate whether socioeconomic status is associated with risk of malpractice claims, particularly among those who have suffered medical injury. Case-control study. Fifty-one hospitals in New York State. The presence and severity of medical injury, defined as disability at the time of discharge or prolongation of the hospitalization caused by medical treatment as opposed to the disease process, were assessed through review of approximately 31,000 hospital records in New York in 1984. These sampled records were then linked to formal malpractice claims. To estimate the risk of malpractice claims by age, gender, race, insurance status, and income, we conducted a case-control study of claimant cases matched with nonclaimant controls. The cases were all those patients who filed malpractice claims referring to alleged malpractice during a sampled hospitalization. Physician reviewers had previously judged the level of disability that resulted from the medical injury. Claimants (n = 51) were each matched with five nonclaimant controls on the basis of injury. Noninjured cases were matched with noninjured controls and injured cases were matched with injured controls. We found that poor patients (odds ratio [OR], 0.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.03 to 0.8) and uninsured patients (OR, 0.1; 95% CI, 0.005 to 0.9) were significantly less likely to file malpractice claims, after controlling for the severity of medical injury. Among patients who suffered medical injury, the elderly (OR, 0.2; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.9) were also less likely to file claims. Gender and race were not independently associated with risk of malpractice claims. Poor and uninsured patients are significantly less likely to sue for malpractice, even after controlling for the presence of medical injury. Fear of malpractice risk should not be a significant factor in the decision to serve the poor. Tort reforms that would protect physicians who serve the medically indigent from malpractice suits may not be

  2. Health issues in the Arab American community. Male infertility in Lebanon: a case-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Kobeissi, Loulou; Inhorn, Marcia C

    2007-01-01

    The impact of risk factors, such as consanguinity and familial clustering, reproductive infections, traumas, and diseases, lifestyle factors and occupational and war exposures on male infertility, was investigated in a case-controlled study conducted in Lebanon. One-hundred-twenty males and 100 controls of Lebanese, Syrian or Lebanese-Palestinian descents were selected from two in-vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics located in Beirut, Lebanon. All cases suffered from impaired sperm count and function, according to World Health Organization guidelines for semen analysis. Controls were the fertile husbands of infertile women. Data were collected using a semi-structured interview, laboratory blood testing and the results of the most recent semen analysis. Univariate, bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used for data analysis, along with checks for effect modification and control of confounders. Consanguinity and the familial clustering of male infertility cases, as well as reproductive illnesses and war exposures were independently significant risk factors for male infertility. The odds of having infertility problems in the immediate family were 2.6 times higher in cases than controls. The odds of reproductive illness were 2 times higher in cases than controls. The odds of war exposures were 1.57 times higher in cases than controls. Occupational exposures, such as smoking and caffeine intake, were not shown to be important risk factors. This case-controlled study highlights the importance of investigating the etiology of male infertility in Middle Eastern communities. It suggests the need to expand research on male reproductive health in the Middle East in order to improve the prevention and management of male infertility and other male reproductive health problems.

  3. Study design in evidence-based surgery: What is the role of case-control studies?

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Amy M; Cox, Michael R; Eslick, Guy D

    2016-01-01

    Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are the gold standard in terms of study design, however, in the surgical setting conducting RCTs can often be unethical or logistically impossible. Case-control studies should become the major study design used in surgical research when RCTs are unable to be conducted and definitely replacing case series which offer little insight into surgical outcomes and disease processes. PMID:27019801

  4. Antioxidant intake and adult-onset wheeze: a case-control study. Aberdeen WHEASE Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bodner, C; Godden, D; Brown, K; Little, J; Ross, S; Seaton, A

    1999-01-01

    An increase in prevalence of wheezing illness in the UK has coincided with a reduction in the consumption of natural antioxidants, which may modulate the lung's response to oxidant stress, limiting the expression of airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms. The hypothesis that intakes and plasma levels of natural antioxidants would be determinants of adult-onset wheezing illness was tested. A nested case-control study was conducted in 94 cases with adult-onset wheeze and 203 controls aged 39-45 yrs identified in a 30-yr follow-up survey. Antioxidant intake was measured by a food frequency questionnaire, and plasma and red cell measurements of antioxidant status were obtained. Outcome measures were onset of wheeze since age 15 yrs (ever wheeze) and wheeze occurring in the past 12 months (current wheeze). After adjusting for the effects of smoking, socioeconomic status, atopy, family history of atopic disease and total energy intake, intakes of vitamin E (odds ratio (OR) = 4.02 for low compared to high tertile of intake) and plasma levels of ascorbate (OR = 0.98 per unit) and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio (OR = 0.34 per log(e) unit) were inversely related to adult-onset wheeze. In analyses stratified by social class and smoking, intakes of vitamin C and E and plasma levels of ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol:triglyceride ratio were inversely related to current wheeze in the manual social class and among current smokers. No independent associations of vitamin A, beta-carotene or total plasma antioxidant capacity were found. The results support the hypothesis that deficiencies of vitamins C and E are associated with wheezing symptoms. Smokers in the manual social class are particularly susceptible to these effects.

  5. 77 FR 12598 - Notice Correction; A Multi-Center International Hospital-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ...-Based Case-Control Study of Lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI) The Federal Register notice published on... international hospital-based case-control study of lymphoma in Asia (AsiaLymph) (NCI)'' was submitted with...

  6. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies: Data collection, analysis and reporting results.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; Baqui, Abdullah H; Broome, Claire V; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Cheryl; Farrar, Jennifer L; Feikin, Daniel R; Groome, Michelle J; Hajjeh, Rana A; Johnson, Hope L; Madhi, Shabir A; Mulholland, Kim; O'Brien, Katherine L; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Rodrigues, Laura C; Santosham, Mathuram; Scott, J Anthony; Smith, Peter G; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Tate, Jacqueline E; Victor, J Chris; Whitney, Cynthia G; Zaidi, Anita K; Zell, Elizabeth R

    2017-06-05

    The case-control methodology is frequently used to evaluate vaccine effectiveness post-licensure. The results of such studies provide important insight into the level of protection afforded by vaccines in a 'real world' context, and are commonly used to guide vaccine policy decisions. However, the potential for bias and confounding are important limitations to this method, and the results of a poorly conducted or incorrectly interpreted case-control study can mislead policies. In 2012, a group of experts met to review recent experience with case-control studies evaluating vaccine effectiveness; we summarize the recommendations of that group regarding best practices for data collection, analysis, and presentation of the results of case-control vaccine effectiveness studies. Vaccination status is the primary exposure of interest, but can be challenging to assess accurately and with minimal bias. Investigators should understand factors associated with vaccination as well as the availability of documented vaccination status in the study context; case-control studies may not be a valid method for evaluating vaccine effectiveness in settings where many children lack a documented immunization history. To avoid bias, it is essential to use the same methods and effort gathering vaccination data from cases and controls. Variables that may confound the association between illness and vaccination are also important to capture as completely as possible, and where relevant, adjust for in the analysis according to the analytic plan. In presenting results from case-control vaccine effectiveness studies, investigators should describe enrollment among eligible cases and controls as well as the proportion with no documented vaccine history. Emphasis should be placed on confidence intervals, rather than point estimates, of vaccine effectiveness. Case-control studies are a useful approach for evaluating vaccine effectiveness; however careful attention must be paid to the collection

  7. Assessing different measures of population-level vaccine protection using a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Mohammad; You, Young Ae; Kanungo, Suman; Manna, Byomkesh; Deen, Jacqueline L; Lopez, Anna Lena; Wierzba, Thomas F; Bhattacharya, Sujit K; Sur, Dipika; Clemens, John D

    2015-11-27

    Case-control studies have not been examined for their utility in assessing population-level vaccine protection in individually randomized trials. We used the data of a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of a cholera vaccine to compare the results of case-control analyses with those of cohort analyses. Cases of cholera were selected from the trial population followed for three years following dosing. For each case, we selected 4 age-matched controls who had not developed cholera. For each case and control, GIS was used to calculate vaccine coverage of individuals in a surrounding "virtual" cluster. Specific selection strategies were used to evaluate the vaccine protective effects. 66,900 out of 108,389 individuals received two doses of the assigned regimen. For direct protection among subjects in low vaccine coverage clusters, we observed 78% (95% CI: 47-91%) protection in a cohort analysis and 84% (95% CI: 60-94%) in case-control analysis after adjusting for confounding factors. Using our GIS-based approach, estimated indirect protection was 52% (95% CI: 10-74%) in cohort and 76% (95% CI: 47-89%) in case control analysis. Estimates of total and overall effectiveness were similar for cohort and case-control analyses. The findings show that case-control analyses of individually randomized vaccine trials may be used to evaluate direct as well as population-level vaccine protection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Tests for gene-environment interaction from case-control data: a novel study of type I error, power and designs.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Bhramar; Ahn, Jaeil; Gruber, Stephen B; Rennert, Gad; Moreno, Victor; Chatterjee, Nilanjan

    2008-11-01

    To evaluate the risk of a disease associated with the joint effects of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposures, epidemiologic researchers often test for non-multiplicative gene-environment effects from case-control studies. In this article, we present a comparative study of four alternative tests for interactions: (i) the standard case-control method; (ii) the case-only method, which requires an assumption of gene-environment independence for the underlying population; (iii) a two-step method that decides between the case-only and case-control estimators depending on a statistical test for the gene-environment independence assumption and (iv) a novel empirical-Bayes (EB) method that combines the case-control and case-only estimators depending on the sample size and strength of the gene-environment association in the data. We evaluate the methods in terms of integrated Type I error and power, averaged with respect to varying scenarios for gene-environment association that are likely to appear in practice. These unique studies suggest that the novel EB procedure overall is a promising approach for detection of gene-environment interactions from case-control studies. In particular, the EB procedure, unlike the case-only or two-step methods, can closely maintain a desired Type I error under realistic scenarios of gene-environment dependence and yet can be substantially more powerful than the traditional case-control analysis when the gene-environment independence assumption is satisfied, exactly or approximately. Our studies also reveal potential utility of some non-traditional case-control designs that samples controls at a smaller rate than the cases. Apart from the simulation studies, we also illustrate the different methods by analyzing interactions of two commonly studied genes, N-acetyl transferase type 2 and glutathione s-transferase M1, with smoking and dietary exposures, in a large case-control study of colorectal cancer.

  9. Factors associated with postmenopausal osteoporosis: a case-control study of Belgrade women.

    PubMed

    Grgurevic, Anita; Gledovic, Zorana; Vujasinovic-Stupar, Nada

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors related to osteoporosis in postmenopausal women in Belgrade. A case-control study was conducted during 2006-2007. The study group consisted of 100 newly diagnosed osteoporosis patients and 100 age-matched controls (± 2 years). The inclusion criteria for the case group were newly diagnosed osteoporosis confirmed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and being menopausal (at least 2 years of amenorrhea). The inclusion criteria for the control group were postmenopausal women with confirmed normal bone mineral density of the lumbar spine by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. All study participants were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. The following factors were significantly independently related to osteoporosis: low body weight (P < 0.001), thin constitution in childhood (P = 0.002), history of previous fracture (P = 0.033), menopause at age <47 years (P < 0.001), family history of fracture (P = 0.005), and less frequent consumption of cheese (P = 0.027) and fish (P = 0.020). The majority of factors identified may be modifiable and could be influenced to prevent postmenopausal osteoporosis.

  10. Common Mental Disorders Associated with Tuberculosis: A Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    de Araújo, Gleide Santos; Pereira, Susan Martins; dos Santos, Darci Neves; Marinho, Jamocyr Moura; Rodrigues, Laura Cunha; Barreto, Mauricio Lima

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the availability of treatment and a vaccine, tuberculosis continues to be a public health problem worldwide. Mental disorders might contribute to the burden of the disease. Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the association between common mental disorders and tuberculosis. Methods A matched case-control study was conducted. The study population included symptomatic respiratory patients who attended three referral hospitals and six community clinics in the city of Salvador, Brazil. A doctor’s diagnosis defined potential cases and controls. Cases were newly diagnosed tuberculosis cases, and controls were symptomatic respiratory patients for whom tuberculosis was excluded as a diagnosis by the attending physician. Cases and controls were ascertained in the same clinic. Data collection occurred between August 2008 and April 2010. The study instruments included a structured interview, a self-reporting questionnaire for the identification of common mental disorders, and a questionnaire for alcoholism. An univariate analysis included descriptive procedures (with chi-square statistics), and a multivariate analysis used conditional logistic regression. Results The mean age of the cases was 38 years, and 61% of the cases were males. After adjusting for potential confounders, the odds of tuberculosis were significantly higher in patients dignosed with a common mental disorder (OR: 1.34; 95% CI 1.05–1.70). Conclusion There appears to be a positive and independent association between common mental disorders and tuberculosis; further epidemiological studies are required to increase our understanding of the possible biological and social mechanisms responsible for this association. Independent of the direction of the association, this finding has implications for the provision of care for mental disorders and for tuberculosis. PMID:24937319

  11. General practitioner notes as a source of information for case-control studies in young women. UK National Case-Control Study Group.

    PubMed Central

    Chilvers, C E; Pike, M C; Taylor, C N; Hermon, C; Crossley, B; Smith, S J

    1994-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The UK National Case-Control Study was carried out to investigate the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk. This study investigates whether general practitioner notes could be used as the sole data source for epidemiological studies of young women and what the effect would be on non-response and recall bias. DESIGN--Case-control study with data on gynaecological, obstetric, and contraceptive history collected at interview and from general practitioners' notes. Information from these two sources was compared. SETTING--This was a population-based study. PARTICIPANTS--Altogether 755 women with breast cancer aged under 36 years at diagnosis, each with an age-matched control, participated in the study. Response rates at interview were 72% and 89% for cases and controls but GP data were available for 90% of the 1049 case and first-selected control pairs. MAIN RESULTS--There was generally good agreement between the two data sources with respect to obstetric history and gynaecological procedures (hysterectomy, oophorectomy, and tubal ligation). The use of intra-uterine devices, or diaphragm, and partner's vasectomy were not reliably recorded in the GP's notes. The overall results of the UK study would have been qualitatively the same with respect to the relationship between oral contraceptive use and breast cancer risk if GP notes only had been used, in spite of the fact that only about half of all oral contraceptive usage was recorded in the notes. Response rates would have been higher, recall bias eliminated, and the cost of the study halved. CONCLUSIONS--When planning case-control studies in young women, the possibility of using GP notes as the primary data source should be considered. Lack of data on potential confounding factors is a possible drawback to such use. The practice of destroying GP's notes shortly after the death of patients seriously restricts the possibility of using these notes when studying rapidly fatal

  12. A Case-Control Study on the Risk Factors for Meningococcal Disease among Children in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Mpalaouras, George; Vasilopoulou, Vasiliki; Katsioulis, Antonios; Rachiotis, George; Theodoridou, Kalliopi; Tzanakaki, Georgia; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Theodoridou, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to identify environmental or genetic risk factors that are associated with invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) in children in Greece. Methods A case-control study was performed in 133 children (44 cases and 89 controls) aged between 0–14 years, who were hospitalized in a children's hospital in Athens. Demographics and possible risk factors were collected by the use of a structured questionnaire. To investigate the association of mannose binding lectin (MBL) with IMD, a frequency analysis of the haplotypes of the MBL2 gene and quantitative measurement of MBL serum protein levels were performed using Nanogen NanoChipR 400 technology and immuno-enzyme techniques, respectively. Results The multivariate analysis revealed that changes in a child's life setting (relocation or vacation, OR = 7.16), paternal smoking (OR = 4.51), upper respiratory tract infection within the previous month (OR = 3.04) and the density of people in the house/100m2 (OR = 3.16), were independent risk factors associated with IMD. Overall 18.8% of patients had a MBL2 genotype with low functionality compared to 10.1% of healthy controls, but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.189). Conclusion Prevention strategies aimed at reducing parental smoking and other risk factors identified in this study could decrease the risk of IMD among children in Greece. PMID:27351742

  13. Factors associated with syphilis infection: a comprehensive analysis based on a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Y; Li, S-L; Lin, H-L; Lin, Z-F; Zhu, X-Z; Fan, J-Y; Gao, K; Zhang, H-L; Lin, L-R; Liu, L-L; Tong, M-L; Niu, J-J; Yang, T-C

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to comprehensively evaluate factors that influence the likelihood of syphilis infection from risk-taking behaviours and medical conditions. A retrospective case-control study was conducted by enrolling 664 syphilis inpatients (excluding 11 congenital syphilis patients) and 800 sex- and age-matched controls. Medical histories, clinical data and patient interview data were collected and subjected to logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of syphilis in the study population was 3·9% (675/17,304). By univariate analysis, syphilis infection was associated with migration between cities, marital status, smoking, reproductive history, hypertension, elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (P < 0·05). A high rate of syphilis-HBV co-infection was observed in HIV-negative patients and further research revealed an association between syphilis and specific HBV serological reactivity. Syphilis was also associated with the frequency, duration and status of tobacco use. Multivariate analysis indicated that syphilis infection was independently associated with migration between cities [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1·368, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·048-1·785], current smoking (aOR 1·607, 95% CI 1·177-2·195), elevated BUN (aOR 1·782, 95% CI 1·188-2·673) and some serological patterns of HBV infection. To prevent the spread of infectious diseases, inpatients and blood donors should be tested for HIV, syphilis, HBV and HCV simultaneously.

  14. Risk factors for chronic periodontitis in Sri Lankan adults: a population based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Wellapuli, Nimali; Ekanayake, Lilani

    2017-09-07

    To determine risk factors for chronic periodontitis in 30-60 year olds in Sri Lanka. Cases and controls for this population based unmatched case-control study were identified from a broader cross-sectional study which was conducted to determine the prevalence of chronic periodontitis in 30-60 year old adults in Colombo district Sri Lanka. The study included 694 cases and 706 controls. Data were collected by means of a pre-tested interviewer administered questionnaire to obtain information about socio-demographic and behavioural factors, a physical examination to record anthropometric measurements and an oral examination. Being a male, a Muslim, belonging to the 45-60 year old age group, having less than 12 years of education, using the finger to clean teeth, current smoking, current betel quid chewing, self-reported diabetes and hypertension emerged as risk factors for chronic periodontitis. Several socio-demographic and behavioural factors as well as co-morbid conditions emerged as independent risk factors for chronic periodontits in this population. The findings could be used for planning programmes to reduce the burden of chronic periodontits in Colombo district Sri Lanka.

  15. Determinants of Internet addiction among adolescents: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Tsitsika, Artemis; Critselis, Elena; Louizou, Amalia; Janikian, Mari; Freskou, Aliki; Marangou, Evgenia; Kormas, Georgios; Kafetzis, Dimitrios

    2011-04-19

    Internet Addiction (IA) is associated with adverse psychosocial development and mental disorders. The study aims were to evaluate the psychosocial profiles and psychiatric comorbidities associated with IA among adolescents. A case-control study was conducted among 129 adolescents in the outpatient setting of the Adolescent Health Unit of the Second University Department of Pediatrics in Athens, Greece. The case group consisted of 86 adolescents with IA as evaluated following psychiatric interview with two independent examiners. The control group consisted of 43 adolescents without IA, frequency matched for age and gender with case group participants. The study findings indicated that adolescents with IA were significantly more likely to have divorced parents (p = 0.012) and/or dysfunctional familial relationships (p < 0.0001). The proportion of adolescents with poor academic performance (p < 0.0001) and unexcused school absences (p = 0.004) was greater among those with IA. Moreover, approximately two-thirds of the adolescents with IA were engaged in high-risk behaviors (p < 0.0001). Finally, adolescents with IA were 3.89 times more likely to present with comorbid psychiatric conditions (CI 95%: 1.19-12.70), including depression (10.5 vs. 0%; p = 0.022). Adolescent IA is associated with deterred familial functions, poor academic performance, engagement in high-risk behaviors, and an augmented likelihood for depression.

  16. Soft tissue infections related to peripheral intravenous catheters in hospitalised patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lee, W-L; Liao, S-F; Lee, W-C; Huang, C-H; Fang, C-T

    2010-10-01

    Peripheral intravenous (i.v.) catheter-related soft tissue infections begin with local skin and soft tissue inflammation, which can progress to cellulitis or even tissue necrosis requiring aggressive surgical treatment. We conducted a matched case-control study to investigate risk factors for peripheral i.v. catheter-related soft tissue infections in hospitalised patients. We retrospectively identified 46 cases that occurred during 2006-2008 in two teaching hospitals. Each case was randomly matched with four control subjects from the same ward and on the same day that the soft tissue infections arose. Risk factors were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Multiple regression analysis identified the following independent risk factors: >24h of continuous i.v. fluid infusion (odds ratio: 5.2, P=0.001), insertion site in lower extremity (8.5, P=0.003), use of an infusion pump (4.6, P=0.023), and hospitalisation due to a neurological or neurosurgical condition (3.6, P=0.018). The population-attributable fractions (the percentage of cases in the study population that could be prevented if the exposure were removed) were 40%, 19%, 24% and 25%, respectively. Minimising unnecessarily prolonged i.v. fluid infusion and avoidance of insertion in the lower extremity may significantly reduce the incidence of peripheral i.v. catheter-related soft tissue infection in the study hospitals. Copyright 2010 The Hospital Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Liver enzymes and metabolic syndrome: a large-scale case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lu; Ma, Xiangyu; Jiang, Zhi; Zhang, Kejun; Zhang, Mengxuan; Li, Yafei; Zhao, Xiaolan; Xiong, Hongyan

    2015-09-29

    Previous studies suggested that elevated liver enzymes could be used as potential novel biomarkers of Metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its clinical outcomes, although the results were inconsistent and the conclusions were underpowered. A case-control study with 6,268 MetS subjects and 6,330 frequency-matched healthy controls was conducted to systematically evaluated levels of four liver enzymes (ALT, AST, GGT and ALP), both in overall populations and in subjects with normal liver enzymes, with MetS risk using both quartiles and continuous unit of liver enzymes. We found significant associations were detected for all above analyses. Compared with quartile 1 (Q1), other quartiles have significant higher MetS risk, with ORs ranging from 1.15 to 18.15. The highest effected was detected for GGT, for which the OR value for the highest versus lowest quartile was 18.15 (95% CI: 15.7-20.9). Mutual adjustment proved the independence of the relations for all four liver enzymes. Sensitivity analyses didn't materially changed the trend. To the best of our knowledge, this study should be the largest, which aimed at evaluating the association between liver enzymes measures and MetS risk. The results can better support that liver enzyme levels could be used as clinical predictors of MetS.

  18. Chinese Eye Exercises and Myopia Development in School Age Children: A Nested Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Kang, Meng-Tian; Li, Shi-Ming; Peng, Xiaoxia; Li, Lei; Ran, Anran; Meng, Bo; Sun, Yunyun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2016-06-22

    Chinese eye exercises have been implemented in China as an intervention for controlling children's myopia for over 50 years. This nested case-control study investigated Chinese eye exercises and their association with myopia development in junior middle school children. Outcome measures were the onset and progression of myopia over a two-year period. Cases were defined as 1. Myopia onset (cycloplegic spherical equivalent ≤ -0.5 diopter in non-myopic children). 2. Myopia progression (myopia shift of ≥1.0 diopter in those who were myopic at baseline). Two independent investigators assessed the quality of Chinese eye exercises performance at the end of the follow-up period. Of 260 children at baseline (mean age was 12.7 ± 0.5 years), 201 were eligible for this study. There was no association between eye exercises and the risk of myopia-onset (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.24-2.21), nor myopia progression (OR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.41-1.53). The group who performed high quality exercises had a slightly lower myopia progression of 0.15 D than the children who did not perform the exercise over a period of 2 years. However, the limited sample size, low dosage and performance quality of Chinese eye exercises in children did not result in statistical significance and require further studies.

  19. Chinese Eye Exercises and Myopia Development in School Age Children: A Nested Case-control Study

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Meng-Tian; Li, Shi-Ming; Peng, Xiaoxia; Li, Lei; Ran, Anran; Meng, Bo; Sun, Yunyun; Liu, Luo-Ru; Li, He; Millodot, Michel; Wang, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Chinese eye exercises have been implemented in China as an intervention for controlling children’s myopia for over 50 years. This nested case-control study investigated Chinese eye exercises and their association with myopia development in junior middle school children. Outcome measures were the onset and progression of myopia over a two-year period. Cases were defined as 1. Myopia onset (cycloplegic spherical equivalent ≤ −0.5 diopter in non-myopic children). 2. Myopia progression (myopia shift of ≥1.0 diopter in those who were myopic at baseline). Two independent investigators assessed the quality of Chinese eye exercises performance at the end of the follow-up period. Of 260 children at baseline (mean age was 12.7 ± 0.5 years), 201 were eligible for this study. There was no association between eye exercises and the risk of myopia-onset (OR = 0.73, 95%CI: 0.24–2.21), nor myopia progression (OR = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.41–1.53). The group who performed high quality exercises had a slightly lower myopia progression of 0.15 D than the children who did not perform the exercise over a period of 2 years. However, the limited sample size, low dosage and performance quality of Chinese eye exercises in children did not result in statistical significance and require further studies. PMID:27329615

  20. Informed Conditioning on Clinical Covariates Increases Power in Case-Control Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlen, Noah; Lindström, Sara; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Cornelis, Marilyn; Genovese, Giulio; Pollack, Samuela; Barton, Anne; Bickeböller, Heike; Bowden, Donald W.; Eyre, Steve; Freedman, Barry I.; Friedman, David J.; Field, John K.; Groop, Leif; Haugen, Aage; Heinrich, Joachim; Henderson, Brian E.; Hicks, Pamela J.; Hocking, Lynne J.; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Langefeld, Carl D.; Le Marchand, Loic; Meister, Michael; Morgan, Ann W.; Raji, Olaide Y.; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Scherf, David; Steer, Sophia; Walshaw, Martin; Waters, Kevin M.; Wilson, Anthony G.; Wordsworth, Paul; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Tchetgen, Eric Tchetgen; Haiman, Christopher; Hunter, David J.; Plenge, Robert M.; Worthington, Jane; Christiani, David C.; Schaumberg, Debra A.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Altshuler, David; Voight, Benjamin; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic case-control association studies often include data on clinical covariates, such as body mass index (BMI), smoking status, or age, that may modify the underlying genetic risk of case or control samples. For example, in type 2 diabetes, odds ratios for established variants estimated from low–BMI cases are larger than those estimated from high–BMI cases. An unanswered question is how to use this information to maximize statistical power in case-control studies that ascertain individuals on the basis of phenotype (case-control ascertainment) or phenotype and clinical covariates (case-control-covariate ascertainment). While current approaches improve power in studies with random ascertainment, they often lose power under case-control ascertainment and fail to capture available power increases under case-control-covariate ascertainment. We show that an informed conditioning approach, based on the liability threshold model with parameters informed by external epidemiological information, fully accounts for disease prevalence and non-random ascertainment of phenotype as well as covariates and provides a substantial increase in power while maintaining a properly controlled false-positive rate. Our method outperforms standard case-control association tests with or without covariates, tests of gene x covariate interaction, and previously proposed tests for dealing with covariates in ascertained data, with especially large improvements in the case of case-control-covariate ascertainment. We investigate empirical case-control studies of type 2 diabetes, prostate cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, age-related macular degeneration, and end-stage kidney disease over a total of 89,726 samples. In these datasets, informed conditioning outperforms logistic regression for 115 of the 157 known associated variants investigated (P-value = 1×10−9). The improvement varied across diseases with a 16% median increase in χ2 test statistics and a

  1. A general regression framework for a secondary outcome in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Modern case-control studies typically involve the collection of data on a large number of outcomes, often at considerable logistical and monetary expense. These data are of potentially great value to subsequent researchers, who, although not necessarily concerned with the disease that defined the case series in the original study, may want to use the available information for a regression analysis involving a secondary outcome. Because cases and controls are selected with unequal probability, regression analysis involving a secondary outcome generally must acknowledge the sampling design. In this paper, the author presents a new framework for the analysis of secondary outcomes in case-control studies. The approach is based on a careful re-parameterization of the conditional model for the secondary outcome given the case-control outcome and regression covariates, in terms of (a) the population regression of interest of the secondary outcome given covariates and (b) the population regression of the case-control outcome on covariates. The error distribution for the secondary outcome given covariates and case-control status is otherwise unrestricted. For a continuous outcome, the approach sometimes reduces to extending model (a) by including a residual of (b) as a covariate. However, the framework is general in the sense that models (a) and (b) can take any functional form, and the methodology allows for an identity, log or logit link function for model (a).

  2. Zinc Status Biomarkers and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Metabolic Syndrome: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Erika P S; Cunha, Aline T O; Aquino, Sephora L S; Pedrosa, Lucia F C; Lima, Severina C V C; Lima, Josivan G; Almeida, Maria G; Sena-Evangelista, Karine C M

    2017-02-22

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) involves pathophysiological alterations that might compromise zinc status. The aim of this study was to evaluate zinc status biomarkers and their associations with cardiometabolic factors in patients with MS. Our case control study included 88 patients with MS and 37 controls. We performed clinical and anthropometric assessments and obtained lipid, glycemic, and inflammatory profiles. We also evaluated zinc intake, plasma zinc, erythrocyte zinc, and 24-h urinary zinc excretion. The average zinc intake was significantly lower in the MS group (p < 0.001). Regression models indicated no significant differences in plasma zinc concentration (all p > 0.05) between the two groups. We found significantly higher erythrocyte zinc concentration in the MS group (p < 0.001) independent from co-variable adjustments. Twenty-four hour urinary zinc excretion was significantly higher in the MS group (p = 0.008), and adjustments for age and sex explained 21% of the difference (R² = 0.21, p < 0.001). There were significant associations between zincuria and fasting blood glucose concentration (r = 0.479), waist circumference (r = 0.253), triglyceride concentration (r = 0.360), glycated hemoglobin concentration (r = 0.250), homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance (r = 0.223), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration (r = 0.427) (all p < 0.05) in the MS group. Patients with MS had alterations in zinc metabolism mainly characterized by an increase in erythrocyte zinc and higher zincuria.

  3. Postural changes in women with chronic pelvic pain: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    Montenegro, Mary LLS; Mateus-Vasconcelos, Elaine CL; Rosa e Silva, Júlio C; dos Reis, Francisco J Candido; Nogueira, Antonio A; Poli-Neto, Omero B

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a lower abdominal pain lasting at least 6 months, occurring continuously or intermittently and not associated exclusively with menstruation or intercourse. Although the musculoskeletal system has been found to be involved in CPP, few studies have assessed the contribution of posture in women with CPP. We aimed to determine if the frequency of postural changes was higher in women with CPP than healthy subjects. Methods A case-control study included 108 women with CPP of more than 6 months' duration (CPP group) who consecutively attended at the Hospital of the University of São Paulo and 48 healthy female volunteers (control group). Postural assessment was noninvasive and performed in the standing position, with the reference points of Kendall used as normal parameters. Factors associated with CPP were assessed by logistic regression analysis. Results Logistic regression showed that the independent factors associated with CPP were postural changes in the cervical spine (OR 4.1; 95% CI 1.6–10.7; p < 0.01) and scapulae (OR 2.9; 95% CI 1.1–7.6; p < 0.05). Conclusion Musculoskeletal changes were associated with CPP in 34% of women. These findings suggest that a more detailed assessment of women with CPP is necessary for better diagnosis and for more effective treatment. PMID:19583850

  4. Fruits and vegetables consumption and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Bahareh; Jessri, Mahsa; Moasheri, Seyed Majid; Rad, Anahita Houshiar; Rashidkhani, Bahram

    2011-01-01

    The authors examined the association of food group intakes and the risk of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in a hospital-based case-control study in Iran. In total, 47 patients with esophageal SCC and 96 controls underwent face-to-face private interviews. Usual dietary intake was assessed using a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Cases had higher tobacco consumption and symptomatic gastresophageal reflux, whereas controls had higher mean body mass index (25.3 vs. 20.4) and years of education. A protective independent effect was observed for the highest tertile of total fruit consumption (OR: 0.13, CI: 0.04-0.45, P value = 0.001). Within the group of fruits, a significant inverse association was observed for bananas and kiwis (P for trends: 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). The risk of SCC decreased monotonically with increasing intake frequency of oranges (P value for trend = 0.01). The effect of total vegetable consumption on esophageal SCC was not significant, although a reduction in risk was observed in the highest tertile of intake (OR: 0.66, CI: 0.23-1.87, P value = 0.43). The results of the present study suggest a reasonable association between fruit consumption and esophageal SCC in a Middle Eastern high-risk population.

  5. Anxiety and depression predicted by medically unexplained symptoms in Pakistani children: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Imran, Nazish; Ani, Cornelius; Mahmood, Zahid; Hassan, Khawaja Amjad; Bhatti, Muhammad Riaz

    2014-02-01

    To explore association between medically unexplained symptoms in children in Pakistan with emotional difficulties and functional impairments. We conducted a matched three-group case-control study of 186 children aged 8-16 years in Lahore, Pakistan. Cases were 62 children with chronic somatic symptoms for which no organic cause was identified after investigations. Two control groups of 62 children with chronic medical paediatric conditions, and 62 healthy children were identified. Cases and controls were matched for gender, age, and school class. Somatisation was measured with the Children's Somatisation Inventory (CSI-24) while anxiety and depression were measured with the Spencer Children's Anxiety Scale and the Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire respectively. All questionnaires were translated into Urdu. Mean age was 11.7 years (SD=2.1). Cases scored significantly higher on somatisation (CSI-24), anxiety and depression than both control groups. Paediatric controls scored significantly higher than healthy controls on all three measures. Two hierarchical linear regression models were used to explore if somatisation predicted depression and anxiety while controlling for several confounders. Somatisation (higher CSI-24 scores) independently and significantly predicted higher anxiety (β=.37, p=.0001) and depression (β=.41, p=.0001) scores. This is the first study to show an association between medically unexplained symptoms and anxiety and depression in Pakistani children. This highlights the importance of screening for emotional difficulties in children presenting with unexplained somatic symptoms in this region. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Salmonella infections in Norway: descriptive epidemiology and a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Kapperud, G.; Lassen, J.; Hasseltvedt, V.

    1998-01-01

    The epidemiological progression of human salmonellosis in Norway is parallel to trends noted elsewhere in Europe. During the past two decades, the number of reported cases has increased steadily, with a special sharp rise in the early 1980s due to the emergence of Salmonella enteritidis, followed by a levelling off in recent years. However, in contrast to the situation in most other European countries, about 90% of the cases from whom a travel history is available, have acquired their infection abroad. The incidence of indigenous salmonella infections as well as the prevalence of the microorganism in the domestic food chain, are both comparatively low. In 1993-4, a national case-control study of sporadic indigenous salmonella infections was conducted to identify preventable risk factors and guide preventive efforts. Ninety-four case patients and 226 matched population controls were enrolled. The study failed to demonstrate any statistically significant association between salmonellosis and consumption of domestically produced red meat, poultry or eggs. The only factor which remained independently associated with an increased risk in conditional logistic regression analysis, was consumption of poultry purchased abroad during holiday visits to neighbouring countries. A separate analysis of Salmonella typhimurium infections incriminated food from catering establishments and foreign travel among household members, in addition to imported poultry. PMID:10030706

  7. [Association between herpetic burden and chronic ischemic heart disease: matched case-control study].

    PubMed

    Esteban-Hernández, Jesús; San Román Montero, Jesús; Gil, Ruth; Anegón, María; Gil, Angel

    2011-07-09

    Previous studies showed a plausible association between herpetic burden and ischemic heart disease. Our aim is to test this hypothesis in an spanish seroepidemiological context. Sex and age matched case-control study (1:1) including patients with chronic ischemic heart disease and healthy controls. Herpetic burden was defined as the aggregate number of antibody seropositivities (IgG) for Epstein Barr Virus, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, Herpes simplex type 1 and type 2. We found that 90.7% of cases and 70,7% of controles (P=.002), were seropositive to 4 or more herpesvirus (high herpetic burden). Within control group, hypercholesterolemic subjects had a higher proportion of high burden (88,5% vs. 61,2%, P=.02). High herpetic burden was associated with ischemic heart disease, even after adjusting for diabetes, smoking, hypertension and literacy level, (OR: 4,5 [1,23-16,53]), but not when hypercholesterolemia was included in the model (OR 2,2 [0,45-10,62]). The hypothesized relationship is independent from most but not all classical cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. A case-control study of airways obstruction among construction workers.

    PubMed

    Dement, John; Welch, Laura; Ringen, Knut; Quinn, Patricia; Chen, Anna; Haas, Scott

    2015-10-01

    While smoking is the major cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), occupational exposures to vapors, gases, dusts, and fumes (VGDF) increase COPD risk. This case-control study estimated the risk of COPD attributable to occupational exposures among construction workers. The study population included 834 cases and 1243 controls participating in a national medical screening program for older construction workers between 1997 and 2013. Qualitative exposure indices were developed based on lifetime work and exposure histories. Approximately 18% (95% CI = 2-24%) of COPD risk can be attributed to construction-related exposures, which are additive to the risk contributed by smoking. A measure of all VGDF exposures combined was a strong predictor of COPD risk. Construction workers are at increased risk of COPD as a result of broad and complex effects of many exposures acting independently or interactively. Control methods should be implemented to prevent worker exposures, and smoking cessation should be promoted. © 2015 The Authors. American Journal of Industrial Medicine Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Drug consumption and additional risk factors associated with microscopic colitis: Case-control study.

    PubMed

    Guagnozzi, Danila; Lucendo, Alfredo J; Angueira, Teresa; González-Castillo, Sonia; Tenías, José María

    2015-06-01

    Microscopic colitis has now emerged as a common cause of chronic diarrhoea, but its aetiology remains unknown. Some studies suggest that commonly prescribed drugs and other additional risk factors may be triggers. To evaluate the effects of drug intake and other risk factors on microscopic colitis patients. A prospective, case-control study with all consecutive adult patients referred to the Hospital General de Tomelloso (Ciudad Real, Spain) for chronic watery diarrhoea (from 2008 to 2011) was performed. Microscopic colitis was diagnosed following the commonly accepted histopathological criteria. 46 consecutive new cases of microscopic colitis and 317 chronic diarrhoea controls were recruited. Five independent risk factors significantly associated with microscopic colitis were identified: Abdominal pain (OR 3.25; 95%CI, 1.49-7.08), weight loss (OR 2.67; 95%CI, 1.16-6.15), celiac disease (OR 15.3; 95%CI, 3.70-63.5), topiramate intake (OR 13.6; 95%CI, 1.84- 100.8), and older age at diagnosis (OR 1 year increase 1.022; 95%CI, 1.002-1.042). Use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was associated with microscopic colitis in the subgroup of patients who fulfilled irritable bowel syndrome criteria (38.5% vs. 10.8%; p < 0.017). Microscopic colitis is associated with autoimmune disease, an increased age at diagnosis, topiramate intake and only in a sub-group of irritable bowel disease patients with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  10. Zinc Status Biomarkers and Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Metabolic Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Erika P. S.; Cunha, Aline T. O.; Aquino, Sephora L. S.; Pedrosa, Lucia F. C.; Lima, Severina C. V. C.; Lima, Josivan G.; Almeida, Maria G.; Sena-Evangelista, Karine C. M.

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) involves pathophysiological alterations that might compromise zinc status. The aim of this study was to evaluate zinc status biomarkers and their associations with cardiometabolic factors in patients with MS. Our case control study included 88 patients with MS and 37 controls. We performed clinical and anthropometric assessments and obtained lipid, glycemic, and inflammatory profiles. We also evaluated zinc intake, plasma zinc, erythrocyte zinc, and 24-h urinary zinc excretion. The average zinc intake was significantly lower in the MS group (p < 0.001). Regression models indicated no significant differences in plasma zinc concentration (all p > 0.05) between the two groups. We found significantly higher erythrocyte zinc concentration in the MS group (p < 0.001) independent from co-variable adjustments. Twenty-four hour urinary zinc excretion was significantly higher in the MS group (p = 0.008), and adjustments for age and sex explained 21% of the difference (R2 = 0.21, p < 0.001). There were significant associations between zincuria and fasting blood glucose concentration (r = 0.479), waist circumference (r = 0.253), triglyceride concentration (r = 0.360), glycated hemoglobin concentration (r = 0.250), homeostatic model assessment—insulin resistance (r = 0.223), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentration (r = 0.427) (all p < 0.05) in the MS group. Patients with MS had alterations in zinc metabolism mainly characterized by an increase in erythrocyte zinc and higher zincuria. PMID:28241426

  11. Occupational exposures and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Canadian case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Karunanayake, Chandima P; McDuffie, Helen H; Dosman, James A; Spinelli, John J; Pahwa, Punam

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective was to study the association between Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and occupational exposures related to long held occupations among males in six provinces of Canada. Methods A population based case-control study was conducted from 1991 to 1994. Males with newly diagnosed NHL (ICD-10) were stratified by province of residence and age group. A total of 513 incident cases and 1506 population based controls were included in the analysis. Conditional logistic regression was conducted to fit statistical models. Results Based on conditional logistic regression modeling, the following factors independently increased the risk of NHL: farmer and machinist as long held occupations; constant exposure to diesel exhaust fumes; constant exposure to ionizing radiation (radium); and personal history of another cancer. Men who had worked for 20 years or more as farmer and machinist were the most likely to develop NHL. Conclusion An increased risk of developing NHL is associated with the following: long held occupations of faer and machinist; exposure to diesel fumes; and exposure to ionizing radiation (radium). The risk of NHL increased with the duration of employment as a farmer or machinist. PMID:18687133

  12. Dietary inflammatory index and prostate cancer risk in a case-control study in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Salas, Ruth A; Shivappa, Nitin; Galván-Portillo, Marcia; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Hébert, James R; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa

    2016-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that a pro-inflammatory diet could be associated with prostate cancer (PC) risk. To evaluate the association between dietary inflammatory index (DII) and PC risk as well as aggressiveness, we conducted a case-control study in Mexico City. Cases were 394 individuals with incident, histologically confirmed PC, who were matched by age (±5 years) with 794 population controls. Dietary information was obtained through a semi-quantitative FFQ with a 3-year frame of reference before diagnosis, for cases, or interview, for controls. On the basis of twenty-eight food parameters, we estimated the energy-adjusted DII (E-DII). According to the Gleason score at diagnosis, PC cases were categorised as high (≥8), moderate (=7) and low (≤6) PC risk. Independent, unconditional logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders were used to estimate PC risk and PC aggressiveness. There were no significant associations between overall PC risk and E-DII (OR3rd v. 1st tertile 1·18; 95 % CI 0·85, 1·63; P=0·33) or among men with high-risk PC (Gleason≥8) (OR 1·46; 95 % CI 0·88, 2·42; P=0·14). These results do not support the hypothesis that a pro-inflammatory diet is related to PC risk and PC aggressiveness. However, further studies with larger sample sizes, with sufficient statistical power and of varying designs should be conducted to address this hypothesis.

  13. Predictors of labor abnormalities in university hospital: unmatched case control study.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Wayu; Berhan, Yifru

    2014-08-03

    Abnormal labor is one of the common emergency obstetric problems contributing for more than two-thirds of the unplanned cesarean section. In Ethiopia, although labor abnormality and its complications like obstetric fistula are highly prevalent, there is no published study that determines the predictors of labor abnormalities. The study design was an unmatched case control which included 844 women (408 cases and 436 controls). Cases were identified when a woman was diagnosed to have one of the labor abnormalities at term (prolonged latent stage, active phase disorder, prolonged second stage, descent disorder and obstructed labor). Subgroup logistic regression analyses were done taking the different type of labor abnormalities as the dependent variable. Nearly half of the cases (48.6%) were found to have the active phase disorder. Obstructed labor alone accounted for about 16.8% of the cases. The mean gestational age of cases and controls was almost comparable. More than a quarter of cases and controls came to the hospital in the second stage of labor. More than two-thirds of the cases (67.4%) gave birth by cesarean section. The logistic regression analysis demonstrated an independent association of overall labor abnormality with pelvic inadequacy. The subgroup analysis, however, revealed that several obstetric factors were associated with one or more types of labor abnormalities. Active phase disorders were the commonest type of labor abnormalities. Cases were late in reporting to the hospital. Malposition, inadequate pelvis and inadequate uterine contraction were some of the predictors of specific types of labor abnormalities.

  14. Accidental out-of-hospital deliveries: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Renesme, L; Garlantézec, R; Anouilh, F; Bertschy, F; Carpentier, M; Sizun, J

    2013-04-01

    To determine risk factors for accidental out-of-hospital deliveries (OHDs), which represent 0.5% of live births in France and are associated with poor neonatal outcomes. This retrospective case-control study assessed accidental OHDs that occurred in the Finistère District (Brittany, France) between January 2007 and December 2009. For each OHD case, two controls were randomly selected. Outcome measures included maternal demographics, obstetric characteristics and neonatal outcomes. During the study period, accidental OHDs accounted for 0.42% of all births; 76 accidental OHDs were included in the analysis. Multivariate analysis found four independent risk factors for accidental OHD: multiparity [OR: 8.84 (3.22-24.29)], unemployment [OR: 4.99 (1.85-13.47)], lack of or poor antenatal care [OR: 9.00 (2.41-33.72)] and a travel time >45 min from home to the delivery unit [OR: 6.18 (1.33-28.65) versus < 15 min]. Significantly more newborns from the OHD group required admission to the neonatal unit (p = 0.04), but accidental OHD was not significantly associated with prematurity or low birth weight. Four risk factors for accidental OHD were identified. Setting up an anonymous registry of OHD cases could improve our knowledge and screening of women at risk. ©2013 The Author(s)/Acta Paediatrica ©2013 Foundation Acta Paediatrica.

  15. Breast cancer recurrence in patients receiving epidural and paravertebral anesthesia: a retrospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Koonce, Stephanie L; Mclaughlin, Sarah A; Eck, Dustin L; Porter, Steven; Bagaria, Sanjay; Clendenen, Steven R; Robards, Christopher B

    2014-10-01

    Studies have suggested an association between the use of regional paravertebral or epidural anesthesia and a reduction in tumor recurrence following breast cancer surgery. To examine this relationship we performed a retrospective case-control study of patients undergoing breast cancer surgery receiving regional, regional and general, or general anesthesia. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients undergoing surgery for stage 0 to III breast cancer. Patients identified as receiving regional anesthesia were then matched for age, stage, estrogen receptor (ER) status, progesterone receptor status, and HER-2 expression with patients who received no regional anesthesia. Univariate (Pearson's χ2 test and odds ratio) and multivariate logistic analyses with backward stepwise regression were performed to determine factors associated with cancer recurrence. Between 1998 and 2007, 816 women underwent surgery for stage 0-III breast cancer at our institution. Forty-five patients developed tumors. Univariate analysis showed the use of regional anesthesia trended towards reduced cancer recurrence, but it did not achieve statistical significance (p = 0.06). Higher recurrence rates were associated with ER positive status (p = 0.003) and higher tumor stage (p < 0.0001). Age and HER-2 status were not associated with increased cancer recurrence (both p > 0.11). Multivariate analysis confirmed ER status and stage as independently influential (p = 0.002 and p < 0.0001 respectively). Although we found a trend towards reduced breast cancer recurrence with the use of regional anesthesia, univariate analysis did not reach statistical significance.

  16. Psychosocial Stress and Risk of Myocardial Infarction: A Case-Control Study in Belgrade (Serbia)

    PubMed Central

    Vujcic, Isidora; Vlajinac, Hristina; Dubljanin, Eleonora; Vasiljevic, Zorana; Matanovic, Dragana; Maksimovic, Jadranka; Sipetic, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to investigate which psychosocial risk factors show the strongest association with occurrence of myocardial infarction (MI) in the population of Belgrade in peacetime, after the big political changes in Serbia. Methods A case-control study was conducted involving 154 consecutive newly diagnosed patients with MI, and 308 controls matched by gender, age, and place of residence. Results According to conditional logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for conventional coronary risk factors, the odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for work-related stressful events, financial stress, deaths and diseases, and general stress were 3.78 (1.83-7.81), 3.80 (1.96-7.38), 1.69 (1.03-2.78), and 3.54 (2.01-6.22), respectively. Among individual stressful life events, the following were independently related to MI: death of a close family member, 2.21 (1.01-4.84); death of a close friend, 42.20 (3.70-481.29); major financial problems, 8.94 (1.83-43.63); minor financial problems, 4.74 (2.02-11.14); changes in working hours, 4.99 (1.64-15.22); and changes in working conditions, 30.94 (5.43-176.31). Conclusions During this political transition period , stress at work, financial stress, and stress in general as they impacted the population of Belgrade, Serbia were strongly associated with occurence of MI. PMID:27274168

  17. A case-control study of dietary factors in patients with lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, C; Zhang, X; Qiao, Z; Guan, L; Peng, S; Liu, J; Xie, R; Zheng, L

    1992-09-01

    A case-control study was designed to investigate association of dietary factors with the risk of lung cancer in Sichuan, China. The cases consisted of 135 patients with preinvasive lung cancer which had been confirmed with histopathology, fiber bronchoscope, CT and X-ray film in three provincial hospitals in the recent one year. Controls were healthy subjects who went to one of these hospitals for health check-up; patients with pulmonary diseases was excluded. Controls were matched to cases for sex and age with a ratio of 1:1. Nutrient intakes, the eating habit and other relevant factors were investigated. The data analyzed with the conditional logistic regression model indicated that dietary beta-carotene intakes had a significantly inverse association with the risk of lung cancer. Vitamin C had a less significantly inverse association with the risk. Association of protein, fat, energy, retinol intakes or diet-balance index with the risk was not significant. Association of tea, alcohol, garlic or mushroom, respectively, with the risk was also not observed. Consumption of more processed foods and deep-fried foods were found to be risk factors. Smoking and air pollution from coal burning stoves were also observed as independent risk factors of lung cancer in the present study. The mental stress incidence in the case was significantly higher than that in the control.

  18. Association between serum adropin levels and gestational diabetes mellitus; a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Aboutaleb; Shirzad, Nooshin; Nikpour, Fatemeh; Nasli Esfahani, Ensieh; Emamgholipour, Solaleh; Bandarian, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between serum adropin concentration and GDM. In a case-control study, conducted in 2013, 40 pregnant women with GDM and 40 healthy pregnant women (controls) were evaluated. Fasting serum adropin and lipid concentration were measured during 24th-28th weeks of gestation for both groups. These factors were compared between the two groups using independent sample t-test. There was a significant difference in adropin levels between the two groups and mean adropin levels were lower in GDM group (p: 0.016). There was no significant correlation between serum adropin levels and body mass index as well as fasting blood glucose (FBS) or serum lipid profile including high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, cholesterol and triglyceride concentration (p > 0.05). There was a significant association between adropin concentration and GDM even after using regression model for removing confounding factors (odds ratio = 0.681). Low serum adropin concentration is associated with GDM in Iranian pregnant women.

  19. A concordance index for matched case-control studies with applications in cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, Adam R; Cuzick, Jack; Field, John; Duffy, Stephen W

    2015-02-10

    In unmatched case-control studies, the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) may be used to measure how well a variable discriminates between cases and controls. The AUC is sometimes used in matched case-control studies by ignoring matching, but it lacks interpretation because it is not based on an estimate of the ROC for the population of interest. We introduce an alternative measure of discrimination that is the concordance of risk factors conditional on the matching factors. Parametric and non-parametric estimators are given for different matching scenarios, and applied to real data from breast and lung cancer case-control studies. Diagnostic plots to verify the constancy of discrimination over matching factors are demonstrated. The proposed simple measure is easy to use, interpret, more efficient than unmatched AUC statistics and may be applied to compare the conditional discrimination performance of risk factors.

  20. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S G; Shahid, Abu S M S B; Shahunja, K M; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0-59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case fatality in such children.

  1. Severe Sepsis in Severely Malnourished Young Bangladeshi Children with Pneumonia: A Retrospective Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer; Salam, Mohammed Abdus; Bardhan, Pradip Kumar; Faruque, Abu S. G.; Shahid, Abu S. M. S. B.; Shahunja, K. M.; Das, Sumon Kumar; Hossain, Md Iqbal; Ahmed, Tahmeed

    2015-01-01

    Background In developing countries, there is no published report on predicting factors of severe sepsis in severely acute malnourished (SAM) children having pneumonia and impact of fluid resuscitation in such children. Thus, we aimed to identify predicting factors for severe sepsis and assess the outcome of fluid resuscitation of such children. Methods In this retrospective case-control study SAM children aged 0–59 months, admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh from April 2011 through July 2012 with history of cough or difficult breathing and radiologic pneumonia, who were assessed for severe sepsis at admission constituted the study population. We compared the pneumonic SAM children with severe sepsis (cases = 50) with those without severe sepsis (controls = 354). Severe sepsis was defined with objective clinical criteria and managed with fluid resuscitation, in addition to antibiotic and other supportive therapy, following the standard hospital guideline, which is very similar to the WHO guideline. Results The case-fatality-rate was significantly higher among the cases than the controls (40% vs. 4%; p<0.001). In logistic regression analysis after adjusting for potential confounders, lack of BCG vaccination, drowsiness, abdominal distension, acute kidney injury, and metabolic acidosis at admission remained as independent predicting factors for severe sepsis in pneumonic SAM children (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion and Significance We noted a much higher case fatality among under-five SAM children with pneumonia and severe sepsis who required fluid resuscitation in addition to standard antibiotic and other supportive therapy compared to those without severe sepsis. Independent risk factors and outcome of the management of severe sepsis in our study children highlight the importance for defining optimal fluid resuscitation therapy aiming at reducing the case

  2. Risk factors for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among tuberculosis patients: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Workicho, Abdulhalik; Kassahun, Wondwosen; Alemseged, Fessahaye

    2017-01-01

    Background Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) did not receive major attention until recently in sub-Saharan Africa where the tuberculosis incidence and risk factors are highest. Factors leading to development of drug resistance need to be understood to develop appropriate control strategies for national programs. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors for MDR-TB among tuberculosis patients. Methods A case-control study was conducted to assess sociodemographic, behavioral and clinical risk factors using a structured questionnaire and clinical record reviewing. The data were entered and analyzed using SPSS windows version 16. Descriptive analysis was done to generate summary values for the variables and those significant variables in the bivariate analysis at p-value less than 0.25 were entered to multivariable logistic regression to identify independent determinants. Statistical significance was declared at p-value less than or equal to 0.05. Results A total of 90 cases and 90 controls were included in the study. Age of respondents (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =7; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.6–24.5), living in a household with only one room (AOR=5; 95%CI: 1.68–15.38), history of previous treatment (AOR=21; 95% CI: 17.8–28) and being HIV infected (AOR=3.1; 95%CI: 1.02–9.4) were found to be independent predictors of MDR-TB. Conclusion In light of these findings, the strategies in controlling MDR-TB should emphasize on patients with HIV coinfection, young patients, those who have a history of previous treatment, and those living in crowded places. PMID:28331350

  3. Neighborhood level risk factors for type 1 diabetes in youth: the SEARCH case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background European ecologic studies suggest higher socioeconomic status is associated with higher incidence of type 1 diabetes. Using data from a case-control study of diabetes among racially/ethnically diverse youth in the United States (U.S.), we aimed to evaluate the independent impact of neighborhood characteristics on type 1 diabetes risk. Data were available for 507 youth with type 1 diabetes and 208 healthy controls aged 10-22 years recruited in South Carolina and Colorado in 2003-2006. Home addresses were used to identify Census tracts of residence. Neighborhood-level variables were obtained from 2000 U.S. Census. Multivariate generalized linear mixed models were applied. Results Controlling for individual risk factors (age, gender, race/ethnicity, infant feeding, birth weight, maternal age, number of household residents, parental education, income, state), higher neighborhood household income (p = 0.005), proportion of population in managerial jobs (p = 0.02), with at least high school education (p = 0.005), working outside the county (p = 0.04) and vehicle ownership (p = 0.03) were each independently associated with increased odds of type 1 diabetes. Conversely, higher percent minority population (p = 0.0003), income from social security (p = 0.002), proportion of crowded households (0.0497) and poverty (p = 0.008) were associated with a decreased odds. Conclusions Our study suggests that neighborhood characteristics related to greater affluence, occupation, and education are associated with higher type 1 diabetes risk. Further research is needed to understand mechanisms underlying the influence of neighborhood context. PMID:22230476

  4. Yersinia enterocolitica infection among children aged less than 12 years: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    El Qouqa, Iyad A; El Jarou, Mahmoud A; Samaha, Ahmed S Abu; Al Afifi, Ahmed S; Al Jarousha, Abdel Moati Kh

    2011-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to identify risk factors, signs, and symptoms that may be associated with, Yersinia enterocolitica among children aged less than 12 years. From February 2006 to January 2007, stool samples from diarrhea cases with a clinical diagnosis of gastroenteritis and those of matched uninfected and infected controls, were examined for the presence of Y. enterocolitica. Sixteen sporadic cases of Y. enterocolitica were identified. Of these, eight were detected in winter (December through February), while the remaining cases occurred in the spring, summer, and autumn. Of the 16 isolates, 10 belonged to serotype O:3, five belonged to serotype O:9, and one to serotype O:8. Compared to matched uninfected controls, multivariate analysis revealed that malnutrition (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 6.23; p=0.002) and water supply (aOR 3.05; p=0.049) were independently associated with infection. Compared to infected controls, multivariate analysis showed malnutrition (aOR 3.53; p=0.027) to be an independent risk factor for the acquisition of yersiniosis. The antibiotic susceptibility profile showed that Y. enterocolitica was generally susceptible to meropenem (100%), ceftriaxone (94%), and ciprofloxacin (94%), followed by ceftazidime (88%) and amikacin (81%). Almost all Y. enterocolitica was resistant to ampicillin. This study demonstrated that Y. enterocolitica occurs sporadically in children, with a predominance of serotypes O:3 and O:9. Furthermore malnutrition was identified as the main risk factor for yersiniosis. Copyright © 2010 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Residential greenness and risk of prostate cancer: A case-control study in Montreal, Canada.

    PubMed

    Demoury, Claire; Thierry, Benoît; Richard, Hugues; Sigler, Brittany; Kestens, Yan; Parent, Marie-Elise

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that exposure to greenness favors several health outcomes. We assessed whether living in the proximity of greener areas was related to prostate cancer incidence in a population-based case-control study in Montreal, Canada. Interviews eliciting lifetime addresses were conducted with 1933 prostate cancer cases diagnosed in 2005-2009 and 1994 population controls. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) estimated the association between residential greenness, both at recruitment (2005-2009) and about ten years prior (1996), defined by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) around the home, and prostate cancer risk. Three models were developed adjusting for age, individual characteristics, and individual and ecological characteristics, estimating relative risk in relation to an interquartile range (IQR) increase of the NDVI. We observed inverse associations between greenness measured within home buffers of 150m, 300m, 500m and 1000m, at both time points, and risk of prostate cancer, independently of individual and ecological characteristics. For instance, using a buffer of 300m, the OR for an IQR increase of 0.11 in NDVI at the time of recruitment was 0.82 (95%CI 0.74-0.92). The corresponding OR for an IQR increase of 0.15 in NDVI in 1996 was 0.86 (95%CI 0.74-1.00). There were little differences in risks according to buffer size, the time point of exposure, when considering prostate cancer aggressiveness, or when restricting controls to men recently screened for prostate cancer to reduce the likelihood of undiagnosed cancer among them. Men living in greener areas, either recently or about a decade earlier, had lower risks of prostate cancer, independently of socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. These observations are novel and require confirmation. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Characteristics of success in mentoring and research productivity - a case-control study of academic centers.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Joshua G; Sherman, Alexander E; Kiet, Tuyen K; Kapp, Daniel S; Osann, Kathryn; Chen, Lee-may; O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Chan, John K

    2012-04-01

    While mentoring has been associated with research productivity, the specific characteristics of successful mentoring have not been well studied. Thus, we performed a case-control study to identify characteristics of successful mentoring programs. Institutions were divided based on number of plenary research presentations at an annual society meeting over 6years. Case institutions (Group A) had more presentations vs. controls (Group B). A survey of professors and research fellows assessed characteristics of their mentoring program. Chi-square and logistic regression analyses were performed. Of 159 surveyed, response rates were 46% for professors and 51% for fellows. Compared to Group B, Group A was more likely to have: an additional year of protected fellowship research training (62% vs. 24%; p=0.003), an established program to connect a mentor and mentee with similar research interests (52% vs. 27%; p=0.049), methods to provide feedback to mentors (62% vs. 29%; p=0.01), require mentee research progress reports (45% vs. 21%; p=0.047), and report ease of identifying a mentor (90% vs. 69%; p=0.046). On multivariate analyses, the additional year of research training (OR=7.53, 95% CI: 2.10-27.09; p=0.002) and ease at identifying a research mentor (OR=7.45, 95% CI: 1.44-38.6; p=0.017) remained as independent factors associated with higher research productivity. Our data suggest that programs can enhance research productivity with the incorporation of accountability features including formalized reports of progress and mentorship feedback in fellowship training. Facilitating the identification of a mentor and providing an additional year of research may be independent factors associated with research productivity. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Aetiological factors in persistent sputum production: a case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Cullinan, P

    1993-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to explore the aetiological roles of smoking, occupational exposure, childhood respiratory illness, and atopy in persistent sputum production. DESIGN--This was a case-control study. Data were obtained using a questionnaire administered by two observers blind to the subjects' status. Information was sought on lifetime smoking, occupation, hospital admissions due to respiratory disease, and respiratory disease history. SETTING--Four general practices in south east England in 1990, with a total population of about 30,000. SUBJECTS--Cases were subjects aged 5 to 54 years with sputum production; one control was selected per case, matched by general practice, age, and sex, forming 210 matched pairs (88% response rate). MAIN RESULTS--Cigarette smoking remains an important cause of persistent sputum production: the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for current smoking was 7.9 (3.6-20.4). A dose-response relationship was confirmed, with falling risk estimates after stopping smoking. The association of sputum production with occupational exposure to respiratory irritants, which was independent of smoking, was confined to men (odds ratio 2.4, 1.0-6.0) and largely attributable to very heavy exposure. Examination of the relationship with early respiratory disease suggested that much, though not all, was attributable to wheezing illnesses first manifest in childhood. CONCLUSIONS--Aetiological fractions derived from the results suggest that in the general population of south east England approximately 68% of all cases of persistent sputum production can be independently attributed to current cigarette smoking, 17% to heavy occupational exposure to respiratory irritants, and 13% to wheezing illnesses first manifest in early childhood. PMID:8436888

  8. Relation between habitual diet and canine mammary tumors in a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pérez Alenza, D; Rutteman, G R; Peña, L; Beynen, A C; Cuesta, P

    1998-01-01

    In the present case-control study several dietary and nutritional factors were investigated to determine if a relationship exists between diet and development of mammary tumors in female dogs. Control female dogs (n = 86) were compared with a case group of dogs (n = 102) with dysplasias or tumors of the mammary gland. A questionnaire providing information on the dog's body conformation and dietary and reproductive histories was answered by the owners. Serum selenium and retinol concentrations and the fatty acid profile in subcutaneous adipose tissue were analyzed as indicators of nutritional status. Obesity at 1 year of age and 1 year before the diagnosis of mammary nodules was found to be significantly related to a higher prevalence of mammary tumors and dysplasias. The intake of homemade meals (compared to that of commercial foods) was also significantly related to a higher incidence of tumors and dysplasias. Other significant risk factors were a high intake of red meat, especially beef and pork, and a low intake of chicken. The subcutaneous fatty acid profile and the serum selenium concentration were not significantly different in the cases and the controls, with the exception of C18:1 fatty acid (oleic acid) content, which was significantly higher in the cases than in healthy controls. Serum retinol concentration was significantly lower in the cases than in the controls. In the multivariate analysis, older age, obesity at 1 year of age, and a high red meat intake were independently and significantly associated with the risk of developing mammary tumor and dysplasias.

  9. Poor social integration and suicide: fact or artifact? A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Duberstein, P R; Conwell, Y; Conner, K R; Eberly, S; Evinger, J S; Caine, E D

    2004-10-01

    Sociological studies have shown that poor social integration confers suicide risk. It is not known whether poor integration amplifies risk after adjusting statistically for the effects of mental disorders and employment status. A case-control design was used to compare 86 suicides and 86 living controls 50 years of age and older, matched on age, gender, race, and county of residence. Structured interviews were conducted with proxy respondents for suicides and controls. Social integration was defined in reference to two broad levels of analysis: family (e.g. sibship status, childrearing status) and social/ community (e.g. social interaction, religious participation, community involvement). Bivariate analyses showed that suicides were less likely to be married, have children, or live with family. They were less likely to engage in religious practice or community activities and they had lower levels of social interaction. A trimmed logistic regression model showed that marital status, social interaction and religious involvement were all associated with suicide even after statistical adjusting for the effects of affective disorder and employment status. Adding substance abuse to the model eliminated the effects of religious involvement. The association between family and social/community indicators of poor social integration and suicide is robust and largely independent of the presence of mental disorders. Findings could be used to enhance screening instruments and identify problem behaviors, such as low levels of social interaction, which could be targeted for intervention.

  10. Risk factors for sporadic Campylobacter infections: results of a case-control study in southeastern Norway.

    PubMed Central

    Kapperud, G; Skjerve, E; Bean, N H; Ostroff, S M; Lassen, J

    1992-01-01

    In 1989 and 1990, a case-control study designed to identify risk factors for sporadic infections with thermotolerant Campylobacter bacteria was conducted in three counties in southeastern Norway. The investigation was confined to infections which were acquired in Norway. A total of 52 bacteriologically confirmed cases and 103 controls matched by age, sex, and geographic region were interviewed. The following risk factors were found to be independently associated with illness in conditional logistic regression analysis: consumption of sausages at a barbecue (odds ratio [OR] = 7.64; P = 0.005), daily contact with a dog (OR = 4.26; P = 0.024), and eating of poultry which was brought into the house raw (frozen or refrigerated) (OR = 3.20; P = 0.024). The risk associated with consumption of sausages at a barbecue could not be attributed to cross-contamination from poultry products. By univariate analysis, consumption of poultry which was brought raw and frozen was associated with illness (OR = 2.42; P = 0.042), even though freezing substantially reduces the number of viable campylobacters. When poultry consumption was examined by country of origin, eating of poultry produced in Denmark or Sweden was strongly associated with illness (OR = 13.66; P = 0.014), whereas consumption of poultry produced in Norway was not (OR = 1.33; P = 0.41). PMID:1452694

  11. Attractiveness of women with rectovaginal endometriosis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vercellini, Paolo; Buggio, Laura; Somigliana, Edgardo; Barbara, Giussy; Viganò, Paola; Fedele, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate physical attractiveness in women with and without endometriosis. Case-control study. Academic hospital. Three hundred nulliparous women. Assessment of attractiveness by four independent female and male observers. A graded attractiveness rating scale. A total of 31 of 100 women in the rectovaginal endometriosis group (cases) were judged as attractive or very attractive, compared with 8 of 100 in the peritoneal and ovarian endometriosis group and 9 of 100 in the group of subjects without endometriosis. A higher proportion of cases first had intercourse before age 18 (53%, 39%, and 30%, respectively). The mean ± SD body mass index in women with rectovaginal endometriosis, in those with other disease forms, and in those without endometriosis was, respectively, 21.0 ± 2.5, 21.3 ± 3.3, and 22.1 ± 3.6. The median (interquartile range) waist-to-hip ratio and breast-to-underbreast ratio were, respectively, 0.75 (0.71-0.81), 0.76 (0.71-0.81), and 0.78 (0.73-0.83), and 1.15 (1.12-1.20), 1.14 (1.10-1.17), and 1.15 (1.11-1.18). Women with rectovaginal endometriosis were judged to be more attractive than those in the two control groups. Moreover, they had a leaner silhouette, larger breasts, and an earlier coitarche. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Corrective eyeglasses and medial canthal basal cell carcinoma: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Resende, M; Hercos, A C; Miot, H A

    2012-07-01

    Corrective eyeglasses are frequently worn by adults, particularly at older ages. Their lenses and frames provide ultraviolet protection. Medial canthal basal cell carcinomas are infrequent (3-8%), and their relation with the use of corrective glasses was not yet investigated. To assess the prevalence of corrective eyeglasses use in individuals with medial canthal basal cell carcinoma. Case-control study using two controls matched by age, gender, and ethnicity for each case. Cases were patients with medial canthal basal cell carcinoma, and controls were patients with basal cell carcinoma elsewhere on the face. The prevalence of major risk variables was estimated and adjusted by conditional multiple logistic regression. Fifty cases and 100 controls were assessed. The mean patient age was 69.7 years, and 54% of the subjects were females. No difference regarding the eyeglasses use or use duration was found between groups. However, when visual defects were separately evaluated, eyeglasses for myopia correction were independently associated with lower risk of medial canthal basal cell carcinoma development (OR=0.26; P=0.03), what can be related to long term local photoprotection. The use of eyeglasses for myopia correction is associated with lower prevalence of medial cantal basal cell carcinoma. Risk-reducing mechanisms should be elucidated. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  13. [Risk factors on road traffic accidents in middle school students: a matched case-control study].

    PubMed

    Li, Ying-chun; Jin, Hui-qing; Tao, Xing-yong; Zhang, Shu-lin; Hu, Chuan-lai

    2008-10-01

    To investigate the predictors of road traffic accidents (RTAs) in middle school students, a case-control study was designed to seek new clues for prevention and control on RTAs in this population. Cases were 116 students who experienced RTAs from 2005/01/01 to 2005/12/31. 116 students were served as controls who were from the same class of the cases and matched by age and sex. Information on personal behavior, family conditions, and knowledge, attitude, practice (KAB) on road traffic of these children were collected and compared. Conditional logistic regressions were conducted to analyze the relationship between these factors and RTAs. Compared to the controls, the cases showed more negative attitude and risk-taking-behaviors especially in riding bicycle. However, knowledge on road safety showed less significant differences between case and control groups. The negative attitude and risk-taking-behaviors were independent risk factors for RTAs by logistic regression. In addition, distance from home to school that longer than 1000 m seemed a risk factors for RTAs, while high education levels among mothers was a protective factor. Road safety attitude and behavior, distance from home to school were the main influence factors for RTAs among middle school students. It seemed more important in improving the attitude and behavior on road safety than to enhance the knowledge for prevention and control of RTAs among middle school students.

  14. Risk factors for facial melasma in women: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Handel, A C; Lima, P B; Tonolli, V M; Miot, L D B; Miot, H A

    2014-09-01

    Melasma is a localized chronic acquired hypermelanosis, common in adult women and which has an important impact on their life quality. Its pathology is unknown, despite some recognized triggering factors. To evaluate risk factors for developing facial melasma in women. This was a case-control study involving adult women with or without facial melasma, paired by age. Variables were grouped into hierarchical levels: personal characteristic data, exposure variables, links to hormonal stimuli and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire, Brazilian version. The data were analysed using conditional multiple logistic regression. We evaluated 207 patients and 207 controls. The mean age was 38 years. Cases differed from controls for phototype, Amerindian ancestry [odds ratio (OR) 2·59], years of beach or rural residence (OR 1·06), time exposed to sun at work (OR 1·65), time exposed to sun in leisure activities (OR 1·04), antidepressant/anxiolytic use (OR 4·96), menstrual irregularity (OR 3·83), pregnancy history (OR 3·59), years of oral contraceptive use (OR 1·23) and anxiety scores (OR 1·08). A family history of melasma was reported in 61% of cases and 13% of controls (OR 10·40). Facial melasma is independently associated with elements linked to pigmentation capacity, family ancestry, chronic sun exposure, sexual hormone stimuli, psychotropics and anxiety traits. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  15. Obstetric trauma, pelvic floor injury and fecal incontinence: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Fletcher, J G; Melton, L Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2012-06-01

    Current concepts based on referral center data suggest that pelvic floor injury from obstetric trauma is a major risk factor for fecal incontinence (FI) in women. In contrast, a majority of community women only develop FI decades after vaginal delivery, and obstetric events are not independent risk factors for FI. However, obstetric events are imperfect surrogates for anal and pelvic floor injury, which is often clinically occult. Hence, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the relationship between prior obstetric events, pelvic floor injury, and FI among community women. In this nested case-control study of 68 women with FI (cases; mean age 57 years) and 68 age-matched controls from a population-based cohort in Olmsted County, MN, pelvic floor anatomy and motion during voluntary contraction and defecation were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Obstetric events and bowel habits were recorded. By multivariable analysis, internal sphincter injury (cases-28%, controls-6%; odds ratio (OR): 8.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.3-34) and reduced perineal descent during defecation (cases-2.6 ± 0.2 cm, controls-3.1 ± 0.2 cm; OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2-2.4) increased FI risk, but external sphincter injury (cases-25%, controls-4%; P<0.005) was not independently predictive. Puborectalis injury was associated (P<0.05) with impaired anorectal motion during squeeze, but was not independently associated with FI. Grades 3-4 episiotomy (OR: 3.9; 95% CI: 1.4-11) but not other obstetric events increased the risk for pelvic floor injury. Heavy smoking (≥ 20 pack-years) was associated (P=0.052) with external sphincter atrophy. State-of-the-art imaging techniques reveal pelvic floor injury or abnormal anorectal motion in a minority of community women with FI. Internal sphincter injury and reduced perineal descent during defecation are independent risk factors for FI. In addition to grades 3-4 episiotomy, smoking may be a potentially preventable, risk factor for pelvic floor

  16. Regulatory Cytokine Expression and Preterm Birth: Case-Control Study Nested in a Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Thaís Basso de Brito; Thomaz, Erika Barbara Abreu Fonseca; do Nascimento, Flávia Raquel Fernandes; dos Santos, Ana Paula Silva de Azevedo; Batista, Rosângela Lucena Fernandes; Bettiol, Heloisa; Cavalli, Ricardo de Carvalho; Barbieri, Marco Antônio; da Silva, Antônio Augusto Moura

    2016-01-01

    Background Currently known risk factors explain only a small fraction of preterm birth (PTB). Previous PTB is one of the most important predictors. However, this information is not available in primiparous women. Few studies have looked at associations between regulatory cytokine expression (RCE) and PTB and the results are conflicting. Objective To investigate the association of RCE–Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Transforming Growth Factor β (TGF-β)–with PTB, and to assess whether bacterial vaginosis (BV) is involved in this relationship. Methods This was a case-control study nested in a prospective cohort–called BRISA. Women with singleton pregnancies were interviewed from 22 to 25 weeks of gestational age (GA). Women were recruited from health services in São Luís, Brazil. A blood sample was collected and gynecological examination was performed. Serum IL-10 and TGF-β were determined using cytometric bead array. Nugent score >7 and/or the presence of clue cells were used for BV diagnosis. All PTB estimated by ultrasound dating performed before 20 weeks of gestational age were considered cases. Controls were selected by simple random sampling from the rest of the cohort, at a 2:1 ratio. Different models were tested, according to the main independent variable. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were estimated by regression analyses. Results The study included 327 pregnant women, 109 cases and 218 controls. No associations were found between BV and PTB (P = 1.44; 95%CI: 0.51–3.77). Low levels of IL-10 (OR = 2.92 95%CI: 1.38–6.16) or TGF-β (OR = 16.90 95%CI: 6.42–44.51) or both simultaneously (OR = 77.16 95%CI: 7.99–744.88) were associated with increasing odds of PTB, even after adjustment for confounding. Conclusion Decreased RCE is a risk factor for PTB. This relationship, however, is not triggered by the presence of BV. Low IL-10/TGF-β levels from 22 to 25 weeks of GA could be used as early predictors of PTB. We suggest

  17. Psychosocial and Psychiatric Factors Associated with Adolescent Suicide: A Case-Control Psychological Autopsy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portzky, Gwendolyn; Audenaert, Kurt; van Heeringen, Kees

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of psychosocial and psychiatric risk factors of adolescent suicide by means of a case-control psychological autopsy study. Relatives and other informants of 19 suicide victims and 19 matched psychiatric controls were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview schedule. Psychiatric controls included…

  18. National Case-Control Study of Homicide Offending and Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretesky, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the…

  19. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  20. Psychosocial and Psychiatric Factors Associated with Adolescent Suicide: A Case-Control Psychological Autopsy Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portzky, Gwendolyn; Audenaert, Kurt; van Heeringen, Kees

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed at the investigation of psychosocial and psychiatric risk factors of adolescent suicide by means of a case-control psychological autopsy study. Relatives and other informants of 19 suicide victims and 19 matched psychiatric controls were interviewed by means of a semi-structured interview schedule. Psychiatric controls included…

  1. National Case-Control Study of Homicide Offending and Methamphetamine Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stretesky, Paul B.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the…

  2. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  3. Behavioural Comorbidity in Tanzanian Children with Epilepsy: A Community-Based Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burton, Kathryn; Rogathe, Jane; Hunter, Ewan; Burton, Matthew; Swai, Mark; Todd, Jim; Neville, Brian; Walker, Richard; Newton, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to define the prevalence of and risk factors for behavioural disorders in children with epilepsy from a rural district of Tanzania by conducting a community-based case-control study. Method: One hundred and twelve children aged 6 to 14 years (55 males, 57 females; median age 12y) with active epilepsy (at least two…

  4. Case-Control Genome-Wide Association Study of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Medland, Sarah; Ripke, Stephan; Anney, Richard J. L.; Asherson, Philip; Buitelaar, Jan; Franke, Barbara; Gill, Michael; Kent, Lindsey; Holmans, Peter; Middleton, Frank; Thapar, Anita; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Faraone, Stephen V.; Daly, Mark; Nguyen, Thuy Trang; Schafer, Helmut; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Reif, Andreas; Renner, Tobias J.; Romanos, Marcel; Romanos, Jasmin; Warnke, Andreas; Walitza, Susanne; Freitag, Christine; Meyer, Jobst; Palmason, Haukur; Rothenberger, Aribert; Hawi, Ziarih; Sergeant, Joseph; Roeyers, Herbert; Mick, Eric; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Although twin and family studies have shown attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to be highly heritable, genetic variants influencing the trait at a genome-wide significant level have yet to be identified. Thus additional genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are needed. Method: We used case-control analyses of 896 cases…

  5. Uncovering clinical and radiological associations of triphasic waves in acute encephalopathy: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sutter, R; Kaplan, P W

    2014-04-01

    Triphasic waves (TWs) are archetypal waveforms seen on electroencephalography (EEG) in some forms of encephalopathy. Their particular underlying pathological substrates are largely unexplored. This case-control study was designed to identify and quantify specific clinical and neuroradiological associations underlying TWs and to determine if TWs predicate outcome. From 2004 to 2012, adult encephalopathic patients with TWs (cases) were matched 1:1 with encephalopathic patients without TWs (controls) by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) and the frequency range of EEG background activity. Clinical characteristics, neuroimaging and outcomes were assessed. The mean age of 190 patients (95 with and 95 without TWs) was 66.6 years (±15.6). In multivariable analyses, patients with TWs had significantly higher odds for liver insufficiency [odds ratio (OR) = 8.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.98-33.08], alcohol abuse (OR = 3.65, 95% CI 1.25-10.63), subcortical brain atrophy (OR = 2.82, 95% CI 1.39-5.71) and respiratory tract infections (OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.01-4.71). With each additional independent predictor, the odds increased for the occurrence of TWs (1 predictor, OR = 2.40, 95% CI 1.16-5.13; ≥2 predictors, OR = 9.20, 95% CI 3.27-25.62). Mortality was 15% and tended to be higher in patients with TWs (19% with vs. 11% without TWs). Alcohol abuse, liver insufficiency, infections and subcortical brain atrophy were independently associated with TWs in patients matched for clinical and EEG features of encephalopathy. These associations strengthen the hypothesis that TWs evolve from an interplay of pathological neurostructural, metabolic and toxic conditions. When matched for EEG background activity and GCS, TWs were not associated with death. © 2014 The Author(s) European Journal of Neurology © 2014 EFNS.

  6. Analgesics use and ESRD in younger age: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van der Woude, Fokke J; Heinemann, Lothar AJ; Graf, Helmut; Lewis, Michael; Moehner, Sabine; Assmann, Anita; Kühl-Habich, Doerthe

    2007-01-01

    Background An ad hoc peer-review committee was jointly appointed by Drug Authorities and Industry in Germany, Austria and Switzerland in 1999/2000 to review the evidence for a causal relation between phenacetin-free analgesics and nephropathy. The committee found the evidence as inconclusive and requested a new case-control study of adequate design. Methods We performed a population-based case-control study with incident cases of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) under the age of 50 years and four age and sex-matched neighborhood controls in 170 dialysis centers (153 in Germany, and 17 in Austria) from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2004. Data on lifetime medical history, risk factors, treatment, job exposure and intake of analgesics were obtained in a standardized face-to-face interview using memory aids to enhance accuracy. Study design, study performance, analysis plan, and study report were approved by an independent international advisory committee and by the Drug Authorities involved. Unconditional logistic regression analyses were performed. Results The analysis included 907 cases and 3,622 controls who had never used phenacetin-containing analgesics in their lifetime. The use of high cumulative lifetime dose (3rd tertile) of analgesics in the period up to five years before dialysis was not associated with later ESRD. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals were 0.8 (0.7 – 1.0) and 1.0 (0.8 – 1.3) for ever- compared with no or low use and high use compared with low use, respectively. The same results were found for all analgesics and for mono-, and combination preparations with and without caffeine. No increased risk was shown in analyses stratifying for dose and duration. Dose-response analyses showed that analgesic use was not associated with an increased risk for ESRD up to 3.5 kg cumulative lifetime dose (98 % of the cases with ESRD). While the large subgroup of users with a lifetime dose up to 0.5 kg (278 cases and 1365 controls) showed a

  7. A Bayesian approach to strengthen inference for case-control studies with multiple error-prone exposure assessments.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Cole, Stephen R; Richardson, David B; Chu, Haitao

    2013-11-10

    In case-control studies, exposure assessments are almost always error-prone. In the absence of a gold standard, two or more assessment approaches are often used to classify people with respect to exposure. Each imperfect assessment tool may lead to misclassification of exposure assignment; the exposure misclassification may be differential with respect to case status or not; and, the errors in exposure classification under the different approaches may be independent (conditional upon the true exposure status) or not. Although methods have been proposed to study diagnostic accuracy in the absence of a gold standard, these methods are infrequently used in case-control studies to correct exposure misclassification that is simultaneously differential and dependent. In this paper, we proposed a Bayesian method to estimate the measurement-error corrected exposure-disease association, accounting for both differential and dependent misclassification. The performance of the proposed method is investigated using simulations, which show that the proposed approach works well, as well as an application to a case-control study assessing the association between asbestos exposure and mesothelioma.

  8. Alcohol consumption and psoriatic risk: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kun-Ju; Zhu, Cheng-Yao; Fan, Yi-Ming

    2012-09-01

    Psoriasis is one of the most common dermatological disorders. The association between alcohol consumption and psoriasis has been inconsistent among studies. To examine the magnitude of the risk of developing psoriasis for drinking populations compared to those with non-drinking, and to determine causes of the variation in odds ratios (OR) between various case-control studies, we performed a comprehensive published work search and a meta-analysis of case-control studies considering prevalence. We did electronic searches on Medline, and searched reports to identify case-control studies of prevalent of psoriasis. We did meta-analyses of study-specific incremental estimates to determine the risk of psoriasis associated with drinking. The magnitude of the OR was analyzed by combining 15 case-control studies that matched defined criteria. The variance in OR between studies was explored. The overall OR of psoriasis for drinking persons compared to those with non-drinking was 1.531 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.164-2.014, P = 0.002) and the association remains statistically significant across a number of stratified analyses in European descent subgroup (OR = 1.432, 95% CI = 1.085-1.889, P = 0.011) and also persists in sensitivity analyses performed to assess the potential effect of varying psoriasis outcome definitions. Alcohol consumption is associated with increased risk of psoriasis. These epidemiological observations should inform the exploration of biological mechanisms that link alcohol consumption with psoriasis.

  9. OBSTETRIC TRAUMA, PELVIC FLOOR INJURY AND FECAL INCONTINENCE: A POPULATION-BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Fletcher, J.G.; Melton, L. Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Current concepts based on referral center data suggest that pelvic floor injury from obstetric trauma is a major risk factor for fecal incontinence (FI) in women. In contrast, a majority of community women only develop FI decades after vaginal delivery, and obstetric events are not independent risk factors for FI. However, obstetric events are imperfect surrogates for anal and pelvic floor injury, which is often clinically occult. Hence, our objectives were to evaluate the relationship between prior obstetric events, pelvic floor injury, and FI among community women. Design In this nested case-control study of 68 women with FI (cases; mean age 57y) and 68 age-matched controls from a population-based cohort in Olmsted County, MN, pelvic floor anatomy and motion during voluntary contraction and defecation were assessed by MRI. Obstetric events and bowel habits were recorded. Results By multivariable analysis, internal sphincter injury (cases-28%, controls-6%; odds ratio [OR], 8.8; 95% CI, 2.3–34) and reduced perineal descent during defecation (cases-2.6 ± 0.2 cm, controls-3.1 ± 0.2 cm; OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2–2.4) increased FI risk, but external sphincter injury (cases-25%, controls-4%;p < 0.005) was not independently predictive. Puborectalis injury was associated (p<0.05) with impaired anorectal motion during squeeze, but was not independently associated with FI. Grade 3–4 episiotomy (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4–11) but not other obstetric events increased the risk for pelvic floor injury. Heavy smoking (≥ 20 pack-years) was associated (p=0.052) with external sphincter atrophy. Conclusions State-of-the-art imaging techniques reveal pelvic floor injury or abnormal anorectal motion in a minority of community women with FI. Internal sphincter injury and reduced perineal descent during defecation are independent risk factors for FI. In addition to grade 3–4 episiotomy, smoking may be a potentially preventable, risk factor for pelvic floor injury

  10. Performance of Disease Risk Score Matching in Nested Case-Control Studies: A Simulation Study.

    PubMed

    Desai, Rishi J; Glynn, Robert J; Wang, Shirley; Gagne, Joshua J

    2016-05-15

    In a case-control study, matching on a disease risk score (DRS), which includes many confounders, should theoretically result in greater precision than matching on only a few confounders; however, this has not been investigated. We simulated 1,000 hypothetical cohorts with a binary exposure, a time-to-event outcome, and 13 covariates. Each cohort comprised 2 subcohorts of 10,000 patients each: a historical subcohort and a concurrent subcohort. DRS were estimated in the historical subcohorts and applied to the concurrent subcohorts. Nested case-control studies were conducted in the concurrent subcohorts using incidence density sampling with 2 strategies-matching on age and sex, with adjustment for additional confounders, and matching on DRS-followed by conditional logistic regression for 9 outcome-exposure incidence scenarios. In all scenarios, DRS matching yielded lower average standard errors and mean squared errors than did matching on age and sex. In 6 scenarios, DRS matching also resulted in greater empirical power. DRS matching resulted in less relative bias than did matching on age and sex at lower outcome incidences but more relative bias at higher incidences. Post-hoc analysis revealed that the effect of DRS model misspecification might be more pronounced at higher outcome incidences, resulting in higher relative bias. These results suggest that DRS matching might increase the statistical efficiency of case-control studies, particularly when the outcome is rare. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Analysis of secondary outcomes in nested case-control study designs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ryung S; Kaplan, Robert C

    2014-10-30

    One of the main perceived advantages of using a case-cohort design compared with a nested case-control design in an epidemiologic study is the ability to evaluate with the same subcohort outcomes other than the primary outcome of interest. In this paper, we show that valid inferences about secondary outcomes can also be achieved in nested case-control studies by using the inclusion probability weighting method in combination with an approximate jackknife standard error that can be computed using existing software. Simulation studies demonstrate that when the sample size is sufficient, this approach yields valid type 1 error and coverage rates for the analysis of secondary outcomes in nested case-control designs. Interestingly, the statistical power of the nested case-control design was comparable with that of the case-cohort design when the primary and secondary outcomes were positively correlated. The proposed method is illustrated with the data from a cohort in Cardiovascular Health Study to study the association of C-reactive protein levels and the incidence of congestive heart failure.

  12. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Monetary Delay Discounting: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Jacob N S; MacKillop, James

    2016-01-01

    Background A growing number of studies have investigated delay discounting, a behavioral economic index of impulsivity, and its relevance to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), but with mixed findings. The current meta-analysis synthesizes the literature on the relationship between monetary delay discounting and ADHD in studies using case-control designs. Specifically, the objectives were: 1) to characterize the aggregated differences in monetary delay discounting between individuals with ADHD (cases) and controls in studies using categorical case-control designs; 2) to examine potential differences based on sample age (<18 vs. >18), reward outcome (real vs. hypothetical), and prevalence of conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder in the sample; and 3) to evaluate potential small-study (publication) bias in the literature. Methods From 567 candidate articles, 21 independent investigations yielded 25 case-control comparisons (total N=3,913). Random effects meta-analysis was conducted using Cohen's d as the common effect size. Publication bias was evaluated using fail-safe N, Begg-Mazumdar and Egger tests, and metaregression of publication year and effect size. Results Across studies, a statistically significant difference of medium magnitude effect size was present for the case-control comparisons (d=0.43; p < 10−15). No significant differences based on sample age, reward outcome, or comorbid status was detected. Minimal heterogeneity and evidence of publication bias was present. Conclusions These findings provide robust evidence that delay discounting is significantly elevated among individuals with ADHD compared to controls. Gaps in the literature and the importance of characterizing the neural and genetic bases of this relationship are discussed. PMID:27722208

  13. Adaptation of Chain Event Graphs for use with Case-Control Studies in Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Keeble, Claire; Thwaites, Peter Adam; Barber, Stuart; Law, Graham Richard; Baxter, Paul David

    2017-09-26

    Case-control studies are used in epidemiology to try to uncover the causes of diseases, but are a retrospective study design known to suffer from non-participation and recall bias, which may explain their decreased popularity in recent years. Traditional analyses report usually only the odds ratio for given exposures and the binary disease status. Chain event graphs are a graphical representation of a statistical model derived from event trees which have been developed in artificial intelligence and statistics, and only recently introduced to the epidemiology literature. They are a modern Bayesian technique which enable prior knowledge to be incorporated into the data analysis using the agglomerative hierarchical clustering algorithm, used to form a suitable chain event graph. Additionally, they can account for missing data and be used to explore missingness mechanisms. Here we adapt the chain event graph framework to suit scenarios often encountered in case-control studies, to strengthen this study design which is time and financially efficient. We demonstrate eight adaptations to the graphs, which consist of two suitable for full case-control study analysis, four which can be used in interim analyses to explore biases, and two which aim to improve the ease and accuracy of analyses. The adaptations are illustrated with complete, reproducible, fully-interpreted examples, including the event tree and chain event graph. Chain event graphs are used here for the first time to summarise non-participation, data collection techniques, data reliability, and disease severity in case-control studies. We demonstrate how these features of a case-control study can be incorporated into the analysis to provide further insight, which can help to identify potential biases and lead to more accurate study results.

  14. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case--control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD…

  15. COMPARISON OF GEOCODING METHODS USED IN CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF AIR QUALITY AND BIRTH DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Accurate geocoding of maternal residence is critical to the success of an ongoing case-control study of exposure to five criteria air pollutants and the risk of selected birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. The geocoded maternal residence a...

  16. Toxoplasmosis gondii and schizophrenia: a case control study in a low Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence Mexican population

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There are conflicting reports concerning the association of T. gondii infection and schizophrenia. Therefore, we determined such association in a Mexican population of Mestizo ethnicity. Through a case-control study design, 50 schizophrenic patients and 150 control subjects matched by gender, age, r...

  17. A Case Control Study of Suicide and Attempted Suicide in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beautrais, Annette L.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for serious suicidal behavior among older adults were examined in a case control study of adults aged 55 and older who died by suicide or made suicide attempts and who were compared with randomly selected comparison subjects. Multivariate analyses suggested that mood disorders were the most significant risk factor for suicidal…

  18. Nutritional Status of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs): A Case-Control Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marí-Bauset, Salvador; Llopis-González, Agustín; Zazpe-García, Itziar; Marí-Sanchis, Amelia; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María

    2015-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have problems of food selectivity, implying risks of nutritional deficiencies. The aim was to compare intakes of macro and micronutrients and body mass index in ASD and typically developing (TD) children. In a case--control study, 3-day food diaries and anthropometric measurements were completed for ASD…

  19. How to quantify information loss due to phase ambiguity in haplotype case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Uh, Hae-Won; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Putter, Hein; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2005-12-30

    Assigning haplotypes in a case-control study is a challenging problem. We proposed a method to quantify the information loss due to missing phase information. We determined which individuals were responsible for the information loss, and calculated how much information could be gained when the ambiguous individuals could be resolved by adding additional parental information.

  20. COMPARISON OF GEOCODING METHODS USED IN CASE-CONTROL STUDY OF AIR QUALITY AND BIRTH DEFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Accurate geocoding of maternal residence is critical to the success of an ongoing case-control study of exposure to five criteria air pollutants and the risk of selected birth defects in seven Texas counties between 1997 and 2000. The geocoded maternal residence a...

  1. A Case Control Study of Suicide and Attempted Suicide in Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beautrais, Annette L.

    2002-01-01

    Risk factors for serious suicidal behavior among older adults were examined in a case control study of adults aged 55 and older who died by suicide or made suicide attempts and who were compared with randomly selected comparison subjects. Multivariate analyses suggested that mood disorders were the most significant risk factor for suicidal…

  2. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies: Preparation, design, and enrollment of cases and controls.

    PubMed

    Verani, Jennifer R; Baqui, Abdullah H; Broome, Claire V; Cherian, Thomas; Cohen, Cheryl; Farrar, Jennifer L; Feikin, Daniel R; Groome, Michelle J; Hajjeh, Rana A; Johnson, Hope L; Madhi, Shabir A; Mulholland, Kim; O'Brien, Katherine L; Parashar, Umesh D; Patel, Manish M; Rodrigues, Laura C; Santosham, Mathuram; Scott, J Anthony; Smith, Peter G; Sommerfelt, Halvor; Tate, Jacqueline E; Victor, J Chris; Whitney, Cynthia G; Zaidi, Anita K; Zell, Elizabeth R

    2017-06-05

    Case-control studies are commonly used to evaluate effectiveness of licensed vaccines after deployment in public health programs. Such studies can provide policy-relevant data on vaccine performance under 'real world' conditions, contributing to the evidence base to support and sustain introduction of new vaccines. However, case-control studies do not measure the impact of vaccine introduction on disease at a population level, and are subject to bias and confounding, which may lead to inaccurate results that can misinform policy decisions. In 2012, a group of experts met to review recent experience with case-control studies evaluating the effectiveness of several vaccines; here we summarize the recommendations of that group regarding best practices for planning, design and enrollment of cases and controls. Rigorous planning and preparation should focus on understanding the study context including healthcare-seeking and vaccination practices. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies are best carried out soon after vaccine introduction because high coverage creates strong potential for confounding. Endpoints specific to the vaccine target are preferable to non-specific clinical syndromes since the proportion of non-specific outcomes preventable through vaccination may vary over time and place, leading to potentially confusing results. Controls should be representative of the source population from which cases arise, and are generally recruited from the community or health facilities where cases are enrolled. Matching of controls to cases for potential confounding factors is commonly used, although should be reserved for a limited number of key variables believed to be linked to both vaccination and disease. Case-control vaccine effectiveness studies can provide information useful to guide policy decisions and vaccine development, however rigorous preparation and design is essential. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Case-control study of the risk factors for acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus species during tigecycline therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, Ga Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Wi, Yu Mi; Ko, Jae-Hoon; Lee, Woo Joo; Lee, Ji Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2015-09-01

    Tigecycline is an important agent in clinical practice because of its broad-spectrum activity. However, it has no activity against Pseudomonas or Proteus species. We conducted a case-control study to analyze risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas or Proteus spp. during tigecycline therapy. Placement of suction drainage at infected wound sites, ICU stay, and neurologic disease were identified as independent risk factors for the acquisition of Pseudomonas and Proteus spp. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Excess relative risk as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiologists often use ratio-type indices (rate ratio, risk ratio and odds ratio) to quantify the association between exposure and disease. By comparison, less attention has been paid to effect measures on a difference scale (excess rate or excess risk). The excess relative risk (ERR) used primarily by radiation epidemiologists is of peculiar interest here, in that it involves both difference and ratio operations. The ERR index (but not the difference-type indices) is estimable in case-control studies. Using the theory of sufficient component cause model, the author shows that when there is no mechanistic interaction (no synergism in the sufficient cause sense) between the exposure under study and the stratifying variable, the ERR index (but not the ratio-type indices) in a rare-disease case-control setting should remain constant across strata and can therefore be regarded as a common effect parameter. By exploiting this homogeneity property, the related attributable fraction indices can also be estimated with greater precision. The author demonstrates the methodology (SAS codes provided) using a case-control dataset, and shows that ERR preserves the logical properties of the ratio-type indices. In light of the many desirable properties of the ERR index, the author advocates its use as an effect measure in case-control studies of rare diseases.

  5. Study designs may influence results: the problems with questionnaire-based case-control studies on the epidemiology of glioma.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Christoffer; Schüz, Joachim; Andreasen, Anne-Marie Serena; Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg

    2017-03-28

    Glioma is a rare brain tumour with a very poor prognosis and the search for modifiable factors is intense. We reviewed the literature concerning risk factors for glioma obtained in case-control designed epidemiological studies in order to discuss the influence of this methodology on the observed results. When reviewing the association between three exposures, medical radiation, exogenous hormone use and allergy, we critically appraised the evidence from both case-control and cohort studies. For medical radiation and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), questionnaire-based case-control studies appeared to show an inverse association, whereas nested case-control and cohort studies showed no association. For allergies, the inverse association was observed irrespective of study design. We recommend that the questionnaire-based case-control design be placed lower in the hierarchy of studies for establishing cause-and-effect for diseases such as glioma. We suggest that a state-of-the-art case-control study should, as a minimum, be accompanied by extensive validation of the exposure assessment methods and the representativeness of the study sample with regard to the exposures of interest. Otherwise, such studies cannot be regarded as 'hypothesis testing' but only 'hypothesis generating'. We consider that this holds true for all questionnaire-based case-control studies on cancer and other chronic diseases, although perhaps not to the same extent for each exposure-outcome combination.

  6. Factors Influencing Non-albicans Candidemia: A Case-Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Kofteridis, Diamantis P; Valachis, Antonis; Dimopoulou, Dimitra; Andrianaki, Angeliki M; Christidou, Athanasia; Maraki, Sofia; Spernovasilis, Nikolaos A; Samonis, George

    2017-08-01

    The study identified factors predisposing to non-albicans candidemia with special interest to prior antimicrobial treatment. A retrospective, case-case-control study was performed at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Greece, from November 2007 through September 2011 including adult patients. The study had three groups. The first included 58 patients with non-albicans candidemia, the second 48 with C. albicans candidemia, while the third (control) 104 without candidemia. Each of the two candidemia groups was compared with the control using multivariate logistic regression model. The mean (SD) age of the non-albicans, the albicans and the control patients was 67 (12), 67 (18) and 59 (19) years, respectively. The most common non-albicans Candida spp. isolated were C. parapsilosis in 19 patients (33%), C. glabrata in 17 (29%) and C. tropicalis in 15 (26%). Independent risk factors for non-albicans candidemia were prior treatment with quinolones (p < 0.001), b-lactam-b-lactamase inhibitors (p = 0.011) and presence of central venous catheter (p = 0.05), while for C. albicans candidemia were prior treatment with quinolones (p < 0.001), carbapenems (p = 0.003) along with cardiac disease (p < 0.001). Neither duration of hospitalization nor in-hospital mortality [41% for the non-albicans vs 29% for C. albicans group (p = 0.192)] was significantly different between the two candidemia groups. The study reveals the role of antimicrobial exposure as a risk factor for candidemia caused by different species. Prior treatment with b-lactam-b-lactamase inhibitors was associated with non-albicans, while with carbapenems with C. albicans candidemia. Prior use of quinolones was associated with candidemia in general.

  7. Food intake and colorectal adenomas: a case-control study in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Amutha; Kandiah, Mirnalini

    2009-01-01

    It is well established that almost all colorectal cancers arise from benign, neoplastic adenomatous polyps. In previous studies, intake of fruits, vegetables and legumes were found to decrease the risk for colorectal adenomas (CRA) and colorectal cancer. This case-control study aimed to evaluate the roles of a variety of foods in contributing to the risk of CRA in Malaysian subjects. One hundred and eighteen subjects were recruited into case (n=59) and control (n=59) groups at Hospital Kuala Lumpur (HKL). A pre-tested quantitative food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was used to record the types of food items and frequency consumed. Logistic regression was used to determine the crude and adjusted odds ratios of the independent variables. Soy bean and soy products were associated with a reduced risk for CRA (OR = 0.38, 95% CI = 0.15-0.98), while tubers were associated with increase in risk four-fold (OR = 4.14, 95% CI = 1.60-10.70) and red meat intake was found to increase the risk two and a half-fold (OR = 2.51, 95% CI = 1.02-6.28). Higher servings of fruits and vegetables were found to significantly decrease the risk (OR fruits = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.30-0.74; OR vegetables = 0.49, 95% = 0.29-0.80). In conclusion, our data support protective roles for soy, fruits and vegetables in the aetiology of colorectal adenomas and increase in risk in those with high intakes of red meat and tubers. Food intake of an individual may have an influence on one's risk for developing CRA. This finding warrants further investigation before the protective effect of these food items is to be accepted. New studies should explore the possibility of these associations among individuals in the general population especially with regard to different ethnic or other groups in Malaysia with low fruit and vegetable consumption.

  8. Aspirin Use Associated With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a Total Population-Based Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ching-Piao; Lin, Feng-Cheng; Lee, Johnny Kuang-Wu; Lee, Charles Tzu-Chi

    2015-01-01

    Background The association of aspirin use and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) risk is unclear. This study determined whether use of any individual compound is associated with ALS risk by conducting a total population-based case-control study in Taiwan. Methods A total of 729 patients with newly diagnosed ALS who had a severely disabling disease certificate between January 1, 2002, and December 1, 2008, comprised the case group. These cases were compared with 7290 sex-, age-, residence-, and insurance premium-matched controls. Drug use by each Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical code was analyzed using conditional logistic regression models. False discovery rate (FDR)-adjusted P values were reported in order to avoid inflating false positives. Results Of the 1336 compounds, only the 266 with use cases exceeding 30 in our database were included in the screening analysis. Without controlling for steroid use, the analysis failed to reveal any compound that was inversely associated with ALS risk according to FDR criteria. After controlling for steroid use, we found use of the following compounds to be associated with ALS risk: aspirin, diphenhydramine (one of the antihistamines), and mefenamic acid (one of the NSAIDs). A multivariate analysis revealed that aspirin was independently inversely associated with ALS risk after controlling for diphenhydramine, mefenamic acid, and steroid use. The inverse association between aspirin and ALS was present predominately in patients older than 55 years. Conclusions The results of this study suggested that aspirin use might reduce the risk of ALS, and the benefit might be more prominent for older people. PMID:25721071

  9. Cerebellar Microstructural Organization is Altered by Complications of Premature Birth: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Brossard-Racine, Marie; Poretti, Andrea; Murnick, Jonathan; Bouyssi-Kobar, Marine; McCarter, Robert; du Plessis, Adre J; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2017-03-01

    To compare regional cerebellar microstructure, as measured by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), between preterm infants at term-equivalent age and healthy term-born control neonates, and to explore associations between DTI findings and clinical risk factors. In this case-control study, DTI studies were performed in 73 premature infants born ≤32 weeks and ≤1500 g birth weight and 73 full-term-born controls from healthy pregnancies. Using a region of interest approach, fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were extracted in 7 cerebellar regions including the anterior vermis, the right/left superior cerebellar peduncles, the middle cerebellar peduncle, and the dentate nuclei. To validate further our DTI measurements, we measured FA and MD in the genu of the corpus callosum and splenium. FA and MD were compared between groups using analyses of multiple linear regression models. Preterm infants at term-equivalent age presented with higher FA in the dentate nuclei (<.001) and middle cerebellar peduncle (.028), and lower MD in the vermis (.023) compared with controls. Conversely, preterm infants showed reduced FA and increased MD in both the genu of the corpus callosum and splenium (P < .001). Independent risk factors associated with altered FA and MD in the cerebellum included low Apgar score, supratentorial injury, compromised cardiorespiratory function, and surgery for necrotizing enterocolitis and patent ductus arteriosus. This DTI study provides evidence that complications of premature birth are associated with altered cerebellar microstructural organization when compared with term-born control infants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Determinants of Visceral Leishmaniasis: A Case-Control Study in Gedaref State, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Salih, Niven; Elhag, Mousab Siddig; Elbadawi, Mobarak Elnour; Hammam, Omer; Mumina, Ann; Atia, Atia Abdalla; Etard, Jean-François; Ritmeijer, Koert; Chappuis, François

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving knowledge on local determinants of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is crucial to guide the development of relevant control strategies. This study aimed to identify individual and household level determinants of primary VL in 24 highly endemic villages of Tabarak Allah hospital’s catchment area, Gedaref State, Sudan. Methods From September 2012 to July 2013, in an unmatched case-control design, 198 patients with primary VL were compared to 801 controls free of VL symptoms and with a negative VL rapid test. Using random spatial sampling, controls were selected with a distribution of age, sex and village of residence proportionate to the distribution of the target population. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. Results Children and men were at higher risk of VL. Reporting VL patient(s) in the household in the previous year was the strongest VL risk factor. In a multivariate analysis, VL risk increased with household size, sleep location (outside the yard, not in the farm), evening outdoor activities in the rainy season (playing, watching TV, radio listening), use of ground nut oil as animal repellent and of smoke of Acacia seyal as indoor repellent, presence of dogs in the yard at night, Acacia nilotica in the yard’s immediate surroundings and of a forest at eye range. VL risk appeared to decrease with the use of drinking water sources other than the village water tank, a buffer distance from the adjacent house yard, and with the presence of animals other than dogs in the yard at night. In contrast with previous studies, housing factors, mosquito-net use, black cotton soil, ethnicity, socioeconomic index, presence of Balanites aegyptica and Azadirachta indica in the yard were not independent VL determinants. Discussion and conclusion Although these results do not provide evidence of causality, they provide useful suggestions for guiding further intervention studies on VL preventive measures. PMID:26544177

  11. Household related predictors of burn injuries in an Iranian population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Arshi, Shahnam; Mashoufi, Mehrnaz; Deljavan-anvari, Reza; Meshkini, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Reza

    2012-05-09

    To prevent burn injuries it is vital to have sound information on predictors of its occurrence in different settings. Ardabil Province is the coldest province of Iran with high burden of burn injuries. The aim of this study was to determine the household related predictors of unintentional burns in Ardabil Province located at North-West of Iran. The study was conducted through a hospital based case-control design. 239 burn victims as well as 246 hospital-based controls were enrolled. Both bivariate and multivariate analysis methods were used. Males comprised 55.2% of all the study subjects. Mean age of the participants was 21.8 years (95% CI: 19.17-24.4). The economic ability of the households was associated with risk of burn injuries. Multivariate conditional logistic regression results showed the following variables to be independent factors associated with burn injuries. Using non-conventional pipe-less air heaters instead of conventional piped kerosene- or gas-burning heaters (Odds ratio: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.1-3.6). Common use of picnic gas-stove for cooking at home (odds ratio = 1.6, 95%CI: 1-2.4). Using electric samovars instead of other types of samovars (Odds ratio = 0.3, 95% CI: 0.1-1). Using samovars lacking the national standard authorization mark (Odds ratio = 2.2, 95% CI: 1.4-3.6). Using some types of specific heating or cooking appliances, and unsafe use of conventional appliances were major risk predictors of burn injuries in this population.

  12. Determinants of mortality from severe dengue in Brazil: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Giselle Hentzy; de Fátima Duarte, Eliane; Duarte, Elisabeth Carmen

    2013-04-01

    Although increases in severity of mortality from dengue infection have been observed in Brazil, their determinants are not fully known. A case-control study was conducted by using the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, including patients with severe dengue during 2000-2005. Cases were defined as patients that died and controls were those who survived. Hierarchical multivariate logistic regression was performed. During the study period, there were 12,321 severe cases of dengue and 1,062 deaths. Factors independently associated with death included age ≥ 50 years (odds ratio [OR] = 2.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.59-3.29), < 4 years of schooling (OR = 1.83, 95% CI = 1.47-2.28), a rural area (OR =2.84, 95% CI = 2.19-3.69), hospitalization (OR = 1.42, 95% CI = 1.17-1.73), and a high hematocrit (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.85-3.28). Factors associated with a lower chance of dying were female sex (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.67-0.87), history of previous dengue (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.62-0.99), positive tourniquet test result (OR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.33-0.66), laboratory diagnosis of dengue (OR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.61-0.92), and a platelet count of 50,000-100,000 cells/mm(3) (OR = 0.56, 95% CI = 0.36-0.87). The risk profile identified in this study should serve to direct public health interventions to minimize deaths.

  13. Individual and community factors for railway suicide: a matched case-control study in Victoria, Australia.

    PubMed

    Too, Lay San; Spittal, Matthew J; Bugeja, Lyndal; McClure, Roderick; Milner, Allison

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to simultaneously examine individual- and community-level factors associated with railway suicide. We performed a case-control study in Victoria, Australia between 2001 and 2012. Data on cases of railway suicide were obtained from the National Coronial Information System (a database of coronial investigations). Controls were living individuals randomly selected from the Household, Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia study, matching to cases on age groups, sex and year of exposures. A conditional logistic regression model was used to assess the individual-level and community-level influences on individual odds of railway suicide, controlling for socioeconomic status. Individual-level diagnosed mental illness increased railway suicide odds by six times [95 % confidence interval (CI) 4.5, 9.2]. Community-level factors such as living in an area with a presence of railway tracks [odds ratio (OR) 1.8, 95 % CI 1.2, 2.8], within a city (OR 3.2, 95 % CI 1.9, 5.4), and with a higher overall suicide rate (OR 1.02, 95 % CI 1.01, 1.04) were independently associated with greater individual odds of railway suicide compared to living in an area without a presence of railway tracks, outside a city, and with a relatively lower overall suicide rate. The effects of mental illness and high incidence of overall suicides are prominent, but not specific on railway suicide. The effects of presence of railway tracks and city residence suggest the importance of accessibility to the railways for individual risk of railway suicide. Prevention efforts should focus on vulnerable people live in areas with easy access to the railways.

  14. Bayesian analysis on meta-analysis of case-control studies accounting for within-study correlation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Chu, Haitao; Luo, Sheng; Nie, Lei; Chen, Sining

    2015-12-01

    In retrospective studies, odds ratio is often used as the measure of association. Under independent beta prior assumption, the exact posterior distribution of odds ratio given a single 2 × 2 table has been derived in the literature. However, independence between risks within the same study may be an oversimplified assumption because cases and controls in the same study are likely to share some common factors and thus to be correlated. Furthermore, in a meta-analysis of case-control studies, investigators usually have multiple 2 × 2 tables. In this article, we first extend the published results on a single 2 × 2 table to allow within study prior correlation while retaining the advantage of closed-form posterior formula, and then extend the results to multiple 2 × 2 tables and regression setting. The hyperparameters, including within study correlation, are estimated via an empirical Bayes approach. The overall odds ratio and the exact posterior distribution of the study-specific odds ratio are inferred based on the estimated hyperparameters. We conduct simulation studies to verify our exact posterior distribution formulas and investigate the finite sample properties of the inference for the overall odds ratio. The results are illustrated through a twin study for genetic heritability and a meta-analysis for the association between the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) acetylation status and colorectal cancer.

  15. Bayesian Analysis on Meta-analysis of Case-control Studies Accounting for Within-study Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Chu, Haitao; Luo, Sheng; Nie, Lei; Chen, Sining

    2013-01-01

    In retrospective studies, odds ratio is often used as the measure of association. Under independent beta prior assumption, the exact posterior distribution of odds ratio given a single 2 × 2 table has been derived in the literature. However, independence between risks within the same study may be an oversimplified assumption because cases and controls in the same study are likely to share some common factors and thus to be correlated. Furthermore, in a meta-analysis of case-control studies, investigators usually have multiple 2×2 tables. In this paper, we first extend the published results on a single 2×2 table to allow within study prior correlation while retaining the advantage of closed form posterior formula, and then extend the results to multiple 2 × 2 tables and regression setting. The hyperparameters, including within study correlation, are estimated via an empirical Bayes approach. The overall odds ratio and the exact posterior distribution of the study-specific odds ratio are inferred based on the estimated hyperparameters. We conduct simulation studies to verify our exact posterior distribution formulas and investigate the finite sample properties of the inference for the overall odds ratio. The results are illustrated through a twin study for genetic heritability and a meta-analysis for the association between the N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) acetylation status and colorectal cancer. PMID:22143403

  16. Significance of Platelet Volume Indices in STEMI Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Ranjan; Marupuru, Srujitha; Yedavalli, Nishanth; Shetty, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Platelets have been well known contributors in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders such as atherosclerosis and its complications such as acute Myocardial Infarction (MI). Aim To study the changes in platelet volume indices and platelet count in ST-Elevated Myocardial Infarction (STEMI) and assess their usefulness in predicting coronary events. Materials and Methods A case-control observational study was carried out on 173 cases diagnosed with STEMI and 191 controls from January 2015 to December 2015, considering the inclusion and exclusion criteria. In total, 364 patients were included, 173 patients with STEMI, from those patients admitted to the intensive care unit and the emergency ward. In addition, 191 healthy non diabetic non hypertensive age-matched controls were enrolled. Results The mean age of cases was 59.4±11.9 years and of controls were 55.25±8.5 years. Males (74.6%) had higher incidence of STEMI then females (25.4%). The Mean Platelet Volume (MPV) was significantly higher in patients with STEMI (10.2±2.8) as compared to controls (8.5±6.9). The Platelet Distribution Width (PDW) was also significantly higher in cases compared to controls (p<0.05). According to Pearson correlation analysis, the positive relationship determined between MPV and Gensini score was statistically significant (p < 0.001, r = 0.132). Conclusion High MPV and PDW seem to be an independent risk factor for STEMI and correlated with the severity of the STEMI. They can be used as a simple, reliable, and economical method for predicting an impending acute coronary event. PMID:28571169

  17. Linezolid-resistant staphylococcal bacteraemia: A multicentre case-case-control study in Italy.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandro; Campanile, Floriana; Falcone, Marco; Tascini, Carlo; Bassetti, Matteo; Goldoni, Paola; Trancassini, Maria; Della Siega, Paola; Menichetti, Francesco; Stefani, Stefania; Venditti, Mario

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this multicentre study was to analyse the characteristics of patients with bloodstream infections due to staphylococcal strains resistant to linezolid. This was a retrospective case-case-control study of patients hospitalised in three large teaching hospitals in Italy. A linezolid-resistant (LIN-R) Staphylococcus spp. group and a linezolid-susceptible (LIN-S) Staphylococcus spp. group were compared with control patients to determine the clinical features and factors associated with isolation of LIN-R strains. All LIN-R Staphylococcus spp. strains underwent molecular typing. Compared with the LIN-S group, central venous catheters were the main source of infection in the LIN-R group. The LIN-R and LIN-S groups showed a similar incidence of severe sepsis or septic shock, and both showed a higher incidence of these compared with the control group. Overall, patients in the LIN-R group had a higher 30-day mortality rate. Multivariate analysis found previous linezolid therapy, linezolid therapy >14 days, antibiotic therapy in the previous 30 days, antibiotic therapy >14 days, previous use of at least two antibiotics and hospitalisation in the previous 90 days as independent risk factors associated with isolation of a LIN-R strain. The G2576T mutation in domain V of 23S rRNA was the principal mechanism of resistance; only one strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis carried the cfr methylase gene (A2503), together with L4 insertion (71GGR72) and L3 substitution (H146Q). LIN-R strains are associated with severe impairment of clinical conditions and unfavourable patient outcomes. Reinforcement of infection control measures may have an important role in preventing these infections.

  18. Case-control study of risk factors for infectious mastitis in Spanish breastfeeding women.

    PubMed

    Mediano, Pilar; Fernández, Leónides; Rodríguez, Juan M; Marín, María

    2014-06-06

    The purpose of this study was to identify potential predisposing factors associated with human infectious mastitis. We conducted a case-control study among breastfeeding women, with 368 cases (women with mastitis) and 148 controls. Data were collected by a questionnaire designed to obtain retrospective information about several factors related to medical history of mother and infant, different aspects of pregnancy, delivery and postpartum, and breastfeeding practices that could be involved in mastitis. Bivariate analyses and multivariate logistic regression model were used to examine the relationship between mastitis and these factors. The variables significantly- and independently-associated with mastitis were cracked nipples (P < 0.0001), oral antibiotics during breastfeeding (P < 0.0001), breast pumps (P < 0.0001), topical antifungal medication during breastfeeding (P = 0.0009), mastitis in previous lactations (P = 0.0014), breast milk coming in later than 24 h postpartum (P = 0.0016), history of mastitis in the family (P = 0.0028), mother-infant separation longer than 24 h (P = 0.0027), cream on nipples (P = 0.0228) and throat infection (P = 0.0224). Valuable factors related to an increased risk of infectious mastitis have been identified. This knowledge will allow practitioners to provide appropriate management advice about modifiable risk factors, such as the use of pumps or inappropriate medication. They also could identify before delivery those women at an increased risk of developing mastitis, such as those having a familial history of mastitis, and thus develop strategies to prevent this condition.

  19. Predictors of Default from Treatment for Tuberculosis: a Single Center Case-Control Study in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Cheol-Kyu; Shin, Hong-Joon; Kim, Yu-Il; Lim, Sung-Chul; Yoon, Jeong-Sun; Kim, Young-Su; Kim, Jung-Chul; Kwon, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    Default from tuberculosis (TB) treatment could exacerbate the disease and result in the emergence of drug resistance. This study identified the risk factors for default from TB treatment in Korea. This single-center case-control study analyzed 46 default cases and 100 controls. Default was defined as interrupting treatment for 2 or more consecutive months. The reasons for default were mainly incorrect perception or information about TB (41.3%) and experience of adverse events due to TB drugs (41.3%). In univariate analysis, low income (< 2,000 US dollars/month, 88.1% vs. 68.4%, P = 0.015), absence of TB stigma (4.3% vs. 61.3%, P < 0.001), treatment by a non-pulmonologist (74.1% vs. 25.9%, P < 0.001), history of previous treatment (37.0% vs. 19.0%, P = 0.019), former defaulter (15.2% vs. 2.0%, P = 0.005), and combined extrapulmonary TB (54.3% vs. 34.0%, P = 0.020) were significant risk factors for default. In multivariate analysis, the absence of TB stigma (adjusted odd ratio [aOR]: 46.299, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.078-265.365, P < 0.001), treatment by a non-pulmonologist (aOR: 14.567, 95% CI: 3.260-65.089, P < 0.001), former defaulters (aOR: 33.226, 95% CI: 2.658-415.309, P = 0.007), and low income (aOR: 5.246, 95% CI: 1.249-22.029, P = 0.024) were independent predictors of default from TB treatment. In conclusion, patients with absence of disease stigma, treated by a non-pulmonologist, who were former defaulters, and with low income should be carefully monitored during TB treatment in Korea to avoid treatment default.

  20. Abnormal chronotropic reserve and heart rate recovery in patients with SLE: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    do Prado, Dm Leite; Gualano, B; Miossi, R; Sá-Pinto, Al; Lima, Fr; Roschel, H; Borba, Ef; Bonfá, E

    2011-06-01

    Abnormal heart-rate (HR) response during or after a graded exercise test has been recognized as a strong and an independent predictor of all-cause mortality in healthy and diseased subjects. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the HR response during exercise in women with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In this case-control study, 22 women with SLE (age 29.5 ± 1.1 years) were compared with 20 gender-, BMI-, and age-matched healthy subjects (age 26.5 ± 1.4 years). A treadmill cardiorespiratory test was performed and HR response during exercise was evaluated by the chronotropic reserve (CR). HR recovery (ΔHRR) was defined as the difference between HR at peak exercise and at both first (ΔHRR1) and second (ΔHRR2) minutes after exercising. SLE patients presented lower peak VO(2) when compared with healthy subjects (27.6 ± 0.9 vs. 36.7 ± 1.1 ml/kg/min, p = 0.001, respectively). Additionally, SLE patients demonstrated lower CR (71.8 ± 2.4 vs. 98.2 ± 2.6%, p = 0.001), ΔHRR1 (22.1 ± 2.5 vs. 32.4 ± 2.2%, p = 0.004) and ΔHRR2 (39.1 ± 2.9 vs. 50.8 ± 2.5%, p = 0.001) than their healthy peers. In conclusion, SLE patients presented abnormal HR response to exercise, characterized by chronotropic incompetence and delayed ΔHRR.

  1. Association of hypothyroidism with unruptured cerebral aneurysms: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Atchaneeyasakul, Kunakorn; Tipirneni, Anita; Zhang, Tony; Khandelwal, Priyank; Ambekar, Sudheer; Snelling, Brian; Dharmadhikari, Sushrut; Dong, Chuanhui; Guada, Luis; Ramdas, Kevin; Chaturvedi, Seemant; Rundek, Tatjana; Yavagal, Dileep R

    2017-02-17

    OBJECTIVE Thyroid disorder has been known to affect vascular function and has been associated with aortic aneurysm formation in some cases; however, the connection has not been well studied. The authors hypothesized that hypothyroidism is associated with the formation of cerebral aneurysms. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective case-control study of consecutive patients who had undergone cerebral angiography at an academic, tertiary care medical center in the period from April 2004 through April 2014. Patients with unruptured aneurysms were identified from among those who had undergone 3-vessel catheter angiography. Age-matched controls without cerebral aneurysms on angiography were also identified from the same database. Patients with previous subarachnoid hemorrhage or intracranial hemorrhage were excluded. History of hypothyroidism and other risk factors were recorded. RESULTS Two hundred forty-three patients with unruptured cerebral aneurysms were identified and age matched with 243 controls. Mean aneurysm size was 9.6 ± 0.8 mm. Hypothyroidism was present in 40 patients (16.5%) and 9 matched controls (3.7%; adjusted OR 3.2, 95% CI 1.3-7.8, p = 0.01). Subgroup analysis showed that men with hypothyroidism had higher odds of an unruptured cerebral aneurysm diagnosis than the women with hypothyroidism, with an adjusted OR of 12.7 (95% CI 1.3-121.9) versus an OR of 2.5 (95% CI 1.0-6.4) on multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS Hypothyroidism appears to be independently associated with unruptured cerebral aneurysms, with a higher effect seen in men. Given the known pathophysiological associations between hypothyroidism and vascular dysfunction, this finding warrants further exploration.

  2. Fertility awareness among medical and non-medical students: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Kazem; Huber, Dagmar; Walch, Katharina; Promberger, Regina; Buerkle, Bernd; Ott, Johannes; Tempfer, Clemens B

    2014-09-26

    To compare the understanding and perceptions of fertility issues among medical and non-medical University students. In a prospective case-control study, using a 43 item questionnaire with 5 sections and 43 questions regarding personal data (8 questions), lifestyle factors (9 questions), plans on having children (5 questions), age and fertility (5 questions), and lifestyle and fertility (16 questions), knowledge of fertility and influencing factors, desired age at commencement and completion of childbearing, among male and female medical and non-medical students in their first academic year at Vienna University, Vienna, Austria were evaluated. 340 students were included. 262/340 (77%) participants planned to have children in the future. Medical students (n = 170) planned to have fewer and later children and had a higher awareness of the impact of age on fertility than non-medical students (n = 170; estimated knowledge probability 0.55 [medical students] vs. 0.47 [non-medical students]; F (1, 336) = 5.18 and p = .024 (η p = .015). Gender did not independently affect estimated knowledge probability (F (1, 336) = 1.50 and p = .221). More female and male medical students had a positive attitude towards Assisted Reproductive Technology in case of infertility than non-medical students (47 and 55% vs. 23 and 29%, respectively; p = <.001). Medical students had a healthier lifestyle than non-medical students. A healthy lifestyle and female gender were associated with higher fertility awareness. Medical students have a higher awareness of fertility issues than non-medical students. Choice of academic study, gender, and personal life style are important factors affecting fertility awareness. These data may be helpful to address knowledge gaps among young non-medical Academics.

  3. Maternal sepsis: a Scottish population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Acosta, C D; Bhattacharya, S; Tuffnell, D; Kurinczuk, J J; Knight, M

    2012-03-01

    To describe the risk of maternal sepsis associated with obesity and other understudied risk factors such as operative vaginal delivery. Population-based, case-control study. North NHS region of Scotland. All cases of pregnant, intrapartum and postpartum women with International Classification of Disease-9 codes for sepsis or severe sepsis recorded in the Aberdeen Maternal and Neonatal Databank (AMND) from 1986 to 2009. Four controls per case selected from the AMND were frequency matched on year-of-delivery. Cases and controls were compared; significant variables from univariable regression were adjusted in a multivariable logistic regression model. Dependent variables were uncomplicated sepsis or severe ('near-miss') sepsis. Independent variables were demographic, medical and clinical delivery characteristics. Unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are reported. Controlling for mode of delivery and demographic and clinical factors, obese women had twice the odds of uncomplicated sepsis (OR 2.12; 95% CI 1.14-3.89) compared with women of normal weight. Age <25 years (OR 5.15; 95% CI 2.43-10.90) and operative vaginal delivery (OR 2.20; 95% CI 1.02-4.87) were also significant predictors of sepsis. Known risk factors for maternal sepsis were also significant in this study (OR for uncomplicated and severe sepsis respectively): multiparity (OR 6.29, 12.04), anaemia (OR 3.43, 18.49), labour induction (OR 3.92 severe only), caesarean section (OR 3.23, 13.35), and preterm birth (OR 2.46 uncomplicated only). Obesity, operative vaginal delivery and age <25 years are significant risk factors for sepsis and should be considered in clinical obstetric care. © 2012 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2012 RCOG.

  4. The Relevance of Maternal Socioeconomic Characteristics for Low Birth Weight – a Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Altenhöner, T.; Köhler, M.; Philippi, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The number of children born underweight (low birth weight, LBW) is increasing despite extensive prevention and screening programmes. The cost is high for the health system, and affected children are burdened with health predictors that can affect them negatively throughout their lives. This study investigates to what extent socioeconomic factors, in addition to known medical causes and the health behaviour of pregnant women, influence LBW. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study 131 mothers of singletons with a birth weight ≤ 2500 g (cases) and 323 mothers of normal birth weight babies (controls) were interviewed with respect to socioeconomic status, health behaviour and stress in the workplace. Medical data were collected by specialist staff using a questionnaire. Results: Independent of medical diagnosis and health behaviour, women with lower level education (OR [95 % CI] = 2.24 [1.12; 4.51]) and those who were not working (OR [95 % CI] = 1.82 [1.10; 3.00]) were more likely to have an LBW baby. No effect was shown for immigrant background (OR [95 % CI] = 1.14 [0.59; 2.21]) or stress in the workplace (OR [95 % CI] = 1.17 [0.90; 1.51]). Discussion and Conclusion: These results show that the association between social and health inequalities starts from before birth. In order to reduce the rising number of babies born underweight, socioeconomic determinants in the care and supervision of pregnant women should systematically receive more attention to enable appropriate early preventive strategies to be implemented. PMID:27065486

  5. A Data Management System for Multi-Phase Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Gibeau, Joanne M.; Steinfeldt, Lois C.; Stine, Mark J.; Tullis, Katherine V.; Lynch, H. Keith

    1983-01-01

    The design of a computerized system for the management of data in multi-phase epidemiologic case-control studies is described. Typical study phases include case-control selection, abstracting of data from medical records, and interview of study subjects or next of kin. In consultation with project personnel, requirements for the system were established: integration of data from all study phases into one data base, accurate follow-up of subjects through the study, sophisticated data editing capabilities, ready accessibility of specified programs to project personnel, and generation of current status and exception reports for project managment. SIR (Scientific Information Retrieval), a commercially available data base management system, was selected as the foundation of this system. The system forms a comprehensive data management system applicable to many types of public health research studies.

  6. [Application of nested case-control study on safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Zhao, Yubin; Xie, Yanming

    2011-10-01

    The nested case-control study design (or the case-control in a cohort study) is described here as a new study design used in safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection. In the nested case-control study, cases of a disease that occur in a defined cohort are identified and, for each, a specified number of matched controls is selected from among those in the cohort who have not developed the disease by the time of disease occurrence in the case. For many research questions, the nested case-control design potentially offers impressive reductions in costs and efforts of data collection and analysis compared with the full cohort approach, with relatively minor loss in statistical efficiency. The nested case-control design is particularly advantageous for studies in safe evaluation of post-marketing traditional Chinese medicine injection. Some examples of the application of nested case-control study were given.

  7. Determinants of neonatal mortality in rural Northern Ethiopia: A population based nested case control study.

    PubMed

    Yirgu, Robel; Molla, Mitike; Sibley, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    In low income and middle income countries, neonatal mortality remains high despite the gradual reduction in under five mortality. Newborn death contributes for about 38% of all under five deaths. This study has identified the magnitude and independent predictors of neonatal mortality in rural Ethiopia. This population based nested case control study was conducted in rural West Gojam zone, Northern Ethiopia, among a cohort of pregnant women who gave birth between March 2011 and Feb 2012. The cohort was established by Maternal and Newborn Health in Ethiopia Partnership (MaNHEP) project in 2010 by recruiting mothers in their third trimester, as identified by trained community volunteers. Once identified, women stayed in the cohort throughout their pregnancy period receiving Community Maternal and Newborn Health (CMNH) training by health extension workers and community volunteers till the end of the first 48 hours postpartum. Cases were 75 mothers who lost their newborns to neonatal death and controls were 150 randomly selected mothers with neonates who survived the neonatal period. Data to identify cause of death were collected using the WHO standard verbal autopsy questionnaire after the culturally appropriate 40 days of bereavement period. Binomial logistic regression model was used to identify independent contributors to neonatal mortality. The neonatal mortality rate was AOR(95%CI) = 18.6 (14.8, 23.2) per 1000 live births. Neonatal mortality declined with an increase in family size, neonates who were born among a family of more than two had lesser odds of death in the neonatal period than those who were born in a family of two AOR (95% CI) = 0.13 (0.02, 0.71). Mothers who gave birth to 2-4 AOR(95%CI) = 0.15 (0.05, 0.48) and 5+ children AOR(95%CI) = 0.08 (0.02, 0.26) had lesser odds of losing their newborns to neonatal mortality. Previous history of losing a newborn to neonatal death also increased the odds of neonatal mortality during the last birth AOR (95%CI

  8. Clinical epidemiology of carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae in community hospitals: a case-case-control study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Grace C; Lawson, Kenneth A; Burgess, David S

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) has been increasing at an alarming rate worldwide. Despite that increase, there are limited data identifying risk factors. To evaluate risk factors associated with the acquisition of CRE among hospitalized patients. We performed a retrospective case-case-control study in 4 community hospitals from June 2007 through June 2012. Case group 1 (CG1) consisted of patients with CRE. Case group 2 (CG2) consisted of patients with carbapenem susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CSE). CG2 patients were matched to CG1 patients by site of infection and species of Enterobacteriaceae. Hospitalized controls were matched 2:1 by date of admission and hospital location to patients in CG1. Two sets of analyses were conducted comparing demographics, comorbidities, and antibiotic exposures of CG1 and CG2 to controls and then contrasted to identify unique risk factors associated with CRE. Overall, 104 patients (CG1, 25 patients; CG2, 29 patients, control, 50 patients) were evaluated. CRE and CSE consisted mostly of Klebsiella spp. (63%) from a urinary source (28%). In multivariable analyses, intensive care unit (ICU) stay (OR 12.48; 95% CI 1.14-136.62; p = 0.04) and cumulative number of antibiotic days (OR 1.47; 95% CI 1.02-2.16; p = 0.04) were distinct independent predictors of CRE isolation; whereas, cumulative health care exposures (OR 2.03; 95% CI 1.20-3.41; p < 0.01) and vancomycin exposure (OR 6.70; 95% CI 1.15- 38.91; p = 0.03) were predictors for CSE. CRE should be considered in patients requiring ICU admission, particularly those who have received multiple antibiotics. Antibiotic stewardship efforts should be directed at reducing all antibiotic exposures as opposed to any specific antibiotic class to reduce the risk of CRE.

  9. A nested case-control study of 277 prediagnostic serum cytokines and glioma.

    PubMed

    Schwartzbaum, Judith; Wang, Min; Root, Elisabeth; Pietrzak, Maciej; Rempala, Grzegorz A; Huang, Ruo-Pan; Johannesen, Tom Borge; Grimsrud, Tom K

    2017-01-01

    Recent research shows bidirectional communication between the normal brain and the peripheral immune system. Glioma is a primary brain tumor characterized by systemic immunosuppression. To better understand gliomagenesis, we evaluated associations between 277 prediagnostic serum cytokines and glioma. We used glioma (n = 487) and matched control (n = 487) specimens from the Janus Serum Bank Cohort in Oslo, Norway. Conditional logistic regression allowed us to identify those cytokines that were individually associated with glioma. Next, we used heat maps to compare case to control Pearson correlation matrices of 12 cytokines modeled in an in silico study of the interaction between the microenvironment and the tumor. We did the same for case-control correlation matrices of lasso-selected cytokines and all 277 cytokines in the data set. Cytokines related to glioma risk (P ≤ .05) more than 10 years before diagnosis are sIL10RB, VEGF, beta-Catenin and CCL22. LIF was associated with decreased glioma risk within five years before glioma diagnosis (odds ratio (OR) = 0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.23, 0.94). After adjustment for cytokines above, the previously observed interaction between IL4 and sIL4RA persisted (> 20 years before diagnosis, OR = 1.72, 95% CI = 1.20, 2.47). In addition, during this period, case correlations among 12 cytokines were weaker than were those among controls. This pattern was also observed among 30 lasso- selected cytokines and all 277 cytokines. We identified four cytokines and one interaction term that were independently related to glioma risk. We have documented prediagnostic changes in serum cytokine levels that may reflect the presence of a preclinical tumor.

  10. Sensation-seeking, criminality, and spinal cord injury: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Mawson, A R; Biundo, J J; Clemmer, D I; Jacobs, K W; Ktsanes, V K; Rice, J C

    1996-09-01

    A retrospective case-control study was performed in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1985-1986 to test the hypotheses that 1) criminality is a risk factor for severe injury, and 2) the association between criminality and injury can be explained in terms of a common underlying factor--increased sensation-seeking tendencies. A total of 140 males with spinal cord injury were individually matched with 140 driver's license holders on age, race, sex, educational attainment, and zip code of residence and were interviewed by telephone. Criminality prior to spinal cord injury was measured by self-report and police records, and sensation seeking was measured by the Disinhibition and Boredom Susceptibility subscales of Zuckerman's Sensation-Seeking Scale (Form V). Those with spinal cord injuries were significantly more likely than controls to report a history of juvenile delinquency, adult criminality, and incarceration prior to the time of spinal cord injury. Statistically significant but modest difference were also found between cases and controls with respect to Disinhibition, Boredom Susceptibility, and the combined Sensation-Seeking Scale score. Matched-pairs logistic regression analysis indicated that the association between sensation seeking and spinal cord injury remained significant after controlling for criminality, with an estimated relative risk of 2.05 (95% confidence interval 1.67-2.53). However, the association between criminality and spinal cord injury also remained significant after controlling for sensation seeking (estimated relative risk = 2.04, 95% confidence interval 1.09-3.82). On the basis of these results, criminality and sensation seeking may be statistically significant but independent predictors of spinal cord injury.

  11. Sugar-sweetened carbonated beverage consumption and childhood/adolescent obesity: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Martin-Calvo, Nerea; Martínez-González, Miguel-Angel; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Gea, Alfredo; Ochoa, Ma Carmen; Marti, Amelia

    2014-10-01

    To assess the association between the consumption of sugar-sweetened carbonated beverages (SSCB) and obesity in children and adolescents from Navarra (Spain). We used a matched case-control study design. The exposure, SSCB consumption (1 serving: 200 ml), was measured with a previously validated FFQ. Anthropometrical measures were taken using standardized protocols. The outcome, obesity, was defined as BMI above the age- and sex-specific 97th percentile according to the Spanish reference charts. In the analysis we used conditional logistic regression. Potential confounders were controlled using a multivariable model. Subjects were recruited in the paediatric departments of the Universidad de Navarra Clinic and the Navarra Hospital Complex, and in three primary health centres of Navarra. Controls were recruited when attending for a routine medical examination or vaccination. One hundred and seventy-four obese children and 174 individually sex- and age-matched controls, 52·87% boys, with a mean age of 11·6 years. Exclusion criteria were dietary interventions, exposure to hormone treatment, development of secondary obesity due to endocrinopathy and serious intercurrent illness. Independently of other factors, high consumption of SSCB (>4 servings/week) was significantly associated with obesity (OR = 3·46; 95% CI 1·24, 9·62; P = 0·01). Besides, each additional daily serving of SSCB was associated with a 69% relative increase in the risk of obesity (OR = 1·69; 95% CI 1·04, 2·73; P = 0·03). We found a strong and significant association between SSCB consumption and obesity risk. Our results suggest a monotonic dose-response linear shape for this association in children and adolescents (P for trend = 0·02).

  12. Anti-inflammatory drugs and variceal bleeding: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    De Ledinghen, V; Heresbach, D; Fourdan, O; Bernard, P; Liebaert-Bories, M; Nousbaum, J; Gourlaouen, A; Becker, M; Ribard, D; Ingrand, P; Silvain, C; Beauchant, M

    1999-01-01

    Background—Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can have severe gastrointestinal effects and cause peptic ulcers to bleed. Acute bleeding from oesophageal varices is a major complication of cirrhosis of the liver. 
Aims—To investigate the role, using a case-control study, of NSAIDs in first bleeding episodes associated with oesophageal or cardial varices in cirrhotic patients. 
Patients/Methods—A structured interview was conducted of 125cirrhotic patients with bleeding mainly related to oesophageal varices and 75 cirrhotic controls with oesophageal varices who had never bled. 
Results—Cirrhotic patients who were admitted for bleeding related to portal hypertension were more likely to have used NSAIDs during the week before the index day (31 of 125 (25%)) than the cirrhotic controls (eight of 75 (11%); odds ratio = 2.8, p = 0.016). Use of aspirin alone or combined with other NSAIDs was also more prevalent in the cases (21 of 125 (17%)) than in the controls (three of 75 (4%); odds ratio = 4.9, p = 0.007). Logistic regression analysis showed that NSAID use (p = 0.022, odds ratio = 2.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.8 to 4.7) and variceal size (p<0.001, odds ratio = 4.0, 95% confidence interval = 1.4 to 11.5) were the only variables independently associated with the risk of bleeding. 
Conclusions—Aspirin, used alone or combined with other NSAIDs, was associated with a first variceal bleeding episode in patients with cirrhosis. Given the life threatening nature of this complication, the possible benefit of this treatment should be weighed against the risk shown here. No firm conclusions could be drawn on non-aspirin NSAIDs used alone. 

 Keywords: portal hypertension; non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; variceal bleeding; aspirin; cirrhosis PMID:9895389

  13. Oophorectomy, hysterectomy, and risk of Alzheimer's disease: a nationwide case-control study.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Bushra; Tuppurainen, Marjo; Tiihonen, Miia; Kivipelto, Miia; Soininen, Hilkka; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Tolppanen, Anna-Maija

    2014-01-01

    Association between oophorectomy and/or hysterectomy and dementia in context of hormone therapy (HT) use is ambiguous. To assess whether oophorectomy, hysterectomy, and hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy are related to risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), whether the possible indication for surgery plays a role, and if the associations are modified by HT. Our nationwide register based case-control (1 : 1) study included all women with clinically-verified AD diagnoses, residing in Finland on December 31, 2005 (n of cases = 19,043, n of controls = 19,043). AD cases, diagnosed according to NINCS-ADRDA and the DSM-IV criteria, were identified from Special Reimbursement Register. Information on HT use was collected from national prescription register, and data on surgery and uterine/ovarian/cervical cancer were obtained from the hospital discharge register. Most of the women (91.8%) were over 51 years of age when the surgery was performed. Oophorectomy, hysterectomy, and hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy were associated with lower risk of AD (OR/95% CI: 0.85/0.75-0.97, 0.89/0.81-0.97 and 0.85/0.75-0.98, respectively) among women without the history of uterine/ovarian/cervical cancer, although the absolute risk difference was small. The association was not evident in women with uterine/ovarian/cervical cancer history (3.00/0.20-44.87 for all surgeries). The associations were not modified by HT use, which was independently associated with AD risk, with longer use showing protective association. Our findings indicate that oophorectomy with or without hysterectomy after commencement of natural menopause is not an important determinant of AD risk in older age and support the critical window hypothesis for HT use.

  14. A case-control study of post-traumatic endophthalmitis at a Spanish hospital.

    PubMed

    Asencio, Maria Angeles; Huertas, María; Carranza, Rafael; Tenias, Jose Maria; Celis, Javier; Gonzalez-del Valle, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    Our aim was to identify the potential risk factors for developing post-traumatic endophthalmitis (PTE) and the possible measures of prevention. Retrospective case-control study, with 15 cases of PTE and 2 matched controls. We reviewed the medical records of the cases and their respective controls during the period 1996-2008 at a Spanish Hospital. We collected demographic data and information about the type of trauma, the potential risk factors, comorbidities, microbial isolations, antimicrobial susceptibility, administered treatments, and the visual outcome. The independent predictor factors identified for PTE were intraocular foreign body (IOFB) (OR 5.48; CI 95 % 1.05-28.7), dirty wound (OR 4.91; CI 95 % 0.96-25.3), and wound closure delays of 24 h or more (OR 5.48; CI 95 % 1.05-28.7). The probability of endophthalmitis in patients without these risk factors was 5.9 %, but ascended to 65.3 % and 90.3 %, in those patients with two and three risk factors, respectively. Infected patients presented a complication rate of 80 %, with an evisceration rate of 53 %; both were significantly associated with infection. The visual outcome was poor and related to the presence of IOFB and virulent microorganisms (Bacillus sp., filamentous fungus), visual acuity at presentation, and retinal detachment. Patients who presented an IOFB, dirty wound, and delayed wound closure were 15 times more likely to develop infection, and when infected, patients fared much worse than those non-infected. We thus recommend aggressive prophylactic measures in patients with these risk factors, adding antifungal prophylaxis when the injury is contaminated with vegetable matter.

  15. Sexuality among Spanish adults with diabetes: a population-based case control study.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Garcia, Rodrigo; Martinez-Huedo, Maria Angeles; Hernandez-Barrera, Valentin; De Andres, Ana Lopez; Jimenez-Trujillo, Isabel; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar

    2012-12-01

    To describe and compare sexuality between subjects with diabetes with matched non-diabetic controls. Population based case control study using individual data from the Spanish National Sexual Health Survey. Diabetes status was self reported, we selected type 2 patients. We identified 461 diabetes sufferers. Two controls were matched by age, sex and sexual partner for each diabetic case. Sexuality measures included: sexual activity, importance of sex, satisfaction with partner, bothersome with one's sexual life and self-rated sexual health. Independent variables included: socio-demographics, physical health, chronic diseases and medications use. No differences were found in "Sexually activity", "Importance of sex" or "Bothersome" between those with and without diabetes. Dissatisfaction with partner was 25% in women with diabetes and 12.9% in non-diabetic controls (Adjusted-OR 1.82 95%CI 1.02-4.85). Diabetes sufferers reported sexual health as "fair/poor/very poor" more than their non-diabetic control, 58.1% vs. 45.1% for women (Adjusted-OR 1.74 95%CI 1.15-2.63) and 54.3% vs. 38% for men (Adjusted-OR 1.88 95%CI 1.29-2.75). Among diabetes sufferers "fair/poor/very poor" sexual health was associated with poorer physical health, not having a sexual partner and among men taking heart medications. Women and men with diabetes have significantly worse sexuality measures than non diabetic controls. Copyright © 2012 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk factors for ischemic optic neuropathy after cardiopulmonary bypass: a matched case/control study.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, G A; Garrity, J A; Dearani, J A; Abel, M D; Schroeder, D R; Mullany, C J

    2001-12-01

    Visual loss (acuity or field) secondary to ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) is a rare but devastating complication of cardiac surgery involving cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). We determined clinical features and risk factors for ION by a retrospective time-matched, case-control study. ION was identified in 17 (0.06%) patients out of 27,915 patients who underwent CPB between January 1, 1976, and December 31, 1994. For each ION patient, two patients who underwent CPB exactly 2 wk before the ION patient were selected as controls. Data were analyzed by using conditional logistic regression with the 1:2 matched-set feature of 17 cases and 34 controls. Two-tailed P values < or =0.05 were considered significant. From bivariate analysis, smaller minimum postoperative hemoglobin concentration (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9, P = 0.047) and the presence of atherosclerotic vascular disease (OR = 7.0, P = 0.026) were found to be independently associated with ION after CPB, as were smaller minimum postoperative hemoglobin concentration (OR = 2.2, P = 0.027) and preoperative angiogram within 48 h of surgery (OR = 7.2, P = 0.042). In ION patients, 13 (76.5%) of 17 experienced a minimum postoperative hemoglobin value of < 8.5 g/dL, whereas only 14 (41.2%) of 34 control patients experienced values < 8.5 g/dL. Patients with clinically significant vascular disease history or preoperative angiogram may be at increased risk for ischemic optic neuropathy after cardiac surgery, especially if the hemoglobin remains low in the postoperative period.

  17. Risk Factors for Scleral Buckle Removal: A Matched, Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Covert, Douglas J.; Wirostko, William J.; Han, Dennis P.; Lindgren, Kevin E.; Hammersley, Jill A.; Connor, Thomas B.; Kim, Judy E.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To identify preoperative, perioperative, and postoperative risk factors for scleral buckle (SB) removal. Methods A retrospective, consecutive, matched, case-control study. Cases included all patients undergoing SB removal between 1988 and 2007 at a single academic center. Case patients were matched against 4 randomly selected control patients who underwent SB implantation during the same year as the case patients. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for each factor investigated. Results Forty cases of SB removal and 148 matched control cases were identified. Three cases of SB removal were omitted from analysis because of incomplete records. Factors associated with SB removal for any reason, according to univariate analysis, included concurrent globe-penetrating injury at the time of SB placement (OR, 24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.9–200), concurrent pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) (OR, 17.3; CI, 4.9–61), diabetes mellitus (DM) (OR, 7.3; CI, 1.8–30), prior long-term topical ocular therapy (OR, 4.3; CI, 1.7–11), and subsequent ocular procedures (OR, 3.4; CI, 1.5–7.5). Factors independently associated with SB removal according to multivariate analysis included concurrent globe-penetrating injury (OR, 27.3; CI, 1.7–426), concurrent PPV (OR, 11.3; CI, 2.9–45), DM (OR, 8.9; CI, 1.3–58), and subsequent ocular procedures (OR, 3.9; CI, 1.4–11). Factors that did not alter SB removal risk included patient age; sex; and type, size, or location of buckling elements used. Conclusions Awareness of these risk factors may be valuable for the surgical planning of retinal detachment repair in patients at higher risk for subsequent SB removal and for risk stratification subsequent to SB implantation. PMID:19277232

  18. Host biomarkers are associated with progression to dengue haemorrhagic fever: a nested case-control study.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Andrea L; Gélvez, Margarita; Hawkes, Michael; Rajwans, Nimerta; Tran, Vanessa; Liles, W Conrad; Villar-Centeno, Luis Angel; Kain, Kevin C

    2015-11-01

    Dengue represents the most important arboviral infection worldwide. Onset of circulatory collapse can be unpredictable. Biomarkers that can identify individuals at risk of plasma leakage may facilitate better triage and clinical management. Using a nested case-control design, we randomly selected subjects from a prospective cohort study of dengue in Colombia (n=1582). Using serum collected within 96 hours of fever onset, we tested 19 biomarkers by ELISA in cases (developed dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS); n=46), and controls (uncomplicated dengue fever (DF); n=65) and healthy controls (HC); n=15. Ang-1 levels were lower and angptl3, sKDR, sEng, sICAM-1, CRP, CXCL10/IP-10, IL-18 binding protein, CHI3L1, C5a and Factor D levels were increased in dengue compared to HC. sICAM-1, sEng and CXCL10/IP-10 were further elevated in subjects who subsequently developed DHF/DSS (p=0.008, p=0.028 and p=0.025, respectively). In a logistic regression model, age (odds ratio (OR) (95% CI): 0.95 (0.92-0.98), p=0.001), hyperesthesia/hyperalgesia (OR; 3.8 (1.4-10.4), p=0.008) and elevated sICAM-1 (>298ng/mL: OR; 6.3 (1.5-25.7), p=0.011) at presentation were independently associated with progression to DHF/DSS. These results suggest that inflammation and endothelial activation are important pathways in the pathogenesis of dengue and sICAM-1 levels may identify individuals at risk of plasma leakage. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical and microbiologic characteristics of cefotaxime-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Taro; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2017-01-07

    Cefotaxime plays an important role in the treatment of patients with bacteremia due to Enterobacteriaceae, although cefotaxime resistance is reported to be increasing in association with extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC β-lactamase (AmpC). We conducted a case-control study in a Japanese university hospital between 2011 and 2012. We assessed the risk factors and clinical outcomes of bacteremia due to cefotaxime-non-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CTXNS-En) and analyzed the resistance mechanisms. Of 316 patients with Enterobacteriaceae bacteremia, 37 patients with bacteremia caused by CTXNS-En were matched to 74 patients who had bacteremia caused by cefotaxime-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae (CTXS-En). The most common CTXNS-En was Escherichia coli (43%), followed by Enterobacter spp. (24%) and Klebsiella spp. (22%). Independent risk factors for CTXNS-En bacteremia included previous infection or colonization of CTXNS-En, cardiac disease, the presence of intravascular catheter and prior surgery within 30 days. Patients with CTXNS-En bacteremia were less likely to receive appropriate empirical therapy and to achieve a complete response at 72 h than patients with CTXS-En bacteremia. Mortality was comparable between CTXNS-En and CTXS-En patients (5 vs. 3%). CTXNS-En isolates exhibited multidrug resistance but remained highly susceptible to amikacin and meropenem. CTX-M-type ESBLs accounted for 76% of the β-lactamase genes responsible for CTXNS E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates, followed by plasmid-mediated AmpC (12%). Chromosomal AmpC was responsible for 89% of CTXNS Enterobacter spp. isolates. CTXNS-En isolates harboring ESBL and AmpC caused delays in appropriate therapy among bacteremic patients. Risk factors and antibiograms may improve the selection of appropriate therapy for CTXNS-En bacteremia. Prevalent mechanisms of resistance in CTXNS-En were ESBL and chromosomal AmpC.

  20. Neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy in very preterm babies: case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D. J.; Hope, P. L.; Johnson, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify neonatal risk factors for cerebral palsy among very preterm babies and in particular the associations independent of the coexistence of antenatal and intrapartum factors. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Oxford health region. SUBJECTS: Singleton babies born between 1984 and 1990 at less than 32 weeks' gestation who survived to discharge from hospital: 59 with cerebral palsy and 234 randomly selected controls without cerebral palsy. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Adverse neonatal factors expressed as odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Factors associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy after adjustment for gestational age and the presence of previously identified antenatal and intrapartum risk factors were patent ductus arteriosus (odds ratio 2.3; 95% confidence interval 1.2 to 4.5), hypotension (2.3; 1.3 to 4.7), blood transfusion (4.8; 2.5 to 9.3), prolonged ventilation (4.8; 2.5 to 9.0), pneumothorax (3.5; 1.6 to 7.6), sepsis (3.6; 1.8 to 7.4), hyponatraemia (7.9; 2.1 to 29.6) and total parenteral nutrition (5.5; 2.8 to 10.5). Seizures were associated with an increased risk of cerebral palsy (10.0; 4.1 to 24.7), as were parenchymal damage (32; 12.4 to 84.4) and appreciable ventricular dilatation (5.4; 3.0 to 9.8) detected by cerebral ultrasound. CONCLUSION: A reduction in the rate of cerebral palsy in very preterm babies requires an integrated approach to management throughout the antenatal, intrapartum, and neonatal periods. PMID:9040385

  1. Gastrointestinal Infections and Diarrheal Disease in Ghanaian Infants and Children: An Outpatient Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Krumkamp, Ralf; Sarpong, Nimako; Schwarz, Norbert Georg; Adelkofer, Julia; Loag, Wibke; Eibach, Daniel; Hagen, Ralf Matthias; Adu-Sarkodie, Yaw; Tannich, Egbert; May, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diarrheal diseases are among the most frequent causes of morbidity and mortality in children worldwide, especially in resource-poor areas. This case-control study assessed the associations between gastrointestinal infections and diarrhea in children from rural Ghana. Methods Stool samples were collected from 548 children with diarrhea and from 686 without gastrointestinal symptoms visiting a hospital from 2007–2008. Samples were analyzed by microscopy and molecular methods. Results The organisms most frequently detected in symptomatic cases were Giardia lamblia, Shigella spp./ enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), and Campylobacter jejuni. Infections with rotavirus (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 8.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.3–16.6), C. parvum/hominis (aOR = 2.7; 95% CI: 1.4–5.2) and norovirus (aOR = 2.0; 95%CI: 1.3–3.0) showed the strongest association with diarrhea. The highest attributable fractions (AF) for diarrhea were estimated for rotavirus (AF = 14.3%; 95% CI: 10.9–17.5%), Shigella spp./EIEC (AF = 10.5%; 95% CI: 3.5–17.1%), and norovirus (AF = 8.2%; 95% CI 3.2–12.9%). Co-infections occurred frequently and most infections presented themselves independently of other infections. However, infections with E. dispar, C. jejuni, and norovirus were observed more often in the presence of G. lamblia. Conclusions Diarrheal diseases in children from a rural area in sub-Saharan Africa are mainly due to infections with rotavirus, Shigella spp./EIEC, and norovirus. These associations are strongly age-dependent, which should be considered when diagnosing causes of diarrhea. The presented results are informative for both clinicians treating gastrointestinal infections as well as public health experts designing control programs against diarrheal diseases. PMID:25738935

  2. Matched case-control studies: a review of reported statistical methodology.

    PubMed

    Niven, Daniel J; Berthiaume, Luc R; Fick, Gordon H; Laupland, Kevin B

    2012-01-01

    Case-control studies are a common and efficient means of studying rare diseases or illnesses with long latency periods. Matching of cases and controls is frequently employed to control the effects of known potential confounding variables. The analysis of matched data requires specific statistical methods. The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of published, peer-reviewed matched case-control studies that used statistical methods appropriate for matched data. Using a comprehensive set of search criteria we identified 37 matched case-control studies for detailed analysis. Among these 37 articles, only 16 studies were analyzed with proper statistical techniques (43%). Studies that were properly analyzed were more likely to have included case patients with cancer and cardiovascular disease compared to those that did not use proper statistics (10/16 or 63%, versus 5/21 or 24%, P = 0.02). They were also more likely to have matched multiple controls for each case (14/16 or 88%, versus 13/21 or 62%, P = 0.08). In addition, studies with properly analyzed data were more likely to have been published in a journal with an impact factor listed in the top 100 according to the Journal Citation Reports index (12/16 or 69%, versus 1/21 or 5%, P ≤ 0.0001). The findings of this study raise concern that the majority of matched case-control studies report results that are derived from improper statistical analyses. This may lead to errors in estimating the relationship between a disease and exposure, as well as the incorrect adaptation of emerging medical literature.

  3. Matched case-control studies: a review of reported statistical methodology

    PubMed Central

    Niven, Daniel J; Berthiaume, Luc R; Fick, Gordon H; Laupland, Kevin B

    2012-01-01

    Background Case-control studies are a common and efficient means of studying rare diseases or illnesses with long latency periods. Matching of cases and controls is frequently employed to control the effects of known potential confounding variables. The analysis of matched data requires specific statistical methods. Methods The objective of this study was to determine the proportion of published, peer-reviewed matched case-control studies that used statistical methods appropriate for matched data. Using a comprehensive set of search criteria we identified 37 matched case-control studies for detailed analysis. Results Among these 37 articles, only 16 studies were analyzed with proper statistical techniques (43%). Studies that were properly analyzed were more likely to have included case patients with cancer and cardiovascular disease compared to those that did not use proper statistics (10/16 or 63%, versus 5/21 or 24%, P = 0.02). They were also more likely to have matched multiple controls for each case (14/16 or 88%, versus 13/21 or 62%, P = 0.08). In addition, studies with properly analyzed data were more likely to have been published in a journal with an impact factor listed in the top 100 according to the Journal Citation Reports index (12/16 or 69%, versus 1/21 or 5%, P ≤ 0.0001). Conclusion The findings of this study raise concern that the majority of matched case-control studies report results that are derived from improper statistical analyses. This may lead to errors in estimating the relationship between a disease and exposure, as well as the incorrect adaptation of emerging medical literature. PMID:22570570

  4. The limitations of case-control studies in the detection of environmental carcinogens.

    PubMed Central

    Crombie, I K

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the case-control study to detect human carcinogens has been investigated theoretically for varying fractions of the population exposed to hazards carrying different relative risks. The method is shown to be useful for the investigation of factors to which exposure is widespread (for example, common foods or beverages) but it is of limited use for the study of uncommon types of exposure, such as those associated with occupation. The case-control study is unable to detect very small relative risks (less than 1.5) even where exposure is widespread and large numbers of cases of cancer are occurring in the population. The principal limitation of the method is the maximum number of cases which can be recruited and analysed. It will only be through large-scale collaborative multicentre or international studies that important risk factors will be detected. PMID:7338704

  5. Evaluating the use of friend or family controls in epidemiologic case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Charlie; Cockburn, Myles; Cozen, Wendy; Voutsinas, Jenna; Lacey, James V; Luo, Jianning; Sullivan-Halley, Jane; Bernstein, Leslie; Wang, Sophia S

    2017-02-01

    Traditional methodologies for identifying and recruiting controls in epidemiologic case-control studies, such as random digit dialing or neighborhood walk, suffer from declining response rates. Here, we revisit the feasibility and comparability of using alternative sources of controls, specifically friend and family controls. We recruited from a recently completed case-control study of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) among women in Los Angeles County where controls from the parent study were ascertained by neighborhood walk. We calculated participation rates and compared questionnaire responses between the friend/family controls and the original matched controls from the parent study. Of the 182 NHL case patients contacted, 111 (61%) agreed to participate in our feasibility study. 70 (63%) provided contact information for potential friend and/or family member controls. We were able to successfully contact and recruit a friend/family member for 92% of the case patients. This represented 46 friend controls and 54 family controls. Family controls significantly differed from original matched controls by sex and household income. Other characteristics were similar between friend controls and the original study's neighborhood controls. The apparent comparability of neighborhood controls to friend and family controls among respondents in this study suggests that these alternative methods of control identification can serve as a complementary source of eligible controls in epidemiologic case-control studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Risk Factors for Maternal Mortality in Rural Tigray, Northern Ethiopia: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Godefay, Hagos; Byass, Peter; Graham, Wendy J; Kinsman, John; Mulugeta, Afework

    2015-01-01

    Maternal mortality continues to have devastating impacts in many societies, where it constitutes a leading cause of death, and thus remains a core issue in international development. Nevertheless, individual determinants of maternal mortality are often unclear and subject to local variation. This study aims to characterise individual risk factors for maternal mortality in Tigray, Ethiopia. A community-based case-control study was conducted, with 62 cases and 248 controls from six randomly-selected rural districts. All maternal deaths between May 2012 and September 2013 were recruited as cases and a random sample of mothers who delivered in the same communities within the same time period were taken as controls. Multiple logistic regression was used to identify independent determinants of maternal mortality. Four independent individual risk factors, significantly associated with maternal death, emerged. Women who were not members of the voluntary Women's Development Army were more likely to experience maternal death (OR 2.07, 95% CI 1.04-4.11), as were women whose husbands or partners had below-median scores for involvement during pregnancy (OR 2.19, 95% CI 1.14-4.18). Women with a pre-existing history of other illness were also at increased risk (OR 5.58, 95% CI 2.17-14.30), as were those who had never used contraceptives (OR 2.58, 95% CI 1.37-4.85). Previous pregnancy complications, a below-median number of antenatal care visits and a woman's lack of involvement in health care decision making were significant bivariable risks that were not significant in the multivariable model. The findings suggest that interventions aimed at reducing maternal mortality need to focus on encouraging membership of the Women's Development Army, enhancing husbands' involvement in maternal health services, improving linkages between maternity care and other disease-specific programmes and ensuring that women with previous illnesses or non-users of contraceptive services are identified

  7. Risk factors for contracting watery diarrhoea in Kadoma City, Zimbabwe, 2011: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Kadoma City experienced an increase in watery diarrhoea from 27 cases during week beginning 5th September, to 107 cases during week beginning 26th September 2011. The weekly diarrhoea cases crossed the threshold action line during week beginning 5th September at the children’s clinic in Rimuka Township, and the remaining four clinics reported cases crossing threshold action lines between week beginning 12th September and week beginning 26th September. Eighty-two percent of the cases were children less than 5 years old. We conducted a case controlstudy to determine risk factorsfor contracting watery diarrhoea in children less than 5 years in Kadoma City. Methods An unmatched 1:1 case control study was conducted in Ngezi and Rimuka townships in Kadoma City, Zimbabwe. A case was a child less than 5 years old, who developed acute watery diarrhoea between 5th September and 1st October 2011. A control was a child less than 5 years old who stayed in the same township and did not suffer from diarrhoea. A structured questionnaire was administered to caregivers of cases and controls.Laboratory water quality tests and stool test results were reviewed.Epi Info™ statistical software was used to analyse data. Results A total of 109 cases and 109 controls were enrolled. Independent protective factors were: having been exclusively breastfed for six months [AOR = 0.44; 95% CI (0.24-0.82)]; using municipal water [AOR = 0.38; 95% CI (0.18-0.80)]; using aqua tablets, [AOR = 0.49; 95% CI (0.26–0.94)] and; storing water in closed containers, [AOR = 0.24; 95% CI (0.07–0.0.83). The only independent risk factor for contracting watery diarrhoea was hand washing in a single bowl, [AOR = 2.89; 95% CI (1.33–6.28)]. Salmonella, Shigella, Rotavirus, and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were isolated in the stool specimens. None of the 33 municipal water samples tested showed contamination with Escherichia coli, whilst 23 of 44 (52%) shallow well water samples and 3 of 15

  8. Risk factors for contracting watery diarrhoea in Kadoma City, Zimbabwe, 2011: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Maponga, Brian A; Chirundu, Daniel; Gombe, Notion T; Tshimanga, Mufuta; Shambira, Gerald; Takundwa, Lucia

    2013-12-02

    Kadoma City experienced an increase in watery diarrhoea from 27 cases during week beginning 5th September, to 107 cases during week beginning 26th September 2011. The weekly diarrhoea cases crossed the threshold action line during week beginning 5th September at the children's clinic in Rimuka Township, and the remaining four clinics reported cases crossing threshold action lines between week beginning 12th September and week beginning 26th September. Eighty-two percent of the cases were children less than 5 years old. We conducted a case controlstudy to determine risk factorsfor contracting watery diarrhoea in children less than 5 years in Kadoma City. An unmatched 1:1 case control study was conducted in Ngezi and Rimuka townships in Kadoma City, Zimbabwe. A case was a child less than 5 years old, who developed acute watery diarrhoea between 5th September and 1st October 2011. A control was a child less than 5 years old who stayed in the same township and did not suffer from diarrhoea. A structured questionnaire was administered to caregivers of cases and controls.Laboratory water quality tests and stool test results were reviewed.Epi Info™ statistical software was used to analyse data. A total of 109 cases and 109 controls were enrolled. Independent protective factors were: having been exclusively breastfed for six months [AOR = 0.44; 95% CI (0.24-0.82)]; using municipal water [AOR = 0.38; 95% CI (0.18-0.80)]; using aqua tablets, [AOR = 0.49; 95% CI (0.26-0.94)] and; storing water in closed containers, [AOR = 0.24; 95% CI (0.07-0.0.83). The only independent risk factor for contracting watery diarrhoea was hand washing in a single bowl, [AOR = 2.89; 95% CI (1.33-6.28)]. Salmonella, Shigella, Rotavirus, and Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli were isolated in the stool specimens. None of the 33 municipal water samples tested showed contamination with Escherichia coli, whilst 23 of 44 (52%) shallow well water samples and 3 of 15(20%) borehole water samples tested

  9. Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaskan Natives

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    1-0490 TITLE: Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaskan Natives PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0490 Control Study in Alaskan Natives 5b. GRANT NUMBER...to pol ychlorinated biphenyl (PCBs) residues, organochlorine pesticides and methylmercury with PD. The hy pothesis is that increased exposure to t

  10. Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    TITLE: Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Caroline M. Tanner, M.D...2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0490 Control Study in...now in progress in Anchorage. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Parkinson’s disease, Polychlorinated biphenyl, Organochlorine pesticides, Methylmercury, Alaska

  11. Accurate liability estimation improves power in ascertained case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Weissbrod, Omer; Lippert, Christoph; Geiger, Dan; Heckerman, David

    2015-04-01

    Linear mixed models (LMMs) have emerged as the method of choice for confounded genome-wide association studies. However, the performance of LMMs in nonrandomly ascertained case-control studies deteriorates with increasing sample size. We propose a framework called LEAP (liability estimator as a phenotype; https://github.com/omerwe/LEAP) that tests for association with estimated latent values corresponding to severity of phenotype, and we demonstrate that this can lead to a substantial power increase.

  12. Alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer in a Mediterranean population: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kontou, Niki; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Soupos, Nick; Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Xinopoulos, Dimitrios; Linos, Athena; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

    2012-06-01

    Alcohol is considered to be a cocarcinogen or a tumor promoter, and various studies have shown a linear dose-dependent association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer. However, a few studies suggest that moderate alcohol consumption may have a protective effect, similar to that in cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship of colorectal cancer to quantity and type of alcohol consumed. This was case-control study. The study was conducted in the area of Attica, Greece. A total of 250 consecutive patients with a first diagnosis of colorectal cancer were matched for age group and sex with 250 controls recruited from the community. The mean age was 63 (SD, 12) years for the patient group (147 men, 59%; 103 women, 41%) and 55 (SD, 13) years for the control group (112 men; 44.8%; 138 women, 55.2%). Questionnaires were administered by trained interviewers to assess sociodemographic, clinical, and lifestyle characteristics, in addition to dietary habits and quantity and type of alcoholic beverages usually consumed during the preceding year. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was evaluated with the MedDietScore (theoretical range, 0-55). With intake of less than 12 g of alcohol per day as the reference, moderate alcohol intake (12-35 g/day) was associated with a significantly decreased likelihood of colorectal cancer in men (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.16-0.74) and in women (OR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.18-0.91). High alcohol intake (more than 48 g/day) was associated with an increased likelihood, which was significant in men (OR, 3.45; 95% CI, 1.35-8.83) but not in women (OR, 3.40; 95% CI, 0.50-22.92). Drinking red wine was associated with reduced odds of colorectal cancer, significant in men (OR, 0.47; 95% CI, 0.23-0.96) but not in women (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.23-1.30). None of the associations between other beverage types and colorectal cancer were significant. Adherence to the Mediterranean diet was independently associated with lower odds

  13. Sequential tests for gene-environment interactions in matched case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Tweel, Ingeborg van der; Schipper, Maria

    2004-12-30

    The sample size necessary to detect a significant gene x environment interaction in an observational study can be large. For reasons of cost-effectiveness and efficient use of available biological samples we investigated the properties of sequential designs in matched case-control studies to test for both non-hierarchical and hierarchical interactions. We derived the test statistics Z and V and their characteristics when applied in a two-sided triangular test. Results of simulations show good agreement with theoretical values for V and the type I error. Power values were larger than their theoretical values for very large sample sizes. Median gain in efficiency was about 27 per cent. For a 'rare' phenotype gain in efficiency was larger when the alternative hypothesis was true than under the null hypothesis. Sequential designs lead to substantial efficiency gains in tests for interaction in matched case-control studies.

  14. On estimation of time-dependent attributable fraction from population-based case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wei; Chen, Ying Qing; Hsu, Li

    2017-01-18

    Population attributable fraction (PAF) is widely used to quantify the disease burden associated with a modifiable exposure in a population. It has been extended to a time-varying measure that provides additional information on when and how the exposure's impact varies over time for cohort studies. However, there is no estimation procedure for PAF using data that are collected from population-based case-control studies, which, because of time and cost efficiency, are commonly used for studying genetic and environmental risk factors of disease incidences. In this article, we show that time-varying PAF is identifiable from a case-control study and develop a novel estimator of PAF. Our estimator combines odds ratio estimates from logistic regression models and density estimates of the risk factor distribution conditional on failure times in cases from a kernel smoother. The proposed estimator is shown to be consistent and asymptotically normal with asymptotic variance that can be estimated empirically from the data. Simulation studies demonstrate that the proposed estimator performs well in finite sample sizes. Finally, the method is illustrated by a population-based case-control study of colorectal cancer.

  15. Determining exposure underreporting in pharmacoepidemiologic case-control studies: methods and example.

    PubMed

    Lane, D A; Kramer, M S

    1999-12-01

    Many pharmacoepidemiologic case-control studies have to rely on what their subjects relate about the drugs to which they have been exposed and the durations of exposure. There is often good reason to suppose that not all exposures are actually reported and to suspect reporting rates may differ between cases and controls. We introduce two procedures designed to determine the extent of underreporting of exposures. These procedures make use of data from the case-control study itself, as well as sales, demographic and market research data for a reference population to which study subjects belong. We apply these procedures to data from the International Primary Pulmonary Hypertension Study (IPPHS) linking anorexigens with PPH. We show that exposures to the anorectic agent dexfenfluramine beginning in or before 1989 were highly significantly underrepresented in the data for IPPHS controls, relative to exposures beginning after 1989 (P<0.01); there is no corresponding evidence for relative underrepresentation of early exposure for IPPHS cases. However, data on control exposures from 1990 to 1992 are consistent with the hypothesis that these exposures were not underreported to the IPPHS. Subject to certain key modeling assumptions and the availability of some supplemental data, it is possible to investigate the extent of underreporting of exposure in a pharmacoepidemiologic case-control study and in particular to determine if study results are likely to have been affected by recall bias.

  16. Using genetic epidemiology to study Rett syndrome: the design of a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Leonard, H; Fyfe, S; Dye, D; Leonard, S

    2000-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder that is seen almost exclusively in females. Although generally considered to have a genetic basis, the underlying mechanism remains obscure. One favoured hypothesis is that the syndrome is an X-linked dominant disorder, lethal or non-expressed in males. Genealogical research has also suggested that the mode of transmission in Rett syndrome may involve a premutation which over several generations is converted to a full mutation. Geographical clustering has been reported, and it has also been proposed that Rett syndrome is a clinically variable condition and that other neurological disorders may be occurring more commonly in families with Rett syndrome. Other studies have found an apparent increase in intellectual disability and seizures in the extended families of girls with Rett syndrome. The science of genetic epidemiology can be used to identify familial aggregation, which is the clustering of a disorder within a family. We have used a case-control study design to investigate both fetal wastage and familial aggregation of other disorders in families of girls with Rett syndrome. The Australian Rett Syndrome Database provided the source of cases, and control probands were girls of a similar age with normal development. This paper describes the methodology for a case-control study of this rare condition using pedigree data and discusses issues in the collection and evaluation of such data. The use of a control population is an important feature. Both the strengths and the shortcomings of our design are identified, and recommendations are made for future research.

  17. Sleep and Parkinson's disease: a review of case-control polysomnography studies.

    PubMed

    Peeraully, Tasneem; Yong, Ming-Hui; Chokroverty, Sudhansu; Tan, Eng-King

    2012-12-01

    The link between Parkinson's disease (PD) and certain primary sleep disorders has yet to be clarified. We performed a systematic review of case-control polysomnography studies to evaluate the relationship between PD and sleep disorders. A PubMed literature search and bibliography review yielded 15 case-control polysomnography studies in patients with PD. Studies differed by recruitment methods, duration of polysomnography monitoring, and sleep parameters measured. Subjective sleepiness was greater in patients than controls (50%-66% vs 2.9%-12%) despite lack of objective increase in daytime sleepiness by mean sleep latency testing. The 4 case-control polysomnography studies investigating rapid eye movement behavior disorder support a higher prevalence in PD (0%-47% vs 0%-1.8% in controls), although differences in diagnostic criteria hamper interpretation. The preponderance of evidence did not support an increased incidence of obstructive sleep apnea (27%-60% vs 13%-65%) or periodic leg movements of sleep in patients compared to controls. Adequately powered, prospective studies with uniform methodology and healthy controls are needed to further address the association and pathophysiological significance between PD and sleep problems.

  18. CONTROL FUNCTION ASSISTED IPW ESTIMATION WITH A SECONDARY OUTCOME IN CASE-CONTROL STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Sofer, Tamar; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Kraft, Peter; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J

    2017-04-01

    Case-control studies are designed towards studying associations between risk factors and a single, primary outcome. Information about additional, secondary outcomes is also collected, but association studies targeting such secondary outcomes should account for the case-control sampling scheme, or otherwise results may be biased. Often, one uses inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimators to estimate population effects in such studies. IPW estimators are robust, as they only require correct specification of the mean regression model of the secondary outcome on covariates, and knowledge of the disease prevalence. However, IPW estimators are inefficient relative to estimators that make additional assumptions about the data generating mechanism. We propose a class of estimators for the effect of risk factors on a secondary outcome in case-control studies that combine IPW with an additional modeling assumption: specification of the disease outcome probability model. We incorporate this model via a mean zero control function. We derive the class of all regular and asymptotically linear estimators corresponding to our modeling assumption, when the secondary outcome mean is modeled using either the identity or the log link. We find the efficient estimator in our class of estimators and show that it reduces to standard IPW when the model for the primary disease outcome is unrestricted, and is more efficient than standard IPW when the model is either parametric or semiparametric.

  19. Combining matched and unmatched control groups in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    le Cessie, Saskia; Nagelkerke, Nico; Rosendaal, Frits R; van Stralen, Karlijn J; Pomp, Elisabeth R; van Houwelingen, Hans C

    2008-11-15

    Multiple control groups in case-control studies are used to control for different sources of confounding. For example, cases can be contrasted with matched controls to adjust for multiple genetic or unknown lifestyle factors and simultaneously contrasted with an unmatched population-based control group. Inclusion of different control groups for a single exposure analysis yields several estimates of the odds ratio, all using only part of the data. Here the authors introduce an easy way to combine odds ratios from several case-control analyses with the same cases. The approach is based upon methods used for meta-analysis but takes into account the fact that the same cases are used and that the estimated odds ratios are therefore correlated. Two ways of estimating this correlation are discussed: sandwich methodology and the bootstrap. Confidence intervals for the pooled estimates and a test for checking whether the odds ratios in the separate case-control studies differ significantly are derived. The performance of the method is studied by simulation and by applying the methods to a large study on risk factors for thrombosis, the MEGA Study (1999-2004), wherein cases with first venous thrombosis were included with a matched control group of partners and an unmatched population-based control group.

  20. Case-Control Studies of Sporadic Enteric Infections: A Review and Discussion of Studies Conducted Internationally from 1990 to 2009

    PubMed Central

    Fullerton, Kathleen E.; Scallan, Elaine; Kirk, Martyn D.; Mahon, Barbara E.; Angulo, Frederick J.; de Valk, Henriette; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Gauci, Charmaine; Hauri, Anja M.; Majowicz, Shannon; O’Brien, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologists have used case-control studies to investigate enteric disease outbreaks for many decades. Increasingly, case-control studies are also used to investigate risk factors for sporadic (not outbreak-associated) disease. While the same basic approach is used, there are important differences between outbreak and sporadic disease settings that need to be considered in the design and implementation of the case-control study for sporadic disease. Through the International Collaboration on Enteric Disease “Burden of Illness” Studies (the International Collaboration), we reviewed 79 case-control studies of sporadic enteric infections caused by nine pathogens that were conducted in 22 countries and published from 1990 through to 2009. We highlight important methodological and study design issues (including case definition, control selection, and exposure assessment) and discuss how approaches to the study of sporadic enteric disease have changed over the last 20 years (e.g., making use of more sensitive case definitions, databases of controls, and computer-assisted interviewing). As our understanding of sporadic enteric infections grows, methods and topics for case-control studies are expected to continue to evolve; for example, advances in understanding of the role of immunity can be used to improve control selection, the apparent protective effects of certain foods can be further explored, and case-control studies can be used to provide population-based measures of the burden of disease. PMID:22443481

  1. Case-control studies of sporadic enteric infections: a review and discussion of studies conducted internationally from 1990 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Kathleen E; Scallan, Elaine; Kirk, Martyn D; Mahon, Barbara E; Angulo, Frederick J; de Valk, Henriette; van Pelt, Wilfrid; Gauci, Charmaine; Hauri, Anja M; Majowicz, Shannon; O'Brien, Sarah J

    2012-04-01

    Epidemiologists have used case-control studies to investigate enteric disease outbreaks for many decades. Increasingly, case-control studies are also used to investigate risk factors for sporadic (not outbreak-associated) disease. While the same basic approach is used, there are important differences between outbreak and sporadic disease settings that need to be considered in the design and implementation of the case-control study for sporadic disease. Through the International Collaboration on Enteric Disease "Burden of Illness" Studies (the International Collaboration), we reviewed 79 case-control studies of sporadic enteric infections caused by nine pathogens that were conducted in 22 countries and published from 1990 through to 2009. We highlight important methodological and study design issues (including case definition, control selection, and exposure assessment) and discuss how approaches to the study of sporadic enteric disease have changed over the last 20 years (e.g., making use of more sensitive case definitions, databases of controls, and computer-assisted interviewing). As our understanding of sporadic enteric infections grows, methods and topics for case-control studies are expected to continue to evolve; for example, advances in understanding of the role of immunity can be used to improve control selection, the apparent protective effects of certain foods can be further explored, and case-control studies can be used to provide population-based measures of the burden of disease.

  2. The LDLR locus in Alzheimer's disease: a family-based study and meta-analysis of case-control data.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Lars; Hsiao, Monica; McQueen, Matthew B; Parkinson, Michele; Mullin, Kristina; Blacker, Deborah; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2007-01-01

    Genetic linkage studies suggest the presence of an Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk gene on chromosome 19, acting independently of apolipoprotein E (apoE), a known AD risk factor on 19q13. The low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is an interesting candidate because it maps within the linked interval, and is intimately involved in cholesterol homeostasis and the function of apoE. We tested three previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within LDLR in a large sample of discordant sibships from multiplex AD families, and failed to find evidence for genetic association with disease risk. In addition, we performed meta-analyses for SNP rs5925 on published data from five independent case control samples, but did not detect any significant summary odds ratios. Based on our data, it seems unlikely that these genetic variants in LDLR make a significant contribution to AD risk in the general population.

  3. Population versus hospital controls for case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospitals.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Min; Holman, D'Arcy

    2011-12-15

    Correct control selection is crucial to the internal validity of case-control studies. Little information exists on differences between population and hospital controls in case-control studies on cancers in Chinese hospital setting. We conducted three parallel case-control studies on leukemia, breast and colorectal cancers in China between 2009 and 2010, using population and hospital controls to separately match 540 incident cases by age, gender and residency at a 1:1 ratio. Demographic and lifestyle factors were measured using a validated questionnaire in face-to-face interview. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using conditional logistic regression analyses. The two control groups had closely similar exposure distributions of 15 out of 16 factors, with the only exception being that hospital controls were less likely to have a BMI ≥ 25 (OR = 0.71, 95% CI: 0.54, 0.93). For exposure of green tea drinking, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) comparing green tealeaves intake ≥ 1000 grams annually with non-drinkers were 0.51 (0.31, 0.83) and 0.21 (0.27, 0.74) for three cancers combined, 0.06 (0.01, 0.61) and 0.07 (0.01, 0.47) for breast cancer, 0.52 (0.29, 0.94) and 0.45 (0.25, 0.82) for colorectal cancer, 0.65 (0.08, 5.63) and 0.57 (0.07, 4.79) for leukemia using hospital and population controls respectively. The study found that hospital controls were comparable with population controls for most demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors measured, but there was a slight difference between the two control groups. Hospital outpatients provide a satisfactory control group in hospital-based case-control study in the Chinese hospital setting.

  4. Trypanosoma cruzi-associated cerebrovascular disease: a case-control study in Eastern Colombia.

    PubMed

    Leon-Sarmiento, Fidias E; Mendoza, Eder; Torres-Hillera, Martin; Pinto, Neyla; Prada, Janette; Silva, Clara A; Vera, Silvia J; Castillo, Erwin; Valderrama, Vladimir; Prada, Didier G; Bayona-Prieto, Jaime; Garcia, Ingrid

    2004-01-15

    Trypanosoma cruzi infection is a common cause of cardiopathy in South America leading it eventually to an established stroke; however, the association between T. cruzi infection itself and cerebrovascular disease is still unknown. We did a case-control study at Eastern Colombia and found that T. cruzi infection was more frequent and statistically significant in stroke cases (24.4%) than controls (1.9%), (Chi square: 21.72; OR: 16.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.64-71.4; p<0.00001). After removing the seropositive patients with cardiological abnormalities, the significance still remained by multivariate analysis (p<0.05). This is the first case-control study that demonstrated a significant link between this infection and symptomatic cerebrovascular disease, mainly ischemic, regardless of cardiac abnormalities. Therefore, we recommend that patients with stroke must be screened for T. cruzi infection if they currently live or have lived in places where this parasite is considered endemic.

  5. Risk factors for mortality in ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pontes, Leonilda Giani; Menezes, Fernando Gatti de; Gonçalves, Priscila; Toniolo, Alexandra do Rosário; Silva, Claudia Vallone; Kawagoe, Julia Yaeko; Santos, Camila Marques Dos; Castagna, Helena Maria Fernandes; Martino, Marinês Dalla Valle; Corrêa, Luci

    2017-01-01

    To describe the microbiological characteristics and to assess the risk factors for mortality of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis in a case-control study of intensive care patients. This case-control study was conducted over a 6-year period in a 40-bed medical-surgical intensive care unit in a tertiary care, private hospital in São Paulo, Brazil. Case patients were identified using the Nosocomial Infection Control Committee database. For the analysis of risk factors, matched control subjects were selected from the same institution at a 1:8.8 ratio, between January 2006 and December 2011. A total of 40 episodes of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis were evaluated in 40 patients in the intensive care unit, and 354 intensive care patients who did not experience tracheobronchitis were included as the Control Group. During the 6-year study period, a total of 42 organisms were identified (polymicrobial infections were 5%) and 88.2% of all the microorganisms identified were Gram-negative. Using a logistic regression model, we found the following independent risk factors for mortality in ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis patients: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation I score (odds ratio 1.18 per unit of score; 95%CI: 1.05-1.38; p=0.01), and duration of mechanical ventilation (odds ratio 1.09 per day of mechanical ventilation; 95%CI: 1.03-1.17; p=0.004). Our study provided insight into the risk factors for mortality and microbiological characteristics of ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. Descrever as características microbiológicas e avaliar os fatores de risco para mortalidade na traqueobronquite associada à ventilação mecânica em um estudo caso-controle de pacientes de terapia intensiva. Estudo realizado ao longo de 6 anos em uma unidade de terapia intensiva médico-cirúrgica de 40 leitos, em um hospital privado e de nível terciário em São Paulo, Brasil. O Grupo Caso foi identificado usando o banco de dados da Comissão de

  6. First degree relatives and familial aggregation of gastric cancer: who to choose for control in case-control studies?

    PubMed

    Marcos-Pinto, Ricardo; Dinis-Ribeiro, Mário; Carneiro, Fátima; Machado, José Carlos; Figueiredo, Ceu; Reis, Celso A; Ferreira, José; Areias, Jorge

    2012-03-01

    Gastric carcinogenesis is a multifactorial process involving host gene and environmental interactions. Diverse case-control studies using different types of controls addressed the familial aggregation role for gastric cancer development. Our aim is to discuss the advantages and expected bias according to the different type of eligible controls. A PubMed search of papers on a query on first degree relatives of gastric cancer patients was conducted. The retrieved studies were evaluated regarding quality based on STROBE checklist. Data concerning risk of premalignant lesions and Helicobacter pylori infection was retrieved as the type of controls used on each study. Nine case-control studies were selected. A variety of controls were used ranging from general population to dyspeptic patients and spouses of the cases. We have observed that, independently of the type of control, the risk for the prevalence of premalignant lesions and H. pylori infection was higher for the cases. However, all of the evaluated case-control studies were average quality studies (mean 28 out of 45), with a small number of cases and controls (range from 39 to 300). Furthermore, concerning gene-environment interaction, each of the discussed type of control (general population, dyspeptic, spouse and neighbor) has potential advantages and disadvantages. The current data suggests that selection of any type of the aforementioned controls is feasible and seems to be mainly related to the feasibility of recruitment more than the genetic or environmental backgrounds. General population and dyspeptic patients would be equally appropriate for studies on familial aggregation of gastric cancer. Nevertheless, high-quality cohort studies are needed to validate this assumption.

  7. Polychlorinated Biphenyls, Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Organochlorines & PD Risk: A Case Control Study in Alaska 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-1-0490 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT...biphenyl (PCBs) residues, organochlorine pesticides and methylmercury with PD. The hypothesis is that increased exposure to these compounds will be...Parkinson’s disease, polychlorinated biphenyl, organochlorine pesticides, methylmercury, Alaska natives, neurodegeneration 16. SECURITY

  8. Acute myeloid leukemia in adults: a case-control study in Yorkshire.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, R A; Darwin, C; McKinney, P A; Roberts, B; Richards, I D; Bird, C C

    1988-10-01

    This paper reports the results of a case-control analysis of 161 cases of acute myeloid leukemia and 310 matched hospital controls. The patients were interviewed between 1982 and 1986. The study shows a weak association for cases with previous malignant disease. Furnace workers show excess risks. Urticaria and vertigo are in excess, as well as some aspects of family medical histories, including multiple sclerosis and cases of leukemia/lymphoma in blood relations.

  9. Case-control study of risk factors for no light perception after open-globe injury: eye injury vitrectomy study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kang; Shen, Lijun; Pang, Xiuqin; Jiang, Yanrong; Nie, Hongping; Wang, Zhijun; Hu, Yuntao; Ma, Zhizhong

    2011-11-01

    Investigate possible risk factors of no light perception (NLP) after open-globe injury. Explore whether these risk factors are predictors for an unfavorable visual outcome. This case-control study matched 72 eyes with NLP according to type and zone of injury to 2 controls per case with light perception or better vision. Cases were selected from the Eye Injury Vitrectomy Study database. All injured eyes in the study underwent surgical intervention. Ciliary body damage (odds ratio = 2.94), closed funnel retinal detachment (odds ratio = 2.43), and choroidal damage (odds ratio = 2.80) were independent risk factors for NLP after open-globe injury. There were 67 traumatized eyes with NLP that had ≥1 of these risk factors. In 43 of the cases (64.2%), the eyes recovered light perception or better after vitreoretinal surgery. The five traumatized NLP cases without these risk factors obtained a favorable visual outcome after vitreoretinal surgery. There was no statistical significance in visual outcome between them (P = 0.162). Ciliary body damage, closed funnel retinal detachment, and choroidal damage are independent risk factors for NLP posttrauma but not prognostic indicators for NLP visual outcome. Traumatized eyes with NLP may recover light perception or better vision if appropriate interventional measures are used for treatment of the injured ciliary body, retina, and choroid.

  10. Questionnaires for collecting detailed occupational information for community-based case control studies.

    PubMed

    Stewart, P A; Stewart, W F; Siemiatycki, J; Heineman, E F; Dosemeci, M

    1998-01-01

    In case control studies, collection of information on the workplace environment has generally been limited to self-reports of exposures or to job title, type of employer, and the dates the jobs were held, supplemented sometimes by work activities. This information, however, may be insufficient to assess the potential and level of exposure accurately due to recall difficulties and the variability of exposures within a job. A solution to this problem is to use job-specific questionnaires. The organization of a series of such questionnaires developed for a case control study of brain tumors is described. Three types of questionnaires, or modules, were developed, task-based, industry-based, and modules based on jobs with nonspecific types of tasks (e.g., laborer). The format of these modules starts with questions on the general work environment (type of employer) and proceeds to questions on tasks. More detailed information is then gathered on materials and equipment used, sensory descriptions, dermal exposure, work practices, engineering controls, and personal protective equipment use. The questionnaires cover a wide variety of exposures including solvents, heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, machining fluids, electromagnetic frequency fields, and many other exposures and, therefore, can be used in other case control studies.

  11. Impact of waning acquired immunity and asymptomatic infections on case-control studies for enteric pathogens.

    PubMed

    Havelaar, Arie H; Swart, Arno

    2016-12-01

    Case-control studies of outbreaks and of sporadic cases of infectious diseases may provide a biased estimate of the infection rate ratio, due to selecting controls that are not at risk of disease. We use a dynamic mathematical model to explore biases introduced in results drawn from case-control studies of enteric pathogens by waning and boosting of immunity, and by asymptomatic infections, using Campylobacter jejuni as an example. Individuals in the population are either susceptible (at risk of infection and disease), fully protected (not at risk of either) or partially protected (at risk of infection but not of disease). The force of infection is a function of the exposure frequency and the exposure dose. We show that the observed disease odds ratios are indeed strongly biased towards the null, i.e. much lower than the infection rate ratio, and furthermore even not proportional to it. The bias could theoretically be controlled by sampling controls only from the reservoir of susceptible individuals. The population at risk is in a dynamic equilibrium, and cannot be identified as those who are not and have never experienced disease. Individual-level samples to measure protective immunity would be required, complicating the design, cost and execution of case-control studies.

  12. Using cumulative sums of martingale residuals for model checking in nested case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Borgan, Ørnulf; Zhang, Ying

    2015-09-01

    Standard use of Cox regression requires collection of covariate information for all individuals in a cohort even when only a small fraction of them experiences the event of interest (fail). This may be very expensive for large cohorts. Further in biomarker studies, it will imply a waste of valuable biological material that one may want to save for future studies. A nested case-control study offers a useful alternative. For this design, covariate information is only needed for the failing individuals (cases) and a sample of controls selected from the cases' at-risk sets. Methods based on martingale residuals are useful for checking the fit of Cox's regression model for cohort data. But similar methods have so far not been developed for nested case-control data. In this article, it is described how one may define martingale residuals for nested case-control data, and it is shown how plots and tests based on cumulative sums of martingale residuals may be used to check model fit. The plots and tests may be obtained using available software.

  13. Multivariate multidistance tests for high-dimensional low sample size case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Marozzi, Marco

    2015-04-30

    A class of multivariate tests for case-control studies with high-dimensional low sample size data and with complex dependence structure, which are common in medical imaging and molecular biology, is proposed. The tests can be applied when the number of variables is much larger than the number of subjects and when the underlying population distributions are heavy-tailed or skewed. As a motivating application, we consider a case-control study where phase-contrast cinematic cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging has been used to compare many cardiovascular characteristics of young healthy smokers and young healthy non-smokers. The tests are based on the combination of tests on interpoint distances. It is theoretically proved that the tests are exact, unbiased and consistent. It is shown that the tests are very powerful under normal, heavy-tailed and skewed distributions. The tests can also be applied to case-control studies with high-dimensional low sample size data from other medical imaging techniques (like computed tomography or X-ray radiography), chemometrics and microarray data (proteomics and transcriptomics).

  14. An alternative hypothesis testing strategy for secondary phenotype data in case-control genetic association studies.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Sharon M; Hokanson, John E; Lange, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by the challenges associated with accounting for the ascertainment when analyzing secondary phenotypes that are correlated with case-control status, Lin and Zeng have proposed a method that properly reflects the case-control sampling (Lin and Zeng, 2009). The Lin and Zeng method has the advantage of accurately estimating effect sizes for secondary phenotypes that are normally distributed or dichotomous. This method can be computationally intensive in practice under the null hypothesis when the likelihood surface that needs to be maximized can be relatively flat. We propose an extension of the Lin and Zeng method for hypothesis testing that uses proportional odds logistic regression to circumvent these computational issues. Through simulation studies, we compare the power and type-1 error rate of our method to standard approaches and Lin and Zeng's approach.

  15. A double robust approach to causal effects in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sherri; van der Laan, Mark

    2014-03-15

    In a recent issue of the Journal, VanderWeele and Vansteelandt (Am J Epidemiol. 2011;174(10):1197-1203) discussed an inverse probability weighting method for case-control studies that could be used to estimate an additive interaction effect, referred to as the "relative excess risk due to interaction." In this article, we reinforce the well-known disadvantages of inverse probability weighting and comment on the desirability of the described parameter. Further, we review an existing double robust estimator not considered by VanderWeele and Vansteelandt, the case-control-weighted targeted maximum likelihood estimator, which has improved properties in comparison with a previously described inverse-probability-weighted estimator. This targeted maximum likelihood estimator can be used to target various parameters of interest, and its implementation has been described previously for the risk difference, relative risk, and odds ratio.

  16. Epidemiological study of prostate cancer (EPICAP): a population-based case-control study in France.

    PubMed

    Menegaux, Florence; Anger, Antoinette; Randrianasolo, Hasina; Mulot, Claire; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Iborra, François; Bringer, Jean-Pierre; Leizour, Benoit; Thuret, Rodolphe; Lamy, Pierre-Jean; Rébillard, Xavier; Trétarre, Brigitte

    2014-02-19

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in male in most Western countries, including France. Despite a significant morbidity and mortality to a lesser extent, the etiology of prostate cancer remains largely unknown. Indeed, the only well-established risk factors to date are age, ethnicity and a family history of prostate cancer. We present, here, the rationale and design of the EPIdemiological study of Prostate CAncer (EPICAP), a population-based case-control study specifically designed to investigate the role of environmental and genetic factors in prostate cancer. The EPICAP study will particularly focused on the role of circadian disruption, chronic inflammation, hormonal and metabolic factors in the occurrence of prostate cancer. EPICAP is a population-based case-control study conducted in the département of Hérault in France. Eligible cases are all cases of prostate cancers newly diagnosed in 2012-2013 in men less than 75 years old and residing in the département of Hérault at the time of diagnosis. Controls are men of the same age as the cases and living in the département of Hérault, recruited in the general population.The sample will include a total of 1000 incident cases of prostate cancer and 1000 population-based controls over a 3-year period (2012-2014).The cases and controls are face-to-face interviewed using a standardized computed assisted questionnaire. The questions focus primarily on usual socio-demographic characteristics, personal and family medical history, lifestyle, leisure activities, residential and occupational history. Anthropometric measures and biological samples are also collected for cases and controls. The EPICAP study aims to answer key questions in prostate cancer etiology: (1) role of circadian disruption through the study of working hours, chronotype and duration/quality of sleep, (2) role of chronic inflammation and anti-inflammatory drugs, (3) role of hormonal and metabolic factors through a detailed questionnaire, (4

  17. Occupational risk factors of lung cancer: a hospital based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Droste, J. H.; Weyler, J. J.; Van Meerbeeck, J. P.; Vermeire, P. A.; van Sprundel, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate the relation between lung cancer and exposure to occupational carcinogens in a highly industrialised region in western Europe. METHODS: In a case-control study 478 cases and 536 controls, recruited from 10 hospitals in the Antwerp region, were interviewed. Cases were male patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer; controls were male patients without cancer or primary lung diseases. Data were collected by questionnaires to obtain information on occupations, exposures, and smoking history. Job titles were coded with the Office of Populations, Censuses and Surveys industrial classification. Exposure was assessed by self report and by job-task exposure matrix. Exposure odds ratios were calculated with logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, smoking history, and marital and socio-economic status. RESULTS: A job history in the categories manufacturing of transport equipment other than automobiles (for example, shipyard workers), transport support services (for example, dockers), and manufacturing of metal goods (for example, welders) was significantly associated with lung cancer (odds ratios (ORs) 2.3, 1.6, and 1.6 respectively). These associations were independent of smoking, education, civil, and economic status. Self reported exposure to potential carcinogens did not show significant associations with lung cancer, probably due to nondifferential misclassification. When assessed by job-task exposure matrix, exposure to molybdenum, mineral oils, and chromium were significantly associated with lung cancer. A strong association existed between smoking and lung cancer: OR of ex- smokers 4.2, OR of current smokers 14.5 v non-smokers. However, smoking did not confound the relation between occupational exposure and lung cancer. CONCLUSIONS: The study has shown a significant excess risk of lung cancer among workers in manufacturing of metal goods, manufacturing of transport equipment (other than automobiles), and transport support

  18. Development and validation of a melanoma risk score based on pooled data from 16 case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Davies, John R; Chang, Yu-mei; Bishop, D Timothy; Armstrong, Bruce K; Bataille, Veronique; Bergman, Wilma; Berwick, Marianne; Bracci, Paige M; Elwood, J Mark; Ernstoff, Marc S; Green, Adele; Gruis, Nelleke A; Holly, Elizabeth A; Ingvar, Christian; Kanetsky, Peter A; Karagas, Margaret R; Lee, Tim K; Le Marchand, Loïc; Mackie, Rona M; Olsson, Håkan; Østerlind, Anne; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Reich, Kristian; Sasieni, Peter; Siskind, Victor; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Titus, Linda; Zens, Michael S; Ziegler, Andreas; Gallagher, Richard P.; Barrett, Jennifer H; Newton-Bishop, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Background We report the development of a cutaneous melanoma risk algorithm based upon 7 factors; hair colour, skin type, family history, freckling, nevus count, number of large nevi and history of sunburn, intended to form the basis of a self-assessment webtool for the general public. Methods Predicted odds of melanoma were estimated by analysing a pooled dataset from 16 case-control studies using logistic random coefficients models. Risk categories were defined based on the distribution of the predicted odds in the controls from these studies. Imputation was used to estimate missing data in the pooled datasets. The 30th, 60th and 90th centiles were used to distribute individuals into four risk groups for their age, sex and geographic location. Cross-validation was used to test the robustness of the thresholds for each group by leaving out each study one by one. Performance of the model was assessed in an independent UK case-control study dataset. Results Cross-validation confirmed the robustness of the threshold estimates. Cases and controls were well discriminated in the independent dataset (area under the curve 0.75, 95% CI 0.73-0.78). 29% of cases were in the highest risk group compared with 7% of controls, and 43% of controls were in the lowest risk group compared with 13% of cases. Conclusion We have identified a composite score representing an estimate of relative risk and successfully validated this score in an independent dataset. Impact This score may be a useful tool to inform members of the public about their melanoma risk. PMID:25713022

  19. Salivary creatinine and urea analysis in patients with chronic kidney disease: a case control study.

    PubMed

    Lasisi, Taye Jemilat; Raji, Yemi Raheem; Salako, Babatunde Lawal

    2016-01-16

    Many metabolic changes develop in patients with chronic kidney disease which often necessitate frequent biochemical analysis of blood. Saliva analysis as an alternative to blood has many advantages. The aims of this study were to evaluate levels of salivary creatinine and urea in patients with chronic kidney disease in comparison to healthy individuals; to determine correlation between salivary creatinine/urea and blood creatinine/urea and to evaluate the diagnostic potential of saliva. A case control study, involving 50 patients with late stage chronic kidney disease and 49 healthy individuals as control. Blood and saliva samples were analyzed for urea and creatinine levels. Data are presented as median with interquartile range and compared using Independent Samples Mann Whitney U test. Correlation between plasma and salivary creatinine as well as urea was determined using Spearman's correlation test. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis was done to determine the diagnostic ability of salivary creatinine and urea and cut-off values were established. Median salivary creatinine levels were 2.60 mg/dl and 0.20 mg/dl while median salivary urea levels were 92.00 mg/dl and 20.50 mg/dl in patients with chronic kidney disease and controls respectively. Salivary levels of creatinine and urea were significantly elevated in chronic kidney disease patients (p < 0.001). In addition, there was positive correlation between blood and salivary creatinine as well as urea levels. Total areas under the curve for salivary creatinine and urea were 0.97 and 0.89 respectively. Cut-off values for salivary creatinine and urea were 0.55 mg/dl and 27.50 mg/dl respectively which gave sensitivity and specificity of 94 % and 85 % for creatinine; as well as 86 % and 93 % for urea. Findings of this study suggest that analysis of salivary creatinine and urea in patients with chronic kidney disease reflects their levels in blood. Hence, salivary creatinine and urea could

  20. Risk factors for human brucellosis in Yemen: a case control study.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shamahy, H. A.; Whitty, C. J.; Wright, S. G.

    2000-01-01

    Brucellosis is known to occur in Yemen but its epidemiology has not been extensively studied. The present investigation examined risk factors for human brucellosis in Yemen using a hospital-based case-control study. A total of 235 consecutive patients with brucellosis attending the Central Health Laboratory in Sana'a, Yemen, were matched in respect of age, sex, and place of residence, rural or urban, with 234 controls selected from individuals attending the Central Health Laboratory for unrelated health problems. Clinical information on patients and controls was supplemented with occupational and socio-economic data obtained by interview of cases and controls using a standard questionnaire. After controlling for confounding factors significant risk factors for infection related to occupation as a farmer (OR 2.5 (95% CI 1.4-4.5, P < 0.0001)), shepherd (OR 7.8 (95% CI 1.0-61, P 0.05)) or microbiologist (OR 24.5 (95% CI 2.9-204, P 0.003)); and drinking fresh milk (OR 2.0 (95% CI 1.3-4.3, P 0.001)) and laban (OR 22.7 (95% CI 1.7-4.2 P < 0.0001)). Taking other milk products and offal were not risk factors. Socio-economic and educational factors were also independent risk factors. Occupational, food and socio-economic risk factors significantly confounded one another. Yemen shares some but not all of the risk factors of neighbouring countries. The interrelation between the various factors is complex and studying any one in isolation may give a false impression of its public health significance. Control through education of the population to minimize exposure to, and contact with, animals and their milk and milk products and to boil milk before drinking it or using it to make buttermilk, would be difficult as these would represent such fundamental changes to established patterns of behaviour of this society. Ideally there would be a campaign to control the infection by animal vaccination but the costs and logistic difficulty would be great. Presently there is a clear need

  1. Is bisphosphonate therapy for benign bone disease associated with impaired dental healing? A case-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates are common first line medications used for the management of benign bone disease. One of the most devastating complications associated with bisphosphonate use is osteonecrosis of the jaws which may be related to duration of exposure and hence cumulative dose, dental interventions, medical co-morbidities or in some circumstances with no identifiable aggravating factor. While jaw osteonecrosis is a devastating outcome which is currently difficult to manage, various forms of delayed dental healing may be a less dramatic and, therefore, poorly-recognised complications of bisphosphonate use for the treatment of osteoporosis. It is hypothesised that long-term (more than 1 year's duration) bisphosphonate use for the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis or other benign bone disease is associated with impaired dental healing. Methods/Design A case-control study has been chosen to test the hypothesis as the outcome event rate is likely to be very low. A total of 54 cases will be recruited into the study following review of all dental files from oral and maxillofacial surgeons and special needs dentists in Victoria where potential cases of delayed dental healing will be identified. Potential cases will be presented to an independent case adjudication panel to determine if they are definitive delayed dental healing cases. Two hundred and fifteen controls (1:4 cases:controls), matched for age and visit window period, will be selected from those who have attended local community based referring dental practices. The primary outcome will be the incidence of delayed dental healing that occurs either spontaneously or following dental treatment such as extractions, implant placement, or denture use. Discussion This study is the largest case-controlled study assessing the link between bisphosphonate use and delayed dental healing in Australia. It will provide invaluable data on the potential link between bisphosphonate use and osteonecrosis of the jaws

  2. Evaluating psychiatric case-control studies using the STROBE (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) statement.

    PubMed

    Goi, Pedro Domingues; Goi, Julia Domingues; Cordini, Kariny Larissa; Ceresér, Keila Mendes; Rocha, Neusa Sica da

    2014-01-01

    Case-control studies are important in developing clinical and public health knowledge. The STROBE statement (STrengthening the Reporting of OBservational Studies in Epidemiology) was developed to establish a checklist of items that should be included in articles reporting observational studies. Our aim was to analyze whether the psychiatric case-control articles published in Brazilian journals with CAPES Qualis rating B1/B2 in 2009 conformed with the STROBE statement. Descriptive study on psychiatric papers published in Brazilian journals, within the Postgraduate Medical Program on Psychiatry, at Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul. All psychiatric case-control studies from Brazilian Qualis B1/B2 journals of psychiatry, neurology and public health in 2009 were analyzed. The four most specific items of the STROBE statement were used to evaluate whether these studies fitted within the case-control parameters: 1) selection of cases and controls; 2) controlling for bias; 3) statistical analysis; and 4) presentation of results. Sixteen case-control studies were identified, of which eleven (68.75%) were in psychiatry-focused journals. From analysis using the STROBE statement, all of the articles conformed with item 1; two (12.5%) completely conformed with item 2; none completely conformed with item 3; and only three (18.8%) conformed with item 4. The case-control studies analyzed here did not completely conform with the four STROBE statement items for case-control design. In view of the inadequate methodology of the published studies, these findings justify focusing on research and methodology and expanding the investigations on adherence of studies to their designs.

  3. Multicenter Case-Control Study on Restless Legs Syndrome in Multiple Sclerosis: the REMS Study

    PubMed Central

    Manconi, Mauro; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Filippi, Massimo; Bonanni, Enrica; Iudice, Alfonso; Murri, Luigi; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Fratticci, Lara; Merlino, Giovanni; Terzano, Giovanni; Granella, Franco; Parrino, Liborio; Silvestri, Rosalia; Aricò, Irene; Dattola, Vincenzo; Russo, Giovanna; Luongo, Carmela; Cicolin, Alessandro; Tribolo, Antonella; Cavalla, Paola; Savarese, Mariantonietta; Trojano, Maria; Ottaviano, Salvatore; Cirignotta, Fabio; Simioni, Valentina; Salvi, Fabrizio; Mondino, Fiorella; Perla, Franco; Chinaglia, Giorgia; Zuliani, Cristina; Cesnik, Edward; Granieri, Enrico; Placidi, Fabio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Manni, Raffaele; Terzaghi, Michele; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Rocchi, Raffaele; Ulivelli, Monica; Bartalini, Sabina; Ferri, Raffaele; Fermo, Salvatore Lo; Ubiali, Emilio; Viscardi, Massimo; Rottoli, Mariarosa; Nobili, Lino; Protti, Alessandra; Ferrillo, Franco; Allena, Marta; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Guarnieri, Biancamaria; Londrillo, Francesco

    2008-01-01

    Study objectives: To verify the existence of a symptomatic form of restless legs syndrome (RLS) secondary to multiple sclerosis (MS) and to identify possible associated risk factors. Design: Prospective, multicenter, case-control epidemiologic survey. Settings: Twenty sleep centers certified by the Italian Association of Sleep Medicine. Patients: Eight hundred and sixty-one patients affected by MS and 649 control subjects. Interventions: N/A. Measures and results: Data regarding demographic and clinical factors, presence and severity of RLS, the results of hematologic tests, and visual analysis of cerebrospinal magnetic resonance imaging studies were collected. The prevalence of RLS was 19% in MS and 4.2% in control subjects, with a risk to be affected by RLS of 5.4 (95%confidence interval: 3.56–8.26) times greater for patients with MS than for control subjects. In patients with MS, the following risk factors for RLS were significant: older age; longer MS duration; the primary progressive MS form; higher global, pyramidal, and sensory disability; and the presence of leg jerks before sleep onset. Patients with MS and RLS more often had sleep complaints and a higher intake of hypnotic medications than patients with MS without RLS. RLS associated with MS was more severe than that of control subjects. Conclusions: RLS is significantly associated with MS, especially in patients with severe pyramidal and sensory disability. These results strengthen the idea that the inflammatory damage correlated with MS may induce a secondary form of RLS. As it does in idiopathic cases, RLS has a significant impact on sleep quality in patients with MS; therefore, it should be always searched for, particularly in the presence of insomnia unresponsive to treatment with common hypnotic drugs. Citation: Manconi M; Ferini-Strambi L; Filippi M; Bonanni E; Iudice A; Murri L; Gigli GL; Fratticci L; Merlino G; Terzano G; Granella F; Parrino L; Silvestri R; Aricò I; Dattola V; Russo G; Luongo

  4. Ethnicity and Cutaneous Melanoma in the City of Sao Paulo, Brazil: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Luiz, Olinda C.; Gianini, Reinaldo José; Gonçalves, Fernanda T.; Francisco, Guilherme; Festa-Neto, Cyro; Sanches, José Antonio; Gattas, Gilka J. F.; Chammas, Roger; Eluf-Neto, José

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last century the incidence of cutaneous melanoma has increased worldwide, a trend that has also been observed in Brazil. The identified risk factors for melanoma include the pattern of sun exposure, family history, and certain phenotypic features. In addition, the incidence of melanoma might be influenced by ethnicity. Like many countries, Brazil has high immigration rates and consequently a heterogenous population. However, Brazil is unique among such countries in that the ethnic heterogeneity of its population is primarily attributable to admixture. This study aimed to evaluate the contribution of European ethnicity to the risk of cutaneous melanoma in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings We carried out a hospital-based case-control study in the metropolitan area of Sao Paulo, Brazil. We evaluated 424 hospitalized patients (202 melanoma patients and 222 control patients) regarding phenotypic features, sun exposure, and number of grandparents born in Europe. Through multivariate logistic regression analysis, we found the following variables to be independently associated with melanoma: grandparents born in Europe—Spain (OR = 3.01, 95% CI: 1.03–8.77), Italy (OR = 3.47, 95% CI: 1.41–8.57), a Germanic/Slavic country (OR = 3.06, 95% CI: 1.05–8.93), or ≥2 European countries (OR = 2.82, 95% CI: 1.06–7.47); eye color—light brown (OR = 1.99, 95% CI: 1.14–3.84) and green/blue (OR = 4.62; 95% CI 2.22–9.58); pigmented lesion removal (OR = 3.78; 95% CI: 2.21–6.49); no lifetime sunscreen use (OR = 3.08; 95% CI: 1.03–9.22); and lifetime severe sunburn (OR = 1.81; 95% CI: 1.03–3.19). Conclusions Our results indicate that European ancestry is a risk factor for cutaneous melanoma. Such risk appears to be related not only to skin type, eye color, and tanning capacity but also to others specific characteristics of European populations introduced in the New World by European immigrants. PMID:22558444

  5. Nocardia Infection in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients: A Multicenter European Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Coussement, Julien; Lebeaux, David; van Delden, Christian; Guillot, Hélène; Freund, Romain; Marbus, Sierk; Melica, Giovanna; Van Wijngaerden, Eric; Douvry, Benoit; Van Laecke, Steven; Vuotto, Fanny; Tricot, Leïla; Fernández-Ruiz, Mario; Dantal, Jacques; Hirzel, Cédric; Jais, Jean-Philippe; Rodriguez-Nava, Veronica; Lortholary, Olivier; Jacobs, Frédérique

    2016-08-01

    Nocardiosis is a rare, life-threatening opportunistic infection, affecting 0.04% to 3.5% of patients after solid organ transplant (SOT). The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for Nocardia infection after SOT and to describe the presentation of nocardiosis in these patients. We performed a retrospective case-control study of adult patients diagnosed with nocardiosis after SOT between 2000 and 2014 in 36 European (France, Belgium, Switzerland, the Netherlands, Spain) centers. Two control subjects per case were matched by institution, transplant date, and transplanted organ. A multivariable analysis was performed using conditional logistic regression to identify risk factors for nocardiosis. One hundred and seventeen cases of nocardiosis and 234 control patients were included. Nocardiosis occurred at a median of 17.5 (range, 2-244) months after transplant. In multivariable analysis, high calcineurin inhibitor trough levels in the month before diagnosis (odds ratio [OR], 6.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.58-14.51), use of tacrolimus (OR, 2.65; 95% CI, 1.17-6.00) and corticosteroid dose (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.03-1.22) at the time of diagnosis, patient age (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.02-1.07), and length of stay in the intensive care unit after SOT (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00-1.09) were independently associated with development of nocardiosis; low-dose cotrimoxazole prophylaxis was not found to prevent nocardiosis. Nocardia farcinica was more frequently associated with brain, skin, and subcutaneous tissue infections than were other Nocardia species. Among the 30 cases with central nervous system nocardiosis, 13 (43.3%) had no neurological symptoms. We identified 5 risk factors for nocardiosis after SOT. Low-dose cotrimoxazole was not found to prevent Nocardia infection. These findings may help improve management of transplant recipients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For

  6. Association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and upper gastrointestinal bleeding: population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    de Abajo, Francisco José; Rodríguez, Luis Alberto García; Montero, Dolores

    1999-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Design Population based case-control study. Setting General practices included in the UK general practice research database. Subjects 1651 incident cases of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and 248 cases of ulcer perforation among patients aged 40 to 79 years between April 1993 and September 1997, and 10 000 controls matched for age, sex, and year that the case was identified. Interventions Review of computer profiles for all potential cases, and an internal validation study to confirm the accuracy of the diagnosis on the basis of the computerised information. Main outcome measures Current use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or other antidepressants within 30 days before the index date. Results Current exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors was identified in 3.1% (52 of 1651) of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding but only 1.0% (95 of 10 000) of controls, giving an adjusted rate ratio of 3.0 (95% confidence interval 2.1 to 4.4). This effect measure was not modified by sex, age, dose, or treatment duration. A crude incidence of 1 case per 8000 prescriptions was estimated. A small association was found with non-selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (relative risk 1.4, 1.1 to 1.9) but not with antidepressants lacking this inhibitory effect. None of the groups of antidepressants was associated with ulcer perforation. The concurrent use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs increased the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding beyond the sum of their independent effects (15.6, 6.6 to 36.6). A smaller interaction was also found between selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and low dose aspirin (7.2, 3.1 to 17.1). Conclusions Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors increase the risk of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The absolute effect is, however

  7. Severity of Scorpion Stings in the Western Brazilian Amazon: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Amanda M.; Sampaio, Vanderson S.; Mendonça, Iran; Fé, Nelson F.; Sachett, Jacqueline; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos L.; Feitosa, Esaú; Wen, Fan Hui; Lacerda, Marcus; Monteiro, Wuelton

    2015-01-01

    Background Scorpion stings are a major public health problem in Brazil, with an increasing number of registered cases every year. Affecting mostly vulnerable populations, the phenomenon is not well described and is considered a neglected disease. In Brazil, the use of anti-venom formulations is provided free of charge. The associate scorpion sting case is subject to compulsory reporting. This paper describes the epidemiology and identifies factors associated with severity of scorpions stings in the state of Amazonas, in the Western Brazilian Amazon. Methodology/Principal Findings This study included all cases of scorpion stings in the state of Amazonas reported to the Brazilian Diseases Surveillance System from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2014. A case-control study was conducted to identify factors associated with scorpions sting severity. A total of 2,120 cases were reported during this period. The mean incidence rate in the Amazonas was 7.6 per 100,000 inhabitants/year. Scorpion stings showed a large spatial distribution in the state and represent a potential occupational health problem for rural populations. There was a positive correlation between the absolute number of cases and the altimetric river levels in the Central (p<0.001; Rs = 0.479 linear) and Southwest (p = 0.032; linear Rs = 0.261) regions of the state. Cases were mostly classified as mild (68.6%), followed by moderate (26.8%), and severe (4.6%). The overall lethality rate was 0.3%. Lethality rate among children ≤10 years was 1.3%. Age <10 years [OR = 2.58 (95%CI = 1.47–4.55; p = 0.001)], stings occurring in the rural area [OR = 1.97 (95%CI = 1.18–3.29; p = 0.033) and in the South region of the state [OR = 1.85 (95%CI = 1.17–2.93; p = 0.008)] were independently associated with the risk of developing severity. Conclusions/Significance Scorpion stings show an extensive distribution in the Western Brazilian Amazon threatening especially rural populations, children ≤10 in particular. Thus

  8. Birth attendance and magnitude of obstetric complications in Western Kenya: a retrospective case-control study.

    PubMed

    Liambila, Wilson N; Kuria, Shiphrah N

    2014-09-08

    Skilled birth attendance is critical in the provision of child birth related services. Yet, literature is scanty on the outcomes of child birth related complications in situations where majority of women deliver under the care of non-skilled birth attendants compared to those who are assisted by skilled providers. The study sought to assess the nature of childbirth related complications among the skilled and the non-skilled birth attendants in Western Kenya. A case-control study was conducted among women aged 15-49 years at the household. Controls were individually matched to cases on the basis of age and socio-economic status. A total of 294 cases and 291 controls were interviewed. Data were collected on various demographic and socio-economic characteristics and women's perception on the quality of care. All independent variables were analysed initially in bivariate models and those that were significantly associated with obstetric complications were included in multiple logistic regression model in order to control for confounding factors. Odds ratios (ORs), with 95% confidence intervals, were computed to show the association between the occurrence, magnitude and the extent to which child birth related complications were managed. Demographic and socio-economic characteristics of the cases and controls were similar. About 52% of the deliveries were assisted by skilled birth attendants while non-skilled providers attended to 48% of them. The odds of the occurrence of obstetric complications were greater among the women who were attended to by skilled providers in health facilities: adjusted odds ratio (AOR): 1.32 (CI 0.95, 1.84) than among those who were assisted by unskilled birth attendants, AOR 0.76 (CI 0.55, 1.06). Undignified care, high delivery and transport costs and fear of hospital procedures such as HIV tests and mishandling of the placenta were cited as some of the barriers to facility deliveries. Skilled birth attendants in facilities were associated

  9. Adult attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, risky behaviors, and motorcycle injuries: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Abedi, Leili; Mahini, Minoo; Amiri, Shahrokh; Khorasani-Zavareh, Davoud

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the association of motorcycle traffic injuries with motorcycle riding behavior and subtypes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) while controlling for individual correlates of motorcycle traffic injuries. Methods A case-control study was carried out in 298 patients with motorcycle trauma along with 151 control patients admitted to the Shohada and Imam Reza university hospitals as the two referral specialty centers in the East Azarbyjan Province of Iran in 2013. The Persian version of the Motorcycle Riding Behavior Questionnaire and the Persian version of Conner’s Adult ADHD Rating Scales (the self-report short version) were used to assess riding behavior and screen for adult ADHD, respectively. The scale has four subscales, comprising subscale A (inattention), subscale B (hyperactivity, impulsivity), subscale C (A + C), and subscale D (ADHD index). The statistical analysis was done using Stata version 11. Results All subjects were male and aged 13–79 years. Approximately 54% of the participants were married and 13% had academic education. Approximately 18% of the motorcycle riders stated that their motorcycle riding was only for fun purposes. More than two thirds of the participants did not have a motorcycle riding license. Variables found to be significantly associated with motorcycle injuries in bivariate analysis included age, marital status, educational level, having a motorcycle riding license, using a helmet while riding, daily amount of riding, riding just for fun, riding behavior score, and ADHD scale scores. It was found in multivariate analysis that if the ADHD index (subscale D) score was used to assess the association of ADHD with motorcycle injuries, a protective role for ADHD was observed. However, the two other subscales showed a different predictive pattern for subscale A versus subscale B, with only subscale B increasing the likelihood of motorcycle traffic injuries. The score based

  10. Caregiver-related predictors of thermal burn injuries among Iranian children: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bazargani, Homayoun; Mohammadi, Reza; Ayubi, Erfan; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Pakzad, Reza; Sullman, Mark J. M.; Safiri, Saeid

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Burns are a common and preventable cause of injury in children. The aim of this study was to investigate child and caregiver characteristics which may predict childhood burn injuries among Iranian children and to examine whether confounding exists among these predictors. Methods A hospital based case-control study was conducted using 281 burn victims and 273 hospital-based controls, which were matched by age, gender and place of residence (rural/urban). The characteristics of the children and their caregivers were analyzed using crude and adjusted models to test whether these were predictors of childhood burn injuries. Results The age of the caregiver was significantly lower for burn victims than for the controls (P<0.05). Further, the amount of time the caregiver spent outdoors with the child and their economic status had a significant positive association with the odds of a burn injury (P<0.05). A multivariate logistic regression found that Type A behaviour among caregivers was independently associated with the child's odds of suffering a burn injury (OR = 1.12, 95% CI: 1.04–1.21). The research also found that children with ADHD (Inattentive subscale: Crude OR = 2.14, 95% CI: 1.16–3.95, Adjusted OR = 5.65, 95% CI: 2.53–12.61; Hyperactive subscale: Crude OR = 1.73, 95% CI: 1.23–2.41, Adjusted OR = 2.53, 95% CI: 1.65–3.87) also had increased odds of suffering a burn injury. However, several variables were identified as possible negative confounder variables, as the associations were stronger in the multivariate model than in the crude models. Conclusion The caregiver's characteristics which were predictors of burn injuries among Iranian children were: being younger, high socio-economic status, Type A behavioural pattern and spending more time outdoors. In addition, the relationship between a child's ADHD scores and the odds of a burn injury may be negatively confounded by the caregivers predictor variables. PMID:28151942

  11. Risk factors for HIV infection among circumcised men in Uganda: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ediau, Michael; Matovu, Joseph KB; Byaruhanga, Raymond; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of HIV infection. However, the risk reduction effect of MC can be modified by type of circumcision (medical, traditional and religious) and sexual risk behaviours post-circumcision. Understanding the risk behaviours associated with HIV infection among circumcised men (regardless of form of circumcision) is critical to the design of comprehensive risk reduction interventions. This study assessed risk factors for HIV infection among men circumcised through various circumcision approaches. Methods This was a case-control study which enrolled 155 cases (HIV-infected) and 155 controls (HIV-uninfected), all of whom were men aged 18–35 years presenting at the AIDS Information Center for HIV testing and care. The outcome variable was HIV sero-status. Using SPSS version 17, multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with HIV infection. Results Overall, 83.9% among cases and 56.8% among controls were traditionally circumcised; 7.7% of cases and 21.3% of controls were religiously circumcised while 8.4% of cases and 21.9% of controls were medically circumcised. A higher proportion of cases than controls reported resuming sexual intercourse before complete wound healing (36.9% vs. 14.1%; p<0.01). Risk factors for HIV infection prior to circumcision were:being in a polygamous marriage (AOR: 6.6, CI: 2.3–18.8) and belonging to the Bagisu ethnic group (AOR: 6.1, CI: 2.6–14.0). After circumcision, HIV infection was associated with: being circumcised at >18 years (AOR: 5.0, CI: 2.4–10.2); resuming sexual intercourse before wound healing (AOR: 3.4, CI: 1.6–7.3); inconsistent use of condoms (AOR: 2.7, CI: 1.5–5.1); and having sexual intercourse under the influence of peers (AOR: 2.9, CI: 1.5–5.5). Men who had religious circumcision were less likely to have HIV infection (AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9) than the traditionally circumcised but there was no statistically

  12. Variation in the Lysyl Oxidase (LOX) Gene Is Associated with Keratoconus in Family-Based and Case-Control Studies

    PubMed Central

    Bykhovskaya, Yelena; Li, Xiaohui; Epifantseva, Irina; Haritunians, Talin; Siscovick, David; Aldave, Anthony; Szczotka-Flynn, Loretta; Iyengar, Sudha K.; Taylor, Kent D.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rabinowitz, Yaron S

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Keratoconus is a bilateral noninflammatory progressive corneal disorder with complex genetic inheritance and a common cause for cornea transplantation in young adults. A genomewide linkage scan in keratoconus families identified a locus at 5q23.2, overlapping the gene coding for the lysyl oxidase (LOX). LOX encodes an enzyme responsible for collagen cross-linking in a variety of tissues including the cornea. Corneal collagen cross-linking with long-wave ultraviolet light and riboflavin is a promising new treatment for keratoconus. To determine whether LOX is a genetic determinant of the pathogenesis of keratoconus, we analyzed association results of LOX polymorphisms in two independent case-control samples and in keratoconus families. Methods. Association results were analyzed of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the LOX gene from a Genome-Wide Association Study (GWAS) investigation in two independent panels of patients with keratoconus and controls and in keratoconus families. Results. Evidence of association was found at SNPs rs10519694 and rs2956540 located in intron 4 of LOX in the GWAS discovery case-control panel with P values of 2.3 × 10−3 and 7 × 10−3, respectively. The same two SNPs were found to be associated with keratoconus by family-based association testing with P values of 2.7 × 10−3 and 7.7 × 10−4, respectively. Meta P values of 4.0 × 10−5 and 4.0 × 10−7 were calculated for SNPs rs10519694 and rs2956540 by analyzing case-control and family samples simultaneously. Sequencing of LOX exons in a subset of keratoconus patients identified two polymorphisms, rs1800449 and rs2288393, located in LOX transcripts I and II, associated with keratoconus in case-control and family samples with a meta P value of 0.02. Conclusions. Results provided strong genetic evidence that LOX variants lead to increased susceptibility to developing of keratoconus. PMID:22661479

  13. Challenges in Recruiting Aging Women Holocaust Survivors to a Case Control Study of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vin-Raviv, Neomi; Dekel, Rachel; Barchana, Micha; Linn, Shai; Keinan-Boker, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Older adults are underrepresented in medical research for many reasons, including recruitment difficulties. Recruitment of older adults for research studies is often a time-consuming process and can be more challenging when the study involves older adults with unique exposures to traumatic events and from minority groups. The current article provides a brief overview of (a) challenges encountered while recruiting aging women Holocaust survivors for a case control study and (b) strategies used for meeting those challenges. The case group comprised women Holocaust survivors who were recently diagnosed with breast cancer and the control group comprised healthy women from a Holocaust-survivor community in Israel.

  14. Design and methods in a multi-center case-control interview study.

    PubMed Central

    Hartge, P; Cahill, J I; West, D; Hauck, M; Austin, D; Silverman, D; Hoover, R

    1984-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study in ten areas of the United States in which a total of 2,982 bladder cancer patients and 5,782 population controls were interviewed. We employed a variety of existing and new techniques to reduce bias and to monitor the quality of data collected. We review here many of the design elements and field methods that can be generally applied in epidemiologic studies, particularly multi-center interview studies, and explain the reasons for our selection of the methods, instruments, and procedures used. PMID:6689843

  15. Bayesian analysis of genetic interactions in case-control studies, with application to adiponectin genes and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Yi, Nengjun; Kaklamani, Virginia G; Pasche, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Complex diseases such as cancers are influenced by interacting networks of genetic and environmental factors. However, a joint analysis of multiple genes and environmental factors is challenging, owing to potentially large numbers of correlated and complex variables. We describe Bayesian generalized linear models for simultaneously analyzing covariates, main effects of numerous loci, gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in population case-control studies. Our Bayesian models use Student-t prior distributions with different shrinkage parameters for different types of effects, allowing reliable estimates of main effects and interactions and hence increasing the power for detection of real signals. We implement a fast and stable algorithm for fitting models by extending available tools for classical generalized linear models to the Bayesian case. We propose a novel method to interpret and visualize models with multiple interactions by computing the average predictive probability. Simulations show that the method has the potential to dissect interacting networks of complex diseases. Application of the method to a large case-control study of adiponectin genes and colorectal cancer risk highlights the previous results and detects new epistatic interactions and sex-specific effects that warrant follow-up in independent studies.

  16. Effectiveness of reactive oral cholera vaccination in rural Haiti: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ivers, Louise C; Hilaire, Isabelle J; Teng, Jessica E; Almazor, Charles P; Jerome, J Gregory; Ternier, Ralph; Boncy, Jacques; Buteau, Josiane; Murray, Megan B; Harris, Jason B; Franke, Molly F

    2015-01-01

    Background Between April and June 2012, a reactive cholera vaccination campaign was conducted in Haiti using an oral inactivated bivalent whole-cell vaccine (BivWC). Methods We conducted a case-control study to estimate field effectiveness of the vaccine. Cases had acute watery diarrhea, sought treatment at one of three participating cholera treatment units from October 24, 2012 through March 9, 2014, and had a stool sample positive for cholera by culture. For each case, four controls (individuals who did not seek treatment for acute watery diarrhea) were matched by location of residence, calendar time, and age. We also conducted a bias-indicator case-control study to assess the likelihood of bias in the vaccine effectiveness (VE) study. Findings During the study period, 114 eligible individuals presented with acute watery diarrhea and were enrolled. 47 were analyzed as cases in the VE case-control study and 42 as cases in the bias-indicator study. In multivariable analyses, VE was 63% [95% confidence interval (CI): 8%–85%] by self-reported vaccination and 58% [95% CI: 13%–80%] for verified vaccination. Neither self-reported nor verified vaccination was significantly associated with non-cholera diarrhea (VE: 18% [95% CI: −208%–−78%] by self-report and −21% [95%CI: −238%–57%] for verified vaccination). Interpretation BivWC oral cholera vaccine was effective in protecting against cholera in Haiti during the study period –from 4 through 24 months after vaccination. Vaccination is an important component of epidemic cholera control efforts. Funding National Institutes of Health, Delivering Oral Vaccines Effectively project, Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School. PMID:25701994

  17. Three ADIPOR1 Polymorphisms and Cancer Risk: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jiaxiang; Jiang, Li; Wu, Changliang; Liu, Aiqun; Mao, Sufei; Ge, Lianying

    2015-01-01

    Studies have come to conflicting conclusions about whether polymorphisms in the adiponectin receptor 1 gene (ADIPOR1) are associated with cancer risk. To help resolve this question, we meta-analyzed case-control studies in the literature. PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, the Chinese Biological Medical Database and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure Database were systematically searched to identify all case-control studies published through February 2015 examining any ADIPOR1 polymorphisms and risk of any type of cancer. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. A total of 13 case-control studies involving 5,750 cases and 6,762 controls were analyzed. Analysis of the entire study population revealed a significant association between rs1342387(G/A) and overall cancer risk using a homozygous model (OR 0.82, 95%CI 0.72 to 0.94), heterozygous model (OR 0.84, 95%CI 0.76 to 0.93), dominant model (OR 0.85, 95%CI 0.75 to 0.97) and allele contrast model (OR 0.88, 95%CI 0.80 to 0.97). However, subgroup analysis showed that this association was significant only for Asians in the case of colorectal cancer. No significant associations were found between rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G) and cancer risk, either in analyses of the entire study population or in analyses of subgroups. Our meta-analysis suggests that the ADIPOR1 rs1342387(G/A) polymorphism, but not rs12733285(C/T) or rs7539542(C/G), may be associated with cancer risk, especially risk of colorectal cancer in Asians. Large, well-designed studies are needed to verify our findings.

  18. Lung cancer risk among bricklayers in a pooled analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Dario; De Matteis, Sara; Pesatori, Angela C; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Olsson, Ann C; Kromhout, Hans; Peters, Susan; Vermeulen, Roel C H; Pesch, Beate; Brüning, Thomas; Kendzia, Benjamin; Behrens, Thomas; Stücker, Isabelle; Guida, Florence; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Brüske, Irene; Landi, Maria Teresa; Caporaso, Neil E; Gustavsson, Per; Plato, Nils; Tse, Lap Ah; Yu, Ignatius Tak-Sun; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Ahrens, Wolfgang; Pohlabeln, Hermann; Merletti, Franco; Richiardi, Lorenzo; Simonato, Lorenzo; Forastiere, Francesco; Siemiatycki, Jack; Parent, Marie-Élise; Tardón, Adonina; Boffetta, Paolo; Zaridze, David; Chen, Ying; Field, John K; 't Mannetje, Andrea; Pearce, Neil; McLaughlin, John; Demers, Paul; Lissowska, Jolanta; Szeszenia-Dabrowska, Neonila; Bencko, Vladimir; Foretova, Lenka; Janout, Vladimir; Rudnai, Peter; Fabiánová, Eleonóra; Stanescu Dumitru, Rodica; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas; Schüz, Joachim; Straif, Kurt

    2015-01-15

    Bricklayers may be exposed to several lung carcinogens, including crystalline silica and asbestos. Previous studies that analyzed lung cancer risk among these workers had several study design limitations. We examined lung cancer risk among bricklayers within SYNERGY, a large international pooled analysis of case-control studies on lung cancer and the joint effects of occupational carcinogens. For men ever employed as bricklayers we estimated odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for study center, age, lifetime smoking history and employment in occupations with exposures to known or suspected lung carcinogens. Among 15,608 cases and 18,531 controls, there were 695 cases and 469 controls who had ever worked as bricklayers (OR: 1.47; 95% CI: 1.28-1.68). In studies using population controls the OR was 1.55 (95% CI: 1.32-1.81, 540/349 cases/controls), while it was 1.24 (95% CI: 0.93-1.64, 155/120 cases/controls) in hospital-based studies. There was a clear positive trend with length of employment (p < 0.001). The relative risk was higher for squamous (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.42-1.98, 309 cases) and small cell carcinomas (OR: 1.78, 95% CI: 1.44-2.20, 140 cases), than for adenocarcinoma (OR: 1.17, 95% CI: 0.95-1.43, 150 cases) (p-homogeneity: 0.0007). ORs were still elevated after additional adjustment for education and in analyses using blue collar workers as referents. This study provided robust evidence of increased lung cancer risk in bricklayers. Although non-causal explanations cannot be completely ruled out, the association is plausible in view of the potential for exposure to several carcinogens, notably crystalline silica and to a lesser extent asbestos. © 2014 UICC.

  19. Case-control study of risk factors for acute corneal hydrops in keratoconus.

    PubMed

    Barsam, Allon; Brennan, Nic; Petrushkin, Harry; Xing, Wen; Quartilho, Ana; Bunce, Catey; Foot, Barny; Cartwright, Nathaniel Knox; Haridas, Anjana; Agrawal, Pavi; Suleman, Hanif; Ahmad, Sajjad; MacDonald, Elisabeth; Johnston, Jennifer; Tuft, Stephen

    2017-04-01

    To determine risk factors for the development of acute corneal hydrops in keratoconus in the UK in a case-controlled study. Between November 2009 and December 2010, we prospectively identified 73 individuals who developed acute corneal hydrops. We then identified 174 controls from nine regions in the UK with keratoconus who had not had hydrops. For cases and controls we recorded demographics and clinical features. Univariate and multivariable logistic regressions were performed to identify risk factors. Univariate analysis suggested strong associations between the odds of hydrops and each of vernal keratoconjunctivitis (OR 4.08, 95% CI 1.45 to 11.49, p=0.008), asthma (OR 2.70, CI 1.34 to 5.47, p=0.006), atopic dermatitis (OR 3.13, CI 1.50 to 6.56, p=0.002), learning difficulties (OR 7.84, CI 2.86 to 21.46, p<0.001), previous hydrops (OR 40.2; CI 6.2 to ∞, p<0.001), black ethnicity (OR 2.98, CI 0.98 to 8.99; p=0.05), visual acuity in the worse eye (OR 8.76 CI 3.86 to 19.88; p<0.001) and minimum keratometry of ≥48 D prior to the hydrops (OR 4.91, CI 1.07 to 22.6, p=0.041). The use of a contact lens correction was also found to be associated with the odds of hydrops (OR 0.08; CI 0.03 to 0.19, p<0.001). Multiple variable regression indicated that having vernal keratoconjunctivitis (adjusted OR (AOR) 15, 95% CI 1.30 to 173.7; p=0.03), asthma (AOR 4.92, CI 1.22 to 19.78; p=0.025), visual acuity in worse eye (AOR 4.11, CI 1.18 to 14.32; p=0.026) and a high keratometry value (AOR 4.44, CI 0.85 to 23.18; p=0.077) were independently associated with the odds of hydrops in subjects with keratoconus. Some individuals with keratoconus are at high risk of developing acute corneal hydrops. These patients could be managed more aggressively to reduce their risk of developing this complication of their disease. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  20. The Impact of Trachomatous Trichiasis on Quality of Life: A Case Control Study.

    PubMed

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewudie, Zebideru; Gebeyehu, Wondimu; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L; Mabey, David C W; Rajak, Saul N; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A; Burton, Matthew J

    2015-11-01

    Trachomatous trichiasis is thought to have a profound effect on quality of life (QoL), however, there is little research in this area. We measured vision and health-related QoL in a case-control study in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. We recruited 1000 adult trichiasis cases and 200 trichiasis-free controls, matched to every fifth trichiasis case on age (+/- two years), sex and location. Vision-related quality of life (VRQoL) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were measured using the WHO/PBD-VF20 and WHOQOL-BREF questionnaires. Comparisons were made using linear regression adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic status. Trichiasis cases had substantially lower VRQoL than controls on all subscales (overall eyesight, visual symptom, general functioning and psychosocial, p<0.0001), even in the sub-group with normal vision (p<0.0001). Lower VRQoL scores in cases were associated with longer trichiasis duration, central corneal opacity, visual impairment and poor contrast sensitivity. Trichiasis cases had lower HRQoL in all domains (Physical-health, Psychological, Social, Environment, p<0.0001), lower overall QoL (mean, 34.5 v 64.6; p<0.0001) and overall health satisfaction (mean, 38.2 v 71.7; p<0.0001). This association persisted in a sub-group analysis of cases and controls with normal vision. Not having a marriage partner (p<0.0001), visual impairment (p = 0.0068), daily labouring (p<0.0001), presence of other health problems (p = 0.0018) and low self-rated wealth (p<0.0001) were independently associated with lower overall QoL scores in cases. Among cases, trichiasis caused 596 (59%) to feel embarrassed, 913 (91.3%) to worry they may lose their remaining eyesight and 681 (68.1%) to have sleep disturbance. Trachomatous trichiasis substantially reduces vision and health related QoL and is disabling, even without visual impairment. Prompt trichiasis intervention is needed both to prevent vision loss and to alleviate physical and psychological suffering, social

  1. The Impact of Trachomatous Trichiasis on Quality of Life: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Habtamu, Esmael; Wondie, Tariku; Aweke, Sintayehu; Tadesse, Zerihun; Zerihun, Mulat; Zewudie, Zebideru; Gebeyehu, Wondimu; Callahan, Kelly; Emerson, Paul M.; Kuper, Hannah; Bailey, Robin L.; Mabey, David C. W.; Rajak, Saul N.; Polack, Sarah; Weiss, Helen A.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Trachomatous trichiasis is thought to have a profound effect on quality of life (QoL), however, there is little research in this area. We measured vision and health-related QoL in a case-control study in Amhara Region, Ethiopia. Methodology/Principal Findings We recruited 1000 adult trichiasis cases and 200 trichiasis-free controls, matched to every fifth trichiasis case on age (+/- two years), sex and location. Vision-related quality of life (VRQoL) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were measured using the WHO/PBD-VF20 and WHOQOL-BREF questionnaires. Comparisons were made using linear regression adjusted for age, sex and socioeconomic status. Trichiasis cases had substantially lower VRQoL than controls on all subscales (overall eyesight, visual symptom, general functioning and psychosocial, p<0.0001), even in the sub-group with normal vision (p<0.0001). Lower VRQoL scores in cases were associated with longer trichiasis duration, central corneal opacity, visual impairment and poor contrast sensitivity. Trichiasis cases had lower HRQoL in all domains (Physical-health, Psychological, Social, Environment, p<0.0001), lower overall QoL (mean, 34.5 v 64.6; p<0.0001) and overall health satisfaction (mean, 38.2 v 71.7; p<0.0001). This association persisted in a sub-group analysis of cases and controls with normal vision. Not having a marriage partner (p<0.0001), visual impairment (p = 0.0068), daily labouring (p<0.0001), presence of other health problems (p = 0.0018) and low self-rated wealth (p<0.0001) were independently associated with lower overall QoL scores in cases. Among cases, trichiasis caused 596 (59%) to feel embarrassed, 913 (91.3%) to worry they may lose their remaining eyesight and 681 (68.1%) to have sleep disturbance. Conclusions/Significance Trachomatous trichiasis substantially reduces vision and health related QoL and is disabling, even without visual impairment. Prompt trichiasis intervention is needed both to prevent vision loss and

  2. Factors affecting occurrence of gastric varioliform lesions: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tian-Hui; Zheng, Ru-Hua; Gao, Qin-Yan; Kong, Xuan; Chen, Xiao-Yu; Ge, Zhi-Zheng; Chen, Ying-Xuan; Zou, Xiao-Ping; Fang, Jing-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the factors influencing the occurrence of gastric varioliform lesions (GVLs) and their possible link with gastric cancer. METHODS: A 1:1 matched case-control study was performed to retrospectively analyze data from 1638 chronic gastritis patients who had undergone gastroscopy at one of two Chinese hospitals between 2009 and 2014. Patients with GVLs (cases) were compared to those without such lesions (controls). Endoscopic and pathological findings were recorded, along with interview information on Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, medical, drug and family histories, lifestyle and eating habits. The association between each factor and the occurrence of GVLs was estimated, and then multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent factors. RESULTS: The frequency and severity of glandular atrophy, intestinal metaplasia (IM) and low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia were significantly increased in the GVL group (P < 0.01). Overall analysis showed that H. pylori infection [3.051 (2.157, 4.317), P <0.001], allergic respiratory diseases [3.636 (2.183, 6.055), P < 0.001], work-related stress [2.019 (1.568, 2.600), P < 0.001], irregular meals [2.300 (1.462, 3.619), P < 0.001], high intake of spicy food [1.754 (1.227, 2.507), P = 0.002] and high intake of fresh fruit [0.231 (0.101, 0.529), P = 0.001] were significantly correlated with the occurrence of GVLs (positively, except for the latter). Stratified analyses indicated that pickled food consumption in patients over 50 years old [7.224 (2.360, 22.115), P = 0.001] and excessive smoking in men [2.013 (1.282, 3.163), P = 0.002] were also positively correlated, and that, for antral GVLs, vegetable consumption [0.491 (0.311, 0.776), P = 0.002] was negatively correlated. CONCLUSION: Seven risk factors and two protective factors are determined for GVLs, which were found to be associated with premalignant abnormalities. PMID:27298565

  3. Effect of socio-cultural factors on spontaneous abortion in Burdur, Turkey: A population based case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Catak, Binali; Oner, Can; Sutlu, Sevinc; Kilinc, Selcuk

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the sociocultural factors that have effect on spontaneous abortion in Burdur, Turkey. Methods: Study was designed as case-control study. The case group consist of 257 women whose pregnancies ended with spontaneous abortion. The control group consisted of 514 women whose pregnancy continued since 22 weeks and more during the study. Chi-square, and backward LR logistic regression were utilized in analyses. Results: In multifactorial-analyses it was determined that four factors (educational status of women, employment status of women, exposure to physical violence and non-receipt of ANC) created independent risk on spontaneous abortions. Conclusions: Pregnant women with these risk factors should be followed up more frequently and in a more qualified way in primary and secondary and tertiary health institutions. PMID:27882032

  4. Non-hodgkin's lymphoma and work in agriculture: Results of a two case-control studies in Saskatchewan, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Karunanayake, Chandima P; Dosman, James A; Pahwa, Punam

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The objective was to examine the association between non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and farming-related activities, gender, pesticides exposure, and exposure to chemicals other than pesticides in Saskatchewan. Materials and Methods: Male and female study participants were taken from two separate case-control studies conducted in Saskatchewan province, Canada. A case was defined as any man or woman aged 19 years and older with a first diagnosis of NHL registered by the Saskatchewan Cancer Agency during the study period. Conditional logistic regression was used to fit the statistical models. Results: Farming exposure and exposure to pesticides-contaminated cloths were related to an increased risk of NHL. Exposure to pesticides was strongly associated with an increased risk of NHL, especially for men. Conclusion: For men, the incidence of NHL was associated with exposure to pesticides after adjusting for other independent predictors. PMID:24872670

  5. Case-control study of the risk factors for age related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chaine, G.; Hullo, A.; Sahel, J.; Soubrane, G.; Espinasse-Berrod, M.; Schutz, D.; Bourguignon, C.; Harpey, C.; Brault, Y.; Coste, M.; Moccatti, D.; Bourgeois, H.

    1998-01-01

    AIM—A case-control study was initiated to determine the risk factors for the development of age related macular degeneration (AMD).
METHODS—Study participants, who were all white, aged 50-85 years, and were recruited from private ophthalmology practices. Each practitioner enrolled patients with bilateral AMD, who were then matched with controls for sex and age. Environmental factors and systemic and ocular histories were screened. All patients had bilateral red-free fundus photographs and fluorescein angiography. Photographs were classified into pigment epithelium alterations, drusen, geographic atrophy, and exudative AMD. Statistical analysis included the identification of risk factors for AMD. A multivariate analysis was performed at the end of the study. Analysis included the entire study population and was carried out for each stage of AMD.
RESULTS—1844 controls were compared with 1844 patients with AMD. Mean age was 71 years for controls and 72 for cases. Logistic regression identified six major risk factors for AMD (whole population): arterial hypertension (odds ratio (OR) =1.28), coronary disease (OR=1.31), hyperopia (OR=1.33), light coloured irises (OR=1.22), and lens opacities or previous cataract surgery (OR=1.55). The significance of vascular risk factors was increased for late stages of AMD, especially the atrophic forms (coronary disease, OR=3.19).
CONCLUSIONS—This large case-control study confirms some of the risk factors previously identified and may contribute to the determination of methods for prevention of AMD.

 Keywords: age related macular degeneration; risk factors; case-control study PMID:9893587

  6. Study of environmental and genetic factors in children with craniosynostosis: A case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Barik, Mayadhar; Bajpai, Minu; Das, Rashmi Ranjan; Panda, Shasanka Shekhar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Craniosynostosis is a congenital defect that causes one or more sutures on an infant's skull to close earlier than normal. Though both genetic and environmental factors play a role in its pathogenesis, there is no published Indian data to verify this. Materials and Methods: In this case-control study, we investigated the association of craniosynostosis with parental age in 50 children with craniosynostosis attending the surgical outpatient department of a tertiary care institution in North India. Results: There was a significant association of craniosynostosis with advanced parental [OR 2.17 (95% CI 1.08 to 4.36)] but not maternal age. Education status of parents also revealed that those having a higher education had an increased risk of having a child with craniosynostosis [maternal education, OR 2.32 (95% CI 1.2 to 4.76); paternal education, OR 2.51 (95% CI 1.21 to 5.0)]. Molecular analysis by sequencing confirmed following amino-acid substitution in different Exons of the FGFR2 gene. Besides these, we found other novel identical mutations in FGFR2 gene in both syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostoses. Conclusion: This is the first epidemiological study in India that provides evidence that, advanced paternal age and higher parental education level might be associated with an increased risk of craniosynostosis. New mutations were identified in cases of both syndromic and non-syndromic craniosynostosis. PMID:24082921

  7. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs

  8. Risk factors for femicide-suicide in abusive relationships: results from a multisite case control study.

    PubMed

    Koziol-McLain, Jane; Webster, Daniel; McFarlane, Judith; Block, Carolyn Rebecca; Ulrich, Yvonne; Glass, Nancy; Campbell, Jacquelyn C

    2006-02-01

    The killing of women by men who then take their own lives (femicide-suicide) is the most common form of homicide-suicide. This study identified femicide-suicide risk factors in an 11-city case-control study of femicide in the United States. Perpetrator, victim, relationship, and incident characteristics were analyzed for femicide-suicide cases (n = 67) and controls (n = 356, women living in the community with nonfatal physical abuse) using logistic regression modeling. Two risk factors emerged that were unique to femicide-suicides cases compared to overall femicide risk analyses: prior perpetrator suicide threats and victims having ever been married to the perpetrator.

  9. Parental smoking and childhood asthma: longitudinal and case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Strachan, D.; Cook, D.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The relation of parental smoking to wheezing and asthma occurring after the first year of life was assessed by a systematic quantitative review of case-control and longitudinal studies, complementing earlier reviews of cross sectional surveys and wheezing in early childhood.
METHODS—Fifty one relevant publications were identified after consideration of 1593 abstracts selected by electronic search of the Embase and Medline databases using keywords relevant to passive smoking in children. The search was completed in April 1997 and identified six studies of asthma incidence, seven of prognosis, 22 case-control studies, and 10 case series addressing disease severity.
RESULTS—Maternal smoking was associated with an increased incidence of wheezing illness up to age 6 (pooled odds ratio 1.31, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.41), but less strongly thereafter (1.13, 95% CI 1.04to 1.22). The long term prognosis of early wheezing illness was better if the mother smoked. The pooled odds ratio for asthma prevalence from 14 case-control studies was 1.37 (95% CI 1.15to 1.64) if either parent smoked. Four studies suggest that parental smoking is more strongly associated with wheezing among non-atopic children. Indicators of disease severity including symptom scores, attack frequency, medication use, hospital attendance, and life threatening bronchospasm were in general positively related to household smoke exposure.
CONCLUSIONS—The excess incidence of wheezing in smoking households appears to be largely non-atopic "wheezy bronchitis" with a relatively benign prognosis, but among children with established asthma, parental smoking is associated with more severe disease. This apparent paradox may be reconciled if environmental tobacco smoke is considered a co-factor provoking wheezing attacks, rather than a cause of the underlying asthmatic tendency.

 PMID:9659358

  10. An alternative experimental case-control design for genetic association studies on bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Biffani, S; Del Corvo, M; Capoferri, R; Pedretti, A; Luini, M; Williams, J L; Pagnacco, G; Minvielle, F; Minozzi, G

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of using genetic control strategies to increase disease resistance to infectious diseases relies on the identification of markers to include in the breeding plans. Possible incomplete exposure of mastitis-free (control) animals, however, is a major issue to find relevant markers in genetic association studies for infectious diseases. Usually, designs based on elite dairy sires are used in association studies, but an epidemiological case-control strategy, based on cows repeatedly field-tested could be an alternative for disease traits. To test this hypothesis, genetic association results obtained in the present work from a cohort of Italian Holstein cows tested for mastitis over time were compared with those from a previous genome-wide scan on Italian Holstein sires genotyped with 50k single nucleotide polymorphisms for de-regressed estimated breeding values for somatic cell counts (SCCs) on Bos taurus autosome (BTA6) and BTA14. A total of 1121 cows were selected for the case-control approach (cases=550, controls=571), on a combination of herd level of SCC incidence and of within herd individual level of SCC. The association study was conducted on nine previously identified markers, six on BTA6 and four on BTA14, using the R statistical environment with the 'qtscore' function of the GenABEL package, on high/low adjusted linear score as a binomial trait. The results obtained in the cow cohort selected on epidemiological information were in agreement with those obtained from the previous sire genome-wide association study (GWAS). Six out of the nine markers showed significant association, four on BTA14 (rs109146371, rs109234250, rs109421300, rs109162116) and two on BTA6 (rs110527224 and rs42766480). Most importantly, using mastitis as a case study, the current work further validated the alternative use of historical field disease data in case-control designs for genetic analysis of infectious diseases in livestock.

  11. A population-based case-control study of radiofrequency exposure in relation to childhood neoplasm.

    PubMed

    Li, Chung-Yi; Liu, Chih-Ching; Chang, Ya-Hui; Chou, Li-Ping; Ko, Ming-Chung

    2012-10-01

    This population-based case-control study in Taiwan considered incident cases aged 15 years or less and admitted in 2003 to 2007 for all neoplasm (ICD-9-CM: 140-239) (n=2606), including 939 leukemia and 394 brain neoplasm cases. Controls were randomly selected, with a case/control ratio of 1:30 and matched on year of birth, from all non-neoplasm children insured in the same year when the index case was admitted. Annual summarized power (ASP, watt-year) was calculated for each of the 71,185 mobile phone base stations (MPBS) in service between 1998 and 2007. Then, the annual power density (APD, watt-year/km(2)) of each township (n=367) was computed as a ratio of the total ASP of all MPBS in a township to the area of that particular township. Exposure of each study subject to radio frequency (RF) was indicated by the averaged APD within 5 years prior to the neoplasm diagnosis (cases) or July 1st of the year when the index case was admitted (controls) in the township where the subject lived. Unconditional logistic regression model with generalized estimation equation was employed to calculate the covariate-adjusted odds ratio [AOR] of childhood neoplasm in relation to RF exposure. A higher than median averaged APD (approximately 168 WYs/km(2)) was significantly associated with an increased AOR for all neoplasms (1.13; 1.01 to 1.28), but not for leukemia (1.23; 0.99 to 1.52) or brain neoplasm (1.14, 0.83 to 1.55). This study noted a significantly increased risk of all neoplasms in children with higher-than-median RF exposure to MPBS. The slightly elevated risk was seen for leukemia and brain neoplasm, but was not statistically significant. These results may occur due to several methodological limitations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Efficacy and safety of Innoseal for air leak after pulmonary resection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Petrella, Francesco; Borri, Alessandro; Brambilla, Daniela; Calanca, Giorgio; Vezzani, Nicola; Colantoni, Antonio; Gasparetto, Adolfo; Spaggiari, Lorenzo

    2016-11-01

    Prolonged air leak is one of the most common complications after lung surgery and the cause of prolonged hospital stay frequently associated with major postoperative morbidity and thus responsible for even higher hospital costs. This case-control study was designed to test the sealing efficacy and safety of Enable-Innoseal TP4 in patients undergoing pulmonary resection for lung cancer. This was a case-control trial enrolling patients with primary or single site metastatic lung cancer scheduled for elective anatomic or nonanatomic pulmonary resection presenting intraoperative grade 1 or 2 air leak at water submersion test; the study group population was then matched 1:1 according to surgical procedure, male/female ratio, preoperative FEV1, and age. In the study population, 21 patients (70.0%) presented intraoperative grade 1 air leak and 9 patients grade 2 (30.0%) air leak; after comparison with the control group, we observed a significant shorter time for chest drain removal in the study population (P = 0.0050), whereas no difference was registered in terms of number of days needing for discharge (P = 0.0762). Enable-Innoseal TP4 was effective in treating limited intraoperative air leaks after pulmonary resection and preventing prolonged postoperative air leaks in patients receiving either anatomic or nonanatomic lung resections. Further randomized double-arm studies are required to confirm the efficacy of Enable-Innoseal TP4 demonstrated by this pilot study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gastric cancer and coal mine dust exposure. A case-control study

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.

    1983-10-01

    Based on evidence that coal miners have elevated gastric cancer mortality rates, a case-control study was developed to assess the gastric cancer risk of coal mine dust exposure. Forty-six cases of US white male gastric cancer deaths from NIOSH coal miner cohorts were individually matched by age to controls. From these data we show that a statistically elevated gastric cancer risk exists for miners who have prolonged exposure to coal mine dust and prolonged exposure to cigarette smoke. Coal workers' pneumoconiosis, a disease defined in terms of coal dust deposition in the lungs, was not found to be a gastric cancer risk.

  14. Consumption of dairy produce and alcohol in a case-control study of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lê, M G; Moulton, L H; Hill, C; Kramar, A

    1986-09-01

    In a French case-control study of 1,010 breast cancer cases and 1,950 controls with nonmalignant diseases, the risk of breast cancer was found to be positively associated with frequency of cheese consumption and the level of fat in the milk consumed. A negative association was found between frequency of yogurt consumption and the risk of breast cancer. No association was found between the consumption of butter and the risk of breast cancer. The positive association between a daily consumption of alcohol and the risk of breast cancer previously reported was not altered when dairy produce consumption was taken into account.

  15. [Recurrent myocardial infarctions: specific changes in biomarkers and in myocardial remodeling (case-control study)].

    PubMed

    Volkova, E G; Malykhina, O P; Levashov, S Iu

    2007-01-01

    Basing on a case-control study (n=81) with the use of standard methods of myocardial infarction verification, examination of hemogram, troponin T, C-reactive protein, echocardiography data it was established that markers of myocardial infarction (troponin T level) and inflammation (C reactive protein level, lymphopenia) during recurrent infarctions are less pronounced than during first infarctions. Remodeling in recurrent infarctions had the following specific characteristics: increase of left ventricular end diastolic dimension, myocardial mass index, diastolic dysfunction and stroke volume with unchanged ejection fraction.

  16. Preeclampsia and preterm delivery: A population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Davies, Emma L; Bell, Jacqueline S; Bhattacharya, Sohinee

    2016-11-01

    To determine the contribution of preeclampsia toward preterm birth in primiparous women. This large population-based case-control study used the Aberdeen Maternity and Neonatal Databank to analyze data on primiparous women with singleton pregnancies, who delivered between 1997 and 2012. A significant positive association was found between preeclampsia and preterm birth (adjusted odds ratio 4.43; 95% confidence interval 3.80-5.16). Magnitude of association varied according to the onset of delivery and year of delivery. Preeclampsia is an important contributor to preterm delivery in this setting and therefore a potentially useful condition to target in order to reduce preterm rates.

  17. Risk Factors for Contact Lens-Related Microbial Keratitis: A Case-Control Multicenter Study.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Arnaud; Meyer, Nicolas; Bourcier, Tristan

    2016-05-01

    The most feared complication of contact lens (CL) wear is microbial keratitis (MK), even though its incidence remains low. This study aimed to identify the risk factors of CL-related MK in a large, prospective, multicenter case-control study. A multicenter case-control study was designed. The CL-related MK subpopulation (Case) was compared with healthy CL wearers (Control) using a 52-item anonymous questionnaire designed to determine subject demographics and lens wear history. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to compare both groups. The study enrolled 499 cases and 508 controls. The risk factors associated with the greatest increased odds of CL-related MK were as follows: using disinfecting solution more than 3 months (odds ratio [OR]=1.94), cosmetic CL wear and use of multipurpose disinfection solution (1.37 each), overnight wear, and soft lens use (OR=1.24 each). The protective factors associated with the greatest reduction in OR were fitting by an ophthalmologist (OR=0.73) and hyperopia versus myopia (OR=0.75). The infectious determinants were linked to the type of lenses, hygiene routine, CL handling, disinfecting solution, and storage case. This study aimed to highlight the increasingly CL-related MK, which likely occurs because of lack of patient information regarding basic rules of hygiene and CL care and handling.

  18. Comparison of racial differences in childhood cancer risk in case-control studies and population-based cancer registries.

    PubMed

    Slusky, Danna A; Mezei, Gabor; Metayer, Catherine; Selvin, Steve; Von Behren, Julie; Buffler, Patricia A

    2012-02-01

    Although selection bias in case-control studies has been studied extensively, little is known about selection of cases and controls among various ethnic groups. This study compares racial differences in childhood cancer rates as estimated by case-control studies with various design features. It also compares estimates of racial distribution among cases as reported by case-control studies to those observed for an ideal case series with complete ascertainment of cases for these studies or in population-based cancer registries in corresponding geographic regions and calendar periods. Peer-reviewed publications on childhood leukemia and brain tumors from North America, published between 1980 and 2007, were reviewed. Incidence data by race/ethnicity were compiled from research publications, federal cancer statistics, and cancer registries. Meta-analysis was conducted to assess racial/ethnic differences by study characteristics. Racial distributions of cases from published case-control studies were compared to those of a presumably noncensored case distribution (i.e. include both participating and non-participating cases in a case-control study) or cases recorded by cancer registries. In interview-based case-control studies of childhood cancer, the proportion of Whites compared to non-Whites tended to be higher among controls than among cases; however, the opposite was true for record-based case-control studies. Additionally, the proportion of Whites tended to be higher among the participating cases in the published case-control studies compared to the proportion of Whites among the non-participating cases or in cancer registries. Investigators need to consider differential participation by racial group as a potential source of bias in the interpretation of case-control study results. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Results of case-control studies support the association between contact lens use and Acanthamoeba keratitis.

    PubMed

    Pacella, Elena; La Torre, Giuseppe; De Giusti, Maria; Brillante, Chiara; Lombardi, Anna Maria; Smaldone, Gianpaolo; Lenzi, Tommaso; Pacella, Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) is ever more frequently reported in industrialized countries. The loss of the corneal surface integrity consequent to secondary microtrauma produced by the use of contact lens (CL) favors the penetration of the parasite into the corneal tissue. A scientific review was performed to investigate the association of CL wear as an Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) risk factor. A computerized screening of 7834 Medline articles (4623 from PubMed; 3211 from Scopus) used a strict selection criteria of case-control studies involving CL wear and/or trauma. The search yielded five case-control studies published from 1995 to 2012. All studies included showed a statistically significant positive association between AK and CL use, with a combined odds ratio (OR) of 10.21 (95%, confidence intervals [CI]; 3.57-27.64). All studies included showed a statistically significant positive association between AK and CL use, though with differing OR values. Though rare, AK should be held in higher consideration when ophthalmologists are faced with CL users exhibiting simplex-like lesions associated with circular stromal infiltrates and disproportionate ocular pain in respect to the objective clinical picture.

  20. A Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Salivary Gland Cancer in Canada

    PubMed Central

    de Groh, Margaret; Morrison, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Aim. To assess the effect of various lifestyle risk factors on the risk of salivary gland cancer in Canada using data from a population-based case-control study. Methods. Data from a population-based case-control study of 132 incident cases of salivary gland cancer and 3076 population controls were collected through self-administered questionnaire and analysed using unconditional logistic regression. Results. Four or more servings/week of processed meat product was associated with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.62 (1.02–2.58). Nonsignificantly increased ORs were also related to obesity, >7 drinks/week of alcohol consumption, and occupational exposure to radiation. Furthermore, nonsignificantly decreased ORs were found to be associated with high education level (>12 years) (OR = 0.65), high consumption of spinach/squash (OR = 0.62) and all vegetables/vegetable juices (OR = 0.75), and >30 sessions/month of recreational physical activity (OR = 0.78). Conclusions. This study suggests positive associations with consumption of processed meat, smoking, obesity, alcohol drinking, and occupational exposure to radiation as well as negative associations with higher education, consumption of spinach/squash, and physical activity, which suggest a role of lifestyle factors in the etiology of salivary gland cancer. However, these findings were based on small number of cases and were nonsignificant. Further larger studies are warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:28133481

  1. [Relations between extraction of wisdom teeth and temporomandibular disorders: a case/control study].

    PubMed

    Duval, Florian; Leroux, Agathe; Bertaud, Valérie; Meary, Fleur; Le Padellec, Clément; Refuveille, Laura; Lemaire, Arnaud; Sorel, Olivier; Chauvel-Lebret, Dominique

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of extraction of third molars on the occurrence of temporo-mandibular disorders (TMD). A review of the literature and a case-control study have been conducted. The case-control study compares the frequency of extraction of third molars between the sample with TMD (case) and the sample without TMD (control). The proportion of patients who had undergone extractions of wisdom teeth was higher in the case group than in the control group. The difference was statistically significant when patients had undergone extraction of all four wisdom teeth or when the extraction of four wisdom teeth underwent in one sitting or under general anesthesia. The study of patients in case sample shows that all signs of TMD were more common in patients who had undergone extractions in several sessions and under local anesthesia. The temporomandibular joint sounds are significantly more frequent with local anesthesia. In the case group, 85 to 92% of patients have parafunctions and 5 to 11% have malocclusion. This demonstrates the multifactorial etiology of temporomandibular disorders.

  2. Diagnostic Microbiologic Methods in the GEMS-1 Case/Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Panchalingam, Sandra; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, Anowar; Mandomando, Inacio; Ochieng, Ben; Oundo, Joseph; Ramamurthy, T.; Tamboura, Boubou; Zaidi, Anita K. M.; Petri, William; Houpt, Eric; Murray, Patrick; Prado, Valeria; Vidal, Roberto; Steele, Duncan; Strockbine, Nancy; Sansonetti, Philippe; Glass, Roger I.; Robins-Browne, Roy M.; Tauschek, Marija; Svennerholm, Ann-Marie; Kotloff, Karen; Levine, Myron M.; Nataro, James P.

    2012-01-01

    To understand the etiology of moderate-to-severe diarrhea among children in high mortality areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, we performed a comprehensive case/control study of children aged <5 years at 7 sites. Each site employed an identical case/control study design and each utilized a uniform comprehensive set of microbiological assays to identify the likely bacterial, viral and protozoal etiologies. The selected assays effected a balanced consideration of cost, robustness and performance, and all assays were performed at the study sites. Identification of bacterial pathogens employed streamlined conventional bacteriologic biochemical and serological algorithms. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were identified by application of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for enterotoxigenic, enteroaggregative, and enteropathogenic E. coli. Rotavirus, adenovirus, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia enterica, and Cryptosporidium species were detected by commercially available enzyme immunoassays on stool samples. Samples positive for adenovirus were further evaluated for adenovirus serotypes 40 and 41. We developed a novel multiplex assay to detect norovirus (types 1 and 2), astrovirus, and sapovirus. The portfolio of diagnostic assays used in the GEMS study can be broadly applied in developing countries seeking robust cost-effective methods for enteric pathogen detection. PMID:23169941

  3. Rethinking sources of representative controls for the conduct of case-control studies in minority populations.

    PubMed

    Bandera, Elisa V; Chandran, Urmila; Zirpoli, Gary; McCann, Susan E; Ciupak, Gregory; Ambrosone, Christine B

    2013-05-31

    Recruitment of controls remains a challenge in case-control studies and particularly in studies involving minority populations. We compared characteristics of controls recruited through random digit dialing (RDD) to those of community controls enrolled through churches, health events and other outreach sources among women of African ancestry (AA) participating in the Women's Circle of Health Study, a case-control study of breast cancer. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were also computed using unconditional logistic regression to evaluate the impact of including the community controls for selected variables relevant to breast cancer and for which there were significant differences in distribution between the two control groups. Compared to community controls (n=347), RDD controls (n=207) had more years of education and higher income, lower body mass index, were more likely to have private insurance, and less likely to be single. While the percentage of nulliparous women in the two groups was similar, community controls tended to have more children, have their first child at a younger age, and were less likely to breastfeed their children. Dietary intake was similar in the two groups. Compared to census data, the combination of RDD and community controls seems to be more representative of the general population than RDD controls alone. Furthermore, the inclusion of the community group had little impact on the magnitude of risk estimates for most variables, while enhancing statistical power. Community-based recruitment was found to be an efficient and feasible method to recruit AA controls.

  4. Diagnostic microbiologic methods in the GEMS-1 case/control study.

    PubMed

    Panchalingam, Sandra; Antonio, Martin; Hossain, Anowar; Mandomando, Inacio; Ochieng, Ben; Oundo, Joseph; Ramamurthy, T; Tamboura, Boubou; Zaidi, Anita K M; Petri, William; Houpt, Eric; Murray, Patrick; Prado, Valeria; Vidal, Roberto; Steele, Duncan; Strockbine, Nancy; Sansonetti, Philippe; Glass, Roger I; Robins-Browne, Roy M; Tauschek, Marija; Svennerholm, Ann-Marie; Berkeley, Lynette Y; Kotloff, Karen; Levine, Myron M; Nataro, James P

    2012-12-01

    To understand the etiology of moderate-to-severe diarrhea among children in high mortality areas of sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, we performed a comprehensive case/control study of children aged <5 years at 7 sites. Each site employed an identical case/control study design and each utilized a uniform comprehensive set of microbiological assays to identify the likely bacterial, viral and protozoal etiologies. The selected assays effected a balanced consideration of cost, robustness and performance, and all assays were performed at the study sites. Identification of bacterial pathogens employed streamlined conventional bacteriologic biochemical and serological algorithms. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli were identified by application of a multiplex polymerase chain reaction assay for enterotoxigenic, enteroaggregative, and enteropathogenic E. coli. Rotavirus, adenovirus, Entamoeba histolytica, Giardia enterica, and Cryptosporidium species were detected by commercially available enzyme immunoassays on stool samples. Samples positive for adenovirus were further evaluated for adenovirus serotypes 40 and 41. We developed a novel multiplex assay to detect norovirus (types 1 and 2), astrovirus, and sapovirus. The portfolio of diagnostic assays used in the GEMS study can be broadly applied in developing countries seeking robust cost-effective methods for enteric pathogen detection.

  5. Bayesian sample size determination for case-control studies when exposure may be misclassified.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Lawrence; Bélisle, Patrick

    2013-12-01

    Odds ratios are frequently used for estimating the effect of an exposure on the probability of disease in case-control studies. In planning such studies, methods for sample size determination are required to ensure sufficient accuracy in estimating odds ratios once the data are collected. Often, the exposure used in epidemiologic studies is not perfectly ascertained. This can arise from recall bias, the use of a proxy exposure measurement, uncertain work exposure history, and laboratory or other errors. The resulting misclassification can have large impacts on the accuracy and precision of estimators, and specialized estimation techniques have been developed to adjust for these biases. However, much less work has been done to account for the anticipated decrease in the precision of estimators at the design stage. Here, we develop methods for sample size determination for odds ratios in the presence of exposure misclassification by using several interval-based Bayesian criteria. By using a series of prototypical examples, we compare sample size requirements after adjustment for misclassification with those required when this problem is ignored. We illustrate the methods by planning a case-control study of the effect of late introduction of peanut to the diet of children to the subsequent development of peanut allergy.

  6. Leptospira Exposure and Patients with Liver Diseases: A Case-Control Seroprevalence Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Sánchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Hernández-Tinoco, Jesús; Ramos-Nevárez, Agar; Margarita Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra; Alberto Guido-Arreola, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in patients suffering from liver disease has been poorly studied. Information about risk factors associated with infection in liver disease patients may help in the optimal planning of preventive measures. We sought to determine the association of Leptospira IgG seroprevalence and patients with liver diseases, and to determine the characteristics of the patients with Leptospira exposure. We performed a case-control study of 75 patients suffering from liver diseases and 150 age- and gender-matched control subjects. Diagnoses of liver disease included liver cirrhosis, steatosis, chronic hepatitis, acute hepatitis, and amoebic liver abscess. Sera of participants were analyzed for the presence of anti- Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 17 (22.7%) of 75 patients and in 15 (10.0%) of 150 control subjects (OR = 2.32; 95% CI: 1.09-4.94; P=0.03). This is the first age- and gender-matched case control study about Leptospira seroprevalence in patients with liver diseases. Results indicate that Leptospira infection is associated with chronic and acute liver diseases. Results warrants for additional studies on the role of Leptospira exposure in chronic liver disease. PMID:27493589

  7. A multicenter, matched case-control study of risk factors for equine laminitis.

    PubMed

    Alford, P; Geller, S; Richrdson, B; Slater, M; Honnas, C; Foreman, J; Robinson, J; Messer, M; Roberts, M; Goble, D; Hood, D; Chaffin, M

    2001-05-01

    Risk factors for equine laminitis were examined in a prospective case-control study of the 258 cases seen at six collaborating veterinary teaching hospitals over a 32-month period. Case-control pairs were matched on institution, clinician, and season of diagnosis. The 90% of case-control pairs (78 acute, 155 chronic) that had complete data for age, gender, and breed were used in separate conditional logistic-regression models for acute and chronic laminitis. There was an increase in risk for horses with acute laminitis from 5 to 7 years of age (OR 4.7, 95% CI 1.3-16) and from 13 to 31 years of age (OR 3.9, 95% CI 1.3-12) (both compared to <5 years); risk was increased for chronic laminitis from 10 to 14 years (OR 3, 95% CI 1.4-6.8) and from 15 to 38 years (OR 2.9, 95% CI 1.4-6.1) (both compared to <6 years). Mares - but not stallions - were more likely than geldings to develop acute laminitis (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1-6.2) and chronic laminitis (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.6). In the small acute-laminitis data set, the breed variable was collapsed into three categories: Thoroughbred (THB, reference), the Quarter Horse (QH), and other (non-QH-THB). The non-QH-THB group was at increased risk of acute laminitis (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.2-11.8). For the seven breed-group categories used in the chronic-laminitis model, however, all non-THB breed groups appeared significantly at risk as compared to the THB, with odds ratios ranging from 3.3 (95% CI 1.3-8.30) for the QH to 9.1 (95% CI 2.1-39.3) for ponies.

  8. A case-control study of gastric cancer and diet in Italy.

    PubMed

    Buiatti, E; Palli, D; Decarli, A; Amadori, D; Avellini, C; Bianchi, S; Biserni, R; Cipriani, F; Cocco, P; Giacosa, A

    1989-10-15

    A case-control study was conducted in high- and low-risk areas of Italy to evaluate reasons for the striking geographic variation in gastric cancer (GC) mortality within the country. Personal interviews with 1,016 histologically confirmed GC cases and 1,159 population controls of similar age and sex revealed that the patients were more often of lower social class and resident in rural areas and more frequently reported a familial history of gastric (but not other) cancer. After adjusting for these effects, case-control differences were found for several dietary variables, assessed by asking about the usual frequency of consumption of 146 food items and beverages. A significant trend of increasing GC risk was found with increasing consumption of traditional soups, meat, salted/dried fish and a combination of cold cuts and seasoned cheeses. The habit of adding salt and the preference for salty foods were associated with elevated GC risk, while more frequently storing foods in the refrigerator, the availability of a freezer and use of frozen foods lowered risk. Reduced GC risk were associated with increasing intake of raw vegetables, fresh fruit and citrus fruits. Lowered risk was also related to consumption of spices, olive oil and garlic. Neither cigarette smoking nor alcoholic beverage drinking were significantly related to GC risk. The case-control differences tended to be consistent across geographic areas, despite marked regional variations in intake levels of certain foods. The high-risk areas tended to show higher consumption of food associated with elevated risk (traditional soups, cold cuts) and lower consumption of foods associated with reduced risks (raw vegetables, citrus fruits, garlic). Our findings indicate that dietary factors contribute to the regional variation of stomach cancer occurrence in Italy, and offer clues for further etiologic and prevention research.

  9. Exposure to electromagnetic fields and suicide among electric utility workers: a nested case-control study

    PubMed Central

    van Wijngaarden, E.; Savitz, D.; Kleckner, R.; Cai, J.; Loomis, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—This nested case-control study examines mortality from suicide in relation to estimated exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in a cohort of 138 905 male electric utility workers.
METHODS—Case-control sampling included 536 deaths from suicide and 5348 eligible controls. Exposure was classified based on work in the most common jobs with increased exposure to magnetic fields and indices of cumulative exposure to magnetic fields based on a measurement survey.
RESULTS—Suicide mortality was increased relative to work in exposed jobs and with indices of exposure to magnetic fields. Increased odds ratios (ORs) were found for years of employment as an electrician (OR 2.18; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.25 to 3.80) or lineman (OR 1.59; 95% CI 1.18 to 2.14), whereas a decreased OR was found for power plant operators (OR 0.67; 95% CI 0.33 to 1.40). A dose response gradient with exposure to magnetic fields was found for exposure in the previous year, with a mortality OR of 1.70 (95% CI 1.00 to 2.90) in the highest exposure category. Stronger associations, with ORs in the range of 2.12-3.62, were found for men <50 years of age.
CONCLUSION—These data provide evidence for an association between occupational electromagnetic fields and suicide that warrants further evaluation. A plausible mechanism related to melatonin and depression provides a direction for additional laboratory research as well as epidemiological evaluation.


Keywords: electromagnetic fields; suicide; nested case-control PMID:10810112

  10. ATRIUM: testing untyped SNPs in case-control association studies with related individuals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zuoheng; McPeek, Mary Sara

    2009-11-01

    In genome-wide association studies, only a subset of all genomic variants are typed by current, high-throughput, SNP-genotyping platforms. However, many of the untyped variants can be well predicted from typed variants, with linkage disequilibrium (LD) information among typed and untyped variants available from an external reference panel such as HapMap. Incorporation of such external information can allow one to perform tests of association between untyped variants and phenotype, thereby making more efficient use of the available genotype data. When related individuals are included in case-control samples, the dependence among their genotypes must be properly addressed for valid association testing. In the context of testing untyped variants, an additional analytical challenge is that the dependence, across related individuals, of the partial information on untyped-SNP genotypes must also be assessed and incorporated into the analysis for valid inference. We address this challenge with ATRIUM, a method for case-control association testing with untyped SNPs, based on genome screen data in samples in which some individuals are related. ATRIUM uses LD information from an external reference panel to specify a one-degree-of-freedom test of association with an untyped SNP. It properly accounts for dependence in the partial information on untyped-SNP genotypes across related individuals. We demonstrate that ATRIUM is robust in that it maintains the nominal type I error rate even when the external reference panel is not well matched to the case-control sample. We apply the method to detect association between type 2 diabetes and variants on chromosome 10 in the Framingham SHARe data.

  11. Does coal mine dust present a risk for lung cancer. A case-control study of U. S. coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, R.G.; Amandus, H.; Attfield, M.; Green, F.Y.; Vallyathan, V.

    1983-11-01

    The relationship between the risk of lung cancer mortality and coal mine dust exposure under control by cigarette smoking status is evaluated. Two case-control studies based on 317 white male lung cancer mortality cases are presented. A one-to-one matched-case design allows examination of the risk of coal mine dust exposure and cigarette smoking. A two-to-one matched-case design was employed to examine the lung cancer risk of coal mine dust exposure independent of cigarette smoking. Based upon these data, no evidence of a coal mine dust exposure-lung cancer risk was found, although the expected increased risk for lung cancer in cigarette smokers was observed. There was no evidence of an interactive effect between cigarette smoking and coal mine dust exposure. (13 refs.)

  12. Fatty acid dietary intake and the risk of ischaemic stroke: a multicentre case-control study. UFA Study Group.

    PubMed

    Ricci, S; Celani, M G; Righetti, E; Caruso, A; De Medio, G; Trovarelli, G; Romoli, S; Stragliotto, E; Spizzichino, L

    1997-06-01

    A low dietary intake of unsaturated fatty acids has been found in male patients with stroke as compared with controls in Italy, and a high consumption of meat has been associated with an increased risk of stroke in Australia. We present a case-control study, comparing the unsaturated and saturated fatty acids content of red cell membranes (which reflects the dietary intake of saturated and unsaturated fats) in 89 patients with ischaemic stroke and 89 controls matched for age and sex. In univariate analysis, besides hypertension, atrial fibrillation, ischaemic changes in ECG and hypercholesterolaemia, stroke patients showed a lower level of oleic acid (P = 0.000), but a higher level of eicosatrienoic acid (P = 0.009). Conditional logistic regression (dependent variable; being a case) showed that the best model included atrial fibrillation, hypertension, oleic acid and eicosatrienoic acids. These results confirm a possible protective role of unsaturated fatty acids against vascular diseases; however, we did not find any difference in the content of omega3 acids, which have been considered in the past to protect against coronary heart disease. We conclude that the preceding diet of patients with ischaemic stroke may be poor in unsaturated fatty acids (namely, oleic acid), and this defect is independent of other vascular risk factors. Only further studies will show whether changes in diet and/or supplement of unsaturated fatty acids might reduce the incidence of ischaemic stroke.

  13. A low-level asbestos exposure case-control epidemiology study

    SciTech Connect

    Ocasio-Alvarex, A.

    1988-01-01

    The potential for low levels of airborne asbestos exposure in public schools and in public and commercial buildings in the United States has generated concern due to the large population at risk and the definite human carcinogenicity of asbestos at high levels. To assist in the clarification of the risk associated with low level asbestos exposure and in the decision-making in asbestos management in schools and in other buildings, a case-control study was conducted to estimate the risk relationship between low levels of asbestos exposure and pulmonary cancer among Indiana public school teachers. A total of 236 lung cancer cases and 154 controls to be used in this case-control study were identified from a previous proportionate mortality rate study which had examined over 8,000 teachers' death certificates. The controls were selected from teachers who died of chronic bronchitis, emphysema or a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The teachers' work history and their potential for asbestos exposure, as well as the reliability of the information obtained on the presence or absence of asbestos, was determined to calculate the odds ratio.

  14. Assessing risk factors of sporadic Campylobacter infection: a case-control study in Arizona.

    PubMed

    Pogreba-Brown, K; Baker, A; Ernst, K; Stewart, J; Harris, R B; Weiss, J

    2016-03-01

    Case-control studies of sporadic Campylobacter infections have predominately been conducted in non-Hispanic populations. In Arizona, rates of campylobacteriosis have been historically higher than the national average, with particularly high rates in Hispanics. In 2010, health departments and a state university collaborated to conduct a statewide case-control study to determine whether risk factors differ in an ethnically diverse region of the United States. Statistically significant risk factors in the final multivariate model were: eating cantaloupe [odds ratio (OR) 7·64], handling raw poultry (OR 4·88) and eating queso fresco (OR 7·11). In addition, compared to non-Hispanic/non-travellers, the highest risk group were Hispanic/non-travellers (OR 7·27), and Hispanic/travellers (OR 5·87, not significant). Results of this study suggest Hispanics have higher odds of disease, probably due to differential exposures. In addition to common risk factors, consumption of cantaloupe was identified as a significant risk factor. These results will inform public health officials of the varying risk factors for Campylobacter in this region.

  15. Anorexia nervosa versus bulimia nervosa: differences based on retrospective correlates in a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Machado, Bárbara C; Gonçalves, Sónia F; Martins, Carla; Brandão, Isabel; Roma-Torres, António; Hoek, Hans W; Machado, Paulo P

    2016-06-01

    This study is the result of two Portuguese case-control studies that examined the replication of retrospective correlates and preceding life events in anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN) development. This study aims to identify retrospective correlates that distinguish AN and BN METHOD: A case-control design was used to compare a group of women who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for AN (N = 98) and BN (N = 79) with healthy controls (N = 86) and with other psychiatric disorders (N = 68). Each control group was matched with AN patients regarding age and parental social categories. Risk factors were assessed by interviewing each person with the Oxford Risk Factor Interview. Compared to AN, women with BN reported significantly higher rates of paternal high expectations, excessive family importance placed on fitness/keeping in shape, and negative consequences due to adolescent overweight and adolescent objective overweight. Overweight during adolescence emerged as the most relevant retrospective correlate in the distinction between BN and AN participants. Family expectations and the importance placed on keeping in shape were also significant retrospective correlates in the BN group.

  16. Postmenopausal hormone therapy and ductal carcinoma in situ: A population-based case control study

    PubMed Central

    Calvocoressi, Lisa; Stowe, Meredith H.; Carter, Darryl; Claus, Elizabeth B.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim The relationship between hormone therapy (HT) and invasive breast cancer has been extensively investigated, but the relationship between HT and in situ breast cancer has received relatively little attention. We examined the relationship between HT and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) among postmenopausal women who participated in a population-based case control study in Connecticut, USA. Methods This analysis included 1,179 post-menopausal women (603 controls and 576 cases), who comprised a subset of a population-based case-control study that included all incident cases of breast carcinoma in situ (BCIS) in Connecticut and frequency-matched controls by 5-year age intervals. Results We found no association between DCIS and ever use of any HT (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.85, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.65-1.11); of estrogen alone (adjusted OR = 0.93; 95 % CI: 0.68-1.29) or of estrogen and progesterone (adjusted OR = 0.75; 95 % CI: 0.52-1.08). There was also no association between DCIS and current use of these hormones. In addition, estimated risk of DCIS did not increase with duration of use of these preparations. Conclusions These results add to a small literature that remains inconclusive. To determine whether HT poses risk of in situ breast cancer, larger studies with greater power and precise control of important covariates (e.g., mammography screening) are needed, as are meta-analyses of available data. PMID:22317899

  17. Control selection methods in recent case-control studies conducted as part of infectious disease outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Waldram, Alison; McKerr, Caoimhe; Gobin, Maya; Adak, Goutam; Stuart, James M; Cleary, Paul

    2015-06-01

    Successful investigation of national outbreaks of communicable disease relies on rapid identification of the source. Case-control methodologies are commonly used to achieve this. We assessed control selection methods used in recently published case-control studies for methodological and resource issues to determine if a standard approach could be identified. Neighbourhood controls were the most frequently used method in 53 studies of a range of different sizes, infections and settings. The most commonly used method of data collection was face to face interview. Control selection issues were identified in four areas: method of identification of controls, appropriateness of controls, ease of recruitment of controls, and resource requirements. Potential biases arising from the method of control selection were identified in half of the studies assessed. There is a need to develop new ways of selecting controls in a rapid, random and representative manner to improve the accuracy and timeliness of epidemiological investigations and maximise the effectiveness of public health interventions. Innovative methods such as prior recruitment of controls could improve timeliness and representativeness of control selection.

  18. Human papillomaviruses in colorectal cancers: A case-control study in western patients.

    PubMed

    Vuitton, Lucine; Jaillet, Carine; Jacquin, Elise; Monnien, Franck; Heberle, Marine; Mihai, Maria I; Lassabe, Catherine; Raffoul, Johnny; Puyraveau, Marc; Lakkis, Zaher; Lamfichekh, Najib; Picard, Alain; Prétet, Jean-Luc; Mougin, Christiane; Valmary-Degano, Séverine

    2017-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers. As in other cancer locations, the involvement of human papillomaviruses (HPV) has been suggested but remains highly debated with wide differences among reported prevalence of HPV infection in CRCs. To determine the actual prevalence of high risk HPV16 and 18 in a large case-control study. CRC specimens were used for analysis of both tumor and distant healthy tissue. As a non-malignant control group, samples from sigmoid diverticulosis resections were studied. Detection of HPV16 and HPV18 DNA was performed using a real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Ten percent of tumor samples were also randomly subjected to a complete HPV genotyping using the INNO-LiPA technique. 467 samples were analyzed: 217 tumor samples from 210 CRCs, 210 distant healthy tissue samples, and 40 sigmoid samples. HPV18 DNA was never amplified and HPV16 was amplified only three times in tumor tissues with viral loads under or at the limit of quantification. New extraction from the same tumor blocks for these samples revealed no HPV with qPCR and INNO-Lipa assays. With adequate procedures and reliable techniques, no HPV was detected in the largest case-control study so far, bringing more evidence on the absence of involvement of HPV in CRCs. Copyright © 2016 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A case-control study on risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Mansori, Kamyar; Soori, Hamid; Farnaghi, Fariba; Khodakarim, Sohila; Mansouri hanis, Shiva; Khodadost, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Poisoning is a major public health problem and is one of the most frequent causes of emergency hospital admissions. The aim of this study was to identify the main risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran, Iran and to suggest possible causes and preventative measures. Methods: In this case-control study (case, n=140; control, n=280), two controls were selected for every case. Controls were matched by age, sex, and date of hospital attendance. All children and their guardians were then interviewed by the same person using a standard questionnaire that covered the demographic, behavioral, and risk factors associated with accidental poisonings. Results: The most common type of poisoning was related to narcotics (58.6%); and among the narcotics, methadone was the most prevalent poisoning agent (74.7%). Multivariate conditional logistic regression model revealed that addiction in the family (OR=14.6; 95% CI:6.2-34.6), previous poisoning (OR=7; 95% CI:2.4- 20.2), maternal occupation (OR=4; 95% CI:1.3- 12.3), and inaccessibility of poisoning products (OR=0.03; 95% CI:0.01- 0.12) were the main risk factors in unintentional childhood poisoning. Conclusion: Addiction in the family as a risk factor and inaccessibility of poisoning products as a protecting factor were recognized to have the highest correlation with the unintentional child poisoning. These two factors were considered as priorities in health education programs. PMID:27453885

  20. Bronchodilator treatment and asthma death: a new analysis of a British case-control study.

    PubMed

    Butland, Barbara K; Anderson, H Ross; Cates, Christopher J

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the relationship between asthma mortality and long-acting beta(2)-agonists (LABA), including interactions with age, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and social deprivation. We used a new, expanded dataset of recorded medication extracted blind from the anonymised primary care records of an earlier British case-control study. The cases were 532 asthma deaths aged < 65 occurring between 1994 and 1998 and the controls were 532 asthma admissions, matched for age, hospital, and index date (date of death/asthma admission). The exposure periods prior to the index date were current (≤ 2 months) or recent ( > 2-6 months). We found no evidence of an overall association with current (OR = 0.89 [95% confidence interval 0.61-1.30]) or recent (1.08 [0.76-1.53]) mention of LABA, but there was some evidence of a positive interaction with age. Among controls with mention of LABA, a concurrent mention of ICS (within 1 month) was common (85% and 93% for the two respective periods) which limited our power to investigate any interaction between LABA and ICS. There was no coherent evidence of effect modification by social deprivation. In a population based case-control study where prescription of LABA without concomitant ICS was uncommon there was no evidence of an overall association between LABA and asthma death.

  1. Case-control study of vulvar vestibulitis risk associated with genital infections.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Elaine M; Ritchie, Justine M; Galask, Rudolph; Pugh, Erica E; Jia, Jian; Ricks-McGillan, Joan

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the risk of vulvar vestibulitis syndrome (VVS) associated with genital infections in a case-control study. METHODS: Diagnosed cases with VVS (n = 69) and age-frequency-matched healthy controls (n = 65) were enrolled from gynecology clinics in a university medical hospital during 1999. They were compared for potential risk factors and symptoms of disease. RESULTS: VVS cases had a significantly higher risk of physician-reported bacterial vaginosis (BV) (odds ratio, OR = 9.4), Candida albicans (OR = 5.7), pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) (OR = 11.2), trichomoniasis (OR = 20.6), and vulvar dysplasia (OR = l5.7) but no risk associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), ASCUS, cervical dysplasia, genital warts, chlamydia, genital herpes or gonorrhea. Genital symptoms reported significantly more often with VVS included vulvar burning (91 vs. 12%), dyspareunia (81 vs. 15%), vulvar itching (68 vs. 23%) and dysuria (54 vs. 19%) (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: A history of genital infections is associated with an increased risk of VVS. Long-term follow-up case-control studies are needed to elucidate etiologic mechanisms, methods for prevention and effective treatment. PMID:12648313

  2. A case-control study on risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran.

    PubMed

    Mansori, Kamyar; Soori, Hamid; Farnaghi, Fariba; Khodakarim, Sohila; Mansouri Hanis, Shiva; Khodadost, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Poisoning is a major public health problem and is one of the most frequent causes of emergency hospital admissions. The aim of this study was to identify the main risk factors for unintentional childhood poisoning in Tehran, Iran and to suggest possible causes and preventative measures. In this case-control study (case, n=140; control, n=280), two controls were selected for every case. Controls were matched by age, sex, and date of hospital attendance. All children and their guardians were then interviewed by the same person using a standard questionnaire that covered the demographic, behavioral, and risk factors associated with accidental poisonings. The most common type of poisoning was related to narcotics (58.6%); and among the narcotics, methadone was the most prevalent poisoning agent (74.7%). Multivariate conditional logistic regression model revealed that addiction in the family (OR=14.6; 95% CI:6.2-34.6), previous poisoning (OR=7; 95% CI:2.4- 20.2), maternal occupation (OR=4; 95% CI:1.3- 12.3), and inaccessibility of poisoning products (OR=0.03; 95% CI:0.01- 0.12) were the main risk factors in unintentional childhood poisoning. Addiction in the family as a risk factor and inaccessibility of poisoning products as a protecting factor were recognized to have the highest correlation with the unintentional child poisoning. These two factors were considered as priorities in health education programs.

  3. Multicenter case-control study on restless legs syndrome in multiple sclerosis: the REMS study.

    PubMed

    Manconi, Mauro; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Filippi, Massimo; Bonanni, Enrica; Iudice, Alfonso; Murri, Luigi; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Fratticci, Lara; Merlino, Giovanni; Terzano, Giovanni; Granella, Franco; Parrino, Liborio; Silvestri, Rosalia; Aricò, Irene; Dattola, Vincenzo; Russo, Giovanna; Luongo, Carmela; Cicolin, Alessandro; Tribolo, Antonella; Cavalla, Paola; Savarese, Mariantonietta; Trojano, Maria; Ottaviano, Salvatore; Cirignotta, Fabio; Simioni, Valentina; Salvi, Fabrizio; Mondino, Fiorella; Perla, Franco; Chinaglia, Giorgia; Zuliani, Cristina; Cesnik, Edward; Granieri, Enrico; Placidi, Fabio; Palmieri, Maria Giuseppina; Manni, Raffaele; Terzaghi, Michele; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Rocchi, Raffaele; Ulivelli, Monica; Bartalini, Sabina; Ferri, Raffaele; Lo Fermo, Salvatore; Ubiali, Emilio; Viscardi, Massimo; Rottoli, Mariarosa; Nobili, Lino; Protti, Alessandra; Ferrillo, Franco; Allena, Marta; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Guarnieri, Biancamaria; Londrillo, Francesco

    2008-07-01

    To verify the existence of a symptomatic form of restless legs syndrome (RLS) secondary to multiple sclerosis (MS) and to identify possible associated risk factors. Prospective, multicenter, case-control epidemiologic survey. Twenty sleep centers certified by the Italian Association of Sleep Medicine. Eight hundred and sixty-one patients affected by MS and 649 control subjects. N/A. Data regarding demographic and clinical factors, presence and severity of RLS, the results of hematologic tests, and visual analysis of cerebrospinal magnetic resonance imaging studies were collected. The prevalence of RLS was 19% in MS and 4.2% in control subjects, with a risk to be affected by RLS of 5.4 (95%confidence interval: 3.56-8.26) times greater for patients with MS than for control subjects. In patients with MS, the following risk factors for RLS were significant: older age; longer MS duration; the primary progressive MS form; higher global, pyramidal, and sensory disability; and the presence of leg jerks before sleep onset. Patients with MS and RLS more often had sleep complaints and a higher intake of hypnotic medications than patients with MS without RLS. RLS associated with MS was more severe than that of control subjects. RLS is significantly associated with MS, especially in patients with severe pyramidal and sensory disability. These results strengthen the idea that the inflammatory damage correlated with MS may induce a secondary form of RLS. As it does in idiopathic cases, RLS has a significant impact on sleep quality in patients with MS; therefore, it should be always searched for, particularly in the presence of insomnia unresponsive to treatment with common hypnotic drugs.

  4. Pilot age and geographic region of commuter and air taxi crashes: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies of major airline and general aviation crashes have identified a host of risk factors. We examined risk factors related to crashes involving commuter air carrier and air taxi flights. A matched case-control design was applied to assess the association of pilot age, total flight time, and geographic region with commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes (14 CFR Part 135) from 1983-2002 in the United States. A total of 2033 commuter air carrier or air taxi crashes from the National Transportation Safety Board aviation crash database were identified as eligible cases. Controls were randomly selected incidents from the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) aviation incident database coded under Part 135 operation. Relative to controls, commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes were less likely to occur in pilots under 30 yr of age (adjusted odds ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.54-0.88) after adjusting for geographic region and total flight time. With adjustment for pilot age and total flight time, the commuter air carrier and air taxi crashes with pilot error were nearly 13 times as likely to be in Alaska as their matched controls (adjusted odds ratio 12.84, 95% confidence interval 5.24-31.45). These results suggest that pilot age may be associated with risk of crash involvement in Part 135 operations. The excess crash risk in Alaska with or without pilot error underscores the importance of environmental hazards in flight safety.

  5. A case--control study of selenium in nails and prostate cancer risk in British men.

    PubMed

    Allen, N E; Morris, J S; Ngwenyama, R A; Key, T J

    2004-04-05

    In view of the experimental evidence suggesting that the micronutrient selenium reduces prostate cancer risk, we investigated the association between the selenium level in fingernails, a measure of long-term selenium intake, and prostate cancer risk in a case-control study among 656 British men, conducted in 1989-1992. Nail clippings were taken at the time of recruitment and selenium concentration, measured using neutron activation techniques, was successfully assayed for 300 case-control pairs and varied six-fold among the controls (0.59 p.p.m.; interquartile range, 0.50-0.71 p.p.m.). Nail selenium concentration was not significantly associated with prostate cancer risk: men in the highest quartile of nail selenium had a slightly increased risk compared with men in the lowest quartile (OR 1.24, 95 CI, 0.73-2.10); for advanced prostate cancer, men in the highest quartile had a slightly reduced risk compared with men in the lowest quartile (OR 0.78, 95% CI, 0.27-2.25). These results suggest that selenium is not strongly associated with prostate cancer risk in British men.

  6. Chernobyl-related thyroid cancer in children of Belarus: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Astakhova, L N; Anspaugh, L R; Beebe, G W; Bouville, A; Drozdovitch, V V; Garber, V; Gavrilin, Y I; Khrouch, V T; Kuvshinnikov, A V; Kuzmenkov, Y N; Minenko, V P; Moschik, K V; Nalivko, A S; Robbins, J; Shemiakina, E V; Shinkarev, S; Tochitskaya, S I; Waclawiw, M A

    1998-09-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant on April 26, 1986, released approximately 2 EBq of 131I and other radioiodine isotopes that heavily contaminated southern Belarus. An increase in thyroid cancer reported in 1992 and attributed to the Chernobyl accident was challenged as possibly the result of intensive screening. We began a case-control study to test the hypothesis that the Chernobyl accident caused the increase in thyroid cancer. Records of childhood thyroid cancer in the national therapy centers in Minsk in 1992 yielded 107 individuals with confirmed pathology diagnoses and available for interview. Pathways to diagnosis were (1) routine endocrinological screening in 63, (2) presentation with enlarged or nodular thyroid in 25 and (3) an incidental finding in 19. Two sets of controls were chosen, one matched on pathway to diagnosis, the other representing the area of heavy fallout, both matched on age, sex and rural/urban residence in 1986. The 131I dose to the thyroid was estimated from ground deposition of 137Cs, ground deposition of 131I, a data bank of 1986 thyroid radiation measurements, questionnaires and interviews. Highly significant differences were observed between cases and controls (both sets) with respect to dose. The differences persisted within pathway to diagnosis, gender, age and year of diagnosis, and level of iodine in the soil, and were most marked in the southern portion of the Gomel region. The case-control comparisons indicate a strong relationship between thyroid cancer and estimated radiation dose from the Chernobyl accident.

  7. Using sign score regression models to select variables in case-control studies.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, T W

    1995-02-28

    This paper evaluates the performance of four variable selection methods suitable for case-control studies. Two of the methods are logistic regression and the rank transformed version of it which uses the ranks of the explanatory variables in place of the original observations. The third method is based on Kendall's tau b correlations. I propose a fourth method, a sign score regression model to select variables. To evaluate these four methods, I generate many data sets for a case group and a control group with the use of several different distributions and covariance matrices. I evaluate the methods on their ability to select correctly the variables related to case-control status while not selecting the unrelated variables. Using this criterion, the sign score regression method and the tau b method are more effective than the other two methods with uncorrelated or weakly correlated variables. The sign score regression method is more effective than the tau b method for all simulations that use normal variables and for some that use log-normal variables. Overall, the sign score regression method is the most effective variable selection method for data sets that have low or moderate correlations between variables.

  8. Bicycle-riding circumstances and injuries in school-aged children. A case-control study.

    PubMed

    Senturia, Y D; Morehead, T; LeBailly, S; Horwitz, E; Kharasch, M; Fisher, J; Christoffel, K K

    1997-05-01

    To identify bicycle-riding circumstances associated with bicycle-related injury among school-aged children. Case-control. One metropolitan emergency department and 3 suburban emergency departments. Consecutive sample of children aged 7 through 18 years who experienced bicycle-related trauma and control children seen for non-bicycle-related trauma (matched for age within 1 year, sex, and area of residence [urban vs suburban]). Parents and case children were interviewed by telephone about the bicycle ride resulting in their visit to the emergency department. Parents and control children were interviewed about their most recent bicycle ride. The survey instrument addressed the following potential risk factors: helmet use, bicycle speed, road conditions, riding location, bicycle condition, an adult presence, riding destination, bicycle style, and stunt riding. Interviews were completed with 47 (73%) of 64 eligible case children and 42 (69%) of 61 control children with the following age distribution: 27 (30%) of the interviews were completed with children aged 7 to 9 years, 40 (45%) of the interviews were completed with children aged 10 to 14 years, and 22 (25%) of the interviews were completed with children aged 15 to 18 years. Fourteen children (16%) were wearing helmets. There was a high degree of agreement between parent and child responses, higher for case children than for control children. In univariate analyses, injury was associated with riding with other children (vs riding alone or with adults), riding fast or slow (vs normal speed), riding a BMX-style (motocross) bicycle (vs another standard or multispeed style bicycle), playing on the bicycle (vs going to school or other purposeful or nonpurposeful trip), and riding only on the sidewalk (vs in the street). More case children than control children were farther than 3/4 mile (> 1.2 km) from home (38% vs 19%, P = .05). Multiple logistic regression identified' slow riding speed (odds ratio, 10.3;95% confidence

  9. Zinc Intake and Risk of Prostate Cancer: Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dabbous, Firas; Ali, Mohamed M.; Batai, Ken; Shah, Ebony; Kittles, Rick A.

    2016-01-01

    Zinc is an essential dietary element that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prostate cancer, a cancer that disproportionately affects men of African descent. Studies assessing the association of zinc intake and prostate cancer have yielded inconsistent results. Furthermore, very little is known about the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer among African Americans. We examined the association between self-reported zinc intake and prostate cancer in a hospital-based case-control study of African Americans. We then compared our results with previous studies by performing a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence regarding the association between zinc and prostate cancer. Newly diagnosed African American men with histologically confirmed prostate cancer (n = 127) and controls (n = 81) were recruited from an urban academic urology clinic in Washington, DC. Controls had higher zinc intake, with a mean of 14 mg/day versus 11 mg/day for cases. We observed a non-significant, non-linear increase in prostate cancer when comparing tertiles of zinc intake (OR <6.5 vs 6.5–12.5mg/day 1.8, 95% CI: 0.6,5.6; OR <6.5 vs >12.5mg/day 1.3, 95% CI: 0.2,6.5). The pooled estimate from 17 studies (including 3 cohorts, 2 nested case-control, 11 case-control studies, and 1 randomized clinical trial, with a total of 111,199 participants and 11,689 cases of prostate cancer) was 1.07hi vs lo 95% CI: 0.98–1.16. Using a dose-response meta-analysis, we observed a non-linear trend in the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer (p for nonlinearity = 0.0022). This is the first study to examine the relationship between zinc intake in black men and risk of prostate cancer and systematically evaluate available epidemiologic evidence about the magnitude of the relationship between zinc intake and prostate cancer. Despite of the lower intake of zinc by prostate cancer patients, our meta-analysis indicated that there is no evidence for an association between zinc

  10. Evaluation of Feasibility for a Case-Control Study of Pituitary-Ovarian Function in Premenopausal Women with Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    feasibility of a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation tests to evaluate sensitivity of the hypothalamic...determine the safety and feasibility of conducting a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnHR) stimulation tests to evaluate...women. The full-scale study will determine if: 1) the anterior pituitary of pre-menopausal women with breast cancer secretes more luteinizing hormone (LH

  11. Healthy control subjects are poorly defined in case-control studies of irritable bowel syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ghorbani, Shireen; Nejad, Amir; Law, David; Chua, Kathleen S.; Amichai, Meridythe M.; Pimentel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Background Case-control studies are vital for understanding the pathophysiology of gastrointestinal disease. While the definition of disease is clear, the definition of healthy control is not. This is particularly relevant for functional bowel diseases such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, a systematic review formed the basis for a prospective study evaluating the effectiveness of commonly used techniques for defining healthy controls in IBS. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted to identify case-control studies involving functional gastrointestinal disorders. “Lack of Rome criteria”, self-description as “healthy” and the bowel disease questionnaire (BDQ) were common methods for identifying healthy controls. These 3 methods were then applied to a cohort of 53 non-patient subjects to determine their validity compared to objective outcome measures (7-day stool diary). Results “Lack of Rome criteria” and “healthy” self-description were the most common methods for identifying healthy control subjects, but many studies failed to describe the methods used. In the prospective study, more subjects were identified as non-healthy using the BDQ than using either lack of Rome criteria (P=0.01) or “healthy” self-description (P=0.026). Furthermore, stool diaries identified several subjects with abnormal stool form and/or frequency which were not identified using lack of Rome criteria or the “healthy” question. Comparisons revealed no agreement (κ) between the different methods for defining healthy controls. Conclusions The definitions of healthy controls in studies of functional bowel diseases such as IBS are inconsistent. Since functional symptoms are common, a strict definition of “normal” is needed in this area of research. PMID:25609236

  12. Association between Myocardial Infarction and Periodontitis: A Meta-Analysis of Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Shi, Quan; Zhang, Bin; Huo, Na; Cai, Chuan; Liu, Hongchen; Xu, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Many clinical researches have been carried out to investigate the relationship between myocardial infarction (MI) and periodontitis. Despite most of them indicated that the periodontitis may be associated with an increased risk of MI, the findings and study types of these studies have been inconsistent. The goal of this meta-analysis was to critically assess the strength of the association between MI and periodontitis in case-control studies. Methods: PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for eligible case-control studies reporting relevant parameters that compared periodontal status between MI and control subjects. The odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) from each study were pooled to estimate the strength of the association between MI and periodontitis. The mean differences and 95% CIs for periodontal-related parameters were calculated to determine their overall effects. Results: Seventeen studies including a total of 3456 MI patients and 3875 non-MI control subjects were included. The pooled OR for the association between MI and periodontitis was 2.531 (95% CI: 1.927-3.324). The mean differences (95% CIs) for clinical attachment loss, probing depth, bleeding on probing, plaque index, and the number of missing teeth were 1.000 (0.726-1.247), 1.209 (0.538-1.880), 0.342 (0.129-0.555), 0.383 (0.205-0.560), and 4.122 (2.012-6.232), respectively. Conclusion: With the current evidence, the results support the presence of a significant association between MI and periodontitis. Moreover, MI patients had worse periodontal and oral hygiene status and fewer teeth than did control subjects. More high-quality and well-designed studies focusing on the casual relationship between MI and periodontitis should be conducted in the future.

  13. Culture, risk factors and suicide in rural China: a psychological autopsy case control study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J.; Conwell, Y.; Zhou, L.; Jiang, C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Previous research on sociocultural factors for Chinese suicide have been basically limited to single case studies or qualitative research with ethnographic methodology. The current study examines the major risk factors and some cultural uniqueness related to Chinese rural suicide using a quantitative design. Method This is a case control study with 66 completed suicides and 66 living controls obtained from psychological autopsy interviews in rural China. Results Both bivariate analyses and the multiple regression model have found that the Chinese rural suicide patterns are basically similar to those in most other cultures in the world: strong predictors of rural Chinese suicide are the psychopathological, psychological, and physical health variables, followed by social support and negative and stressful life events. Other significant correlates include lower education, poverty, religion, and family disputes. Conclusion Culture has an important impact on suicide patterns in a society. PMID:15521827

  14. Opioid system genes in alcoholism: a case-control study in Croatian population.

    PubMed

    Cupic, B; Stefulj, J; Zapletal, E; Matosic, A; Bordukalo-Niksic, T; Cicin-Sain, L; Gabrilovac, J

    2013-10-01

    Due to their involvement in dependence pathways, opioid system genes represent strong candidates for association studies investigating alcoholism. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphisms within the genes for mu (OPRM1) and kappa (OPRK1) opioid receptors and precursors of their ligands - proopiomelanocortin (POMC), coding for beta-endorphin and prodynorphin (PDYN) coding for dynorphins, were analyzed in a case-control study that included 354 male alcohol-dependent and 357 male control subjects from Croatian population. Analysis of allele and genotype frequencies of the selected polymorphisms of the genes OPRM1/POMC and OPRK1/PDYN revealed no differences between the tested groups. The same was true when alcohol-dependent persons were subdivided according to the Cloninger's criteria into type-1 and type-2 groups, known to differ in the extent of genetic control. Thus, the data obtained suggest no association of the selected polymorphisms of the genes OPRM1/POMC and OPRK1/PDYN with alcoholism in Croatian population.

  15. Adherence to Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment in Opioid Dependence Syndrome: A Case Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bandawar, Mrunal; Kandasamy, Arun; Chand, Prabhat; Murthy, Pratima; Benegal, Vivek

    2015-01-01

    Background: Opioid Use disorders are emerging as a serious public health concern in India. Opioid substitution treatment is one of the emerging forms of treatment in this population which needs more evidence to increase its availability and address prejudices towards the same. Materials and Methods: This is a case control study with retrospective design reviewing the charts of patients with opioid dependence syndrome registered between January 2005 to December 2012. Adherence to treatment was the outcome variable assessed in this study. Results: The odds of the Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment (BMT) group remaining in treatment is 4.5 (P < 0.005) times more than Naltrexone Maintenance Treatment (NMT) group and 7 times (P < 0.001) more than Psychosocial intervention (PST) alone group. Discussion: We believe that these study findings will help in reducing the prejudice towards BMT and encourage further research in this field. Conclusion: BMT has a better adherence rate than other treatments in opioid use disorders. PMID:26664083

  16. High reprint orders in medical journals and pharmaceutical industry funding: case-control study.

    PubMed

    Handel, Adam E; Patel, Sunil V; Pakpoor, Julia; Ebers, George C; Goldacre, Ben; Ramagopalan, Sreeram V

    2012-06-28

    To assess the extent to which funding and study design are associated with high reprint orders. Case-control study. Top articles by size of reprint orders in seven journals, 2002-09. Lancet, Lancet Neurology, Lancet Oncology (Lancet Group), BMJ, Gut, Heart, and Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry (BMJ Group) matched to contemporaneous articles not in the list of high reprint orders. Funding and design of randomised controlled trials or other study designs. Median reprint orders for the seven journals ranged from 3000 to 126,350. Papers with high reprint orders were more likely to be funded by the pharmaceutical industry than were control papers (industry funding versus other or none: odds ratio 8.64, 95% confidence interval 5.09 to 14.68, and mixed funding versus other or none: 3.72, 2.43 to 5.70). Funding by the pharmaceutical industry is associated with high numbers of reprint orders.

  17. Occupation and risk of pancreatic cancer: a population-based case-control study in iowa.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yawei; Cantor, Kenneth P; Lynch, Charles F; Zhu, Yong; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2005-04-01

    Previous epidemiological studies have inconsistently linked various occupations and industries to pancreatic cancer risk. We analyzed data from a population-based case-control study conducted in Iowa involving 376 histologically confirmed incident pancreatic cancer cases and 2434 control subjects. A significantly increased risk was observed among men who worked in the following industries: chemical and allied products, transportation, and elementary and secondary schools. Increased risks also were observed in men who were employed as truck drivers; railroad brake, signal, and switch operators; purchasing agents and buyers; teachers; insurance agents; and retail supervisors. Among women, a significantly increased risk of pancreatic cancer was found for employment in furniture and home furnishing stores, and a borderline significantly increased risk among textile sewing machine operators and tenders. Working in several occupations and industries was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in this study, and these associations warrant further investigation.

  18. Case-control studies of sporadic cryptosporidiosis in Melbourne and Adelaide, Australia.

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, B.; Sinclair, M. I.; Forbes, A. B.; Veitch, M.; Kirk, M.; Cunliffe, D.; Willis, J.; Fairley, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    Few studies have assessed risk factors for sporadic cryptosporidiosis in industrialized countries, even though it may be numerically more common than outbreaks of disease. We carried out case-control studies assessing risk factors for sporadic disease in Melbourne and Adelaide, which have water supplies from different ends of the raw water spectrum. In addition to examining drinking water, we assessed several other exposures. 201 cases and 795 controls were recruited for Melbourne and 134 cases and 536 controls were recruited for Adelaide. Risk factors were similar for the two cities, with swimming in public pools and contact with a person with diarrhoea being most important. The consumption of plain tap water was not found to be associated with disease. This study emphasizes the need for regular public health messages to the public and swimming pool managers in an attempt to prevent sporadic cryptosporidiosis, as well as outbreaks of disease. PMID:12113486

  19. National case-control study of homicide offending and methamphetamine use.

    PubMed

    Stretesky, Paul B

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between methamphetamine use and homicide. To carry out this study, data from the National Household Survey on Drug Abuse and Survey of Inmates in State and Federal Correctional Facilities were combined to create a case-control design. The main exposure measure is methamphetamine use and the main outcome measure is homicide. Results suggest that the odds of committing a homicide are nearly 9 times greater for an individual who uses methamphetamine. More importantly, the association between methamphetamine use and homicide persists even after adjusting for alternative drug use (i.e., alcohol, heroin, crack, cocaine, PCP, LSD), sex, race, income, age, marital status, previous arrests, military experience, and education level. Methamphetamine was the only drug use variable that was strongly correlated with homicide. These results support recent clinical studies that suggest methamphetamine use is different than other drug use in its effects on violence.

  20. On Combining Family–based and Population-based Case-control Data in Association Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yingye; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Hsu, Li; Newcomb, Polly A

    2011-01-01

    Summary Combining data collected from different sources can potentially enhance statistical efficiency in estimating effects of environmental or genetic factors or gene-environment interactions. However, combining data across studies becomes complicated when data are collected under different study designs, such as family-based and unrelated individual-based case-control design. In this paper, we describe likelihood based approaches that permit the joint estimation of covariate effects on disease risk under study designs that include cases, relatives of cases, and unrelated individuals. Our methods accommodate familial residual correlation and a variety of ascertainment schemes. Extensive simulation experiments demonstrate that the proposed methods for estimation and inference perform well in realistic settings. Efficiencies of different designs are contrasted in the simulation. We applied the methods to data from the Colorectal Cancer Family Registry. PMID:20163402

  1. A case-control study of Nocardia mastitis in Nova Scotia dairy herds

    PubMed Central

    Ferns, Lyn; Dohoo, Ian; Donald, Alan

    1991-01-01

    A case-control study was conducted to identify herd production, housing, and hygienic and therapeutic factors associated with a diagnosis of Nocardia mastitis in dairy herds in Nova Scotia. The data were collected by on-farm interviews with owners of 54 case and 54 control herds. Logistic regression was used to study risk factors. The use of dry cow products containing neomycin, including two specific dry cow products, was strongly associated with a diagnosis of Nocardia mastitis in a herd. Other factors which increased the risk of Nocardia mastitis were higher levels of production, larger herd size, and a large percentage of cows treated with dry cow products. These results are compared to results from a similar study carried out in Ontario. PMID:17423896

  2. Evaluation of an Association of Blood Homocysteine Levels With Gastric Cancer Risk From 27 Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Cheng, Yuelei; Zhu, Huirong

    2016-05-01

    High blood homocysteine levels may risk gastric cancer. However, observational studies have been plagued by chance, bias, confounding, or reverse causality. In this study, we assessed the relationship between blood homocysteine levels and gastric cancer by using a Mendelian randomization method, which is independent of nongenetic confounding.We took 2 steps to perform Mendelian randomization analysis. First, we evaluated the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T association with gastric cancer by a meta-analysis of case-control studies including 7566 patients with gastric cancer and 10 640 control subjects from 27 Case-Control studies. Second, MTHFR C677T polymorphism, which affects the blood homocysteine levels, was used as an instrumental variable to calculate the risk and estimate the association of gastric cancer with this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). We obtained an estimate to the association of blood total homocysteine levels with this SNP from a meta-analysis of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), which comprises a total of 44 147 individuals.In our Mendelian randomization analysis, we demonstrated a significant effect of the blood homocysteine levels on gastric cancer risk, representing an OR of 2.56 (95% CI = 2.41-2.72; P = 5.0×10) for gastric cancer per 1-SD increase in the natural log-transformed blood total homocysteine levels.We proved that there is a causal relationship between blood total homocysteine and risk of gastric cancer, and this study will add insight into the treatment and pathology research of gastric cancer.

  3. [Case-control study of risk factors associated with constipation. The FREI Study].

    PubMed

    Comas Vives, A; Polanco Allué, I

    2005-04-01

    Children represent one of the patient groups most affected by constipation. Our objective was to identify and describe the risk factors associated with childhood constipation. The study had a case-control, retrospective, open and multicenter design. Clinical data on possible risk factors were collected through an ad-hoc questionnaire. Two groups were studied: children with and without constipation. Nine hundred twenty-one children were recruited; of these, 898 (97.6%) were included in the statistical analysis. There were 408 (45.4%) children in the constipated group and 490 (54.5%) in the non-constipated group. Most of the children with constipation (53.6%) had a maternal history of constipation compared with 21.4% of children without constipation (p < 0.05). More than half (53.2%) of the constipated children reported a lack of regularity in their toilet habits while 64.9 % of the children without constipation went to the toilet regularly. Toilet training started slightly earlier (at 3 years) in children without constipation (93.2%) than in those with the disorder (83.8%) (p < 0.05). At school, 57.4% of the children with constipation never used the toilet compared with 26.8% of those without constipation (p < 0.05). A total of 73.4% of children with constipation drank less than four glasses of water per day compared with 47.1% of those without constipation (p < 0.05). Consumption of vegetables and legumes in the diet was significantly lower in children with constipation than in those without (p < 0.05). The risk factors linked to childhood constipation found in this study were a familial history of constipation, irregular toilet habits, low dietary fiber contents and no fruit intake. The main preventive factors against constipation were water and vegetable consumption and training on the use of the toilet at school. Daily toilet training and dietary changes are needed to prevent constipation among children and to achieve regular defecation. This preventive

  4. Serum Taurine and Stroke Risk in Women: A Prospective, Nested Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fen; Koenig, Karen L.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Jonas, Saran; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Wójcik, Oktawia P.; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Background Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a conditionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid, is mainly obtained from diet in humans. Experimental studies have shown that taurine’s main biological actions include bile salt conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. Methods We conducted a prospective case-control study nested in the New York University Women’s Health Study, a cohort study involving 14,274 women enrolled since 1985. Taurine was measured in pre-diagnostic serum samples of 241 stroke cases and 479 matched controls. Results There was no statistically significant association between serum taurine and stroke risk in the overall study population. The adjusted ORs for stroke were 1.0 (reference), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.59–1.28), and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.69–1.54) in increasing tertiles of taurine (64.3–126.6, 126.7–152.9, and 153.0–308.5 nmol/mL, respectively). A significant inverse association between serum taurine and stroke risk was observed among never smokers, with an adjusted OR of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.37–1.18) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.26–0.94) for the second and third tertile, respectively (p for trend = 0.01), but not among past or current smokers (p for interaction < 0.01). Conclusions We observed no overall association between serum taurine and stroke risk, although a protective effect was observed in never smokers, which requires further investigation. Taurine, Stroke, Epidemiology, Prospective, Case-control study, NYUWHS. PMID:26866594

  5. Serum Taurine and Stroke Risk in Women: A Prospective, Nested Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fen; Koenig, Karen L; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne; Jonas, Saran; Afanasyeva, Yelena; Wójcik, Oktawia P; Costa, Max; Chen, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid), a conditionally essential sulfur-containing amino acid, is mainly obtained from diet in humans. Experimental studies have shown that taurine's main biological actions include bile salt conjugation, blood pressure regulation, anti-oxidation, and anti-inflammation. We conducted a prospective case-control study nested in the New York University Women's Health Study, a cohort study involving 14,274 women enrolled since 1985. Taurine was measured in pre-diagnostic serum samples of 241 stroke cases and 479 matched controls. There was no statistically significant association between serum taurine and stroke risk in the overall study population. The adjusted ORs for stroke were 1.0 (reference), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.59-1.28), and 1.03 (95% CI, 0.69-1.54) in increasing tertiles of taurine (64.3-126.6, 126.7-152.9, and 153.0-308.5 nmol/mL, respectively). A significant inverse association between serum taurine and stroke risk was observed among never smokers, with an adjusted OR of 0.66 (95% CI, 0.37-1.18) and 0.50 (95% CI, 0.26-0.94) for the second and third tertile, respectively (p for trend = 0.01), but not among past or current smokers (p for interaction < 0.01). We observed no overall association between serum taurine and stroke risk, although a protective effect was observed in never smokers, which requires further investigation. Taurine, Stroke, Epidemiology, Prospective, Case-control study, NYUWHS.

  6. Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jie-Mei; Ao, Yuan-Yun; Liu, Na; Li, Li-Li; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis.

  7. Salivirus in Children and Its Association with Childhood Acute Gastroenteritis: A Paired Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jie-mei; Ao, Yuan-yun; Liu, Na; Li, Li-li; Duan, Zhao-jun

    2015-01-01

    Salivirus was recently discovered in children with gastroenteritis and in sewage. Though a causative role for salivirus in childhood gastroenteritis was suggested in the previous study, the relationship between salivirus and acute gastroenteritis has not yet been clearly clarified. The sewage strain reported by Ng, although represented by incomplete genome sequencing data, was distinct from previously reported saliviruses, and had not previously been detected in humans. A case-control study examining 461 paired stool samples from children with diarrhea and healthy controls (1:1) was conducted in this study. Also, common diarrheal viruses were detected and complete genome of a salivirus was determined. Results showed that salivirus was detected in 16 (3.5%) and 13 (2.8%) of the case and control samples, respectively; no differences in detection rates (p=0.571) or mean values of viral loads (p=0.400) were observed between the groups. Multivariate Cox regression revealed no association between salivirus and gastroenteritis (p=0.774). The data also demonstrated that salivirus infection did not exacerbate clinical symptoms of gastroenteritis in children. Furthermore, complete genome sequence of a salivirus recovered from the feces of a child with diarrhea (i.e., SaliV-FHB) shared a 99% nucleotide identity with the sewage strain. In conclusion, a paired case-control study did not support a causative role for salivirus strains detected in this study with pediatric gastroenteritis. This study also demonstrated that all known saliviruses can be detected in the feces of children with or without gastroenteritis. PMID:26193371

  8. Influence of social factors on avoidable mortality: a hospital-based case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Daniel; Alfonso, José Luis; Corella, Dolores; Saiz, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effect of socioeconomic factors on avoidable mortality at an individual level is not well known, since most studies showing this association are based on aggregate data. The purpose of this study was to determine socioeconomic differences between those patients who die of avoidable causes and those who do not die. METHODS: A matched case-control study was carried out regarding in-hospital avoidable mortality (Holland's medical care indicators) that occurred in a university hospital serving a Spanish-Mediterranean population during a 30-month period. RESULTS: We studied 82 cases of death from avoidable causes and 300 controls matched on medical care indicators and age. The variables that showed a statistically significant association with in-hospital avoidable mortality were number of diagnoses (the greater the number, the higher the risk), length of stay (patients staying seven or more days presented a lower risk), and education. Those patients with low and middle educational levels showed a greater risk of avoidable mortality (adjusted odds ratio=3.57 and 2.82, respectively) than those patients with higher levels of education. CONCLUSIONS: Consistent with the findings of studies based on aggregate data, our case-control analyses indicated that among several socioeconomic variables studied, educational level was significantly associated with the risk of in-hospital avoidable mortality, regardless of age and medical care indicators. Patients with low levels of education (<6 years of schooling) were at highest risk for in-hospital avoidable mortality, followed by those with middle levels of education (7-10 years of schooling). PMID:15736332

  9. A cohort mortality and nested case-control study of French and Austrian talc workers

    PubMed Central

    Wild, P; Leodolter, K; Refregier, M; Schmidt, H; Zidek, T; Haidinger, G

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To study whether the mortality from non-malignant and malignant respiratory diseases of workers employed in French and Austrian talc mines and mills is related to their long term occupational exposure. Methods: Two historical cohorts were set up comprising all male subjects who had been working continuously for at least 1 year in a series of talc producing companies in France and Austria. The French cohort consisted of those employed at a site in the French Pyrenees and working between 1 January 1945 and 31 December 1994. The Austrian cohort consisted of the workers employed between 1 January 1972 and 31 December 1995 in one of four industrial sites in the Austrian Alps. The mortality within the cohorts was compared with local death rates. Two nested case-control studies focusing on non-malignant and malignant respiratory diseases were set up to estimate possible dose-response relations with cumulative exposure to talc dust based on an industry specific job exposure matrix. Results: Mortality from lung cancer was in small excess in both cohorts (France, standardised mortality ratio (SMR) 1.23, 21 cases observed, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.76 to 1.89; Austria, SMR 1.06, seven observed, 95% CI 0.43 to 2.19). A non-significant excess mortality was found for all non-malignant respiratory diseases in the French cohort due to a significant excess for pneumoconiosis (SMR 5.56, three observed, 95% CI 1.12 to 16.2). The case-control study of non-malignant respiratory disease showed an increased mortality in the highest exposure groups (odds ratio (OR) 2.5 for a cumulative exposure ≥800 y.mg/m3) with a significant trend (OR/100 y.mg/m3 1.08) with cumulative exposure to talc. On the contrary, no increasing trend could be found in the case-control study of lung cancer. This result must be interpreted considering the small cohort size. Adjustment on smoking and exposure to quartz did not influence these results to any extent. Conclusions: The mortality

  10. Coffee consumption and risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Galeone, Carlotta; Turati, Federica; La Vecchia, Carlo; Tavani, Alessandra

    2010-11-01

    A meta-analysis of case-control studies on coffee consumption and colorectal cancer risk was conducted. Twenty-four eligible studies published before May 2010 were identified, including a total of 14,846 cases of colorectal, colon or rectal cancer. Compared to non/occasional drinkers, the odds ratios (OR) for drinkers were 0.83 (95% CI 0.73-0.95) for colorectal, 0.93 (95% CI 0.81-1.07) for colon and 0.98 (95% CI 0.85-1.13) for rectal cancer, with significant heterogeneity among studies; the corresponding ORs for the increment of 1 cup/day were 0.94 (95% CI 0.91-0.98), 0.95 (95% CI 0.92-0.98), and 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-0.99). For the highest coffee drinkers, the ORs were 0.70 (95% CI 0.60-0.81) for colorectal cancer, 0.75 (95% CI 0.64-0.88) for colon cancer and 0.87 (95% CI 0.75-1.00) for rectal cancer, when compared to non/low drinkers. The results of this meta-analysis of case-control studies suggest a moderate favorable effect of coffee consumption on colorectal cancer risk. The reduced risk was consistent across study design (hospital vs. population based), geographic area, and various confounding factors considered. It may reflect a real protection but also partly or largely be due to reverse causation, i.e. decreased coffee consumption among cases following the onset of bowel symptoms.

  11. Poison prevention practices and medically attended poisoning in young children: multicentre case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kendrick, Denise; Majsak-Newman, Gosia; Benford, Penny; Coupland, Carol; Timblin, Clare; Hayes, Mike; Goodenough, Trudy; Hawkins, Adrian; Reading, Richard

    2017-04-01

    Childhood poisonings are common, placing a substantial burden on health services. Case-control studies have found inconsistent evidence about modifiable risk factors for poisonings among children aged 0-4 years. This study quantifies associations between poison prevention practices and medically attended poisonings in children aged 0-4 years. Multicentre case-control study conducted at hospitals, minor injury units and family practices from four study centres in England between 2010 and 2013. Participants comprised 567 children presenting with unintentional poisoning occurring at home and 2320 community control participants matched on age, sex, date of event and study centre. Parents/caregivers provided data on safety practices, safety equipment use, home hazards and potential confounders by means of self-completion questionnaires. Data were analysed using conditional logistic regression. Compared with community controls, parents of poisoned children were significantly more likely not to store medicines out of reach (adjusted OR (AOR) 1.59; 95% CI 1.21 to 2.09; population attributable fraction (PAF) 15%), not to store medicines safely (locked or out of reach (AOR 1.83; 95% CI 1.38 to 2.42; PAF 16%) and not to have put all medicines (AOR 2.11; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.90; PAF 20%) or household products (AOR 1.79, 95% CI 1.29 to 2.48; PAF 11%) away immediately after use. Not storing medicines out of reach or locked away and not putting medicines and household products away immediately after use increased the odds of secondary care attended poisonings in children aged 0-4 years. If associations are causal, implementing these poison prevention practices could each prevent between 11% and 20% of poisonings. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Multilocus genetic risk score associates with ischemic stroke in case-control and prospective cohort studies.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rainer; Bevan, Steve; Nalls, Michael A; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Devan, William J; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Verhaaren, Benjamin F J; Bis, Joshua C; Joon, Aron Y; de Stefano, Anita L; Fornage, Myriam; Psaty, Bruce M; Ikram, M Arfan; Launer, Lenore J; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Sharma, Pankaj; Mitchell, Braxton D; Rosand, Jonathan; Meschia, James F; Levi, Christopher; Rothwell, Peter M; Sudlow, Cathie; Markus, Hugh S; Seshadri, Sudha; Dichgans, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed multiple common variants associated with known risk factors for ischemic stroke (IS). However, their aggregate effect on risk is uncertain. We aimed to generate a multilocus genetic risk score (GRS) for IS based on genome-wide association studies data from clinical-based samples and to establish its external validity in prospective population-based cohorts. Three thousand five hundred forty-eight clinic-based IS cases and 6399 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 were used for derivation of the GRS. Subjects from the METASTROKE consortium served as a replication sample. The validation sample consisted of 22 751 participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium. We selected variants that had reached genome-wide significance in previous association studies on established risk factors for IS. A combined GRS for atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and systolic blood pressure significantly associated with IS both in the case-control samples and in the prospective population-based studies. Subjects in the top quintile of the combined GRS had >2-fold increased risk of IS compared with subjects in the lowest quintile. Addition of the combined GRS to a simple model based on sex significantly improved the prediction of IS in the combined clinic-based samples but not in the population-based studies, and there was no significant improvement in net reclassification. A multilocus GRS based on common variants for established cardiovascular risk factors was significantly associated with IS both in clinic-based samples and in the general population. However, the improvement in clinical risk prediction was found to be small.

  13. Sympathetic skin response in multiple sclerosis: a meta-analysis of case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Margaritella, Nicolò; Mendozzi, Laura; Garegnani, Massimo; Gilardi, Elisabetta; Nemni, Raffaello; Pugnetti, Luigi

    2017-09-29

    The usefulness of sympathetic skin responses (SSR) in multiple sclerosis (MS) has been advocated by several studies in the last 20 years; however, due to a great heterogeneity of findings, a comprehensive meta-analysis of case-control studies is in order to pinpoint consistencies and investigate the causes of discrepancies. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases for case-control studies comparing SSR absence frequency and latency between patients with MS and healthy controls. Thirteen eligible studies including 415 MS patients and 331 healthy controls were identified. The pooled analysis showed that SSR can be always obtained in healthy controls while 34% of patients had absent SSRs in at least one limb (95% CI 22-47%; p < 0.0001) but with considerable heterogeneity across studies (I (2) = 90.3%). Patients' age explained 22% of the overall variability and positive correlations were found with Expanded Disability Status Scale and disease duration. The pooled mean difference of SSR latency showed a significant increase in patients on both upper (193 ms; 95% CI 120-270 ms) and lower (350 ms; 95% CI 190-510 ms) extremities. We tested the discriminatory value of SSR latency thresholds defined as the 95% confidence interval (CI) upper bound of the healthy controls, and validated the results on a new dataset. The lower limb threshold of 1.964 s produces the best results in terms of sensitivity 0.86, specificity 0.67, positive predicted value 0.75 and negative predicted value 0.80. Despite a considerable heterogeneity of findings, there is evidence that SSR is a useful tool in MS.

  14. Reduced Risk of Barrett's Esophagus in Statin Users: Case-Control Study and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Beales, Ian L P; Dearman, Leanne; Vardi, Inna; Loke, Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Use of statins has been associated with a reduced incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma in population-based studies. However there are few studies examining statin use and the development of Barrett's esophagus. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between statin use and the presence of Barrett's esophagus in patients having their first gastroscopy. We have performed a case-control study comparing statin use between patients with, and without, an incident diagnosis of non-dysplastic Barrett's esophagus. Male Barrett's cases (134) were compared to 268 male age-matched controls in each of two control groups (erosive gastro-esophageal reflux and dyspepsia without significant upper gastrointestinal disease). Risk factor and drug exposure were established using standardised interviews. Logistic regression was used to compare statin exposure and correct for confounding factors. We performed a meta-analysis pooling our results with three other case-control studies. Regular statin use was associated with a significantly lower incidence of Barrett's esophagus compared to the combined control groups [adjusted OR 0.62 (95 % confidence intervals 0.37-0.93)]. This effect was more marked in combined statin plus aspirin users [adjusted OR 0.43 (95 % CI 0.21-0.89)]. The inverse association between statin or statin plus aspirin use and risk of Barrett's was significantly greater with longer duration of use. Meta-analysis of pooled data (1098 Barrett's, 2085 controls) showed that statin use was significantly associated with a reduced risk of Barrett's esophagus [pooled adjusted OR 0.63 (95 % CI 0.51-0.77)]. Statin use is associated with a reduced incidence of a new diagnosis of Barrett's esophagus.

  15. Diagonal Earlobe Crease as a Significant Marker for Coronary Artery Disease: A Case-control Study.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Rida; Kausar, Komal; Qavi, Ahmed H; Minto, Moeed H; Ilyas, Fariha; Assad, Salman; Shah, Saeed U

    2017-02-05

    To investigate the association between diagonal earlobe crease (DELC) and coronary artery disease (CAD). Limited data exists in South Asia and no prior studies have been performed in Pakistan to assess this relationship. In this case-control study, 200 participants from December 2015 to March 2016 at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan were enrolled. Consecutive non-probability sampling was used to recruit patients. Cases were enrolled from cardiac care unit (CCU) of the hospital with angiography-proven CAD. Controls were selected from surgical, medical and neurology units of the hospital if they had no previously established evidence or symptoms of CAD. Patients were evaluated in terms of age and any history of hypertension, diabetes and/or smoking. Cases and controls were examined separately by two investigators for the unilateral or bilateral presence of DELC of the lobular portion of either auricle. Patients with ear piercings were excluded from the study. The data was analyzed in statistical product and service solutions (SPSS) (IBM, Delaware, Chicago), and an online statistical software. Out of the 200 patients, 126 (63%) were males and 74 (37%) were females. In the 100 cases, 76 had DELC and 24 had no crease whereas, among the 100 controls, 36 had DELC and 64 had no DELC (p <0.001, OR = 5.63, CI = 2.91-10.93). The prevalence of diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, smoking among the cases and controls were 66%, 53%, 27% and 27%, 18%, 25% respectively. The effect of hypertension and diabetes on the presence of DELC was statistically significant (p <0.05) but the impact of smoking on DELC presence was insignificant (p >0.05). There is a significant association between DELC and CAD. This is the first case-control study from South Asia disclosing this important correlation. Our study also reports a high frequency of DELC in patients suffering from hypertension and diabetes mellitus. No association between smoking and DELC was found.

  16. High Seroprevalence of Leptospira Exposure in Meat Workers in Northern Mexico: A Case-Control Study.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro; Martinez-Ramirez, Lucio

    2016-03-01

    The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in workers occupationally exposed to raw meat has been poorly studied. This work aimed to determine the association between Leptospira exposure and the occupation of meat worker, and to determine the seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, work, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the meat workers studied. We performed a case-control study in 124 meat workers and 124 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico. Sera of cases and controls were analyzed for anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Data of meat workers were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. The association of Leptospira exposure with the characteristics of meat workers was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 22 (17.7%) of 124 meat workers and in eight (6.5%) of 124 controls (OR = 3.12; 95% CI: 1.33 - 7.33; P = 0.006). Seroprevalence of Leptospira infection was similar between male butchers (17.6%) and female butchers (18.2%) (P = 1.00). Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, work and behavioral variables showed that Leptospira exposure was associated with duration in the activity, rural residence, and consumption of snake meat and unwashed raw fruits. This is the first case-control study of the association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of meat worker. Results indicate that meat workers represent a risk group for Leptospira exposure. Risk factors for Leptospira exposure found in this study may help in the design of optimal preventive measures against Leptospira infection.

  17. Multilocus genetic risk score associates with ischemic stroke in case-control and prospective cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Malik, R; Bevan, S; Nalls, MA; Holliday, EG; Devan, WJ; Cheng, YC; Ibrahim-Verbaas, CA; Verhaaren, BF; Bis, JC; Joon, AY; de Stefano, AL; Fornage, M; Psaty, BM; Ikram, MA; Launer, LJ; van Duijn, CM; Sharma, P; Mitchell, BD; Rosand, J; Meschia, JF; Levi, C; Rothwell, PM; Sudlow, C; Markus, HS; Seshadri, S; Dichgans, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Genome-wide association studies have revealed multiple common variants associated with known risk factors for ischemic stroke (IS). However, their aggregate effect on risk is uncertain. We aimed to generate a multilocus genetic risk score (GRS) for IS based on genome-wide association studies data from clinical-based samples and to establish its external validity in prospective population-based cohorts. METHODS Three thousand five hundred forty-eight clinic-based IS cases and 6399 controls from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium 2 were used for derivation of the GRS. Subjects from the METASTROKE consortium served as a replication sample. The validation sample consisted of 22 751 participants from the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology consortium. We selected variants that had reached genome-wide significance in previous association studies on established risk factors for IS. RESULTS A combined GRS for atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, hypertension, and systolic blood pressure significantly associated with IS both in the case-control samples and in the prospective population-based studies. Subjects in the top quintile of the combined GRS had >2-fold increased risk of IS compared with subjects in the lowest quintile. Addition of the combined GRS to a simple model based on sex significantly improved the prediction of IS in the combined clinic-based samples but not in the population-based studies, and there was no significant improvement in net reclassification. CONCLUSIONS A multilocus GRS based on common variants for established cardiovascular risk factors was significantly associated with IS both in clinic-based samples and in the general population. However, the improvement in clinical risk prediction was found to be small. PMID:24436234

  18. High Seroprevalence of Leptospira Exposure in Meat Workers in Northern Mexico: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernandez-Tinoco, Jesus; Sanchez-Anguiano, Luis Francisco; Ramos-Nevarez, Agar; Cerrillo-Soto, Sandra Margarita; Saenz-Soto, Leandro; Martinez-Ramirez, Lucio

    2016-01-01

    Background The seroepidemiology of Leptospira infection in workers occupationally exposed to raw meat has been poorly studied. This work aimed to determine the association between Leptospira exposure and the occupation of meat worker, and to determine the seroprevalence association with socio-demographic, work, clinical and behavioral characteristics of the meat workers studied. Methods We performed a case-control study in 124 meat workers and 124 age- and gender-matched control subjects in Durango City, Mexico. Sera of cases and controls were analyzed for anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay. Data of meat workers were obtained with the aid of a questionnaire. The association of Leptospira exposure with the characteristics of meat workers was analyzed by bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Anti-Leptospira IgG antibodies were found in 22 (17.7%) of 124 meat workers and in eight (6.5%) of 124 controls (OR = 3.12; 95% CI: 1.33 - 7.33; P = 0.006). Seroprevalence of Leptospira infection was similar between male butchers (17.6%) and female butchers (18.2%) (P = 1.00). Multivariate analysis of socio-demographic, work and behavioral variables showed that Leptospira exposure was associated with duration in the activity, rural residence, and consumption of snake meat and unwashed raw fruits. Conclusions This is the first case-control study of the association of Leptospira exposure with the occupation of meat worker. Results indicate that meat workers represent a risk group for Leptospira exposure. Risk factors for Leptospira exposure found in this study may help in the design of optimal preventive measures against Leptospira infection. PMID:26858797

  19. Case-Control Study of Risk Factors for Meningococcal Disease in Chile.

    PubMed

    Olea, Andrea; Matute, Isabel; González, Claudia; Delgado, Iris; Poffald, Lucy; Pedroni, Elena; Alfaro, Tania; Hirmas, Macarena; Nájera, Manuel; Gormaz, Ana; López, Darío; Loayza, Sergio; Ferreccio, Catterina; Gallegos, Doris; Fuentes, Rodrigo; Vial, Pablo; Aguilera, Ximena

    2017-07-01

    An outbreak of meningococcal disease with a case-fatality rate of 30% and caused by predominantly serogroup W of Neisseria meningitidis began in Chile in 2012. This outbreak required a case-control study to assess determinants and risk factors for infection. We identified confirmed cases during January 2012-March 2013 and selected controls by random sampling of the population, matched for age and sex, resulting in 135 case-patients and 618 controls. Sociodemographic variables, habits, and previous illnesses were studied. Analyses yielded adjusted odds ratios as estimators of the probability of disease development. Results indicated that conditions of social vulnerability, such as low income and overcrowding, as well as familial history of this disease and clinical histories, especially chronic diseases and hospitalization for respiratory conditions, increased the probability of illness. Findings should contribute to direction of intersectoral public policies toward a highly vulnerable social group to enable them to improve their living conditions and health.

  20. Tobacco chewing and risk of gastric cancer: a case-control study in Yemen.

    PubMed

    Al-Qadasi, F A; Shah, S A; Ghazi, H F

    2017-01-23

    This study aimed to assess the risk factors for gastric cancer in Yemen. A hospital-based case-control study of 70 cases and 140 controls was carried out in Sana'a city between May and October 2014. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information through direct interview. Living in rural areas, tobacco chewing and drinking untreated water were significant risk factors for gastric cancer. Frequent consumption of chicken, cheese, milk, starchy vegetables, cucumber, carrots, leeks, sweet pepper, fruit drinks, legumes and olive oil were associated significantly with decreased risk of gastric cancer. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that chewing tobacco and frequent consumption of white bread were associated with increased risk of gastric cancer, whereas frequent consumption of chicken, cooked potatoes and fruit drinks had an inverse association. Risk of gastric cancer can be prevented by health education and increasing community awareness.

  1. Dietary total antioxidant capacity and the risk of breast cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Z; Bahadoran, Z; Abedini, S; Houshyar-Rad, A; Rashidkhani, B

    2015-09-28

    There is growing evidence that dietary antioxidants may have favourable effects in reducing cancer risk. In a case-control study we investigated the association of dietary total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and risk of breast cancer. Sociodemographic data, medical history and anthropometric measurements were collected from 275 women (100 breast cancer cases & 175 controls). Participants' usual dietary intake was measured using a validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire and their dietary TAC was estimated. An inverse, but non-significant, association was observed between dietary TAC and breast cancer risk. Multiple logistic regression models based on TAC of individual food groups showed that consumption of fruits and vegetables with higher TAC (μmolTE/100 g) was associated with a significantly decreased risk of breast cancer. Our study supports a protective effect of dietary antioxidants in relation to breast cancer risk. Food selection based on TAC of foods may be an effective strategy to modify the risk of cancer.

  2. [Voice disorders related to job stress in teaching: a case-control study].

    PubMed

    Giannini, Susana Pimentel Pinto; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; Ferreira, Leslie Piccolotto

    2012-11-01

    This case-control study aimed to test the association between voice disorders and job stress among public schoolteachers in São Paulo, Brazil. The groups consisted of teachers with (n = 165) and without (n = 105) voice-related complaints. Both groups answered the questionnaires Conditions of Vocal Production and Job Stress Scale. Analysis of cases and controls showed comparable samples, differing only by vocal symptoms. There was a statistically significant difference between cases and controls in relation to job stress involving high strain (OR = 2.1; 95%CI: 1.1-3.9), which places high demands combined with low job control. High strain in cases in this study represents the highest risk of physical and mental disorders for teachers. Loss of voice prevents teachers from continuing in their professional role, eliminates their professional identity, and jeopardizes their career.

  3. Effect of suboptimal breast-feeding on occurrence of autism: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Al-Farsi, Yahya M; Al-Sharbati, Marwan M; Waly, Mostafa I; Al-Farsi, Omar A; Al-Shafaee, Mohammed A; Al-Khaduri, Maha M; Trivedi, Malav S; Deth, Richard C

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the association between suboptimal breast-feeding practices and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A case-control study was conducted in 102 ASD cases and 102 matched healthy controls. Based on adjusted odds ratios from logistic regression models, ASD was found to be associated with the late initiation of breast-feeding (odds ratio 1.48, 95% confidence interval 1.01-3.1), a non-intake of colostrum (odds ratio 1.7, 95% confidence interval 1.03-4.3), prelacteal feeding, and bottle-feeding. The risk of ASD was found to decrease in a dose-response fashion over increasing periods of exclusive breast-feeding (P for trend = 0.04) and continued breast-feeding (P for trend = 0.001). The study indicates that increased ASD risk is generally associated with suboptimal breast-feeding practices. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Relationship between air pollution and pre-eclampsia in pregnant women: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Nahidi, F; Gholami, R; Rashidi, Y; Majd, H Alavi

    2014-01-09

    Pre-eclampsia is the main cause of maternal and fetal death and disability worldwide. Its incidence in the Islamic Republic of Iran is 5%-12%. Air pollution has been reported to be one of the causative factors, and this case-control study determined its effect on pre-eclampsia in 195 pregnant women (65 with pre-eclampsia and 130 without) admitted to hospitals in Tehran. Women were divided into high and low exposure groups according to the mean density of exposure to pollutants during pregnancy. There was no statistically significant relationship between exposure to air pollutants including CO, particulate matter, SO2, NO2 and O3 and pre-eclampsia. The combined effect was also not significant. Air pollution is one of the problems of modern society and its avoidance is almost impossible for pregnant women. This study should reduce concern about pregnant women living in polluted cities.

  5. Association between psoas abscess and prosthetic hip infection: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Dauchy, Frédéric-Antoine; Dupon, Michel; Dutronc, Hervé; de Barbeyrac, Bertille; Lawson-Ayayi, Sylvie; Dubuisson, Vincent; Souillac, Vincent

    2009-04-01

    The relationship between prosthetic hip infection and a psoas abscess is poorly documented. We determined the frequency of prosthetic hip infections associated with psoas abscesses and identified their determinants. We conducted a 2-year observational study. Data from patients with psoas abscesses that were associated with prosthetic hip infections were examined in a case-control study. Of 106 patients admitted to the Infectious Diseases Department with prosthetic hip infection, 13 also had a psoas abscess (12%; 95% CI: 6-19). By conditional logistic regression analysis, psoas abscesses were observed more frequently in cases of hematogenous prosthetic infections (OR = 93, p = 0.06) and in patients with a history of neoplasm (OR = 20, p = 0.03). Our results suggest that the presence of psoas abscesses is a frequent but under-diagnosed complication of prosthetic hip infection. We recommend that an abdominal CT scan be performed on patients with hematogenous prosthetic hip infection or with a history of neoplasm.

  6. Putative risk factors in developmental dyslexia: a case-control study of Italian children.

    PubMed

    Mascheretti, Sara; Marino, Cecilia; Simone, Daniela; Quadrelli, Ermanno; Riva, Valentina; Cellino, Maria Rosaria; Maziade, Michel; Brombin, Chiara; Battaglia, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Although dyslexia runs in families, several putative risk factors that cannot be immediately identified as genetic predict reading disability. Published studies analyzed one or a few risk factors at a time, with relatively inconsistent results. To assess the contribution of several putative risk factors to the development of dyslexia, we conducted a case-control study of 403 Italian children, 155 with dyslexia, by implementing a stepwise logistic regression applied to the entire sample, and then to boys and girls separately. Younger parental age at child's birth, lower parental education, and risk of miscarriage significantly increased the odds of belonging to the dyslexia group (19.5% of the variation). These associations were confirmed in the analyses conducted separately by sex, except for parental education, which significantly affected only males. These findings support reading disabilities as a multifactorial disorder and may bear some importance for the prevention and/or early detection of children at heightened risk for dyslexia.

  7. Occupation and thyroid cancer: a population-based case-control study in Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Ba, Yue; Huang, Huang; Lerro, Catherine C.; Li, Shuzhen; Zhao, Nan; Li, Anqi; Ma, Shuangge; Udelsman, Robert; Zhang, Yawei

    2016-01-01

    Objective The study aims to explore the associations between various occupations and thyroid cancer risk. Methods A population-based case-control study involving 462 histologically confirmed incident cases and 498 controls was conducted in Connecticut in 2010–2011. Results A significantly increased risk of thyroid cancer, particularly papillary microcarcinoma, was observed for those working as the healthcare practitioners and technical workers, health diagnosing and treating practitioners and registered nurses. Those working in building and grounds cleaning, maintenance occupations, pest control, retail sales, and customer service also had increased risk for papillary thyroid cancer. Subjects who worked as cooks, janitors, cleaners, and customer service representatives were at an increased risk of papillary thyroid cancer with tumor size >1 cm. Conclusions Certain occupations were associated with an increased risk of thyroid cancer, with some tumor size and subtype specificity. PMID:26949881

  8. Causative or precipitating aspects of burning mouth syndrome: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sardella, Andrea; Lodi, Giovanni; Demarosi, Federica; Uglietti, Daniela; Carrassi, Antonio

    2006-09-01

    On causative or precipitating causes of burning mouth syndrome (BMS), there is a lack of consensus. In this prospective case-control study, we compared clinical features and laboratory aspects to evaluate the association of the proposed causative/precipitating factors of BMS. A total of 61 BMS patients and 54 control subjects underwent several evaluations: rest and stimulated salivary flow rates measurements, laboratory tests, isolation of Candida species, assessment of parafunctional activities, detection of anxiety and depression by means of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were calculated to compare the variables. No statistically significant differences were found with regard to the tested variables except for anxiety and depression. The results of this study seem not to support a role for the usually reported causative or precipitating factors of BMS and efforts should be addressed towards different aetiologies including possible neuropathic mechanisms of BMS.

  9. A case-control study of pediatric falls using electronic medical records.

    PubMed

    Messmer, Patricia Ruth; Williams, Phoebe D; Williams, Arthur R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively review Humpty Dumpty Falls Scale (HDFS) scores using electronic medical records (EMR) reports at a pediatric hospital to determine characteristics related to falls, injuries, and performance of the HDFS tool. The specific research question was: Is there a significant difference in HDFS total scores between cases (children who fell) and controls (those who did not fall)? Results from 74 cases and 242 controls revealed the number of falls did not differ significantly between those who obtained high HDFS scores and those who obtained low scores. HDFS sensitivity was 57%, specificity was 39%. The pediatric patients who fell were mostly oriented and ambulating; falls with injury did not exceed 19%. Future case-control studies should use larger sample sizes across multiple institutions with EMR capability. © 2013 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  10. Food groups and endometrial cancer risk: a case-control study from Italy.

    PubMed

    Bravi, Francesca; Scotti, Lorenza; Bosetti, Cristina; Zucchetto, Antonella; Talamini, Renato; Montella, Maurizio; Greggi, Stefano; Pelucchi, Claudio; Negri, Eva; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2009-03-01

    Although several studies have been conducted on the relation between dietary habits and endometrial cancer risk, the evidence for specific food groups is still controversial. We analyzed data from an Italian case-control study including 454 women with histologically confirmed endometrial cancer and 908 controls admitted to the same hospitals for acute, nonneoplastic conditions. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) were obtained after allowance for major potential confounding factors. A significant increase in risk was observed for red meat, with an OR of 2.07 for an increment of 1 serving per day. Inverse associations were observed for coffee (OR, 0.83), cereals (OR, 0.92), and vegetables (OR, 0.83). Our results support the existence of a relation between dietary habits and endometrial cancer risk and in particular suggest that a diet rich in red meat and poor in vegetables may have an unfavorable effect.

  11. Blinded case-control study of the relationship between human coronavirus NL63 and Kawasaki syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Samuel R; Anderson, Marsha S; Glodé, Mary P; Robinson, Christine C; Holmes, Kathryn V

    2006-12-15

    We conducted a blinded, case-control, retrospective study in pediatric patients hospitalized at The Children's Hospital, Denver, Colorado, to determine whether human coronavirus (HCoV)-NL63 infection is associated with Kawasaki syndrome (KS). Over the course of a 7-month period, nasopharyngeal-wash samples from 2 (7.7%) of 26 consecutive children with KS and 4 (7.7%) of 52 matched control subjects tested positive for HCoV-NL63 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. These data suggest that, although HCoV-NL63 was circulating in children in our community during the time of the study, the prevalence of infection with HCoV-NL63 was not greater in patients with KS than in control subjects.

  12. Causal diagrams and the logic of matched case-control studies

    PubMed Central

    Shahar, Eyal; Shahar, Doron J

    2012-01-01

    It is tempting to assume that confounding bias is eliminated by choosing controls that are identical to the cases on the matched confounder(s). We used causal diagrams to explain why such matching not only fails to remove confounding bias, but also adds colliding bias, and why both types of bias are removed by conditioning on the matched confounder(s). As in some publications, we trace the logic of matching to a possible tradeoff between effort and variance, not between effort and bias. Lastly, we explain why the analysis of a matched case-control study – regardless of the method of matching – is not conceptually different from that of an unmatched study. PMID:22701093

  13. Evaluation of Feasibility for a Case-Control Study of Pituitary-Ovarian Function in Premenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist stimulation tests to compare pituitary -ovarian function in premenopausal women...in responsiveness of ovarian hormones to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation in healthy premenopausal women. GnRH stimulation was...determine the safety and feasibility of conducting a case-control study that uses gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation tests to evaluate

  14. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  15. Dietary food groups intake and cooking methods associations with pancreatic cancer: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Zeinab; Hekmatdoost, Azita; Zinab, Hassan Eini; Farrokhzad, Solmaz; Rahimi, Roya; Malekzadeh, Reza; Pourshams, Akram

    2015-05-01

    The role of dietary habits in the etiology of pancreatic cancer (PC) has not yet been well elucidated. The aim of the present study was to examine the association of the frequency of different food groups' intake and their cooking methods with PC risk based on a well-designed case-control study. A case-control study including 307 PC patients and 322 controls referred to four tert