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  1. Involvement of endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms in midazolam-induced vasodilation.

    PubMed

    Colussi, Gian Luca; Di Fabio, Alessandro; Catena, Cristiana; Chiuch, Alessandra; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2011-08-01

    Benzodiazepine (BDZ) infusion has been shown to reduce blood pressure in both humans and animals. Although the inhibitory effects of BDZ on the central nervous system have been well documented, less is known about the direct effects of BDZ on the vascular bed. The aims of this study were to assess the effects of the BDZ midazolam on the vascular system in C57/BL6 mouse aortic rings and to investigate the mechanisms of its direct vascular action. We found that midazolam induced reversible, dose-dependent vasodilation in potassium- and phenylephrine-precontracted rings. In rings that were precontracted with potassium or phenylephrine, treatment with 10 μmol l(-1) midazolam increased vasodilation by 15 and 60%, respectively, compared with baseline. Vasodilation increased by 80 and 87%, respectively, after treatment with 50 μmol l(-1) midazolam. Only the low concentration of midazolam (10 μmol l(-1)) induced endothelium-dependent vasodilation in phenylephrine-precontracted rings. Vasodilation increased by 60% in rings with endothelium and by 20% in rings without endothelium. Conversely, only the high concentration of midazolam (50 μmol l(-1)) reduced the CaCl(2)-induced vasoconstriction of aortic rings with EC(50) (the concentration giving 50% of the maximal effect) values of 1 and 6 mmol l(-1) for vehicle- and midazolam-treated rings, respectively. Furthermore, the incubation of phenylephrine-precontracted rings with an inhibitor of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the inhibitors of central or peripheral type BDZ receptors (flumazenil or PK 11195, respectively) produced no change in midazolam-induced vasodilation. Thus, low concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-dependent mechanism that does not involve NO production. In contrast, high concentrations of midazolam induce vasodilation via an endothelium-independent mechanism that implies reduced sensitivity of aortic rings to calcium ions. Additionally

  2. Overcoming NS1-Mediated Immune Antagonism Involves Both Interferon-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Juilee; Schmid, Sonja; Duke, Jamie L.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    To ensure survival, our immune system must overcome the action of pathogen-encoded immune antagonists, such as influenza A nonstructural protein-1 (NS1). NS1 subverts the host interferon (IFN) response at multiple levels and blocks the induction of IFN-β, a critical antiviral cytokine. This immune antagonism can be overcome in some cases. It has been shown that IFN-β is upregulated by 48 h in the lungs of wild-type C57BL/6 mice infected with influenza A. In contrast, it is shown here that IFNB1 continues to be repressed in IFNAR1−/− IL28Rα−/− mice, which are deficient in Type-I and III IFN signaling, implying induction of IFNB1 depends on effective IFN signaling. Despite the complete lack of IFN signaling in this system, some IFN stimulated genes (ISGs) were induced following infection with a Flu strain lacking NS1. While the expression of these viral stress-inducible genes (VSIGs) was initially repressed following infection with wild-type Flu, many of these genes became upregulated by 48 h postinfection. These results demonstrate the existence of IFN-independent mechanisms that can overcome NS1-mediated immune antagonism of VSIGs. PMID:23772952

  3. Involvement of a joker mutation in a polymerase-independent lethal mutagenesis escape mechanism.

    PubMed

    Agudo, Rubén; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Arias, Armando; Grande-Pérez, Ana; Domingo, Esteban

    2016-07-01

    We previously characterized a foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) with three amino acid replacements in its polymerase (3D) that conferred resistance to the mutagenic nucleoside analogue ribavirin. Here we show that passage of this mutant in the presence of high ribavirin concentrations resulted in selection of viruses with the additional replacement I248T in 2C. This 2C substitution alone (even in the absence of replacements in 3D) increased FMDV fitness mainly in the presence of ribavirin, prevented an incorporation bias in favor of A and U associated with ribavirin mutagenesis, and conferred the ATPase activity of 2C decreased sensitivity to ribavirin-triphosphate. Since in previous studies we described that 2C with I248T was selected under different selective pressures, this replacement qualifies as a joker substitution in FMDV evolution. The results have identified a role of 2C in nucleotide incorporation, and have unveiled a new polymerase-independent mechanism of virus escape to lethal mutagenesis.

  4. Involvement of a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1-independent mechanism in lipopolysaccharide-induced fever in chickens.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Shimizu, Yasutake; Shiina, Takahiko; Nikami, Hideki; Dosoky, Reem Mahmoud; Ahmed, Moustafa Mohamed; Takewaki, Tadashi

    2007-11-01

    It has been demonstrated that capsaicin blocks lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever in mammals. In this study, we investigated TRPV1 (transient receptor potential ion channel of vanilloid subtype-1)-independent action of capsaicin on LPS-induced fever in chickens. The chicken is a valuable model for this purpose because chicken TRPV1 has been shown to be insensitive to capsaicin and thus the effects of capsaicin can be attributed to TRPV1-independent mechanisms. Administration of capsaicin (10 mg/kg, iv) to conscious unrestrained chicks at 5 days of age caused a transient decrease in body temperature. This effect of capsaicin was not observed in chicks that had been pretreated twice with capsaicin, indicating that the capsaicin-sensitive pathway can be desensitized. LPS (2 mg/kg, ip) induced fever that lasted for about 2.5 h, but fever was not induced in chicks that had been pretreated with capsaicin for 2 days. The preventive effect of capsaicin on LPS-induced fever was not blocked by capsazepine, an antagonist for TRPV1, but the antagonist per se blocked the febrile response to LPS. These findings suggest that a capsaicin-sensitive TRPV1-independent mechanism may be involved in LPS-induced fever.

  5. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation.

  6. Bromoenol lactone promotes cell death by a mechanism involving phosphatidate phosphohydrolase-1 rather than calcium-independent phospholipase A2.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Lucía; Pérez, Rebeca; Nieto, María L; Balsinde, Jesús; Balboa, María A

    2003-11-07

    Originally described as a serine protease inhibitor, bromoenol lactone (BEL) has recently been found to potently inhibit Group VI calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2). Thus, BEL is widely used to define biological roles of iPLA2 in cells. However, BEL is also known to inhibit another key enzyme of phospholipid metabolism, namely the magnesium-dependent phosphatidate phosphohydrolase-1 (PAP-1). In this work we report that BEL is able to promote apoptosis in a variety of cell lines, including U937, THP-1, and MonoMac (human phagocyte), RAW264.7 (murine macrophage), Jurkat (human T lymphocyte), and GH3 (human pituitary). In these cells, long term treatment with BEL (up to 24 h) results in increased annexin-V binding to the cell surface and nuclear DNA damage, as detected by staining with both DAPI and propidium iodide. At earlier times (2 h), BEL induces the proteolysis of procaspase-9 and procaspase-3 and increases cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. These changes are preceded by variations in the mitochondrial membrane potential. All these effects of BEL are not mimicked by the iPLA2 inhibitor methylarachidonyl fluorophosphonate or by treating the cells with a specific iPLA2 antisense oligonucleotide. However, propranolol, a PAP-1 inhibitor, is able to reproduce these effects, suggesting that it is the inhibition of PAP-1 and not of iPLA2 that is involved in BEL-induced cell death. In support of this view, BEL-induced apoptosis is accompanied by a very strong inhibition of PAP-1-regulated events, such as incorporation of [3H]choline into phospholipids and de novo incorporation of [3H]arachidonic acid into triacylglycerol. Collectively, these results stress the role of PAP-1 as a key enzyme for cell integrity and survival and in turn caution against the use of BEL in studies involving long incubation times, due to the capacity of this drug to induce apoptosis in a variety of cells.

  7. P2X(7) receptor-mediated release of cathepsins from macrophages is a cytokine-independent mechanism potentially involved in joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Theaker, Jill; Pelegrin, Pablo; Clifton, Andrew D; Braddock, Martin; Surprenant, Annmarie

    2010-08-15

    The ATP-gated P2X(7) receptor (P2X(7)R) is a promising therapeutic target in chronic inflammatory diseases with highly specific antagonists currently under clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis. Anti-inflammatory actions of P2X(7)R antagonists are considered to result from inhibition of P2X(7)R-induced release of proinflammatory cytokines from activated macrophages. However, P2X(7)Rs are also expressed in resting macrophages, suggesting that P2X(7)R may also signal via cytokine-independent mechanisms involved in joint disease. In this study, we examined P2X(7)R function in resting human lung macrophages and mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages and found that ATP induced rapid release of the lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsin B, K, L, and S and that was independent of the presence of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-18. Cathepsins released into the medium were effective to degrade collagen extracellular matrix. ATP-induced cathepsin release was abolished by P2X(7)R antagonists, absent from P2X(7)R(-/-) mouse macrophages, and not associated with cell death. Our results suggest P2X(7)R activation may play a novel and direct role in tissue damage through release of cathepsins independently of its proinflammatory actions via IL-1 cytokines.

  8. Regulation of glucose transport by insulin, bombesin, and bradykinin in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts: Involvement of protein kinase C-dependent and -independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Dettori, C.; Meldolesi, J. )

    1989-05-01

    Glucose transport stimulation by insulin, bombesin, and bradykinin in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts was compared with the phosphoinositide hydrolysis effects of the same stimulants in a variety of experimental paradigms known to affect generation and/or functioning of intracellular second messengers: short- and long-term treatments with phorbol dibutyrate, that cause activation and down-regulation of protein kinase C, respectively; cell loading with high (quin2), that causes clamping of (Ca{sup 2+}){sub i} near the resting level; poisoning with pertussis toxin, that affects the GTP binding proteins of the Go/Gi class; treatment with Ca{sup 2+} ionophores. ({sup 14}C) glucose transport stimulation by maximal (insulin) was affected by neither pertussis toxin nor protein kinase C down-regulation. This result correlates with the lack of effect of insulin on phosphoinositide hydrolysis. In contrast, part of the glucose transport responses induced by bombesin and bradykinin appeared to be mediated by protein kinase C in proportion with the stimulation induced by these peptides on the phosphoinositide hydrolysis. The protein kinase C-independent portion of the response to bradykinin was found to be inhibitable by pertussis toxin. This latter result might suggest an interaction between the bradykinin receptor and a glucose transporter, mediated by a protein of the Go/Gi class.

  9. Vascular Tone Regulation Induced by C-Type Natriuretic Peptide: Differences in Endothelium-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms Involved in Normotensive and Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Caniffi, Carolina; Cerniello, Flavia M.; Gobetto, María N.; Sueiro, María L.; Arranz, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Given that the role of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) in the regulation of vascular tone in hypertensive states is unclear, we hypothesized that impaired response of the nitric oxide system to CNP in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) could affect vascular relaxation induced by the peptide in this model of hypertension, and that other endothelial systems or potassium channels opening could also be involved. We examined the effect of CNP on isolated SHR aortas, and the hindlimb vascular resistance (HVR) in response to CNP administration compared to normotensive rats. Aortas were mounted in an isometric organ bath and contracted with phenylephrine. CNP relaxed arteries in a concentration-dependent manner but was less potent in inducing relaxation in SHR. The action of CNP was diminished by removal of the endothelium, inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, and inhibition of soluble guanylyl cyclase by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one in both groups. In contrast, blockade of cyclooxygenase or subtype 2 bradykinin receptor increased CNP potency only in SHR. In both Wistar and SHR, CNP relaxation was blunted by tetraethylammonium and partially inhibited by BaCl2 and iberiotoxin, indicating that it was due to opening of the Kir and BKCa channels. However, SHR seem to be more sensitive to Kir channel blockade and less sensitive to BKCa channel blockade than normotensive rats. In addition, CNP decreases HVR in Wistar and SHR, but the effect of CNP increasing blood flow was more marked in SHR. We conclude that CNP induces aorta relaxation by activation of the nitric oxide system and opening of potassium channels, but the response to the peptide is impaired in conductance vessel of hypertensive rats. PMID:27936197

  10. Exosome-dependent and independent mechanisms are involved in prion-like transmission of propagated Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase misfolding

    PubMed Central

    Grad, Leslie I; Pokrishevsky, Edward; Silverman, Judith M; Cashman, Neil R

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal adult-onset degenerative neuromuscular disorder with a poorly defined etiology, progresses in an orderly spatiotemporal manner from one or more foci within the nervous system, reminiscent of prion disease pathology. We have previously shown that misfolded mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1), mutation of which is associated with a subset of ALS cases, can induce endogenous wild-type SOD1 misfolding in the intracellular environment in a templating fashion similar to that of misfolded prion protein. Our recent observations further extend the prion paradigm of pathological SOD1 to help explain the intercellular transmission of disease along the neuroaxis. It has been shown that both mutant and misfolded wild-type SOD1 can traverse cell-to-cell either as protein aggregates that are released from dying cells and taken up by neighboring cells via macropinocytosis, or released to the extracellular environment on the surface of exosomes secreted from living cells. Furthermore, once propagation of misfolded wild-type SOD1 has been initiated in human cell culture, it continues over multiple passages of transfer and cell growth. Propagation and transmission of misfolded wild-type SOD1 is therefore a potential mechanism in the systematic progression of ALS pathology. PMID:25551548

  11. A p53-independent apoptotic mechanism of adenoviral mutant E1A was involved in its selective antitumor activity for human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Lin; Cheng, Qian; Zhao, Jingjing; Ge, Yan; Zhu, Qi; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Qi; Li, Liantao; Liu, Junjie; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-01-01

    The conserved regions (CR) of adenoviral E1A had been shown to be necessary for disruption of pRb-E2F transcription factor complexes and induction of the S phase. Here we constructed a mutant adenoviral E1A with Rb-binding ability absent (E1A 30-60aa and 120-127aa deletion, mE1A) and investigated its antitumor capacities in vitro and in vivo. The mE1A suppressed the viability of tumor cells as efficiently as the wild type E1A, and there was no cytotoxic effect on normal cells. Although the mE1A arrested tumor cell cycle with the same manner as E1A, the former played a different role on cell cycle regulation compared with E1A in normal cells, which might contribute to its selective antitumor activity. E1A and mE1A had accumulated inactive p53, decreased the expression of mdm2, Cdkn1a (also named p21), increased p21's nuclear distribution and induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpent manner. Further, E1A or mE1A significantly suppressed tumor growth in subcutaneous hepatocellular carcinoma xenograft models. Especially, tumor-bearing mice treated with mE1A had higher survival rate than those treated with E1A. Our data demonstrated that mutant adenoviral E1A significantly induced tumor cell apoptosis in a p53-indenpednt manner and had selective tumor suppressing ability. The observations of adenoviral E1A mutant had provided a novel mechanism for E1A's complex activities during infection. PMID:27340782

  12. Complement-mediated cell death induced by rituximab in B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is mediated in vitro by a caspase-independent mechanism involving the generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bellosillo, B; Villamor, N; López-Guillermo, A; Marcé, S; Esteve, J; Campo, E; Colomer, D; Montserrat, E

    2001-11-01

    Mechanisms involving the in vitro effect of rituximab in cells from 55 patients with B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders were investigated. No cytotoxic effect was observed when cells were incubated with rituximab alone, but in the presence of human AB serum rituximab induced complement-dependent cell death (R-CDC). A cytotoxic effect was observed in cells from 9 of 33 patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 16 of 16 patients with mantle-cell lymphoma, 4 of 4 patients with follicular lymphoma, and 2 of 2 patients with hairy-cell leukemia. R-CDC was observed in cells from patients expressing more than 50 x 10(3) CD20 molecules per cell, and directly correlated with the number of CD20 molecules per cell. Preincubation with anti-CD59 increased the cytotoxic effect of rituximab and sensitized cells from nonsensitive cases. Neither cleavage of poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) nor activation of caspase-3 was observed in R-CDC. In addition, no cells with a hypodiploid DNA content were detected and R-CDC was not prevented by a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, suggesting a caspase-independent mechanism. Incubation with rituximab in the presence of AB serum induced a rapid and intense production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). R-CDC was blocked by the incubation of cells with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or Tiron, 2 ROS scavengers, indicating that the cytotoxic effect was due to the generation of superoxide (O) radicals. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that CD20, CD59, and complement have a role in the in vitro cytotoxic effect of rituximab, which is mediated by a caspase-independent process that involves ROS generation.

  13. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in neuronal cells is mediated via caspase-dependent and independent mechanisms involving calpain and caspase-3 proteases as well as apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and this process is inhibited by equine estrogens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, YueMei; Bhavnani, Bhagu R

    2006-01-01

    Background Glutamate, a major excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter, causes apoptotic neuronal cell death at high concentrations. Our previous studies have shown that depending on the neuronal cell type, glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death was associated with regulation of genes such as Bcl-2, Bax, and/or caspase-3 and mitochondrial cytochrome c. To further delineate the intracellular mechanisms, we have investigated the role of calpain, an important calcium-dependent protease thought to be involved in apoptosis along with mitochondrial apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) and caspase-3 in primary cortical cells and a mouse hippocampal cell line HT22. Results Glutamate-induced apoptotic cell death in neuronal cells was associated with characteristic DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, activation of calpain and caspase-3 as well as the upregulation and/or translocation of AIF from mitochondria into cytosol and nuclei. Our results reveal that primary cortical cells and HT22 cells display different patterns of regulation of these genes/proteins. In primary cortical cells, glutamate induces activation of calpain, caspase-3 and translocation of AIF from mitochondria to cytosol and nuclei. In contrast, in HT22 cells, only the activation of calpain and upregulation and translocation of AIF occurred. In both cell types, these processes were inhibited/reversed by 17β-estradiol and Δ8,17β-estradiol with the latter being more potent. Conclusion Depending upon the neuronal cell type, at least two mechanisms are involved in glutamate-induced apoptosis: a caspase-3-dependent pathway and a caspase-independent pathway involving calpain and AIF. Since HT22 cells lack caspase-3, glutamate-induced apoptosis is mediated via the caspase-independent pathway in this cell line. Kinetics of this apoptotic pathway further indicate that calpain rather than caspase-3, plays a critical role in the glutamate-induced apoptosis. Our studies further indicate that glutamate- induced changes

  14. Characterization of alveolar macrophage receptors involved in opsonin independent phagocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Godleski, J.J.; Parod, R.J.; Katler, M.; Brain, J.D.

    1986-03-05

    Hamster alveolar macrophages (AM) avidly ingest particles in the absence of serum. This process is calcium dependent and can be blocked by HAMM, a mouse monoclonal antibody specific for hamster AM's. The purpose of this study was to identify the membrane receptors involved. AM membranes were labeled with /sup 125/I, lysed with RIPA-PMSF, and then reacted with uncoated latex beads or with beads coated with BSA, gelatin, or poly-L-lysine. Lysed membranes were also reacted with zymosan particles. All of these reactions were done in the presence and absence of calcium and magnesium ions. After reaction, the particles were boiled in SDS to remove attached membrane constituents which were then separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Only one AM membrane protein (37 kilodaltons (kd)) bound to BSA and gelatin coated latex, uncoated latex, and zymosan particles in the presence of Ca/sup + +/ and Mg/sup + +/. Proteins of 45 and 19 kd attached to all particles even in the absence of divalent cations. In contrast, HAMM reacted with a membrane constituent of 102 kd. The authors conclude that the Ca/sup + +/ dependent receptor for opsonin independent phagocytosis has a molecular weight of 37 kd and is different from the antigen identified by HAMM.

  15. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  16. Fas involvement in Ca(2+)-independent T cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Rouvier, E; Luciani, M F; Golstein, P

    1993-01-01

    Mechanisms of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity remain poorly defined at the molecular level. To investigate some of these mechanisms, we used as target cells, on the one hand, thymocytes from lpr and gld mouse mutants, and on the other hand, L1210 cells transfected or not with the apoptosis-inducing Fas molecule. These independent mutant or transfectant-based approaches both led to the conclusion that Fas was involved in the Ca(2+)-independent component of cytotoxicity mediated by at least two sources of T cells, namely nonantigen-specific in vitro activated hybridoma cells, and antigen-specific in vivo raised peritoneal exudate lymphocytes. Thus, in these cases, T cell-mediated cytotoxicity involved transduction via Fas of the target cell death signal.

  17. Involvement of Mechanical Stress in Androgenetic Alopecia

    PubMed Central

    Tellez-Segura, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Context: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a frequent disorder characterized by progressive hair miniaturization in a very similar pattern among all affected men. The pathogenesis is related to androgen-inducible overexpression of transforming growth factor β-1 from balding dermal papilla cells, which is involved in epithelial inhibition and perifollicular fibrosis. Recent research shows that hair follicle androgen sensitivity is regulated by Hic-5, an androgen receptor co-activator which may be activated by the mechanical stimulation. Moreover, the dermis of scalp susceptible to be affected by AGA is firmly bounded to the galea aponeurotica, so the physical force exerted by the occipitofrontalis muscle is transmitted to the scalp skin. Aims: To know whether mechanical stress supported by hair follicles is involved in AGA phenomenon. Materials and Methods: It is performed with a finite element analysis of a galea model and a schematic representation of AGA progression according to Hamilton–Norwood scale in order to establish the correlation between elastic deformation in scalp and clinical progression of male pattern baldness. Results: The result was a highly significant correlation (r: −0.885, P < 0.001) that clearly identifies a mechanical factor in AGA development. Conclusions: All these data suggest that mechanical stress determines AGA patterning and a stretch-induced and androgen-mediated mechanotransduction in dermal papilla cells could be the primary mechanism in AGA pathogenesis. PMID:26622151

  18. Involvement of ERK in NMDA receptor-independent cortical neurotoxicity of hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect

    Kurokawa, Yuko; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Kubo, Satoko; Yamasaki, Yoshiko; Matsuda, Sachi; Okamoto, Yukari; Sekimoto, Teruki; Fukatsu, Anna; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Kume, Toshiaki; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen sulfide causes NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity in mouse fetal cortical neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of ERK mediates the toxicity of hydrogen sulfide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Apoptotic mechanisms are involved in the hydrogen-induced cell death. -- Abstract: Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a gasotransmitter, exerts both neurotoxicity and neuroprotection, and targets multiple molecules including NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NO synthase (NOS) that might affect neuronal viability. Here, we determined and characterized effects of NaHS, an H{sub 2}S donor, on cell viability in the primary cultures of mouse fetal cortical neurons. NaHS caused neuronal death, as assessed by LDH release and trypan blue staining, but did not significantly reduce the glutamate toxicity. The neurotoxicity of NaHS was resistant to inhibitors of NMDA receptors, T-type calcium channels and NOS, and was blocked by inhibitors of MEK, but not JNK, p38 MAP kinase, PKC and Src. NaHS caused prompt phosphorylation of ERK and upregulation of Bad, followed by translocation of Bax to mitochondria and release of mitochondrial cytochrome c, leading to the nuclear condensation/fragmentation. These effects of NaHS were suppressed by the MEK inhibitor. Our data suggest that the NMDA receptor-independent neurotoxicity of H{sub 2}S involves activation of the MEK/ERK pathway and some apoptotic mechanisms.

  19. [Signaling mechanisms involved in resolution of inflammation].

    PubMed

    Cervantes-Villagrana, Rodolfo Daniel; Cervantes-Villagrana, Alberto Rafael; Presno-Bernal, José Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a physiological process, which eliminates pathogens and induces repair of damaged tissue. This process is controlled by negative feedback mechanisms, but if the inflammation persists, it generates a deleterious autoimmune process or can to contribute with diseases such as obesity or cancer. The inflammation resolution involves mechanisms such as decrease of proliferation and maturation of immune cells, phagocytosis and apoptosis of immune cells, and decrease of proinflammatory mediators. Therefore, is relevant to study the physiological effects of specific receptors that participate in inflammation resolution and the design of specific agonists as conventional anti-inflammatory therapeutics, without dramatic collateral effects. In this review, we study some mechanisms associated with inflammation inhibition, particularly the transduction of receptors for ligands with anti-inflammatory effects and that are relevant for their potential therapeutic.

  20. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies.

  1. Major regulatory mechanisms involved in sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Rute; Sá, Rosália; Barros, Alberto; Sousa, Mário

    2017-01-01

    The genetic bases and molecular mechanisms involved in the assembly and function of the flagellum components as well as in the regulation of the flagellar movement are not fully understood, especially in humans. There are several causes for sperm immotility, of which some can be avoided and corrected, whereas other are related to genetic defects and deserve full investigation to give a diagnosis to patients. This review was performed after an extensive literature search on the online databases PubMed, ScienceDirect, and Web of Science. Here, we review the involvement of regulatory pathways responsible for sperm motility, indicating possible causes for sperm immotility. These included the calcium pathway, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, the importance of kinases and phosphatases, the function of reactive oxygen species, and how the regulation of cell volume and osmolarity are also fundamental components. We then discuss main gene defects associated with specific morphological abnormalities. Finally, we slightly discuss some preventive and treatments approaches to avoid development of conditions that are associated with unspecified sperm immotility. We believe that in the near future, with the development of more powerful techniques, the genetic causes of sperm immotility and the regulatory mechanisms of sperm motility will be better understand, thus enabling to perform a full diagnosis and uncover new therapies. PMID:26680031

  2. Mechanisms of Mass-independent Fractionation of Sulfur Isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    2006-05-01

    Sulfur mass-independent fractionation (MIF) is believed to arise from gas-phase atmospheric reactions involving SO2 and H2S [1]. However, a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms remains elusive. Here I will discuss two MIF mechanisms for sulfur isotopes, and use existing laboratory data to place constraints on these mechanisms. The relevant laboratory data includes the following: 1) Photolysis of H2S [2]; 2) spark discharge of SO2 [3]; 3) SO2 photolysis from 190-210 nm [3]; 4) SO2 photolysis at wavelengths > 220 nm [4]. Experiments 1 and 2 yielded elemental sulfur (Sel) that exhibited primarily mass-dependent fractionation, while experiment 3 produced Sel with a large MIF signature, and experiment 4 yielded sulfate with a smaller MIF signature. One likely MIF mechanism is intramolecular disequilibrium (or non-RRKM) effects, as proposed for O + O2 -- > O3 [5]. The isoelectronic sulfur reaction, S + S2 --> S3, may also exhibit non-RRKM effects, but for several reasons that I will discuss such effects may either be reduced in magnitude or of negligible importance. A second possible source of MIF is isotope-selective photodissociation during predissociation. This process is likely in SO and SH, may occur in SO2, and unlikely in H2S, but in all cases depends on wavelength. SO2 dissociation is also likely to depend on the oxygen isotopes present, because an O isotope substitution will change SO2 symmetry. Although this may produce a MIF signature in oxygen isotopes, it's not clear that this would be accompanied by a MIF effect in S. I will present kinetics simulations of the above H2S and SO2 photolysis experiments, and show how it is possible to use the results of these experiments to constrain the mechanism of MIF for atmospheric sulfur species. For example, simulations of Sel formation by H2S photolysis predict little MIF in experiments, but possible MIF in the atmosphere. [1] J. Farquhar et al. (2000) Science 289 756-758. [2] J. Farquhar et al. (2000) Nature

  3. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Schwann Cell Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Boerboom, Angélique; Dion, Valérie; Chariot, Alain; Franzen, Rachelle

    2017-01-01

    Schwann cell incredible plasticity is a hallmark of the utmost importance following nerve damage or in demyelinating neuropathies. After injury, Schwann cells undergo dedifferentiation before redifferentiating to promote nerve regeneration and complete functional recovery. This review updates and discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in the negative regulation of myelination as well as in the reprogramming of Schwann cells taking place early following nerve lesion to support repair. Significant advance has been made on signaling pathways and molecular components that regulate SC regenerative properties. These include for instance transcriptional regulators such as c-Jun or Notch, the MAPK and the Nrg1/ErbB2/3 pathways. This comprehensive overview ends with some therapeutical applications targeting factors that control Schwann cell plasticity and highlights the need to carefully modulate and balance this capacity to drive nerve repair. PMID:28261057

  4. Brain mechanisms involved in processing unreal perceptions.

    PubMed

    Ku, Jeonghun; Kim, Jae-Jin; Jung, Young Chul; Park, Il Ho; Lee, Hyeongrae; Han, Kiwan; Yoon, Kang Jun; Kim, In Young; Kim, Sun I

    2008-12-01

    Individuals sometimes experience an illusory or hallucinatory perception. This unreal perception is usually resolved after the individual recognizes that the perception was not real. In this study, we investigated the brain mechanisms involved in the process to an illusory or hallucinatory perception through 'obtaining insight into unreality'. We used a novel and intuitive paradigm designed by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging and augmented reality technology to simulate visual illusory stimuli that mimic hallucinations during brain scanning. The results showed various brain activations, predominantly in the amygdala in the early phase, the medial frontal cortex and the occipitotemporal junction in the middle phase, and the thalamus in the late phase, which correlated with a subject's proneness to hallucinating. These activations may correspond to a 'responding stage' for a perception-based immediate emotional reaction, a 'monitoring stage' for integration and recalibration to ascertain that the perception was not real, and a 'resolving stage' for controlling the information and finally settling it, respectively. Our paradigm and findings may be useful in understanding the mechanisms for discriminating and coping with hallucinatory perceptions.

  5. DNA-binding protects p53 from interactions with cofactors involved in transcription-independent functions

    PubMed Central

    Lambrughi, Matteo; De Gioia, Luca; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Nussinov, Ruth; Urani, Chiara; Bruschi, Maurizio; Papaleo, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Binding-induced conformational changes of a protein at regions distant from the binding site may play crucial roles in protein function and regulation. The p53 tumour suppressor is an example of such an allosterically regulated protein. Little is known, however, about how DNA binding can affect distal sites for transcription factors. Furthermore, the molecular details of how a local perturbation is transmitted through a protein structure are generally elusive and occur on timescales hard to explore by simulations. Thus, we employed state-of-the-art enhanced sampling atomistic simulations to unveil DNA-induced effects on p53 structure and dynamics that modulate the recruitment of cofactors and the impact of phosphorylation at Ser215. We show that DNA interaction promotes a conformational change in a region 3 nm away from the DNA binding site. Specifically, binding to DNA increases the population of an occluded minor state at this distal site by more than 4-fold, whereas phosphorylation traps the protein in its major state. In the minor conformation, the interface of p53 that binds biological partners related to p53 transcription-independent functions is not accessible. Significantly, our study reveals a mechanism of DNA-mediated protection of p53 from interactions with partners involved in the p53 transcription-independent signalling. This also suggests that conformational dynamics is tightly related to p53 signalling. PMID:27604871

  6. Electric field-directed fibroblast locomotion involves cell surface molecular reorganization and is calcium independent

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Directional cellular locomotion is thought to involve localized intracellular calcium changes and the lateral transport of cell surface molecules. We have examined the roles of both calcium and cell surface glycoprotein redistribution in the directional migration of two murine fibroblastic cell lines, NIH 3T3 and SV101. These cell types exhibit persistent, cathode directed motility when exposed to direct current electric fields. Using time lapse phase contrast microscopy and image analysis, we have determined that electric field-directed locomotion in each cell type is a calcium independent process. Both exhibit cathode directed motility in the absence of extracellular calcium, and electric fields cause no detectable elevations or gradients of cytosolic free calcium. We find evidence suggesting that galvanotaxis in these cells involves the lateral redistribution of plasma membrane glycoproteins. Electric fields cause the lateral migration of plasma membrane concanavalin A receptors toward the cathode in both NIH 3T3 and SV101 fibroblasts. Exposure of directionally migrating cells to Con A inhibits the normal change of cell direction following a reversal of electric field polarity. Additionally, when cells are plated on Con A- coated substrata so that Con A receptors mediate cell-substratum adhesion, cathode-directed locomotion and a cathodal accumulation of Con A receptors are observed. Immunofluorescent labeling of the fibronectin receptor in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts suggests the recruitment of integrins from large clusters to form a more diffuse distribution toward the cathode in field-treated cells. Our results indicate that the mechanism of electric field directed locomotion in NIH 3T3 and SV101 fibroblasts involves the lateral redistribution of plasma membrane glycoproteins involved in cell-substratum adhesion. PMID:7929557

  7. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the mechanical actuation subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacher, J. L.; Montgomery, A. D.; Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1987-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). The IOA analysis process utilized available MAS hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  8. Independent recruitment of a conserved developmental mechanism during leaf evolution.

    PubMed

    Harrison, C Jill; Corley, Susie B; Moylan, Elizabeth C; Alexander, Debbie L; Scotland, Robert W; Langdale, Jane A

    2005-03-24

    Vascular plants evolved in the Middle to Late Silurian period, about 420 million years ago. The fossil record indicates that these primitive plants had branched stems with sporangia but no leaves. Leaf-like lateral outgrowths subsequently evolved on at least two independent occasions. In extant plants, these events are represented by microphyllous leaves in lycophytes (clubmosses, spikemosses and quillworts) and megaphyllous leaves in euphyllophytes (ferns, gymnosperms and angiosperms). Our current understanding of how leaves develop is restricted to processes that operate during megaphyll formation. Because microphylls and megaphylls evolved independently, different mechanisms might be required for leaf formation. Here we show that this is not so. Gene expression data from a microphyllous lycophyte, phylogenetic analyses, and a cross-species complementation experiment all show that a common developmental mechanism can underpin both microphyll and megaphyll formation. We propose that this mechanism might have operated originally in the context of primitive plant apices to facilitate bifurcation. Recruitment of this pathway to form leaves occurred independently and in parallel in different plant lineages.

  9. Independent Passive Mechanical Behavior of Bovine Extraocular Muscle Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Andrew; Yoo, Lawrence; Chaudhuri, Zia; Demer, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Intramuscular innervation of horizontal rectus extraocular muscles (EOMs) is segregated into superior and inferior (transverse) compartments, while all EOMs are also divided into global (GL) and orbital (OL) layers with scleral and pulley insertions, respectively. We sought evidence of potential independent action by examining passive mechanical coupling between EOM compartments. Methods. Putative compartments of each of the six whole bovine anatomical EOMs were separately clamped to a physiologically controlled, dual channel microtensile load cell (5-mN force resolution) driven by independent, high-speed, linear motors having 20-nm position resolution. One channel at a time was extended or retracted by 3 to 5 mm, with the other channel stationary. Fiducials distributed on the EOM global surface enabled optical tracking of local deformation. Loading rates of 5 to 100 mm/sec were applied to explore speeds from slow vergence to saccades. Control loadings employed transversely loaded EOM and isotropic latex. Results. All EOM bellies and tendons exhibited substantial compartmental independence when loaded in the physiologic direction, both between OL and GL, and for arbitrary transverse parsings of EOM width ranging from 60%:40% to 80%:20%. Intercompartmental force coupling in the physiologic direction was less than or equal to 10% in all six EOMS even for saccadic loading rates. Coupling was much higher for nonphysiologic transverse EOM loading and isotropic latex. Optical tracking demonstrated independent strain distribution between EOM compartments. Conclusions. Substantial mechanical independence exists among physiologically loaded fiber bundles in bovine EOMs and tendons, providing biomechanical support for the proposal that differential compartmental function in horizontal rectus EOMs contributes to novel torsional and vertical actions. PMID:23188730

  10. Mechanisms Involved in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Juliana Pereira; Lessa, Marcos Adriano

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Furthermore, research has shown that exercise, in addition to reducing cardiovascular risk factors, can also protect the heart against injury due to ischemia and reperfusion through a direct effect on the myocardium. However, the specific mechanism involved in exerciseinduced cardiac preconditioning is still under debate. Objective To perform a systematic review of the studies that have addressed the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise promotes direct cardioprotection against ischemia and reperfusion injury. Methods A search was conducted using MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde, and Scientific Electronic Library Online databases. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by two independent researchers, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the studies. Results The search retrieved 78 studies; after evaluating the abstracts, 30 studies were excluded. The manuscripts of the remaining 48 studies were completely read and, of these, 20 were excluded. Finally, 28 studies were included in this systematic review. Conclusion On the basis of the selected studies, the following are potentially involved in the cardioprotective response to exercise: increased heat shock protein production, nitric oxide pathway involvement, increased cardiac antioxidant capacity, improvement in ATP-dependent potassium channel function, and opioid system activation. Despite all the previous investigations, further research is still necessary to obtain more consistent conclusions. PMID:25830711

  11. Transition to Independent Living and Substance Involvement of Treated and High Risk Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kypri, Kypros; McCarthy, Denis M.; Coe, Michael T.; Brown, Sandra A.

    2004-01-01

    National studies indicate that alcohol and drug involvement increases during transition from adolescence to young adulthood. The present study evaluated change in alcohol and drug use as youth move from living with their family of origin to independent living environments. Two samples of youth, those who had previously been treated for alcohol and…

  12. Hydrogel Nanocomposites with Independently Tunable Rheology and Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Unterman, Shimon; Charles, Lyndon F; Strecker, Sara E; Kramarenko, Denis; Pivovarchik, Dmitry; Edelman, Elazer R; Artzi, Natalie

    2017-03-28

    Hydrogels are an attractive class of biomaterials for minimally invasive local drug delivery given their injectability, tunability, high water content, and biocompatibility. Broad applicability though is challenged: relatively modest mechanical properties restrict use to soft tissues, while flow properties necessary for injectability limit implantation to dried, enclosed tissues to minimize material migration during gelation. To address these dual concerns, we designed an injectable nanocomposite hydrogel based on dextran aldehyde and a poly(amido amine) dendrimer doped with phyllosilicate nanoplatelet fillers. Balance of components allows for exfoliation of nanoplatelets, significantly changing macromer solution flow, facilitating injection and manipulation in a wide variety of implantation contexts while enhancing compressive modulus of hydrogels at low loading. Importantly, rheological and mechanical effects were dependent on aspect ratio, with high aspect ratio nanoplatelets having much stronger effects on mechanics and low aspect ratio nanoplatelets having stronger effects on rheology, enabling nearly independent control of rheological and mechanical properties. Nanoplatelets enhanced hydrogel properties at a filler loading substantially lower than that of comparably sized nanoparticles. We present a model to explain the role that aspect ratio plays in control of rheology and mechanics in nanoplatelet-containing hydrogels, with lessons for further nanocomposite hydrogel development. This low-cost biocompatible material may be useful as a drug delivery platform in challenging implantation environments.

  13. Mechanisms Involved in the Aging-Induced Vascular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    El Assar, Mariam; Angulo, Javier; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F.; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2012-01-01

    Vascular aging is a key process determining health status of aged population. Aging is an independent cardiovascular risk factor associated to an impairment of endothelial function, which is a very early and important event leading to cardiovascular disease. Vascular aging, formerly being considered an immutable and inexorable risk factor, is now viewed as a target process for intervention in order to achieve a healthier old age. A further knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the age-related vascular dysfunction is required to design an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent or restore this impairment of vascular functionality. Among the proposed mechanisms that contribute to age-dependent endothelial dysfunction, this review is focused on the following aspects occurring into the vascular wall: (1) the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, caused by diminished NO synthesis and/or by augmented NO scavenging due to oxidative stress, leading to peroxynitrite formation (ONOO−); (2) the possible sources involved in the enhancement of oxidative stress; (3) the increased activity of vasoconstrictor factors; and (4) the development of a low-grade pro-inflammatory environment. Synergisms and interactions between all these pathways are also analyzed. Finally, a brief summary of some cellular mechanisms related to endothelial cell senescence (including telomere and telomerase, stress-induced senescence, as well as sirtuins) are implemented, as they are likely involved in the age-dependent endothelial dysfunction, as well as in the lower vascular repairing capacity observed in the elderly. Prevention or reversion of those mechanisms leading to endothelial dysfunction through life style modifications or pharmacological interventions could markedly improve cardiovascular health in older people. PMID:22783194

  14. Mechanisms involved in the aging-induced vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    El Assar, Mariam; Angulo, Javier; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio

    2012-01-01

    Vascular aging is a key process determining health status of aged population. Aging is an independent cardiovascular risk factor associated to an impairment of endothelial function, which is a very early and important event leading to cardiovascular disease. Vascular aging, formerly being considered an immutable and inexorable risk factor, is now viewed as a target process for intervention in order to achieve a healthier old age. A further knowledge of the mechanisms underlying the age-related vascular dysfunction is required to design an adequate therapeutic strategy to prevent or restore this impairment of vascular functionality. Among the proposed mechanisms that contribute to age-dependent endothelial dysfunction, this review is focused on the following aspects occurring into the vascular wall: (1) the reduction of nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability, caused by diminished NO synthesis and/or by augmented NO scavenging due to oxidative stress, leading to peroxynitrite formation (ONOO(-)); (2) the possible sources involved in the enhancement of oxidative stress; (3) the increased activity of vasoconstrictor factors; and (4) the development of a low-grade pro-inflammatory environment. Synergisms and interactions between all these pathways are also analyzed. Finally, a brief summary of some cellular mechanisms related to endothelial cell senescence (including telomere and telomerase, stress-induced senescence, as well as sirtuins) are implemented, as they are likely involved in the age-dependent endothelial dysfunction, as well as in the lower vascular repairing capacity observed in the elderly. Prevention or reversion of those mechanisms leading to endothelial dysfunction through life style modifications or pharmacological interventions could markedly improve cardiovascular health in older people.

  15. Arsenite-induced mitotic death involves stress response and is independent of tubulin polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, B. Frazier; McNeely, Samuel C.; Miller, Heather L.; States, J. Christopher

    2008-07-15

    Arsenite, a known mitotic disruptor, causes cell cycle arrest and cell death at anaphase. The mechanism causing mitotic arrest is highly disputed. We compared arsenite to the spindle poisons nocodazole and paclitaxel. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in interphase cells demonstrated that, while nocodazole and paclitaxel disrupt microtubule polymerization through destabilization and hyperpolymerization, respectively, microtubules in arsenite-treated cells remain comparable to untreated cells even at supra-therapeutic concentrations. Immunofluorescence analysis of {alpha}-tubulin in mitotic cells showed spindle formation in arsenite- and paclitaxel-treated cells but not in nocodazole-treated cells. Spindle formation in arsenite-treated cells appeared irregular and multi-polar. {gamma}-tubulin staining showed that cells treated with nocodazole and therapeutic concentrations of paclitaxel contained two centrosomes. In contrast, most arsenite-treated mitotic cells contained more than two centrosomes, similar to centrosome abnormalities induced by heat shock. Of the three drugs tested, only arsenite treatment increased expression of the inducible isoform of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i). HSP70 and HSP90 proteins are intimately involved in centrosome regulation and mitotic spindle formation. HSP90 inhibitor 17-DMAG sensitized cells to arsenite treatment and increased arsenite-induced centrosome abnormalities. Combined treatment of 17-DMAG and arsenite resulted in a supra-additive effect on viability, mitotic arrest, and centrosome abnormalities. Thus, arsenite-induced abnormal centrosome amplification and subsequent mitotic arrest is independent of effects on tubulin polymerization and may be due to specific stresses that are protected against by HSP90 and HSP70.

  16. Homing orientation in salamanders: A mechanism involving chemical cues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madison, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    A detailed description is given of experiments made to determine the senses and chemical cues used by salamanders for homing orientation. Sensory impairment and cue manipulative techniques were used in the investigation. All experiments were carried out at night. Results show that sense impaired animals did not home as readily as those who were blind but retained their sensory mechanism. This fact suggests that the olfactory mechanism is necessary for homing in the salamander. It was determined that after the impaired salamander regenerated its sensory mechanism it too returned home. It was concluded that homing ability in salamanders is direction independent, distant dependent, and vision independent.

  17. An ATM-independent S-phase checkpoint response involves CHK1 pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Xiang-Yang; Wang, Xiang; Hu, Baocheng; Guan, Jun; Iliakis, George; Wang, Ya

    2002-01-01

    After exposure to genotoxic stress, proliferating cells actively slow down the DNA replication through a S-phase checkpoint to provide time for repair. We report that in addition to the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent pathway that controls the fast response, there is an ATM-independent pathway that controls the slow response to regulate the S-phase checkpoint after ionizing radiation in mammalian cells. The slow response of S-phase checkpoint, which is resistant to wortmannin, sensitive to caffeine and UCN-01, and related to cyclin-dependent kinase phosphorylation, is much stronger in CHK1 overexpressed cells, and it could be abolished by Chk1 antisense oligonucleotides. These results provide evidence that the ATM-independent slow response of S-phase checkpoint involves CHK1 pathway.

  18. Polarization-independent mechanically induced long-period fiber gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Ueyn L.; Ozcan, Aydogan; Digonnet, Michel J. F.; Fejer, Martin M.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs) utilizing the photoelastic effect and have demonstrated polarization-independent operation. The LPFG is made by pressing a standard, jacketed single-mode fiber between a flat plate and a plate with grooves mechanically machined with a suitable period. The grating's transmission spectrum is easily tuned by adjusting pressure, grating tilt, and length. Furthermore, the grating can be completely erased by removing the pressure from the fiber. Grating attenuation greater than 25 dB has been demonstrated with a notch-location polarization dependence of +-4 nm. In this paper we report drastic reduction in this polarization dependence by two different approaches. Passing through the grating a second time after reflecting off a Faraday rotator mirror was successful; this method may be used with other types of LPFGs. The second approach utilizes our mechanical grating's ability to be double-passed with two fibers side-by-side. Between passes, a fiber-loop half-wave plate aligned at 45 degrees to the plane of the grooved plate swaps power between x- and y-polarization states. The resulting output's measured polarization dependence was smaller than +/- 0.2 nm. Further improvement is expected through careful tuning of the wave plate. We also report a computer model of the filter spectrum and its polarization dependence, which takes into account non-uniform index perturbation, lossy cladding modes, cladding index perturbation, as well as the polarization dependence of the photoelastic effect, characteristics not usually present in UV-induced LPFGs. The model generates transmission spectra that agree quite well with experimental results.

  19. Evidence for the involvement of apoptosis-inducing factor-mediated caspase-independent neuronal death in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenfeng; Mechawar, Naguib; Krantic, Slavica; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-05-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests the involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent mechanisms in neuronal cell death in Alzheimer disease (AD). The apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) is a mitochondrial oxido-reductase originally characterized as a mediator of caspase-independent programmed cell death (PCD). In this postmortem study, we investigated the distribution of AIF and its possible morphological association with pathological features in the hippocampus, as well as entorhinal and medial gyrus of temporal cortices of late stage AD, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and control subjects. In comparison with controls, a significant increase in neuronal AIF immunoreactivity (AIF-ir) was observed in the hippocampus and the superficial layers of entorhinal and medial gyrus of temporal cortices in AD--but not DLB--samples. AIF-ir in neuronal nuclei was also significantly more widespread in AD compared with control and DLB samples. Furthermore, AIF-ir was found to be colocalized with neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in AD brains. Interestingly, a significant positive correlation was seen between nuclear AIF-ir and Braak stage in CA1 of the hippocampus as well as in entorhinal and temporal cortices in AD samples. These data show for the first time: (1) the nuclear localization of AIF in the AD brain and (2) its colocalization with NFTs, suggesting a possible involvement of AIF-mediated caspase-independent PCD, at least in the late stage of this neuropathology.

  20. Functional Identification of Novel Genes Involved in the Glutathione-Independent Gentisate Pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xi-Hui; Jiang, Cheng-Ying; Huang, Yan; Liu, Zhi-Pei; Liu, Shuang-Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum used gentisate and 3-hydroxybenzoate as its sole carbon and energy source for growth. By genome-wide data mining, a gene cluster designated ncg12918-ncg12923 was proposed to encode putative proteins involved in gentisate/3-hydroxybenzoate pathway. Genes encoding gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase (ncg12920) and fumarylpyruvate hydrolase (ncg12919) were identified by cloning and expression of each gene in Escherichia coli. The gene of ncg12918 encoding a hypothetical protein (Ncg12918) was proved to be essential for gentisate-3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation. Mutant strain RES167Δncg12918 lost the ability to grow on gentisate or 3-hydroxybenzoate, but this ability could be restored in C. glutamicum upon the complementation with pXMJ19-ncg12918. Cloning and expression of this ncg12918 gene in E. coli showed that Ncg12918 is a glutathione-independent maleylpyruvate isomerase. Upstream of ncg12920, the genes ncg12921-ncg12923 were located, which were essential for gentisate and/or 3-hydroxybenzoate catabolism. The Ncg12921 was able to up-regulate gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, maleylpyruvate isomerase, and fumarylpyruvate hydrolase activities. The genes ncg12922 and ncg12923 were deduced to encode a gentisate transporter protein and a 3-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase, respectively, and were essential for gentisate or 3-hydroxybenzoate assimilation. Based on the results obtained in this study, a GSH-independent gentisate pathway was proposed, and genes involved in this pathway were identified. PMID:16000747

  1. Cadmium-induced apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell line: involvement of caspase-dependent and -independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Coutant, A; Lebeau, J; Bidon-Wagner, N; Levalois, C; Lectard, B; Chevillard, S

    2006-11-01

    Cadmium is a widely used heavy metal that causes severe damage to many organs including liver, kidney and lung. Cadmium toxicity has been described as in vitro and in vivo apoptosis but its molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we used the human lymphoblastoid cell line Boleth to characterise cadmium-induced apoptosis further, using sub-lethal (10 microM) and lethal (IC50: 350 microM) doses. At lethal concentration, we observed features of apoptosis between 6 and 8 h after treatment: maturation of caspases 3 and 8, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In order to determine the role of the MAPKs in this process, we investigated p38, ERK1/2 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinases (JNK) phosphorylation: at lethal concentration, all these pathways were rapidly activated, but no decrease in the apoptotic rate was seen on inhibition of these kinases with drugs. Chemical inhibitors of caspases 3 and 8 blocked cleavage of PARP but not cell death, suggesting the existence of a caspase-independent death. We found that cadmium depolarised membrane potential in less than 1 h, as determined with DiOC6 dye. Interestingly, mitochondrial alteration led to the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus, where we observed chromatin condensation and possibly DNA fragmentation. These results suggest that cadmium-induced apoptosis can occur in the Boleth cell line through caspase-dependent and -independent pathways, independently of activation of major MAPKs.

  2. Testing Multiple Psychological Processes for Common Neural Mechanisms Using EEG and Independent Component Analysis.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R

    2016-03-08

    Temporal independent component analysis (ICA) is applied to an electrophysiological signal mixture (such as an EEG recording) to disentangle the independent neural source signals-independent components-underlying said signal mixture. When applied to scalp EEG, ICA is most commonly used either as a pre-processing step (e.g., to isolate physiological processes from non-physiological artifacts), or as a data-reduction step (i.e., to focus on one specific neural process with increased signal-to-noise ratio). However, ICA can be used in an even more powerful way that fundamentally expands the inferential utility of scalp EEG. The core assumption of EEG-ICA-namely, that individual independent components represent separable neural processes-can be leveraged to derive the following inferential logic: If a specific independent component shows activity related to multiple psychological processes within the same dataset (e.g., elicited by different experimental events), it follows that those psychological processes involve a common, non-separable neural mechanism. As such, this logic allows testing a class of hypotheses that is beyond the reach of regular EEG analyses techniques, thereby crucially increasing the inferential utility of the EEG. In the current article, this logic will be referred to as the 'common independent process identification' (CIPI) approach. This article aims to provide a tutorial into the application of this powerful approach, targeted at researchers that have a basic understanding of standard EEG analysis. Furthermore, the article aims to exemplify the usage of CIPI by outlining recent studies that successfully applied this approach to test neural theories of mental functions.

  3. Mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism: implications for a direct activation of mTOR by phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    You, Jae Sung; Frey, John W; Hornberger, Troy A

    2012-01-01

    Signaling by mTOR is a well-recognized component of the pathway through which mechanical signals regulate protein synthesis and muscle mass. However, the mechanisms involved in the mechanical regulation of mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nevertheless, recent studies suggest that a mechanically-induced increase in phosphatidic acid (PA) may be involved. There is also evidence which suggests that mechanical stimuli, and PA, utilize ERK to induce mTOR signaling. Hence, we reasoned that a mechanically-induced increase in PA might promote mTOR signaling via an ERK-dependent mechanism. To test this, we subjected mouse skeletal muscles to mechanical stimulation in the presence or absence of a MEK/ERK inhibitor, and then measured several commonly used markers of mTOR signaling. Transgenic mice expressing a rapamycin-resistant mutant of mTOR were also used to confirm the validity of these markers. The results demonstrated that mechanically-induced increases in p70(s6k) T389 and 4E-BP1 S64 phosphorylation, and unexpectedly, a loss in total 4E-BP1, were fully mTOR-dependent signaling events. Furthermore, we determined that mechanical stimulation induced these mTOR-dependent events, and protein synthesis, through an ERK-independent mechanism. Similar to mechanical stimulation, exogenous PA also induced mTOR-dependent signaling via an ERK-independent mechanism. Moreover, PA was able to directly activate mTOR signaling in vitro. Combined, these results demonstrate that mechanical stimulation induces mTOR signaling, and protein synthesis, via an ERK-independent mechanism that potentially involves a direct interaction of PA with mTOR. Furthermore, it appears that a decrease in total 4E-BP1 may be part of the mTOR-dependent mechanism through which mechanical stimuli activate protein synthesis.

  4. COX-Independent Mechanisms of Cancer Chemoprevention by Anti-Inflammatory Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Gurpinar, Evrim; Grizzle, William E.; Piazza, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selective inhibitors, reduce the risk of developing cancer. Experimental studies in human cancer cell lines and rodent models of carcinogenesis support these observations by providing strong evidence for the antineoplastic properties of NSAIDs. The involvement of COX-2 in tumorigenesis and its overexpression in various cancer tissues suggest that inhibition of COX-2 is responsible for the chemopreventive efficacy of these agents. However, the precise mechanisms by which NSAIDs exert their antiproliferative effects are still a matter of debate. Numerous other studies have shown that NSAIDs can act through COX-independent mechanisms. This review provides a detailed description of the major COX-independent molecular targets of NSAIDs and discusses how these targets may be involved in their anticancer effects. Toxicities resulting from COX inhibition and the suppression of prostaglandin synthesis preclude the long-term use of NSAIDs for cancer chemoprevention. Furthermore, chemopreventive efficacy is incomplete and treatment often leads to the development of resistance. Identification of alternative NSAID targets and elucidation of the biochemical processes by which they inhibit tumor growth could lead to the development of safer and more efficacious drugs for cancer chemoprevention. PMID:23875171

  5. Arabidopsis Responds to Alternaria alternata Volatiles by Triggering Plastid Phosphoglucose Isomerase-Independent Mechanisms1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-López, Ángela María; Bahaji, Abdellatif; De Diego, Nuria; Baslam, Marouane; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; García-Gómez, Pablo; Ricarte-Bermejo, Adriana; Novák, Ondřej; Spíchal, Lukáš; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Volatile compounds (VCs) emitted by phylogenetically diverse microorganisms (including plant pathogens and microbes that do not normally interact mutualistically with plants) promote photosynthesis, growth, and the accumulation of high levels of starch in leaves through cytokinin (CK)-regulated processes. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants not exposed to VCs, plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI) acts as an important determinant of photosynthesis and growth, likely as a consequence of its involvement in the synthesis of plastidic CKs in roots. Moreover, this enzyme plays an important role in connecting the Calvin-Benson cycle with the starch biosynthetic pathway in leaves. To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the responses of plants to microbial VCs and to investigate the extent of pPGI involvement, we characterized pPGI-null pgi1-2 Arabidopsis plants cultured in the presence or absence of VCs emitted by Alternaria alternata. We found that volatile emissions from this fungal phytopathogen promote growth, photosynthesis, and the accumulation of plastidic CKs in pgi1-2 leaves. Notably, the mesophyll cells of pgi1-2 leaves accumulated exceptionally high levels of starch following VC exposure. Proteomic analyses revealed that VCs promote global changes in the expression of proteins involved in photosynthesis, starch metabolism, and growth that can account for the observed responses in pgi1-2 plants. The overall data show that Arabidopsis plants can respond to VCs emitted by phytopathogenic microorganisms by triggering pPGI-independent mechanisms. PMID:27663407

  6. Independent backup mode transfer and mechanism for digital control computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulpule, Bhalchandra R. (Inventor); Oscarson, Edward M. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    An interrupt is provided to a signal processor having a non-maskable interrupt input, in response to the detection of a request for transfer to backup software. The signal processor provides a transfer signal to a transfer mechanism only after completion of the present machine cycle. Transfer to the backup software is initiated by the transfer mechanism only upon reception of the transfer signal.

  7. WNT regulation of embryonic development likely involves pathways independent of nuclear CTNNB1.

    PubMed

    Tribulo, Paula; Moss, James I; Ozawa, Manabu; Jiang, Zongliang; Tian, Xiuchun Cindy; Hansen, Peter J

    2017-04-01

    The bovine was used to examine the potential for WNT signaling to affect the preimplantation embryo. Expression of seven key genes involved in canonical WNT signaling declined to a nadir at the morula or blastocyst stage. Expression of 80 genes associated with WNT signaling in the morula and inner cell mass (ICM) and trophectoderm (TE) of the blastocyst was also evaluated. Many genes associated with WNT signaling were characterized by low transcript abundance. Seven genes were different between ICM and TE, and all of them were overexpressed in TE as compared to ICM, including WNT6, FZD1, FZD7, LRP6, PORCN, APC and SFRP1 Immunoreactive CTNNB1 was localized primarily to the plasma membrane at all stages examined from the 2-cell to blastocyst stages of development. Strikingly, neither CTNNB1 nor non-phospho (i.e., active) CTNNB1 was observed in the nucleus of blastomeres at any stage of development even after the addition of WNT activators to culture. In contrast, CTNNB1 associated with the plasma membrane was increased by activators of WNT signaling. The planar cell polarity pathway (PCP) could be activated in the embryo as indicated by an experiment demonstrating an increase in phospho-JNK in the nucleus of blastocysts treated with the non-canonical WNT11. Furthermore, WNT11 improved development to the blastocyst stage. In conclusion, canonical WNT signaling is attenuated in the preimplantation bovine embryo but WNT can activate the PCP component JNK. Thus, regulation of embryonic development by WNT is likely to involve activation of pathways independent of nuclear actions of CTNNB1.

  8. A Unique Platform for H-Ras Signaling Involving Clathrin-independent Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Porat-Shliom, Natalie; Kloog, Yoel

    2008-01-01

    Trafficking of H-Ras was examined to determine whether it can enter cells through clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE). H-Ras colocalized with the CIE cargo protein, class I major histocompatibility complex, and it was sequestered in vacuoles that formed upon expression of an active mutant of Arf6, Q67L. Activation of Ras, either through epidermal growth factor stimulation or the expression of an active mutant of Ras, G12V, induced plasma membrane ruffling and macropinocytosis, a stimulated form of CIE. Live imaging of cells expressing H-RasG12V and fluorescent protein chimeras with pleckstrin homology domains that recognize specific phosphoinositides showed that incoming macropinosomes contained phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatiylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). PIP2 loss from the macropinosome was followed by the recruitment of Rab5, a downstream target of Ras, and then PIP3 loss. Our studies support a model whereby Ras can signal on macropinosomes that pass through three distinct stages: PIP2/PIP3, PIP3/Rab5, and Rab5. Vacuoles that form in cells expressing Arf6Q67L trap Ras signaling in the first stage, recruiting the active form of the Ras effectors extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) but not Rab5. Arf6 stimulation of macropinocytosis also involves passage through the distinct lipid phases, but recruitment of Akt is not observed. PMID:18094044

  9. Similar phenomena, different mechanisms: semantic and phonological false memories are produced by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ballou, McKenzie R; Sommers, Mitchell S

    2008-12-01

    The Deese/Roediger-McDermott paradigm can produce high levels of false remembering for lists of both semantic and phonological associates. The present study investigated whether similar mechanisms mediate false memories with these two types of lists. Experiment 1 measured the relationship between levels of false memory obtained with lists of semantic and phonological associates. The results indicated little correlation between false memories generated with the two types of associates. Experiment 2 used a between-subjects design to determine whether the absence of a significant correlation in Experiment 1 was a consequence of the relatively low levels of false memory observed in that experiment. The results indicated similar proportions of false memories in Experiments 1 and 2, suggesting that the within-subjects design in Experiment 1 did not reduce the overall levels of false recall or recognition. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for the independence of the mechanisms mediating different types of false memories.

  10. Time-independent Anisotropic Plastic Behavior by Mechanical Subelement Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pian, T. H. H.

    1983-01-01

    The paper describes a procedure for modelling the anisotropic elastic-plastic behavior of metals in plane stress state by the mechanical sub-layer model. In this model the stress-strain curves along the longitudinal and transverse directions are represented by short smooth segments which are considered as piecewise linear for simplicity. The model is incorporated in a finite element analysis program which is based on the assumed stress hybrid element and the iscoplasticity-theory.

  11. Pain without nociceptors? Nav1.7-independent pain mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Minett, Michael S; Falk, Sarah; Santana-Varela, Sonia; Bogdanov, Yury D; Nassar, Mohammed A; Heegaard, Anne-Marie; Wood, John N

    2014-01-30

    Nav1.7, a peripheral neuron voltage-gated sodium channel, is essential for pain and olfaction in mice and humans. We examined the role of Nav1.7 as well as Nav1.3, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 in different mouse models of chronic pain. Constriction-injury-dependent neuropathic pain is abolished when Nav1.7 is deleted in sensory neurons, unlike nerve-transection-related pain, which requires the deletion of Nav1.7 in sensory and sympathetic neurons for pain relief. Sympathetic sprouting that develops in parallel with nerve-transection pain depends on the presence of Nav1.7 in sympathetic neurons. Mechanical and cold allodynia required distinct sets of neurons and different repertoires of sodium channels depending on the nerve injury model. Surprisingly, pain induced by the chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin and cancer-induced bone pain do not require the presence of Nav1.7 sodium channels or Nav1.8-positive nociceptors. Thus, similar pain phenotypes arise through distinct cellular and molecular mechanisms. Therefore, rational analgesic drug therapy requires patient stratification in terms of mechanisms and not just phenotype.

  12. Mechanisms of FAD neurodegeneration may be independent of Aβ

    PubMed Central

    Robakis, Nikolaos K.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in the aged population. Most cases are sporadic although a small percent are familial (FAD) linked to genetic mutations. AD is caused by severe neurodegeneration in the hippocampus and neocortical regions of the brain but the cause of this neuronal loss is unclear. A widely discussed theory posits that amyloid depositions of Aβ peptides or their soluble forms are the causative agents of AD. Extensive research in the last twenty years however, failed to produce convincing evidence that brain amyloid is the main cause of AD neurodegeneration. Moreover, a number of observations, including absence of correlations between amyloid deposits and cognition, detection in normal individuals of amyloid loads similar to AD, and animal models with behavioral abnormalities independent of amyloid, are inconsistent with this theory. Other theories propose soluble Aβ or its oligomers as agents that promote AD. These peptides, however, are normal components of human CSF and serum and there is little evidence of disease-associated increases in soluble Aβ and oligomers. That mutants of APP and presenilin (PS) promote FAD suggests these proteins play crucial roles in neuronal function and survival. Accordingly, PS regulates production of signaling peptides and cell survival pathways while APP functions in cell death and may promote endosomal abnormalities. Evidence that FAD mutations inhibit the biological functions of PS combined with absence of haploinsufficiency mutants, support the hypothesis that FAD mutant alleles promote autosomal dominant neurodegeneration by interfering with the functions of wild type alleles. PMID:20594619

  13. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-08-04

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates.

  14. Thermal fluctuations affect the transcriptome through mechanisms independent of average temperature

    PubMed Central

    Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Schou, Mads Fristrup; Kristensen, Torsten Nygaard; Loeschcke, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial ectotherms are challenged by variation in both mean and variance of temperature. Phenotypic plasticity (thermal acclimation) might mitigate adverse effects, however, we lack a fundamental understanding of the molecular mechanisms of thermal acclimation and how they are affected by fluctuating temperature. Here we investigated the effect of thermal acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster on critical thermal maxima (CTmax) and associated global gene expression profiles as induced by two constant and two ecologically relevant (non-stressful) diurnally fluctuating temperature regimes. Both mean and fluctuation of temperature contributed to thermal acclimation and affected the transcriptome. The transcriptomic response to mean temperatures comprised modification of a major part of the transcriptome, while the response to fluctuations affected a much smaller set of genes, which was highly independent of both the response to a change in mean temperature and to the classic heat shock response. Although the independent transcriptional effects caused by fluctuations were relatively small, they are likely to contribute to our understanding of thermal adaptation. We provide evidence that environmental sensing, particularly phototransduction, is a central mechanism underlying the regulation of thermal acclimation to fluctuating temperatures. Thus, genes and pathways involved in phototransduction are likely of importance in fluctuating climates. PMID:27487917

  15. A Review of Molecular Mechanisms Involved in Toxicity of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Khalili Fard, Javad; Jafari, Samira; Eghbal, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades, the use of nanomaterials has received much attention in industrial and medical fields. However, some reports have mentioned adverse effects of these materials on the biological systems and cellular components. There are several major mechanisms for cytotoxicity of nanoparticles (NPs) such as physicochemical properties, contamination with toxic element, fibrous structure, high surface charge and radical species generation. In this review, a brief key mechanisms involved in toxic effect of NPs are given, followed by the in vitro toxicity assays of NPs and prooxidant effects of several NPs such as carbon nanotubes, titanium dioxide NPs, quantum dots, gold NPs and silver NPs. PMID:26819915

  16. Insulin-independent GLUT4 translocation in proliferative vascular smooth muscle cells involves SM22α.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Peng; Xie, Xiao-Li; Dou, Yong-Qing; Lin, Yan-Ling; Nie, Lei; Lv, Pin; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Xiao-Kun; Miao, Sui-Bing; Yin, Ya-Juan; Dong, Li-Hua; Song, Yu; Shu, Ya-Nan; Han, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The insulin-sensitive glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) is a predominant facilitative glucose transporter in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and is significantly upregulated in rabbit neointima. This study investigated the role of GLUT4 in VSMC proliferation, the cellular mechanism underlying PDGF-BB-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, and effects of SM22α, an actin-binding protein, on this process. Chronic treatment of VSMCs with PDGF-BB significantly elevated GLUT4 expression and glucose uptake. PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation was dependent on GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake. Meanwhile, the response of GLUT4 to insulin decreased in PDGF-BB-stimulated VSMCs. PDGF-BB-induced GLUT4 translocation partially rescued glucose utilization in insulin-resistant cells. Immunofluorescence and western blot analysis revealed that PDGF-BB induced GLUT4 translocation in an actin dynamics-dependent manner. SM22α disruption facilitated GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake by promoting actin dynamics and cortical actin polymerization. Similar results were observed in VSMCs of SM22α (-/-) mice. The in vivo experiments showed that the glucose level in the neointima induced by ligation was significantly increased in SM22α (-/-) mice, accompanied by increased neointimal thickness, compared with those in wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GLUT4-mediated glucose uptake is involved in VSMC proliferation, and provide a novel link between SM22α and glucose utilization in PDGF-BB-triggered proliferation.

  17. Retinol Promotes In Vitro Growth of Proximal Colon Organoids through a Retinoic Acid-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nibe, Yoichi; Akiyama, Shintaro; Matsumoto, Yuka; Nozaki, Kengo; Fukuda, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Ayumi; Mizutani, Tomohiro; Oshima, Shigeru; Watanabe, Mamoru; Nakamura, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Retinol (ROL), the alcohol form of vitamin A, is known to control cell fate decision of various types of stem cells in the form of its active metabolite, retinoic acid (RA). However, little is known about whether ROL has regulatory effects on colonic stem cells. We examined in this study the effect of ROL on the growth of murine normal colonic cells cultured as organoids. As genes involved in RA synthesis from ROL were differentially expressed along the length of the colon, we tested the effect of ROL on proximal and distal colon organoids separately. We found that organoid forming efficiency and the expression level of Lgr5, a marker gene for colonic stem cells were significantly enhanced by ROL in the proximal colon organoids, but not in the distal ones. Interestingly, neither retinaldehyde (RAL), an intermediate product of the ROL-RA pathway, nor RA exhibited growth promoting effects on the proximal colon organoids, suggesting that ROL-dependent growth enhancement in organoids involves an RA-independent mechanism. This was confirmed by the observation that an inhibitor for RA-mediated gene transcription did not abrogate the effect of ROL on organoids. This novel role of ROL in stem cell maintenance in the proximal colon provides insights into the mechanism of region-specific regulation for colonic stem cell maintenance. PMID:27564706

  18. Caspase-independent cell death mediated by apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation is involved in ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hengwen; Yang, Shana; Li, Jianhua; Zhang, Yajie; Gao, Dongsheng; Zhao, Shenting

    2016-03-25

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common cancer in the world. The aim of radiotherapy is to eradicate cancer cells with ionizing radiation. Except for the caspase-dependent mechanism, several lines of evidence demonstrated that caspase-independent mechanism is directly involved in the cell death responding to irradiation. For this reason, defining the contribution of caspase-independent molecular mechanisms represents the main goal in radiotherapy. In this study, we focused on the role of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), the caspase-independent molecular, in ionizing radiation induced hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cell death. We found that ionizing radiation has no function on AIF expression in HepG2 cells, but could induce AIF release from the mitochondria and translocate into nuclei. Inhibition of AIF could reduce ionizing radiation induced HepG2 cell death. These studies strongly support a direct relationship between AIF nuclear translocation and radiation induced cell death. What's more, AIF nuclear translocation is caspase-independent manner, but not caspase-dependent manner, in this process. These new findings add a further attractive point of investigation to better define the complex interplay between caspase-independent cell death and radiation therapy.

  19. Molecular Mechanisms in Mood Regulation Involving the Circadian Clock.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Urs

    2017-01-01

    The circadian system coordinates activities and functions in cells and tissues in order to optimize body functions in anticipation to daily changes in the environment. Disruption of the circadian system, due to irregular lifestyle such as rotating shift work, frequent travel across time-zones, or chronic stress, is correlated with several diseases such as obesity, cancer, and neurological disorders. Molecular mechanisms linking the circadian clock with neurological functions have been uncovered suggesting that disruption of the clock may be critically involved in the development of mood disorders. In this mini-review, I will summarize molecular mechanisms in which clock components play a central role for mood regulation. Such mechanisms have been identified in the monoaminergic system, the HPA axis, and neurogenesis.

  20. Molecular Mechanisms in Mood Regulation Involving the Circadian Clock

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Urs

    2017-01-01

    The circadian system coordinates activities and functions in cells and tissues in order to optimize body functions in anticipation to daily changes in the environment. Disruption of the circadian system, due to irregular lifestyle such as rotating shift work, frequent travel across time-zones, or chronic stress, is correlated with several diseases such as obesity, cancer, and neurological disorders. Molecular mechanisms linking the circadian clock with neurological functions have been uncovered suggesting that disruption of the clock may be critically involved in the development of mood disorders. In this mini-review, I will summarize molecular mechanisms in which clock components play a central role for mood regulation. Such mechanisms have been identified in the monoaminergic system, the HPA axis, and neurogenesis. PMID:28223962

  1. Protein oxidation: examination of potential lipid-independent mechanisms for protein carbonyl formation.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, D P; Ryan, T P; Jolly, R A; Petry, T W

    1998-01-01

    Previous data indicated that diquat-mediated protein oxidation (protein carbonyl formation) occurs through multiple pathways, one of which is lipid dependent, and the other, lipid independent. Studies reported here investigated potential mechanisms of the lipid-independent pathway in greater detail, using bovine serum albumin as the target protein. One hypothesized mechanism of protein carbonyl formation involved diquat-dependent production of H2O2, which would then react with site-specifically bound ferrous iron as proposed by Stadtman and colleagues. This hypothesis was supported by the inhibitory effect of catalase on diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation. However, exogenous H2O2 alone did not induce protein carbonyl formation. Hydroxyl radical-generating reactions may result from the H2O2-catalyzed oxidation of ferrous iron, which normally is bound to protein in the ferric state. Therefore, the possible reduction of site-specifically bound Fe3+ to Fe2+ by the diquat cation radical (which could then react with H2O2) was also investigated. The combination of H2O2 and an iron reductant, ascorbate, however, also failed to induce significant protein carbonyl formation. In a phospholipid-containing system, an ADP:Fe2+ complex induced both lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl formation; both indices were largely inhibitable by antioxidants. There was no substantial ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation in the absence of phospholipid under otherwise identical conditions. Based on the lipid requirement and antioxidant sensitivity, these data suggest that ADP:Fe(2+)-dependent protein carbonyl formation occurs through reaction of BSA with aldehydic lipid peroxidation products. The precise mechanism of diquat-mediated protein carbonyl formation remains unclear, but it appears not to be a function of H2O2 generation or diquat cation radical-dependent reduction of bound Fe3+.

  2. Opioid-independent mechanisms supporting offset analgesia and temporal sharpening of nociceptive information.

    PubMed

    Martucci, K T; Eisenach, J C; Tong, C; Coghill, R C

    2012-06-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed after administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and after intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real-time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1 to 10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered after naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or after the termination of remifentanil infusion. Because thermal hyperalgesia was observed after both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone, and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia, which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals.

  3. Opioid-Independent Mechanisms Supporting Offset Analgesia and Temporal Sharpening of Nociceptive Information

    PubMed Central

    Martucci, K. T.; Eisenach, J. C.; Tong, C.; Coghill, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms supporting temporal processing of pain remain poorly understood. To determine the involvement of opioid mechanisms in temporal processing of pain, responses to dynamic noxious thermal stimuli and offset analgesia were assessed following administration of naloxone, a μ-opioid antagonist, and on a separate day, during and following intravenous administration of remifentanil, a μ-opioid agonist, in 19 healthy human volunteers. Multiple end points were sampled from real time computerized visual analog scale ratings (VAS, 1–10) to assess thermal sensitivity, magnitude and duration of offset analgesia, and painful after sensations. It was hypothesized that the magnitude of offset analgesia would be reduced by direct opioid antagonism and during states of acute opioid-induced hypersensitivity (OIH), as well as diminished by the presence of exogenous opioids. Surprisingly, the magnitude of offset analgesia was not altered following naloxone administration, during remifentanil infusion, or following the termination of remifentanil infusion. Since thermal hyperalgesia was observed following both drugs, 8 of the original 19 subjects returned for an additional session without drug administration. Thermal hyperalgesia and increased magnitude of offset analgesia were observed across conditions of remifentanil, naloxone and no drug within this subset analysis, indicating that repeated heat testing induced thermal hyperalgesia which potentiated the magnitude of offset analgesia. Thus, it is concluded that the mechanisms subserving temporal processing of nociceptive information are largely opioid-independent, but that offset analgesia may be potentiated by heat-induced thermal hyperalgesia in a proportion of individuals. PMID:22503222

  4. The Challenges of Lifelong Learning: Report of a Seminar Involving the New Independent States and Mongolia, February 2002. Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Training Foundation, Turin (Italy).

    To help the New Independent States and Mongolia address central issues related to lifelong learning, the European Training Foundation organized a project on lifelong learning that involved the following countries: Armenia; Belarus; Georgia; Kazakhstan; Kyrgyzstan; Mongolia; the Russian Federation; Ukraine; and Uzbekistan. The project's principal…

  5. An Undergraduate Organic Laboratory Project Involving Independent Synthesis of Novel Flavones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Letcher, R. M.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a synthetic organic laboratory experiment which ensures independence of students but is not excessively demanding of instructor time. Each student is provided with different starting materials to prepare different flavones but use the same general procedure, the "organic synthesis" flavone preparation. Various features of this procedure…

  6. A path-independent integral for fracture of solids under combined electrochemical and mechanical loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haftbaradaran, Hamed; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we first demonstrate that the J-integral in classical linear elasticity becomes path-dependent when the solid is subjected to combined electrical, chemical and mechanical loadings. We then construct an electro-chemo-mechanical J-integral that is path-independent under such combined multiple driving forces. Further, we show that this electro-chemo-mechanical J-integral represents the rate at which the grand potential releases per unit crack growth. As an example, the path-independent nature of the electro-chemo-mechanical J-integral is demonstrated by solving the problem of a thin elastic film delaminated from a thick elastic substrate.

  7. Antibody-independent mechanisms regulate the establishment of chronic Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Brugat, Thibaut; Reid, Adam James; Lin, Jing-Wen; Cunningham, Deirdre; Tumwine, Irene; Kushinga, Garikai; McLaughlin, Sarah; Spence, Philip; Böhme, Ulrike; Sanders, Mandy; Conteh, Solomon; Bushell, Ellen; Metcalf, Tom; Billker, Oliver; Duffy, Patrick E; Newbold, Chris; Berriman, Matthew; Langhorne, Jean

    2017-02-06

    Malaria is caused by parasites of the genus Plasmodium. All human-infecting Plasmodium species can establish long-lasting chronic infections(1-5), creating an infectious reservoir to sustain transmission(1,6). It is widely accepted that the maintenance of chronic infection involves evasion of adaptive immunity by antigenic variation(7). However, genes involved in this process have been identified in only two of five human-infecting species: Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium knowlesi. Furthermore, little is understood about the early events in the establishment of chronic infection in these species. Using a rodent model we demonstrate that from the infecting population, only a minority of parasites, expressing one of several clusters of virulence-associated pir genes, establishes a chronic infection. This process occurs in different species of parasites and in different hosts. Establishment of chronicity is independent of adaptive immunity and therefore different from the mechanism proposed for maintenance of chronic P. falciparum infections(7-9). Furthermore, we show that the proportions of parasites expressing different types of pir genes regulate the time taken to establish a chronic infection. Because pir genes are common to most, if not all, species of Plasmodium(10), this process may be a common way of regulating the establishment of chronic infections.

  8. Neurophysiological mechanisms involved in language learning in adults

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fornells, Antoni; Cunillera, Toni; Mestres-Missé, Anna; de Diego-Balaguer, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the brain mechanisms involved in word learning during infancy and in second language acquisition and about the way these new words become stable representations that sustain language processing. In several studies we have adopted the human simulation perspective, studying the effects of brain-lesions and combining different neuroimaging techniques such as event-related potentials and functional magnetic resonance imaging in order to examine the language learning (LL) process. In the present article, we review this evidence focusing on how different brain signatures relate to (i) the extraction of words from speech, (ii) the discovery of their embedded grammatical structure, and (iii) how meaning derived from verbal contexts can inform us about the cognitive mechanisms underlying the learning process. We compile these findings and frame them into an integrative neurophysiological model that tries to delineate the major neural networks that might be involved in the initial stages of LL. Finally, we propose that LL simulations can help us to understand natural language processing and how the recovery from language disorders in infants and adults can be accomplished. PMID:19933142

  9. [Ocular involvement in spondylarthritis--new mechanisms, new therapies].

    PubMed

    Itulescu, T C M; Alexandrescu, Cristina; Voinea, Liliana-Mary

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloarthrites (SPA) represent a group of heterogenous rheumatic diseases (ankylosing spondylitis/SA, psoriatic arthritis/PsA, reactive arthritis/ReA, spondyloarthritis in bowel inflammatory diseases/BID, undifferentiated spondyloarthritis/undif SpA) with distinct clinical features and common genetic predisposition (HLA-B27). SpA may also affect other organs, ocular involvement, represented by uveitis and conjunctivitis, being one of the most important extraskeletal manifestations. Pathogenic mechanisms of ocular involment in SpA are not entirely known; nevertheless, the inflammatory process which characterizes the main rheumatic diseases seems to be responsible for this extraskeletal manifestation. SpA treatment targeted at clinical remission has a favourable effect not only on articular but also on ocular involvement. The discovery of new pathogenic mechanisms of both rheumatic and eye disease in SpA have contributed to identification of new pathogenic therapies. The interdisciplinary team work of rheumatologists and ophtalmologists have prove essential for the management of SpA patients with ocular manifestations.

  10. Involvement of Cell Surface Structures in Size-Independent Grazing Resistance of Freshwater Actinobacteria▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tarao, Mitsunori; Jezbera, Jan; Hahn, Martin W.

    2009-01-01

    We compared the influences of grazing by the bacterivorous nanoflagellate Poterioochromonas sp. strain DS on ultramicrobacterial Actinobacteria affiliated with the Luna-2 cluster and ultramicrobacterial Betaproteobacteria of the species Polynucleobacter cosmopolitanus. These bacteria were almost identical in size (<0.1 μm3) and shape. Predation on a Polynucleobacter strain resulted in a reduction of >86% relative to the initial bacterial cell numbers within 20 days, while in comparable predation experiments with nine actinobacterial strains, no significant decrease of cell numbers by predation was observed over the period of ≥39 days. The differences in predation mortality between the actinobacterial strains and the Polynucleobacter strain clearly demonstrated size-independent grazing resistance for the investigated Actinobacteria. Importantly, this size-independent grazing resistance is shared by all nine investigated Luna-2 strains and thus represents a group-specific trait. We investigated if an S-layer, previously observed in an ultrastructure study, was responsible for the grazing resistance of these strains. Experiments aiming for removal of the S-layer or modification of cell surface proteins of one of the grazing-resistant strains by treatment with lithium chloride, EDTA, or formaldehyde resulted in 4.2- to 5.2-fold higher grazing rates in comparison to the levels for untreated cells. These results indicate the protective role of a proteinaceous cell surface structure in the size-independent grazing resistance of the actinobacterial Luna-2 strains, which can be regarded as a group-specific trait. PMID:19502450

  11. Irisin relaxes mouse mesenteric arteries through endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miao; Wan, Fangzhu; Wang, Fang; Wu, Qi

    2015-12-25

    Irisin, a newly discovered myokine, has been shown to produce modest weight loss and improve glucose intolerance in mice. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of irisin on vascular activity and the mechanisms involved. Experiments were performed on mouse mesenteric arteries. We demonstrated that irisin induced relaxation in mesenteric arteries with or without endothelium in a concentration-dependent manner. It was further demonstrated that the irisin-induced vasorelaxation effects on endothelium-intact mesenteric arteries were reduced by pretreatment with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) or 1H-[1, 2, 4] oxadizolo [4, 3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). However, pretreatment with indomethacin (INDO), a nonselective cyclooxygenase inhibitor did not modulate irisin-induced relaxation. In addition, the contraction due to extracellular Ca(2+) influx and intracellular Ca(2+) release was also inhibited by irisin. In summary, these results suggested that the endothelium-dependent relaxation of irisin is mediated by the nitric oxide (NO)-guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic phosphate (cGMP)-dependent pathway but not the prostaglandin I2 (PGI2)-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent mechanism. Endothelium-independent relaxation may be depend on inhibiting Ca(2+) influx through blocking VDCCs and intracellular Ca(2+) release through both IP3R and RyR channels.

  12. A γ-Secretase-independent Mechanism of Signal Transduction by the Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Hass, Matthew R.; Yankner, Bruce A.

    2006-01-01

    It has been proposed that γ-secretase-mediated release of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) intracellular domain (AICD) results in nuclear translocation and signaling through a complex with the adaptor protein Fe65 and the histone acetyltransferase Tip60. Here, we show that APP and Fe65 activate transcription through a Gal4-Tip60 reporter in presenilin-1/2-deficient cells lacking generation of AICD. APP and Fe65 also activated transcription in the presence of γ-secretase inhibitors that prevent amyloid β-peptide production in human embryonic kidney 293 and SH-SY5Y cells. In contrast to the transcriptionally active Notch intracellular domain, expression of AICD did not activate transcription. An alternative mechanism for APP signal transduction is suggested by the identification of essential cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) phosphorylation sites in Tip60. Mutation of these Tip60 phosphorylation sites or treatment with the CDK inhibitor roscovitine blocked the ability of APP to signal through Tip60. Moreover, APP stabilized Tip60 through CDK-dependent phosphorylation. Subcellular fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence showed that APP recruited Tip60 to membrane compartments. Thus, APP may signal to the nucleus by a γ-secretase-independent mechanism that involves membrane sequestration and phosphorylation of Tip60. PMID:16103124

  13. Voriconazole Enhances the Osteogenic Activity of Human Osteoblasts In Vitro through a Fluoride-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Allen, Kahtonna C; Sanchez, Carlos J; Niece, Krista L; Wenke, Joseph C; Akers, Kevin S

    2015-12-01

    Periostitis, which is characterized by bony pain and diffuse periosteal ossification, has been increasingly reported with prolonged clinical use of voriconazole. While resolution of clinical symptoms following discontinuation of therapy suggests a causative role for voriconazole, the biological mechanisms contributing to voriconazole-induced periostitis are unknown. To elucidate potential mechanisms, we exposed human osteoblasts in vitro to voriconazole or fluconazole at 15 or 200 μg/ml (reflecting systemic or local administration, respectively), under nonosteogenic or osteogenic conditions, for 1, 3, or 7 days and evaluated the effects on cell proliferation (reflected by total cellular DNA) and osteogenic differentiation (reflected by alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium accumulation, and expression of genes involved in osteogenic differentiation). Release of free fluoride, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) was also measured in cell supernatants of osteoblasts exposed to triazoles, with an ion-selective electrode (for free fluoride) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) (for VEGF and PDGF). Voriconazole but not fluconazole significantly enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts. In contrast to clinical observations, no increases in free fluoride levels were detected following exposure to either voriconazole or fluconazole; however, significant increases in the expression of VEGF and PDGF by osteoblasts were observed following exposure to voriconazole. Our results demonstrate that voriconazole can induce osteoblast proliferation and enhance osteogenic activity in vitro. Importantly, and in contrast to the previously proposed mechanism of fluoride-stimulated osteogenesis, our findings suggest that voriconazole-induced periostitis may also occur through fluoride-independent mechanisms that enhance the expression of cytokines that can augment osteoblastic activity.

  14. An Independent Replication of the Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach With Justice-Involved Youth

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Craig E.; Wevodau, Amy L.; Henderson, Susan E.; Colbourn, Scholar L.; Gharagozloo, Laadan; North, Lindsey W.; Lotts, Vivian A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Substance use disorders among youth remain a serious public health problem. Although research has overwhelmingly supported the use of evidenced-based interventions, one of the primary limitations of the current evidence base is that for the vast majority of treatments, the developers of the treatments are also the ones conducting research on them, raising the possibility of allegiance bias. Methods The present study was an independently conducted randomized controlled trial (n =126) comparing an evidenced-based treatment for adolescent substance use, Adolescent-Community Reinforcement Approach (A-CRA), and assertive continuing care (ACC), to services as usual (SAU) provided by a juvenile probation department. Latent growth curve modeling was used to compare the treatments on change in substance use assessed by the Global Appraisal of Individual Needs (GAIN) at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months following treatment entry. Results All youth evidenced a substantial reduction in substance use frequency and substance-related problems following treatment; however, youth treated with A-CRA/ACC evidenced a substantially greater decrease in substance-related problems. Conclusions and Scientific Significance Results are consistent with studies conducted by A-CRA/ACC model developers supporting the effectiveness of the clinical approach and, because the outcomes resulted from an independent replication, are encouraging for the transportation potential of A-CRA/ACC. PMID:26992083

  15. p38MAPK activation is involved in androgen-independent proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by regulating IL-6 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Shida, Yohei; Igawa, Tsukasa . E-mail: tigawa@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Hakariya, Tomoaki; Sakai, Hideki; Kanetake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Increased levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) are frequently observed in patients with advanced, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. However, the precise mechanism of IL-6 regulation is still largely unknown. Since prostate cancer gradually progresses to an androgen-independent state despite the stress caused by various therapeutic agents, we hypothesized the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) involvement in androgen-independent growth or IL-6 secretion of prostate cancer cells. Using PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells, we analyzed the role of SAPKs in IL-6 mediated cell growth and found that the p38MAPK and JNK are involved in androgen-independent cancer cell growth. Furthermore, IL-6 secretion by PC-3 and DU145 cells was significantly suppressed by SAPKs inhibitor, especially by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by JNK inhibitor SP600125 nor by MEK inhibitor, PD98059. These results raised the possibility that the IL-6 mediated androgen-independent proliferation of PC-3 and DU145 cells is regulated at least partly via SAPKs signaling pathway especially through p38MAPK activation.

  16. RGD-independent cell adhesion to the carboxy-terminal heparin-binding fragment of fibronectin involves heparin-dependent and -independent activities

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix components such as fibronectin has a complex basis, involving multiple determinants on the molecule that react with discrete cell surface macromolecules. Our previous results have demonstrated that normal and transformed cells adhere and spread on a 33-kD heparin binding fragment that originates from the carboxy-terminal end of particular isoforms (A-chains) of human fibronectin. This fragment promotes melanoma adhesion and spreading in an arginyl-glycyl-aspartyl-serine (RGDS) independent manner, suggesting that cell adhesion to this region of fibronectin is independent of the typical RGD/integrin-mediated binding. Two synthetic peptides from this region of fibronectin were recently identified that bound [3H]heparin in a solid-phase assay and promoted the adhesion and spreading of melanoma cells (McCarthy, J. B., M. K. Chelberg, D. J. Mickelson, and L. T. Furcht. 1988. Biochemistry. 27:1380-1388). The current studies further define the cell adhesion and heparin binding properties of one of these synthetic peptides. This peptide, termed peptide I, has the sequence YEKPGSP-PREVVPRPRPGV and represents residues 1906-1924 of human plasma fibronectin. In addition to promoting RGD-independent melanoma adhesion and spreading in a concentration-dependent manner, this peptide significantly inhibited cell adhesion to the 33-kD fragment or intact fibronectin. Polyclonal antibodies generated against peptide I also significantly inhibited cell adhesion to the peptide, to the 33-kD fragment, but had minimal effect on melanoma adhesion to fibronectin. Anti-peptide I antibodies also partially inhibited [3H]heparin binding to fibronectin, suggesting that peptide I represents a major heparin binding domain on the intact molecule. The cell adhesion activity of another peptide from the 33-kD fragment, termed CS1 (Humphries, M. J., A. Komoriya, S. K. Akiyama, K. Olden, and K. M. Yamada. 1987. J. Biol. Chem., 262:6886-6892) was contrasted with

  17. Involvement of ASR genes in aluminium tolerance mechanisms in rice.

    PubMed

    Arenhart, Rafael Augusto; Lima, Julio César de; Pedron, Marcelo; Carvalho, Fabricio E L; Silveira, Joaquim Albenisio Gomes da; Rosa, Silvia Barcelos; Caverzan, Andreia; Andrade, Claudia M B; Schünemann, Mariana; Margis, Rogério; Margis-Pinheiro, Márcia

    2013-01-01

    Among cereal crops, rice is considered the most tolerant to aluminium (Al). However, variability among rice genotypes leads to remarkable differences in the degree of Al tolerance for distinct cultivars. A number of studies have demonstrated that rice plants achieve Al tolerance through an unknown mechanism that is independent of root tip Al exclusion. We have analysed expression changes of the rice ASR gene family as a function of Al treatment. The gene ASR5 was differentially regulated in the Al-tolerant rice ssp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare. However, ASR5 expression did not respond to Al exposure in Indica cv. Taim rice roots, which are highly Al sensitive. Transgenic plants carrying RNAi constructs that targeted the ASR genes were obtained, and increased Al susceptibility was observed in T1 plants. Embryogenic calli of transgenic rice carrying an ASR5-green fluorescent protein fusion revealed that ASR5 was localized in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Using a proteomic approach to compare non-transformed and ASR-RNAi plants, a total of 41 proteins with contrasting expression patterns were identified. We suggest that the ASR5 protein acts as a transcription factor to regulate the expression of different genes that collectively protect rice cells from Al-induced stress responses.

  18. SAP-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate T Cell Development Involving SLAMF Receptors.

    PubMed

    De Calisto, Jaime; Wang, Ninghai; Wang, Guoxing; Yigit, Burcu; Engel, Pablo; Terhorst, Cox

    2014-01-01

    Signaling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) plays an essential role in the immune system mediating the function of several members of the SLAM family (SLAMF) of receptors, whose expression is essential for T, NK, and B-cell responses. Additionally, the expression of SAP in double-positive thymocytes is mandatory for natural killer T (NKT) cells and, in mouse, for innate CD8(+) T cell development. To date, only two members of the SLAMF of receptors, Slamf1 and Slamf6, have been shown to positively cooperate during NKT cell differentiation in mouse. However, it is less clear whether other members of this family may also participate in the development of these innate T cells. Here, we show that Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) and Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) B6 mice have ~70% reduction of NKT cells compared to wild-type B6 mice. Unexpectedly, the proportion of innate CD8(+) T cells slightly increased in the Slamf[1 + 5 + 6](-/-) , but not in the Slamf[1 + 6](-/-) strain, suggesting that Slamf5 may function as a negative regulator of innate CD8(+) T cell development. Accordingly, Slamf5(-/-) B6 mice showed an exclusive expansion of innate CD8(+) T cells, but not NKT cells. Interestingly, the SAP-independent Slamf7(-/-) strain showed an expansion of both splenic innate CD8(+) T cells and thymic NKT cells. On the other hand, and similar to what was recently shown in Slamf3(-/-) BALB/c mice, the proportions of thymic promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger (PLZF(hi)) NKT cells and innate CD8(+) T cells significantly increased in the SAP-independent Slamf8(-/-) BALB/c strain. In summary, these results show that NKT and innate CD8(+) T cell development can be regulated in a SAP-dependent and -independent fashion by SLAMF receptors, in which Slamf1, Slamf6, and Slamf8 affect development of NKT cells, and that Slamf5, Slamf7, and Slamf8 affect the development of innate CD8(+) T cells.

  19. Effects of distraction on muscle length: mechanisms involved in sarcomerogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caiozzo, Vincent J; Utkan, Ali; Chou, Richard; Khalafi, Afshin; Chandra, Heena; Baker, Michael; Rourke, Bryan; Adams, Greg; Baldwin, Ken; Green, Stuart

    2002-10-01

    Although a great deal of interest has been given to understanding the mechanisms involved in regulating the radial growth that occurs because of resistance training, much less has been given to studying the longitudinal growth of skeletal muscle that occurs because of passive stretch. The current authors provide a brief overview of key issues relevant to the longitudinal growth of skeletal muscle that occurs during distraction osteogenesis. Specifically, five key issues are addressed: (1) the pattern of sarcomerogenesis during distraction; (2) sarcomerogenesis and altered expression of sarcomeric and nonsarcomeric genes; (3) the satellite cell hypothesis; (4) mitogenic factors; and (5) new approaches for studying the longitudinal growth of skeletal muscle. A discussion is provided that revolves around the concept of a negative feedback loop. One of the most interesting issues to be resolved in muscle biology is the role of satellite cells in regulating the growth of skeletal muscle. Currently, it is not known whether satellite cell activation is a prerequisite for the longitudinal growth of skeletal muscle. Gene chip analyses provide a paradoxical view, showing that distraction osteogenesis results in the upregulation of a gene, GADD45, involved with growth arrest and deoxyribonucleic acid destruction.

  20. Identification of cell surface molecules involved in dystroglycan-independent Lassa virus cell entry.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Masayuki; Ströher, Ute; Ebihara, Hideki; Feldmann, Heinz; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2012-02-01

    Although O-mannosylated dystroglycan is a receptor for Lassa virus, a causative agent of Lassa fever, recent findings suggest the existence of an alternative receptor(s). Here we identified four molecules as receptors for Lassa virus: Axl and Tyro3, from the TAM family, and dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and liver and lymph node sinusoidal endothelial calcium-dependent lectin (LSECtin), from the C-type lectin family. These molecules enhanced the binding of Lassa virus to cells and mediated infection independently of dystroglycan. Axl- or Tyro3-mediated infection required intracellular signaling via the tyrosine kinase activity of Axl or Tyro3, whereas DC-SIGN- or LSECtin-mediated infection and binding were dependent on a specific carbohydrate and on ions. The identification of these four molecules as Lassa virus receptors advances our understanding of Lassa virus cell entry.

  1. Cellular and Humoral Mechanisms Involved in the Control of Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Zuñiga, Joaquin; Torres-García, Diana; Santos-Mendoza, Teresa; Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Granados, Julio; Yunis, Edmond J.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection is a major international public health problem. One-third of the world's population is thought to have latent tuberculosis, a condition where individuals are infected by the intracellular bacteria without active disease but are at risk for reactivation, if their immune system fails. Here, we discuss the role of nonspecific inflammatory responses mediated by cytokines and chemokines induced by interaction of innate receptors expressed in macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). We also review current information regarding the importance of several cytokines including IL-17/IL-23 in the development of protective cellular and antibody-mediated protective responses against Mtb and their influence in containment of the infection. Finally, in this paper, emphasis is placed on the mechanisms of failure of Mtb control, including the immune dysregulation induced by the treatment with biological drugs in different autoimmune diseases. Further functional studies, focused on the mechanisms involved in the early host-Mtb interactions and the interplay between host innate and acquired immunity against Mtb, may be helpful to improve the understanding of protective responses in the lung and in the development of novel therapeutic and prophylactic tools in TB. PMID:22666281

  2. Examining factors involved in stress-related working memory impairments: Independent or conditional effects?

    PubMed

    Banks, Jonathan B; Tartar, Jaime L; Tamayo, Brittney A

    2015-12-01

    A large and growing body of research demonstrates the impact of psychological stress on working memory. However, the typical study approach tests the effects of a single biological or psychological factor on changes in working memory. The current study attempted to move beyond the standard single-factor assessment by examining the impact of 2 possible factors in stress-related working memory impairments. To this end, 60 participants completed a working memory task before and after either a psychological stressor writing task or a control writing task and completed measures of both cortisol and mind wandering. We also included a measure of state anxiety to examine the direct and indirect effect on working memory. We found that mind wandering mediated the relationship between state anxiety and working memory at the baseline measurement. This indirect relationship was moderated by cortisol, such that the impact of mind wandering on working memory increased as cortisol levels increased. No overall working memory impairment was observed following the stress manipulation, but increases in state anxiety and mind wandering were observed. State anxiety and mind wandering independently mediated the relationship between change in working memory and threat perception. The indirect paths resulted in opposing effects on working memory. Combined, the findings from this study suggest that cortisol enhances the impact of mind wandering on working memory, that state anxiety may not always result in stress-related working memory impairments, and that high working memory performance can protect against mind wandering.

  3. Histamine H3 receptors aggravate cerebral ischaemic injury by histamine-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Haijing; Zhang, Xiangnan; Hu, Weiwei; Ma, Jing; Hou, Weiwei; Zhang, Xingzhou; Wang, Xiaofen; Gao, Jieqiong; Shen, Yao; Lv, Jianxin; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Han, Feng; Wang, Guanghui; Chen, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    The role of the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) in cerebral ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains unknown. Here we show that H3R expression is upregulated after I/R in two mouse models. H3R antagonists and H3R knockout attenuate I/R injury, which is reversed by an H3R-selective agonist. Interestingly, H1R and H2R antagonists, a histidine decarboxylase (HDC) inhibitor and HDC knockout all fail to compromise the protection by H3R blockade. H3R blockade inhibits mTOR phosphorylation and reinforces autophagy. The neuroprotection by H3R antagonism is reversed by 3-methyladenine and siRNA for Atg7, and is diminished in Atg5−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Furthermore, the peptide Tat-H3RCT414-436, which blocks CLIC4 binding with H3Rs, or siRNA for CLIC4, further increases I/R-induced autophagy and protects against I/R injury. Therefore, H3R promotes I/R injury while its antagonism protects against ischaemic injury via histamine-independent mechanisms that involve suppressing H3R/CLIC4 binding-activated autophagy, suggesting that H3R inhibition is a therapeutic target for cerebral ischaemia. PMID:24566390

  4. v-src transformation of rat embryo fibroblasts. Inefficient conversion to anchorage-independent growth involves heterogeneity of primary cultures

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    To clarify whether a single oncogene can transform primary cells in culture, we compared the transforming effect of a recombinant retrovirus (ZSV) containing the v-src gene in rat embryo fibroblasts (REFs) to that in the rat cell line 3Y1. In the focus assay, REFs exhibited resistance to transformation as only six foci were observed in the primary cultures as opposed to 98 in 3Y1 cells. After G418 selection, efficiency of transformation was again somewhat lower with REFs compared to that with 3Y1 cells, but the number of G418-resistant REF colonies was much greater than the number of foci in REF cultures. Furthermore, while 98% of G418-resistant colonies of ZSV-infected REFs were morphologically transformed, only 25% were converted to anchorage- independent growth, as opposed to 100% conversion seen in ZSV-infected 3Y1 cells. The poor susceptibility of REFs to anchorage-independent transformation did not involve differences in expression and subcellular distribution of p60v-src, or its kinase activity in vitro and in vivo. It rather reflected a property of the primary cultures, as cloning of REFs before ZSV infection demonstrated that only 2 out of 6 REF clones tested were permissive for anchorage-independent growth. The nonpermissive phenotype was dominant over the permissive one in somatic hybrid cells, and associated with organized actin filament bundles and a lower growth rate, both before and after ZSV infection. These results indicate that the poor susceptibility of REFs to anchorage-independent transformation by p60v-src reflects the heterogeneity of the primary cultures. REFs can be morphologically transformed by p60v-src with high efficiency but only a small fraction is convertible to anchorage- independent growth. REF resistance seems to involve the presence of a suppressor factor which may emerge from REF differentiation during embryonic development. PMID:8034746

  5. Naringenin inhibits seed germination and seedling root growth through a salicylic acid-independent mechanism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-12-01

    Flavonoids fulfill an enormous range of biological functions in plants. In seeds, these compounds play several roles; for instance proanthocyanidins protect them from moisture, pathogen attacks, mechanical stress, UV radiation, etc., and flavonols have been suggested to protect the embryo from oxidative stress. The present study aimed at determining the role of flavonoids in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) seed germination, and the involvement of salicylic acid (SA) and auxin (indole-3-acetic acid), two phytohormones with the same biosynthetic origin as flavonoids, the shikimate pathway, in such a putative role. We show that naringenin, a flavanone, strongly inhibits the germination of A. thaliana seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner. Altered auxin levels do not affect seed germination in Arabidopsis, but impaired auxin transport does, although to a minor extent. Naringenin and N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA) impair auxin transport through the same mechanisms, so the inhibition of germination by naringenin might involve impaired auxin transport among other mechanisms. From the present study it is concluded that naringenin inhibits the germination of Arabidopsis seeds in a dose-dependent and SA-independent manner, and the results also suggest that such effects are exerted, at least to some extent, through impaired auxin transport, although additional mechanisms seem to operate as well.

  6. Ligand-independent dimerization of oncogenic v-erbB products involves covalent interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Adelsman, M A; Huntley, B K; Maihle, N J

    1996-01-01

    Mutant v-erbB products of avian c-erbB1 have previously been used to correlate structural domains of the receptor encoded by this proto-oncogene with tissue-specific transformation potential. In these studies, deletion of the ligand-binding domain of the receptor has been shown to be required for transformation of erythroblasts, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. It has, therefore, been postulated that deletion of this domain results in an allosteric change in the receptor analogous to the ligand-bound state of the epidermal growth factor receptor; i.e., it induces a receptor conformation that is constitutively active with respect to mitogenic signaling. While oncogenic v-erbB products have been shown to be expressed on the cell surface of both fibroblasts and erythroblasts, no comprehensive analysis of the oligomeric potential of these products has been conducted. Since the first event known to follow epidermal growth factor binding to its receptor is oligomerization, and receptor dimerization has been correlated with mitogenic signaling, we have carefully analyzed the ability of several v-erbB products to oligomerize in the three target cell types transformed by these oncogenes. In this report, we demonstrate the v-erbB products can efficiently homodimerize in all three target tissues, that this dimerization is ligand independent and occurs at the cell surface, and that there is no apparent correlation between v-erbB dimerization and transformation of avian fibroblasts. Furthermore, both oncogenic and nononcogenic v-erbB products can heterodimerize with the native c-erbB1 product in chicken embryo fibroblasts, suggesting that heterodimerization between v-erB and native c-erbB1 is not sufficient to result in c-erbB1-mediated sarcomagenesis. PMID:8642683

  7. Involvement of Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 isoforms in oxidant-induced neural cell death.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Brianna; Knotts, Taylor; Cummings, Brian S

    2007-01-01

    This study determined the roles of Ca2+-independent PLA2 (iPLA2) in phospholipid chemistry and oxidant-induced cell death in human astrocytes. A172 cells expressed both cytosolic Group VIA (iPLA2beta) and microsomal Group VIB (iPLA2gamma) PLA2 as determined by activity assays and immunoblot analysis. Inhibition of total iPLA2 activity using racemic bromoenol lactone (BEL, 2.5 microM) decreased the expression of 14:0-16:0 phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) 15% and increased 18:0-18:1-PtdCho expression 15%. Treatment of cells with the iPLA2gamma specific inhibitor R-BEL decreased 14:0-16:0-PtdCho 35%, 16:0-16:0-PtdCho 15% and induced a 35% increase in 18:0-18:1-PtdCho. In contrast, treatment of cells with the iPLA2beta inhibitor S-BEL did not alter any phospholipid studied. To determine the roles of iPLA2 in oxidant-induced cell death, A172 cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or tert-butylhydroperoxide (TBHP); both induced time- and concentration-dependent increases in cell death as assessed by annexin V and propidium iodide staining. Treatment of cells with racemic-BEL alone did not induce cell death. However, pretreatment with BEL prior to H2O2 (500 microM) or TBHP (200 microM) significantly increased necrosis as determined by increases in propidium iodide staining. Treatment with BEL prior to exposure to oxidants accelerated the loss of ATP levels, but not the formation of reactive oxygen species. These data support the hypothesis that iPLA2 mediates oxidant-induced neural cell death and demonstrates differential roles of iPLA2 isoforms in physiological and pathological events.

  8. Dichloroacetate Stimulates Glycogen Accumulation in Primary Hepatocytes through an Insulin-Independent Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lingohr, Melissa K.; Bull, Richard J.; Kato-Weinstein, Junko; Thrall, Brian D. )

    2002-01-01

    Dichloroacetate (DCA), a by-product of water chlorination, causes liver cancer in B6C3F1 mice. A hallmark response observed in mice exposed to carcinogenic doses of DCA is an accumulation of hepatic glycogen content. To distinguish whether the in vivo glycogenic effect of DCA was dependent on insulin and insulin signaling proteins, experiments were conducted in isolated hepatocytes where insulin concentrations could be controlled. In hepatocytes isolated from male B6C3F1 mice, DCA increased glycogen levels in a dose-related manner, independently of insulin. The accumulation of hepatocellular glycogen induced by DCA was not the result of decreased glycogenolysis, since DCA had no effect on the rate of glucagon-stimulated glycogen breakdown. Glycogen accumulation caused by DCA treatment was not hindered by inhibitors of extracellular-regulated protein kinase kinase (Erk1/2 kinase or MEK) or p70 kDa S6 protein kinase (p70(S6K)), but was completely blocked by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors, LY294002 and wortmannin. Similarly, insulin-stimulated glycogen deposition was not influenced by the Erk1/2 kinase inhibitor, PD098509, or the p70(S6K) inhibitor, rapamycin. Unlike DCA-stimulated glycogen deposition, PI3K-inhibition only partially blocked the glycogenic effect of insulin. DCA did not cause phosphorylation of the downstream PI3K target protein, protein kinase B (PKB/Akt). The phosphorylation of PKB/Akt did not correlate to insulin-stimulated glycogenesis either. Similar to insulin, DCA in the medium decreased IR expression in isolated hepatocytes. The results indicate DCA increases hepatocellular glycogen accumulation through a PI3K-dependent mechanism that does not involve PKB/Akt and is, at least in part, different from the classical insulin-stimulated glycogenesis pathway. Somewhat surprisingly, insulin-stimulated glycogenesis also appears not to involve PKB/Akt in isolated murine hepatocytes.

  9. Anaerobic transcription activation in Bacillus subtilis: identification of distinct FNR-dependent and -independent regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Ramos, H; Boursier, L; Moszer, I; Kunst, F; Danchin, A; Glaser, P

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is able to grow anaerobically using alternative electron acceptors, including nitrate or fumarate. We characterized an operon encoding the dissimilatory nitrate reductase subunits homologous to the Escherichia coli narGHJI operon and the narK gene encoding a protein with nitrite extrusion activity. Downstream from narK and co-transcribed with it a gene (fnr) encoding a protein homologous to E.coli FNR was found. Disruption of fnr abolished both nitrate and fumarate utilization as electron acceptors and anaerobic induction of narK. Four putative FNR binding sites were found in B.subtilis sequences. The consensus sequence, centred at position -41.5, is identical to the consensus for the DNA site for E.coli CAP. Bs-FNR contained a four cysteine residue cluster at its C-terminal end. This is in contrast to Ec-FNR, where a similar cluster is present at the N-terminal end. It is possible that oxygen modulates the activity of both activators by a similar mechanism involving iron. Unlike in E.coli, where fnr expression is weakly repressed by anaerobiosis, fnr gene expression in B.subtilis is strongly activated by anaerobiosis. We have identified in the narK-fnr intergenic region a promotor activated by anaerobiosis independently of FNR. Thus induction of genes involved in anaerobic respiration requires in B.subtilis at least two levels of regulation: activation of fnr transcription and activation of FNR to induce transcription of FNR-dependent promoters. Images PMID:8846791

  10. Novel mechanism for temperature-independent transitions in flexible molecules: role of thermodynamic fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Teslenko, V I; Petrov, E G; Verkhratsky, A; Krishtal, O A

    2010-04-30

    A novel physical mechanism is proposed to explain the temperature-independent transition reactions in molecular systems. The mechanism becomes effective in the case of conformation transitions between quasi-isoenergetic molecular states. It is shown that at room temperatures, stochastic broadening of molecular energy levels predominates the energy of low-frequency vibrations accompanying the transition. This leads to a cancellation of temperature dependence in the stochastically averaged rate constants. As an example, a physical interpretation of temperature-independent onset of P2X{3} receptor desensitization in neuronal membranes is provided.

  11. Mechanisms involved in BACE upregulation associated to stress.

    PubMed

    Martisova, Eva; Solas, Maite; Gerenu, Gorka; Milagro, Fermin I; Campion, Javier; Ramirez, Maria J

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to study a purported involvement of stress in amyloid pathology through the modulation of BACE expression. Early-life stressed rats (maternal separation, MS) showed significant increases in corticosterone levels, BACE expression and Aβ levels. The CpG7 site of the BACE promoter was significantly hypomethylated in MS, and corticosterone levels negatively correlated to the methylation status of CpG7. The activation of the stress-activated protein kinase JNK was also increased in MS rats. In SHSY-5Y neuroblastoma cells, corticosterone induced a rapid increase in BACE expression that was abolished by specific inhibiton of JNK activation or by spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, but not by mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. Corticosterone was also able to increase pJNK expression and this effect was fully reverted by spironolactone. Mice chronically treated with corticosterone showed increased BACE and pJNK expression. These increases were reverted by treatment with spironolactone or with a JNK inhibitor. It is suggested that increased corticosterone levels associated to stress lead to increase BACE transcription both through epigenetic mechanisms and activation of JNK.

  12. Pigment patterns in adult fish result from superimposition of two largely independent pigmentation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ceinos, Rosa M; Guillot, Raúl; Kelsh, Robert N; Cerdá-Reverter, José M; Rotllant, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Dorso-ventral pigment pattern differences are the most widespread pigmentary adaptations in vertebrates. In mammals, this pattern is controlled by regulating melanin chemistry in melanocytes using a protein, agouti-signalling peptide (ASIP). In fish, studies of pigment patterning have focused on stripe formation, identifying a core striping mechanism dependent upon interactions between different pigment cell types. In contrast, mechanisms driving the dorso-ventral countershading pattern have been overlooked. Here, we demonstrate that, in fact, zebrafish utilize two distinct adult pigment patterning mechanisms - an ancient dorso-ventral patterning mechanism, and a more recent striping mechanism based on cell-cell interactions; remarkably, the dorso-ventral patterning mechanism also utilizes ASIP. These two mechanisms function largely independently, with resultant patterns superimposed to give the full pattern.

  13. Thick filament mechano-sensing is a calcium-independent regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fusi, L.; Brunello, E.; Yan, Z.; Irving, M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent X-ray diffraction studies on actively contracting fibres from skeletal muscle showed that the number of myosin motors available to interact with actin-containing thin filaments is controlled by the stress in the myosin-containing thick filaments. Those results suggested that thick filament mechano-sensing might constitute a novel regulatory mechanism in striated muscles that acts independently of the well-known thin filament-mediated calcium signalling pathway. Here we test that hypothesis using probes attached to the myosin regulatory light chain in demembranated muscle fibres. We show that both the extent and kinetics of thick filament activation depend on thick filament stress but are independent of intracellular calcium concentration in the physiological range. These results establish direct control of myosin motors by thick filament mechano-sensing as a general regulatory mechanism in skeletal muscle that is independent of the canonical calcium signalling pathway. PMID:27796302

  14. MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN MYCORRHIZAL WHEAT PROTECTION AGAINST POWDERY MILDEW.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, G; Tisserant, B; Randoux, B; Fontaine, J; Sahraoui, A Lounes-Hadj; Reignault, Ph

    2014-01-01

    In France, the Ecophyto 2018 national action plan will set out to reduce the use of pesticides by 50% by 2018, if possible. To achieve this goal, the use of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi could be a potential alternative method allowing the control of crop diseases. The inoculation by AM fungi has been demonstrated to protect plants against soil-borne pathogens, but little is known about their effectiveness against aerial pathogens, such as the biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici (Bgt) causing wheat (Triticum aestivum) powdery mildew. In the present study, wheat plants were grown in pots, under controlled conditions. Using various phosphorus (P) concentrations, the effectiveness of three AM inocula (Rhizophagus irregularis (Ri), Funneliformis mosseae (Fm)) and Solrize, a mixture of Ri and Fm) in Orvantis wheat cultivar, were tested. After 42 days of culture, mycorrhizal (M) and non-mycorrhizal (NM) wheat plants were infected by Bgt. A satisfactory mycorrhizal rate was obtained with the phosphorus concentration P/5 (P corresponding to the dose used in wheat fields in = 62 mg/L). Our work shows, for the first time, (i) a protective effect of AM inoculation against wheat powdery mildew, reaching up to 73% with Fm inocula, and (ii) its ability to induce a systemic resistance in wheat. Thereafter, we investigated mechanisms involved in this protection. Control plants, M plants, infected plants by Bgt, and M-infected plants were compared at: (i) cytological level, our results revealed that papillae and whole-fluorescent cells presence was induced, conversely fungal haustorium formation in epidermal cells was reduced within M plants leaves (ii) enzymatic level-by assessing defense enzyme activities (lipoxygenase, peroxidase) known as defense markers were measured 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after infection (hai). The importance of these activities in the defense pathways induced in wheat by AM fungi will be discussed.

  15. Engineering interpenetrating network hydrogels as biomimetic cell niche with independently tunable biochemical and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-02-01

    Hydrogels have been widely used as artificial cell niche to mimic extracellular matrix with tunable properties. However, changing biochemical cues in hydrogels developed-to-date would often induce simultaneous changes in mechanical properties, which do not support mechanistic studies on stem cell-niche interactions. Here we report the development of a PEG-based interpenetrating network (IPN), which is composed of two polymer networks that can independently and simultaneously crosslink to form hydrogels in a cell-friendly manner. The resulting IPN hydrogel allows independently tunable biochemical and mechanical properties, as well as stable and more homogeneous presentation of biochemical ligands in 3D than currently available methods. We demonstrate the potential of our IPN platform for elucidating stem cell-niche interactions by modulating osteogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells. The versatility of such IPN hydrogels is further demonstrated using three distinct and widely used polymers to form the mechanical network while keeping the biochemical network constant.

  16. Involvement of DNA-dependent RNA polymerase in a recA-independent pathway of genetic recombination in Escheria coli.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, H; Kobayashi, I

    1977-09-01

    Recombinant DNA molecule of phage lambda formed in Escherichia coli in the presence of chloramphenicol and/or rifampin can be assayed by their biological activity. recA- cells were found to be capable of forming recombinant lambda phage DNA in the presence of chloramphenicol. The relatively high recA-independent recombination observed in this system contrasts with the relatively low recA-independent recombination when recombinant phage particles rather than recombinant DNA are titrated. Formation of the recombinant DNA was suppressed by the the addition of rifampin. The introduction of the rif-r mutation into host bacteria made their recombination activity rifampin-resistant. These results show that DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (EC 2.7.7.6) is involved in this recA-independent pathway of recombination, which is named the "Rpo pathway." This is distinct from Red, Int, RecBC, RecE, or Der pathways of recombination. Crossover was much more frequent in the N-PL-cI and cI-PR-O regions than in the A-D and O-S regions. The crossover seems to occur in the regions that are transcribed actively. Some local change of DNA structure caused by transcription might be required for the Rpo pathway of recombination.

  17. Mouse Oocytes Acquire Mechanisms that Permit Independent Cell Volume Regulation at the End of Oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Richard, Samantha; Tartia, Alina P; Boison, Detlev; Baltz, Jay M

    2016-09-02

    Mouse embryos employ a unique mechanism of cell volume regulation in which glycine is imported via the GLYT1 transporter to regulate intracellular osmotic pressure. Independent cell volume regulation normally becomes active in the oocyte after ovulation is triggered. This involves two steps: the first is the release of the strong adhesion between the oocyte and zona pellucida (ZP) while the second is the activation of GLYT1. In fully-grown oocytes, release of adhesion and GLYT1 activation also occur spontaneously in oocytes removed from the follicle. It is unknown, however, whether the capacity to release oocyte-ZP adhesion or activate GLYT1 first arises in the oocyte after ovulation is triggered or instead growing oocytes already possess these capabilities but they are suppressed in the follicle. Here, we assessed when during oogenesis oocyte-ZP adhesion can be released and when GLYT1 can be activated, with adhesion assessed by an osmotic assay and GLYT1 activity determined by [(3) H]-glycine uptake. Oocyte-ZP adhesion could not be released by growing oocytes until they were nearly fully grown. Similarly, the amount of GLYT1 activity that can be elicited in oocytes increased sharply at the end of oogenesis. The SLC6A9 protein that is responsible for GLYT1 activity and Slc6a9 transcripts are present in growing oocytes and increased over the course of oogenesis. Furthermore, SLC6A9 becomes localized to the oocyte plasma membrane as the oocyte grows. Thus, oocytes acquire the ability to regulate their cell volume by releasing adhesion to the ZP and activating GLYT1 as they approach the end of oogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Mild MPP(+) exposure impairs autophagic degradation through a novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Masatsugu; Kotake, Yaichiro; Tokunaga, Wataru; Sanoh, Seigo; Ohta, Shigeru

    2016-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, but its underlying cause remains unknown. Although recent studies using PD-related neurotoxin MPP(+) suggest autophagy involvement in the pathogenesis of PD, the effect of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of PD, remains largely unclear. We examined the effect of mild MPP(+) exposure (10 and 200 μM for 48 h), which induces a more slowly developing cell death, on autophagic processes and the mechanistic differences with acute MPP(+) toxicity (2.5 and 5 mM for 24 h). In SH-SY5Y cells, mild MPP(+) exposure predominantly inhibited autophagosome degradation, whereas acute MPP(+) exposure inhibited both autophagosome degradation and basal autophagy. Mild MPP(+) exposure reduced lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D activity without changing lysosomal acidity, whereas acute exposure decreased lysosomal density. Lysosome biogenesis enhancers trehalose and rapamycin partially alleviated mild MPP(+) exposure induced impaired autophagosome degradation and cell death, but did not prevent the pathogenic response to acute MPP(+) exposure, suggesting irreversible lysosomal damage. We demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation by MPP(+) exposure and mechanistic differences between mild and acute MPP(+) toxicities. Mild MPP(+) toxicity impaired autophagosome degradation through novel lysosomal acidity-independent mechanisms. Sustained mild lysosomal damage may contribute to PD. We examined the effects of MPP(+) on autophagic processes under mild exposure, which mimics the slow progressive nature of Parkinson's disease, in SH-SY5Y cells. This study demonstrated impaired autophagic degradation through a reduction in lysosomal cathepsin D activity without altering lysosomal acidity by mild MPP(+) exposure. Mechanistic differences between acute and mild MPP(+) toxicity were also observed. Sustained mild damage of lysosome may be an underlying cause

  19. Estimation of the cumulative incidence function under multiple dependent and independent censoring mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lok, Judith J; Yang, Shu; Sharkey, Brian; Hughes, Michael D

    2017-02-25

    Competing risks occur in a time-to-event analysis in which a patient can experience one of several types of events. Traditional methods for handling competing risks data presuppose one censoring process, which is assumed to be independent. In a controlled clinical trial, censoring can occur for several reasons: some independent, others dependent. We propose an estimator of the cumulative incidence function in the presence of both independent and dependent censoring mechanisms. We rely on semi-parametric theory to derive an augmented inverse probability of censoring weighted (AIPCW) estimator. We demonstrate the efficiency gained when using the AIPCW estimator compared to a non-augmented estimator via simulations. We then apply our method to evaluate the safety and efficacy of three anti-HIV regimens in a randomized trial conducted by the AIDS Clinical Trial Group, ACTG A5095.

  20. Technical key and mechanism of laser-involved therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhaobing; Zhang, Dan; Gao, Feng

    1997-06-01

    The method of laser-involved therapy can be classified as the following: (1) intravascular low level He-Ne laser irradiation therapy; (2) light-oxygen-blood therapy; (3) light-oxygen-blood therapy. The key of laser-involved therapy is the proper wavelength light. The use of energy in laser-involved therapy is different from that in laser acupuncture. Of all kinds of light-involved therapy, oxygen has direct influence on the curative effect. Oxygen can be thought as the carrier of laser energy. Having absorbed the photon, the oxygen get excited and reaches every part of the organism through blood circulation, which promotes physiological and biochemistry reaction and therefore improves the metabolism.

  1. Gauge-origin independent magnetizabilities from hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics models: Theory and applications to liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidas, Kestutis; Kongsted, Jacob; Nielsen, Christian B.; Mikkelsen, Kurt V.; Christiansen, Ove; Ruud, Kenneth

    2007-07-01

    The theory of a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach for gauge-origin independent calculations of the molecular magnetizability using Hartree-Fock or Density Functional Theory is presented. The method is applied to liquid water using configurations generated from classical Molecular Dynamics simulation to calculate the statistical averaged magnetizability. Based on a comparison with experimental data, treating only one water molecule quantum mechanically appears to be insufficient, while a quantum mechanical treatment of also the first solvation shell leads to good agreement between theory and experiment. This indicates that the gas-to-liquid phase shift for the molecular magnetizability is to a large extent of non-electrostatic nature.

  2. A Cytochrome P450-Independent Mechanism of Acetaminophen-Induced Injury in Cultured Mouse Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Miyakawa, Kazuhisa; Albee, Ryan; Letzig, Lynda G; Lehner, Andreas F; Scott, Michael A; Buchweitz, John P; James, Laura P; Ganey, Patricia E; Roth, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Mouse hepatic parenchymal cells (HPCs) have become the most frequently used in vitro model to study mechanisms of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity. It is universally accepted that APAP hepatocellular injury requires bioactivation by cytochromes P450 (P450s), but this remains unproven in primary mouse HPCs in vitro, especially over the wide range of concentrations that have been employed in published reports. The aim of this work was to test the hypothesis that APAP-induced hepatocellular death in vitro depends solely on P450s. We evaluated APAP cytotoxicity and APAP-protein adducts (a biomarker of metabolic bioactivation by P450) using primary mouse HPCs in the presence and absence of a broad-spectrum inhibitor of P450s, 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT). 1-ABT abolished formation of APAP-protein adducts at all concentrations of APAP (0-14 mM), but eliminated cytotoxicity only at small concentrations (≦5 mM), indicating the presence of a P450-independent mechanism at larger APAP concentrations. P450-independent cell death was delayed in onset relative to toxicity observed at smaller concentrations. p-Aminophenol was detected in primary mouse HPCs exposed to large concentrations of APAP, and a deacetylase inhibitor [bis (4-nitrophenyl) phosphate (BNPP)] significantly reduced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, APAP hepatocellular injury in vitro occurs by at least two mechanisms, a P450-dependent mechanism that operates at concentrations of APAP ≦ 5 mM and a P450-independent mechanism that predominates at larger concentrations and is slower in onset. p-Aminophenol most likely contributes to the latter mechanism. These findings should be considered in interpreting results from APAP cytotoxicity studies in vitro and in selecting APAP concentrations for use in such studies.

  3. [Classical dengue transmission dynamics involving mechanical control and prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Toro-Zapata, Hernán D; Restrepo, Leonardo D; Vergaño-Salazar, Juan G; Muñoz-Loaiza, Aníbal

    2010-12-01

    Dengue fever transmission dynamics were studied in an endemic region considering the use of preventative measures and mechanical control in reducing transmission of the disease. A system of ordinary differential equations was proposed, describing the dynamics and their evolution as determined by numerical simulation. Different mechanical control and prophylaxis strategies were compared to the situation without control. The basic reproduction number R₀ was determined R₀ to show that if R₀ > 1 there would be a risk of an epidemic and otherwise the disease would have low impact levels. The basic reproduction number helps determine the dynamics' future pattern and contrast the results so obtained with those obtained numerically. It was concluded that although prophylaxis and mechanical control alone provide effective results in controlling the disease, if both controls are combined then infection levels become significantly reduced. Around 60 % mechanical control and prevention levels are needed to provide suitable results in controlling dengue outbreaks.

  4. Anticoagulant independent mechanical heart valves: viable now or still a distant holy grail

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard J.; Stupka, Jonathan C.; Emken, Michael R.; Scotten, Lawrence N.; Siegel, Rolland

    2016-01-01

    Valvular heart disease remains a large public health problem for all societies; it attracts the attention of public health organizations, researchers and governments. Valve substitution is an integral part of the treatment for this condition. At present, the choice of valve prosthesis is either tissue or mechanical. Tissue valves have become increasingly popular in spite of unresolved problems with durability, hemodynamics, cost and need for anticoagulation therapy. As a consequence, mechanical valve innovation has virtually ceased; the last successful mechanical design is 25 years old. We postulate that with improved technology, knowledge and experience gained over the last quarter century, the best possible solution to the problem of valve substitution can be achieved with a mechanical valve that is anticoagulant independent, durable, hemodynamically and cost efficient. At present, it is possible to design, test and produce a valve that can accomplish these goals. PMID:28149886

  5. Anticoagulant independent mechanical heart valves: viable now or still a distant holy grail.

    PubMed

    Chaux, Aurelio; Gray, Richard J; Stupka, Jonathan C; Emken, Michael R; Scotten, Lawrence N; Siegel, Rolland

    2016-12-01

    Valvular heart disease remains a large public health problem for all societies; it attracts the attention of public health organizations, researchers and governments. Valve substitution is an integral part of the treatment for this condition. At present, the choice of valve prosthesis is either tissue or mechanical. Tissue valves have become increasingly popular in spite of unresolved problems with durability, hemodynamics, cost and need for anticoagulation therapy. As a consequence, mechanical valve innovation has virtually ceased; the last successful mechanical design is 25 years old. We postulate that with improved technology, knowledge and experience gained over the last quarter century, the best possible solution to the problem of valve substitution can be achieved with a mechanical valve that is anticoagulant independent, durable, hemodynamically and cost efficient. At present, it is possible to design, test and produce a valve that can accomplish these goals.

  6. A Nodal-independent and tissue-intrinsic mechanism controls heart-looping chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Emily S.; Verhoeven, Manon; Lagendijk, Anne Karine; Tessadori, Federico; Smith, Kelly; Choorapoikayil, Suma; den Hertog, Jeroen; Bakkers, Jeroen

    2013-11-01

    Breaking left-right symmetry in bilateria is a major event during embryo development that is required for asymmetric organ position, directional organ looping and lateralized organ function in the adult. Asymmetric expression of Nodal-related genes is hypothesized to be the driving force behind regulation of organ laterality. Here we identify a Nodal-independent mechanism that drives asymmetric heart looping in zebrafish embryos. In a unique mutant defective for the Nodal-related southpaw gene, preferential dextral looping in the heart is maintained, whereas gut and brain asymmetries are randomized. As genetic and pharmacological inhibition of Nodal signalling does not abolish heart asymmetry, a yet undiscovered mechanism controls heart chirality. This mechanism is tissue intrinsic, as explanted hearts maintain ex vivo retain chiral looping behaviour and require actin polymerization and myosin II activity. We find that Nodal signalling regulates actin gene expression, supporting a model in which Nodal signalling amplifies this tissue-intrinsic mechanism of heart looping.

  7. Mechanisms Involved in Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-01

    We are using experimental infection with reoviruses as a model to study how viruses induce cell death (apoptosis) and cause dysregulation of the cell...and their ligand (TRAIL). Apoptosis involves both death-receptor (DR) and mitochondrial-associated cell death pathways, and leads to the early

  8. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments

    PubMed Central

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth’s dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics. PMID:27444949

  9. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-22

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth's dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics.

  10. Tracking the spatiotemporal variations of statistically independent components involving enrichment of rare-earth elements in deep-sea sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasukawa, Kazutaka; Nakamura, Kentaro; Fujinaga, Koichiro; Iwamori, Hikaru; Kato, Yasuhiro

    2016-07-01

    Deep-sea sediments have attracted much attention as a promising resource for rare-earth elements and yttrium (REY). In this study, we show statistically independent components characterising REY-enrichment in the abyssal ocean that are decoded by Independent Component Analysis of a multi-elemental dataset of 3,968 bulk sediment samples from 101 sites in the Pacific and Indian oceans. This study for the first time reconstructs the spatiotemporal variations of the geochemical signatures, including hydrothermal, hydrogenous, and biogenic calcium phosphate components that were closely involved in the formation of REY-rich mud over the past 65 million years. An underlying key factor of significant REY-enrichment is a sufficiently low sedimentation rate that enables the mud to accumulate REY from seawater. In the early Cenozoic, a remarkably small supply of aeolian dust, compared with any other time and region, facilitated the deposition of very high-grade REY-rich mud in the South Pacific. This indicates an important link between the genesis of the seafloor mineral resources and Earth’s dynamic phenomena such as climate change and plate tectonics.

  11. Molecular mechanism(s) involved in differential expression of vitamin C transporters along the intestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Veedamali S; Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Wildman, Alexis J; Marchant, Jonathan S; Said, Hamid M

    2017-04-01

    Mammalian cells utilize two transporters for the uptake of ascorbic acid (AA), Na(+)-dependent vitamin C transporter SVCT-1 and SVCT-2. In the intestine, these transporters are involved in AA absorption and are expressed at the apical and basolateral membrane domains of the polarized epithelia, respectively. Little is known about the differential expression of these two transporters along the anterior-posterior axis of the intestinal tract and the molecular mechanism(s) that dictate this pattern of expression. We used mouse and human intestinal cDNAs to address these issues. The results showed a significantly lower rate of carrier-mediated AA uptake by mouse colon than jejunum. This was associated with a significantly lower level of expression of SVCT-1 and SVCT-2 at the protein, mRNA, and heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) levels in the colon than the jejunum, implying the involvement of transcriptional mechanism(s). Similarly, expression levels of SVCT-1 and SVCT-2 mRNA and hnRNA were significantly lower in human colon. We also examined the levels of expression of hepatocyte nuclear factor 1α and specificity protein 1, which drive transcription of the Slc23a1 and Slc23a2 promoters, respectively, and found them to be markedly lower in the colon. Furthermore, significantly lower levels of the activating markers for histone (H3) modifications [H3 trimethylation of lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and H3 triacetylation of lysine 9 (H3K9ac)] were observed in the Slc23a1 and Slc23a2 promoters in the colon. These findings show, for the first time, that SVCT-1 and SVCT-2 are differentially expressed along the intestinal tract and that this pattern of expression is, at least in part, mediated via transcriptional/epigenetic mechanisms.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Our findings show, for the first time, that transporters of the water-soluble vitamin ascorbic acid (i.e., the vitamin C transporters SVCT-1 and SVCT-2) are differentially expressed along the length of the intestinal tract and that the

  12. New insights on the mechanism of the K(+-) independent activity of crenarchaeota pyruvate kinases.

    PubMed

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge-independent

  13. New Insights on the Mechanism of the K+-Independent Activity of Crenarchaeota Pyruvate Kinases

    PubMed Central

    De la Vega-Ruíz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Ramírez, Lenin; Riveros-Rosas, Héctor; Guerrero-Mendiola, Carlos; Torres-Larios, Alfredo; Hernández-Alcántara, Gloria; García-Trejo, José J.; Ramírez-Silva, Leticia

    2015-01-01

    Eukarya pyruvate kinases have glutamate at position 117 (numbered according to the rabbit muscle enzyme), whereas in Bacteria have either glutamate or lysine and in Archaea have other residues. Glutamate at this position makes pyruvate kinases K+-dependent, whereas lysine confers K+-independence because the positively charged residue substitutes for the monovalent cation charge. Interestingly, pyruvate kinases from two characterized Crenarchaeota exhibit K+-independent activity, despite having serine at the equivalent position. To better understand pyruvate kinase catalytic activity in the absence of K+ or an internal positive charge, the Thermofilum pendens pyruvate kinase (valine at the equivalent position) was characterized. The enzyme activity was K+-independent. The kinetic mechanism was random order with a rapid equilibrium, which is equal to the mechanism of the rabbit muscle enzyme in the presence of K+ or the mutant E117K in the absence of K+. Thus, the substrate binding order of the T. pendens enzyme was independent despite lacking an internal positive charge. Thermal stability studies of this enzyme showed two calorimetric transitions, one attributable to the A and C domains (Tm of 99.2°C), and the other (Tm of 105.2°C) associated with the B domain. In contrast, the rabbit muscle enzyme exhibits a single calorimetric transition (Tm of 65.2°C). The calorimetric and kinetic data indicate that the B domain of this hyperthermophilic enzyme is more stable than the rest of the protein with a conformation that induces the catalytic readiness of the enzyme. B domain interactions of pyruvate kinases that have been determined in Pyrobaculum aerophilum and modeled in T. pendens were compared with those of the rabbit muscle enzyme. The results show that intra- and interdomain interactions of the Crenarchaeota enzymes may account for their higher B domain stability. Thus the structural arrangement of the T. pendens pyruvate kinase could allow charge-independent

  14. Ochratoxin A carcinogenicity involves a complex network of epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Marin-Kuan, Maricel; Cavin, Christophe; Delatour, Thierry; Schilter, Benoît

    2008-08-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a mycotoxin occurring in a wide range of food products. Because of the limitation of human epidemiological data, the safety significance of OTA in food has to rely on animal data, with renal toxicity and carcinogenicity being considered the pivotal effects. The elucidation of the mechanism of action would improve the use of experimental animal data for risk assessment. Direct genotoxicity versus epigenetic mechanisms appears to be a key question. In the present review, the increasingly documented epigenetic cellular effects of OTA and their potential toxicological relevance are discussed. The information available suggests that OTA is unlikely to act through a single, well-defined mechanism of action. Instead, it is proposed that a network of interacting epigenetic mechanisms, including protein synthesis inhibition, oxidative stress and the activation of specific cell signalling pathways, is responsible for OTA carcinogenicity. From a risk assessment perspective, it has to be noted that the mechanisms proposed above depend mainly upon gene expression and enzyme activation, and are, therefore, likely to be thresholded.

  15. Dietary restriction involves NAD⁺ -dependent mechanisms and a shift toward oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Moroz, Natalie; Carmona, Juan J; Anderson, Edward; Hart, Anne C; Sinclair, David A; Blackwell, T Keith

    2014-12-01

    Interventions that slow aging and prevent chronic disease may come from an understanding of how dietary restriction (DR) increases lifespan. Mechanisms proposed to mediate DR longevity include reduced mTOR signaling, activation of the NAD⁺ -dependent deacylases known as sirtuins, and increases in NAD⁺ that derive from higher levels of respiration. Here, we explored these hypotheses in Caenorhabditis elegans using a new liquid feeding protocol. DR lifespan extension depended upon a group of regulators that are involved in stress responses and mTOR signaling, and have been implicated in DR by some other regimens [DAF-16 (FOXO), SKN-1 (Nrf1/2/3), PHA-4 (FOXA), AAK-2 (AMPK)]. Complete DR lifespan extension required the sirtuin SIR-2.1 (SIRT1), the involvement of which in DR has been debated. The nicotinamidase PNC-1, a key NAD⁺ salvage pathway component, was largely required for DR to increase lifespan but not two healthspan indicators: movement and stress resistance. Independently of pnc-1, DR increased the proportion of respiration that is coupled to ATP production but, surprisingly, reduced overall oxygen consumption. We conclude that stress response and NAD⁺ -dependent mechanisms are each critical for DR lifespan extension, although some healthspan benefits do not require NAD⁺ salvage. Under DR conditions, NAD⁺ -dependent processes may be supported by a DR-induced shift toward oxidative metabolism rather than an increase in total respiration.

  16. Mechanisms of molecular mimicry involving the microbiota in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Friedland, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    The concept of molecular mimicry was established to explain commonalities of structure which developed in response to evolutionary pressures. Most examples of molecular mimicry in medicine have involved homologies of primary protein structure which cause disease. Molecular mimicry can be expanded beyond amino acid sequence to include microRNA and proteomic effects which are either pathogenic or salutogenic (beneficial) in regard to Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and related disorders. Viruses of animal or plant origin may mimic nucleotide sequences of microRNAs and influence protein expression. Both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases involve the formation of transmissible self-propagating prion-like proteins. However, the initiating factors responsible for creation of these misfolded nucleating factors are unknown. Amyloid patterns of protein folding are highly conserved through evolution and are widely distributed in the world. Similarities of tertiary protein structure may be involved in the creation of these prion-like agents through molecular mimicry. Cross-seeding of amyloid misfolding, altered proteostasis, and oxidative stress may be induced by amyloid proteins residing in bacteria in our microbiota in the gut and in the diet. Pathways of molecular mimicry induced processes induced by bacterial amyloid in neurodegeneration may involve TLR 2/1, CD14, and NFκB, among others. Furthermore, priming of the innate immune system by the microbiota may enhance the inflammatory response to cerebral amyloids (such as amyloid-β and α-synuclein). This paper describes the specific molecular pathways of these cross-seeding and neuroinflammatory processes. Evolutionary conservation of proteins provides the opportunity for conserved sequences and structures to influence neurological disease through molecular mimicry.

  17. Beyond buckling: humidity-independent measurement of the mechanical properties of green nanobiocomposite films.

    PubMed

    Gill, Urooj; Sutherland, Travis; Himbert, Sebastian; Zhu, Yujie; Rheinstädter, Maikel C; Cranston, Emily D; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M

    2017-04-11

    Precise knowledge of the mechanical properties of emerging nanomaterials and nanocomposites is crucial to match their performance with suitable applications. While methods to characterize mechanical properties exist, they are limited by instrument sensitivity and sample requirements. For bio-based nanomaterials this challenge is exacerbated by the extreme dependence of mechanical properties on humidity. This work presents an alternative approach, based on polymer shrinking-induced wrinkling mechanics, to determine the elastic modulus of nanobiocomposite films in a humidity-independent manner. Layer-by-layer (LbL) films containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) and water-soluble polymers were deposited onto pre-stressed polystyrene substrates followed by thermal shrinking, which wrinkled the films to give them characteristic topographies. Three deposition parameters were varied during LbL assembly: (1) polymer type (xyloglucan - XG, or polyethyleneimine - PEI); (2) polymer concentration (0.1 or 1 wt%); and (3) number of deposition cycles, resulting in 10-600 nm thick nanobiocomposite films with tuneable compositions. Fast Fourier transform analysis on electron microscopy images of the wrinkled films was used to calculate humidity-independent moduli of 70 ± 2 GPa for CNC-XG0.1, 72 ± 2 GPa for CNC-PEI0.1, and 32.2 ± 0.8 GPa for CNC-PEI1.0 films. This structuring method is straightforward and amenable to a wide range of supported thin films.

  18. Cue-independent forgetting by intentional suppression - Evidence for inhibition as the mechanism of intentional forgetting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingying; Cao, Zhijun; Zhu, Zijian; Cai, Huaqian; Wu, Yanhong

    2015-10-01

    People are able to intentionally forget unwanted memories through voluntary suppression, as revealed by the Think/No-think (TNT) paradigm. However, the nature of intentional forgetting is controversial. Findings that forgetting is independent of retrieval cues suggest that inhibitory control underlies intentional forgetting, but this result is also in line with an interference account. To resolve this controversy, we have directly contrasted the cue-independent characteristic of suppression versus interference. A double-cue paradigm was used, in which two different cues were associated with the same target during initial memory formation. Only one cue-target association received further interference/suppression training. In the test phase, when both cues were used to retrieve the target, we found that interference caused memory impairment that was restricted to the trained cue-target association, while suppression induced forgetting that generalized to the independent cue-target association. Therefore, the effect of suppression differs from that of interference. The cue-independent forgetting by voluntary suppression indicates that the target memory itself is inhibited, providing evidence that the underlying mechanism of suppression-induced forgetting is inhibitory control.

  19. GCN2 contributes to mTORC1 inhibition by leucine deprivation through an ATF4 independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Averous, Julien; Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Mesclon, Florent; Carraro, Valérie; Parry, Laurent; Jousse, Céline; Bruhat, Alain; Maurin, Anne-Catherine; Pierre, Philippe; Proud, Christopher G.; Fafournoux, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the GCN2 and mTORC1 signaling pathways are regulated by amino acids and share common functions, in particular the control of translation. The regulation of GCN2 activity by amino acid availability relies on the capacity of GCN2 to sense the increased levels of uncharged tRNAs upon amino acid scarcity. In contrast, despite recent progress in the understanding of the regulation of mTORC1 by amino acids, key aspects of this process remain unsolved. In particular, while leucine is well known to be a potent regulator of mTORC1, the mechanisms by which this amino acid is sensed and control mTORC1 activity are not well defined. Our data establish that GCN2 is involved in the inhibition of mTORC1 upon leucine or arginine deprivation. However, the activation of GCN2 alone is not sufficient to inhibit mTORC1 activity, indicating that leucine and arginine exert regulation via additional mechanisms. While the mechanism by which GCN2 contributes to the initial step of mTORC1 inhibition involves the phosphorylation of eIF2α, we show that it is independent of the downstream transcription factor ATF4. These data point to a novel role for GCN2 and phosphorylation of eIF2α in the control of mTORC1 by certain amino acids. PMID:27297692

  20. The cytotoxic mechanism of glyoxal involves oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shangari, Nandita; O'Brien, Peter J

    2004-10-01

    Glyoxal is a reactive alpha-oxoaldehyde that is a physiological metabolite formed by lipid peroxidation, ascorbate autoxidation, oxidative degradation of glucose and degradation of glycated proteins. Glyoxal is capable of inducing cellular damage, like methylglyoxal (MG), but may also accelerate the rate of glycation leading to the formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs). However, the mechanism of glyoxal cytotoxicity has not been precisely defined. In this study we have focused on the cytotoxic effects of glyoxal and its ability to overcome cellular resistance to oxidative stress. Isolated rat hepatocytes were incubated with different concentrations of glyoxal. Glyoxal by itself was cytotoxic at 5mM, depleted GSH, formed reactive oxygen species (ROS) and collapsed the mitochondrial membrane potential. Glyoxal also induced lipid peroxidation and formaldehyde formation. Glycolytic substrates, e.g. fructose, sorbitol and xylitol inhibited glyoxal-induced cytotoxicity and prevented the decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential suggesting that mitochondrial toxicity contributed to the cytotoxic mechanism. Glyoxal cytotoxicity was prevented by the glyoxal traps d-penicillamine or aminoguanidine or ROS scavengers were also cytoprotective even when added some time after glyoxal suggesting that oxidative stress contributed to the glyoxal cytotoxic mechanism.

  1. The secretory mechanisms in equine platelets are independent of cytoskeletal polymerization and occur through membrane fusion.

    PubMed

    Brunso, L; Segura, D; Monreal, L; Escolar, G; White, J G; Diaz-Ricart, M

    2010-01-01

    Studies in animal models are useful to understand the basic mechanisms involved in hemostasis and the functional differences among species. Ultrastructural observations led us to predict differences in the activation and secretion mechanisms between equine and human platelets. The potential mechanisms involved have been comparatively explored in the present study. Equine and human platelets were activated with thrombin (0.5 U/ml) and collagen (20 µg/ml), for 90 seconds, and samples processed to evaluate: i) ultrastructural changes, by electron microscopy, ii) actin polymerization and cytoskeletal assembly, by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and iii) specific molecules involved in activation and secretion, by western blot. In activated human platelets, centralization of granules, cytoskeletal assembly and fusion of granules with the open canalicular system were observed. In activated equine platelets, granules fused together forming an organelle chain that fused with the surface membrane and released its content directly outside the platelets. Human platelets responded to activation with actin polymerization and the assembly of other contractile proteins to the cytoskeleton. These events were almost undetectable in equine platelets. When exploring the involvement of the synaptosomal-associated protein-23 (SNAP-23), a known regulator of secretory granule/plasma membrane fusion events, it was present in both human and equine platelets. SNAP-23 was shown to be more activated in equine platelets than human platelets in response to activation, especially with collagen. Thus, there are significant differences in the secretion mechanisms between human and equine platelets. While in human platelets, activation and secretion of granules depend on mechanisms of internal contraction and membrane fusion, in equine platelets the fusion mechanisms seem to be predominant.

  2. Molecular mechanisms involved in mammalian primary sex determination.

    PubMed

    She, Zhen-Yu; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2014-08-01

    Sex determination refers to the developmental decision that directs the bipotential genital ridge to develop as a testis or an ovary. Genetic studies on mice and humans have led to crucial advances in understanding the molecular fundamentals of sex determination and the mutually antagonistic signaling pathway. In this review, we summarize the current molecular mechanisms of sex determination by focusing on the known critical sex determining genes and their related signaling pathways in mammalian vertebrates from mice to humans. We also discuss the underlying delicate balance between testis and ovary sex determination pathways, concentrating on the antagonisms between major sex determining genes.

  3. Mechanisms involved in antibody- and complement-mediated allograft rejection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection has become critical clinically because this form of rejection is usually unresponsive to conventional anti-rejection therapy, and therefore, it has been recognized as a major cause of allograft loss. Our group developed experimental animal models of vascularized organ transplantation to study pathogenesis of antibody- and complement-mediated endothelial cell injury leading to graft rejection. In this review, we discuss mechanisms of antibody-mediated graft rejection resulting from activation of complement by C1q- and MBL (mannose-binding lectin)-dependent pathways and interactions with a variety of effector cells, including macrophages and monocytes through Fcγ receptors and complement receptors. PMID:20135240

  4. Mechanisms Involved in Osteoblast Response to Implant Surface Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyan, Barbara D.; Lohmann, Christoph H.; Dean, David D.; Sylvia, Victor L.; Cochran, David L.; Schwartz, Zvi

    2001-08-01

    Osteoblasts respond to surface topography with altered morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. The effects observed vary with cell culture model and the topographical features of the surface. In general, increased surface roughness is associated with decreased proliferation and increased differentiation. Cell responses to hormones, growth factors, and cytokines are altered as well, as is autocrine production of these factors. The cells interact with the surface via integrin receptors, and their expression is also surface roughness-dependent. Integrin binding to cell attachment proteins activates signal transduction cascades, including those mediated by protein kinase C and phospholipase A2. These signaling pathways are also used by regulatory factors, which results in synergistic responses. Prostaglandins are important mediators of the surface effects, and both constitutive and inducible cyclooxygenase are involved.

  5. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  6. Mechanical feedback amplification in Drosophila hearing is independent of synaptic transmission.

    PubMed

    Kamikouchi, Azusa; Albert, Jörg T; Göpfert, Martin C

    2010-02-01

    Vertebrate inner-ear hair cells use mechanical feedback to amplify sound-induced vibrations. The gain of this 'cochlear amplifier' is centrally controlled via efferent fibres that, making synaptic contacts with the hair cells, modulate the feedback gain. The sensory neurons of the Drosophila ear likewise employ mechanical feedback to assist sound-evoked vibrations, yet whether this neuron-based feedback is also subject to efferent control has remained uncertain. We show here that the function of Drosophila auditory neurons is independent of efferent modulation, and that no synaptic transmission is needed to control the gain of mechanical feedback amplification. Immunohistochemical, mechanical and electrophysiological analyses revealed that the Drosophila auditory organ lacks peripheral synapses and efferent innervations, and that blocking synaptic transmission in a pan-neural manner does not affect the afferent electrical activity of the sensory neurons or the mechanical feedback gain. Hence, unlike the cochlear amplifier of vertebrates, mechanical feedback amplification in Drosophila is not associated with an efferent control system but seems to be a purely local process that is solely controlled peripherally within the ear itself.

  7. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the mechanical actuation subsystem, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine draft failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Post 51-L NASA FMEA/CIL baseline that was available. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison was provided through additional analysis as required. These discrepancies were flagged as issues, and recommendations were made based on the FMEA data available at the time. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  8. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the mechanical actuation subsystem, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradway, M. W.; Slaughter, W. T.

    1988-01-01

    The results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine draft failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Post 51-L NASA FMEA/CIL baseline that was available. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison was provided through additional analysis as required. These discrepancies were flagged as issues, and recommendations were made based on the FMEA data available at the time. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter Mechanical Actuation System (MAS) hardware. Specifically, the MAS hardware consists of the following components: Air Data Probe (ADP); Elevon Seal Panel (ESP); External Tank Umbilical (ETU); Ku-Band Deploy (KBD); Payload Bay Doors (PBD); Payload Bay Radiators (PBR); Personnel Hatches (PH); Vent Door Mechanism (VDM); and Startracker Door Mechanism (SDM). Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode. Volume 2 continues the presentation of IOA analysis worksheets and contains the potential critical items list, detailed analysis, and NASA FMEA/CIL to IOA worksheet cross reference and recommendations.

  9. Prickle isoforms control the direction of tissue polarity by microtubule independent and dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Sharp, Katherine A; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2016-02-10

    Planar cell polarity signaling directs the polarization of cells within the plane of many epithelia. While these tissues exhibit asymmetric localization of a set of core module proteins, in Drosophila, more than one mechanism links the direction of core module polarization to the tissue axes. One signaling system establishes a polarity bias in the parallel, apical microtubules upon which vesicles containing core proteins traffic. Swapping expression of the differentially expressed Prickle isoforms, Prickle and Spiny-legs, reverses the direction of core module polarization. Studies in the proximal wing and the anterior abdomen indicated that this results from their differential control of microtubule polarity. Prickle and Spiny-legs also control the direction of polarization in the distal wing (D-wing) and the posterior abdomen (P-abd). We report here that this occurs without affecting microtubule polarity in these tissues. The direction of polarity in the D-wing is therefore likely determined by a novel mechanism independent of microtubule polarity. In the P-abd, Prickle and Spiny-legs interpret at least two directional cues through a microtubule-polarity-independent mechanism.

  10. Capsaicin pretreatment attenuates LPS-induced hypothermia through TRPV1-independent mechanisms in chicken.

    PubMed

    Nikami, Hideki; Mahmoud, Motamed Elsayed; Shimizu, Yasutake; Shiina, Takahiko; Hirayama, Haruko; Iwami, Momoe; Dosoky, Reem Mahmoud; Ahmed, Moustafa Mohamed; Takewaki, Tadashi

    2008-06-06

    It has been demonstrated that chicken TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid of subtype-1) is insensitive to capsaicin (CAP), and therefore, a chicken model is suitable to analyze the CAP-sensitive TRPV1-independent pathway. We elucidated here the possible involvement of the pathway in hypothermia induced by bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) in chickens. Chicks were pretreated with CAP (10 mg/kg, iv) at 1, 2 and 3 days of age to desensitize them towards the CAP-sensitive pathway. An intravenous injection of LPS in 4-day-old chicks caused progressive hypothermia, ending with collapse and 78% mortality within 12 h after injection. The CAP pretreatment rescued the LPS-induced endotoxin shock and hypothermia in chicks. LPS-induced iNOS expression as well as NO production in liver and lung was suppressed by CAP pretreatment. CAP pretreatment also attenuated hypothermia due to exposure of chicks to cold ambient temperature. These findings suggest that a CAP-sensitive TRPV1-independent pathway may be involved in pathophysiological hypothermic reactions through the mediation of NO in chickens.

  11. Mechanisms involved in the development of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Boyette-Davis, Jessica A; Walters, Edgar T; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a debilitating and painful condition seen in patients undergoing treatment with common agents such as vincristine, paclitaxel, oxaliplatin and bortezomib. The mechanisms of this condition are diverse, and include an array of molecular and cellular contributions. Current research implicates genetic predispositions to this condition, which then may influence cellular responses to chemotherapy. Processes found to be influenced during CIPN include increased expression of inflammatory mediators, primarily cytokines, which can create cascading effects in neurons and glia. Changes in ion channels and neurotransmission, as well as changes in intracellular signaling and structures have been implicated in CIPN. This review explores these issues and suggests considerations for future research. PMID:26087973

  12. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  13. Mechanisms and Targets Involved in Dissemination of Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    H. WEIDLE, ULRICH; BIRZELE, FABIAN; KOLLMORGEN, GWENDLYN; RUEGER, RÜDIGER

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian carcinoma is associated with the highest death rate of all gynecological tumors. On one hand, its aggressiveness is based on the rapid dissemination of ovarian cancer cells to the peritoneum, the omentum, and organs located in the peritoneal cavity, and on the other hand, on the rapid development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. In this review, we focus on the metastatic process of ovarian cancer, which involves dissemination of, homing to and growth of tumor cells in distant organs, and describe promising molecular targets for possible therapeutic intervention. We provide an outline of the interaction of ovarian cancer cells with the microenvironment such as mesothelial cells, adipocytes, fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and other stromal components in the context of approaches for therapeutic interference with dissemination. The targets described in this review are discussed with respect to their validity as drivers of metastasis and to the availability of suitable efficient agents for their blockage, such as small molecules, monoclonal antibodies or antibody conjugates as emerging tools to manage this disease. PMID:27807064

  14. Involvement of Agrobacterium tumefaciens Galacturonate Tripartite ATP-Independent Periplasmic (TRAP) Transporter GaaPQM in Virulence Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinlei

    2015-01-01

    Monosaccharides capable of serving as nutrients for the soil bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens are also inducers of the vir regulon present in the tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid of this plant pathogen. One such monosaccharide is galacturonate, the predominant monomer of pectin found in plant cell walls. This ligand is recognized by the periplasmic sugar binding protein ChvE, which interacts with the VirA histidine kinase that controls vir gene expression. Although ChvE is also a member of the ChvE-MmsAB ABC transporter involved in the utilization of many neutral sugars, it is not involved in galacturonate utilization. In this study, a putative tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP) transporter, GaaPQM, is shown to be essential for the utilization of galacturonic acid; we show that residue R169 in the predicted sugar binding site of the GaaP is required for activity. The gene upstream of gaaPQM (gaaR) encodes a member of the GntR family of regulators. GaaR is shown to repress the expression of gaaPQM, and the repression is relieved in the presence of the substrate for GaaPQM. Moreover, GaaR is shown to bind putative promoter regions in the sequences required for galacturonic acid utilization. Finally, A. tumefaciens strains carrying a deletion of gaaPQM are more sensitive to galacturonate as an inducer of vir gene expression, while the overexpression of gaaPQM results in strains being less sensitive to this vir inducer. This supports a model in which transporter activity is crucial in ensuring that vir gene expression occurs only at sites of high ligand concentration, such as those at a plant wound site. PMID:26637603

  15. TFIIB-facilitated recruitment of preinitiation complexes by a TAF-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Hori, Roderick T; Xu, Shuping; Hu, Xianyuan; Pyo, Sung

    2004-01-01

    Gene activators contain activation domains that are thought to recruit limiting components of the transcription machinery to a core promoter. VP16, a viral gene activator, has served as a model for studying the mechanistic aspects of transcriptional activation from yeast to human. The VP16 activation domain can be divided into two modules--an N-terminal subdomain (VPN) and a C-terminal subdomain (VPC). This study demonstrates that VPC stimulates core promoters that are either independent or dependent on TAFs (TATA-box Binding Protein-Associated Factors). In contrast, VPN only activates the TAF-independent core promoter and this activity increases in a synergistic fashion when VPN is dimerized (VPN2). Compared to one copy of VPN (VPN1), VPN2 also displays a highly cooperative increase in binding hTFIIB. The increased TFIIB binding correlates with VPN2's increased ability to recruit a complex containing TFIID, TFIIA and TFIIB. However, VPN1 and VPN2 do not increase the assembly of a complex containing only TFIID and TFIIA. The VPN subdomain also facilitates assembly of a complex containing TBP:TFIIA:TFIIB, which lacks TAFs, and provides a mechanism that could function at TAF-independent promoters. Taken together, these results suggest the interaction between VPN and TFIIB potentially initiate a network of contacts allowing the activator to indirectly tether TFIID or TBP to DNA.

  16. Mechanisms involved in the intrinsic isoniazid resistance of Mycobacterium avium.

    PubMed

    Mdluli, K; Swanson, J; Fischer, E; Lee, R E; Barry, C E

    1998-03-01

    Isoniazid (INH), which acts by inhibiting mycolic acid biosynthesis, is very potent against the tuberculous mycobacteria. It is about 100-fold less effective against Mycobacterium avium. This difference has often been attributed to a decreased permeability of the cell wall. We measured the rate of conversion of radiolabelled INH to 4-pyridylmethanol by whole cells and cell-free extracts and estimated the permeability barrier imposed by the cell wall to INH influx in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. avium. There was no significant difference in the relative permeability to INH between these two species. However, the total conversion rate in M. tuberculosis was found to be four times greater. Examination of in vitro-generated mutants revealed that the major resistance mechanism for both species is loss of the catalase-peroxidase KatG. Analysis of lipid and protein biosynthetic profiles demonstrated that the molecular target of activated INH was identical for both species. M. avium, however, formed colonies at INH concentrations inhibitory for mycolic acid biosynthesis. These mycolate-deficient M. avium exhibited altered colony morphologies, modified cell wall ultrastructure and were 10-fold more sensitive to treatment with hydrophobic antibiotics, such as rifampin. These findings may significantly impact the design of new therapeutic regimens for the treatment of infections with atypical mycobacteria.

  17. Mechanisms involved in cholesterol-induced neuronal insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Taghibiglou, Changiz; Bradley, Clarrisa A; Gaertner, Tara; Li, Yuping; Wang, Yushan; Wang, Yu Tian

    2009-09-01

    Insulin receptors (IRs) are highly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS) and play an important role in normal brain functions, such as learning and memory. Due to the increasing rate of obesity in western societies and overall high fat diets, the incidents of neuronal insulin resistance is also on the rise, but the underlying mechanism is still poorly characterized. We found that cholesterol treatment produces robust insulin signaling resistance that is characterized by the marked reduction in insulin-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of the IR and its downstream targets insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) and 2 (IRS2). Surface expression of IRs was also decreased and was correlated with an increase in facilitated receptor endocytosis. Membrane fractionation showed that after cholesterol treatment, the proportion of IRs localized in the lipid raft increased and correspondingly there was a reduction of IRs in the non-raft membrane. Interestingly, we found that IRs in the lipid rafts, unlike their counterparts in the non-raft membrane domain, were essentially unresponsive to insulin stimulation and that a high level of tyrosine phosphatase activity was associated with these raft fractions. Our results suggest that the lipid raft microdomain of the neuronal plasma membrane has a strong influence on IR signaling, and that incorporation of high levels of cholesterol may reduce IR signaling by increasing their representation in lipid rafts. The trapping of the IR in the lipid raft domain may result in its inactivation and promote its endocytosis: effects that could contribute to neuronal insulin resistance in obesity.

  18. Mechanisms involved in the developmental programming of adulthood disease.

    PubMed

    Warner, Matthew J; Ozanne, Susan E

    2010-04-14

    There are many instances in life when the environment plays a critical role in the health outcomes of an individual, yet none more so than those experienced in fetal and neonatal life. One of the most detrimental environmental problems encountered during this critical growth period are changes in nutrition to the growing fetus and newborn. Disturbances in the supply of nutrients and oxygen to the fetus can not only lead to adverse fetal growth patterns, but they have also been associated with the development of features of metabolic syndrome in adult life. This fetal response has been termed developmental programming or the developmental origins of health and disease. The present review focuses on the epidemiological studies that identified this association and the importance that animal models have played in studying this concept. We also address the potential mechanisms that may underpin the developmental programming of future disease. It also highlights (i) how developmental plasticity, although beneficial for short-term survival, can subsequently programme glucose intolerance and insulin resistance in adult life by eliciting changes in key organ structures and the epigenome, and (ii) how aberrant mitochondrial function can potentially lead to the development of Type 2 diabetes and other features of metabolic syndrome.

  19. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS.

    PubMed

    Marrone, Gina F; Grinnell, Steven G; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W

    2016-03-29

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3'-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50, 488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia.

  20. Truncated mu opioid GPCR variant involvement in opioid-dependent and opioid-independent pain modulatory systems within the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Gina F.; Grinnell, Steven G.; Lu, Zhigang; Rossi, Grace C.; Le Rouzic, Valerie; Xu, Jin; Majumdar, Susruta; Pan, Ying-Xian; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical management of severe pain depends heavily on opioids acting through mu opioid receptors encoded by the Oprm1 gene, which undergoes extensive alternative splicing. In addition to generating a series of prototypic seven transmembrane domain (7TM) G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), Oprm1 also produces a set of truncated splice variants containing only six transmembrane domains (6TM) through which selected opioids such as IBNtxA (3′-iodobenzoyl-6β-naltrexamide) mediate a potent analgesia without many undesirable effects. Although morphine analgesia is independent of these 6TM mu receptor isoforms, we now show that the selective loss of the 6TM variants in a knockout model eliminates the analgesic actions of delta and kappa opioids and of α2-adrenergic compounds, but not cannabinoid, neurotensin, or muscarinic drugs. These observations were confirmed by using antisense paradigms. Despite their role in analgesia, loss of the 6TM variants were not involved with delta opioid-induced seizure activity, aversion to the kappa drug U50,488H, or α2-mediated hypolocomotion. These observations support the existence of parallel opioid and nonopioid pain modulatory systems and highlight the ability to dissociate unwanted delta, kappa1, and α2 actions from analgesia. PMID:26976581

  1. Independent mechanisms recruit the cohesin loader protein NIPBL to sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bot, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Annika; Giordano, Fosco; Dantuma, Nico P.; Ström, Lena

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT NIPBL is required to load the cohesin complex on to DNA. While the canonical role of cohesin is to couple replicated sister chromatids together until the onset of mitosis, it also promotes tolerance to DNA damage. Here, we show that NIPBL is recruited to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle via independent mechanisms, influenced by type of damage. First, the heterochromatin protein HP1γ (also known as CBX3) recruits NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through the corresponding HP1-binding motif within the N-terminus. By contrast, the C-terminal HEAT repeat domain is unable to recruit NIPBL to DSBs but independently targets NIPBL to laser microirradiation-induced DNA damage. Each mechanism is dependent on the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitylation pathway, while the recruitment of the HEAT repeat domain requires further ATM or ATR activity. Thus, NIPBL has evolved a sophisticated response to damaged DNA that is influenced by the form of damage, suggesting a highly dynamic role for NIPBL in maintaining genomic stability. PMID:28167679

  2. Independent mechanisms recruit the cohesin loader protein NIPBL to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bot, Christopher; Pfeiffer, Annika; Giordano, Fosco; Manjeera, Dharani E; Dantuma, Nico P; Ström, Lena

    2017-03-15

    NIPBL is required to load the cohesin complex on to DNA. While the canonical role of cohesin is to couple replicated sister chromatids together until the onset of mitosis, it also promotes tolerance to DNA damage. Here, we show that NIPBL is recruited to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle via independent mechanisms, influenced by type of damage. First, the heterochromatin protein HP1γ (also known as CBX3) recruits NIPBL to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) through the corresponding HP1-binding motif within the N-terminus. By contrast, the C-terminal HEAT repeat domain is unable to recruit NIPBL to DSBs but independently targets NIPBL to laser microirradiation-induced DNA damage. Each mechanism is dependent on the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitylation pathway, while the recruitment of the HEAT repeat domain requires further ATM or ATR activity. Thus, NIPBL has evolved a sophisticated response to damaged DNA that is influenced by the form of damage, suggesting a highly dynamic role for NIPBL in maintaining genomic stability.

  3. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-3 (TIMP3) promotes endothelial apoptosis via a caspase-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Qi, Jian Hua; Anand-Apte, Bela

    2015-04-01

    Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP3) is a tumor suppressor and a potent inhibitor of angiogenesis. TIMP3 exerts its anti-angiogenic effect via a direct interaction with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor-2 (KDR) and inhibition of proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial cells (ECs). TIMP3 has also been shown to induce apoptosis in some cancer cells and vascular smooth muscle cells via MMP inhibition and caspase-dependent mechanisms. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanisms of TIMP3-mediated apoptosis in endothelial cells. We have previously demonstrated that mice developed smaller tumors with decreased vascularity when injected with breast carcinoma cells overexpressing TIMP3, than with control breast carcinoma cells. TIMP3 overexpression resulted in increased apoptosis in human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB435) in vivo but not in vitro. However, TIMP3 could induce apoptosis in ECs in vitro. The apoptotic activity of TIMP3 in ECs appears to be independent of MMP inhibitory activity. Furthermore, the equivalent expression of functional TIMP3 promoted apoptosis and caspase activation in ECs expressing KDR (PAE/KDR), but not in ECs expressing PDGF beta-receptor (PAE/β-R). Surprisingly, the apoptotic activity of TIMP3 appears to be independent of caspases. TIMP3 inhibited matrix-induced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) tyrosine phosphorylation and association with paxillin and disrupted the incorporation of β3 integrin, FAK and paxillin into focal adhesion contacts on the matrix, which were not affected by caspase inhibitors. Thus, TIMP3 may induce apoptosis in ECs by triggering a caspase-independent cell death pathway and targeting a FAK-dependent survival pathway.

  4. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Michinao; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Okinaga, Toshinori; Habu, Manabu; Yoshioka, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  5. SERCA Pump Optimizes Ca2+ Release by a Mechanism Independent of Store Filling in Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Viquez, Leticia; Guerrero-Serna, Guadalupe; García, Ubaldo; Guerrero-Hernández, Agustín

    2003-01-01

    Thapsigargin-sensitive sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pumps (SERCAs) are involved in maintaining and replenishing agonist-sensitive internal stores. Although it has been assumed that release channels act independently of SERCA pumps, there are data suggesting the opposite. Our aim was to study the relationship between SERCA pumps and the release channels in smooth muscle cells. To this end, we have rapidly blocked SERCA pumps with thapsigargin, to avoid depletion of the internal Ca2+ stores, and induced Ca2+ release with either caffeine, to open ryanodine receptors, or acetylcholine, to open inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors. Blocking SERCA pumps produced smaller and slower agonist-induced [Ca2+]i responses. We determined the Ca2+ level of the internal stores both indirectly, measuring the frequency of spontaneous transient outward currents, and directly, using Mag-Fura-2, and demonstrated that the inhibition of SERCA pumps did not produce a reduction of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels to explain the decrease in the agonist-induced Ca2+ responses. It appears that SERCA pumps are involved in sustaining agonist-induced Ca2+ release by a mechanism that involves the modulation of Ca2+ availability in the lumen of the internal stores. PMID:12829491

  6. Gene microarray assessment of multiple genes and signal pathways involved in androgen-dependent prostate cancer becoming androgen independent.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun-Bao; Dai, Chun-Mei; Su, Xiao-Yun; Cao, Lu; Qin, Rui; Kong, Qing-Bo

    2014-01-01

    To study the gene expression change and possible signal pathway during androgen-dependent prostate cancer (ADPC) becoming androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC), an LNCaP cell model of AIPC was established using flutamide in combination with androgen-free environment inducement, and differential expression genes were screened by microarray. Then the biological process, molecular function and KEGG pathway of differential expression genes are analyzed by Molecule Annotation System (MAS). By comparison of 12,207 expression genes, 347 expression genes were acquired, of which 156 were up-ragulated and 191 down-regulated. After analyzing the biological process and molecule function of differential expression genes, these genes are found to play crucial roles in cell proliferation, differntiation, cell cycle control, protein metabolism and modification and other biological process, serve as signal molecules, enzymes, peptide hormones, cytokines, cytoskeletal proteins and adhesion molecules. The analysis of KEGG show that the relevant genes of AIPC transformation participate in glutathione metabolism, cell cycle, P53 signal pathway, cytochrome P450 metabolism, Hedgehog signal pathway, MAPK signal pathway, adipocytokines signal pathway, PPAR signal pathway, TGF-β signal pathway and JAK-STAT signal pathway. In conclusion, during the process of ADPC becoming AIPC, it is not only one specific gene or pathway, but multiple genes and pathways that change. The findings above lay the foundation for study of AIPC mechanism and development of AIPC targeting drugs.

  7. Adrenergic regulation of gluconeogenesis: possible involvement of two mechanisms of signal transduction in alpha 1-adrenergic action.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M

    1985-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the effects of alpha 1-adrenergic agents on hepatocyte metabolism involve two mechanisms: (i) a calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process that is modulated by glucocorticoids and (ii) a calcium-dependent insulin-insensitive process that is modulated by thyroid hormones. We have studied the effect of epinephrine (plus propranolol) on gluconeogenesis from lactate and dihydroxyacetone. It was observed that the adrenergic stimulation of gluconeogenesis from lactate seemed to occur through both mechanisms, whereas when the substrate was dihydroxyacetone the action took place exclusively through the calcium-independent insulin-sensitive process. This effect was absent in hepatocytes from adrenalectomized rats, suggesting that it is modulated by glucocorticoids. PMID:2995981

  8. Mechanism(S) Involved in the Colon-Specific Expression of the Thiamine Pyrophosphate (Tpp) Transporter.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Ramos, Mel Brendan; Said, Hamid M

    2016-01-01

    Microbiota of the large intestine synthesizes considerable amount of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). We have recently demonstrated the existence of an efficient and specific carrier-mediated uptake process for TPP in human colonocytes, identified the TPP transporter (TPPT) involved (product of the SLC44A4 gene), and shown that expression of TPPT along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is restricted to the colon. Our aim in this study was to determine the molecular basis of the colon-specific expression of TPPT focusing on a possible epigenetic mechanism. Our results showed that the CpG island predicted in the SLC44A4 promoter is non-methylated in the human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells, but is hyper-methylated in the human duodenal epithelial HuTu80 cells (as well as in the human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE19 cells). In the mouse (where TPPT expression in the GI tract is also restricted to the colon), the CpG island predicted in the Slc44a4 promoter is non-methylated in both the jejunum and colon, thus arguing against possible contribution of DNA methylation in the colon-specific expression of TPPT. A role for histone modifications in the tissue-specific pattern of Slc44a4 expression, however, was suggested by the findings that in mouse colon, histone H3 in the 5'-regulatory region of Slc44a4 is tri-methylated at lysine 4 and acetylated at lysine 9, whereas the tri-methylation at lysine 27 modification was negligible. In contrast, in the mouse jejunum, histone H3 is hyper-trimethylated at lysine 27 (repressor mark). Similarly, possible involvement of miRNA(s) in the tissue-specific expression of TPPT was also suggested by the findings that the 3'-UTR of SLC44A4 is targeted by specific miRNAs/RNA binding proteins in non-colonic, but not in colonic, epithelial cells. These studies show, for the first time, epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications) play a role in determining the tissue-specific pattern of expression of TPPT

  9. CD8+ T Cell-Independent Immune-Mediated Mechanisms of Anti-Tumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    Pluhar, G. Elizabeth; Pennell, Christopher A.; Olin, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the growing number of preclinical and clinical trials focused on immunotherapy for the treatment of malignant gliomas, the prognosis for this disease remains grim. Cancer immunotherapy seeks to recruit an effective immune response to eliminate tumor cells. To date, cancer vaccines have shown only limited effectiveness because of our incomplete understanding of the necessary effector cells and mechanisms that yield efficient tumor clearance. CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity has long been proposed as the primary effector function necessary for tumor regression. However, there is increasing evidence that indicates that components of the immune system other than CD8+ T cells play important roles in tumor eradication and control. The following review should provide an understanding of the mechanisms involved in an effective antitumor response to guide future therapeutic designs. The information provided suggests an alternate means of effective tumor clearance in malignant glioma to the canonical CD8+ cytotoxic T cell mechanism. PMID:26351148

  10. Natural Endogenous Human Matriptase and Prostasin Undergo Zymogen Activation via Independent Mechanisms in an Uncoupled Manner

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hui Chen; Liang, Yan A.; Lai, Ying-Jung J.; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Barndt, Robert B.; Shiao, Frank; Chang, Hsiang-Hua D.; Lu, Dajun D.; Huang, Nanxi; Tseng, Chun-Che; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Johnson, Michael D.; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-associated serine proteases matriptase and prostasin are believed to function in close partnership. Their zymogen activation has been reported to be tightly coupled, either as a matriptase-initiated proteolytic cascade or through a mutually dependent mechanism involving the formation of a reciprocal zymogen activation complex. Here we show that this putative relationship may not apply in the context of human matriptase and prostasin. First, the tightly coupled proteolytic cascade between matriptase and prostasin might not occur when modest matriptase activation is induced by sphingosine 1-phospahte in human mammary epithelial cells. Second, prostasin is not required and/or involved in matriptase autoactivation because matriptase can undergo zymogen activation in cells that do not endogenously express prostasin. Third, matriptase is not required for and/or involved in prostasin activation, since activated prostasin can be detected in cells expressing no endogenous matriptase. Finally, matriptase and prostasin both undergo zymogen activation through an apparently un-coupled mechanism in cells endogenously expressing both proteases, such as in Caco-2 cells. In these human enterocytes, matriptase is detected primarily in the zymogen form and prostasin predominantly as the activated form, either in complexes with protease inhibitors or as the free active form. The negligible levels of prostasin zymogen with high levels of matriptase zymogen suggests that the reciprocal zymogen activation complex is likely not the mechanism for matriptase zymogen activation. Furthermore, high level prostasin activation still occurs in Caco-2 variants with reduced or absent matriptase expression, indicating that matriptase is not required and/or involved in prostasin zymogen activation. Collectively, these data suggest that any functional relationship between natural endogenous human matriptase and prostasin does not occur at the level of zymogen activation. PMID:27936035

  11. Galanin-Mediated Behavioural Hyperalgesia from the Dorsomedial Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Involves Two Independent Descending Pronociceptive Pathways.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Diana; Viisanen, Hanna; Wei, Hong; Almeida, Armando; Pertovaara, Antti; Pinto-Ribeiro, Filipa

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the dorsomedial nucleus of the hypothalamus (DMH) by galanin (GAL) induces behavioural hyperalgesia. Since DMH neurones do not project directly to the spinal cord, we hypothesized that the medullary dorsal reticular nucleus (DRt), a pronociceptive region projecting to the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) and/or the serotoninergic raphe-spinal pathway acting on the spinal 5-HT3 receptor (5HT3R) could relay descending nociceptive facilitation induced by GAL in the DMH. Heat-evoked paw-withdrawal latency (PWL) and activity of SDH neurones were assessed in monoarthritic (ARTH) and control (SHAM) animals after pharmacological manipulations of the DMH, DRt and spinal cord. The results showed that GAL in the DMH and glutamate in the DRt lead to behavioural hyperalgesia in both SHAM and ARTH animals, which is accompanied particularly by an increase in heat-evoked responses of wide-dynamic range neurons, a group of nociceptive SDH neurones. Facilitation of pain behaviour induced by GAL in the DMH was reversed by lidocaine in the DRt and by ondansetron, a 5HT3R antagonist, in the spinal cord. However, the hyperalgesia induced by glutamate in the DRt was not blocked by spinal ondansetron. In addition, in ARTH but not SHAM animals PWL was increased after lidocaine in the DRt and ondansetron in the spinal cord. Our data demonstrate that GAL in the DMH activates two independent descending facilitatory pathways: (i) one relays in the DRt and (ii) the other one involves 5-HT neurones acting on spinal 5HT3Rs. In experimental ARTH, the tonic pain-facilitatory action is increased in both of these descending pathways.

  12. Membrane-mediated action of the endocannabinoid anandamide on membrane proteins: implications for understanding the receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Medeiros, Djalma; Silva-Gonçalves, Laíz da Costa; da Silva, Annielle Mendes Brito; dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel

    2017-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are amphiphilic molecules that play crucial neurophysiological functions acting as lipid messengers. Antagonists and knockdown of the classical CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors do not completely abolish many endocannabinoid activities, supporting the idea of a mechanism independent of receptors whose mode of action remains unclear. Here we combine gramicidin A (gA) single channel recordings and membrane capacitance measurements to investigate the lipid bilayer-modifying activity of endocannabinoids. Single channel recordings show that the incorporation of endocannabinoids into lipid bilayers reduces the free energy necessary for gramicidin channels to transit from the monomeric to the dimeric conformation. Membrane capacitance demonstrates that the endocannabinoid anandamide has limited effects on the overall structure of the lipid bilayers. Our results associated with the theory of membrane elastic deformation reveal that the action of endocannabinoids on membrane proteins can involve local adjustments of the lipid/protein hydrophobic interface. The current findings shed new light on the receptor-independent mode of action of endocannabinoids on membrane proteins, with important implications towards their neurobiological function. PMID:28128290

  13. Membrane-mediated action of the endocannabinoid anandamide on membrane proteins: implications for understanding the receptor-independent mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medeiros, Djalma; Silva-Gonçalves, Laíz Da Costa; da Silva, Annielle Mendes Brito; Dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel

    2017-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are amphiphilic molecules that play crucial neurophysiological functions acting as lipid messengers. Antagonists and knockdown of the classical CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors do not completely abolish many endocannabinoid activities, supporting the idea of a mechanism independent of receptors whose mode of action remains unclear. Here we combine gramicidin A (gA) single channel recordings and membrane capacitance measurements to investigate the lipid bilayer-modifying activity of endocannabinoids. Single channel recordings show that the incorporation of endocannabinoids into lipid bilayers reduces the free energy necessary for gramicidin channels to transit from the monomeric to the dimeric conformation. Membrane capacitance demonstrates that the endocannabinoid anandamide has limited effects on the overall structure of the lipid bilayers. Our results associated with the theory of membrane elastic deformation reveal that the action of endocannabinoids on membrane proteins can involve local adjustments of the lipid/protein hydrophobic interface. The current findings shed new light on the receptor-independent mode of action of endocannabinoids on membrane proteins, with important implications towards their neurobiological function.

  14. Membrane-mediated action of the endocannabinoid anandamide on membrane proteins: implications for understanding the receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, Djalma; Silva-Gonçalves, Laíz da Costa; da Silva, Annielle Mendes Brito; Dos Santos Cabrera, Marcia Perez; Arcisio-Miranda, Manoel

    2017-01-27

    Endocannabinoids are amphiphilic molecules that play crucial neurophysiological functions acting as lipid messengers. Antagonists and knockdown of the classical CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors do not completely abolish many endocannabinoid activities, supporting the idea of a mechanism independent of receptors whose mode of action remains unclear. Here we combine gramicidin A (gA) single channel recordings and membrane capacitance measurements to investigate the lipid bilayer-modifying activity of endocannabinoids. Single channel recordings show that the incorporation of endocannabinoids into lipid bilayers reduces the free energy necessary for gramicidin channels to transit from the monomeric to the dimeric conformation. Membrane capacitance demonstrates that the endocannabinoid anandamide has limited effects on the overall structure of the lipid bilayers. Our results associated with the theory of membrane elastic deformation reveal that the action of endocannabinoids on membrane proteins can involve local adjustments of the lipid/protein hydrophobic interface. The current findings shed new light on the receptor-independent mode of action of endocannabinoids on membrane proteins, with important implications towards their neurobiological function.

  15. Role of the Wasp Venom Peptide Mastoparan in the Study of Mechanisms Involved in Cell Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-23

    Involved in Cell Death 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK...study of mechanisms involved in cell death " beyond brief excerpts is with the permission of the copyright owner, and will save and hold harmless...Dissertation: Role of the wasp venom peptide mastoparan in the study of mechanisms involved in cell death . Samuel P. Eng, Master of Science, 1989

  16. Worms under Pressure: Bulk Mechanical Properties of C. elegans Are Independent of the Cuticle

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, William; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Brangwynne, Clifford P.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of cells and tissues play a well-known role in physiology and disease. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits mechanical properties that are still poorly understood, but are thought to be dominated by its collagen-rich outer cuticle. To our knowledge, we use a novel microfluidic technique to reveal that the worm responds linearly to low applied hydrostatic stress, exhibiting a volumetric compression with a bulk modulus, κ = 140 ± 20 kPa; applying negative pressures leads to volumetric expansion of the worm, with a similar bulk modulus. Surprisingly, however, we find that a variety of collagen mutants and pharmacological perturbations targeting the cuticle do not impact the bulk modulus. Moreover, the worm exhibits dramatic stiffening at higher stresses—behavior that is also independent of the cuticle. The stress-strain curves for all conditions can be scaled onto a master equation, suggesting that C. elegans exhibits a universal elastic response dominated by the mechanics of pressurized internal organs. PMID:25902429

  17. Worms under Pressure: Bulk Mechanical Properties of C. elegans Are Independent of the Cuticle.

    PubMed

    Gilpin, William; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Brangwynne, Clifford P

    2015-04-21

    The mechanical properties of cells and tissues play a well-known role in physiology and disease. The model organism Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits mechanical properties that are still poorly understood, but are thought to be dominated by its collagen-rich outer cuticle. To our knowledge, we use a novel microfluidic technique to reveal that the worm responds linearly to low applied hydrostatic stress, exhibiting a volumetric compression with a bulk modulus, κ = 140 ± 20 kPa; applying negative pressures leads to volumetric expansion of the worm, with a similar bulk modulus. Surprisingly, however, we find that a variety of collagen mutants and pharmacological perturbations targeting the cuticle do not impact the bulk modulus. Moreover, the worm exhibits dramatic stiffening at higher stresses-behavior that is also independent of the cuticle. The stress-strain curves for all conditions can be scaled onto a master equation, suggesting that C. elegans exhibits a universal elastic response dominated by the mechanics of pressurized internal organs.

  18. Iron-Induced Damage in Cardiomyopathy: Oxidative-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gammella, Elena; Recalcati, Stefania; Rybinska, Ilona; Buratti, Paolo; Cairo, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    The high incidence of cardiomyopathy in patients with hemosiderosis, particularly in transfusional iron overload, strongly indicates that iron accumulation in the heart plays a major role in the process leading to heart failure. In this context, iron-mediated generation of noxious reactive oxygen species is believed to be the most important pathogenetic mechanism determining cardiomyocyte damage, the initiating event of a pathologic progression involving apoptosis, fibrosis, and ultimately cardiac dysfunction. However, recent findings suggest that additional mechanisms involving subcellular organelles and inflammatory mediators are important factors in the development of this disease. Moreover, excess iron can amplify the cardiotoxic effect of other agents or events. Finally, subcellular misdistribution of iron within cardiomyocytes may represent an additional pathway leading to cardiac injury. Recent advances in imaging techniques and chelators development remarkably improved cardiac iron overload detection and treatment, respectively. However, increased understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of iron overload cardiomyopathy is needed to pave the way for the development of improved therapeutic strategies. PMID:25878762

  19. Tributyltin affects adipogenic cell fate commitment in mesenchymal stem cells by a PPARγ independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Biemann, Ronald; Fischer, Bernd; Blüher, Matthias; Navarrete Santos, Anne

    2014-05-05

    The food contaminant tributyltin (TBT) is an endocrine disrupting compound (EDC) promoting adipogenic differentiation in vitro and in vivo. Although prenatal TBT exposure has been shown to induce obesity, the underlying mechanisms and the role of the transcription factor PPARγ are not clarified yet. At different stages of adipogenesis, multipotent murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), C3H10T1/2, were exposed to TBT and analyzed for adipogenic differentiation, PPARγ promoter activation and PPARγ1, PPARγ2, Pref-1 and SOX9 expression. Depending on the exposure window, TBT promoted subsequent adipogenesis independently and dependently from PPARγ. In undifferentiated MSC, TBT exposure induced a transcriptional PPARγ-independent repression of Pref-1 and SOX9, which are both suppressors of adipogenic cell fate commitment. During hormonal induction TBT additionally enhanced adipogenic differentiation by PPARγ signaling. The impact of TBT on early cell fate development documents a novel mechanistic insight in the development of adipocytes derived from MSC and its susceptibility to EDC.

  20. A review of path-independent integrals in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Kwang S.; Orange, Thomas W.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the path-independent (P-I) integrals in elastic plastic fracture mechanics which have been proposed in recent years to overcome the limitations imposed on the J-integral. The P-I integrals considered are the J-integral by Rice (1968), the thermoelastic P-I integrals by Wilson and Yu (1979) and Gurtin (1979), the J-integral by Blackburn (1972), the J(theta)-integral by Ainsworth et al. (1978), the J-integral by Kishimoto et al. (1980), and the Delta-T(p) and Delta T(p)-asterisk integrals by Alturi et al. (1982). The theoretical foundation of the P-I integrals is examined with an emphasis on whether or not the path independence is maintained in the presence of nonproportional loading and unloading in the plastic regime, thermal gradient, and material inhomogeneities. The simularities, difference, salient features, and limitations of the P-I integrals are discussed. Comments are also made with regard to the physical meaning, the possibility of experimental measurement, and computational aspects.

  1. AT7867 Inhibits Human Colorectal Cancer Cells via AKT-Dependent and AKT-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chen; Huang, Ping; Zhang, Yi; Cao, Shibing; Li, Xiangcheng

    2017-01-01

    AKT is often hyper-activated in human colorectal cancers (CRC). This current study evaluated the potential anti-CRC activity by AT7867, a novel AKT and p70S6K1 (S6K1) dual inhibitor. We showed that AT7867 inhibited survival and proliferation of established (HT-29, HCT116 and DLD-1 lines) and primary human CRC cells. Meanwhile, it provoked caspase-dependent apoptosis in the CRC cells. Molecularly, AT7867 blocked AKT-S6K1 activation in CRC cells. Restoring AKT-S6K1 activation, via expression of a constitutively-active AKT1 (“ca-AKT1”), only partially attenuated AT7867-induced HT-29 cell death. Further studies demonstrated that AT7867 inhibited sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity to promote pro-apoptotic ceramide production in HT-29 cells. Such effects by AT7867 were independent of AKT inhibition. AT7867-indued ceramide production and subsequent HT-29 cell apoptosis were attenuated by co-treatment of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), but were potentiated with the glucosylceramide synthase (GCS) inhibitor PDMP. In vivo, intraperitoneal injection of AT7867 inhibited HT-29 xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. AKT activation was also inhibited in AT7867-treated HT-29 tumors. Together, the preclinical results suggest that AT7867 inhibits CRC cells via AKT-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PMID:28081222

  2. Asc-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms Contribute to Restriction of Legionella Pneumophila Infection in Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Dalia H. A.; Gavrilin, Mikhail A.; Akhter, Anwari; Caution, Kyle; Kotrange, Sheetal; Khweek, Arwa Abu; Abdulrahman, Basant A.; Hassan, Zeinab A.; El-Sharkawi, Fathia Z.; Bedi, Simranjit S.; Ladner, Katherine; Gonzalez-Mejia, M. Elba; Doseff, Andrea I.; Mostafa, Mahmoud; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi; Guttridge, Dennis; Marsh, Clay B.; Wewers, Mark D.; Amer, Amal O.

    2010-01-01

    The apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (Asc) is an adaptor molecule that mediates inflammatory and apoptotic signals. Legionella pneumophila is an intracellular bacterium and the causative agent of Legionnaire's pneumonia. L. pneumophila is able to cause pneumonia in immuno-compromised humans but not in most inbred mice. Murine macrophages that lack the ability to activate caspase-1, such as caspase-1−/− and Nlrc4−/− allow L. pneumophila infection. This permissiveness is attributed mainly to the lack of active caspase-1 and the absence of its down stream substrates such as caspase-7. However, the role of Asc in control of L. pneumophila infection in mice is unclear. Here we show that caspase-1 is moderately activated in Asc−/− macrophages and that this limited activation is required and sufficient to restrict L. pneumophila growth. Moreover, Asc-independent activation of caspase-1 requires bacterial flagellin and is mainly detected in cellular extracts but not in culture supernatants. We also demonstrate that the depletion of Asc from permissive macrophages enhances bacterial growth by promoting L. pneumophila-mediated activation of the NF-κB pathway and decreasing caspase-3 activation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that L. pneumophila infection in murine macrophages is controlled by several mechanisms: Asc-independent activation of caspase-1 and Asc-dependent regulation of NF-κB and caspase-3 activation. PMID:21713115

  3. A review of path-independent integrals in elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, task 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    The path independent (P-I) integrals in elastic plastic fracture mechanics which have been proposed in recent years to overcome the limitations imposed on the J integral are reviewed. The P-I integrals considered herein are the J integral by Rice, the thermoelastic P-I integrals by Wilson and Yu and by Gurtin, the J* integral by Blackburn, the J sub theta integral by Ainsworth et al., the J integral by Kishimoto et al., and the delta T sub p and delta T* sub p integrals by Atluri et al. The theoretical foundation of these P-I integrals is examined with emphasis on whether or not path independence is maintained in the presence of nonproportional loading and unloading in the plastic regime, thermal gradients, and material inhomogeneities. The similarities, differences, salient features, and limitations of these P-I integrals are discussed. Comments are also made with regard to the physical meaning, the possibility of experimental measurement, and computational aspects.

  4. Progesterone modulates the LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone-receptor independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wolfson, Manuel Luis; Schander, Julieta Aylen; Bariani, María Victoria; Correa, Fernando; Franchi, Ana María

    2015-12-15

    Genital tract infections caused by Gram-negative bacteria induce miscarriage and are one of the most common complications of human pregnancy. LPS administration to 7-day pregnant mice induces embryo resorption after 24h, with nitric oxide playing a fundamental role in this process. We have previously shown that progesterone exerts protective effects on the embryo by modulating the inflammatory reaction triggered by LPS. Here we sought to investigate whether the in vivo administration of progesterone modulated the LPS-induced nitric oxide production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from pregnant and non-pregnant mice. We found that progesterone downregulated LPS-induced nitric oxide production by a progesterone receptor-independent mechanism. Moreover, our results suggest a possible participation of glucocorticoid receptors in at least some of the anti-inflammatory effects of progesterone.

  5. piRNA biogenesis during adult spermatogenesis in mice is independent of the ping-pong mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Beyret, Ergin; Liu, Na; Lin, Haifan

    2012-01-01

    piRNAs, a class of small non-coding RNAs associated with PIWI proteins, have broad functions in germline development, transposon silencing, and epigenetic regulation. In diverse organisms, a subset of piRNAs derived from repeat sequences are produced via the interplay between two PIWI proteins. This mechanism, termed “ping-pong” cycle, operates among the PIWI proteins of the primordial mouse testis; however, its involvement in postnatal testes remains elusive. Here we show that adult testicular piRNAs are produced independent of the ping-pong mechanism. We identified and characterized large populations of piRNAs in the adult and postnatal developing testes associated with MILI and MIWI, the only PIWI proteins detectable in these testes. No interaction between MILI and MIWI or sequence feature for the ping-pong mechanism among their piRNAs was detected in the adult testis. The majority of MILI- and MIWI-associated piRNAs originate from the same DNA strands within the same loci. Both populations of piRNAs are biased for 5′ Uracil but not for Adenine on the 10th nucleotide position, and display no complementarity. Furthermore, in Miwi mutants, MILI-associated piRNAs are not downregulated, but instead upregulated. These results indicate that the adult testicular piRNAs are predominantly, if not exclusively, produced by a primary processing mechanism instead of the ping-pong mechanism. In this primary pathway, biogenesis of MILI- and MIWI-associated piRNAs may compete for the same precursors; the types of piRNAs produced tend to be non-selectively dictated by the available precursors in the cell; and precursors with introns tend to be spliced before processed into piRNAs. PMID:22907665

  6. Neuroplasticity-dependent and -independent mechanisms of chronic deep brain stimulation in stressed rats

    PubMed Central

    Bambico, F R; Bregman, T; Diwan, M; Li, J; Darvish-Ghane, S; Li, Z; Laver, B; Amorim, B O; Covolan, L; Nobrega, J N; Hamani, C

    2015-01-01

    Chronic ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) deep brain stimulation (DBS) improves depressive-like behaviour in rats via serotonergic and neurotrophic-related mechanisms. We hypothesise that, in addition to these substrates, DBS-induced increases in hippocampal neurogenesis may also be involved. Our results show that stress-induced behavioural deficits in the sucrose preference test, forced swim test, novelty-suppressed feeding test (NSFT) and elevated plus maze were countered by chronic vmPFC DBS. In addition, stressed rats receiving stimulation had significant increases in hippocampal neurogenesis, PFC and hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels. To block neurogenesis, stressed animals given DBS were injected with temozolomide. Such treatment reversed the anxiolytic-like effect of stimulation in the NSFT without significantly affecting performance in other behavioural tests. Taken together, our findings suggest that neuroplastic changes, including neurogenesis, may be involved in specific anxiolytic effects of DBS without affecting its general antidepressant-like response. PMID:26529427

  7. Withaferin A induces Nrf2-dependent protection against liver injury: Role of Keap1-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Palliyaguru, Dushani L; Chartoumpekis, Dionysios V; Wakabayashi, Nobunao; Skoko, John J; Yagishita, Yoko; Singh, Shivendra V; Kensler, Thomas W

    2016-12-01

    Small molecules of plant origin offer presumptively safe opportunities to prevent carcinogenesis, mutagenesis and other forms of toxicity in humans. However, the mechanisms of action of such plant-based agents remain largely unknown. In recent years the stress responsive transcription factor Nrf2 has been validated as a target for disease chemoprevention. Withania somnifera (WS) is a herb used in Ayurveda (an ancient form of medicine in South Asia). In the recent past, withanolides isolated from WS, such as Withaferin A (WA) have been demonstrated to be preventive and therapeutic against multiple diseases in experimental models. The goals of this study are to evaluate withanolides such as WA as well as Withania somnifera root extract as inducers of Nrf2 signaling, to probe the underlying signaling mechanism of WA and to determine whether prevention of acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatic toxicity in mice by WA occurs in an Nrf2-dependent manner. We observed that WA profoundly protects wild-type mice but not Nrf2-disrupted mice against APAP hepatotoxicity. WA is a potent inducer of Nrf2-dependent cytoprotective enzyme expression both in vivo and in vitro. Unexpectedly, WA induces Nrf2 signaling at least in part, in a Keap1-independent, Pten/Pi3k/Akt-dependent manner in comparison to prototypical Nrf2 inducers, sulforaphane and CDDO-Im. The identification of WA as an Nrf2 inducer that can signal through a non-canonical, Keap1-independent pathway provides an opportunity to evaluate the role of other regulatory partners of Nrf2 in the dietary and pharmacological induction of Nrf2-mediated cytoprotection.

  8. Internalization of Tissue Factor-Rich Microvesicles by Platelets Occurs Independently of GPIIb-IIIa, and Involves CD36 Receptor, Serotonin Transporter and Cytoskeletal Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Galan, Ana M; Roque, Merce; Caballo, Carolina; Molina, Patricia; White, James G; Escolar, Gines

    2016-02-01

    Platelets are important in hemostasis, but also detect particles and pathogens in the circulation. Phagocytic and endocytic activities of platelets are widely recognized; however, receptors and mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We previously demonstrated that platelets internalize and store phospholipid microvesicles enriched in human tissue factor (TF+MVs) and that platelet-associated TF enhances thrombus formation at sites of vascular damage. Here, we investigate the mechanisms implied in the interactions of TF+MVs with platelets and the effects of specific inhibitory strategies. Aggregometry and electron microscopy were used to assess platelet activation and TF+MVs uptake. Cytoskeletal assembly and activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and RhoA were analyzed by western blot and ELISA. Exposure of platelets to TF+MVs caused reversible platelet aggregation, actin polymerization and association of contractile proteins to the cytoskeleton being maximal at 1 min. The same kinetics were observed for activation of PI3K and translocation of RhoA to the cytoskeleton. Inhibitory strategies to block glycoprotein IIb-IIIa (GPIIb-IIIa), scavenger receptor CD36, serotonin transporter (SERT) and PI3K, fully prevented platelet aggregation by TF+MVs. Ultrastructural techniques revealed that uptake of TF+MVs was efficiently prevented by anti-CD36 and SERT inhibitor, but only moderately interfered by GPIIb-IIIa blockade. We conclude that internalization of TF+MVs by platelets occurs independently of receptors related to their main hemostatic function (GPIIb-IIIa), involves the scavenger receptor CD36, SERT and engages PI3-Kinase activation and cytoskeletal assembly. CD36 and SERT appear as potential therapeutic targets to interfere with the association of TF+MVs with platelets and possibly downregulate their prothrombotic phenotype.

  9. Highly polarized Th17 cells induce EAE via a T-bet independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Grifka-Walk, Heather M; Lalor, Stephen J; Segal, Benjamin M

    2013-11-01

    In the MOG35-55 induced EAE model, autoreactive Th17 cells that accumulate in the central nervous system acquire Th1 characteristics via a T-bet dependent mechanism. It remains to be determined whether Th17 plasticity and encephalitogenicity are causally related to each other. Here, we show that IL-23 polarized T-bet(-/-) Th17 cells are unimpaired in either activation or proliferation, and induce higher quantities of the chemokines RANTES and CXCL2 than WT Th17 cells. Unlike their WT counterparts, T-bet(-/-) Th17 cells retain an IL-17(hi) IFN-γ(neg-lo) cytokine profile following adoptive transfer into syngeneic hosts. This population of highly polarized Th17 effectors is capable of mediating EAE, albeit with a milder clinical course. It has previously been reported that the signature Th1 and Th17 effector cytokines, IFN-γ and IL-17, are dispensable for the development of autoimmune demyelinating disease. The current study demonstrates that the "master regulator" transcription factor, T-bet, is also not universally required for encephalitogenicity. Our results contribute to a growing body of data showing heterogeneity of myelin-reactive T cells and the independent mechanisms they employ to inflict damage to central nervous system tissues, complicating the search for therapeutic targets relevant across the spectrum of individuals with multiple sclerosis.

  10. Calorie restriction regulates circadian clock gene expression through BMAL1 dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sonal A.; Velingkaar, Nikkhil; Makwana, Kuldeep; Chaudhari, Amol; Kondratov, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Feeding behavior, metabolism and circadian clocks are interlinked. Calorie restriction (CR) is a feeding paradigm known to extend longevity. We found that CR significantly affected the rhythms in the expression of circadian clock genes in mice on the mRNA and protein levels, suggesting that CR reprograms the clocks both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally. The effect of CR on gene expression was distinct from the effects of time-restricted feeding or fasting. Furthermore, CR affected the circadian output through up- or down-regulation of the expression of several clock-controlled transcriptional factors and the longevity candidate genes. CR-dependent effects on some clock gene expression were impaired in the liver of mice deficient for BMAL1, suggesting importance of this transcriptional factor for the transcriptional reprogramming of the clock, however, BMAL1- independent mechanisms also exist. We propose that CR recruits biological clocks as a natural mechanism of metabolic optimization under conditions of limited energy resources. PMID:27170536

  11. Mechanisms for independent cytoplasmic inheritance of mitochondria and plastids in angiosperms.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Noriko

    2010-03-01

    The inheritance of mitochondria and plastids in angiosperms has been categorized into three modes:maternal, biparental and paternal. Many mechanisms have been proposed for maternal inheritance, including: (1) physical exclusion of the organelle itself during pollenmitosis I (PMI); (2) elimination of the organelle by formation of enucleated cytoplasmic bodies (ECB); (3) autophagic degradation of organelles during male gametophyte development; (4) digestion of the organelle after fertilization; and (5)--the most likely possibility--digestion of organellar DNA in generative cells just after PMI. In detailed cytological observations, the presence or absence of mitochondrial and plastid DNA in generative cells corresponds to biparental/paternal inheritance or maternal inheritance of the respective organelle examined genetically. These improved cytological observations demonstrate that the replication or digestion of organellar DNA in young generative cells just after PMI is a critical point determining the mode of cytoplasmic inheritance. This review describes the independent control mechanisms in mitochondria and plastids that lead to differences in cytoplasmic inheritance in angiosperms.

  12. Adult criminal involvement: A cross-sectional inquiry into correlates and mechanisms over the life course

    PubMed Central

    DePadilla, Lara; Perkins, Molly M.; Elifson, Kirk W.; Sterk, Claire E.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the relative contribution of four domains of predictors that have been linked to adult criminal involvement: (1) socio-demographic characteristics, (2) family-of-origin factors, (3) proximal processes developed during adolescence, and (4) current lifestyle and situational factors. Cross-sectional data were collected through face-to-face interviews with 242 community-recruited adults. Data analysis involved negative binomial regression. Being male, family size, juvenile delinquency, aggression, living with someone involved in illegal activity and recent violent victimization were independently associated with non-violent criminal involvement. Aggression, association with deviant peers, and recent violent victimization were independently associated with violent criminal involvement. Juvenile delinquency and aggression mediated the affect of multiple family-of-origin characteristics on non-violent criminal involvement and aggression mediated the effect of childhood physical abuse on violent criminal involvement. The results emphasize the importance of investigating both antecedents and proximal risk factors predictive of different types of criminal involvement, which, in turn, will assist in developing risk-focused prevention and intervention programs. PMID:24307752

  13. Hypoxia negatively regulates antimetastatic PEDF in melanoma cells by a hypoxia inducible factor-independent, autophagy dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Barral, Asunción; Orgaz, José Luis; Gomez, Valentí; del Peso, Luis; Calzada, María José; Jiménez, Benilde

    2012-01-01

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF), a member of the serine protease inhibitor (SERPIN) superfamily, displays a potent antiangiogenic and antimetastatic activity in a broad range of tumor types. Melanocytes and low aggressive melanoma cells secrete high levels of PEDF, while its expression is lost in highly aggressive melanomas. PEDF efficiently abrogates a number of functional properties critical for the acquisition of metastatic ability by melanoma cells, such as neovascularization, proliferation, migration, invasiveness and extravasation. In this study, we identify hypoxia as a relevant negative regulator of PEDF in melanocytes and low aggressive melanoma cells. PEDF was regulated at the protein level. Importantly, although downregulation of PEDF was induced by inhibition of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases, it was independent of the hypoxia inducible factor (HIF), a key mediator of the adaptation to hypoxia. Decreased PEDF protein was not mediated by inhibition of translation through untranslated regions (UTRs) in melanoma cells. Degradation by metalloproteinases, implicated on PEDF degradation in retinal pigment epithelial cells, or by the proteasome, was also excluded as regulatory mechanism in melanoma cells. Instead, we found that degradation by autophagy was critical for PEDF downregulation under hypoxia in human melanoma cells. Our findings show that hypoxic conditions encountered during primary melanoma growth downregulate antiangiogenic and antimetastasic PEDF by a posttranslational mechanism involving degradation by autophagy and could therefore contribute to the acquisition of highly metastatic potential characteristic of aggressive melanoma cells.

  14. N-acetyl cysteine mediates protection from 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate induced apoptosis via nuclear factor kappa B-dependent and independent pathways: potential involvement of JNK.

    PubMed

    Paranjpe, Avina; Cacalano, Nicholas A; Hume, Wyatt R; Jewett, Anahid

    2009-04-01

    The mechanisms by which resin based materials induce adverse effects in patients have not been completely elucidated. Here we show that 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) induces apoptotic cell death in oral keratinocytes. Functional loss and cell death induced by HEMA was significantly inhibited in the presence of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) treatment. NAC also prevented HEMA mediated decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor secretion. The protective effect of NAC was partly related to its ability to induce NF-kappaB in the cells, since HEMA mediated inhibition of nuclear NF-kappaB expression and function was significantly blocked in the presence of NAC treatment. Moreover, blocking of nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB in oral keratinocytes sensitized these cells to HEMA mediated apoptosis. In addition, since NAC was capable of rescuing close to 50% of NF-kappaB knockdown cells from HEMA mediated cell death, there is, therefore, an NF-kappaB independent pathway of protection from HEMA mediated cell death by NAC. NAC mediated prevention of HEMA induced cell death in NF-kappaB knockdown cells was correlated with a decreased induction of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity since NAC inhibited HEMA mediated increase in JNK levels. Furthermore, the addition of a pharmacologic JNK inhibitor to HEMA treated cells prevented cell death and restored NF-kappaB knockdown cell function significantly. Therefore, NAC protects oral keratinocytes from the toxic effects of HEMA through NF-kappaB dependent and independent pathways. Moreover, our data suggest the potential involvement of JNK pathway in NAC mediated protection.

  15. Distinct molecular mechanisms involved in carbon catabolite repression of the arabinose regulon in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Inácio, José Manuel; Costa, Carla; de Sá-Nogueira, Isabel

    2003-09-01

    The Bacillus subtilis proteins involved in the utilization of L-arabinose are encoded by the araABDLMNPQ-abfA metabolic operon and by the araE/araR divergent unit. Transcription from the ara operon, araE transport gene and araR regulatory gene is induced by L-arabinose and negatively controlled by AraR. Additionally, expression of both the ara operon and the araE gene is regulated at the transcriptional level by glucose repression. Here, by transcriptional fusion analysis in different mutant backgrounds, it is shown that CcpA most probably complexed with HPr-Ser46-P plays the major role in carbon catabolite repression of the ara regulon by glucose and glycerol. Site-directed mutagenesis and deletion analysis indicate that two catabolite responsive elements (cres) present in the ara operon (cre araA and cre araB) and one cre in the araE gene (cre araE) are implicated in this mechanism. Furthermore, cre araA located between the promoter region of the ara operon and the araA gene, and cre araB placed 2 kb downstream within the araB gene are independently functional and both contribute to glucose repression. In Northern blot analysis, in the presence of glucose, a CcpA-dependent transcript consistent with a message stopping at cre araB was detected, suggesting that transcription 'roadblocking' of RNA polymerase elongation is the most likely mechanism operating in this system. Glucose exerts an additional repression of the ara regulon, which requires a functional araR.

  16. Psychostimulants affect dopamine transmission through both dopamine transporter-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    dela Peña, Ike; Gevorkiana, Ruzanna; Shi, Wei-Xing

    2015-10-05

    The precise mechanisms by which cocaine and amphetamine-like psychostimulants exert their reinforcing effects are not yet fully defined. It is widely believed, however, that these drugs produce their effects by enhancing dopamine neurotransmission in the brain, especially in limbic areas such as the nucleus accumbens, by inducing dopamine transporter-mediated reverse transport and/or blocking dopamine reuptake though the dopamine transporter. Here, we present the evidence that aside from dopamine transporter, non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanisms also participate in psychostimulant-induced dopamine release and contribute to the behavioral effects of these drugs, such as locomotor activation and reward. Accordingly, psychostimulants could increase norepinephrine release in the prefrontal cortex, the latter then alters the firing pattern of dopamine neurons resulting in changes in action potential-dependent dopamine release. These alterations would further affect the temporal pattern of dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens, thereby modifying information processing in that area. Hence, a synaptic input to a nucleus accumbens neuron may be enhanced or inhibited by dopamine depending on its temporal relationship to dopamine release. Specific temporal patterns of dopamine release may also be required for certain forms of synaptic plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Together, these effects induced by psychostimulants, mediated through a non-dopamine transporter-mediated mechanism involving norepinephrine and the prefrontal cortex, may also contribute importantly to the reinforcing properties of these drugs.

  17. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression through a MYCN independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mandriota, Stefano J; Valentijn, Linda J; Lesne, Laurence; Betts, David R; Marino, Denis; Boudal-Khoshbeen, Mary; London, Wendy B; Rougemont, Anne-Laure; Attiyeh, Edward F; Maris, John M; Hogarty, Michael D; Koster, Jan; Molenaar, Jan J; Versteeg, Rogier; Ansari, Marc; Gumy-Pause, Fabienne

    2015-07-30

    Neuroblastoma, a childhood cancer with highly heterogeneous biology and clinical behavior, is characterized by genomic aberrations including amplification of MYCN. Hemizygous deletion of chromosome 11q is a well-established, independent marker of poor prognosis. While 11q22-q23 is the most frequently deleted region, the neuroblastoma tumor suppressor in this region remains to be identified. Chromosome bands 11q22-q23 contain ATM, a cell cycle checkpoint kinase and tumor suppressor playing a pivotal role in the DNA damage response. Here, we report that haploinsufficiency of ATM in neuroblastoma correlates with lower ATM expression, event-free survival, and overall survival. ATM loss occurs in high stage neuroblastoma without MYCN amplification. In SK-N-SH, CLB-Ga and GI-ME-N human neuroblastoma cells, stable ATM silencing promotes neuroblastoma progression in soft agar assays, and in subcutaneous xenografts in nude mice. This effect is dependent on the extent of ATM silencing and does not appear to involve MYCN. Our findings identify ATM as a potential haploinsufficient neuroblastoma tumor suppressor, whose inactivation mirrors the increased aggressiveness associated with 11q deletion in neuroblastoma.

  18. Insights into reference point indentation involving human cortical bone: sensitivity to tissue anisotropy and mechanical behavior.

    PubMed

    Granke, Mathilde; Coulmier, Aurélie; Uppuganti, Sasidhar; Gaddy, Jennifer A; Does, Mark D; Nyman, Jeffry S

    2014-09-01

    Reference point indentation (RPI) is a microindentation technique involving 20 cycles of loading in "force-control" that can directly assess a patient׳s bone tissue properties. Even though preliminary clinical studies indicate a capability for fracture discrimination, little is known about what mechanical behavior the various RPI properties characterize and how these properties relate to traditional mechanical properties of bone. To address this, the present study investigated the sensitivity of RPI properties to anatomical location and tissue organization as well as examined to what extent RPI measurements explain the intrinsic mechanical properties of human cortical bone. Multiple indents with a target force of 10N were done in 2 orthogonal directions (longitudinal and transverse) per quadrant (anterior, medial, posterior, and lateral) of the femoral mid-shaft acquired from 26 donors (25-101 years old). Additional RPI measurements were acquired for 3 orthogonal directions (medial only). Independent of age, most RPI properties did not vary among these locations, but they did exhibit transverse isotropy such that resistance to indentation is greater in the longitudinal (axial) direction than in the transverse direction (radial or circumferential). Next, beam specimens (~2mm×5mm×40mm) were extracted from the medial cortex of femoral mid-shafts, acquired from 34 donors (21-99 years old). After monotonically loading the specimens in three-point bending to failure, RPI properties were acquired from an adjacent region outside the span. Indent direction was orthogonal to the bending axis. A significant inverse relationship was found between resistance to indentation and the apparent-level mechanical properties. Indentation distance increase (IDI) and a linear combination of IDI and the loading slope, averaged over cycles 3 through 20, provided the best explanation of the variance in ultimate stress (r(2)=0.25, p=0.003) and toughness (r(2)=0.35, p=0.004), respectively

  19. Geranylated 4-Phenylcoumarins Exhibit Anticancer Effects against Human Prostate Cancer Cells through Caspase-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Suparji, Noor Shahirah; Chan, Gomathi; Sapili, Hani; Arshad, Norhafiza M.; In, Lionel L. A.; Awang, Khalijah; Hasima Nagoor, Noor

    2016-01-01

    Geranylated 4-phenylcoumarins, DMDP-1 & -2 isolated from Mesua elegans were investigated for anticancer potential against human prostate cancer cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 resulted in cell death in a time and dose dependent manner in an MTT assay on all cancer cell lines tested with the exception of lung adenocarcinoma cells. DMDP-1 showed highest cytotoxic efficacy in PC-3 cells while DMDP-2 was most potent in DU 145 cells. Flow cytometry indicated that both coumarins were successful to induce programmed cell death after 24 h treatment. Elucidation on the mode-of-action via protein arrays and western blotting demonstrated death induced without any significant expressions of caspases, Bcl-2 family proteins and cleaved PARP, thus suggesting the involvement of caspase-independent pathways. In identifying autophagy, analysis of GFP-LC3 showed increased punctate in PC-3 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-1. In these cells decreased expression of autophagosome protein, p62 and cathepsin B further confirmed autophagy. In contrary, the DU 145 cells pre-treated with CQ and treated with DMDP-2 has reduced GFP-LC3 punctate although the number of cells with obvious GFP-LC3 puncta was significantly increased in the inhibitor-treated cells. The increase level of p62 suggested leakage of cathepsin B into the cytosol to trigger potential downstream death mediators. This correlated with increased expression of cathepsin B and reduced expression after treatment with its inhibitor, CA074. Also auto-degradation of calpain-2 upon treatment with DMDP-1 &-2 and its inhibitor alone, calpeptin compared with the combination treatment, further confirmed involvement of calpain-2 in PC-3 and DU 145 cells. Treatment with DMDP-1 & -2 also showed up-regulation of total and phosphorylated p53 levels in a time dependent manner. Hence, DMDP-1 & -2 showed ability to activate multiple death pathways involving autophagy, lysosomal and endoplasmic reticulum death proteins which could

  20. Cannabidiol inhibits human glioma cell migration through a cannabinoid receptor-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vaccani, Angelo; Massi, Paola; Colombo, Arianna; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of cannabidiol (CBD) to impair the migration of tumor cells stimulated by conditioned medium. CBD caused concentration-dependent inhibition of the migration of U87 glioma cells, quantified in a Boyden chamber. Since these cells express both cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors in the membrane, we also evaluated their engagement in the antimigratory effect of CBD. The inhibition of cell was not antagonized either by the selective cannabinoid receptor antagonists SR141716 (CB1) and SR144528 (CB2) or by pretreatment with pertussis toxin, indicating no involvement of classical cannabinoid receptors and/or receptors coupled to Gi/o proteins. These results reinforce the evidence of antitumoral properties of CBD, demonstrating its ability to limit tumor invasion, although the mechanism of its pharmacological effects remains to be clarified. PMID:15700028

  1. Evolutionary Conservation of a GPCR-Independent Mechanism of Trimeric G Protein Activation

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Brantley D.; Marivin, Arthur; Parag-Sharma, Kshitij; DiGiacomo, Vincent; Kim, Seongseop; Pepper, Judy S.; Casler, Jason; Nguyen, Lien T.; Koelle, Michael R.; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    Trimeric G protein signaling is a fundamental mechanism of cellular communication in eukaryotes. The core of this mechanism consists of activation of G proteins by the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity of G protein coupled receptors. However, the duration and amplitude of G protein-mediated signaling are controlled by a complex network of accessory proteins that appeared and diversified during evolution. Among them, nonreceptor proteins with GEF activity are the least characterized. We recently found that proteins of the ccdc88 family possess a Gα-binding and activating (GBA) motif that confers GEF activity and regulates mammalian cell behavior. A sequence similarity-based search revealed that ccdc88 genes are highly conserved across metazoa but the GBA motif is absent in most invertebrates. This prompted us to investigate whether the GBA motif is present in other nonreceptor proteins in invertebrates. An unbiased bioinformatics search in Caenorhabditis elegans identified GBAS-1 (GBA and SPK domain containing-1) as a GBA motif-containing protein with homologs only in closely related worm species. We demonstrate that GBAS-1 has GEF activity for the nematode G protein GOA-1 and that the two proteins are coexpressed in many cells of living worms. Furthermore, we show that GBAS-1 can activate mammalian Gα-subunits and provide structural insights into the evolutionarily conserved determinants of the GBA–G protein interface. These results demonstrate that the GBA motif is a functional GEF module conserved among highly divergent proteins across evolution, indicating that the GBA-Gα binding mode is strongly constrained under selective pressure to mediate receptor-independent G protein activation in metazoans. PMID:26659249

  2. The Stapled AKAP Disruptor Peptide STAD-2 Displays Antimalarial Activity through a PKA-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Flaherty, Briana R; Wang, Yuxiao; Trope, Edward C; Ho, Tienhuei G; Muralidharan, Vasant; Kennedy, Eileen J; Peterson, David S

    2015-01-01

    Drug resistance poses a significant threat to ongoing malaria control efforts. Coupled with lack of a malaria vaccine, there is an urgent need for the development of new antimalarials with novel mechanisms of action and low susceptibility to parasite drug resistance. Protein Kinase A (PKA) has been implicated as a critical regulator of pathogenesis in malaria. Therefore, we sought to investigate the effects of disrupted PKA signaling as a possible strategy for inhibition of parasite replication. Host PKA activity is partly regulated by a class of proteins called A Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs), and interaction between HsPKA and AKAP can be inhibited by the stapled peptide Stapled AKAP Disruptor 2 (STAD-2). STAD-2 was tested for permeability to and activity against Plasmodium falciparum blood stage parasites in vitro. The compound was selectively permeable only to infected red blood cells (iRBC) and demonstrated rapid antiplasmodial activity, possibly via iRBC lysis (IC50 ≈ 1 μM). STAD-2 localized within the parasite almost immediately post-treatment but showed no evidence of direct association with PKA, indicating that STAD-2 acts via a PKA-independent mechanism. Furosemide-insensitive parasite permeability pathways in the iRBC were largely responsible for uptake of STAD-2. Further, peptide import was highly specific to STAD-2 as evidenced by low permeability of control stapled peptides. Selective uptake and antiplasmodial activity of STAD-2 provides important groundwork for the development of stapled peptides as potential antimalarials. Such peptides may also offer an alternative strategy for studying protein-protein interactions critical to parasite development and pathogenesis.

  3. Cinnamaldehyde modulates LPS-induced systemic inflammatory response syndrome through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Saulo J F; Sousa, Fernanda I A B; Pereira, Domingos M S; Ferro, Thiago A F; Pereira, Ione C P; Silva, Bruna L R; Pinheiro, Aruanã J M C R; Mouchrek, Adriana Q S; Monteiro-Neto, Valério; Costa, Soraia K P; Nascimento, José L M; Grisotto, Marcos A G; da Costa, Robson; Fernandes, Elizabeth S

    2016-05-01

    Cinnamaldehyde is a natural essential oil suggested to possess anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; and to activate transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channels expressed on neuronal and non-neuronal cells. Here, we investigated the immunomodulatory effects of cinnamaldehyde in an in vivo model of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) induced by lipopolysaccharide. Swiss mice received a single oral treatment with cinnamaldehyde 1 h before LPS injection. To investigate whether cinnamaldehyde effects are dependent on TRPA1 activation, animals were treated subcutaneously with the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 5 min prior to cinnamaldehyde administration. Vehicle-treated mice were used as controls. Cinnamaldehyde ameliorated SIRS severity in LPS-injected animals. Diminished numbers of circulating mononuclear cells and increased numbers of peritoneal mononuclear and polymorphonuclear cell numbers were also observed. Cinnamaldehyde augmented the number of peritoneal Ly6C(high) and Ly6C(low) monocyte/macrophage cells in LPS-injected mice. Reduced levels of nitric oxide, plasma TNFα and plasma and peritoneal IL-10 were also detected. Additionally, IL-1β levels were increased in the same animals. TRPA1 antagonism by HC-030031 reversed the changes in the number of circulating and peritoneal leukocytes in cinnamaldehyde-treated animals, whilst increasing the levels of peritoneal IL-10 and reducing peritoneal IL-1β. Overall, cinnamaldehyde modulates SIRS through TRPA1-dependent and independent mechanisms.

  4. Histone Demethylase KDM6A Controls the Mammary Luminal Lineage through Enzyme-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Oh, Sumin; Kang, Keunsoo; Wang, Chaochen; Robinson, Gertraud W.; Ge, Kai

    2016-01-01

    Establishment of the mammary luminal cell lineage is controlled primarily by hormones and through specific transcription factors (TFs). Previous studies have linked histone methyltransferases to the differentiation of mammary epithelium, thus opening the possibility of biological significance of counteracting demethylases. We have now demonstrated an essential role for the H3K27me3 demethylase KDM6A in generating a balanced alveolar compartment. Deletion of Kdm6a in the mammary luminal cell lineage led to a paucity of luminal cells and an excessive expansion of basal cells, both in vivo and in vitro. The inability to form structurally normal ducts and alveoli during pregnancy resulted in lactation failure. Mutant luminal cells did not exhibit their distinctive transcription factor pattern and displayed basal characteristics. The genomic H3K27me3 landscape was unaltered in mutant tissue, and support for a demethylase-independent mechanism came from mice expressing a catalytically inactive KDM6A. Mammary tissue developed normally in these mice. Chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) experiments demonstrated KDM6A binding to putative enhancers enriched for key mammary TFs and H3K27ac. This study demonstrated for the first time that the mammary luminal lineage relies on KDM6A to ensure a transcription program leading to differentiated alveoli. Failure to fully implement this program results in structurally and functionally impaired mammary tissue. PMID:27215382

  5. A RanGTP-independent mechanism allows ribosomal protein nuclear import for ribosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Schütz, Sabina; Fischer, Ute; Altvater, Martin; Nerurkar, Purnima; Peña, Cohue; Gerber, Michaela; Chang, Yiming; Caesar, Stefanie; Schubert, Olga T; Schlenstedt, Gabriel; Panse, Vikram G

    2014-01-01

    Within a single generation time a growing yeast cell imports ∼14 million ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) into the nucleus for ribosome production. After import, it is unclear how these intrinsically unstable and aggregation-prone proteins are targeted to the ribosome assembly site in the nucleolus. Here, we report the discovery of a conserved nuclear carrier Tsr2 that coordinates transfer of the r-protein eS26 to the earliest assembling pre-ribosome, the 90S. In vitro studies revealed that Tsr2 efficiently dissociates importin:eS26 complexes via an atypical RanGTP-independent mechanism that terminates the import process. Subsequently, Tsr2 binds the released eS26, shields it from proteolysis, and ensures its safe delivery to the 90S pre-ribosome. We anticipate similar carriers—termed here escortins—to securely connect the nuclear import machinery with pathways that deposit r-proteins onto developing pre-ribosomal particles. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03473.001 PMID:25144938

  6. A Base-Independent Repair Mechanism for DNA Glycosylase—No Discrimination Within the Active Site

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Iris D.; Sadeghian, Keyarash; Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous occurrence of DNA damages renders its repair machinery a crucial requirement for the genomic stability and the survival of living organisms. Deficiencies in DNA repair can lead to carcinogenesis, Alzheimer, or Diabetes II, where increased amounts of oxidized DNA bases have been found in patients. Despite the highest mutation frequency among oxidized DNA bases, the base-excision repair process of oxidized and ring-opened guanine, FapydG (2,6-diamino-4-hydroxy-5-formamidopyrimidine), remained unclear since it is difficult to study experimentally. We use newly-developed linear-scaling quantum-chemical methods (QM) allowing us to include up to 700 QM-atoms and achieving size convergence. Instead of the widely assumed base-protonated pathway we find a ribose-protonated repair mechanism which explains experimental observations and shows strong evidence for a base-independent repair process. Our results also imply that discrimination must occur during recognition, prior to the binding within the active site. PMID:26013033

  7. Neisseria cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by type IV pilus-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Wörmann, Mirka E.; Horien, Corey L.; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Guangyu; Aho, Ellen; Tang, Christoph M.

    2016-01-01

    In pathogenic Neisseria species the type IV pili (Tfp) are of primary importance in host–pathogen interactions. Tfp mediate initial bacterial attachment to cell surfaces and formation of microcolonies via pilus–pilus interactions. Based on genome analysis, many non-pathogenic Neisseria species are predicted to express Tfp, but aside from studies on Neisseria elongata, relatively little is known about the formation and function of pili in these organisms. Here, we have analysed pilin expression and the role of Tfp in Neisseria cinerea. This non-pathogenic species shares a close taxonomic relationship to the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and also colonizes the human oropharyngeal cavity. Through analysis of non-pathogenic Neisseria genomes we identified two genes with homology to pilE, which encodes the major pilin of N. meningitidis. We show which of the two genes is required for Tfp expression in N. cinerea and that Tfp in this species are required for DNA competence, similar to other Neisseria. However, in contrast to the meningococcus, deletion of the pilin gene did not impact the association of N. cinerea to human epithelial cells, demonstrating that N. cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by Tfp-independent mechanisms. PMID:26813911

  8. Odorant receptors can mediate axonal identity and gene choice via cAMP-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Grosmaitre, Xavier; Feinstein, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Odorant receptors (ORs) control several aspects of cell fate in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), including singular gene choice and axonal identity. The mechanisms of OR-induced axon guidance have been suggested to principally rely on G-protein signalling. Here, we report that for a subset of OSNs, deleting G proteins or altering their levels of signalling does not affect axonal identity. Signalling-deficient ORs or surrogate receptors that are unable to couple to Gs/Golf still provide axons with distinct identities and the anterior–posterior targeting of axons does not correlate with the levels of cAMP produced by genetic modifications. In addition, we refine the models of negative feedback by showing that ectopic ORs can be robustly expressed without suppressing endogenous gene choice. In conclusion, our results uncover a new feature of ORs, showing that they can instruct axonal identity and regulate olfactory map formation independent of canonical G-protein signalling and cAMP production. PMID:27466441

  9. Neisseria cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by type IV pilus-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wörmann, Mirka E; Horien, Corey L; Johnson, Errin; Liu, Guangyu; Aho, Ellen; Tang, Christoph M; Exley, Rachel M

    2016-03-01

    In pathogenic Neisseria species the type IV pili (Tfp) are of primary importance in host-pathogen interactions. Tfp mediate initial bacterial attachment to cell surfaces and formation of microcolonies via pilus-pilus interactions. Based on genome analysis, many non-pathogenic Neisseria species are predicted to express Tfp, but aside from studies on Neisseria elongata, relatively little is known about the formation and function of pili in these organisms. Here, we have analysed pilin expression and the role of Tfp in Neisseria cinerea. This non-pathogenic species shares a close taxonomic relationship to the pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and also colonizes the human oropharyngeal cavity. Through analysis of non-pathogenic Neisseria genomes we identified two genes with homology to pilE, which encodes the major pilin of N. meningitidis. We show which of the two genes is required for Tfp expression in N. cinerea and that Tfp in this species are required for DNA competence, similar to other Neisseria. However, in contrast to the meningococcus, deletion of the pilin gene did not impact the association of N. cinerea to human epithelial cells, demonstrating that N. cinerea isolates can adhere to human epithelial cells by Tfp-independent mechanisms.

  10. Adrenoceptors promote glucose uptake into adipocytes and muscle by an insulin-independent signaling pathway involving mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, Saori; Evans, Bronwyn A; Bengtsson, Tore; Hutchinson, Dana S; Sato, Masaaki

    2017-02-01

    Uptake of glucose into skeletal muscle and adipose tissue plays a vital role in metabolism and energy balance. Insulin released from β-islet cells of the pancreas promotes glucose uptake in these target tissues by stimulating translocation of GLUT4 transporters to the cell surface. This process is complex, involving signaling proteins including the mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) and Akt that intersect with multiple pathways controlling cell survival, growth and proliferation. mTOR exists in two forms, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). mTORC1 has been intensively studied, acting as a key regulator of protein and lipid synthesis that integrates cellular nutrient availability and energy balance. Studies on mTORC2 have focused largely on its capacity to activate Akt by phosphorylation at Ser473, however recent findings demonstrate a novel role for mTORC2 in cellular glucose uptake. For example, agonists acting at β2-adrenoceptors (ARs) in skeletal muscle or β3-ARs in brown adipose tissue increase glucose uptake in vitro and in vivo via mechanisms dependent on mTORC2 but not Akt. In this review, we will focus on the signaling pathways downstream of β-ARs that promote glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and brown adipocytes, and will highlight how the insulin and adrenergic pathways converge and interact in these cells. The identification of insulin-independent mechanisms that promote glucose uptake should facilitate novel treatment strategies for metabolic disease.

  11. Endothelium-dependent and -independent vasorelaxant actions and mechanisms induced by total flavonoids of Elsholtzia splendens in rat aortas.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Ping; Lu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Guo-Lin; Li, Xu-Yun; Peng, Hong-Yun; Lu, Yuan; Zhao, Liang; Ye, Zhi-Guo; Bruce, Iain C; Xia, Qiang; Qian, Ling-Bo

    2014-09-01

    Elsholtzia splendens (ES) is, rich in flavonoids, used to repair copper contaminated soil in China, which has been reported to benefit cardiovascular systems as folk medicine. However, few direct evidences have been found to clarify the vasorelaxation effect of total flavonoids of ES (TFES). The vasoactive effect of TFES and its underlying mechanisms in rat thoracic aortas were investigated using the organ bath system. TFES (5-200mg/L) caused a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in endothelium-intact rings, which was not abolished but significantly reduced by the removal of endothelium. The nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (100μM) and the guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,2-α]quinoxalin-1-one (30μM) significantly blocked the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation of TFES. Meanwhile, NOS activity in endothelium-intact aortas was concentration-dependently elevated by TFES. However, indomethacin (10μM) did not affect TFES-induced vasorelaxation. Endothelium-independent vasorelaxation of TFES was significantly attenuated by KATP channel blocker glibenclamide. The accumulative Ca(2+)-induced contraction in endothelium-denuded aortic rings primed with KCl or phenylephrine was markedly weakened by TFES. These results revealed that the NOS/NO/cGMP pathway is likely involved in the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation induced by TFES, while activating KATP channel, inhibiting intracellular Ca(2+) release, blocking Ca(2+) channels and decreasing Ca(2+) influx into vascular smooth muscle cells might contribute to the endothelium-independent vasorelaxation conferred by TFES.

  12. Hyperactivity and tree-top disease induced by the baculovirus AcMNPV in Spodoptera exigua larvae are governed by independent mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houte, Stineke; Ros, Vera I. D.; van Oers, Monique M.

    2014-04-01

    Although many parasites are known to manipulate the behavior of their hosts, the mechanisms underlying such manipulations are largely unknown. Baculoviruses manipulate the behavior of caterpillar hosts by inducing hyperactivity and by inducing climbing behavior leading to death at elevated positions (tree-top disease or Wipfelkrankheit). Whether hyperactivity and tree-top disease are independent manipulative strategies of the virus is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated the involvement of the protein tyrosine phosphatase ( ptp) gene of the baculovirus Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) in the induction of hyperactivity in Spodoptera exigua larvae. Here we show that AcMNPV ptp is not required for tree-top disease, indicating that in S. exigua baculovirus-induced hyperactivity and tree-top disease are independently induced behaviors that are governed by distinct mechanisms.

  13. WRN Loss Induces Switching of Telomerase-Independent Mechanisms of Telomere Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Gocha, April Renee Sandy; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Telomere maintenance can occur in the presence of telomerase or in its absence, termed alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT). ALT adds telomere repeats using recombination-based processes and DNA repair proteins that function in homologous recombination. Our previous work reported that the RecQ-like BLM helicase is required for ALT and that it unwinds telomeric substrates in vitro. WRN is also a RecQ-like helicase that shares many biochemical functions with BLM. WRN interacts with BLM, unwinds telomeric substrates, and co-localizes to ALT-associated PML bodies (APBs), suggesting that it may also be required for ALT processes. Using long-term siRNA knockdown of WRN in three ALT cell lines, we show that some, but not all, cell lines require WRN for telomere maintenance. VA-13 cells require WRN to prevent telomere loss and for the formation of APBs; Saos-2 cells do not. A third ALT cell line, U-2 OS, requires WRN for APB formation, however WRN loss results in p53-mediated apoptosis. In the absence of WRN and p53, U-2 OS cells undergo telomere loss for an intermediate number of population doublings (50–70), at which point they maintain telomere length even with the continued loss of WRN. WRN and the tumor suppressor BRCA1 co-localize to APBs in VA-13 and U-2 OS, but not in Saos-2 cells. WRN loss in U-2 OS is associated with a loss of BRCA1 from APBs. While the loss of WRN significantly increases telomere sister chromatid exchanges (T-SCE) in these three ALT cell lines, loss of both BRCA1 and WRN does not significantly alter T-SCE. This work demonstrates that ALT cell lines use different telomerase-independent maintenance mechanisms that variably require the WRN helicase and that some cells can switch from one mechanism to another that permits telomere elongation in the absence of WRN. Our data suggest that BRCA1 localization may define these mechanisms. PMID:24709898

  14. Sodium tungstate activates glycogen synthesis through a non-canonical mechanism involving G-proteins.

    PubMed

    Zafra, Delia; Nocito, Laura; Domínguez, Jorge; Guinovart, Joan J

    2013-01-31

    Tungstate treatment ameliorates experimental diabetes by increasing liver glycogen deposition through an as yet unidentified mechanism. The signalling mechanism of tungstate was studied in CHOIR cells and primary cultured hepatocytes. This compound exerted its pro-glycogenic effects through a new G-protein-dependent and Tyr-Kinase Receptor-independent mechanism. Chemical or genetic disruption of G-protein signalling prevented the activation of the Ras/ERK cascade and the downstream induction of glycogen synthesis caused by tungstate. Thus, these findings unveil a novel non-canonical signalling pathway that leads to the activation of glycogen synthesis and that could be exploited as an approach to treat diabetes.

  15. Hotline Complaint Involving Auditor Independence at a Field Audit Office in the Defense Contract Audit Agency Western Region

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-06

    the Comptroller General issued a “2011 Internet Version” of the standards on August 19, 2011, the new standards do not take effect until December 15...and make improvements to help ensure future compliance. Management Action: On August 3, 2011, DCAA issued revised training on GAGAS independence...a significant noncompliance willl Generally Accepted Government Auditing StAndards. During our review of’ a Defense I lot line comt >laint, we

  16. Gas-phase Mechanisms of Sulfur Isotope Mass-independent Fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in sulfur isotopes in ancient sulfur-bearing rocks (Farquhar et al. 2000a) is interpreted as evidence for gas-phase MIF processes in the early Earth atmosphere. This interpretation is made by analogy with oxygen isotope MIF in the modern atmosphere (produced during ozone formation), and by laboratory photolysis experiments on SO2 (Farquhar et al. 2001; Wing et al. 2004) that yield both elemental sulfur and sulfate with S MIF signatures at wavelengths above and below the SO2 dissociation limit. What is lacking is a quantitative understanding of the mechanisms of gas-phase S MIF. Quantification is essential in order to extract the full implications of sulfur MIF throughout Earth history, including for bacterial sulfate reduction processes which largely conserve D33S and D36S. Several sulfur MIF mechanisms are possible. The most obvious is the gas-phase thiozone reaction, which is isovalent to the ozone formation reaction. Ozone formation produces a well-known MIF signature in oxygen isotopes (Thiemens and Heidenreich 1983), and a symmetry-dependent non-RRKM mechanism has been proposed as the origin of O MIF (Gao and Marcus 2001). It is possible and perhaps likely that S3 formation also proceeds by a non-RRKM process. Data are lacking on isotopic (an even non-isotopic) rates of S3 formation, so it is not possible to make definitive statements about MIF in S3 at this time. However modeling results suggest that the vapor pressure of S2 is too low for gas-phase S3 formation to be significant. Two additional species that may exhibit a non-RRKM MIF signature are S2O2 and S4. Again, there is a lack of isotopomer-specific kinetic data for these reactions, and gas-phase formation of S4 is likely inconsequential. Perhaps the most obvious mechanism is simply the primary act of SO2 photolysis. The SO2 absorption spectrum is highly structured, with strong vibronic bands above and below the dissociation limit. In contrast H2S, with its mostly

  17. Effects of ethanol on transforming growth factor Β1-dependent and -independent mechanisms of neural stem cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Steven D; Miller, Michael W

    2011-06-01

    Stem cell vitality is critical for the growth of the developing brain. Growth factors can define the survival of neural stem cells (NSCs) and ethanol can affect growth factor-mediated activities. The present study tested two hypotheses: (a) ethanol causes the apoptotic death of NSCs and (b) this effect is influenced by the ambient growth factor. Monolayer cultures of non-immortalized NS-5 cells were exposed to fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2 or transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 in the absence or presence of ethanol for 48 h. Ethanol killed NSCs as measured by increases in the numbers of ethidium bromide+ and annexin V+ cells and decreases in the number of calcein AM+ (viable) cells. These toxic effects were promoted by TGFβ1. A quantitative polymerase chain reaction array of apoptosis-related mRNAs revealed an ethanol-induced increase (≥2-fold change; p<0.05) in transcripts involved in Fas ligand (FasL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) signaling. These effects, particularly the FasL pathway, were potentiated by TGFβ1. Immunocytochemical analyses of NS-5 cells showed that transcriptional alterations translated into consistent up-regulation of protein expression. Experiments with the neocortical proliferative zones harvested from fetal mice exposed to ethanol showed that ethanol activated similar molecular systems in vivo. Thus, ethanol induces NSC death through two distinct molecular mechanisms, one is initiated by TGFβ1 (FasL) and another (through TNF) which is TGFβ1-independent.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide fever is initiated via a capsaicin-sensitive mechanism independent of the subtype-1 vanilloid receptor.

    PubMed

    Dogan, M Devrim; Patel, Shreya; Rudaya, Alla Y; Steiner, Alexandre A; Székely, Miklós; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2004-12-01

    As pretreatment with intraperitoneal capsaicin (8-methyl-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide, CAP), an agonist of the vanilloid receptor known as VR1 or transient receptor potential channel-vanilloid receptor subtype 1 (TRPV-1), has been shown to block the first phase of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) fever in rats, this phase is thought to depend on the TRPV-1-bearing sensory nerve fibers originating in the abdominal cavity. However, our recent studies suggest that CAP blocks the first phase via a non-neural mechanism. In the present work, we studied whether this mechanism involves the TRPV-1. Adult Long-Evans rats implanted with chronic jugular catheters were used. Pretreatment with CAP (5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) 10 days before administration of LPS (10 microg kg(-1), i.v.) resulted in the loss of the entire first phase and a part of the second phase of LPS fever. Pretreatment with the ultrapotent TRPV-1 agonist resiniferatoxin (RTX; 2, 20, or 200 microg kg(-1), i.p.) 10 days before administration of LPS had no effect on the first and second phases of LPS fever, but it exaggerated the third phase at the highest dose. The latter effect was presumably due to the known ability of high doses of TRPV-1 agonists to cause a loss of warm sensitivity, thus leading to uncontrolled, hyperpyretic responses. Pretreatment with the selective competitive TRPV-1 antagonist capsazepine (N-[2-(4-chlorophenyl)ethyl]-1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-7,8-dihydroxy-2H-2-benzazepine-2-carbothioamidem, CPZ; 40 mg kg(-1), i.p.) 90 min before administration of LPS (10 microg kg(-1), i.v.) or CAP (1 mg kg(-1), i.p.) did not affect LPS fever, but blocked the immediate hypothermic response to acute administration of CAP. It is concluded that LPS fever is initiated via a non-neural mechanism, which is CAP-sensitive but RTX- and CPZ-insensitive. The action of CAP on this mechanism is likely TRPV-1-independent. It is speculated that this mechanism may be the production of prostaglandin E(2) by macrophages in LPS-processing organs.

  19. Rapamycin inhibits the secretory phenotype of senescent cells by a Nrf2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Yu, Zhen; Sunchu, Bharath; Shoaf, James; Dang, Ivana; Zhao, Stephanie; Caples, Kelsey; Bradley, Lynda; Beaver, Laura M; Ho, Emily; Löhr, Christiane V; Perez, Viviana I

    2017-03-31

    Senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology and loss of function, and their selective removal improves physiological function and extends longevity. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, inhibits cell senescence in vitro and increases longevity in several species. Nrf2 levels have been shown to decrease with aging and silencing Nrf2 gene induces premature senescence. Therefore, we explored whether Nrf2 is involved in the mechanism by which rapamycin delays cell senescence. In wild-type (WT) mouse fibroblasts, rapamycin increased the levels of Nrf2, and this correlates with the activation of autophagy and a reduction in the induction of cell senescence, as measured by SA-β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), and p16 and p21 molecular markers. In Nrf2KO fibroblasts, however, rapamycin still decreased β-gal staining and the SASP, but rapamycin did not activate the autophagy pathway or decrease p16 and p21 levels. These observations were further confirmed in vivo using Nrf2KO mice, where rapamycin treatment led to a decrease in β-gal staining and pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum and fat tissue; however, p16 levels were not significantly decreased in fat tissue. Consistent with literature demonstrating that the Stat3 pathway is linked to the production of SASP, we found that rapamycin decreased activation of the Stat3 pathway in cells or tissue samples from both WT and Nrf2KO mice. Our data thus suggest that cell senescence is a complex process that involves at least two arms, and rapamycin uses Nrf2 to regulate cell cycle arrest, but not the production of SASP.

  20. Mechanism(s) involved in opioid drug abuse modulation of HAND.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Raini; Roy, Sabita

    2012-07-01

    Drug abuse and HIV infection are interlinked. From the onset of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the impact of illicit drug use on HIV disease progression has been a focus of many investigations. Both laboratory-based and epidemiological studies strongly indicate that drug abuse may exacerbate HIV disease progression and increase mortality and morbidity in these patients. Increase susceptibility to opportunistic infection has been implicated as one of the major causes for this detriment. Furthermore, opioids are known to elicit prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders in HIV-infected patients. Numerous authors have delineated various molecular as well as cellular mechanisms associated with neurological complications in these patients. This review gives an overview of these findings. Understanding the mechanisms will allow for the development of targeted therapies aimed at reducing the progression of neurocognitive decline in the drug abusing HIV infected individuals.

  1. Clustering of Two Genes Putatively Involved in Cyanate Detoxification Evolved Recently and Independently in Multiple Fungal Lineages

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, M. Holly; McGary, Kriston L.; Wisecaver, Jennifer H.; Slot, Jason C.; Geiser, David M.; Sink, Stacy; O’Donnell, Kerry; Rokas, Antonis

    2015-01-01

    Fungi that have the enzymes cyanase and carbonic anhydrase show a limited capacity to detoxify cyanate, a fungicide employed by both plants and humans. Here, we describe a novel two-gene cluster that comprises duplicated cyanase and carbonic anhydrase copies, which we name the CCA gene cluster, trace its evolution across Ascomycetes, and examine the evolutionary dynamics of its spread among lineages of the Fusarium oxysporum species complex (hereafter referred to as the FOSC), a cosmopolitan clade of purportedly clonal vascular wilt plant pathogens. Phylogenetic analysis of fungal cyanase and carbonic anhydrase genes reveals that the CCA gene cluster arose independently at least twice and is now present in three lineages, namely Cochliobolus lunatus, Oidiodendron maius, and the FOSC. Genome-wide surveys within the FOSC indicate that the CCA gene cluster varies in copy number across isolates, is always located on accessory chromosomes, and is absent in FOSC’s closest relatives. Phylogenetic reconstruction of the CCA gene cluster in 163 FOSC strains from a wide variety of hosts suggests a recent history of rampant transfers between isolates. We hypothesize that the independent formation of the CCA gene cluster in different fungal lineages and its spread across FOSC strains may be associated with resistance to plant-produced cyanates or to use of cyanate fungicides in agriculture. PMID:25663439

  2. The Relationship between the Financial Status of Sole Community Independent Pharmacies and Their Broader Involvement with Other Rural Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radford, Andrea; Slifkin, Rebecca; King, Jennifer; Lampman, Michelle; Richardson, Indira; Rutledge, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To document sole community pharmacists' involvement with other local health care organizations, these pharmacies' current financial status, and to determine whether financial position was associated with the provision of pharmacy services to other local health care providers. Methods: We conducted semistructured interviews with…

  3. Mechanisms involved in regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by mechanical stress-loaded osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneuji, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Toshinaga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of compressive force on osteoblasts were examined. {yields} Compressive force induced OPG expression and suppressed osteoclastogenesis. {yields} This enhancement of OPG is dependent on Wnt/Ca2+ signal pathway. -- Abstract: Mechanical stress is known to be important for regulation of bone turnover, though the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of mechanical stress on osteoblasts using a novel compression model. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were embedded in three-dimensional (3D) gels and cultured with continuous compressive force (0-10.0 g/cm{sup 2}) for 48 h, and the conditioned medium were collected. RAW264.7 cells were then incubated with the conditioned medium for various times in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Conditioned medium was found to inhibit the differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclasts induced by RANKL via down-regulation of the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, and nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. Interestingly, the conditioned medium also had a high level of binding activity to RANKL and blocked the binding of RANK to RANKL. Furthermore, the binding activity of conditioned medium to RANKL was reduced when the 3D gel was supplemented with KN-93, an inhibitor of non-canonical Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. In addition, expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA was increased in time- and force-dependent manners, and remarkably suppressed by KN-93. These results indicate that osteoblastic cells subjected to mechanical stress produce OPG, which binds to RANKL. Furthermore, this binding activity strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis through suppression of TRAF6 and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling pathway, suggesting that enhancement of OPG expression induced by mechanical stress is dependent on non-canonical Wnt

  4. CIBZ, a Novel BTB Domain-Containing Protein, Is Involved in Mouse Spinal Cord Injury via Mitochondrial Pathway Independent of p53 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shiyong; Li, Ping; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Honglin

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) induces both primary uncontrollable mechanical injury and secondary controllable degeneration, which further results in the activation of cell death cascades that mediate delayed tissue damage. To alleviate its impairments and seek for an effective remedy, mRNA differential display was used to investigate gene mRNA expression profiling in mice following SCI. A specific Zinc finger and BTB domain-containing protein, CIBZ, was discovered to implicate in the SCI process for the first time. Further researches indicated that CIBZ was extensively distributed in various tissues, and the expression level was highest in muscle, followed by spinal cord, large intestine, kidney, spleen, thymus, lung, cerebrum, stomach, ovary and heart, respectively. After injury, the CIBZ expression decreased dramatically and reached the lowest level at 8 h, but it gradually increased to the maximal level at 7 d. Caspase-3 and C-terminal-binding protein (CtBP), two CIBZ-related proteins, showed similar tendency. Interestingly, p53 expression remained constant in all groups. Via flow cytometry (FCM) analysis, it was found that the cell death rate in SCI group markedly increased and reached the highest value 1 d after surgery and the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) at 1 d was the lowest in all groups. Taken together, it is suggested that: (i) in the presence of CtBP, CIBZ gene is involved in secondary injury process and trigger the activation of apoptotic caspase-3 and bax genes independent of p53; (ii) abrupt down-regulation of CtBP at 8 h is a sign of mitochondria dysfunction and the onset of cell death; (iii) it could be used as an inhibitor or target drug of caspase-3 gene to improve spinal cord function. PMID:22427977

  5. Caspase-Dependent and Caspase-Independent Pathways Are Involved in Cadmium-Induced Apoptosis in Primary Rat Proximal Tubular Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Long, Mengfei; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Yuan, Yan; Song, Ruilong; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Liu, Zongping

    2016-01-01

    We designed this study to investigate whether cadmium induces caspase-independent apoptosis and to investigate the relationship between the caspase-dependent and caspase-independent apoptotic pathways. Cadmium (1.25–2.5 μM) induced oxidative stress in rat proximal tubular (rPT) cells, as seen in the reactive oxygen species levels; N-acetylcysteine prevented this. Cyclosporin A (CsA) prevented mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and apoptosis; there was mitochondrial ultrastructural disruption, mitochondrial cytochrome c (cyt c) translocation to the cytoplasm, and subsequent caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. Z-VAD-FMK prevented caspase-3 activation and apoptosis and decreased BNIP-3 (Bcl-2/adenovirus E1B 19-kDa interacting protein 3) expression levels and apoptosis-inducing factor/endonuclease G (AIF/Endo G) translocation. Simultaneously, cadmium induced prominent BNIP-3 expression in the mitochondria and cytoplasmic AIF/Endo G translocation to the nucleus. BNIP-3 silencing significantly prevented AIF and Endo G translocation and decreased the apoptosis rate, cyt c release, and caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation. These results suggest that BNIP-3 is involved in the caspase-independent apoptotic pathway and is located upstream of AIF/Endo G; both the caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways are involved in cadmium-induced rPT cell apoptosis and act synergistically. PMID:27861627

  6. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Involvement of Glial Cells in Brain Plastic Remodeling in Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Khaspekov, L G; Frumkina, L E

    2017-03-01

    In this review we summarize published data on the involvement of glial cells in molecular mechanisms underlying brain plastic reorganization in epilepsy. The role of astrocytes as glial elements in pathological plasticity in epilepsy is discussed. Data on the involvement of aquaporin-4 in epileptogenic plastic changes and on participation of microglia and extracellular matrix in dysregulation of synaptic transmission and plastic remodeling in epileptic brain tissue are reviewed.

  7. [THE ROLE OF MATERNAL DIET IN METABOLIC AND BEHAVIOURAL PROGRAMMING: REVIEW OF BIOLOGIC MECHANISMS INVOLVED].

    PubMed

    Ramírez-López, María Teresa; Vázquez Berrios, Mariam; Arco González, Rocío; Blanco Velilla, Rosario Noemí; Decara Del Olmo, Juan; Suárez Pérez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gómez de Heras, Raquel

    2015-12-01

    Over the last few years, a considerable amount of studies have focused on the effect of undernutrition and overnutrition during critical periods of offspring development and their risk of developing metabolic diseases later in life. Additionally, inadequate maternal diets have been involved in the malprogramming of brain functions and some behaviours. Several mechanisms have been associated with the process of malprogramming such as epigenetics modifications, excessive oxidative stress or hypothalamic alterations. This evidence supports the idea that nutritional prevention strategies must be considered for offspring during early development stages that include the preconceptional period. Additionally, studying involved mechanisms could be particularly useful in the search of efficient therapies against malprogramming.

  8. Mechanistic insights into Mg2+-independent prenylation by CloQ from classical molecular mechanics and hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bayse, Craig A; Merz, Kenneth M

    2014-08-05

    Understanding the mechanism of prenyltransferases is important to the design of engineered proteins capable of synthesizing derivatives of naturally occurring therapeutic agents. CloQ is a Mg(2+)-independent aromatic prenyltransferase (APTase) that transfers a dimethylallyl group to 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate in the biosynthetic pathway for clorobiocin. APTases consist of a common ABBA fold that defines a β-barrel containing the reaction cavity. Positively charged basic residues line the inside of the β-barrel of CloQ to activate the pyrophosphate leaving group to replace the function of the Mg(2+) cofactor in other APTases. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of CloQ, its E281G and F68S mutants, and the related NovQ were used to explore the binding of the 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (4HPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate substrates in the reactive cavity and the role of various conserved residues. Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics potential of mean force (PMF) calculations show that the effect of the replacement of the Mg(2+) cofactor with basic residues yields a similar activation barrier for prenylation to Mg(2+)-dependent APTases like NphB. The topology of the binding pocket for 4HPP is important for selective prenylation at the ortho position of the ring. Methylation at this position alters the conformation of the substrate for O-prenylation at the phenol group. Further, a two-dimensional PMF scan shows that a "reverse" prenylation product may be a possible target for protein engineering.

  9. HSF1 Protects Neurons through a Novel Trimerization- and HSP-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pragya; Pfister, Jason A.; Mallick, Sathi

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) protects neurons from death caused by the accumulation of misfolded proteins. It is believed that this protective effect is mediated by the transcriptional stimulation of genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs), a family of chaperones that refold or degrade misfolded proteins. Whether HSF1 is protective when neuronal death is not caused by protein misfolding has not been studied. Here, we report that HSF1 expression is necessary for the survival of rat neurons and that HSF1 mRNA and protein expression is reduced in neurons primed to die. Knock-down of HSF1 induces death of otherwise healthy neurons, whereas reestablishment of elevated levels of HSF1 protects neurons even when death is not due to accumulation of misfolded proteins. Neuroprotection by HSF1 does not require its trimerization, an event obligatory for the binding of HSF1 to heat shock elements within HSP gene promoters. Moreover, knock-down of HSP70 or blockade of HSP90 signaling does not reduce neuroprotection by HSF1. Although several neuroprotective molecules and signaling pathways, including CaMK, PKA, Casein kinase-II, and the Raf-MEK-ERK and PI-3K-Akt pathways, are not required for HSF1-mediated neuroprotection, protection is abrogated by inhibition of classical histone deacetylases (HDACs). We report that the novel mechanism of neuroprotection by HSF1 involves cooperation with SIRT1, an HDAC with well documented neuroprotective effects. Using a cell culture model of Huntington's disease, we show that HSF1 trimerization is not required for protection against mutant huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity, suggesting that HSF1 can protect neurons against both proteinopathic and nonproteinopathic death through a noncanonical pathway. PMID:24478344

  10. HSF1 protects neurons through a novel trimerization- and HSP-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Verma, Pragya; Pfister, Jason A; Mallick, Sathi; D'Mello, Santosh R

    2014-01-29

    Heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) protects neurons from death caused by the accumulation of misfolded proteins. It is believed that this protective effect is mediated by the transcriptional stimulation of genes encoding heat shock proteins (HSPs), a family of chaperones that refold or degrade misfolded proteins. Whether HSF1 is protective when neuronal death is not caused by protein misfolding has not been studied. Here, we report that HSF1 expression is necessary for the survival of rat neurons and that HSF1 mRNA and protein expression is reduced in neurons primed to die. Knock-down of HSF1 induces death of otherwise healthy neurons, whereas reestablishment of elevated levels of HSF1 protects neurons even when death is not due to accumulation of misfolded proteins. Neuroprotection by HSF1 does not require its trimerization, an event obligatory for the binding of HSF1 to heat shock elements within HSP gene promoters. Moreover, knock-down of HSP70 or blockade of HSP90 signaling does not reduce neuroprotection by HSF1. Although several neuroprotective molecules and signaling pathways, including CaMK, PKA, Casein kinase-II, and the Raf-MEK-ERK and PI-3K-Akt pathways, are not required for HSF1-mediated neuroprotection, protection is abrogated by inhibition of classical histone deacetylases (HDACs). We report that the novel mechanism of neuroprotection by HSF1 involves cooperation with SIRT1, an HDAC with well documented neuroprotective effects. Using a cell culture model of Huntington's disease, we show that HSF1 trimerization is not required for protection against mutant huntingtin-induced neurotoxicity, suggesting that HSF1 can protect neurons against both proteinopathic and nonproteinopathic death through a noncanonical pathway.

  11. Importance of bacterial replication and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Camberlein, Emilie; Cohen, Jonathan M; José, Ricardo; Hyams, Catherine J; Callard, Robin; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Yuste, Jose; Edwards, Lindsey A; Marshall, Helina; van Rooijen, Nico; Noursadeghi, Mahdad; Brown, Jeremy S

    2015-03-01

    Although the importance of alveolar macrophages for host immunity during early Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection is well established, the contribution and relative importance of other innate immunity mechanisms and of bacterial factors are less clear. We have used a murine model of S. pneumoniae early lung infection with wild-type, unencapsulated, and para-amino benzoic acid auxotroph mutant TIGR4 strains to assess the effects of inoculum size, bacterial replication, capsule, and alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent clearance mechanisms on bacterial persistence within the lungs. Alveolar macrophage-dependent and -independent (calculated indirectly) clearance half-lives and bacterial replication doubling times were estimated using a mathematical model. In this model, after infection with a high-dose inoculum of encapsulated S. pneumoniae, alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms were dominant, with a clearance half-life of 24 min compared to 135 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance. In addition, after a high-dose inoculum, successful lung infection required rapid bacterial replication, with an estimated S. pneumoniae doubling time of 16 min. The capsule had wide effects on early lung clearance mechanisms, with reduced half-lives of 14 min for alveolar macrophage-independent and 31 min for alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance of unencapsulated bacteria. In contrast, with a lower-dose inoculum, the bacterial doubling time increased to 56 min and the S. pneumoniae alveolar macrophage-dependent clearance half-life improved to 42 min and was largely unaffected by the capsule. These data demonstrate the large effects of bacterial factors (inoculum size, the capsule, and rapid replication) and alveolar macrophage-independent clearance mechanisms during early lung infection with S. pneumoniae.

  12. Mechanisms involved in the transport of mercuric ions in target tissues.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Christy C; Zalups, Rudolfs K

    2017-01-01

    Mercury exists in the environment in various forms, all of which pose a risk to human health. Despite guidelines regulating the industrial release of mercury into the environment, humans continue to be exposed regularly to various forms of this metal via inhalation or ingestion. Following exposure, mercuric ions are taken up by and accumulate in numerous organs, including brain, intestine, kidney, liver, and placenta. In order to understand the toxicological effects of exposure to mercury, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that facilitate entry of mercuric ions into target cells must first be obtained. A number of mechanisms for the transport of mercuric ions into target cells and organs have been proposed in recent years. However, the ability of these mechanisms to transport mercuric ions and the regulatory features of these carriers have not been characterized completely. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current findings related to the mechanisms that may be involved in the transport of inorganic and organic forms of mercury in target tissues and organs. This review will describe mechanisms known to be involved in the transport of mercury and will also propose additional mechanisms that may potentially be involved in the transport of mercuric ions into target cells.

  13. An alternative, arginase-independent pathway for arginine metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis involves guanidinobutyrase as a key enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Romagnoli, G; Verhoeven, M D; Mans, R; Fleury Rey, Y; Bel-Rhlid, R; van den Broek, M; Maleki Seifar, R; Ten Pierick, A; Thompson, M; Müller, V; Wahl, S A; Pronk, J T; Daran, J M

    2014-01-01

    Most available knowledge on fungal arginine metabolism is derived from studies on Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which arginine catabolism is initiated by releasing urea via the arginase reaction. Orthologues of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the first three enzymes in the arginase pathway were cloned from Kluyveromyces lactis and shown to functionally complement the corresponding deletion in S. cerevisiae. Surprisingly, deletion of the single K. lactis arginase gene KlCAR1 did not completely abolish growth on arginine as nitrogen source. Growth rate of the deletion mutant strongly increased during serial transfer in shake-flask cultures. A combination of RNAseq-based transcriptome analysis and 13C-15N-based flux analysis was used to elucidate the arginase-independent pathway. Isotopic 13C15N-enrichment in γ-aminobutyrate revealed succinate as the entry point in the TCA cycle of the alternative pathway. Transcript analysis combined with enzyme activity measurements indicated increased expression in the Klcar1Δ mutant of a guanidinobutyrase (EC.3.5.3.7), a key enzyme in a new pathway for arginine degradation. Expression of the K. lactis KLLA0F27995g (renamed KlGBU1) encoding guanidinobutyrase enabled S. cerevisiae to use guanidinobutyrate as sole nitrogen source and its deletion in K. lactis almost completely abolish growth on this nitrogen source. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that this enzyme activity is widespread in fungi. PMID:24912400

  14. The Drosophila PRR GNBP3 assembles effector complexes involved in antifungal defenses independently of its Toll pathway activation function

    PubMed Central

    Matskevich, Alexey A.; Quintin, Jessica; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Drosophila Toll signalling pathway controls the systemic antifungal host response. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3), a member of the β-Glucan recognition protein (βGRP) family, senses fungal infections and activates this pathway. A second detection system perceives the activity of proteolytic fungal virulence factors and redundantly activates Toll. GNBP3hades mutant flies succumb more rapidly to Candida albicans and to entomopathogenic fungal infections than wild type (WT) flies, despite normal triggering of the Toll pathway via the virulence detection system. These observations suggest that GNBP3 triggers antifungal defenses that are not dependent on activation of the Toll pathway. Here, we show that GNBP3 agglutinates fungal cells. Furthermore, it can activate melanization in a Toll-independent manner. Melanization is likely to be an essential defense against some fungal infections since the entomopathogenic fungus B. bassiana inhibits the activity of the main melanization enzymes, the phenol oxidases. Finally, we show that GNBP3 assembles “attack complexes”, which comprise PO and the serpin NEC. We propose that Drosophila GNBP3 targets fungi immediately at the inception of the infection by bringing effector molecules in direct contact with the invading microorganisms. PMID:20201042

  15. The Drosophila PRR GNBP3 assembles effector complexes involved in antifungal defenses independently of its Toll-pathway activation function.

    PubMed

    Matskevich, Alexey A; Quintin, Jessica; Ferrandon, Dominique

    2010-05-01

    The Drosophila Toll-signaling pathway controls the systemic antifungal host response. Gram-negative binding protein 3 (GNBP3), a member of the beta-glucan recognition protein family senses fungal infections and activates this pathway. A second detection system perceives the activity of proteolytic fungal virulence factors and redundantly activates Toll. GNBP3(hades) mutant flies succumb more rapidly to Candida albicans and to entomopathogenic fungal infections than WT flies, despite normal triggering of the Toll pathway via the virulence detection system. These observations suggest that GNBP3 triggers antifungal defenses that are not dependent on activation of the Toll pathway. Here, we show that GNBP3 agglutinates fungal cells. Furthermore, it can activate melanization in a Toll-independent manner. Melanization is likely to be an essential defense against some fungal infections given that the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana inhibits the activity of the main melanization enzymes, the phenol oxidases. Finally, we show that GNBP3 assembles "attack complexes", which comprise phenoloxidase and the necrotic serpin. We propose that Drosophila GNBP3 targets fungi immediately at the inception of the infection by bringing effector molecules in direct contact with the invading microorganisms.

  16. Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis is involved in the response to flooding stress in soybean roots, independent of oxygen limitation.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2012-04-01

    Ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis plays an important role in the response to several environmental stresses. Here, we described the relationship of the proteolysis in the flooding stress in soybean (Glycine max L. cultivar Enrei). Immunoblot analyses were performed using antibodies against two subunits of 26S proteasome, Rpt5 and Rpn10, 20S proteasome and two subunits of COP9 signalosome (CSN), CSN4 and CSN5, to compare between flooded and untreated roots. We also examined their protein amounts in the condition of low oxygen. Moreover, crude extracts from flooded or untreated roots incubated with or without a proteasome inhibitor MG132 were analyzed by proteomics technique. We revealed that the amount of ubiquitinated proteins in soybean roots decreased after flooding treatment and increased to levels similar to controls after de-submergence. Both CSN4 and CSN5 accumulated following flooding treatment, although no significant difference was observed in proteasome. Low oxygen had no effect on the amount of ubiquitinated proteins or CSN4. By 2D-PAGE, the amount of 6 proteins changed significantly following MG132 treatment in flooding stressed plants. We conclude that the accumulation of CSN proteins might enhance the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins independent of hypoxia caused by flooding, thereby lowering their abundance during flooding stress.

  17. The neurotrophin Neuritin1 (cpg15) is involved in melanoma migration, attachment independent growth, and vascular mimicry

    PubMed Central

    Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin; Schneider, Nadja; Ellmann, Lisa; Heinzerling, Lucie; Kuphal, Silke

    2017-01-01

    The neurotrophin Neuritin1 (NRN1; cpg15) belongs to the candidate plasticity gene (CPG) family and is expressed in postmitotic-differentiating neurons of the developmental nervous system and neuronal structures associated with plasticity in the brain of human adult. Our newest findings document that NRN1 deregulation could contribute also to disease development and have impact on malignant melanoma. Our analyses displayed the over-expression of NRN1 in melanoma in vitro and in vivo, shown by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR on microdissected melanoma tissue; furthermore, soluble NRN1 was detectable in tissue culture supernatant and serum of melanoma patients. To investigate the role of NRN1 in melanoma we performed knockdown, over-expression and recombinant-NRN1-treatment experiments affiliated by functional assays. Our results show that migration, attachment independent growth and vasculogenesis were affected after manipulation of NRN1 on endogenous and extrinsic level. Interestingly, high NRN1 serum levels correlate with low MIA serum levels (< 10ng/ml). Therefore, we speculate that NRN1 could be a marker for early melanoma stages, in particular. In summary, we detected an overexpression of NRN1 in melanoma patient. In functional cell culture experiments we found a correlation between NRN1 expression and the cancerous behavior of melanoma cells. PMID:27901477

  18. PHTS, a novel putative tumor suppressor, is involved in the transformation reversion of HeLaHF cells independently of the p53 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Dehua; Fan, Wufang; Liu, Guohong; Nguy, Vivian; Chatterton, Jon E.; Long Shilong; Ke, Ning; Meyhack, Bernd; Bruengger, Adrian; Brachat, Arndt; Wong-Staal, Flossie; Li, Qi-Xiang . E-mail: li@immusol.com

    2006-04-01

    HeLaHF is a non-transformed revertant of HeLa cells, likely resulting from the activation of a putative tumor suppressor(s). p53 protein was stabilized in this revertant and reactivated for certain transactivation functions. Although p53 stabilization has not conclusively been linked to the reversion, it is clear that the genes in p53 pathway are involved. The present study confirms the direct role of p53 in HeLaHF reversion by demonstrating that RNAi-mediated p53 silencing partially restores anchorage-independent growth potential of the revertant through the suppression of anoikis. In addition, we identified a novel gene, named PHTS, with putative tumor suppressor properties, and showed that this gene is also involved in HeLaHF reversion independently of the p53 pathway. Expression profiling revealed that PHTS is one of the genes that is up-regulated in HeLaHF but not in HeLa. It encodes a putative protein with CD59-like domains. RNAi-mediated PHTS silencing resulted in the partial restoration of transformation (anchorage-independent growth) in HeLaHF cells, similar to that of p53 gene silencing, implying its tumor suppressor effect. However, the observed increased transformation potential by PHTS silencing appears to be due to an increased anchorage-independent proliferation rate rather than suppression of anoikis, unlike the effect of p53 silencing. p53 silencing did not affect PHTS gene expression, and vice versa, suggesting PHTS may function in a new and p53-independent tumor suppressor pathway. Furthermore, over-expression of PHTS in different cancer cell lines, in addition to HeLa, reduces cell growth likely via induced apoptosis, confirming the broad PHTS tumor suppressor properties.

  19. High throughput analysis reveals dissociable gene expression profiles in two independent neural systems involved in the regulation of social behavior

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Production of contextually appropriate social behaviors involves integrated activity across many brain regions. Many songbird species produce complex vocalizations called ‘songs’ that serve to attract potential mates, defend territories, and/or maintain flock cohesion. There are a series of discrete interconnect brain regions that are essential for the successful production of song. The probability and intensity of singing behavior is influenced by the reproductive state. The objectives of this study were to examine the broad changes in gene expression in brain regions that control song production with a brain region that governs the reproductive state. Results We show using microarray cDNA analysis that two discrete brain systems that are both involved in governing singing behavior show markedly different gene expression profiles. We found that cortical and basal ganglia-like brain regions that control the socio-motor production of song in birds exhibit a categorical switch in gene expression that was dependent on their reproductive state. This pattern is in stark contrast to the pattern of expression observed in a hypothalamic brain region that governs the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. Subsequent gene ontology analysis revealed marked variation in the functional categories of active genes dependent on reproductive state and anatomical localization. HVC, one cortical-like structure, displayed significant gene expression changes associated with microtubule and neurofilament cytoskeleton organization, MAP kinase activity, and steroid hormone receptor complex activity. The transitions observed in the preoptic area, a nucleus that governs the motivation to engage in singing, exhibited variation in functional categories that included thyroid hormone receptor activity, epigenetic and angiogenetic processes. Conclusions These findings highlight the importance of considering the temporal patterns of gene expression across several brain regions

  20. On reaction mechanisms involved in the deuteron–induced surrogate reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Avrigeanu, V.; Mănăilescu, C.

    2015-02-24

    An extended analysis of the nuclear reaction mechanisms involved within deuteron interaction with nuclei, namely the breakup, stripping, pick-up, pre-equilibrium emission, and evaporation from fully equilibrated compound nucleus, is presented in order to highlight the importance of the direct mechanisms still neglected in the analysis of deuteron-induced surrogate reactions. Particularly, the dominance of the breakup mechanism at low energies around the Coulomb barrier should be considered in the case of (d,x) surrogate reactions on actinide target nuclei.

  1. Evaluation of autophagy as a mechanism involved in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury

    EPA Science Inventory

    Evaluation of autophagy as a mechanism involved in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injuryHenriquez, A.1, Snow, S.2, Miller, D1.,Schladweiler, M.2 and Kodavanti, U2.1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC. 2 EPHD/NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, Durham, NC. ...

  2. Involvement of the Central Cognitive Mechanism in Word Production in Adults Who Stutter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Pei-Tzu; Bernstein Ratner, Nan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study examined whether semantic and phonological encoding processes were capacity demanding, involving the central cognitive mechanism, in adults who do and do not stutter (AWS and NS) to better understand the role of cognitive demand in linguistic processing and stuttering. We asked (a) whether the two linguistic processes in AWS are…

  3. The "Regulatory" State and the Use of "Independent" Agencies as Legitimising Mechanisms of Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouvias, Dionyssios

    2007-01-01

    The emergence--at the dawn of the new millennium--of "independent agencies", "national commissions" and "councils" around the world, has been based and justified on grounds of "impartiality", "reliability", "democratic-principles guardianship", or even "technical competence".…

  4. Desensitization and internalization of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor are directed by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pals-Rylaarsdam, R; Xu, Y; Witt-Enderby, P; Benovic, J L; Hosey, M M

    1995-12-01

    The phenomenon of acute desensitization of G-protein-coupled receptors has been associated with several events, including receptor phosphorylation, loss of high affinity agonist binding, receptor:G-protein uncoupling, and receptor internalization. However, the biochemical events underlying these processes are not fully understood, and their contributions to the loss of signaling remain correlative. In addition, the nature of the kinases and the receptor domains which are involved in modulation of activity have only begun to be investigated. In order to directly measure the role of G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs) in the desensitization of the m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (m2 mAChR), a dominant-negative allele of GRK2 was used to inhibit receptor phosphorylation by endogenous GRK activity in a human embryonic kidney cell line. The dominant-negative GRK2K220R reduced agonist-dependent phosphorylation of the m2 mAChR by approximately 50% and prevented acute desensitization of the receptor as measured by the ability of the m2 mAChR to attenuate adenylyl cyclase activity. In contrast, the agonist-induced internalization of the m2 mAChR was unaffected by the GRK2K220R construct. Further evidence linking receptor phosphorylation to acute receptor desensitization was obtained when two deletions of the third intracellular loop were made which created m2 mAChRs that did not become phosphorylated in an agonist-dependent manner and did not desensitize. However, the mutant mAChRs retained the ability to internalize. These data provide the first direct evidence that GRK-mediated receptor phosphorylation is necessary for m2 mAChR desensitization; the likely sites of in vivo phosphorylation are in the central portion of the third intracellular loop (amino acids 282-323). These results also indicate that internalization of the m2 receptor is not a key event in desensitization and is mediated by mechanisms distinct from GRK phosphorylation of the receptor.

  5. Presumptive mechanisms of peptic ulceration by Helicobacter pylori VacA involving mucoprotease and CagA.

    PubMed

    Choi, K M; Lim, W J; Park, J K; Hwang, S Y

    2001-06-30

    Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) appears to be unusually stable, not only against extreme pH conditions or high temperatures, but also against common organic solvents or detergents. Under acidic conditions, its activity was markedly increased in the manner of temperature-independent, suggesting a spontaneous activation. A similar finding was also observed under alkaline conditions, however, it should have an appropriate temperature. From these observations, the mechanisms of VacA activation were suggested to be so redundant that either the case of acidic or basic amino acid residues could be involved in the VacA activation. Separately, we also found that the VacA production by H. pylori was pH-dependent: Its production was increased at a low pH region with a broad range (1.0-5.0), and at a high pH region with a narrow range (8.0-9.0). Astonishingly, a highly immunogenic CagA did not appear to be expressed under the acidic conditions. Its expression, however, was shown to be enhanced when the surrounding pH of this bacterium was raised. In contrast, mucoproteolytic activity in the H. pylori membrane was found to be increased at acidic conditions. Considering these observations, together with the stomach and duodenal pH of humans, two presumptive mechanisms of H. pylori VacA-associated ulceration may be deduced; namely, an acid- and an alkali-dependent type, involving mucoprotease and CagA, respectively.

  6. Cell resistance to the Cytolethal Distending Toxin involves an association of DNA repair mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bezine, Elisabeth; Malaisé, Yann; Loeuillet, Aurore; Chevalier, Marianne; Boutet-Robinet, Elisa; Salles, Bernard; Mirey, Gladys; Vignard, Julien

    2016-01-01

    The Cytolethal Distending Toxin (CDT), produced by many bacteria, has been associated with various diseases including cancer. CDT induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), leading to cell death or mutagenesis if misrepaired. At low doses of CDT, other DNA lesions precede replication-dependent DSB formation, implying that non-DSB repair mechanisms may contribute to CDT cell resistance. To address this question, we developed a proliferation assay using human cell lines specifically depleted in each of the main DNA repair pathways. Here, we validate the involvement of the two major DSB repair mechanisms, Homologous Recombination and Non Homologous End Joining, in the management of CDT-induced lesions. We show that impairment of single-strand break repair (SSBR), but not nucleotide excision repair, sensitizes cells to CDT, and we explore the interplay of SSBR with the DSB repair mechanisms. Finally, we document the role of the replicative stress response and demonstrate the involvement of the Fanconi Anemia repair pathway in response to CDT. In conclusion, our work indicates that cellular survival to CDT-induced DNA damage involves different repair pathways, in particular SSBR. This reinforces a model where CDT-related genotoxicity primarily involves SSBs rather than DSBs, underlining the importance of cell proliferation during CDT intoxication and pathogenicity. PMID:27775089

  7. Two Independent Mechanisms for Motion-In-Depth Perception: Evidence from Individual Differences

    PubMed Central

    Nefs, Harold T.; O'Hare, Louise; Harris, Julie M.

    2010-01-01

    Our forward-facing eyes allow us the advantage of binocular visual information: using the tiny differences between right and left eye views to learn about depth and location in three dimensions. Our visual systems also contain specialized mechanisms to detect motion-in-depth from binocular vision, but the nature of these mechanisms remains controversial. Binocular motion-in-depth perception could theoretically be based on first detecting binocular disparity and then monitoring how it changes over time. The alternative is to monitor the motion in the right and left eye separately and then compare these motion signals. Here we used an individual differences approach to test whether the two sources of information are processed via dissociated mechanisms, and to measure the relative importance of those mechanisms. Our results suggest the existence of two distinct mechanisms, each contributing to the perception of motion-in-depth in most observers. Additionally, for the first time, we demonstrate the relative prevalence of the two mechanisms within a normal population. In general, visual systems appear to rely mostly on the mechanism sensitive to changing binocular disparity, but perception of motion-in-depth is augmented by the presence of a less sensitive mechanism that uses interocular velocity differences. Occasionally, we find observers with the opposite pattern of sensitivity. More generally this work showcases the power of the individual differences approach in studying the functional organization of cognitive systems. PMID:21833221

  8. Cissus sicyoides: Pharmacological Mechanisms Involved in the Anti-Inflammatory and Antidiarrheal Activities

    PubMed Central

    Beserra, Fernando Pereira; de Cássia Santos, Raquel; Périco, Larissa Lucena; Rodrigues, Vinicius Peixoto; de Almeida Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo; Saldanha, Luiz Leonardo; Pupo, André Sampaio; da Rocha, Lúcia Regina Machado; Dokkedal, Anne Lígia; Vilegas, Wagner; Hiruma-Lima, Clélia Akiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in anti-inflammatory and antidiarrheal actions of hydroalcoholic extract obtained from the leaves of Cissus sicyoides (HECS). The anti-inflammatory effect was evaluated by oral administration of HECS against acute model of edema induced by xylene, and the mechanisms of action were analysed by involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The antidiarrheal effect of HECS was observed and we analyzed the motility and accumulation of intestinal fluid. We also analyzed the antidiarrheal mechanisms of action of HECS by evaluating the role of the opioid receptor, α2 adrenergic receptor, muscarinic receptor, nitric oxide (NO) and PGE2. The oral administration of HECS inhibited the edema induced by xylene and AA and was also able to significantly decrease the levels of PGE2. The extract also exhibited significant anti-diarrheal activity by reducing motility and intestinal fluid accumulation. This extract significantly reduced intestinal transit stimulated by muscarinic agonist and intestinal secretion induced by PGE2. Our data demonstrate that the mechanism of action involved in the anti-inflammatory effect of HECS is related to PGE2. The antidiarrheal effect of this extract may be mediated by inhibition of contraction by acting on the intestinal smooth muscle and/or intestinal transit. PMID:26805827

  9. Tissue transglutaminase is involved in mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation of human ligamentum flavum cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Yuan-Hung; Huang, Shih-Yung; Yang, Ruei-Cheng; Sun, Jui-Sheng

    2016-07-01

    Mechanical load-induced osteogenic differentiation might be the key cellular event in the calcification and ossification of ligamentum flavum. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of tissue transglutaminase (TGM2) on mechanical load-induced osteogenesis of ligamentum flavum cells. Human ligamentum flavum cells were obtained from 12 patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. Osteogenic phenotypes of ligamentum flavum cells, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP), Alizarin red-S stain, and gene expression of osteogenic makers were evaluated following the administration of mechanical load and BMP-2 treatment. The expression of TGM2 was evaluated by real-time PCR, Western blotting, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Our results showed that mechanical load in combination with BMP-2 enhanced calcium deposition and ALP activity. Mechanical load significantly increased ALP and OC gene expression on day 3, whereas BMP-2 significantly increased ALP, OPN, and Runx2 on day 7. Mechanical load significantly induced TGM2 gene expression and enzyme activity in human ligamentum flavum cells. Exogenous TGM2 increased ALP and OC gene expression; while, inhibited TG activity significantly attenuated mechanical load-induced and TGM2-induced ALP activity. In summary, mechanical load-induced TGM2 expression and enzyme activity is involved in the progression of the calcification of ligamentum flavum.

  10. mTOR regulates skeletal muscle regeneration in vivo through kinase-dependent and kinase-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yejing; Wu, Ai-Luen; Warnes, Christine; Liu, Jianming; Zhang, Chongben; Kawasome, Hideki; Terada, Naohiro; Boppart, Marni D; Schoenherr, Christopher J; Chen, Jie

    2009-12-01

    Rapamycin-sensitive signaling is required for skeletal muscle differentiation and remodeling. In cultured myoblasts, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been reported to regulate differentiation at different stages through distinct mechanisms, including one that is independent of mTOR kinase activity. However, the kinase-independent function of mTOR remains controversial, and no in vivo studies have examined those mTOR myogenic mechanisms previously identified in vitro. In this study, we find that rapamycin impairs injury-induced muscle regeneration. To validate the role of mTOR with genetic evidence and to probe the mechanism of mTOR function, we have generated and characterized transgenic mice expressing two mutants of mTOR under the control of human skeletal actin (HSA) promoter: rapamycin-resistant (RR) and RR/kinase-inactive (RR/KI). Our results show that muscle regeneration in rapamycin-administered mice is restored by RR-mTOR expression. In the RR/KI-mTOR mice, nascent myofiber formation during the early phase of regeneration proceeds in the presence of rapamycin, but growth of the regenerating myofibers is blocked by rapamycin. Igf2 mRNA levels increase drastically during early regeneration, which is sensitive to rapamycin in wild-type muscles but partially resistant to rapamycin in both RR- and RR/KI-mTOR muscles, consistent with mTOR regulation of Igf2 expression in a kinase-independent manner. Furthermore, systemic ablation of S6K1, a target of mTOR kinase, results in impaired muscle growth but normal nascent myofiber formation during regeneration. Therefore, mTOR regulates muscle regeneration through kinase-independent and kinase-dependent mechanisms at the stages of nascent myofiber formation and myofiber growth, respectively.

  11. Viral evasion mechanisms of early antiviral responses involving regulation of ubiquitin pathways.

    PubMed

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-08-01

    Early innate and cell-intrinsic responses are essential to protect host cells against pathogens. In turn, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to establish productive infections by counteracting host innate immune responses. Increasing evidence indicates that these antiviral factors may have a dual role by directly inhibiting viral replication as well as by sensing and transmitting signals to induce antiviral cytokines. Recent studies have pointed at new, unappreciated mechanisms of viral evasion of host innate protective responses including manipulating the host ubiquitin (Ub) system. Virus-mediated inhibition of antiviral factors by Ub-dependent degradation is emerging as a crucial mechanism for evading the antiviral response. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new mechanisms by which virus-encoded proteins inhibit Ub and Ub-like (Ubl) modification of host proteins involved in innate immune signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent findings and novel strategies that viruses have developed to counteract these early innate antiviral defenses.

  12. The N1 effect of temporal attention is independent of sound location and intensity: implications for possible mechanisms of temporal attention.

    PubMed

    Lange, Kathrin

    2012-11-01

    It has been repeatedly shown that the auditory N1 is enhanced for sounds presented at an attended time point. The present study investigated the underlying mechanisms using a temporal cuing paradigm. In each trial, an auditory cue indicated at which time point a second sound could be relevant for response selection. Crucially, in addition to temporal attention, two physical sound features with known effects on the sensory N1 were manipulated: location and intensity. Positive evidence for conjoint effects of attention and location or attention and intensity would corroborate the notion that the sensory N1 was modulated by temporal attention, thus supporting a gain mechanism. However, the N1 effect of temporal attention was not similarly lateralized as the sensory N1, and, moreover, it was independent of sound intensity. Thus, the present results do not provide compelling evidence that temporal attention involves an increase in sensory gain.

  13. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: a novel mechanism for improving bone material properties.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Maxime A; Brown, Drew M; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C; Almer, Jonathan D; Stock, Stuart R; Allen, Matthew R; Burr, David B

    2014-04-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle X-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength.

  14. Bone cell-independent benefits of raloxifene on the skeleton: A novel mechanism for improving bone material properties

    PubMed Central

    Gallant, Maxime A.; Brown, Drew M.; Hammond, Max; Wallace, Joseph M.; Du, Jiang; Deymier-Black, Alix C.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Stock, Stuart R.; Allen, Matthew R.; Burr, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Raloxifene is an FDA approved agent used to treat bone loss and decrease fracture risk. In clinical trials and animal studies, raloxifene reduces fracture risk and improves bone mechanical properties, but the mechanisms of action remain unclear because these benefits occur largely independent of changes to bone mass. Using a novel experimental approach, machined bone beams, both from mature male canine and human male donors, were depleted of living cells and then exposed to raloxifene ex vivo. Our data show that ex vivo exposure of non-viable bone to raloxifene improves intrinsic toughness, both in canine and human cortical bone beams tested by 4-point bending. These effects are cell-independent and appear to be mediated by an increase in matrix bound water, assessed using basic gravimetric weighing and sophisticated ultrashort echo time magnetic resonance imaging. The hydroxyl groups (−OH) on raloxifene were shown to be important in both the water and toughness increases. Wide and small angle x-ray scattering patterns during 4-pt bending show that raloxifene alters the transfer of load between the collagen matrix and the mineral crystals, placing lower strains on the mineral, and allowing greater overall deformation prior to failure. Collectively, these findings provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the therapeutic effect of raloxifene and more importantly identify a cell-independent mechanism that can be utilized for novel pharmacological approaches for enhancing bone strength. PMID:24468719

  15. [Involvement of adrenergic mechanisms in developing the nervous syndrome of high pressure and nitrogen narcosis].

    PubMed

    Sledkov, A I; Bernarskii, K V; Shilina, M N

    1996-01-01

    Involvement of the adrenergic mediator system in central mechanisms of hyperbaric nitrogen narcosis or the high pressure nervous syndrome (NSHP) produced by nitrogen or heliox gas mixtures under increased pressure was studied in mice and rabbit experiments with the use of pharmacological substances-analyzers. Accumulated data are indicative of lack of a significant role of the adrenergic system in the NSHP genesis and a protective effect of activation of the central but not peripheric adrenergic mediation in development of the behavioural and electrophysiological symptomatics of nitrogen narcosis. Mechanisms of NSHP and nitrogen narcosis and possible principles of pharmacological correction are under discussion.

  16. Motivational concordance: an important mechanism in self-help therapeutic rituals involving inert (placebo) substances.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Michael E; Whalley, Ben

    2008-11-01

    We tested the contribution of two mechanisms, response expectancy and motivational concordance, to reported psychological benefit from a popular, biologically inactive, self-help, complementary therapy (a placebo). Flower essences were taken by 251 people for self-selected symptoms and were randomized to receive three different kinds of information. When the flower essence was presented as a spiritual therapy, then baseline spirituality (beta=.35, P=.01) and expectancy (beta=.25, P=.03) independently predicted outcome. When flower essences were presented as an affirmation (i.e., nonspiritual) therapy, then spirituality negatively (beta=-.27, P=.03) and expectancy (beta=.33, P=.01) predicted outcome. For both groups, expectancy predicted outcome after controlling for spirituality and compliance, but did not after controlling for ease of task completion. Expectancy failed to predict outcome in the nonenhanced ritual group. The results suggest that motivational concordance is an important therapeutic mechanism for real-life placebos.

  17. Neural Mechanisms Involved in Hypersensitive Hearing: Helping Children with ASD Who Are Overly Sensitive to Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Lucker, Jay R.; Doman, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Professionals working with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may find that these children are overly sensitive to sounds. These professionals are often concerned as to why children may have auditory hypersensitivities. This review article discusses the neural mechanisms identified underlying hypersensitive hearing in people. The authors focus on brain research to support the idea of the nonclassical auditory pathways being involved in connecting the auditory system with the emotional system of the brain. The authors also discuss brain mechanisms felt to be involved in auditory hypersensitivity. The authors conclude with a discussion of some treatments for hypersensitive hearing. These treatments include desensitization training and the use of listening therapies such as The Listening Program. PMID:26823983

  18. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mabb, Angela M.; Simon, Jeremy M.; King, Ian F.; Lee, Hyeong-Min; An, Lin-Kun; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc’s) that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb) genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc’s, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A) that stabilizes TOP1cc’s. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression. PMID:27231886

  19. Ionic mechanisms involved in the nodal swelling of myelinated axons caused by marine toxins.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Evelyne; Mattei, Cesar; Ouanounou, Gilles; Meunier, Frederic A; Suput, Dusan; Le Gall, Frederic; Marquais, Michel; Dechraoui, Marie Y; Molgo, Jordi

    2002-01-01

    This review describes the ionic mechanisms involved in the nodal swelling of frog myelinated axons caused by specific marine neurotoxins (ciguatoxins, brevetoxins, Conus consors toxin and equinatoxin-II), analysed using confocal laser scanning microscopy. We have focussed on toxins that either target neuronal voltage-dependent Na+ channels, or that form cation-selective pores and indirectly affect the functioning of the Na(+)-Ca(++)exchanger.

  20. Gauge-independent Higgs mechanism and the implications for quark confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    We propose a gauge-invariant description for the Higgs mechanism by which a gauge boson acquires the mass. We do not need to assume spontaneous breakdown of gauge symmetry signaled by a non-vanishing vacuum expectation value of the scalar field. In fact, we give a manifestly gauge-invariant description of the Higgs mechanism in the operator level, which does not rely on spontaneous symmetry breaking. For concreteness, we discuss the gauge-Higgs models with U(1) and SU(2) gauge groups explicitly. This enables us to discuss the confinement-Higgs complementarity from a new perspective.

  1. Raloxifene inhibits bone loss and improves bone strength through an Opg-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mei-zhu; Xu, Yong; Gong, Yun-xia; Liu, Jian-min; Lu, Shun-yuan; Huang, Lei; Wang, Zhu-gang; Zhao, Yong-ju; Pang, Xiao-fen

    2010-02-01

    The osteoblast-derived paracrine factor osteoprotegerin (OPG) is considered to play a key role in inhibition of osteoclast formation and activity. Recently, raloxifene, a nonsteroidal benzothiophene, was found to exert anti-resorptive effects via modulating OPG expression in osteoblasts. To explore whether raloxifene regulates bone metabolism via an OPG-dependant pathway in vivo, we investigated the effects of raloxifene on bone loss in Opg-deficient mice. The results show that bone mineral density and bone strength are increased in mice deficient for Opg after treatment with raloxifene for 30 days. Histomorphometric analysis shows that raloxifene can increase bone trabecular area and decrease the number of osteoclasts in Opg (-/-) mice. Moreover, raloxifene reduces Rankl transcription and serum level of Rankl, which is dramatically increased in Opg knockout mice. These results suggest that raloxifene-induced inhibition of bone resorption may be independent of Opg pathway in mice.

  2. Acetylcholinesterase Regulates Skeletal In Ovo Development of Chicken Limbs by ACh-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Spieker, Janine; Ackermann, Anica; Salfelder, Anika; Vogel-Höpker, Astrid; Layer, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Formation of the vertebrate limb presents an excellent model to analyze a non-neuronal cholinergic system (NNCS). Here, we first analyzed the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by IHC and of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) by ISH in developing embryonic chicken limbs (stages HH17-37). AChE outlined formation of bones, being strongest at their distal tips, and later also marked areas of cell death. At onset, AChE and ChAT were elevated in two organizing centers of the limb anlage, the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) and zone of polarizing activity (ZPA), respectively. Thereby ChAT was expressed shortly after AChE, thus strongly supporting a leading role of AChE in limb formation. Then, we conducted loss-of-function studies via unilateral implantation of beads into chicken limb anlagen, which were soaked in cholinergic components. After varying periods, the formation of cartilage matrix and of mineralizing bones was followed by Alcian blue (AB) and Alizarin red (AR) stainings, respectively. Both acetylcholine (ACh)- and ChAT-soaked beads accelerated bone formation in ovo. Notably, inhibition of AChE by BW284c51, or by the monoclonal antibody MAB304 delayed cartilage formation. Since bead inhibition of BChE was mostly ineffective, an ACh-independent action during BW284c51 and MAB304 inhibition was indicated, which possibly could be due to an enzymatic side activity of AChE. In conclusion, skeletogenesis in chick is regulated by an ACh-dependent cholinergic system, but to some extent also by an ACh-independent aspect of the AChE protein. PMID:27574787

  3. A Sister-Strand Exchange Mechanism for Reca-Independent Deletion of Repeated DNA Sequences in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Lovett, S. T.; Drapkin, P. T.; Sutera-Jr., V. A.; Gluckman-Peskind, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    In the genomes of many organisms, deletions arise between tandemly repeated DNA sequences of lengths ranging from several kilobases to only a few nucleotides. Using a plasmid-based assay for deletion of a 787-bp tandem repeat, we have found that a recA-independent mechanism contributes substantially to the deletion process of even this large region of homology. No Escherichia coli recombination gene tested, including recA, had greater than a fivefold effect on deletion rates. The recA-independence of deletion formation is also observed with constructions present on the chromosome. RecA promotes synapsis and transfer of homologous DNA strands in vitro and is indispensable for intermolecular recombination events in vivo measured after conjugation. Because deletion formation in E. coli shows little or no dependence on recA, it has been assumed that homologous recombination contributes little to the deletion process. However, we have found recA-independent deletion products suggestive of reciprocal crossovers when branch migration in the cell is inhibited by a ruvA mutation. We propose a model for recA-independent crossovers between replicating sister strands, which can also explain deletion or amplification of repeated sequences. We suggest that this process may be initiated as post-replicational DNA repair; subsequent strand misalignment at repeated sequences leads to genetic rearrangements. PMID:8293969

  4. ECE-1 influences prostate cancer cell invasion via ET-1-mediated FAK phosphorylation and ET-1-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Whyteside, A R; Hinsley, E E; Lambert, L A; McDermott, P J; Turner, A J

    2010-08-01

    Plasma concentrations of the mitogenic peptide endothelin-1 (ET-1) are significantly elevated in men with metastatic prostate cancer (PC). ET-1 also contributes to the transition of hormonally regulated androgen-dependent PC to androgen-independent disease. ET-1 is generated from big-ET-1 by endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE-1). ECE-1 is present in PC cell lines and primary tissue and is elevated in primary malignant stromal cells compared with benign. siRNA or shRNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous ECE-1 in either the epithelial or stromal compartment significantly reduced PC cell (PC-3) invasion and migration. The re-addition of ET-1 only partially recovered the effect, suggesting ET-1-dependent and -independent functions for ECE-1 in pPC. The ET-1-independent effect of ECE-1 on PC invasion may be due to modulation of downstream signalling events. Addition of an ECE-1 specific inhibitor to PC-3 cells reduced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), a signalling molecule known to play a role in PC. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ECE-1 resulted in a significant reduction in FAK phosphorylation. Accordingly, transient ECE-1 overexpression in PNT1-a cells increased FAK phosphorylation. In conclusion, ECE-1 influences PC cell invasion via both ET-1-mediated FAK phosphorylation and ET-1 independent mechanisms.

  5. Utilizing a reference material for assessing absolute tumor mechanical properties in modality independent elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Kyu; Weis, Jared A.; Yankeelov, Thomas E.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    There is currently no reliable method for early characterization of breast cancer response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) [1,2]. Given that disruption of normal structural architecture occurs in cancer-bearing tissue, we hypothesize that further structural changes occur in response to NAC. Consequently, we are investigating the use of modalityindependent elastography (MIE) [3-8] as a method for monitoring mechanical integrity to predict long term outcomes in NAC. Recently, we have utilized a Demons non-rigid image registration method that allows 3D elasticity reconstruction in abnormal tissue geometries, making it particularly amenable to the evaluation of breast cancer mechanical properties. While past work has reflected relative elasticity contrast ratios [3], this study improves upon that work by utilizing a known stiffness reference material within the reconstruction framework such that a stiffness map becomes an absolute measure. To test, a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) cryogel phantom and a silicone rubber mock mouse tumor phantom were constructed with varying mechanical stiffness. Results showed that an absolute measure of stiffness could be obtained based on a reference value. This reference technique demonstrates the ability to generate accurate measurements of absolute stiffness to characterize response to NAC. These results support that `referenced MIE' has the potential to reliably differentiate absolute tumor stiffness with significant contrast from that of surrounding tissue. The use of referenced MIE to obtain absolute quantification of biomarkers is also translatable across length scales such that the characterization method is mechanics-consistent at the small animal and human application.

  6. The FAAH inhibitor URB597 efficiently reduces tyrosine hydroxylase expression through CB1- and FAAH-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bosier, Barbara; Muccioli, Giulio G; Lambert, Didier M

    2013-01-01

    Background Anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol are neuromodulatory lipids interacting with cannabinoid receptors, whose availability is regulated by the balance between ‘on demand’ generation and enzymatic degradation [by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH)/monoacylglycerol lipase]. Given the reported effects of anandamide on dopamine transmission, we investigated the influence of endocannabinoids and URB597, a well-known FAAH inhibitor, on the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in dopamine synthesis. Experimental Approach We investigated TH expression in N1E115 neuroblastoma using a reporter gene assay, as well as mRNA and protein quantifications. FAAH inhibition was confirmed by measuring radiolabelled substrate hydrolysis and endogenous endocannabinoids. Key Results Anandamide decreased TH promoter activity in N1E115 cells through CB1 receptor activation. Unexpectedly, URB597 reduced TH expression (pEC50 = 8.7 ± 0.2) through FAAH-independent mechanisms. Indeed, four structurally unrelated inhibitors of FAAH had no influence on TH expression, although all the inhibitors increased endocannabinoid levels. At variance with the endocannabinoid responses, the use of selective antagonists indicated that the URB597-mediated decrease in TH expression was not directed by the CB1 receptor, but rather by abnormal-cannabidiol-sensitive receptors and PPARs. Further supporting the physiological relevance of these in vitro data, URB597 administration resulted in reduced TH mRNA levels in mice brain. Conclusions While confirming the implication of endocannabinoids on the modulation of TH, we provide strong evidence for additional physiologically relevant off-target effects of URB597. In light of the numerous preclinical studies involving URB597, particularly in anxiety and depression, the existence of non-CB1 and non-FAAH mediated influences of URB597 on key enzymes of the catecholaminergic transmission system should be taken into account when

  7. 15-Deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) reveals a new pVHL-independent, lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation.

    PubMed

    Olmos, Gemma; Arenas, María I; Bienes, Raquel; Calzada, María Jose; Aragonés, Julián; Garcia-Bermejo, Maria Laura; Landazuri, Manuel O; Lucio-Cazaña, Javier

    2009-07-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha) protein is degraded under normoxia by its association to von Hippel-Lindau protein (pVHL) and further proteasomal digestion. However, human renal cells HK-2 treated with 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin-J(2) (15d-PGJ(2)) accumulate HIF-1alpha in normoxic conditions. Thus, we aimed to investigate the mechanism involved in this accumulation. We found that 15d-PGJ(2) induced an over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in RCC4 cells, which lack pVHL and in HK-2 cells treated with inhibitors of the pVHL-proteasome pathway. These results indicated that pVHL-proteasome-independent mechanisms are involved, and therefore we aimed to ascertain them. We have identified a new lysosomal-dependent mechanism of HIF-1alpha degradation as a target for 15d-PGJ(2) based on: (1) HIF-1alpha colocalized with the specific lysosomal marker Lamp-2a, (2) 15d-PGJ(2) inhibited the activity of cathepsin B, a lysosomal protease, and (3) inhibition of lysosomal activity did not result in over-accumulation of HIF-1alpha in 15d-PGJ(2)-treated cells. Therefore, expression of HIF-1alpha is also modulated by lysosomal degradation.

  8. Peripheral and Central Mechanisms Involved in the Hormonal Control of Male and Female Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, L. M.; Bentley, G. E.; Calandra, R. S.; Paredes, A. H.; Tesone, M.; Wu, T. J.; Micevych, P. E.

    2016-01-01

    Reproduction involves the integration of hormonal signals acting across multiple systems to generate a synchronised physiological output. A critical component of reproduction is the luteinising hormone (LH) surge, which is mediated by oestradiol (E2) and neuroprogesterone interacting to stimulate kisspeptin release in the rostral periventricular nucleus of the third ventricle in rats. Recent evidence indicates the involvement of both classical and membrane E2 and progesterone signalling in this pathway. A metabolite of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH-(1-5), has been shown to stimulate GnRH expression and secretion, and has a role in the regulation of lordosis. Additionally, gonadotrophin release-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) projects to and influences the activity of GnRH neurones in birds. Stress-induced changes in GnIH have been shown to alter breeding behaviour in birds, demonstrating another mechanism for the molecular control of reproduction. Peripherally, paracrine and autocrine actions within the gonad have been suggested as therapeutic targets for infertility in both males and females. Dysfunction of testicular prostaglandin synthesis is a possible cause of idiopathic male infertility. Indeed, local production of melatonin and corticotrophin-releasing hormone could influence spermatogenesis via immune pathways in the gonad. In females, vascular endothelial growth factor A has been implicated in an angiogenic process that mediates development of the corpus luteum and thus fertility via the Notch signalling pathway. Age-induced decreases in fertility involve ovarian kisspeptin and its regulation of ovarian sympathetic innervation. Finally, morphological changes in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus influence female sexual receptivity in rats. The processes mediating these morphological changes have been shown to involve the rapid effects of E2 controlling synaptogenesis in this hypothalamic nucleus. In summary, this review highlights new

  9. Pathophysiology of major depressive disorder: mechanisms involved in etiology are not associated with clinical progression.

    PubMed

    Verduijn, J; Milaneschi, Y; Schoevers, R A; van Hemert, A M; Beekman, A T F; Penninx, B W J H

    2015-09-29

    Meta-analyses support the involvement of different pathophysiological mechanisms (inflammation, hypothalamic-pituitary (HPA)-axis, neurotrophic growth and vitamin D) in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it remains unknown whether dysregulations in these mechanisms are more pronounced when MDD progresses toward multiple episodes and/or chronicity. We hypothesized that four central pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD are not only involved in etiology, but also associated with clinical disease progression. Therefore, we expected to find increasingly more dysregulation across consecutive stages of MDD progression. The sample from the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (18-65 years) consisted of 230 controls and 2333 participants assigned to a clinical staging model categorizing MDD in eight stages (0, 1A, 1B, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C and 4), from familial risk at MDD (stage 0) to chronic MDD (stage 4). Analyses of covariance examined whether pathophysiological mechanism markers (interleukin (IL)-6, C-reactive protein (CRP), cortisol, brain-derived neurotrophic factor and vitamin D) showed a linear trend across controls, those at risk for MDD (stages 0, 1A and 1B), and those with full-threshold MDD (stages 2, 3A, 3B, 3C and 4). Subsequently, pathophysiological differences across separate stages within those at risk and with full-threshold MDD were examined. A linear increase of inflammatory markers (CRP P=0.026; IL-6 P=0.090), cortisol (P=0.025) and decrease of vitamin D (P<0.001) was found across the entire sample (for example, from controls to those at risk and those with full-threshold MDD). Significant trends of dysregulations across stages were present in analyses focusing on at-risk individuals (IL-6 P=0.050; cortisol P=0.008; vitamin D P<0.001); however, no linear trends were found in dysregulations for any of the mechanisms across more progressive stages of full-threshold MDD. Our results support that the examined pathophysiological mechanisms are

  10. Thyroid hormone influences muscle mechanics in carp (Cyprinus carpio) independently from SERCA activity.

    PubMed

    James, Rob S; Little, Alexander G; Tallis, Jason; Seebacher, Frank

    2016-09-15

    Thyroid hormone is a key regulator of metabolism, and in zebrafish, hypothyroidism decreases sustained and burst swimming performance. These effects are accompanied by decreases in both metabolic scope and the activity of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (SERCA) in zebrafish. Our aim was to determine whether thyroid hormone affects skeletal muscle contractile function directly and whether these effects are mediated by influencing SERCA activity. We show that hypothyroidism reduces sustained locomotor performance but not sprint performance in carp (Cyprinus carpio). We accept our hypothesis that hypothyroidism reduces force production in isolated skeletal muscle, when compared with the thyroid hormone T2, but we reject the hypothesis that this effect is mediated by influencing SERCA activity. Blocking SERCA activity with thapsigargin reduced muscle fatigue resistance, but hypothyroidism had no effect on fatigue. Hence, thyroid hormone plays a role in determining isolated skeletal muscle mechanics, but its effects are more likely to be mediated by mechanisms other than affecting SERCA activity.

  11. Calcium-independent metal-ion catalytic mechanism of anthrax edema factor

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yuequan; Zhukovskaya, Natalia L.; Guo, Qing; Florián, Jan; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-11-18

    Edema factor (EF), a key anthrax exotoxin, has an anthrax protective antigen-binding domain (PABD) and a calmodulin (CaM)-activated adenylyl cyclase domain. Here, we report the crystal structures of CaM-bound EF, revealing the architecture of EF PABD. CaM has N- and C-terminal domains and each domain can bind two calcium ions. Calcium binding induces the conformational change of CaM from closed to open. Structures of the EF-CaM complex show how EF locks the N-terminal domain of CaM into a closed conformation regardless of its calcium-loading state. This represents a mechanism of how CaM effector alters the calcium affinity of CaM and uncouples the conformational change of CaM from calcium loading. Furthermore, structures of EF-CaM complexed with nucleotides show that EF uses two-metal-ion catalysis, a prevalent mechanism in DNA and RNA polymerases. A histidine (H351) further facilitates the catalysis of EF by activating a water to deprotonate 3'OH of ATP. Mammalian adenylyl cyclases share no structural similarity with EF and they also use two-metal-ion catalysis, suggesting the catalytic mechanism-driven convergent evolution of two structurally diverse adenylyl cyclases.

  12. Compound C inhibits macrophage chemotaxis through an AMPK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngyi; Park, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Eun Ju

    2016-01-15

    Macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue is a well-established cause of obesity-linked insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue has beneficial effects on the protection against obesity-induced insulin resistance, which is mainly mediated by prevention of adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation. In examining the role of AMPK on adipose tissue inflammation, we unexpectedly found that compound C (CC), despite its inhibition of AMPK, robustly inhibited macrophage chemotaxis in RAW 264.7 cells when adipocyte conditioned medium (CM) was used as a chemoattractant. Here, we report that CC inhibition of macrophage migration occurred independently of AMPK. Mechanistically, this inhibitory effect of cell migration by CC was mediated by inhibition of the focal adhesion kinase, AKT, nuclear factor κB pathways. Moreover, the expression of chemokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and pro-inflammatory genes such as tumor necrosis factor α and inducible nitric oxide synthase were prevented by CC treatment in RAW 264.7 cells stimulated with either adipocyte CM or lipopolysaccharide. Lastly, in accord with the findings of the anti-inflammatory effect of CC, we demonstrated that CC functioned as a repressor of macrophage CM-mediated insulin resistance in adipocytes. Taken together, our results suggest that CC serves as a useful inhibitory molecule against macrophage chemotaxis into adipose tissue and thus might have therapeutic potential for the treatment of obesity-linked adipose inflammation.

  13. Lipopolysaccharide reduces food passage rate from the crop by a prostaglandin-independent mechanism in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, T.; Ogino, M.; Makino, R.; Khan, M. S. I.; Cline, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT 1. We examined the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacteria, on food passage in the digestive tract of chickens (Gallus gallus) in order to clarify whether bacterial infection affects food passage in birds. 2. Food passage in the crop was significantly reduced by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of LPS while it did not affect the number of defecations, suggesting that LPS may affect food passage only in the upper digestive tract. 3. Similar to LPS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the mediators of LPS, also reduced crop-emptying rate in chickens while it had no effect on the number of defecations. 4. Pretreatment with indomethacin, which is an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX), a prostaglandin synthase, had no effect on LPS-induced inhibition of crop emptying. 5. IP injection of LPS did not affect the mRNA expression of COX2 in the upper digestive tract of chickens. 6. It is therefore likely that LPS and PGE2 reduced food passage rate in the crop by a prostaglandin-independent pathway in chickens. PMID:27871194

  14. A new mechanism for low and temperature-independent elastic modulus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liangxiang; Wang, Dong; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2015-06-25

    The first Elinvar alloy, FeNiCr, which has invariant elastic modulus over a wide temperature range, was discovered almost 100 years ago by Guillaume. The physical origin of such an anomaly has been attributed to the magnetic phase transition taking place in the system. However, the recent discovery of non-magnetic Elinvar such as multi-functional β-type Ti alloys has imposed a new challenge to the existing theories. In this study we show that random field from stress-carrying defects could suppress the sharp first-order martensitic transformation into a continuous strain glass transition, leading to continued formation and confined growth of nano-domains of martensite in a broad temperature range. Accompanying such a unique transition, there is a gradual softening of the elastic modulus over a wide temperature range, which compensates the normal modulus hardening due to anharmonic atomic vibration, resulting in a low and temperature-independent elastic modulus. The abundance of austenite/martensite interfaces are found responsible for the low elastic modulus.

  15. A new mechanism for low and temperature-independent elastic modulus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liangxiang; Wang, Dong; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2015-01-01

    The first Elinvar alloy, FeNiCr, which has invariant elastic modulus over a wide temperature range, was discovered almost 100 years ago by Guillaume. The physical origin of such an anomaly has been attributed to the magnetic phase transition taking place in the system. However, the recent discovery of non-magnetic Elinvar such as multi-functional β-type Ti alloys has imposed a new challenge to the existing theories. In this study we show that random field from stress-carrying defects could suppress the sharp first-order martensitic transformation into a continuous strain glass transition, leading to continued formation and confined growth of nano-domains of martensite in a broad temperature range. Accompanying such a unique transition, there is a gradual softening of the elastic modulus over a wide temperature range, which compensates the normal modulus hardening due to anharmonic atomic vibration, resulting in a low and temperature-independent elastic modulus. The abundance of austenite/martensite interfaces are found responsible for the low elastic modulus. PMID:26108371

  16. A new mechanism for low and temperature-independent elastic modulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liangxiang; Wang, Dong; Ren, Xiaobing; Wang, Yunzhi

    2015-06-01

    The first Elinvar alloy, FeNiCr, which has invariant elastic modulus over a wide temperature range, was discovered almost 100 years ago by Guillaume. The physical origin of such an anomaly has been attributed to the magnetic phase transition taking place in the system. However, the recent discovery of non-magnetic Elinvar such as multi-functional β-type Ti alloys has imposed a new challenge to the existing theories. In this study we show that random field from stress-carrying defects could suppress the sharp first-order martensitic transformation into a continuous strain glass transition, leading to continued formation and confined growth of nano-domains of martensite in a broad temperature range. Accompanying such a unique transition, there is a gradual softening of the elastic modulus over a wide temperature range, which compensates the normal modulus hardening due to anharmonic atomic vibration, resulting in a low and temperature-independent elastic modulus. The abundance of austenite/martensite interfaces are found responsible for the low elastic modulus.

  17. Independent mechanisms for ventriloquism and multisensory integration as revealed by theta-burst stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Caterina; Leo, Fabrizio; Avenanti, Alessio; Làdavas, Elisabetta

    2010-05-01

    The visual and auditory systems often concur to create a unified perceptual experience and to determine the localization of objects in the external world. Co-occurring auditory and visual stimuli in spatial coincidence are known to enhance performance of auditory localization due to the integration of stimuli from different sensory channels (i.e. multisensory integration). However, auditory localization of audiovisual stimuli presented at spatial disparity might also induce a mislocalization of the sound towards the visual stimulus (i.e. ventriloquism effect). Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation we tested the role of right temporoparietal (rTPC), right occipital (rOC) and right posterior parietal (rPPC) cortex in an auditory localization task in which indices of ventriloquism and multisensory integration were computed. We found that suppression of rTPC excitability by means of continuous theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) reduced multisensory integration. No similar effect was found for cTBS over rOC. Moreover, inhibition of rOC, but not of rTPC, suppressed the visual bias in the contralateral hemifield. In contrast, cTBS over rPPC did not produce any modulation of ventriloquism or integrative effects. The double dissociation found in the present study suggests that ventriloquism and audiovisual multisensory integration are functionally independent phenomena and may be underpinned by partially different neural circuits.

  18. Lipopolysaccharide reduces food passage rate from the crop by a prostaglandin-independent mechanism in chickens.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, T; Ogino, M; Makino, R; Khan, M S I; Cline, M A

    2017-02-01

    1. We examined the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of Gram-negative bacteria, on food passage in the digestive tract of chickens (Gallus gallus) in order to clarify whether bacterial infection affects food passage in birds. 2. Food passage in the crop was significantly reduced by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of LPS while it did not affect the number of defecations, suggesting that LPS may affect food passage only in the upper digestive tract. 3. Similar to LPS, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), one of the mediators of LPS, also reduced crop-emptying rate in chickens while it had no effect on the number of defecations. 4. Pretreatment with indomethacin, which is an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX), a prostaglandin synthase, had no effect on LPS-induced inhibition of crop emptying. 5. IP injection of LPS did not affect the mRNA expression of COX2 in the upper digestive tract of chickens. 6. It is therefore likely that LPS and PGE2 reduced food passage rate in the crop by a prostaglandin-independent pathway in chickens.

  19. GABA(B) receptors and opioid mechanisms involved in homotaurine-induced analgesia.

    PubMed

    Serrano, M I; Serrano, J S; Fernández, A; Asadi, I; Serrano-Martino, M C

    1998-03-01

    1. The involvement of GABA(B) receptors and opioid mechanisms in homotaurine-induced analgesia has been investigated in current models of nociception by using a GABA(B) receptor antagonist, morphine, and naloxone. CGP 35348 (50-200 mg/kg IP), a highly selective GABA(B) antagonist, was administered prior to carrying out a dose-response curve of homotaurine (22.6-445 mg/kg IP) antinociceptive effect in the abdominal constriction (mice) and tail flick (rats) tests. 2. The tail flick test was performed in animals pretreated with morphine (0.5 mg/kg SC) and naloxone (1 mg/kg), 15 min before amino acid. Animals treated with saline 10 ml/kg (mice) or 1.25 ml/kg (rats) were included as control for the vehicle used. 3. CGP 35348 antagonized the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine in both tests. The range of doses affected by the interaction depended on the test assayed, but it was coincident for the main part of the dose-response curve. 4. A subanalgesic dose of morphine potentiated the antinociceptive effect of lower doses of homotaurine in the tail flick test. Naloxone pretreatment inhibited the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine. 5. These data imply that GABA(B) receptor subpopulations and opiate mechanisms are involved in the antinociceptive effect of homotaurine. Because functional relationships have been found between GABAergic and opiate systems in analgesic effects, an interaction of the two mechanisms may be operating in the effects described for homotaurine.

  20. Differential gene expression in seasonal sympatry: mechanisms involved in diverging life histories

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Mark P.; Greives, Timothy J.; Atwell, Jonathan W.; Bridge, Eli S.; Ketterson, Ellen D.

    2016-01-01

    In an era of climate change, understanding the genetic and physiological mechanisms underlying flexibility in phenology and life history has gained greater importance. These mechanisms can be elucidated by comparing closely related populations that differ in key behavioural and physiological traits such as migration and timing of reproduction. We compared gene expression in two recently diverged dark-eyed Junco ( Junco hyemalis) subspecies that live in seasonal sympatry during winter and early spring, but that differ in behaviour and physiology, despite exposure to identical environmental cues. We identified 547 genes differentially expressed in blood and pectoral muscle. Genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism were highly expressed in migrant juncos, while genes involved in reproductive processes were highly expressed in resident breeders. Seasonal differences in gene expression in closely related populations residing in the same environment provide significant insights into mechanisms underlying variation in phenology and life history, and have potential implications for the role of seasonal timing differences in gene flow and reproductive isolation. PMID:26979563

  1. Performance pressure and caffeine both affect cognitive performance, but likely through independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boere, Julia J; Fellinger, Lizz; Huizinga, Duncan J H; Wong, Sebastiaan F; Bijleveld, Erik

    2016-02-01

    A prevalent combination in daily life, performance pressure and caffeine intake have both been shown to impact people's cognitive performance. Here, we examined the possibility that pressure and caffeine affect cognitive performance via a shared pathway. In an experiment, participants performed a modular arithmetic task. Performance pressure and caffeine intake were orthogonally manipulated. Findings indicated that pressure and caffeine both negatively impacted performance. However, (a) pressure vs. caffeine affected performance on different trial types, and (b) there was no hint of an interactive effect. So, though the evidence is indirect, findings suggest that pressure and caffeine shape performance via distinct mechanisms, rather than a shared one.

  2. [The clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis--the complex of three independent mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Fassbender, Hans Georg; Meyer-Scholten, Carola; Zorn, Kati

    2009-01-01

    The assumption of inflamation as the only cause of the complex clinical picture of rheumatoid atrhritis does not correspond to facts. We have found and proven the existence of three seemingly unconnected mechanisms, and only their combination can account for the general clinical picture of rheumatoid arthritis. They are: 1. immunologic synovitis, responsible for pain, swelling and stiffnes; 2. oncological process ("tumorlike proliferation"), responsible for the destruction of joints; 3. Primary necrotizing process, responsible for the (sometimes lethal) destructions in the heart and blood vessels.

  3. Autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins induce joint pain independent of inflammation via a chemokine-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wigerblad, Gustaf; Bas, Duygu B; Fernades-Cerqueira, Cátia; Krishnamurthy, Akilan; Rogoz, Katarzyna; Kato, Jungo; Sandor, Katalin; Su, Jie; Jimenez–Andrade, Juan Miguel; Finn, Anja; Bersellini Farinotti, Alex; Amara, Khaled; Lundberg, Karin; Holmdahl, Rikard; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Malmström, Vivianne; Catrina, Anca I; Klareskog, Lars; Svensson, Camilla I

    2016-01-01

    Objective An interesting and so far unexplained feature of chronic pain in autoimmune disease is the frequent disconnect between pain and inflammation. This is illustrated well in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) where pain in joints (arthralgia) may precede joint inflammation and persist even after successful anti-inflammatory treatment. In the present study, we have addressed the possibility that autoantibodies against citrullinated proteins (ACPA), present in RA, may be directly responsible for the induction of pain, independent of inflammation. Methods Antibodies purified from human patients with RA, healthy donors and murinised monoclonal ACPA were injected into mice. Pain-like behaviour was monitored for up to 28 days, and tissues were analysed for signs of pathology. Mouse osteoclasts were cultured and stimulated with antibodies, and supernatants analysed for release of factors. Mice were treated with CXCR1/2 (interleukin (IL) 8 receptor) antagonist reparixin. Results Mice injected with either human or murinised ACPA developed long-lasting pronounced pain-like behaviour in the absence of inflammation, while non-ACPA IgG from patients with RA or control monoclonal IgG were without pronociceptive effect. This effect was coupled to ACPA-mediated activation of osteoclasts and release of the nociceptive chemokine CXCL1 (analogue to human IL-8). ACPA-induced pain-like behaviour was reversed with reparixin. Conclusions The data suggest that CXCL1/IL-8, released from osteoclasts in an autoantibody-dependent manner, produces pain by activating sensory neurons. The identification of this new pain pathway may open new avenues for pain treatment in RA and also in other painful diseases associated with autoantibody production and/or osteoclast activation. PMID:26613766

  4. Folding mechanism of a multiple independently-folding domain protein: double B domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Hammes, Gordon G; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-10-10

    The antibody binding properties of staphylococcal protein A (SpA) can be attributed to the presence of five highly homologous domains (E, D, A, B, and C). Although the folding of the B domain of protein A (BdpA) is well-characterized, the folding behavior of this domain in the context of full-length SpA in the cell remains unexplored. The sequence of the B domain is 89 and 91% identical to those of domains A and C, respectively. We have fused B domain sequences (BBdpA) as a close approximation of the A-B or B-C portion of SpA. Circular dichroism and fluorescence-detected denaturation curves of BBdpA are experimentally indistinguishable from those of BdpA. The rate constants for folding and unfolding from NMR line shape analysis for the single- and double-domain proteins are the same within experimental uncertainties (+/-20%). These results support the designation of SpA as a multiple independently-folding domain (MIFD) protein. We develop a mathematical model that describes the folding thermodynamics and kinetics of MIFD proteins. The model depicts MIFD protein folding and unfolding as a parallel network and explicitly calculates the flux through all parallel pathways. These fluxes are combined to give a complete description of the global thermodynamics and kinetics of the folding and unfolding of MIFD proteins. The global rates for complete folding and unfolding of a MIFD protein and those of the individual domains depend on the stability of the protein. We show that the global unfolding rate of a MIFD protein may be many orders of magnitude slower than that of the constituent domains.

  5. Independent mechanisms for bright and dark image features in a stereo correspondence task.

    PubMed

    Read, Jenny C A; Vaz, Xavier A; Serrano-Pedraza, Ignacio

    2011-10-07

    A pioneering study by J. M. Harris and A. J. Parker (1995) found that disparity judgments using random-dot stereograms were better for stimuli composed of mixed bright and dark dots than when the dots were all bright or all dark. They attribute this to an improvement in stereo correspondence. This result is hard to explain within current models of how stereo correspondence is achieved. However, their experiment varied task difficulty by adding disparity noise. We wondered if this might challenge mechanisms subsequent to the solution of the correspondence problem rather than mechanisms that solve the correspondence problem itself. If so, this would avoid the need to modify current models of stereo correspondence. We therefore repeated Harris and Parker's experiment using interocular decorrelation to vary task difficulty. This technique is believed to probe stereo correspondence more specifically. We observed the efficiency increase reported by Harris and Parker for mixed-polarity dots both using their original technique of disparity noise and using interocular decorrelation. We show that this effect cannot be accounted for by the stereo energy or by simple modifications of it. Our results confirm Harris and Parker's original conclusion that mixed-polarity dots specifically benefit stereo correspondence and point up the challenge to current models of this process.

  6. Mechanism of UV-induced IkappaBalpha-independent activation of NF-kappaB.

    PubMed

    László, Csaba F; Wu, Shiyong

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) plays an important role in UV-induced skin tumorigenesis. Activation of NF-kappaB by UV-irradiation is composed of two phases. The early phase culminates with maximal levels of DNA binding ability at 4 h postirradiation and is dependent on translational inhibition. The late-phase activation of NF-kappaB occurs between 16 and 48 h post-irradiation and the mechanism is not clear due to the fact that NF-kappaB was activated in the presence of high level of IkappaBalpha. In this report, we provide evidence that without translational inhibition, the transcription of IkappaBalpha was induced by UV-irradiation. In the late-phase of UV-induced NF-kappaB activation, the IkappaBalpha depletion is the combined result of regulation at both transcriptional and translational levels. Neither ubiquitination nor proteasomal degradation have detectable attributions to IkappaBalpha breakdown. We also demonstrate that UV only induced phosphorylation of p65(S276), while tumor necrosis factor-alpha induced phosphorylation at both Ser276 and 536 sites of p65. Based upon our results, we propose a novel mechanism for translation-regulated IkappaBalpha depletion and MSK-mediated NF-kappaB activation at 24 h post-UV-irradiation.

  7. Telomere Dysfunction Triggers Palindrome Formation Independently of Double-Strand Break Repair Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Raykov, Vasil; Marvin, Marcus E.; Louis, Edward J.; Maringele, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Inverted chromosome duplications or palindromes are linked with genetic disorders and malignant transformation. They are considered by-products of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair: the homologous recombination (HR) and the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Palindromes near chromosome ends are often triggered by telomere losses. An important question is to what extent their formation depends upon DSB repair mechanisms. Here we addressed this question using yeast genetics and comparative genomic hybridization. We induced palindrome formation by passaging cells lacking any form of telomere maintenance (telomerase and telomere recombination). Surprisingly, we found that DNA ligase 4, essential for NHEJ, did not make a significant contribution to palindrome formation induced by telomere losses. Moreover RAD51, important for certain HR-derived mechanisms, had little effect. Furthermore RAD52, which is essential for HR in yeast, appeared to decrease the number of palindromes in cells proliferating without telomeres. This study also uncovered an important role for Rev3 and Rev7 (but not for Pol32) subunits of polymerase ζ in the survival of cells undergoing telomere losses and forming palindromes. We propose a model called short-inverted repeat-induced synthesis in which DNA synthesis, rather than DSB repair, drives the inverted duplication triggered by telomere dysfunction. PMID:27334270

  8. Mechanisms Involved in the Pro-Apoptotic Effect of Melatonin in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Carmen; Martín, Vanesa; Herrera, Federico; García-Santos, Guillermo; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Casado-Zapico, Sara; Sánchez-Sánchez, Ana María; Suárez, Santos; Puente-Moncada, Noelia; Anítua, María José; Antolín, Isaac

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that melatonin exerts antitumoral effects in many cancer types, mostly decreasing cell proliferation at low concentrations. On the other hand, induction of apoptosis by melatonin has been described in the last few years in some particular cancer types. The cytotoxic effect occurs after its administration at high concentrations, and the molecular pathways involved have been only partially determined. Moreover, a synergistic effect has been found in several cancer types when it is administered in combination with chemotherapeutic agents. In the present review, we will summarize published work on the pro-apoptotic effect of melatonin in cancer cells and the reported mechanisms involved in such action. We will also construct a hypothesis on how different cell signaling pathways may relate each other on account for such effect. PMID:23528889

  9. Cellular Metabolism and Dose Reveal Carnitine-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms of Butyrate Oxidation in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Anna; Bennett, Natalie; MacDonald, Amber; Johnstone, Megan; Whelan, Jay; Donohoe, Dallas R

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fiber has been suggested to suppress colorectal cancer development, although the mechanisms contributing to this beneficial effect remain elusive. Butyrate, a fermentation product of fiber, has been shown to have anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on colorectal cancer cells. The metabolic fate of butyrate in the cell is important in determining whether, it acts as an HDAC inhibitor or is consumed as a short-chain fatty acid. Non-cancerous colonocytes utilize butyrate as the primary energy source whereas cancerous colonocytes increase glucose utilization through the Warburg effect. In this study, we show that butyrate oxidation is decreased in cancerous colonocytes compared to non-cancerous colonocytes. We demonstrate that colorectal cancer cells utilize both a carnitine-dependent and carnitine-independent mechanism that contributes to butyrate oxidation. The carnitine-dependent mechanism is contingent on butyrate concentration. Knockdown of CPT1A in colorectal cancer cells abolishes butyrate oxidation. In terms of selectivity, the carnitine-dependent mechanism only regulated butyrate oxidation, as acetate and propionate oxidation were carnitine-independent. Carnitine decreased the action of butyrate as an HDAC inhibitor and suppressed induction of H3 acetylation by butyrate in colorectal cancer cells. Thus, diminished oxidation of butyrate is associated with decreased HDAC inhibition and histone acetylation. In relation to the mechanism, we find that dichloroacetate, which decreases phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase, increased butyrate oxidation and that this effect was carnitine-dependent. In conclusion, these data suggest that colorectal cancer cells decrease butyrate oxidation through inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase, which is carnitine-dependent, and provide insight into why butyrate shows selective effects toward colorectal cancer cells. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1804-1813, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Pathogenic mechanisms involved in the hematological alterations of arenavirus-induced hemorrhagic fevers.

    PubMed

    Schattner, Mirta; Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Pozner, Roberto G; Gómez, Ricardo M

    2013-01-21

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses are acute diseases characterized by fever, headache, general malaise, impaired cellular immunity, eventual neurologic involvement, and hemostatic alterations that may ultimately lead to shock and death. The causes of the bleeding are still poorly understood. However, it is generally accepted that these causes are associated to some degree with impaired hemostasis, endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts or function. In this article, we present the current knowledge about the hematological alterations present in VHF induced by arenaviruses, including new aspects on the underlying pathogenic mechanisms.

  11. Pathogenic Mechanisms Involved in the Hematological Alterations of Arenavirus-induced Hemorrhagic Fevers

    PubMed Central

    Schattner, Mirta; Rivadeneyra, Leonardo; Pozner, Roberto G.; Gómez, Ricardo M.

    2013-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs) caused by arenaviruses are acute diseases characterized by fever, headache, general malaise, impaired cellular immunity, eventual neurologic involvement, and hemostatic alterations that may ultimately lead to shock and death. The causes of the bleeding are still poorly understood. However, it is generally accepted that these causes are associated to some degree with impaired hemostasis, endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts or function. In this article, we present the current knowledge about the hematological alterations present in VHF induced by arenaviruses, including new aspects on the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:23337384

  12. Mechanisms regulating proteostasis are involved in sympatric speciation of the blind mole rat, Spalax galili.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Li, Kexin; Nevo, Eviatar; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils. Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents. Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants.

  13. Mechanisms regulating proteostasis are involved in sympatric speciation of the blind mole rat, Spalax galili

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Li, Kexin; Nevo, Eviatar; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils. Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents. Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants. PMID:27050459

  14. uPA dependent and independent mechanisms of wound healing by C-phycocyanin.

    PubMed

    Madhyastha, H K; Radha, K S; Nakajima, Y; Omura, S; Maruyama, M

    2008-12-01

    Wound repair requires both recruitment and well co-ordinated actions of many cell types including inflammatory cells, endothelial cells, epithelial cells and importantly fibroblast cells. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) system plays a vital role in wound healing phenomenon. We have previously demonstrated that C-phycocyanin (C-pc), a biliprotein from blue-green algae, transcriptionally regulates uPA through cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. To date, a role for C-pc in wound-healing scenario is not elucidated. This study was designed to examine the wound-healing property of C-pc in relation to fibroblast proliferation and migration. C-pc increased fibroblast proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. It also enhanced G1 phase of cell cycle and increased the expressions of cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2, which facilitate cell cycle progression, in a uPA-independent manner. In vitro wound healing and migration assays revealed the pro-migratory properties of C-pc. Short-interference RNA studies demonstrated that uPA was necessary for C-pc-induced fibroblast migration. C-pc also significantly elevated the expressions of chemokines (MDC, RANTES, Eotaxin, GRO alpha, ENA78 and TARC) and Rho-GTPases (Cdc 42 and Rac 1) in a uPA-dependent manner. Pre-treatment of C-pc-stimulated cells with pharmacological inhibitor of PI-3K (LY294002) annulled the expression of GTPases implying that Rac 1 and Cdc 42 were induced through PI-3K pathway. C-pc-induced cellular migration towards wounded area was also negatively affected by PI-3K inhibition. In vivo wound-healing experiments in mice validated our finding that C-pc accelerates wound healing. Our data provides conclusive evidence of a novel therapeutic usage for C-pc as a wound-healing agent. C-pc is a food and drug administration (FDA)-approved health supplement. We believe this compound can also be beneficial in healing of internal wounds, such as ulcers.

  15. Thrombospondin1 in tissue repair and fibrosis: TGF-β-dependent and independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sweetwyne, Mariya T.; Murphy-Ullrich, Joanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Thrombospondin 1(TSP1) plays major roles in both physiologic and pathologic tissue repair. TSP1 through its type 1 repeats is a known regulator of latent TGF-β activation and plays a role in wound healing and fibrosis. Binding of the TSP N-terminal domain to cell surface calreticulin in complex with LDL-receptor related protein 1 stimulates intermediate cell adhesion, cell migration, anoikis resistance and collagen expression and matrix deposition in an in vivo model of the foreign body response. There is also emerging evidence that TSP EGF-like repeats alters endothelial cell-cell interactions and stimulate epithelial migration through transactivation of EGF receptors. The mechanisms underlying these functions of TSP1 and the implications for physiologic and pathologic wound repair and fibrosis will be discussed. PMID:22266026

  16. Diacylglycerol analogs inhibit the rod cGMP-gated channel by a phosphorylation-independent mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, S. E.; Downing-Park, J.; Tam, B.; Zimmerman, A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The electrical response to light in retinal rods is mediated by cyclic nucleotide-gated, nonselective cation channels in the outer segment plasma membrane. Although cGMP appears to be the primary light-regulated second messenger, cellular levels of other substances, including Ca2+ and phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, are also sensitive to the level of illumination. We now show that diacylglycerol (DAG) analogs reversibly suppress the cGMP-activated conductance in excised patches from frog rod outer segments. This suppression did not require nucleoside triphosphates, indicating that a phosphorylation reaction was not involved. DAG was more effective at low than at high [cGMP]: with 50 microM 8-Br-cGMP, the DAG analog 1,2-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (1,2-DiC8) reduced the current with an IC50 of approximately 22 microM (Hill coefficient, 0.8), whereas with 1.2 microM 8-Br-cGMP, only approximately 1 microM 1,2-DiC8 was required to halve the current. DAG reduced the apparent affinity of the channels for cGMP: 4 microM 1,2-DiC8 produced a threefold increase in the K1/2 for channel activation by 8-Br-cGMP, as well as a threefold reduction in the maximum current, without changing the apparent stoichiometry or cooperativity of cGMP binding. Inhibition by 1,2-DiC8 was not relieved by supersaturating concentrations of 8-Br-cGMP, suggesting that DAG did not act by competitive inhibition of cGMP binding. Furthermore, DAG did not seem to significantly reduce single-channel conductance. A DAG analog similar to 1,2-DiC8--1,3-dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol (1,3-DiC8)--suppressed the current with the same potency as 1,2-DiC8, whereas an ethylene glycol of identical chain length (DiC8-EG) was much less effective. Our results suggest that DAG allosterically interferes with channel opening, and raise the question of whether DAG is involved in visual transduction. PMID:8527654

  17. GABAergic signaling by AgRP neurons prevents anorexia via a melanocortin-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qi; Palmiter, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus contains two anatomically and functionally distinct populations of neurons – the agouti-related peptide (AgRP)- and pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons that integrate various nutritional, hormonal, and neuronal signals to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, and thereby help achieve energy homeostasis. AgRP neurons, also co-release neuropeptide Y and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to promote feeding and inhibit metabolism through at least three possible mechanisms: (1) suppression of the melanocortin signaling system through competitive binding of AgRP with the melanocortin 4 receptors; (2) neuropeptide Y-mediated inhibition of post-synaptic neurons that reside in hypothalamic nuclei; (3) GABAergic inhibition of POMC neurons in their post-synaptic targets including the parabrachial nucleus (parabrachial nucleus), a brainstem structure that relays gustatory and visceral sensory information. Acute ablation of AgRP neurons in adult mice by the action of diphtheria toxin (DT) results in precipitous reduction of food intake, and eventually leads to starvation within 6 days of DT treatment. Chronic delivery of bretazenil, a GABAA receptor partial agonist, into the parabrachial nucleus is sufficient to restore feeding and body weight when AgRP neurons are ablated, whereas chronic blockade of melanocortin 4 receptor signaling is inadequate. This review summarizes the physiological roles of a neural circuitry regulated by AgRP neurons in control of feeding behavior with particular emphasis of the GABA output to the parabrachial nucleus. We also describe a compensatory mechanism that is gradually engaged after ablation of AgRP neurons that allows mice to continue eating without them. PMID:21211531

  18. A review on the molecular mechanisms involved in insulin resistance induced by organophosphorus pesticides.

    PubMed

    Lasram, Mohamed Montassar; Dhouib, Ines Bini; Annabi, Alya; El Fazaa, Saloua; Gharbi, Najoua

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing evidence reporting that organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) impair glucose homeostasis and cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is a complex metabolic disorder that defies explanation by a single etiological pathway. Formation of advanced glycation end products, accumulation of lipid metabolites, activation of inflammatory pathways and oxidative stress have all been implicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. Ultimately, these molecular processes activate a series of stress pathways involving a family of serine kinases, which in turn have a negative effect on insulin signaling. Experimental and clinical data suggest an association between these molecular mechanisms and OPs compounds. It was first reported that OPs induce hyperglycemia. Then a concomitant increase of blood glucose and insulin was pointed out. For some years only, we have begun to understand that OPs promote insulin resistance and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Overall, this review outlines various mechanisms that lead to the development of insulin resistance by OPs exposure.

  19. Reaction mechanisms involved in reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons using sulfated iron

    SciTech Connect

    Hassan, S.M.; Cipollone, M.G.; Wolfe, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    Experiments were carried out to investigate the mechanisms and pathways involved in the reduction of halogenated hydrocarbons represented by trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with sulfated iron aqueous media. Results suggested that iron sulfide acted as the dehalogenation center. Zero-valent iron acted as a generator for molecular hydrogen through its reaction with water. Results of experiments in which iron sulfide was replaced by other transition metal sulfides and experiments in which zero-valent iron was replaced by other sources of molecular hydrogen will be reported. The main reduction product of chloroethylene derivatives was ethyne which under the catalytic reaction of zero-valent iron was reduced further to ethene and finally to ethane. Intermediate products were identified using GC-MS. Mechanisms and pathways will be presented.

  20. Cholinergic deficiency involved in vascular dementia: possible mechanism and strategy of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Hai-yan; Tang, Xi-can

    2009-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence. Several studies have recently reported that VaD patients present cholinergic deficits in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that may be closely related to the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment. Moreover, cholinergic therapies have shown promising effects on cognitive improvement in VaD patients. The precise mechanisms of these cholinergic agents are currently not fully understood; however, accumulating evidence indicates that these drugs may act through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, in which the efferent vagus nerve signals suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine release and inhibit inflammation, although regulation of oxidative stress and energy metabolism, alleviation of apoptosis may also be involved. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of the cholinergic treatment strategy for VaD and its relevant mechanisms of anti-inflammation. PMID:19574993

  1. The Ssn6-Tup1 repressor complex of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is involved in the osmotic induction of HOG-dependent and -independent genes.

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, J A; Pascual-Ahuir, A; Proft, M; Serrano, R

    1998-01-01

    The response of yeast to osmotic stress has been proposed to rely on the HOG-MAP kinase signalling pathway and on transcriptional activation mediated by STRE promoter elements. However, the osmotic induction of HAL1, an important determinant of salt tolerance, is HOG independent and occurs through the release of transcriptional repression. We have identified an upstream repressing sequence in HAL1 promoter (URSHAL1) located between -231 and -156. This promoter region was able to repress transcription from a heterologous promoter and to bind proteins in non-stressed cells, but not in salt-treated cells. The repression conferred by URSHAL1 is mediated through the Ssn6-Tup1 protein complex and is abolished in the presence of osmotic stress. The Ssn6-Tup1 co-repressor is also involved in the regulation of HOG-dependent genes such as GPD1, CTT1, ALD2, ENA1 and SIP18, and its deletion can suppress the osmotic sensitivity of hog1 mutants. We propose that the Ssn6-Tup1 repressor complex might be a general component in the regulation of osmostress responses at the transcriptional level of both HOG-dependent and -independent genes. PMID:9564037

  2. Neural mechanisms of emotion regulation: Evidence for two independent prefrontal-subcortical pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wager, Tor D.; Davidson, Matthew L.; Hughes, Brent L.; Lindquist, Martin A.; Ochsner, Kevin N.

    2008-01-01

    Although prefrontal cortex has been implicated in the cognitive regulation of emotion, the cortical-subcortical interactions that mediate this ability remain poorly understood. To address this issue, we identified a right ventrolateral prefrontal region (vlPFC) whose activity correlated with reduced negative emotional experience during cognitive reappraisal of aversive images. We then applied a novel pathway-mapping analysis on subcortical regions to locate mediators of the association between vlPFC activity and reappraisal success (i.e. reductions in reported emotion). Results identified two separable pathways that together explained ~50% of the reported variance in self-reported emotion: 1) a path through nucleus accumbens that predicted greater reappraisal success, and 2) a path through ventral amygdala that predicted reduced reappraisal success (i.e., more negative emotion). These results provide direct evidence that vlPFC is involved in both the generation and regulation of emotion through different subcortical pathways, suggesting a general role for this region in appraisal processes. PMID:18817740

  3. Luminal and basolateral mechanisms involved in the renal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Zalups, R.K.; Minor, K.H.

    1995-09-01

    The present study provides evidence for the existence of both a luminal and a basolateral mechanism involved in the renal tubular uptake of inorganic mercury. The researchers compared the disposition of inorganic mercury in groups of surgical control rats, rats that underwent a unilateral ureteral ligation, and rats that underwent a bilateral ureteral ligation that were pretreated with either normal saline or a 7.5 mmol/kg intravenous dose of PAH 5 min prior to receiving a nontoxic 0.5-{mu}mol/kg intravenous dose of mercuric chloride. The {open_quotes}stop-flow{close_quotes} conditions induced by either unilateral or bilateral ureteral ligation caused a significant reduction in the uptake and content of mercury in the kidneys (whose ureter was ligated) both at 1 h and 24 h after the intravenous injection of the nontoxic dose of mercuric chloride. This decreased renal uptake of mercury was due specifically to decreased uptake of mercury in the renal cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla. The amount of mercury has not taken up during ureteral ligation represents the portion of mercury that is presumably taken up by a luminal mechanism. Pretreatment with PAH also caused a significant reduction in the renal uptake of mercury in the cortex and outer stripe of the outer medulla. When either unilateral or bilateral ureteral ligation was combined with PAH pretreatment, an additive inhibitory effect occurred with respect to the renal uptake of mercury. In fact, the renal uptake of mercury was reduced by approximately 85% at 1 h after the injection of mercuric chloride. Since the luminal uptake of mercury was blocked by ureteral ligation, the effect of PAH on the renal uptake of mercury must have occurred at the basolateral membrane. Two distinct mechanisms are involved in mercury uptake, with one mechanism located on the luminal membrane and another located on the basolateral membrane. 22 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. A Hierarchical Model Predictive Tracking Control for Independent Four-Wheel Driving/Steering Vehicles with Coaxial Steering Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Masato; Hagimori, Yuki; Nonaka, Kenichiro; Sekiguchi, Kazuma

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we apply a hierarchical model predictive control to omni-directional mobile vehicle, and improve the tracking performance. We deal with an independent four-wheel driving/steering vehicle (IFWDS) equipped with four coaxial steering mechanisms (CSM). The coaxial steering mechanism is a special one composed of two steering joints on the same axis. In our previous study with respect to IFWDS with ideal steering, we proposed a model predictive tracking control. However, this method did not consider constraints of the coaxial steering mechanism which causes delay of steering. We also proposed a model predictive steering control considering constraints of this mechanism. In this study, we propose a hierarchical system combining above two control methods for IFWDS. An upper controller, which deals with vehicle kinematics, runs a model predictive tracking control, and a lower controller, which considers constraints of coaxial steering mechanism, runs a model predictive steering control which tracks the predicted steering angle optimized an upper controller. We verify the superiority of this method by comparing this method with the previous method.

  5. Resistance to spiramycin in Streptomyces ambofaciens, the producer organism, involves at least two different mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pernodet, J L; Alegre, M T; Blondelet-Rouault, M H; Guérineau, M

    1993-05-01

    During its stationary phase, Streptomyces ambofaciens produces the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin, and has to protect itself against this antibiotic. Young mycelia, not yet producing spiramycin, are sensitive to it, but they become fully resistant when production begins. In a sensitive mycelium, resistance could be induced by exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of spiramycin, and these induced mycelia, like producing mycelia were resistant not only to spiramycin but also to several other macrolide antibiotics. Ribosomes extracted from these resistant mycelia were shown in vitro to be more resistant to spiramycin than ribosomes extracted from sensitive mycelium, indicating that S. ambofaciens possesses a spiramycin-inducible ribosomal resistance to spiramycin and to macrolide antibiotics. Studies with spiramycin non-producing mutants showed that, in these mutants, resistance to spiramycin also varies during cultivation, in that an old culture was much more resistant than a young one. But with these non-producing mutants, the spectrum of resistance was narrower, and in vitro data showed that resistance was not due to ribosomal modification. These results suggest that S. ambofaciens presents at least two distinct mechanisms for spiramycin resistance; a spiramycin-inducible ribosomal resistance, and a second resistance mechanism which might be temporally regulated and which could involve decreased permeability to, or export of, the antibiotic. The two mechanisms are probably at work simultaneously in the producing mycelium, the spiramycin-inducible resistance being induced by endogenous spiramycin. In non-producing mutants, in the absence of self-induction by spiramycin, only the second mechanism is observed.

  6. The mechanism of sperm-egg interaction and the involvement of IZUMO1 in fusion.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Naokazu; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru

    2011-01-01

    An average human ejaculate contains over 100 million sperm, but only a few succeed in accomplishing the journey to an egg by migration through the female reproductive tract. Among these few sperm, only one participates in fertilization. There might be an ingenious molecular mechanism to ensure that the very best sperm fertilize an egg. However, recent gene disruption experiments in mice have revealed that many factors previously described as important for fertilization are largely dispensable. One could argue that the fertilization mechanism is made robust against gene disruptions. However, this is not likely, as there are already six different gene-disrupted mouse lines (Calmegin, Adam1a, Adam2, Adam3, Ace and Pgap1), all of which result in male sterility. The sperm from these animals are known to have defective zona-binding ability and at the same time lose oviduct-migrating ability. Concerning sperm-zona binding, the widely accepted involvement of sugar moiety on zona pellucida 3 (ZP3) is indicated to be dispensable by gene disruption experiments. Thus, the landscape of the mechanism of fertilization is revolving considerably. In the sperm-egg fusion process, CD9 on egg and IZUMO1 on sperm have emerged as essential factors. This review focuses on the mechanism of fertilization elucidated by gene-manipulated animals.

  7. Trypanosoma brucei TIF2 and TRF Suppress VSG Switching Using Overlapping and Independent Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jehi, Sanaa E; Nanavaty, Vishal; Li, Bibo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei causes debilitating human African trypanosomiasis and evades the host's immune response by regularly switching its major surface antigen, VSG, which is expressed exclusively from subtelomeric loci. We previously showed that two interacting telomere proteins, TbTRF and TbTIF2, are essential for cell proliferation and suppress VSG switching by inhibiting DNA recombination events involving the whole active VSG expression site. We now find that TbTIF2 stabilizes TbTRF protein levels by inhibiting their degradation by the 26S proteasome, indicating that decreased TbTRF protein levels in TbTIF2-depleted cells contribute to more frequent VSG switching and eventual cell growth arrest. Surprisingly, although TbTIF2 depletion leads to more subtelomeric DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that are both potent VSG switching inducers and detrimental to cell viability, TbTRF depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs inside subtelomeric VSG expression sites. Furthermore, expressing an ectopic allele of F2H-TbTRF in TbTIF2 RNAi cells allowed cells to maintain normal TbTRF protein levels for a longer frame of time. This resulted in a mildly better cell growth and partially suppressed the phenotype of increased VSG switching frequency but did not suppress the phenotype of more subtelomeric DSBs in TbTIF2-depleted cells. Therefore, TbTIF2 depletion has two parallel effects: decreased TbTRF protein levels and increased subtelomeric DSBs, both resulting in an acute increased VSG switching frequency and eventual cell growth arrest.

  8. Trypanosoma brucei TIF2 and TRF Suppress VSG Switching Using Overlapping and Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Jehi, Sanaa E.; Nanavaty, Vishal; Li, Bibo

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei causes debilitating human African trypanosomiasis and evades the host’s immune response by regularly switching its major surface antigen, VSG, which is expressed exclusively from subtelomeric loci. We previously showed that two interacting telomere proteins, TbTRF and TbTIF2, are essential for cell proliferation and suppress VSG switching by inhibiting DNA recombination events involving the whole active VSG expression site. We now find that TbTIF2 stabilizes TbTRF protein levels by inhibiting their degradation by the 26S proteasome, indicating that decreased TbTRF protein levels in TbTIF2-depleted cells contribute to more frequent VSG switching and eventual cell growth arrest. Surprisingly, although TbTIF2 depletion leads to more subtelomeric DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) that are both potent VSG switching inducers and detrimental to cell viability, TbTRF depletion does not increase the amount of DSBs inside subtelomeric VSG expression sites. Furthermore, expressing an ectopic allele of F2H-TbTRF in TbTIF2 RNAi cells allowed cells to maintain normal TbTRF protein levels for a longer frame of time. This resulted in a mildly better cell growth and partially suppressed the phenotype of increased VSG switching frequency but did not suppress the phenotype of more subtelomeric DSBs in TbTIF2-depleted cells. Therefore, TbTIF2 depletion has two parallel effects: decreased TbTRF protein levels and increased subtelomeric DSBs, both resulting in an acute increased VSG switching frequency and eventual cell growth arrest. PMID:27258069

  9. Lipid-II Independent Antimicrobial Mechanism of Nisin Depends On Its Crowding And Degree Of Oligomerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, Ashutosh; Sandhu, Padmani; Kumar, Pankaj; Dash, Eva; Sharma, Shingarika; Arakha, Manoranjan; Jha, Suman; Akhter, Yusuf; Saleem, Mohammed

    2016-11-01

    Nisin inhibits bacterial growth by generating pores in cell membrane and interrupting cell-wall biosynthesis through specific lipid II interaction. However, the role of the hinge region and C-terminus residues of the peptide in antibacterial action of nisin is largely unknown. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and experimental approach, we report that at high concentration regimes of nisin, interaction with phospholipids may equally deform the bacterial cell membranes even under significantly varying amounts of lipid-II. Membrane thinning, destabilization and decrease in lipid density depend on the degree of oligomerization of nisin. Growth kinetics of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli interestingly show recovery by extended lag phase under low concentrations of nisin treatment while high concentrations of nisin caused decrease in cell viability as recorded by striking reduction in membrane potential and surface area. The significant changes in the dipole potential and fluorescence anisotropy were observed in negatively charged membranes in the absence of lipid-II with increasing concentration of nisin. The identical correlation of cell viability, membrane potential dissipation and morphology with the concentration regime of nisin, in both Bacillus subtilis (lipid II rich) and Escherichia coli (lipid II impoverished), hints at a non-specific physical mechanism where degree of membrane deformation depends on degree of crowding and oligomerization of nisin.

  10. Lipid-II Independent Antimicrobial Mechanism of Nisin Depends On Its Crowding And Degree Of Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Prince, Ashutosh; Sandhu, Padmani; Kumar, Pankaj; Dash, Eva; Sharma, Shingarika; Arakha, Manoranjan; Jha, Suman; Akhter, Yusuf; Saleem, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Nisin inhibits bacterial growth by generating pores in cell membrane and interrupting cell-wall biosynthesis through specific lipid II interaction. However, the role of the hinge region and C-terminus residues of the peptide in antibacterial action of nisin is largely unknown. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and experimental approach, we report that at high concentration regimes of nisin, interaction with phospholipids may equally deform the bacterial cell membranes even under significantly varying amounts of lipid-II. Membrane thinning, destabilization and decrease in lipid density depend on the degree of oligomerization of nisin. Growth kinetics of Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli interestingly show recovery by extended lag phase under low concentrations of nisin treatment while high concentrations of nisin caused decrease in cell viability as recorded by striking reduction in membrane potential and surface area. The significant changes in the dipole potential and fluorescence anisotropy were observed in negatively charged membranes in the absence of lipid-II with increasing concentration of nisin. The identical correlation of cell viability, membrane potential dissipation and morphology with the concentration regime of nisin, in both Bacillus subtilis (lipid II rich) and Escherichia coli (lipid II impoverished), hints at a non-specific physical mechanism where degree of membrane deformation depends on degree of crowding and oligomerization of nisin. PMID:27897200

  11. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ regulates RhoA activation via a kinase-independent scaffolding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ard, Ryan; Mulatz, Kirk; Abramovici, Hanan; Maillet, Jean-Christian; Fottinger, Alexandra; Foley, Tanya; Byham, Michèle-Renée; Iqbal, Tasfia Ahmed; Yoneda, Atsuko; Couchman, John R; Parks, Robin J; Gee, Stephen H

    2012-10-01

    Rho GTPases share a common inhibitor, Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDI), which regulates their expression levels, membrane localization, and activation state. The selective dissociation of individual Rho GTPases from RhoGDI ensures appropriate responses to cellular signals, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Diacylglycerol kinase ζ (DGKζ), which phosphorylates diacylglycerol to yield phosphatidic acid, selectively dissociates Rac1 by stimulating PAK1-mediated phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-101/174. Similarly, phosphorylation of RhoGDI on Ser-34 by protein kinase Cα (PKCα) selectively releases RhoA. Here we show DGKζ is required for RhoA activation and Ser-34 phosphorylation, which were decreased in DGKζ-deficient fibroblasts and rescued by wild-type DGKζ or a catalytically inactive mutant. DGKζ bound directly to the C-terminus of RhoA and the regulatory arm of RhoGDI and was required for efficient interaction of PKCα and RhoA. DGKζ-null fibroblasts had condensed F-actin bundles and altered focal adhesion distribution, indicative of aberrant RhoA signaling. Two targets of the RhoA effector ROCK showed reduced phosphorylation in DGKζ-null cells. Collectively our findings suggest DGKζ functions as a scaffold to assemble a signaling complex that functions as a RhoA-selective, GDI dissociation factor. As a regulator of Rac1 and RhoA activity, DGKζ is a critical factor linking changes in lipid signaling to actin reorganization.

  12. An Independent Review and Accountability Mechanism for the Sustainable Development Goals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Framework Convention on Global Health (FCGH), a proposed global treaty to be rooted in the right to health and aimed at health equity, could establish a nuanced, layered, and multi-faceted regime of compliance with, and accountability to, the right to health. In so doing, it would significantly strengthen accountability for the health-related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which it would encompass. Legally binding, the FCGH could facilitate accountability through the courts and catalyze comprehensive domestic accountability regimes, requiring national strategies that include transparency, community and national mechanisms for accountability and participation and an enabling environment for social empowerment. A “Right to Health Capacity Fund” could ensure resources to implement these strategies. Inclusive national processes could establish targets, benchmarks, and indicators consistent with FCGH guidance, with regular reporting to a treaty body, which could also hear individual cases. State reports could be required to include plans to overcome implementation gaps, subjecting poorly complying states to penalties and targeted capacity building measures. Regional special rapporteurs could facilitate compliance through regular country visits, while also responding to serious violations. And reaching beyond government compliance, from capacity building to the courts and contractual obligations, the FCGH could establish nationally enforceable right to health obligations on the private sector. PMID:27781005

  13. Arsenic increased lipid peroxidation in rat tissues by a mechanism independent of glutathione levels.

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, O; Carrizales, L; Yáñez, L; Mejía, J; Batres, L; Ortíz, D; Díaz-Barriga, F

    1995-01-01

    The role of lipid peroxidation in the mechanism of arsenic toxicity was investigated in female rats pretreated with N-acetylcysteine (NAC, a glutathione [GSH] inducer) or with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO, a GSH depletor). Rats were challenged with sodium arsenite, and sacrificed 1 hr after this treatment. Results showed that arsenic decreased GSH levels and increased lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney, and heart, with a larger effect at 18.2 mg/kg than at 14.8 mg/kg for lipid peroxidation induction. In the liver of rats treated with arsenic, pretreatment with NAC increased the levels of GSH and decreased lipid peroxidation. In kidney and heart, NAC pretreatment protected the tissues against arsenic-induced depletion of GSH levels, but the same degree of protection was not found for lipid peroxidation induction. In its turn, BSO had an additive effect with arsenic in lowering the levels of GSH in the liver and kidney, but an inverse correlation between GSH levels and lipid peroxidation was found only in liver. Arsenic content in tissues of rats pretreated with NAC was lower than in rats treated only with arsenic. In rats with depleted levels of GSH (BSO-pretreated rats), a shift in arsenic tissue distribution was found, with higher levels in skin and lower levels in kidney. A clear tendency for a positive correlation between arsenic concentration and lipid peroxidation levels was found in liver, kidney, and heart. PMID:7621808

  14. Telomerase contributes to tumorigenesis by a telomere length-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Sheila A.; Hahn, William C.; O'Connor, Benjamin F.; Banner, Elisa N.; Lundberg, Ante S.; Modha, Poonam; Mizuno, Hana; Brooks, Mary W.; Fleming, Mark; Zimonjic, Drazen B.; Popescu, Nicholas C.; Weinberg, Robert A.

    2002-01-01

    Once immortalized, human cells are susceptible to transformation by introduction of an oncogene such as ras. Several lines of evidence now suggest that the maintenance of telomere length is a major determinant of replicative lifespan in human cells and thus of the immortalized state. The majority of human tumor cells acquire immortality through expression of the catalytic subunit of telomerase (hTERT), whereas others activate an alternative mechanism of telomere maintenance (ALT) that does not depend on the actions of telomerase. We have examined whether ALT could substitute for telomerase in the processes of transformation in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo. Expression of oncogenic H-Ras in the immortal ALT cell line GM847 did not result in their transformation. However, subsequent ectopic expression of hTERT in these cells imparted a tumorigenic phenotype. Indeed, this outcome was also observed after introduction of a mutant hTERT that retained catalytic activity but was incapable of maintaining telomere length. These studies indicate that hTERT confers an additional function that is required for tumorigenesis but does not depend on its ability to maintain telomeres. PMID:12193655

  15. Involvement of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 in goniothalamin-induced TP53-dependent and -independent apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma-derived cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Kung-Kai; Chen, Yi-Ling; Chen, Lih-Ren; Li, Chien-Feng; Lan, Yu-Hsuan; Chang, Fang-Rong; Wu, Yang-Chang; Shiue, Yow-Ling

    2011-10-01

    The objective was to investigate the upstream apoptotic mechanisms that were triggered by a styrylpyrone derivative, goniothalamin (GTN), in tumor protein p53 (TP53)-positive and -negative hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)-derived cells. Effects of GTN were evaluated by the flow cytometry, alkaline comet assay, immunocytochemistry, small-hairpin RNA interference, mitochondria/cytosol fractionation, quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting analysis and caspase 3 activity assays in two HCC-derived cell lines. Results indicated that GTN triggered phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (PMAIP1, also known as NOXA)-mediated apoptosis via TP53-dependent and -independent pathways. In TP53-positive SK-Hep1 cells, GTN furthermore induced TP53 transcription-dependent and -independent apoptosis. After GTN treatment, accumulation of reactive oxygen species, formation of DNA double-strand breaks, transactivation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 gene, translocation of TP53 and/or PMAIP1 proteins to mitochondria, release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, cleavage of caspases and induction of apoptosis in both cell lines were sustained. GTN might represent a novel class of anticancer drug that induces apoptosis in HCC-derived cells through PMAIP1 transactivation regardless of the status of TP53 gene. - Highlights: > Goniothalamin (GTN) induced apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinomas-derived cells. > The apoptosis induced by GTN is PMAIP1-dependent, regardless of TP53 status. > The apoptosis induced by GTN might be TP53 transcription-dependent or -independent. > GTN-induced apoptosis is mitochondria- and caspases-mediated.

  16. Microglial cell migration stimulated by ATP and C5a involve distinct molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Aaron M.; Stella, Nephi

    2009-01-01

    Microglial cells, the macrophages of the brain, play an essential role in the propagation of neuroinflammation. Increased microglial cell migration in response to specific chemoattractants has been documented, but less is known about the differences between these stimuli and the signal transduction pathways that mediate their effects. Current methods to measure cell migration are often labor-intensive and rely on the manual counting of cell number, so more efficient and objective methods are needed. Here we present an improved and higher-throughput Boyden Chamber technique that measures microglial cell migration by using DRAQ5, a nuclear dye that emits in the near-infrared. Out of a panel of chemoattractants tested, we found that ATP and C5a potently stimulate the migration of mouse primary microglial cells. The stimulatory effects of ATP and C5a displayed significant additivity, suggesting that each chemoattractant stimulated migration through independent molecular mechanisms. Accordingly, we found key differences in these responses: ATP stimulated a combination of both chemokinesis and chemotaxis, and this response was mediated by the ROCK signaling pathway; whereas C5a stimulated only chemotaxis and this response was mediated by the Rac1 signaling pathway. Finally, we found that functional PI3-kinase is only required for random basal microglial cell migration. Thus, our results show that distinct non-overlapping signal transduction pathways control different modes of microglial cell migration and suggest that the targeting of these distinct molecular mechanisms should modulate different aspects of neuroinflammation propagation. PMID:19053059

  17. The Possible Mechanisms Involved in Degradation of Patulin by Pichia caribbica

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiangfeng; Yang, Qiya; Zhang, Hongyin; Cao, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Apaliya, Maurice Tibiru

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we examined the mechanisms involved in the degradation of patulin by Pichia caribbica. Our results indicate that cell-free filtrate of P. caribbica reduced patutlin content. The heat-killed cells could not degrade patulin. However, the live cells significantly reduced the concentration of the patulin. In furtherance to this, it was observed that patulin was not detected in the broken yeast cells and cell wall. The addition of cycloheximide to the P. caribbica cells decreased the capacity of degradation of patulin. Proteomics analyses revealed that patulin treatment resulted in an upregulated protein which was involved in metabolism and stress response processes. Our results suggested that the mechanism of degradation of patulin by P. caribbica was not absorption; the presence of patulin can induce P. caribbica to produce associated intracellular and extracellular enzymes, both of which have the ability to degrade patulin. The result provides a new possible method that used the enzymes produced by yeast to detoxify patulin in food and feed. PMID:27735830

  18. Mechanism involved in phagocytosis and killing of Listeria monocytogenes by Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    PubMed

    Akya, Alisha; Pointon, Andrew; Thomas, Connor

    2009-10-01

    Intra-cellular pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, is capable of invasion and survival within mammalian cells. However, Acanthamoeba polyphaga trophozoites phagocytose and rapidly degrade Listeria cells. In order to provide more information on amoeba phagocytosis and killing mechanisms, this study used several inhibitor agents known to affect the phagocytosis and killing of bacteria by eukaryotes. Amoebae were pre-treated with mannose, cytochalasin D, wortmannin, suramin, ammonium chloride, bafilomycin A and monensin followed by co-culture with bacteria. Phagocytosis and killing of bacterial cells by amoeba trophozoites was assessed using plate counting methods and microscopy. The data presented indicates that actin polymerisation and cytoskeletal rearrangement are involved in phagocytosis of L. monocytogenes cells by A. polyphaga trophozoites. Further, both phagosomal acidification and phagosome-lysosome fusion are involved in killing and degradation of L. monocytogenes cells by A. polyphaga. However, the mannose-binding protein receptor does not play an important role in uptake of bacteria by amoeba trophozoites. In conclusion, this data reveals the similar principles of molecular mechanisms used by different types of eukaryotes in uptake and killing of bacteria.

  19. Antinociceptive Activity of Methanol Extract of Muntingia calabura Leaves and the Mechanisms of Action Involved

    PubMed Central

    Sani, M. H. Mohd.; Zakaria, Z. A.; Balan, T.; Teh, L. K.; Salleh, M. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Muntingia calabura L. (family Elaeocarpaceae) has been traditionally used to relieve various pain-related ailments. The present study aimed to determine the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of M. calabura leaves (MEMC) and to elucidate the possible mechanism of antinociception involved. The in vivo chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-, serotonin-induced paw licking test) and thermal (hot plate test) models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. The extract (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg) was administered orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that MEMC produced significant (P < 0.05) antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which was reversed after pretreatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone, a non-selective opioid antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO) donor), NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS)), methylene blue (MB; an inhibitor of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway), or their combination also caused significant (P < 0.05) change in the intensity of the MEMC antinociception. In conclusion, the MEMC antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms, and modulation via, partly, the opioid receptors and NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:22611437

  20. Soil biochar amendment as a climate change mitigation tool: Key parameters and mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Brassard, Patrick; Godbout, Stéphane; Raghavan, Vijaya

    2016-10-01

    Biochar, a solid porous material obtained from the carbonization of biomass under low or no oxygen conditions, has been proposed as a climate change mitigation tool because it is expected to sequester carbon (C) for centuries and to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from soils. This review aimed to identify key biochar properties and production parameters that have an effect on these specific applications of the biochar. Moreover, mechanisms involved in interactions between biochar and soils were highlighted. Following a compilation and comparison of the characteristics of 76 biochars from 40 research studies, biochars with a lower N content, and consequently a higher C/N ratio (>30), were found to be more suitable for mitigation of N2O emissions from soils. Moreover, biochars produced at a higher pyrolysis temperature, and with O/C ratio <0.2, H/Corg ratio <0.4 and volatile matter below 80% may have high C sequestration potential. Based on these observations, biochar production and application to the field can be used as a tool to mitigate climate change. However, it is important to determine the pyrolysis conditions and feedstock needed to produce a biochar with the desired properties for a specific application. More research studies are needed to identify the exact mechanisms involved following biochar amendment to soil.

  1. Mechanisms and neuronal networks involved in reactive and proactive cognitive control of interference in working memory.

    PubMed

    Irlbacher, Kerstin; Kraft, Antje; Kehrer, Stefanie; Brandt, Stephan A

    2014-10-01

    Cognitive control can be reactive or proactive in nature. Reactive control mechanisms, which support the resolution of interference, start after its onset. Conversely, proactive control involves the anticipation and prevention of interference prior to its occurrence. The interrelation of both types of cognitive control is currently under debate: Are they mediated by different neuronal networks? Or are there neuronal structures that have the potential to act in a proactive as well as in a reactive manner? This review illustrates the way in which integrating knowledge gathered from behavioral studies, functional imaging, and human electroencephalography proves useful in answering these questions. We focus on studies that investigate interference resolution at the level of working memory representations. In summary, different mechanisms are instrumental in supporting reactive and proactive control. Distinct neuronal networks are involved, though some brain regions, especially pre-SMA, possess functions that are relevant to both control modes. Therefore, activation of these brain areas could be observed in reactive, as well as proactive control, but at different times during information processing.

  2. Integrated Innate Mechanisms Involved in Airway Allergic Inflammation to the Serine Protease Subtilisin

    PubMed Central

    Florsheim, Esther; Yu, Shuang; Bragatto, Ivan; Faustino, Lucas; Gomes, Eliane; Ramos, Rodrigo N.; Barbuto, José Alexandre M.; Medzhitov, Ruslan; Russo, Momtchilo

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are recognized environmental allergens, but little is known about the mechanisms responsible for sensing enzyme activity and initiating the development of allergic inflammation. Because usage of the serine protease subtilisin in the detergent industry resulted in an outbreak of occupational asthma in workers, we sought to develop an experimental model of allergic lung inflammation to subtilisin and to determine the immunological mechanisms involved in type 2 responses. By using a mouse model of allergic airway disease, we have defined here that subcutaneous or intranasal sensitization followed by airway challenge to subtilisin induces prototypic allergic lung inflammation, characterized by airway eosinophilia, type 2 cytokines release, mucus production, high levels of serum IgE, and airway reactivity. These allergic responses were dependent on subtilisin protease activity, protease-activated receptor (PAR)-2, IL-33 receptor ST2, and MyD88 signaling. Also, subtilisin stimulated the expression of the pro-allergic cytokines IL-1α, IL-33, TSLP, and the growth factor amphiregulin in a human bronchial epithelial cell line. Notably, acute administration of subtilisin into the airways increased lung IL-5-producing type 2 innate lymphoid cells, which required PAR-2 expression. Finally, subtilisin activity acted as a Th2 adjuvant to an unrelated airborne antigen promoting allergic inflammation to inhaled OVA. Therefore, we established a murine model of occupational asthma to a serine protease and characterized the main molecular pathways involved in allergic sensitization to subtilisin that potentially contribute to initiate allergic airway disease. PMID:25876764

  3. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A.; Johnson, Matthew S.; Danielache, Sebastian O.; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-01-01

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of 32SO2, 33SO2, 34SO2, and 36SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ33S/δ34S and Δ36S/Δ33S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events. PMID:23417298

  4. SO2 photoexcitation mechanism links mass-independent sulfur isotopic fractionation in cryospheric sulfate to climate impacting volcanism.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Shohei; Schmidt, Johan A; Johnson, Matthew S; Danielache, Sebastian O; Yamada, Akinori; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yoshida, Naohiro

    2013-10-29

    Natural climate variation, such as that caused by volcanoes, is the basis for identifying anthropogenic climate change. However, knowledge of the history of volcanic activity is inadequate, particularly concerning the explosivity of specific events. Some material is deposited in ice cores, but the concentration of glacial sulfate does not distinguish between tropospheric and stratospheric eruptions. Stable sulfur isotope abundances contain additional information, and recent studies show a correlation between volcanic plumes that reach the stratosphere and mass-independent anomalies in sulfur isotopes in glacial sulfate. We describe a mechanism, photoexcitation of SO2, that links the two, yielding a useful metric of the explosivity of historic volcanic events. A plume model of S(IV) to S(VI) conversion was constructed including photochemistry, entrainment of background air, and sulfate deposition. Isotopologue-specific photoexcitation rates were calculated based on the UV absorption cross-sections of (32)SO2, (33)SO2, (34)SO2, and (36)SO2 from 250 to 320 nm. The model shows that UV photoexcitation is enhanced with altitude, whereas mass-dependent oxidation, such as SO2 + OH, is suppressed by in situ plume chemistry, allowing the production and preservation of a mass-independent sulfur isotope anomaly in the sulfate product. The model accounts for the amplitude, phases, and time development of Δ(33)S/δ(34)S and Δ(36)S/Δ(33)S found in glacial samples. We are able to identify the process controlling mass-independent sulfur isotope anomalies in the modern atmosphere. This mechanism is the basis of identifying the magnitude of historic volcanic events.

  5. Flavonoids inhibit hypoxia-induced vascular endothelial growth factor expression by a HIF-1 independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ansó, Elena; Zuazo, Alicia; Irigoyen, Marta; Urdaci, María C; Rouzaut, Ana; Martínez-Irujo, Juan J

    2010-06-01

    Flavonoids are a group of polyphenolic dietary compounds that have been proposed to possess chemopreventive properties against lung cancer. In this work we analyzed the effect of a group of 20 structurally related flavonoids, including flavones, flavonols and isoflavones, on the production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induced by hypoxia in NCI-H157 cells. VEGF is the main regulator of physiological and pathological angiogenesis and is highly stimulated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). We found that apigenin, luteolin, fisetin and quercetin inhibited hypoxia-induced VEGF expression in the low micromolar range. Structure-activity relationships demonstrated that flavone derivatives were the most active compounds and that hydroxylation of the A ring at the positions 5 and 7 and of the B ring at the 4' position were important for this activity. Interestingly, only a group of VEGF inhibitors, including apigenin, flavone and 4',7-dihydroxiflavone, reduced the expression of HIF-1alpha under these conditions, whereas others, such as fisetin, luteolin, galangin or quercetin, induced HIF-1alpha expression while reducing those of VEGF. When cells were exposed to hypoxia in the presence of these flavonoids, HIF-1alpha translocated to the nucleus and interacted with p300/CBP, but this complex was transcriptionally inactive. Taken together these findings indicate that flavonoids impair VEGF transcription by an alternative mechanism that did not depend on nuclear HIF levels. We also found that flavonoids suppressed hypoxia-induced STAT3 tyrosine phosphorylation and that this activity correlated with their potency as VEGF inhibitors, suggesting that inhibition of STAT3 function may play a role in this process.

  6. Murine Cytomegalovirus Disrupts Splenic Dendritic Cell Subsets via Type I Interferon-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nash, William T.; Gillespie, Alyssa L.; Brown, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are well-known modulators of immunity. This heterogeneous population is composed of defined subsets that exhibit functional specialization and are critical in initiating responses to pathogens. As such, many infectious agents employ strategies to disrupt DC functioning in attempts to evade the immune system. In some instances, this manifests as an outright loss of these cells. Previous work has suggested that, in the absence of an efficient natural killer (NK) cell response, murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) induces large amounts of interferon (IFN)-I. This heightened IFN-I response is thought to contribute to conventional DC (cDC) loss and delayed development of T cell immunity. However, the precise role of IFN-I in such cDC loss remains unclear. We investigated the effects of licensed NK cells and IFN-I signaling on splenic cDC subsets during MCMV infection and found that a licensed NK cell response partially protects cDC numbers, but does not prevent increases in serum IFN-I. This suggested that high residual IFN-I could contribute to cDC loss. Therefore, we used multiple strategies to modulate IFN-I signaling during MCMV infection including plasmacytoid DC depletion, IFN-I receptor (IFNAR) blockade, and genetic ablation of IFNAR expression. Interestingly, restriction of IFN-I signals did not substantially preserve either CD8+ or CD4+ DC total numbers, but resulted in significant retention and/or accumulation of the splenic CD8− CD4− [double negative (DN)] subset. However, the DN DC effect manifested in a DC-extrinsic manner since IFNAR-deficient cells were not preferentially retained over their IFNAR wild-type counterparts in a mixed-chimera setting. Our results show that IFN-I signaling is not responsible for overt cDC toxicity in the setting of acute MCMV infection and emphasize that additional mechanisms contribute to DC loss and require exploration. PMID:28337202

  7. Breakpoint profiling of 64 cancer genomes reveals numerous complex rearrangements spawned by homology-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Ankit; Lindberg, Michael; Faust, Gregory G.; Leibowitz, Mitchell L.; Clark, Royden A.; Layer, Ryan M.; Quinlan, Aaron R.; Hall, Ira M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor genomes are generally thought to evolve through a gradual accumulation of mutations, but the observation that extraordinarily complex rearrangements can arise through single mutational events suggests that evolution may be accelerated by punctuated changes in genome architecture. To assess the prevalence and origins of complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs), we mapped 6179 somatic structural variation breakpoints in 64 cancer genomes from seven tumor types and screened for clusters of three or more interconnected breakpoints. We find that complex breakpoint clusters are extremely common: 154 clusters comprise 25% of all somatic breakpoints, and 75% of tumors exhibit at least one complex cluster. Based on copy number state profiling, 63% of breakpoint clusters are consistent with being CGRs that arose through a single mutational event. CGRs have diverse architectures including focal breakpoint clusters, large-scale rearrangements joining clusters from one or more chromosomes, and staggeringly complex chromothripsis events. Notably, chromothripsis has a significantly higher incidence in glioblastoma samples (39%) relative to other tumor types (9%). Chromothripsis breakpoints also show significantly elevated intra-tumor allele frequencies relative to simple SVs, which indicates that they arise early during tumorigenesis or confer selective advantage. Finally, assembly and analysis of 4002 somatic and 6982 germline breakpoint sequences reveal that somatic breakpoints show significantly less microhomology and fewer templated insertions than germline breakpoints, and this effect is stronger at CGRs than at simple variants. These results are inconsistent with replication-based models of CGR genesis and strongly argue that nonhomologous repair of concurrently arising DNA double-strand breaks is the predominant mechanism underlying complex cancer genome rearrangements. PMID:23410887

  8. Improved cold tolerance in Elymus nutans by exogenous application of melatonin may involve ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juanjuan; Wu, Ye; Miao, Yanjun; Xu, Yamei; Zhao, Enhua; Wang, Jin; Sun, Huaien; Liu, Qian; Xue, Yongwei; Xu, Yuefei; Hu, Tianming

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin is an important secondary messenger that plays a central role in plant growth, as well as abiotic and biotic stress tolerance. However, the underlying physiological and molecular mechanisms of melatonin-mediated cold tolerance, especially interactions between melatonin and other key molecules in the plant stress response, remain unknown. Here, the interrelation between melatonin and abscisic acid (ABA) was investigated in two genotypes of Elymus nutans Griseb., the cold-tolerant Damxung (DX) and the cold-sensitive Gannan (GN) under cold stress. Pre-treatment with exogenous melatonin or ABA alleviated oxidative injury via scavenging ROS, while enhancing both antioxidant enzyme activities and non-enzymatic antioxidant contents. Treatment of fluridone, an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor caused membrane lipid peroxidation and lowered melatonin-induced antioxidant defense responses. It is worth noting that cold stress significantly induced both endogenous melatonin and ABA levels in both genotypes. Application of melatonin increased ABA production, while fluridone significantly suppressed melatonin-induced ABA accumulation. ABA and fluridone pre-treatments failed to affect the endogenous melatonin concentration. Moreover, exogenous melatonin up-regulated the expression of cold-responsive genes in an ABA-independent manner. These results indicate that both ABA-dependent and ABA-independent pathways may contribute to melatonin-induced cold tolerance in E. nutans. PMID:28045095

  9. Estradiol decreases cortical reactive astrogliosis after brain injury by a mechanism involving cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    López Rodríguez, Ana Belén; Mateos Vicente, Beatriz; Romero-Zerbo, Silvana Y; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Noé; Bellini, María José; Rodriguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Bermudez-Silva, Francisco Javier; Azcoitia, Iñigo; Garcia-Segura, Luis M; Viveros, María-Paz

    2011-09-01

    The neuroactive steroid estradiol reduces reactive astroglia after brain injury by mechanisms similar to those involved in the regulation of reactive gliosis by endocannabinoids. In this study, we have explored whether cannabinoid receptors are involved in the effects of estradiol on reactive astroglia. To test this hypothesis, the effects of estradiol, the cannabinoid CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist AM251, and the cannabinoid CB2 antagonist/inverse agonist AM630 were assessed in the cerebral cortex of male rats after a stab wound brain injury. Estradiol reduced the number of vimentin immunoreactive astrocytes and the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactive astrocytes in the proximity of the wound. The effect of estradiol was significantly inhibited by the administration of either CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists. The effect of estradiol may be in part mediated by alterations in endocannabinoid signaling because the hormone increased in the injured cerebral cortex the messenger RNA levels of CB2 receptors and of some of the enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of endocannabinoids. These findings suggest that estradiol may decrease reactive astroglia in the injured brain by regulating the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  10. Oleifolioside A mediates caspase-independent human cervical carcinoma HeLa cell apoptosis involving nuclear relocation of mitochondrial apoptogenic factors AIF and EndoG.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai Yang; Jin, Cheng-Yun; Kim, Kyoung-Sook; Lee, Young-Choon; Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Gi-Young; Kim, Wun-Jae; Moon, Hyung-In; Choi, Yung Hyun; Lee, Jai-Heon

    2012-05-30

    Apoptosis, the main type of programmed cell death, plays an essential role in a variety of biological events. Whereas "classical" apoptosis is dependent on caspase activation, caspase-independent death is increasingly recognized as an alternative pathway. To develop new anticancer agents, oleifolioside A was isolated from Dendropanax morbifera Leveille and the biochemical mechanisms of oleifolioside A-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells were investigated. Exposure to oleifolioside A resulted in caspase activation and typical features of apoptosis, although cell death was not prevented by caspase inhibition. Oleifolioside A treatment induced up-regulation of Bad, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, nuclear relocation of mitochondrial factors, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), endonuclease G (EndoG), and apoptosis induction. This is the first report of anticancer activity of oleifolioside A, and nuclear translocation of AIF and EndoG in oleifolioside A-treated HeLa cells might represent an alternative death signaling pathway in the absence of caspase activity.

  11. The Arabidopsis MEI1 gene encodes a protein with five BRCT domains that is involved in meiosis-specific DNA repair events independent of SPO11-induced DSBs.

    PubMed

    Grelon, Mathilde; Gendrot, Ghislaine; Vezon, Daniel; Pelletier, Georges; Mathilde, Grelon; Ghislaine, Gendrot; Daniel, Vezon; Georges, Pelletier

    2003-08-01

    Arabidopsis thaliana MEI1 was first described as a gene involved in male meiosis, encoding a short protein showing homology with a human acrosin-trypsin inhibitor. We have isolated a new allele of mei1, and shown that in both mutants male and female meiosis are affected. In both reproductive pathways, meiosis proceeds while chromosomes become fragmented, resulting in aberrant meiotic products and in a strongly reduced fertility. We have shown that the gene mutated in mei1 mutants actually encodes a protein of 972 amino acids that contains five BRCA1 C-terminus (BRCT) domains and is similar to proteins involved in the response to DNA damage and replication blocks in eukaryotes. During meiosis, recombination is initiated by the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) induced by the protein SPO11. We analysed meiotic chromosome behaviour of the mei1 mutant in a spo11 mutant background and proved that the meiotic fragmentation observed in mei1 mutants was not the consequence of defects in the repair of meiotic DSBs induced by SPO11. We also analysed the effect of mei1 on the mitotic cell cycle but could not detect any sensitivity of mei1 seedlings to DNA-damaging agents like gamma-rays or UV. Therefore, MEI1 is a BRCT-domain-containing protein that could be specific to the meiotic cell cycle and that plays a crucial role in some DNA repair events independent of SPO11 DSB recombination repair.

  12. Mitochondrial DNA replication proceeds via a ‘bootlace’ mechanism involving the incorporation of processed transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Aurelio; Kazak, Lawrence; Wood, Stuart R.; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Jacobs, Howard T.; Holt, Ian J.

    2013-01-01

    The observation that long tracts of RNA are associated with replicating molecules of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that the mitochondrial genome of mammals is copied by an unorthodox mechanism. Here we show that these RNA-containing species are present in living cells and tissue, based on interstrand cross-linking. Using DNA synthesis in organello, we demonstrate that isolated mitochondria incorporate radiolabeled RNA precursors, as well as DNA precursors, into replicating DNA molecules. RNA-containing replication intermediates are chased into mature mtDNA, to which they are thus in precursor–product relationship. While a DNA chain terminator rapidly blocks the labeling of mitochondrial replication intermediates, an RNA chain terminator does not. Furthermore, processed L-strand transcripts can be recovered from gel-extracted mtDNA replication intermediates. Therefore, instead of concurrent DNA and RNA synthesis, respectively, on the leading and lagging strands, preformed processed RNA is incorporated as a provisional lagging strand during mtDNA replication. These findings indicate that RITOLS is a physiological mechanism of mtDNA replication, and that it involves a ‘bootlace' mechanism, in which processed transcripts are successively hybridized to the lagging-strand template, as the replication fork advances. PMID:23595151

  13. Modelling Systemic Iron Regulation during Dietary Iron Overload and Acute Inflammation: Role of Hepcidin-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sparla, Richard; Hahnel, Maximilian; Bode, Johannes; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Legewie, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    ferroportin-independent homeostasis mechanisms. PMID:28068331

  14. Tumour necrosis factor receptor I blockade shows that TNF-dependent and TNF-independent mechanisms synergise in TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Lucy C; Stoop, A Allart; Negm, Ola H; Radford, Paul M; Tighe, Patrick J; Todd, Ian

    2015-10-01

    TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS) is an autoinflammatory disease involving recurrent episodes of fever and inflammation. It is associated with autosomal dominant mutations in TNF receptor superfamily 1A gene localised to exons encoding the ectodomain of the p55 TNF receptor, TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1). The aim of this study was to investigate the role of cell surface TNFR1 in TRAPS, and the contribution of TNF-dependent and TNF-independent mechanisms to the production of cytokines. HEK-293 and SK-HEP-1 cell lines were stably transfected with WT or TRAPS-associated variants of human TNF receptor superfamily 1A gene. An anti-TNFR1 single domain antibody (dAb), and an anti-TNFR1 mAb, bound to cell surface WT and variant TNFR1s. In HEK-293 cells transfected with death domain-inactivated (R347A) TNFR1, and in SK-HEP-1 cells transfected with normal (full-length) TNFR1, cytokine production stimulated in the absence of exogenous TNF by the presence of certain TNFR1 variants was not inhibited by the anti-TNFR1 dAb. In SK-Hep-1 cells, specific TRAPS mutations increased the level of cytokine response to TNF, compared to WT, and this augmented cytokine production was suppressed by the anti-TNFR1 dAb. Thus, TRAPS-associated variants of TNFR1 enhance cytokine production by a TNF-independent mechanism and by sensitising cells to a TNF-dependent stimulation. The TNF-dependent mechanism requires cell surface expression of TNFR1, as this is blocked by TNFR1-specific dAb.

  15. Wnt5a promotes cancer cell invasion and proliferation by receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively

    PubMed Central

    Shojima, Kensaku; Sato, Akira; Hanaki, Hideaki; Tsujimoto, Ikuko; Nakamura, Masahiro; Hattori, Kazunari; Sato, Yuji; Dohi, Keiji; Hirata, Michinari; Yamamoto, Hideki; Kikuchi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Wnt5a activates the Wnt/β-catenin-independent pathway and its overexpression is associated with tumor aggressiveness enhancing invasive activity. For this action, Wnt5a-induced receptor endocytosis with clathrin is required. Wnt5a expression was previously believed to be associated with cancer cell motility but not proliferation. Recently, it was reported that Wnt5a is also implicated in cancer cell proliferation, but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we generated a neutralizing anti-Wnt5a monoclonal antibody (mAb5A16) to investigate the mechanism by which Wnt5a regulates cancer cell proliferation. Wnt5a stimulated both invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells, including HeLaS3 cervical cancer cells and A549 lung cancer cells although Wnt5a promoted invasion but not proliferation in other cancer cells such as KKLS gastric cancer cells. mAb5A16 did not affect the binding of Wnt5a to its receptor, but it suppressed Wnt5a-induced receptor-mediated endocytosis. mAb5A16 inhibited invasion but not proliferation of HeLaS3 and A549 cells. Wnt5a activated Src family kinases (SFKs) and Wnt5a-dependent cancer cell proliferation was dependent on SFKs, yet blockade of receptor-mediated endocytosis did not affect cancer cell proliferation and SFK activity. These results suggest that Wnt5a promotes invasion and proliferation of certain types of cancer cells through receptor-mediated endocytosis-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:25622531

  16. Mechanisms Involved in the Nociception Triggered by the Venom of the Armed Spider Phoneutria nigriventer

    PubMed Central

    Gewehr, Camila; Oliveira, Sara Marchesan; Rossato, Mateus Fortes; Trevisan, Gabriela; Dalmolin, Gerusa Duarte; Rigo, Flávia Karine; de Castro Júnior, Célio José; Cordeiro, Marta Nascimento; Ferreira, Juliano; Gomez, Marcus V.

    2013-01-01

    Background The frequency of accidental spider bites in Brazil is growing, and poisoning due to bites from the spider genus Phoneutria nigriventer is the second most frequent source of such accidents. Intense local pain is the major symptom reported after bites of P. nigriventer, although the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify the mechanisms involved in nociception triggered by the venom of Phoneutria nigriventer (PNV). Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty microliters of PNV or PBS was injected into the mouse paw (intraplantar, i.pl.). The time spent licking the injected paw was considered indicative of the level of nociception. I.pl. injection of PNV produced spontaneous nociception, which was reduced by arachnid antivenin (ArAv), local anaesthetics, opioids, acetaminophen and dipyrone, but not indomethacin. Boiling or dialysing the venom reduced the nociception induced by the venom. PNV-induced nociception is not dependent on glutamate or histamine receptors or on mast cell degranulation, but it is mediated by the stimulation of sensory fibres that contain serotonin 4 (5-HT4) and vanilloid receptors (TRPV1). We detected a kallikrein-like kinin-generating enzyme activity in tissue treated with PNV, which also contributes to nociception. Inhibition of enzymatic activity or administration of a receptor antagonist for kinin B2 was able to inhibit the nociception induced by PNV. PNV nociception was also reduced by the blockade of tetrodotoxin-sensitive Na+ channels, acid-sensitive ion channels (ASIC) and TRPV1 receptors. Conclusion/Significance Results suggest that both low- and high-molecular-weight toxins of PNV produce spontaneous nociception through direct or indirect action of kinin B2, TRPV1, 5-HT4 or ASIC receptors and voltage-dependent sodium channels present in sensory neurons but not in mast cells. Understanding the mechanisms involved in nociception caused by PNV are of interest not only for

  17. Genes and mechanisms involved in beta-amyloid generation and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Steiner, H; Capell, A; Leimer, U; Haass, C

    1999-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the invariable accumulation of senile plaques that are predominantly composed of amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta). Abeta is generated by proteolytic processing of the beta-amyloid precursor protein (betaAPP) involving the combined action of beta- and gamma-secretase. Cleavage within the Abeta domain by alpha-secretase prevents Abeta generation. In some very rare cases of familial AD (FAD), mutations have been identified within the betaAPP gene. These mutations are located close to or at the cleavage sites of the secretases and pathologically effect betaAPP processing by increasing Abeta production, specifically its highly amyloidogenic 42 amino acid variant (Abeta42). Most of the mutations associated with FAD have been identified in the two presenilin (PS) genes, particularly the PS1 gene. Like the mutations identified within the betaAPP gene, mutations in PS1 and PS2 cause the increased generation of Abeta42. PS1 has been shown to be functionally involved in Notch signaling, a key process in cellular differentation, and in betaAPP processing. A gene knock out of PS1 in mice leads to an embryonic lethal phenotype similar to that of mice lacking Notch. In addition, absence of PS1 results in reduced gamma-secretase cleavage and leads to an accumulation of betaAPP C-terminal fragments and decreased amounts of Abeta. Recent work may suggest that PS1 could be the gamma-secretase itself, exhibiting the properties of a novel aspartyl protease. Mutagenesis of either of two highly conserved intramembraneous aspartate residues of PS1 leads to reduced Abeta production as observed in the PS1 knockout. A corresponding mutation in PS2 interfered with betaAPP processing and Notch signaling suggesting a functional redundancy of both presenilins. In this issue, some of the recent work on the molecular mechanisms involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) as well as novel diagnostic approaches and risk factors for AD will be discussed. In the first

  18. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    PubMed

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed.

  19. Mechanisms involved in vitamin D mediated intestinal calcium absorption and in non-classical actions of vitamin D.

    PubMed

    Christakos, Sylvia; Dhawan, Puneet; Ajibade, Dare; Benn, Bryan S; Feng, Jingjing; Joshi, Sneha S

    2010-07-01

    Recent studies in our laboratory using calbindin-D9k null mutant mice as well as mice lacking the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3) inducible epithelial calcium channel TRPV6 provide evidence for calbindin-D9k and TRPV6 independent regulation of active intestinal calcium absorption. These findings suggest that in the knock out (KO) mice there is compensation by another calcium channel or protein and that other novel factors are involved in 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated active intestinal calcium absorption. In addition, 1,25(OH)2D3 mediated paracellular transport of calcium may have contributed to the normalization of serum calcium in the null mutant mice. 1,25(OH)2D3 downregulates cadherin-17 and upregulates claudin-2 and claudin-12 in the intestine, suggesting that 1,25(OH)2D3, by regulating these epithelial cell junction proteins, can route calcium through the paracellular path. With regard to non-classical actions, 1,25(OH)2D3 has been reported to inhibit the proliferation of a number of malignant cells and to regulate adaptive as well as innate immunity. This article will review new developments related to the function and regulation of vitamin D target proteins in classical and non-classical vitamin D target tissues that have provided novel insight into mechanisms of vitamin D action.

  20. Cooperative mechanisms involved in chronic antidiuretic response to bendroflumethiazide in rats with lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, S M S; Karimi, Z

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies of central diabetes insipidus suggested that thiazides acutely exerted a paradoxical antidiuresis by either indirectly activating volume-homeostatic reflexes to decrease distal fluid-delivery, or directly stimulating distal water-reabsorption. This study investigated whether the direct and indirect actions of bendroflumethiazide (BFTZ) simultaneously cooperated and also whether the renal nerves were involved in inducing long-term antidiuresis in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). BFTZ or vehicle was gavaged into bilateral renal denervated and innervated rats with lithium-induced NDI for 10 days, constituting four groups. At one day before (D0) and one, five and ten days after starting administration of BFTZ or vehicle, rats were placed in metabolic cages to collect urine for 6 hours. BFTZ-treatment in both renal innervated and denervated rats caused equivalent reductions in urine-flow, creatinine clearance, lithium clearance and free-water clearance, but rises in urine-osmolality, fractional proximal reabsorption and fractional distal reabsorption at all days compared to D0, as well as to those of their relevant vehicle-received group. Therefore, the chronic antidiuretic response to BFTZ in conscious NDI rats was exerted through a concomitant cooperation of its direct distal effect of stimulating water-reabsorption and its indirect effect of reducing distal fluid-delivery by activating volume-homeostatic mechanisms, which appeared independent of the renal nerves.

  1. Capsaicin-stimulated release of substance P from cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons: involvement of two distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Purkiss, J; Welch, M; Doward, S; Foster, K

    2000-06-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent component of "hot" chili peppers, selectively activates a distinct population of primary sensory neurons responsive to noxious stimuli. Many of these fibres express neuropeptides including the tachykinin, substance P. Using cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that capsaicin (10 microM) stimulated a 2-fold increase in release of substance P in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Elevated potassium (75 mM) was unable to induce release under these conditions. The introduction of Ca(2+) enhanced capsaicin-induced release and brought about a robust response to potassium. Preincubation of cells with botulinum neurotoxin A (100 nM) completely blocked potassium-induced release but the capsaicin response, in the absence of Ca(2+), was unaffected. However, toxin treatment dramatically reduced capsaicin-stimulated release in the presence of Ca(2+). It is concluded that capsaicin induces release of substance P from dorsal root ganglion neurons via two mechanisms, one requiring extracellular Ca(2+) and the intact synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa (SNAP-25), and the other independent of extracellular Ca(2+) and not involving SNAP-25.

  2. Coral bleaching under thermal stress: putative involvement of host/symbiont recognition mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Dupiol, Jeremie; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Roger, Emmanuel; Foure, Laurent; Duval, David; Mone, Yves; Ferrier-Pages, Christine; Tambutte, Eric; Tambutte, Sylvie; Zoccola, Didier; Allemand, Denis; Mitta, Guillaume

    2009-01-01

    Background Coral bleaching can be defined as the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their photosynthetic pigments from their cnidarian host. This major disturbance of reef ecosystems is principally induced by increases in water temperature. Since the beginning of the 1980s and the onset of global climate change, this phenomenon has been occurring at increasing rates and scales, and with increasing severity. Several studies have been undertaken in the last few years to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching but the jigsaw puzzle is far from being complete, especially concerning the early events leading to symbiosis breakdown. The aim of the present study was to find molecular actors involved early in the mechanism leading to symbiosis collapse. Results In our experimental procedure, one set of Pocillopora damicornis nubbins was subjected to a gradual increase of water temperature from 28°C to 32°C over 15 days. A second control set kept at constant temperature (28°C). The differentially expressed mRNA between the stressed states (sampled just before the onset of bleaching) and the non stressed states (control) were isolated by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization. Transcription rates of the most interesting genes (considering their putative function) were quantified by Q-RT-PCR, which revealed a significant decrease in transcription of two candidates six days before bleaching. RACE-PCR experiments showed that one of them (PdC-Lectin) contained a C-Type-Lectin domain specific for mannose. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that this host gene mediates molecular interactions between the host and the symbionts suggesting a putative role in zooxanthellae acquisition and/or sequestration. The second gene corresponds to a gene putatively involved in calcification processes (Pdcyst-rich). Its down-regulation could reflect a trade-off mechanism leading to the arrest of the mineralization process under stress. Conclusion Under thermal

  3. One mechanism of glucocorticoid action in asthma may involve the inhibition of IL-25 expression

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Lu, Chao; Zhang, Chengming; Zhang, Chenghao

    2017-01-01

    While the mechanism of action of classic cytokines in asthma has received increased attention from researchers, certain non-classical cytokines, such as IL-25, also participate in this mechanism. The present study was performed to investigate the changes in IL-25 (IL-17E) mRNA and protein in bronchial asthma and to further characterize the mechanism underlying the action of glucocorticoids in asthma. A total of 96 specific pathogen-free BALB/c male mice were randomly divided into three normal groups (after the first allergization, after the second allergization and after excitation), three asthma groups (with the same three subgroups), a dexamethasone group and a budesonide group (n=12/group). An asthma model was established via the ovalbumin-sensitized excitation method. Mice in the dexamethasone group received intraperitoneal injections of dexamethasone 1 h prior to each excitation, the budesonide group received a budesonide suspension via inhalation 2 h before and after each provocation, and the normal group was sensitized and challenged with isotonic saline. IL-25 protein expression levels in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were measured by ELISA, and the relative IL-25 mRNA content in lung tissue was determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the normal groups, both the protein and mRNA levels of IL-25 were significantly increased (P<0.05) in the asthma groups. Dexamethasone and budesonide groups exhibited significant protein and mRNA reductions in IL-25, as compared with the asthma group after excitation (P<0.05), whereas these two groups significantly increased levels compared with the normal group after excitation (P<0.05). No significant differences in IL-25 mRNA expression levels were detected in the dexamethasone and budesonide groups when compared with the normal group after excitation. Therefore, we conclude that IL-25 is involved throughout the process of inflammation and inflammatory immune pathogenesis

  4. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Massi, Paola; Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells. PMID:24281104

  5. Afferent control mechanisms involved in the development of soleus fiber alterations in simulated hypogravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenkman, B. S.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.; Shapovalova, K. B.; Podlubnaya, Z. A.; Vikhliantsev, I. M.; Moukhina, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-02-01

    It was recently established that support withdrawal (withdrawal of support reaction force) in microgravity provokes a sequence of functional shifts in the activity of motor units (inactivation of slow ones) and peripheral muscle apparatus which lead to the decline of postural muscle contractility and alterations in fiber characteristics. However, mechanisms involved in inactivation of the slow motor units and appropriate slow-twitch muscle fiber disuse under the supportless conditions remained unknown. We show here that artificial inactivation of muscles-antagonists (which are known to be hyperactive during unloading) counteracts some of the unloading-induced events in the rat soleus (fiber size reduction, slow-to-fast fiber-type transition and decline of titin and nebulin content). It was also demonstrated that direct activation of the muscarinic receptors of the neostriatum neurons prevented slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation in soleus of hindlimb suspended rats.

  6. Cardioproteomics: advancing the discovery of signaling mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ziyou; Dewey, Shannamar; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2011-01-01

    Cardioproteomics (Cardiovascular proteomics) is fast becoming an indispensible technique in deciphering changes in signaling pathways that occur in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). The quality and availability of the instruments and bioinformatics software used for cardioproteomics continues to improve, and these techniques are now available to most cardiovascular researchers either directly or indirectly via university core centers. The heart and aorta are specialized tissues which present unique challenges to investigate. Currently, the diverse range of proteomic techniques available for cardiovascular research makes the choice of the best method or best combination of methods for the disease parameter(s) being investigated as important as the equipment used. This review focuses on proteomic techniques and their applications which have advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms involved in CVDs at the levels of protein complex/protein-protein interaction, post-translational modifications and signaling induced protein changes. PMID:22254205

  7. Possible Mechanism for Sulfur Mass Independent Fractionation in the B-X UV Transition of S2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, Alexander W.; Whitehill, Andrew Richard; Ono, Shuhei; Field, Robert W.

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous sulfur isotope ratios, called mass independent fractionation (MIF), are commonly observed in sedimentary rocks formed more than 2.5 billion years ago. These anomalies likely originated from photochemistry of small, sulfur-containing molecules in the early Earth's atmosphere. The disappearance of MIF in rocks younger than 2.5 billion years is thought to be evidence of rising O2 concentrations during the Great Oxygenation Event (GOE), an important milestone in the development of life on Earth. However, the photochemical origin of the pre-GOE anomaly is not well understood. Here, we use a model of the X, B, and B" states of S2, originally developed by Western, to determine a possible mechanism for isotopologue-selective photodissociation. A model of the rotation-vibration structure of the B-X UV transition shows small perturbations between the bright B state and the dark B" state that vary depending on isotopologue. These perturbations suggest a sequential two-photon mechanism for selective photodissociation. Symmetry (e.g., 32-32 vs. 32-34) may also contribute to MIF. This presentation will primarily focus on the UV spectra of the 32-32 and 32-34 isotopologues. We also examine the possibility that a similar mechanism may be at work in the B-X transition of SO.

  8. Myeloma cells resistance to NK cell lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gao, Minjie; Gao, Lu; Yang, Guang; Tao, Yi; Hou, Jun; Xu, Hongwei; Hu, Xiaojing; Han, Ying; Zhang, Qianqiao; Zhan, Fenghuang; Wu, Xiaosong; Shi, Jumei

    2014-07-01

    The anti-multiple myeloma (MM) potential of natural killer (NK) cells has been of rising interest in recent years. However, the molecular mechanism of NK cell cytotoxicity to myeloma cells remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the expressions of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and HLA-G in patient myeloma cells, and determined their relevance in patient tumor-cell susceptibility to NK cell cytotoxicity. Our results showed that patient myeloma cells (n = 12) were relatively resistant to NK-92 cell lysis, compared with myeloma cell lines (n = 7, P < 0.01). Gene expression profiling and flow cytometry analysis showed that both mRNA and protein of HLA class I were highly expressed in 12 patient myeloma cells. Interestingly, no or low HLA-G surface expression was detected, although multiple HLA-G transcripts were detected in these myeloma cells. NK cell function assay showed that down-regulating HLA class I expression on patient cells by acid treatment significantly increased the susceptibility of MM cells to NK-mediated lysis. Furthermore, we found that the blocking of membrane-bound HLA class I rather than HLA-G using antibodies on myeloma samples markedly increased their susceptibility to NK-mediated killing. These results demonstrated that the resistance of patient MM cells to NK lysis mainly involves an HLA class I-dependent mechanism, suggesting that HLA class I may be involved in protecting MM cells from NK-mediated attack and contribute to their immune escape in vivo.

  9. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed Central

    Oset-Gasque, M. J.; Parramón, M.; González, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed. PMID:8306105

  10. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed

    Oset-Gasque, M J; Parramón, M; González, M P

    1993-12-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed.

  11. Mechanisms Involved in Glucocorticoid Induction of Pituitary GH Expression During Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Ellestad, Laura E.; Puckett, Stefanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones are involved in functional differentiation of GH-producing somatotrophs. Glucocorticoid treatment prematurely induces GH expression in mammals and birds in a process requiring protein synthesis and Rat sarcoma (Ras) signaling. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms through which glucocorticoids initiate GH expression during embryogenesis, taking advantage of the unique properties of chicken embryos as a developmental model. We determined that stimulation of GH expression occurred through transcriptional activation of GH, rather than enhancement of mRNA stability, and this process requires histone deacetylase activity. Through pharmacological inhibition, we identified the ERK1/2 pathway as a likely downstream Ras effector necessary for glucocorticoid stimulation of GH. However, we also found that chronic activation of ERK1/2 activity with a constitutively active mutant or stimulatory ligand reduced initiation of GH expression by glucocorticoid treatment. Corticosterone treatment of cultured embryonic pituitary cells increased ERK1/2 activity in an apparent cyclical manner, with a rapid increase within 5 minutes, followed by a reduction to near-basal levels at 3 hours, and a subsequent increase again at 6 hours. Therefore, we conclude that ERK1/2 signaling must be strictly controlled for maximal glucocorticoid induction of GH to occur. These results are the first in any species to demonstrate that Ras- and ERK1/2-mediated transcriptional events requiring histone deacetylase activity are involved in glucocorticoid induction of pituitary GH during embryonic development. This report increases our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying glucocorticoid recruitment of somatotrophs during embryogenesis and should provide insight into glucocorticoid-induced developmental changes in other tissues and cell types. PMID:25560830

  12. Key diffusion mechanisms involved in regulating bidirectional water permeation across E. coli outer membrane lectin

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Shivangi; Kolimi, Narendar; Nair, Sanjana Anilkumar; Rathinavelan, Thenmalarchelvi

    2016-01-01

    Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are major bacterial virulent determinants that facilitate host immune evasion. E. coli group1 K30CPS is noncovalently attached to bacterial surface by Wzi, a lectin. Intriguingly, structure based phylogenetic analysis indicates that Wzi falls into porin superfamily. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations further shed light on dual role of Wzi as it also functions as a bidirectional passive water specific porin. Such a functional role of Wzi was not realized earlier, due to the occluded pore. While five water specific entry points distributed across extracellular & periplasmic faces regulate the water diffusion involving different mechanisms, a luminal hydrophobic plug governs water permeation across the channel. Coincidently, MD observed open state structure of “YQF” triad is seen in sugar-binding site of sodium-galactose cotransporters, implicating its involvement in K30CPS surface anchorage. Importance of Loop 5 (L5) in membrane insertion is yet another highlight. Change in water diffusion pattern of periplasmic substitution mutants suggests Wzi’s role in osmoregulation by aiding in K30CPS hydration, corroborating earlier functional studies. Water molecules located inside β-barrel of Wzi crystal structure further strengthens the role of Wzi in osmoregulation. Thus, interrupting water diffusion or L5 insertion may reduce bacterial virulence. PMID:27320406

  13. Post-ictal analgesia: involvement of opioid, serotoninergic and cholinergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, N C; Castro-Souza, C; Segato, E N; Nora, J E; Herrero, C F; Tedeschi-Filho, W; Garcia-Cairasco, N

    2001-01-12

    The neural mechanisms involved in post-ictal analgesia remain to be elucidated. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) is used experimentally to induce seizure in animal subjects. This non-competitive antagonist blocks GABA-mediated Cl(-) flux. The aim of this work is to study the neurochemical basis of the antinociception induced by convulsions elicited by peripheral administration of PTZ (64 mg/kg). The analgesia was measured by the tail-flick test, in eight rats per group. Convulsions were followed by significant increase in the tail-flick latencies (TFL), at least for 30 min of the post-ictal period. Peripheral administration of naloxone (5 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg), atropine (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg), methysergide (1 mg/kg and 5 mg/kg) and ketanserine (1 mg/kg and 2 mg/kg) caused a significant decrease in the TFL in seizing animals, as compared to controls. However, while naloxone antagonized analgesia 15 and 25 min post convulsions, the other drugs caused a blockade of the post-ictal analgesia in a relatively greater period of time. These results indicate that endogenous opioids, serotonin and acetylcholine may be involved in post-ictal analgesia.

  14. 9-cis-retinoic acid promotes cell adhesion through integrin dependent and independent mechanisms across immune lineages.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jarrett T; Chen, Jianming; Miller, Jabin; Morrow, Rebekah L; Lingo, Joshuah D; Merrell, Kaitlin; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Bridges, Lance C

    2013-05-01

    Retinoids are essential in the proper establishment and maintenance of immunity. Although retinoids are implicated in immune related processes, their role in immune cell adhesion has not been well established. In this study, the effect of 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) on human hematopoietic cell adhesion was investigated. 9-cis-RA treatment specifically induced cell adhesion of the human immune cell lines HuT-78, NB4, RPMI 8866 and U937. Due to the prominent role of integrin receptors in mediating immune cell adhesion, we sought to evaluate if cell adhesion was integrin-dependent. By employing a variety of integrin antagonist including function-blocking antibodies and EDTA, we establish that 9-cis-RA prompts immune cell adhesion through established integrin receptors in addition to a novel integrin-independent process. The novel integrin-independent adhesion required the presence of retinoid and was attenuated by treatment with synthetic corticosteroids. Finally, we demonstrate that 9-cis-RA treatment of primary murine B-cells induces ex vivo adhesion that persists in the absence of integrin function. Our study is the first to demonstrate that 9-cis-RA influences immune cell adhesion through at least two functionally distinct mechanisms.

  15. Red human hair pheomelanin is a potent pro-oxidant mediating UV-independent contributory mechanisms of melanomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Panzella, Lucia; Leone, Loredana; Greco, Giorgia; Vitiello, Giuseppe; D'Errico, Gerardino; Napolitano, Alessandra; d'Ischia, Marco

    2014-03-01

    The highest incidence of melanoma in red haired individuals is attributed to the synthesis and phototoxic properties of pheomelanin pigments. Recently, pheomelanin has also been implicated in UV-independent pathways of oxidative stress; however, the underlying mechanisms have remained uncharted. Herein, we disclose the unprecedented property of purified red human hair pheomelanin (RHP) to promote (i) the oxygen-dependent depletion of major cell antioxidants, for example glutathione and NADH; (ii) the autoxidative formation of melanin pigments from their precursors. RHP would thus behave as a unique 'living' polymer and biocatalyst that may grow by simple exposure to monomer building blocks and may trigger autoxidative processes. These results yield new clues as to the origin of the pro-oxidant state in the red hair phenotype, uncover non-enzymatic pathways of melanogenesis, and pave the way to innovative strategies for melanoma prevention.

  16. Photoperiod regulates corticosterone rhythms by altered adrenal sensitivity via melatonin-independent mechanisms in Fischer 344 rats and C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Goto, Mariko; Kawai, Misato; Togo, Yuki; Sato, Katsuyoshi; Katoh, Kazuo; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Yasuo, Shinobu

    2012-01-01

    Most species living in temperate zones adapt their physiology and behavior to seasonal changes in the environment by using the photoperiod as a primary cue. The mechanisms underlying photoperiodic regulation of stress-related functions are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the effects of photoperiod on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in photoperiod-sensitive Fischer 344 rats. We first examined how photoperiod affects diurnal variations in plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone. ACTH levels did not exhibit diurnal variations under long- and short-day conditions. On the other hand, corticosterone levels exhibited a clear rhythm under short-day condition with a peak during dark phase. This peak was not observed under long-day condition in which a significant rhythm was not detected. To analyze the mechanisms responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of corticosterone rhythms, ACTH was intraperitoneally injected at the onset of the light or dark phase in dexamethasone-treated rats maintained under long- and short-day conditions. ACTH induced higher corticosterone levels in rats examined at dark onset under short-day condition than those maintained under long-day condition. Next, we asked whether melatonin signals are involved in photoperiodic regulation of corticosterone rhythms, and rats were intraperitoneally injected with melatonin at late afternoon under long-day condition for 3 weeks. However, melatonin injections did not affect the corticosterone rhythms. In addition, photoperiodic changes in the amplitude of corticosterone rhythms were also observed in melatonin-deficient C57BL/6J mice, in which expression profiles of several clock genes and steroidgenesis genes in adrenal gland were modified by the photoperiod. Our data suggest that photoperiod regulates corticosterone rhythms by altered adrenal sensitivity through melatonin-independent mechanisms that may involve the adrenal clock.

  17. Dehydroepiandrosterone inhibits the progression phase of mammary carcinogenesis by inducing cellular senescence via a p16-dependent but p53-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Shilkaitis, Anne; Green, Albert; Punj, Vasu; Steele, Vernon; Lubet, Ronald; Christov, Konstantin

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), an adrenal 17-ketosteroid, is a precursor of testosterone and 17β-estradiol. Studies have shown that DHEA inhibits carcinogenesis in mammary gland and prostate as well as other organs, a process that is not hormone dependent. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms of DHEA-mediated inhibition of the neoplastic process. Here we examine whether DHEA and its analog DHEA 8354 can suppress the progression of hyperplastic and premalignant (carcinoma in situ) lesions in mammary gland toward malignant tumors and the cellular mechanisms involved. Methods Rats were treated with N-nitroso-N-methylurea and allowed to develop mammary hyperplastic and premalignant lesions with a maximum frequency 6 weeks after carcinogen administration. The animals were then given DHEA or DHEA 8354 in the diet at 125 or 1,000 mg/kg diet for 6 weeks. The effect of these agents on induction of apoptosis, senescence, cell proliferation, tumor burden and various effectors of cellular signaling were determined. Results Both agents induced a dose-dependent decrease in tumor multiplicity and in tumor burden. In addition they induced a senescent phenotype in tumor cells, inhibited cell proliferation and increased the number of apoptotic cells. The DHEA-induced cellular effects were associated with increased expression of p16 and p21, but not p53 expression, implicating a p53-independent mechanism in their action. Conclusion We provide evidence that DHEA and DHEA 8354 can suppress mammary carcinogenesis by altering various cellular functions, inducing cellular senescence, in tumor cells with the potential involvement of p16 and p21 in mediating these effects. PMID:16457693

  18. Organic Anion Transporter 1 Is Inhibited by Multiple Mechanisms and Shows a Transport Mode Independent of Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Adam G; Gao, Tiandai; Khan, Usman; Berrigan, Liam; Li, Mansong; Ingraham, Leslie; Pelis, Ryan M

    2015-12-01

    The mechanism by which drugs inhibit organic anion transporter 1 (OAT1) was examined. OAT1 was stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and para-aminohippurate (PAH) and 6-carboxyfluorescein were the substrates. Most compounds (10 of 14) inhibited competitively, increasing the Michaelis constant (Km) without affecting the maximal transport rate (Jmax). Others were mixed-type (lowering Jmax and increasing Km) or noncompetitive (lowering Jmax only) inhibitors. The interaction of a noncompetitive inhibitor (telmisartan) with OAT1 was examined further. Binding of telmisartan to OAT1 was observed, but translocation was not. Telmisartan did not alter the plasma membrane expression of OAT1, indicating that it lowers Jmax by reducing the turnover number. PAH transport after telmisartan treatment and its washout recovered faster in the presence of 10% fetal bovine serum in the washout buffer, indicating that binding of telmisartan to OAT1 and its inhibitory effect are reversible. Together, these data suggest that telmisartan binds reversibly to a site distinct from substrate and stabilizes the transporter in a conformation unfavorable for translocation. In the absence of an exchangeable extracellular substrate, PAH efflux from CHO-OAT1 cells was relatively rapid. Telmisartan slowed PAH efflux, suggesting that some transporter-mediated efflux occurs independent of exchange. Although drug-drug interaction predictions at OAT1 assume competitive inhibition, these data show that OAT1 can be inhibited by other mechanisms, which could influence the accuracy of drug-drug interaction predictions at the transporter. Telmisartan was useful for examining how a noncompetitive inhibitor can alter OAT1 transport activity and for uncovering a transport mode independent of exchange.

  19. Anti-inflammatory effect of certain dihydroxy flavones and the mechanisms involved.

    PubMed

    Vidyalakshmi, K; Kamalakannan, P; Viswanathan, S; Ramaswamy, S

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of four dihydroxy flavone derivatives; 3,3'- dihydroxy flavone, 5,6-dihydroxy flavone, 3,7-dihydroxy flavone and 6,3'-dihydroxy flavone and to further investigate the multiple cellular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effect of these compounds. The effect of dihydroxy flavones on acute inflammation was studied in rats employing carrageenan induced hind paw edema method. Further, the role of proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-α and IL-1β, cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2), and free radicals in the action of flavone derivatives was investigated using in vitro assays. All the four dihydroxy flavone derivatives exhibited time and dose dependent inhibition of carrageenan induced paw edema. In addition, the investigated compounds inhibited both the isoforms of cyclooxygenase and cytokines in a concentration dependent manner and also suppressed the release of reactive oxygen species. The anti-inflammatory effect of dihydroxy flavones may be through mechanisms that involve an interaction with cyclooxygenases, cytokines and reactive oxygen species.

  20. Exploring the temporal mechanism involved in the pitch of unresolved harmonics.

    PubMed

    Kaernbach, C; Bering, C

    2001-08-01

    This paper continues a line of research initiated by Kaernbach and Demany [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 104, 2298-2306 (1998)], who employed filtered click sequences to explore the temporal mechanism involved in the pitch of unresolved harmonics. In a first experiment, the just noticeable difference (jnd) for the fundamental frequency (F0) of high-pass filtered and low-pass masked click trains was measured, with F0 (100 to 250 Hz) and the cut frequency (0.5 to 6 kHz) being varied orthogonally. The data confirm the result of Houtsma and Smurzynski [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 87, 304-310 (1990)] that a pitch mechanism working on the temporal structure of the signal is responsible for analyzing frequencies higher than ten times the fundamental. Using high-pass filtered click trains, however, the jnd for the temporal analysis is at 1.2% as compared to 2%-3% found in studies using band-pass filtered stimuli. Two further experiments provide evidence that the pitch of this stimulus can convey musical information. A fourth experiment replicates the finding of Kaernbach and Demany on first- and second-order regularities with a cut frequency of 2 kHz and extends the paradigm to binaural aperiodic click sequences. The result suggests that listeners can detect first-order temporal regularities in monaural click streams as well as in binaurally fused click streams.

  1. Depletion of bovine pituitary prolactin by cysteamine involves a thiol:disulfide mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenson, M.Y.; Jacobs, L.S.

    1984-10-01

    Cysteamine (2-aminoethanethiol (CySH)) reduces measurable PRL concentrations in vivo and in vitro. Since secretion is also inhibited, CySH may block conversion from a poorly assayable hormone storage form(s) to readily assayable, releasable PRL. This would represent a previously unrecognized mechanism for secretory regulation. We undertook the present study to identify the sites involved in the loss of measurable PRL (depletion) induced by cysteamine. The disulfide cystamine was ineffective on secretory granules unless combined with reduced glutathione, indicating the generation of the active CySH-thiol form. Pretreatment of granules with thiol-blocking agents resulted in dose-dependent enhancement of CySH inhibition, achieving nearly complete inhibition with 5 mM iodoacetamide. In contrast, pretreatment with reduced glutathione or dithiothreitol, respectively, impaired or abolished the CySH effect. These data suggest that the mechanism by which CySH causes PRL depletion is mediated by granule disulfides and the -SH of CySH. The regulation of thiol:disulfide equilibria appears to be an important determinant of the detectability of PRL storage forms and of their secretion.

  2. Bovine glycomacropeptide ameliorates experimental rat ileitis by mechanisms involving downregulation of interleukin 17

    PubMed Central

    Requena, P; Daddaoua, A; Martínez-Plata, E; González, M; Zarzuelo, A; Suárez, M D; Sánchez de Medina, F; Martínez-Augustin, O

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Bovine glycomacropeptide (BGMP) is an inexpensive, non-toxic milk peptide with anti-inflammatory effects in rat experimental colitis but its mechanism of action is unclear. It is also unknown whether BGMP can ameliorate inflammation in proximal regions of the intestine. Our aim was therefore two-fold: first, to determine the anti-inflammatory activity of BGMP in the ileum; second, to characterise its mechanism of action. Experimental approach: We used a model of ileitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulphonic acid in rats. Rats were treated orally with BGMP and its efficacy compared with that of oral 5-aminosalicylic acid or vehicle, starting 2 days before ileitis induction. Key results: BGMP pretreatment (500 mg kg−1 day−1) resulted in marked reduction of inflammatory injury, as assessed by lower extension of necrosis and damage score, myeloperoxidase, alkaline phosphatase, inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 17. These effects were generally comparable to those of 5-aminosalicylic acid (200 mg kg−1 day−1). Neither compound affected the production of interferon γ, tumour necrosis factor and interleukin 2 by mesenteric lymph node cells isolated from animals with ileitis. The expression of Foxp3 was increased in ileitis and not reduced significantly by BGMP or aminosalicylate treatment. Conclusions and implications: These results demonstrate that BGMP has anti-inflammatory activity in the ileum with similar efficacy to 5-aminosalicylic acid. The mechanism of action may involve Th17 and regulatory T cells and perhaps macrophages but probably not Th1 lymphocytes. Patients with Crohn's ileitis may benefit from treatment with BGMP. PMID:18536735

  3. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-12-05

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca(2+)) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects.

  4. Crosstalk of Signaling Mechanisms Involved in Host Defense and Symbiosis Against Microorganisms in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Akira; Shimamoto, Ko; Kawano, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Rice is one of the most important food crops, feeding about half population in the world. Rice pathogens cause enormous damage to rice production worldwide. In plant immunity research, considerable progress has recently been made in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-triggered immunity. Using genome sequencing and molecular techniques, a number of new MAMPs and their receptors have been identified in the past two decades. Notably, the mechanisms for chitin perception via the lysine motif (LysM) domain-containing receptor OsCERK1, as well as the mechanisms for bacterial MAMP (e.g. flg22, elf18) perception via the leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain-containing receptors FLS2 and EFR, have been clarified in rice and Arabidopsis, respectively. In chitin signaling in rice, two direct substrates of OsCERK1, Rac/ROP GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factor OsRacGEF1 and receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase OsRLCK185, have been identified as components of the OsCERK1 complex and are rapidly phosphorylated by OsCERK1 in response to chitin. Interestingly, OsCERK1 also participates in symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) in rice and plays a role in the recognition of short-chitin molecules (CO4/5), which are symbiotic signatures included in AMF germinated spore exudates and induced by synthetic strigolactone. Thus, OsCERK1 contributes to both immunity and symbiotic responses. In this review, we describe recent studies on pathways involved in rice immunity and symbiotic signaling triggered by interactions with microorganisms. In addition, we describe recent advances in genetic engineering by using plant immune receptors and symbiotic microorganisms to enhance disease resistance of rice. PMID:27499679

  5. First Independent Replication of the Involvement of LARS2 in Perrault Syndrome by Whole-Exome Sequencing of an Italian Family

    PubMed Central

    Soldà, Giulia; Caccia, Sonia; Robusto, Michela; Chiereghin, Chiara; Castorina, Pierangela; Ambrosetti, Umberto; Duga, Stefano; Asselta, Rosanna

    2015-01-01

    Perrault syndrome (MIM #233400) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ovarian dysgenesis and primary ovarian insufficiency in females, and progressive hearing loss in both genders. Recently, mutations in five genes (HSD17B4, HARS2, CLPP, LARS2, and C10ORF2) were found to be responsible for Perrault syndrome, although they do not account for all cases of this genetically heterogeneous condition. We used whole-exome sequencing to identify pathogenic variants responsible for Perrault syndrome in an Italian pedigree with two affected siblings. Both patients were compound heterozygous for two novel missense variants within the mitochondrial leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LARS2), NM_015340.3:c.899C>T(p.Thr300Met) and c.1912G>A(p.Glu638Lys). Both variants co-segregated with the phenotype in the family. p.Thr300 and p.Glu638 are evolutionary conserved residues, and are located respectively within the editing domain and immediately before the catalytically important KMSKS motif. Homology modeling using as template the E. coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase provided further insights on the possible pathogenic effects of the identified variants. This represents the first independent replication of the involvement of LARS2 mutations in Perrault syndrome, contributing valuable information for the further understanding of this disease. PMID:26657938

  6. The metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1), upregulates p21 via p53-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Zaklina; Sivagurunathan, Sutharshani; Mangs, Helena; Chikhani, Sherin; Zhang, Daohai; Richardson, Des R

    2011-05-01

    The metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1), has been shown to markedly reduce metastasis of numerous tumors. The current study was focused on further elucidating the molecular mechanisms behind the antitumor function of NDRG1. We have identified for the first time that NDRG1 upregulates the potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, p21. This effect was observed in three different cancer cell types, including PC3MM and DU145 prostate cancer cells and H1299 lung carcinoma cells, and occurred independently of p53. In addition, reducing NDRG1 expression using short hairpin RNA in PC3MM and DU145 cells resulted in significantly reduced p21 protein levels. Hence, p21 is closely correlated with NDRG1 expression in these latter cell types. Examining the mechanisms behind the effect of NDRG1 on p21 expression, we found that NDRG1 upregulated p21 via transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms in prostate cancer cells, although its effect on H1299 cells was posttranscriptional only. Further studies identified two additional NDRG1 protein targets. The dominant-negative p63 isoform, ΔNp63, which has been found to inhibit p21 transcription, was downregulated by NDRG1. On the other hand, a truncated 50 kDa MDM2 isoform (p50(MDM2)), which may protect p21 from proteasomal degradation, was upregulated by NDRG1. The downregulation of ΔNp63 and upregulation of p50(MDM2) are potential mechanisms by which NDRG1 increases p21 expression in these cells. Additional functional studies identified that NDRG1 inhibits cancer cell migration, suggesting that p21 is a molecular player in its antimetastatic activity.

  7. Fungal pattern receptors down-regulate the inflammatory response by a cross-inhibitory mechanism independent of interleukin-10 production.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Mario; Márquez, Saioa; de la Rosa, Juan Vladimir; Alonso, Sara; Castrillo, Antonio; Sánchez Crespo, Mariano; Fernández, Nieves

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic AMP regulatory element binding protein and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) may control inflammation by several mechanisms, one of the best characterized is the induction of the expression of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10). STAT3 also down-regulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines induced by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-coupled receptors, a mechanism termed cross-inhibition. Because signalling via ITAM-dependent mechanisms is a hallmark of fungal pattern receptors, STAT3 activation might be involved in the cross-inhibition associated with invasive fungal infections. The fungal surrogate zymosan produced the phosphorylation of Y705-STAT3 and the expression of Ifnb1 and Socs3, but did not induce the interferon (IFN)-signature cytokines Cxcl9 and Cxcl10 in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. Unlike lipopolysaccharide (LPS), zymosan induced IL-10 and phosphorylated Y705-STAT3 to a similar extent in Irf3 and Ifnar1 knockout and wild-type mice. Human dendritic cells showed similar results, although the induction of IFNB1 was less prominent. These results indicate that LPS and zymosan activate STAT3 through different routes. Whereas type I IFN is the main effector of LPS effect, the mechanism involved in Y705-STAT3 phosphorylation by zymosan is more complex, cannot be associated with type I IFN, IL-6 or granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and seems dependent on several factors given that it was partially inhibited by the platelet-activating factor antagonist WEB2086 and high concentrations of COX inhibitors, p38 mitogen-activate protein kinase inhibitors, and blockade of tumour necrosis factor-α function. Altogether, these results indicate that fungal pattern receptors share with other ITAM-coupled receptors the capacity to produce cross-inhibition through a mechanism involving STAT3 and induction of SOCS3 and IL-10, but that cannot be explained through type I IFN

  8. Vascular Endothelium-Dependent and Independent Actions of Oleanolic Acid and Its Synthetic Oleanane Derivatives as Possible Mechanisms for Hypotensive Effects

    PubMed Central

    Madlala, Hlengiwe P.; Metzinger, Thomas; van Heerden, Fanie R.; Mubagwa, Kanigula; Dessy, Chantal

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Plant-derived oleanolic acid (OA) and its related synthetic derivatives (Br-OA and Me-OA) possess antihypertensive effects in experimental animals. The present study investigated possible underlying mechanisms in rat isolated single ventricular myocytes and in vascular smooth muscles superfused at 37°C. Methods Cell shortening was assessed at 1 Hz using a video-based edge-detection system and the L-type Ca2+ current (ICaL) was measured using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in single ventricular myocytes. Isometric tension was measured using force transducer in isolated aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries. Vascular effects were measured in endothelium-intact and denuded vessels in the presence of various enzyme or channel inhibitors. Results OA and its derivatives increased cell shortening in cardiomyocytes isolated from normotensive rats but had no effect in those isolated from hypertensive animals. These triterpenes also caused relaxation in aortic rings and in mesenteric arteries pre-contracted with either phenylephrine or KCl-enriched solution. The relaxation was only partially inhibited by endothelium denudation, and also partly inhibited by the cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor indomethacin, with no additional inhibitory effect of the NO synthase inhibitor, N-ω-Nitro-L-arginine. A combination of both ATP-dependent channel inhibition by glibenclaminde and voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibition by 4-aminopyridine was necessary to fully inhibit the relaxation. Conclusion These data indicate that the effects of OA and its derivatives are mediated via both endothelium-dependent and independent mechanisms suggesting the involvement of COX in the endothelium-dependent effects and of vascular muscle K+ channels in the endothelium-independent effects. Finally, our results support the view that the antihypertensive action of OA and its derivatives is due to a decrease of vascular resistance with no negative inotropic effect on the heart. PMID:26799746

  9. Myostatin induces cachexia by activating the ubiquitin proteolytic system through an NF-kappaB-independent, FoxO1-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, Craig; Plummer, Erin; Thomas, Mark; Hennebry, Alex; Ashby, Murray; Ling, Nicholas; Smith, Heather; Sharma, Mridula; Kambadur, Ravi

    2006-11-01

    Myostatin, a transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) super-family member, has been well characterized as a negative regulator of muscle growth and development. Myostatin has been implicated in several forms of muscle wasting including the severe cachexia observed as a result of conditions such as AIDS and liver cirrhosis. Here we show that Myostatin induces cachexia by a mechanism independent of NF-kappaB. Myostatin treatment resulted in a reduction in both myotube number and size in vitro, as well as a loss in body mass in vivo. Furthermore, the expression of the myogenic genes myoD and pax3 was reduced, while NF-kappaB (the p65 subunit) localization and expression remained unchanged. In addition, promoter analysis has confirmed Myostatin inhibition of myoD and pax3. An increase in the expression of genes involved in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis is observed during many forms of muscle wasting. Hence we analyzed the effect of Myostatin treatment on proteolytic gene expression. The ubiquitin associated genes atrogin-1, MuRF-1, and E214k were upregulated following Myostatin treatment. We analyzed how Myostatin may be signaling to induce cachexia. Myostatin signaling reversed the IGF-1/PI3K/AKT hypertrophy pathway by inhibiting AKT phosphorylation thereby increasing the levels of active FoxO1, allowing for increased expression of atrophy-related genes. Therefore, our results suggest that Myostatin induces cachexia through an NF-kappaB-independent mechanism. Furthermore, increased Myostatin levels appear to antagonize hypertrophy signaling through regulation of the AKT-FoxO1 pathway.

  10. Thiamine increases the resistance of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae against oxidative, osmotic and thermal stress, through mechanisms partly independent of thiamine diphosphate-bound enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wolak, Natalia; Kowalska, Ewa; Kozik, Andrzej; Rapala-Kozik, Maria

    2014-12-01

    Numerous recent studies have established a hypothesis that thiamine (vitamin B1 ) is involved in the responses of different organisms against stress, also suggesting that underlying mechanisms are not limited to the universal role of thiamine diphosphate (TDP) in the central cellular metabolism. The current work aimed at characterising the effect of exogenously added thiamine on the response of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the oxidative (1 mM H2 O2 ), osmotic (1 M sorbitol) and thermal (42 °C) stress. As compared to the yeast culture in thiamine-free medium, in the presence of 1.4 μM external thiamine, (1) the relative mRNA levels of major TDP-dependent enzymes under stress conditions vs. unstressed control (the 'stress/control ratio') were moderately lower, (2) the stress/control ratio was strongly decreased for the transcript levels of several stress markers localised to the cytoplasm, peroxisomes, the cell wall and (with the strongest effect observed) the mitochondria (e.g. Mn-superoxide dismutase), (3) the production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under stress conditions was markedly decreased, with the significant alleviation of concomitant protein oxidation. The results obtained suggest the involvement of thiamine in the maintenance of redox balance in yeast cells under oxidative stress conditions, partly independent of the functions of TDP-dependent enzymes.

  11. Epidemiological and genetic clues for molecular mechanisms involved in uterine leiomyoma development and growth

    PubMed Central

    Commandeur, Arno E.; Styer, Aaron K.; Teixeira, Jose M.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) are highly prevalent benign smooth muscle tumors of the uterus. In the USA, the lifetime risk for women developing uterine leiomyomas is estimated as up to 75%. Except for hysterectomy, most therapies or treatments often provide only partial or temporary relief and are not successful in every patient. There is a clear racial disparity in the disease; African-American women are estimated to be three times more likely to develop uterine leiomyomas and generally develop more severe symptoms. There is also familial clustering between first-degree relatives and twins, and multiple inherited syndromes in which fibroid development occurs. Leiomyomas have been described as clonal and hormonally regulated, but despite the healthcare burden imposed by the disease, the etiology of uterine leiomyomas remains largely unknown. The mechanisms involved in their growth are also essentially unknown, which has contributed to the slow progress in development of effective treatment options. METHODS A comprehensive PubMed search for and critical assessment of articles related to the epidemiological, biological and genetic clues for uterine leiomyoma development was performed. The individual functions of some of the best candidate genes are explained to provide more insight into their biological function and to interconnect and organize genes and pathways in one overarching figure that represents the current state of knowledge about uterine leiomyoma development and growth. RESULTS In this review, the widely recognized roles of estrogen and progesterone in uterine leiomyoma pathobiology on the basis of clinical and experimental data are presented. This is followed by fundamental aspects and concepts including the possible cellular origin of uterine fibroids. The central themes in the subsequent parts are cytogenetic aberrations in leiomyomas and the racial/ethnic disparities in uterine fibroid biology. Then, the attributes of various in vitro and

  12. Novel pathway in Bcr-Abl signal transduction involves Akt-independent, PLC-gamma1-driven activation of mTOR/p70S6-kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Markova, B; Albers, C; Breitenbuecher, F; Melo, J V; Brümmendorf, T H; Heidel, F; Lipka, D; Duyster, J; Huber, C; Fischer, T

    2010-02-04

    In chronic myeloid leukemia, activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway is crucial for survival and proliferation of leukemic cells. Essential downstream molecules involve mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S6-kinase. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the molecular events involved in activation of these key signaling pathways. We provide evidence for a previously unrecognized phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1)-controlled mechanism of mTOR/p70S6-kinase activation, which operates in parallel to the classical Akt-dependent machinery. Short-term imatinib treatment of Bcr-Abl-positive cells caused dephosphorylation of p70S6-K and S6-protein without inactivation of Akt. Suppression of Akt activity alone did not affect phosphorylation of p70-S6K and S6. These results suggested the existence of an alternative mechanism for mTOR/p70S6-K activation. In Bcr-Abl-expressing cells, we detected strong PLC-gamma1 activation, which was suppressed by imatinib. Pharmacological inhibition and siRNA knockdown of PLC-gamma1 blocked p70S6-K and S6 phosphorylation. By inhibiting the Ca-signaling, CaMK and PKCs we demonstrated participation of these molecules in the pathway. Suppression of PLC-gamma1 led to inhibition of cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis. The novel pathway proved to be essential for survival and proliferation of leukemic cells and almost complete cell death was observed upon combined PLC-gamma1 and Bcr-Abl inhibition. The pivotal role of PLC-gamma1 was further confirmed in a mouse leukemogenesis model.

  13. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Yuxiang

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  14. Lysine 2,3-aminomutase. Support for a mechanism of hydrogen transfer involving S-adenosylmethionine.

    PubMed

    Baraniak, J; Moss, M L; Frey, P A

    1989-01-25

    The conversion of L-lysine to L-beta-lysine is catalyzed by lysine 2,3-aminomutase. The reaction involves the interchange of the 2-amino group of lysine with a hydrogen at carbon 3. As such the reaction is formally analogous to adenosylcobalamin-dependent rearrangements. However, the enzyme does not contain and is not activated by this coenzyme. Instead it contains iron and pyridoxal phosphate and is activated by S-adenosylmethionine. Earlier experiments implicated adenosyl-C-5' of S-adenosylmethionine in the hydrogen transfer mechanism, apparently in a role similar or analogous to that of adenosyl moiety of adenosylcobalamin in the B12-dependent rearrangements. The question of whether both hydrogens or only one hydrogen at adenosyl-C-5' participate in the hydrogen-transfer process has been addressed by carrying out the lysine 2,3-aminomutase reaction with S-[5'-3H] adenosylmethionine in the presence of 10 times its molar concentration of enzyme. Under these conditions all of the tritium appeared in lysine and beta-lysine, showing that C-5'-hydrogens participate. To determine whether hydrogen transfer is compulsorily intermolecular and intramolecular, various molar ratios of [3,3-2H2]lysine and unlabeled lysine were submitted to the action of lysine 2,3-aminomutase under conditions in which 10-15% conversion to beta-lysine occurred. Mass spectral analysis of the beta-lysine for monodeutero and dideutero species showed conclusively that hydrogen transfer is both intramolecular and intermolecular. The results quantitatively support our postulate that activation of the enzyme involves a transformation of S-adenosylmethionine into a form that promotes the generation of an adenosyl-5' free radical, which abstracts hydrogen from lysine to form 5'-deoxyadenosine as an intermediate.

  15. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms.

  16. Toxic effects of expanded ataxin-1 involve mechanical instability of the nuclear membrane.

    PubMed

    Mapelli, Lisa; Canale, Claudio; Pesci, Daniela; Averaimo, Stefania; Guizzardi, Fabiana; Fortunati, Valentina; Falasca, Laura; Piacentini, Mauro; Gliozzi, Alessandra; Relini, Annalisa; Mazzanti, Michele; Jodice, Carla

    2012-06-01

    Ataxin 1 (ATXN1) is the protein involved in spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, one of nine dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases triggered by polyglutamine expansion. One of the isolated polyglutamine tracts properties is to interact with lipid bilayers. Here we used a multidisciplinary approach to test whether one of the mechanisms responsible for neuronal degeneration involves the destabilization of the nuclear membrane. We thus analyzed the interaction between ATXN1 and lipid membranes, both on cellular models and on artificial lipid bilayers, comparing pathological expanded polyglutamine and histidine interrupted non-harmful polyglutamine tracts of the same length. The toxicity of the different constructs was tested in transiently transfected COS1 cells. Cells expressing pathological ATXN1 presented a significantly higher frequency of anomalous nuclei with respect to those expressing non-harmful ATXN1. Immunofluorescence and electron microscopy showed severe damage in the nuclear membrane of cells expressing the pathological protein. Atomic force microscopy on artificial membranes containing interrupted and non-interrupted partial ATXN1 peptides revealed a different arrangement of the peptides within the lipid bilayer. Force-distance measurements indicated that membrane fragility increases with the lengthening of the uninterrupted glutamine. Transmembrane electrical measurements were performed on artificial bilayers and on the inner nuclear membrane of ATXN1 full length transfected cells. Both artificial lipid bilayers and cellular models demonstrated the dynamic appearance of ionic pathways. Uninterrupted polyglutamines showed not only a larger ionic flow, but also an increase in the single event conductance. Collectively, our results suggest that expanded ATXN1 may induce unregulated ionic pathways in the nuclear membrane, causing severe damage to the cell.

  17. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Junlin; Zhao, Guifang; Gao, Xiaocai

    2013-02-20

    Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs) in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd), which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX), Williams syndrome (WS), Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS). A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Interaction Effects of Alcohol and Hepatitis C Virus in Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Mas, Valeria R; Fassnacht, Ryan; Archer, Kellie J; Maluf, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The mechanisms by which alcohol consumption accelerates liver disease in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) are not well understood. To identify the characteristics of molecular pathways affected by alcohol in HCV patients, we fit probe-set level linear models that included the additive effects as well as the interaction between alcohol and HCV. The study included liver tissue samples from 78 patients, 23 (29.5%) with HCV-cirrhosis, 13 (16.7%) with alcohol-cirrhosis, 23 (29.5%) with HCV/alcohol cirrhosis and 19 (24.4%) with no liver disease (no HCV/no alcohol group). We performed gene-expression profiling by using microarrays. Probe-set expression summaries were calculated by using the robust multiarray average. Probe-set level linear models were fit where probe-set expression was modeled by HCV status, alcohol status, and the interaction between HCV and alcohol. We found that 2172 probe sets (1895 genes) were differentially expressed between HCV cirrhosis versus alcoholic cirrhosis groups. Genes involved in the virus response and the immune response were the more important upregulated genes in HCV cirrhosis. Genes involved in apoptosis regulation were also overexpressed in HCV cirrhosis. Genes of the cytochrome P450 superfamily of enzymes were upregulated in alcoholic cirrhosis, and 1230 probe sets (1051 genes) had a significant interaction estimate. Cell death and cellular growth and proliferation were affected by the interaction between HCV and alcohol. Immune response and response to the virus genes were downregulated in HCV-alcohol interaction (interaction term alcohol*HCV). Alcohol*HCV in the cirrhotic tissues resulted in a strong negative regulation of the apoptosis pattern with concomitant positive regulation of cellular division and proliferation. PMID:20386865

  19. Zuclopenthixol facilitates memory retrieval in rats: possible involvement of noradrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Khalifa, Amani E

    2003-07-01

    Although disturbed memory function often coexists with psychosis, the cognitive effects of antipsychotic medications with diverse pharmacodynamic properties are rarely investigated. The neurocognitive profile of zuclopenthixol, a thioxanthene dopaminergic antagonist and a conventional neuroleptic agent, has yet to be investigated despite the effect of the drug on a variety of neurotransmitter systems involved in mediation of learning and memory processes. In this study, the effect of zuclopenthixol was tested on memory retrieval 24 h after training using an inhibitory avoidance task in rats. Acute administration of zuclopenthixol (0.7 and 1.4 mg/kg i.p.) before retrieval testing increased step-through latency during the test session. The same doses of zuclopenthixol did not affect the ambulatory activity of rats in the openfield test and therefore the facilitatory effect of the drug on memory function could not be confounded with any motoric properties. This study also investigated the effect of zuclopenthixol on cortical and hippocampal monoaminergic neurotransmitters' levels together with acetylcholinesterase enzyme (AChE) activity, both of which are known to be important in control of cognitive function. Administration of zuclopenthixol (0.7 and 1.4 mg/kg i.p.) neither affected dopamine (DA) level nor AChE activity in rat cortex and hippocampus. On the other hand, the lower dose of zuclopenthixol elevated cortical norepinephrine (NE) level, while the higher dose elevated both cortical and hippocampal NE level together with hippocampal serotonin (5-HT) level. These results may suggest the involvement of adrenergic and serotonergic mechanisms in the facilitatory effect of zuclopenthixol on retrieval memory. Zuclopenthixol may therefore be a better alternative than other commonly used antipsychotic medications reported to impair cognitive function of schizophrenic patients.

  20. Structure and Mechanism of Enzymes Involved in Biosynthesis and Breakdown of the Phosphonates Fosfomycin, Dehydrophos, and Phosphinothricin

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Satish K.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid increase in the mechanistic and structural information on enzymes that are involved in the biosynthesis and breakdown of naturally occurring phosphonates. This review focuses on these recent developments with an emphasis on those enzymes that have been characterized crystallographically in the past five years, including proteins involved in the biosynthesis of phosphinothricin, fosfomycin, and dehydrophos and proteins involved in resistance mechanisms. PMID:20854789

  1. Thermal annealing of SiC nanoparticles induces SWNT nucleation: evidence for a catalyst-independent VSS mechanism.

    PubMed

    Page, Alister J; Chandrakumar, K R S; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2011-09-14

    Density-functional tight-binding molecular dynamics (DFTB/MD) methods were employed to demonstrate single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation resulting from thermal annealing of SiC nanoparticles. SWNT nucleation in this case is preceded by a change of the SiC structure from a crystalline one, to one in which silicon and carbon are segregated. This structural transformation ultimately resulted in the formation of extended polyyne chains on the SiC nanoparticle surface. These polyyne chains subsequently coalesced, forming an extended sp(2)-hybridized carbon cap on the SiC nanoparticle. The kinetics of this process were enhanced significantly at higher temperatures (2500 K), compared to lower temperatures (1200 K) and so directly correlated to the surface premelting behavior of the nanoparticle structure. Analysis of the SiC nanoparticle Lindemann index between 1000 and 3000 K indicated that SWNT nucleation at temperatures below 2600 K occurred in the solid, or quasi-solid, phase. Thus, the traditional vapor-liquid-solid mechanism of SWNT growth does not apply in the case of SiC nanoparticles. Instead, we propose that this example of SWNT nucleation constitutes evidence of a vapor-solid-solid process. This conclusion complements our recent observations regarding SWNT nucleation on SiO(2) nanoparticles (A. J. Page, K. R. S. Chandrakumar, S. Irle and K. Morokuma, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 621-628). In addition, similarities between the atomistic SWNT nucleation mechanisms on SiC and SiO(2) catalysts provide the first evidence of a catalyst-independent SWNT nucleation mechanism with respect to 'non-traditional' SWNT catalyst species.

  2. Semiquinone Intermediates are involved in the Energy Coupling Mechanism of E. coli Complex I

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, Madhavan; Leung, Steven A.; Inaba, Yuta; Elguindy, Mahmoud M.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-01-01

    Complex I (NADH:quinone oxidoreductase) is central to cellular aerobic energy metabolism, and its deficiency is involved in many human mitochondrial diseases. Complex I translocates protons across the membrane using electron transfer energy. Semiquinone (SQ) intermediates appearing during catalysis are suggested to be key for the coupling mechanism in complex I. However, the existence of SQ has remained controversial due to the extreme difficulty in detecting unstable and low intensity SQ signals. Here, for the first time with E. coli complex I reconstituted in proteoliposomes, we successfully resolved and characterized three distinct SQ species by EPR. These species include: fast-relaxing SQ (SQNf) with P1/2 (half-saturation power level) > 50 mW and a wider linewidth (12.8 G); slow-relaxing SQ (SQNs) with P1/2 = 2–3 mW and a 10 G linewidth; and very slow-relaxing SQ (SQNvs) with P1/2 = ~ 0.1 mW and a 7.5 G linewidth. The SQNf signals completely disappeared in the presence of the uncoupler gramicidin D or squamotacin, a potent E. coli complex I inhibitor. The pH dependency of the SQNf signals correlated with the proton-pumping activities of complex I. The SQNs signals were insensitive to gramicidin D, but sensitive to squamotacin. The SQNvs signals were insensitive to both gramicidin D and squamotacin. Our deuterium exchange experiments suggested that SQNf is neutral, while SQNs and SQNvs are anion radicals. The SQNs signals were lost in the ΔNuoL mutant missing transporter module subunits NuoL and NuoM. The roles and relationships of the SQ intermediates in the coupling mechanism are discussed. PMID:25868873

  3. Neural Correlates of Successful and Unsuccessful Strategical Mechanisms Involved in Uncertain Decision-Making.

    PubMed

    Giustiniani, Julie; Gabriel, Damien; Nicolier, Magali; Monnin, Julie; Haffen, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The ability to develop successful long-term strategies in uncertain situations relies on complex neural mechanisms. Although lesion studies have shown some of the mechanisms involved, it is still unknown why some healthy subjects are able to make the right decision whereas others are not. The aim of our study was to investigate neurophysiological differences underlying this ability to develop a successful strategy in a group of healthy subjects playing a monetary card game called the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). In this task, subjects have to win and earn money by choosing between four decks of cards, two were advantageous in the long term and two disadvantageous. Twenty healthy right-handed subjects performed the IGT while their cerebral activity was recorded by electroencephalography. Based on their behavioral performances, two groups of subjects could clearly be distinguished: one who selected the good decks and thus succeeded in developing a Favorable strategy (9 subjects) and one who remained Undecided (11 subjects). No neural difference was found between each group before the selection of a deck, but in both groups a greater negativity was found emerging from the right superior frontal gyrus 600 ms before a disadvantageous selection. During the processing of the feedback, an attenuation of the P200 and P300 waveforms was found for the Undecided group, and a P300 originating from the medial frontal gyrus was found in response to a loss only in the Favorable group. Our results suggest that undecided subjects are hyposensitive to the valence of the cards during gambling, which affects the feedback processing.

  4. Targeting GLI by GANT61 involves mechanisms dependent on inhibition of both transcription and DNA licensing

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ruowen; Wu, Jiahui; Ferrandon, Sylvain; Glowacki, Katie J.; Houghton, Janet A.

    2016-01-01

    The GLI genes are transcription factors and in cancers are oncogenes, aberrantly and constitutively activated. GANT61, a specific GLI inhibitor, has induced extensive cytotoxicity in human models of colon cancer. The FOXM1 promoter was determined to be a transcriptional target of GLI1. In HT29 cells, inhibition of GLI1 binding at the GLI consensus sequence by GANT61 led to inhibited binding of Pol II, the pause-release factors DSIF, NELF and p-TEFb. The formation of R-loops (RNA:DNA hybrids, ssDNA), were reduced by GANT61 at the FOXM1 promoter. Pretreatment of HT29 cells with α-amanitin reduced GANT61-induced γH2AX foci. Co-localization of GLI1 and BrdU foci, inhibited by GANT61, indicated GLI1 and DNA replication to be linked. By co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy, GLI1 co-localized with the DNA licensing factors ORC4, CDT1, and MCM2. Significant co-localization of GLI1 and ORC4 was inhibited by GANT61, and enrichment of ORC4 occurred at the GLI binding site in the FOXM1 promoter. CDT1 was found to be a transcription target of GLI1. Overexpression of CDT1 in HT29 and SW480 cells reduced GANT61-induced cell death, gH2AX foci, and cleavage of caspase-3. Data demonstrate involvement of transcription and of DNA replication licensing factors by non-transcriptional and transcriptional mechanisms in the GLI-dependent mechanism of action of GANT61. PMID:27863397

  5. Neural Correlates of Successful and Unsuccessful Strategical Mechanisms Involved in Uncertain Decision-Making

    PubMed Central

    Giustiniani, Julie; Gabriel, Damien; Nicolier, Magali; Monnin, Julie; Haffen, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    The ability to develop successful long-term strategies in uncertain situations relies on complex neural mechanisms. Although lesion studies have shown some of the mechanisms involved, it is still unknown why some healthy subjects are able to make the right decision whereas others are not. The aim of our study was to investigate neurophysiological differences underlying this ability to develop a successful strategy in a group of healthy subjects playing a monetary card game called the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). In this task, subjects have to win and earn money by choosing between four decks of cards, two were advantageous in the long term and two disadvantageous. Twenty healthy right-handed subjects performed the IGT while their cerebral activity was recorded by electroencephalography. Based on their behavioral performances, two groups of subjects could clearly be distinguished: one who selected the good decks and thus succeeded in developing a Favorable strategy (9 subjects) and one who remained Undecided (11 subjects). No neural difference was found between each group before the selection of a deck, but in both groups a greater negativity was found emerging from the right superior frontal gyrus 600 ms before a disadvantageous selection. During the processing of the feedback, an attenuation of the P200 and P300 waveforms was found for the Undecided group, and a P300 originating from the medial frontal gyrus was found in response to a loss only in the Favorable group. Our results suggest that undecided subjects are hyposensitive to the valence of the cards during gambling, which affects the feedback processing. PMID:26086196

  6. Involvement of metabolites in early defense mechanism of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) against Ganoderma disease.

    PubMed

    Nusaibah, S A; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Idris, A S; Sariah, M; Mohamad Pauzi, Z

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of interaction between the oil palm and its key pathogen, Ganoderma spp. is crucial as the disease caused by this fungal pathogen leads to a major loss of revenue in leading palm oil producing countries in Southeast Asia. Here in this study, we assess the morphological and biochemical changes in Ganoderma disease infected oil palm seedling roots in both resistant and susceptible progenies. Rubber woodblocks fully colonized by G. boninense were applied as a source of inoculum to artificially infect the roots of resistant and susceptible oil palm progenies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to measure an array of plant metabolites in 100 resistant and susceptible oil palm seedling roots treated with pathogenic Ganoderma boninense fungus. Statistical effects, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify key-Ganoderma disease associated metabolic agitations in both resistant and susceptible oil palm root tissues. Ganoderma disease related defense shifts were characterized based on (i) increased antifungal activity in crude extracts, (ii) increased lipid levels, beta- and gamma-sitosterol particularly in the resistant progeny, (iii) detection of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, benzo [h] quinoline, pyridine, pyrimidine (iv) elevation in antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol (iv) degraded cortical cell wall layers, possibly resulting from fungal hydrolytic enzyme activity needed for initial penetration. The present study suggested that plant metabolites mainly lipids and heterocyclic aromatic organic metabolites could be potentially involved in early oil palm defense mechanism against G. boninense infection, which may also highlight biomarkers for disease detection, treatment, development of resistant variety and monitoring.

  7. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  8. The involvement and possible mechanism of NR4A1 in chondrocyte apoptosis during osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xinge; Ye, Hui; Yao, Xuedong; Gao, Yanzheng

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a joint disease caused by the breakdown of joint cartilage and underlying bone, and places great burdens to daily life of patients. Nuclear orphan receptor nuclear receptor subfamily 4, group A, member 1 (NR4A1) is vital for cell apoptosis, but little is known about its role in OA. This study aims to reveal the expression and function of NR4A1 during OA chondrocyte apoptosis. NR4A1 expression by qRT-PCR and western blot, and chondrocyte apoptosis by TUNEL assay were detected in normal and OA joint cartilage. NR4A1 was located in cartilage sections by immunohistofluorescence. Chondrocytes from normal joint cartilage were cultured in vitro for interleukin 6 (IL6) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF) treatment and si-NR4A1 transfection, after which the possible mechanism involving NR4A1 was analyzed. Results showed that NR4A1 expression and chondrocyte apoptosis were significantly elevated in OA cartilage (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). NR4A1 was located in nuclei of normal cartilage chondrocytes, but was translocated to mitochondria and co-located with B-cell lymphoma 2 in OA chondrocytes. NR4A1 expression in cultured chondrocytes could be promoted by both IL6 and TNF treatment. si-NR4A1 partly reduced TNF-induced cell apoptosis. Inhibiting p38 by SB203580 could decrease TNF-induced NR4A1 to some extent, while inhibiting JNK could not. So NR4A1 is likely to facilitate OA chondrocyte apoptosis, which is associated with p38 MAPK and mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. This study provides a potential therapeutic target for OA treatment and offers information for regulatory mechanisms in OA. PMID:28337303

  9. The central anorexigenic mechanism of adrenocorticotropic hormone involves the caudal hypothalamus in chicks.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Steven L; Yi, Jiaqing; Dridi, Sami; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), consisting of 39 amino acids, is most well-known for its involvement in an organism's response to stress. It also participates in satiety, as exogenous ACTH causes decreased food intake in rats. However, its anorexigenic mechanism is not well understood in any species and its effect on appetite is not reported in the avian class. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate central ACTH's effect on food intake and to elucidate the mechanism mediating this response using broiler chicks. Chicks that received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 1, 2, or 4 nmol of ACTH reduced food intake, under both ad libitum and 180 min fasted conditions. Water intake was also reduced in ACTH-injected chicks under both feeding conditions, but when measured without access to feed it was not affected. Blood glucose was not affected in either feeding condition. Following ACTH injection, c-Fos immunoreactivity was quantified in key appetite-associated hypothalamic nuclei including the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamus (LH), arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the parvo- and magno-cellular portions of the paraventricular nucleus. ACTH-injected chicks had increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the VMH, LH, and ARC. Hypothalamus was collected at 1h post-injection, and real-time PCR performed to measure mRNA abundance of some appetite-associated factors. Neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, glutamate decarboxylase 1, melanocortin receptors 2-5, and urocortin 3 mRNA abundance was not affected by ACTH treatment. However, expression of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), urotensin 2 (UT), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), and orexin (ORX), and melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) mRNA decreased in the hypothalamus of ACTH-injected chicks. In conclusion, ICV ACTH causes decreased food intake in chicks, and is associated with VMH, LH, and ARC activation, and a decrease in hypothalamic mRNA abundance of CRF, UT, AgRP, ORX

  10. DDT and its metabolites alter gene expression in human uterine cell lines through estrogen receptor-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Frigo, Daniel E; Burow, Matthew E; Mitchell, Kamron A; Chiang, Tung-Chin; McLachlan, John A

    2002-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting organochlorines, such as the pesticide dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), bind to and activate estrogen receptors (ERs), thereby eliciting estrogen-like effects. Although ERs function predominantly through activation of transcription via estrogen-responsive elements, both ERs, alpha and ss, can interact with various transcription factors such as activator protein-1 (AP-1). Additionally, estrogens may regulate early signaling events, suggesting that the biological effects of environmental estrogens may not be mediated through classic ER (alpha and ss) activity alone. We hypothesized that known environmental estrogens, such as DDT and its metabolites, activate AP-1-mediated gene transactivation through both ER-dependent and ER-independent means. Using two Ishikawa human endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line variants that we confirmed to be estrogen responsive [Ishikawa(+)] and estrogen unresponsive [Ishikawa(-)], we generated stably transfected AP-1 luciferase cell lines to identify the role of an estrogen-responsive mechanism in AP-1-mediated gene expression by various stimuli. Our results demonstrate that DDT and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDD) were the most potent activators of AP-1 activity; 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) acetic acid failed to activate. Although stimulated in both Ishikawa(+) and Ishikawa(-) cells by DDT and its congeners, AP-1 activation was more pronounced in the estrogen-unresponsive Ishikawa(-) cells. In addition, DDT, DDD, and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) could also stimulate AP-1 activity in the estrogen-unresponsive human embryonic kidney 293 cells using a different promoter context. Thus, our data demonstrate that DDT and its metabolites activate the AP-1 transcription factor independent of ER (alpha or ss) status. PMID:12460804

  11. Insulin Protects Hepatic Lipotoxicity by Regulating ER Stress through the PI3K/Akt/p53 Involved Pathway Independently of Autophagy Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Hua; Sun, Zongxiang; Liu, Yunyun; Liu, Lei; Hao, Liuyi; Ye, Yaxin; Feng, Rennan; Li, Jie; Li, Ying; Chu, Xia; Li, Songtao; Sun, Changhao

    2016-01-01

    The detrimental role of hepatic lipotoxicity has been well-implicated in the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Previously, we reported that inhibiting autophagy aggravated saturated fatty acid (SFA)-induced hepatotoxicity. Insulin, a physiological inhibitor of autophagy, is commonly increased within NAFLD mainly caused by insulin resistance. We therefore hypothesized that insulin augments the sensitivity of hepatocyte to SFA-induced lipotoxicity. The present study was conducted via employing human and mouse hepatocytes, which were exposed to SFAs, insulin, or their combination. Unexpectedly, our results indicated that insulin protected hepatocytes against SFA-induced lipotoxicity, based on the LDH, MTT, and nuclear morphological measurements, and the detection from cleaved-Parp-1 and -caspase-3 expressions. We subsequently clarified that insulin led to a rapid and short-period inhibition of autophagy, which was gradually recovered after 1 h incubation in hepatocytes, and such extent of inhibition was insufficient to aggravate SFA-induced lipotoxicity. The mechanistic study revealed that insulin-induced alleviation of ER stress contributed to its hepatoprotective role. Pre-treating hepatocytes with insulin significantly stimulated phosphorylated-Akt and reversed SFA-induced up-regulation of p53. Chemical inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α robustly prevented palmitate-induced cell death. The PI3K/Akt pathway blockade by its special antagonist abolished the protective role of insulin against SFA-induced lipotoxicity and p53 up-regulation. Furthermore, we observed that insulin promoted intracellular TG deposits in hepatocytes in the present of palmitate. However, blocking TG accumulation via genetically silencing DGAT-2 did not prevent insulin-protected lipotoxicity. Our study demonstrated that insulin strongly protected against SFA-induced lipotoxicity in hepatocytes mechanistically through alleviating ER stress via a PI3K/Akt/p53 involved pathway but independently from autophagy

  12. Noradrenergic mechanism involved in the nociceptive modulation of hippocampal CA3 region of normal rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hua; Teng, Yueqiu; Zhang, Xuexin; Yang, Chunxiao; Xu, Manying; Yang, Lizhuang

    2014-06-27

    Norepinephrine (NE) is an important neurotransmitter in the brain, and regulates antinociception. However, the mechanism of action of NE on pain-related neurons in the hippocampal CA3 region is not clear. This study examines the effects of NE, phentolamine on the electrical activities of pain-excited neurons (PENs) and pain-inhibited neurons (PINs) in the hippocampal CA3 region of rats. Trains of electric impulses applied to the right sciatic nerve were used as noxious stimulation. The electrical activities of PENs or PINs in the hippocampal CA3 region were recorded by using a glass microelectrode. Our results revealed that, in the hippocampal CA3 region, the intra-CA3 region microinjection of NE decreased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and prolonged the discharged latency of PEN, and increased the pain-evoked discharged frequency and shortened discharged inhibitory duration (ID) of PIN, exhibiting the specific analgesic effect of NE. While intra-CA3 region microinjection of phentolamine produced the opposite response. It implies that phentolamine can block the effect of endogenous NE to cause the enhanced response of PEN and PIN to noxious stimulation. On the basis of above findings we can deduce that NE, phentolamine and alpha-adrenoceptor are involved in the modulation of nociceptive information transmission in the hippocampal CA3 region.

  13. Mechanisms involved in Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens removal during activated sludge wastewater treatment

    PubMed Central

    Orruño, Maite; Garaizabal, Idoia; Bravo, Zaloa; Parada, Claudia; Barcina, Isabel; Arana, Inés

    2014-01-01

    Wastewater treatment reduces environmental contamination by removing gross solids and mitigating the effects of pollution. Treatment also reduces the number of indicator organisms and pathogens. In this work, the fates of two coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens, were analyzed in an activated sludge process to determine the main mechanisms involved in the reduction of pathogenic microorganisms during wastewater treatment. These bacteria, modified to express green fluorescent protein, were inoculated in an activated sludge unit and in batch systems containing wastewater. The results suggested that, among the different biological factors implied in bacterial removal, bacterivorous protozoa play a key role. Moreover, a representative number of bacteria persisted in the system as free-living or embedded cells, but their distribution into liquid or solid fractions varied depending on the bacterium tested, questioning the real value of bacterial indicators for the control of wastewater treatment process. Additionally, viable but nonculturable cells constituted an important part of the bacterial population adhered to solid fractions, what can be derived from the competition relationships with native bacteria, present in high densities in this environment. These facts, taken together, emphasize the need for reliable quantitative and qualitative analysis tools for the evaluation of pathogenic microbial composition in sludge, which could represent an undefined risk to public health and ecosystem functions when considering its recycling. PMID:25044599

  14. Strict control of auricin production in Streptomyces aureofaciens CCM 3239 involves a feedback mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kutas, Peter; Feckova, Lubomira; Rehakova, Alena; Novakova, Renata; Homerova, Dagmar; Mingyar, Erik; Rezuchova, Bronislava; Sevcikova, Beatrica; Kormanec, Jan

    2013-03-01

    The polyketide gene cluster aur1 is responsible for the production of the angucycline antibiotic auricin in Streptomyces aureofaciens CCM 3239. Auricin production is regulated in a complex manner involving several regulators, including a key pathway-specific positive regulator Aur1P that belongs to the family of 'atypical' response regulators. Production of auricin is induced after entry into stationary phase. However, auricin was produced in only a short time interval of several hours. We found that the decrease of auricin production was due to a strict regulation of auricin biosynthetic genes at the transcriptional level by a feedback mechanism; auricin and/or its intermediate(s) inhibited binding of Aur1P to its cognate biosynthetic promoter aur1Ap and consequently stopped its activation. In addition, we also determined that synthesised auricin is unstable during growth of S. aureofaciens CCM3239 in the production medium even though purified auricin is stable for days in various organic solvents. The critical parameter affecting its stability was pH. Auricin is stable at acid pH and unstable at neutral and alkaline pH. The drop in auricin concentration was due to an increase of pH shortly after induction of auricin production during cultivation of S. aureofaciens CCM3239.

  15. Molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of alphavirus-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Assunção-Miranda, Iranaia; Cruz-Oliveira, Christine; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2013-01-01

    Arthritogenic alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), Chikungunya virus (CHIKV), Sindbis virus (SINV), Mayaro virus (MAYV), O'nyong-nyong virus (ONNV), and Barmah Forest virus (BFV), cause incapacitating and long lasting articular disease/myalgia. Outbreaks of viral arthritis and the global distribution of these diseases point to the emergence of arthritogenic alphaviruses as an important public health problem. This review discusses the molecular mechanisms involved in alphavirus-induced arthritis, exploring the recent data obtained with in vitro systems and in vivo studies using animal models and samples from patients. The factors associated to the extension and persistence of symptoms are highlighted, focusing on (a) virus replication in target cells, and tissues, including macrophages and muscle cells; (b) the inflammatory and immune responses with recruitment and activation of macrophage, NK cells and T lymphocytes to the lesion focus and the increase of inflammatory mediators levels; and (c) the persistence of virus or viral products in joint and muscle tissues. We also discuss the importance of the establishment of novel animal models to test new molecular targets and to develop more efficient and selective drugs to treat these diseases.

  16. Evidence for the involvement of central serotonin in mechanism of domestication of silver foxes.

    PubMed

    Popova, N K; Voitenko, N N; Kulikov, A V; Avgustinovich, D F

    1991-12-01

    Silver foxes selected for more than 30 years for tame behavior and displaying no defensive reaction to human contact were shown to have a higher serotonin level in midbrain and hypothalamus, and a higher 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5-HIAA) content in midbrain, hypothalamus and hippocampus in comparison to nonselected wild silver foxes bred in captivity over the same time span. Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) activity in midbrain and hypothalamus in domesticated foxes was increased as compared with their aggressive/defensive counterparts. Monoamine oxidase type A (MAO A) activity was was decreased with an increased Km and unchanged Vmax in domesticated foxes. No changes in specific [3H]ketanserin or [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding in frontal cortex was revealed. A reduced density (Bmax) of 5HT1A receptors in hypothalamic membranes in domesticated foxes was shown. It is suggested that the brain serotonergic system is involved in the mechanism of domestication converting wild aggressive/defensive animals into tame ones.

  17. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-01-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses CYP7A1 by activating a transcriptional repressor named small heterodimer partner (SHP). We observed that hypoxia decreased the levels of both CDCA and SHP, suggesting that hypoxia repressed CYP7A1 without inducing SHP. The finding that overexpression of HIF-1α increased the activity of the CYP7A1 promoter suggested that hypoxia decreased the expression of CYP7A1 in a HIF-1-independent manner. Thus, the results of this study suggested that hypoxia decreased the activity of CYP7A1 by limiting its substrate O2, and by decreasing the transcription of CYP7A1. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 173-178] PMID:26521940

  18. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-03-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor- 1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses CYP7A1 by activating a transcriptional repressor named small heterodimer partner (SHP). We observed that hypoxia decreased the levels of both CDCA and SHP, suggesting that hypoxia repressed CYP7A1 without inducing SHP. The finding that overexpression of HIF-1α increased the activity of the CYP7A1 promoter suggested that hypoxia decreased the expression of CYP7A1 in a HIF-1-independent manner. Thus, the results of this study suggested that hypoxia decreased the activity of CYP7A1 by limiting its substrate O2, and by decreasing the transcription of CYP7A1. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 173-178].

  19. Novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets based on acid-independent mechanism: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Kan, Shuling; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets (novel-NAP/EMZ) depending on EMZ acid-independent mechanism which has been proved to be predominate in the mechanism of co-therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, composed of NAP colon-specific pellets (NAP-CSPs) and EMZ modified-release pellets (EMZ-MRPs), were prepared by fluid-bed coating technology with desired in vitro release profiles. The resulting pellets were filled into hard gelatin capsules for in vivo evaluation in rats and compared with the reference compound pellets, consisted of NAP enteric-coated pellets (NAP-ECPs) and EMZ immediate-release pellets (EMZ-IRPs). The reference compound pellets were prepared simulating the drug delivery system of VIMOVO(®). In vivo pharmacokinetics, EMZ-MRPs had significantly larger AUC0-t (p < 0.01), 1.67 times more than that of EMZ-IRPs, and prolonged mean residence time (7.55 ± 0.12 h) than that of IRPs (1.46 ± 0.39 h). NAP-CSPs and NAP-ECPs showed similar AUC0-t. Compared to the reference compound pellets, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets did not show distinct differences in histological mucosal morphology. However, biochemical tests exhibited enhanced total antioxidant capacity, increased nitric oxide content and reduced malondialdehyde level for novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, indicating that the acid-independent action took effect. The gastric pH values of novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets were at a low and stable level, which could ensure normal physiological range of human gastric pH. As a result, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets may be a more suitable formulation with potential advantages by improving bioavailability of drug and further reducing undesirable gastrointestinal damages.

  20. The Relationship between Self-Determination and Quality of Life among Individuals with Disabilities Involved with a Center for Independent Living

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bekemeier, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Individuals with disabilities have historically been compromised in their ability to assert independence with respect to concepts of independent living and self-determination. In turn this may potentially impact an individual's overall quality of life. Community integration and availability of a full quality of life and to be self-determined has…

  1. Mammary blood flow and metabolic activity are linked by a feedback mechanism involving nitric oxide synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cieslar, S R L; Madsen, T G; Purdie, N G; Trout, D R; Osborne, V R; Cant, J P

    2014-01-01

    To test which, if any, of the major milk precursors can elicit a rapid change in the rate of mammary blood flow (MBF) and to define the time course and magnitude of such changes, 4 lactating cows were infused with glucose, amino acids, or triacylglycerol into the external iliac artery feeding one udder half while iliac plasma flow (IPF) was monitored continuously by dye dilution. Adenosine and saline were infused as positive and negative controls, respectively, and insulin was infused to characterize the response to a centrally produced anabolic hormone. To test the roles of cyclooxygenase, NO synthase and ATP-sensitive K (KATP) channels in nutrient-mediated changes in blood flow, their respective inhibitors-indomethacin, Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), and glibenclamide-were infused simultaneously with glucose. Each day, 1 infusate was given twice to each cow, over a 20-min period each time, separated by a 20-min washout period. In addition, each treatment protocol was administered on 2 separate days. A 73% increase in IPF during adenosine infusion showed that the mammary vasodilatory response was quadratic in time, with most changes occurring in the first 5min. Glucose infusion decreased IPF by 9% in a quadratic manner, most rapidly in the first 5min, indicating that a feedback mechanism of local blood flow control, likely through adenosine release, was operative in the mammary vasculature. Amino acid infusion increased IPF 9% in a linear manner, suggesting that mammary ATP utilization was stimulated more than ATP production. This could reflect a stimulation of protein synthesis. Triacylglycerol only tended to decrease IPF and insulin did not affect IPF. A lack of IPF response to glibenclamide indicates that KATP channels are not involved in MBF regulation. Indomethacin and L-NAME both depressed IPF. In the presence of indomethacin, glucose infusion caused a quadratic 9% increase in IPF. Indomethacin is an inhibitor of mitochondrial

  2. Study of the Genes and Mechanism Involved in the Radioadaptive Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dasgupta, Pushan R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioadaptive response is a phenomenon where exposure to a prior low dose of radiation reduces the level of damage induced by a subsequent high radiation dose. The molecular mechanism behind this is still not well understood. Learning more about the radioadaptive response is critical for long duration spaceflight since astronauts are exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The micronucleus assay was used to measure the level of damage caused by radiation. Although cells which were not washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after a low priming dose of 5cGy did not show adaptation to the challenge dose, washing the cells with PBS and giving the cells fresh media after the low dose did allow radioadaptation to occur. This is consistent with the results of a previous publication by another research group. In the present study, genes involved in DNA damage signaling and the oxidative stress response were studied using RT PCR techniques in order to look at changes in expression level after the low dose with or without washing. Our preliminary results indicate that upregulation of oxidative stress response genes ANGPTL7, NCF2, TTN, and SRXN1 may be involved in the radioadaptive response. The low dose of radiation alone was found to activate the oxidative stress response genes GPR156 and MTL5, whereas, washing the cells alone caused relatively robust upregulation of the oxidative stress response genes DUSP1 and PTGS2. Washing after the priming dose showed some changes in the expression level of several DNA damage signaling genes. In addition, we studied whether washing the cells after the priming dose has an effect on the level of nitric oxide in both the media and cells, since nitric oxide levels are known to increase in the media of the cells after a high dose of radiation only if the cells were already exposed to a low priming dose. Based on this preliminary study, we propose that washing the cells after priming exposure actually eliminates some factor

  3. Pathophysiological mechanisms involved in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and novel potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Higuera-de la Tijera, Fátima; Servín-Caamaño, Alfredo I

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a major health care problem and represents the hepatic expression of the metabolic syndrome. NAFLD is classified as non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) or simple steatosis, and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). NASH is characterized by the presence of steatosis and inflammation with or without fibrosis. The physiopathology of NAFL and NASH and their progression to cirrhosis involve several parallel and interrelated mechanisms, such as, insulin resistance (IR), lipotoxicity, inflammation, oxidative stress, and recently the gut-liver axis interaction has been described. Incretin-based therapies could play a role in the treatment of NAFLD. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an intestinal mucosa-derived hormone which is secreted into the bloodstream in response to nutrient ingestion; it favors glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, inhibition of postprandial glucagon secretion and delayed gastric emptying. It also promotes weight loss and is involved in lipid metabolism. Once secreted, GLP-1 is quickly degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4). Therefore, DPP-4 inhibitors are able to extend the activity of GLP-1. Currently, GLP-1 agonists and DPP-4 inhibitors represent attractive options for the treatment of NAFLD and NASH. The modulation of lipid and glucose metabolism through nuclear receptors, such as the farsenoid X receptor, also constitutes an attractive therapeutic target. Obeticholic acid is a potent activator of the farnesoid X nuclear receptor and reduces liver fat content and fibrosis in animal models. Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is a hydrophilic bile acid with immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic, antioxidant and anti-fibrotic properties. UDCA can improve IR and modulate lipid metabolism through its interaction with nuclear receptors such as, TGR5, farnesoid X receptor-α, or the small heterodimeric partner. Finally, pharmacologic modulation of the gut microbiota could have a role in the therapy of

  4. The Relaxant Activity of Safranal in Isolated Rat Aortas is Mediated Predominantly via an Endothelium-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Amanloo, Mojtaba Alipoor; Imenshahidi, Mohsen; Hosseinzadeh, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Safranal is a pharmacologically active component of saffron and is responsible for the unique aroma of saffron. The hypotensive effect of safranal has been shown in previous studies. This study evaluates the mechanism for the vasodilatory effects induced by safranal on isolated rat aortas. Methods: To study the vasodilatory effects of safranal (0.2, 0.4 and 0.8 mM), we contracted isolated rat thoracic aorta rings by using 10-6-M phenylephrine (PE) or 80-mM KCl. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) was used as a control. The vasodilatory effect of safranal was also evaluated both on intact and denuded endothelium aortic rings. Furthermore, to study the role of nitric oxide and prostacyclin in the relaxation induced by safranal, we incubated the aortic rings by using L-NAME (10-6 M) or indomethacin (10-5 M), each for 20 minutes. Results: Safranal induced relaxation in endothelium-intact aortic rings precontracted by using PE or KCl in a concentration-dependent manner, with a maximum relaxation of more than 100%. The relaxant activity of safranal was not eliminated by incubating the aortic rings with L-NAME (EC50 = 0.29 vs. EC50 = 0.43) or with indomethacin (EC50 = 0.29 vs. EC50 = 0.35), where EC50 is the half maximal effective concentration. Also, the vasodilatory activity of safranal was not modified by endothelial removal. Conclusion: This study indicated that relaxant activity of safranal is mediated predominantly through an endothelium- independent mechanism. PMID:28097042

  5. The monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor tranylcypromine enhances nicotine self-administration in rats through a mechanism independent of MAO inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lotfipour, Shahrdad; Arnold, Monica M; Hogenkamp, Derk J; Gee, Kelvin W; Belluzzi, James D; Leslie, Frances M

    2011-01-01

    Our current study aims to evaluate the mechanisms of tranylcypromine (TCP)-mediated enhancement of nicotine self-administration. We replicated our previous findings which demonstrate that 1 h pretreatment with TCP (3 mg/kg, i.p.) enhances nicotine self-administration (7.5 μg/kg/inj, i.v.) when compared with vehicle-treated rodents. We tested whether TCP-mediated enhancement of nicotine self-administration was due to MAO inhibition or off-target effects by (i) extending the TCP pretreatment time from 1 to 20 h, and (ii) evaluating the role of the individual TCP stereoisomers in nicotine self-administration studies. While 20 h and (-)TCP pretreatment induced significant inhibition of MAO (60-90%), animals found nicotine only weakly reinforcing. Furthermore, while both (+) and (±)TCP treatment induced nearly 100% MAO inhibition, (+)TCP pretreated animals took longer to acquire nicotine self-administration compared to (±)TCP pretreated animals. Stable nicotine self-administration in (+)TCP pretreated animals was influenced by nicotinic receptor activation but not nicotine-paired cues. The opposite was found in (±)TCP pretreated animals. Treatment with (-) or (±)TCP increased dopamine and serotonin overflow, while the (+) and (±)TCP treatment enhanced monoamine overflow subsequent to nicotine. Together, our data suggests TCP enhancement of nicotine self-administration are mediated through mechanisms independent of MAO inhibition, including nicotine-paired cues and monoamine uptake inhibition.

  6. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, Axel J; Wu, Shaw-Wen; Peters, James H

    2014-01-01

    Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST) contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33 to 37°C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  7. Evidence from vergence eye movements that disparities defined by luminance and contrast are sensed by independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger A; Sheliga, Boris M; Miles, Frederick A

    2010-12-29

    We recorded the initial disparity vergence responses (DVRs) elicited by 1-D sinusoidal gratings differing in phase at the two eyes by 1/4 wavelength and defined by luminance modulation (LM) or contrast modulation (CM) of dynamic binary noise. Both LM and CM stimuli elicited DVRs, but those to CM had longer latency (on average by ∼20 ms). DVRs showed sigmoidal dependence on depth of modulation, with higher thresholds for CM than for LM. With both LM and CM stimuli, fixing the modulation at one eye well above threshold rendered the DVR hypersensitive to low-level modulation at the other eye (dichoptic facilitation). Disparities defined by LM at one eye and CM at the other generated weak DVRs in the "wrong" direction, consistent with mediation entirely by distortion products associated with the CM stimulus. These (reversed) DVRs could be nulled by adding LM to the CM stimulus (in phase), and the greater the depth of the CM, the greater the added LM required for nulling, exactly as predicted by a simple compressive non-linearity. We conclude that disparities defined by LM and by CM are sensed by independent cortical mechanisms, at least for the purposes of generating short-latency vergence eye movements to disparity steps.

  8. Viral infection transiently reverses activation receptor-mediated NK cell hyporesponsiveness in an MHC class I-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Mazumdar, Budhaditya; Bolanos, Fred D; Tripathy, Sandeep K

    2013-05-01

    Continuous engagement of the Ly49H activating receptor with its ligand (m157) in a transgenic mouse expressing m157 (m157-Tg) results in hyporesponsiveness of Ly49H(+) NK cells. The same interaction, during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection, leads to activation of Ly49H(+) NK cells. MCMV infection results in decreased MHC class I (MHC-I) expression on the infected cell as well as inflammatory responses, both of which do not take place in the uninfected m157-Tg mouse, potentially allowing for activation of NK cells in the context of MCMV infection. In this study, we demonstrated that viral infection transiently reverses activation receptor-mediated NK cell hyporesponsiveness in an MHC-I-independent mechanism. Furthermore, Ly49H(+) NK cells in an MHC-I-deficient environment remained hyporesponsive in the context of m157 expression, even when mature WT splenocytes were transferred into m157-Tg mice in an MHC-I-deficient environment. However, the administration of cytokines TNF-α, IL-12, and IFN-β resulted in a partial recovery from activation receptor-induced hyporesponsiveness. Thus, the release of the aforementioned cytokines during MCMV infection and not the downregulation of MHC-I expression appears to be responsible for partial resolution of Ly49H receptor-induced NK cell hyporesponsiveness.

  9. The cannabinoid beta-caryophyllene (BCP) induces neuritogenesis in PC12 cells by a cannabinoid-receptor-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Santos, Neife Aparecida Guinaim; Martins, Nádia Maria; Sisti, Flávia Malvestio; Fernandes, Laís Silva; Ferreira, Rafaela Scalco; de Freitas, Osvaldo; Santos, Antônio Cardozo

    2017-01-05

    Beta-caryophyllene (BCP) is a phytocannabinoid whose neuroprotective activity has been mainly associated with selective activation of cannabinoid-type-2 (CB2) receptors, inhibition of microglial activation and decrease of inflammation. Here, we addressed the potential of BCP to induce neuritogenesis in PC12 cells, a model system for primary neuronal cells that express trkA receptors, respond to NGF and do not express CB2 receptors. We demonstrated that BCP increases the survival and activates the NGF-specific receptor trkA in NGF-deprived PC12 cells, without increasing the expression of NGF itself. The neuritogenic effect of BCP in PC12 cells was abolished by k252a, an inhibitor of the NGF-specific receptor trkA. Accordingly, BCP did not induce neuritogenesis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, a neuronal model that does not express trkA receptors and do not respond to NGF. Additionally, we demonstrated that BCP increases the expression of axonal-plasticity-associated proteins (GAP-43, synapsin and synaptophysin) in PC12 cells. It is known that these proteins are up-regulated by NGF in neurons and neuron-like cells, such as PC12 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that BCP activates trka receptors and induces neuritogenesis by a mechanism independent of NGF or cannabinoid receptors. This is the first study to show such effects of BCP and their beneficial role in neurodegenerative processes should be further investigated.

  10. CD4+ T-cell-independent mechanisms suppress reactivation of latent tuberculosis in a macaque model of HIV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Foreman, Taylor W; Mehra, Smriti; LoBato, Denae N; Malek, Adel; Alvarez, Xavier; Golden, Nadia A; Bucşan, Allison N; Didier, Peter J; Doyle-Meyers, Lara A; Russell-Lodrigue, Kasi E; Roy, Chad J; Blanchard, James; Kuroda, Marcelo J; Lackner, Andrew A; Chan, John; Khader, Shabaana A; Jacobs, William R; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-09-20

    The synergy between Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and HIV in coinfected patients has profoundly impacted global mortality because of tuberculosis (TB) and AIDS. HIV significantly increases rates of reactivation of latent TB infection (LTBI) to active disease, with the decline in CD4(+) T cells believed to be the major causality. In this study, nonhuman primates were coinfected with Mtb and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), recapitulating human coinfection. A majority of animals exhibited rapid reactivation of Mtb replication, progressing to disseminated TB and increased SIV-associated pathology. Although a severe loss of pulmonary CD4(+) T cells was observed in all coinfected macaques, a subpopulation of the animals was still able to prevent reactivation and maintain LTBI. Investigation of pulmonary immune responses and pathology in this cohort demonstrated that increased CD8(+) memory T-cell proliferation, higher granzyme B production, and expanded B-cell follicles correlated with protection from reactivation. Our findings reveal mechanisms that control SIV- and TB-associated pathology. These CD4-independent protective immune responses warrant further studies in HIV coinfected humans able to control their TB infection. Moreover, these findings will provide insight into natural immunity to Mtb and will guide development of novel vaccine strategies and immunotherapies.

  11. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    oxidative stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted. PMID:22185664

  12. Molecular mechanisms involved in the hormonal prevention of aging in the rat.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Jesús A F; Kireev, Roman; Tresguerres, Ana F; Borras, Consuelo; Vara, Elena; Ariznavarreta, Carmen

    2008-02-01

    Previous data from our group have provided support for the role of GH, melatonin and estrogens in the prevention of aging of several physiological parameters from bone, liver metabolism, vascular activity, the central nervous system (CNS), the immune system and the skin. In the present work data on the molecular mechanisms involved are presented. A total of 140 male and female rats have been submitted to different treatments over 10 weeks, between 22 and 24 months of age. Males have been treated with GH and melatonin. Females were divided in two groups: intact and castrated at 12 months of age. The first group was treated with GH and melatonin and the second with the two latter compounds and additionally with estradiol and Phytosoya. Aging was associated with a reduction in the number of neurons of the hylus of the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus and with a reduction of neurogenesis. GH treatment increased the number of neurons but did not increase neurogenesis thus suggesting a reduction of apoptosis. This was supported by the reduction in nucleosomes and the increase in Bcl2 observed in cerebral homogenates together with an increase in sirtuin2 and a reduction of caspases 9 and 3. Melatonin, estrogen and Phytosoya treatments increased neurogenesis but did not enhance the total number of neurons. Aging induced a significant increase in mitochondrial nitric oxide in the hepatocytes, together with a reduction in the mitochondrial fraction content in cytochrome C and an increase of this compound in the cytosolic fraction. Reductions of glutathione peroxidase and glutathione S-transferase were also detected, thus indicating oxidative stress and possibly apoptosis. Treatment for 2.5 months of old rats with GH and melatonin were able to significantly and favourably affect age-induced deteriorations, thus reducing oxidative damage. Keratinocytes obtained from old rats in primary culture showed an increase in lipoperoxides, caspases 8 and 3 as well as a reduction in Bcl2

  13. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    PubMed

    Sagai, Masaru; Bocci, Velio

    2011-12-20

    stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted.

  14. Achyranthes aspera Attenuates epilepsy in experimental animals: possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Godavarthi, Ashok

    2017-03-06

    The present study was aimed to examine the possible anticonvulsant property of aerial parts of Achyranthes aspera using various experimental models of epilepsy in mice. Petroleum ether extract of aerial parts of A. aspera (PeAA), methanolic eAA (MeAA) and aqueous eAA (AeAA) was initially evaluated against six-hertz seizure model in mice, based on the outcomes the effective extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) models in mice. In addition, the potent extract was evaluated against the PTZ model by co-administering with flumazenil (FMZ), and also evaluated for its effect on GABA levels in brain and NMDA-induced lethality in mice. Furthermore, the probable locomotor deficit-inducing property of the extract was evaluated by actophotometer test in mice. In results, only MeAA showed protection against six-hertz-induced seizures in mice, based on these outcomes only MeAA was evaluated in MES and PTZ models. Notably, the MeAA (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg) has offered mild and dose dependent protection against MES and PTZ-induced seizures in mice. Alongside, the MeAA (400 mg/kg) showed a significant increase in GABA levels in the brain compared to control, and in line with these findings the anti-PTZ effect of MeAA (400 mg/kg, p.o.) was blocked when co-administered with flumazenil (5 mg/kg, i.p.). However, the MeAA has not shown significant protection against NMDA-induced mortality and also did not cause significant change in locomotor activity compared to before treatment. These findings suggest that MeAA possess mild anticonvulsant activity and the outcomes further confirmed the involvement of GABAergic mechanism behind the anticonvulsant activity of MeAA.

  15. Ghrelin prevents tumour- and cisplatin-induced muscle wasting: characterization of multiple mechanisms involved

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji-an; Splenser, Andres; Guillory, Bobby; Luo, Jiaohua; Mendiratta, Meenal; Belinova, Blaga; Halder, Tripti; Zhang, Guohua; Li, Yi-Ping; Garcia, Jose M

    2015-01-01

    Background Cachexia and muscle atrophy are common consequences of cancer and chemotherapy administration. The novel hormone ghrelin has been proposed as a treatment for this condition. Increases in food intake and direct effects on muscle proteolysis and protein synthesis are likely to mediate these effects, but the pathways leading to these events are not well understood. Methods We characterized molecular pathways involved in muscle atrophy induced by Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumour implantation in c57/bl6 adult male mice and by administration of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin in mice and in C2C12 myotubes. The effects of exogenous ghrelin administration and its mechanisms of action were examined in these settings. Results Tumour implantation and cisplatin induced muscle atrophy by activating pro-inflammatory cytokines, p38-C/EBP-β, and myostatin, and by down-regulating Akt, myoD, and myogenin, leading to activation of ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated proteolysis and muscle weakness. Tumour implantation also increased mortality. In vitro, cisplatin up-regulated myostatin and atrogin-1 by activating C/EBP-β and FoxO1/3. Ghrelin prevented these changes in vivo and in vitro, significantly increasing muscle mass (P < 0.05 for LLC and P < 0.01 for cisplatin models) and grip strength (P = 0.038 for LLC and P = 0.001 for cisplatin models) and improving survival (P = 0.021 for LLC model). Conclusion Ghrelin prevents muscle atrophy by down-regulating inflammation, p38/C/EBP-β/myostatin, and activating Akt, myogenin, and myoD. These changes appear, at least in part, to target muscle cells directly. Ghrelin administration in this setting is associated with improved muscle strength and survival. PMID:26136189

  16. Independent Mechanisms Target SMCHD1 to Trimethylated Histone H3 Lysine 9-Modified Chromatin and the Inactive X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Brideau, Nicholas J.; Coker, Heather; Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Siebert, C. Alistair; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen; Poot, Raymond A.; Nesterova, Tatyana B.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal protein SMCHD1 plays an important role in epigenetic silencing at diverse loci, including the inactive X chromosome, imprinted genes, and the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus. Although homology with canonical SMC family proteins suggests a role in chromosome organization, the mechanisms underlying SMCHD1 function and target site selection remain poorly understood. Here we show that SMCHD1 forms an active GHKL-ATPase homodimer, contrasting with canonical SMC complexes, which exist as tripartite ring structures. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrates that SMCHD1 homodimers structurally resemble prokaryotic condensins. We further show that the principal mechanism for chromatin loading of SMCHD1 involves an LRIF1-mediated interaction with HP1γ at trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3)-modified chromatin sites on the chromosome arms. A parallel pathway accounts for chromatin loading at a minority of sites, notably the inactive X chromosome. Together, our results provide key insights into SMCHD1 function and target site selection. PMID:26391951

  17. Triggering Apoptotic Death of Human Malignant Melanoma A375.S2 Cells by Bufalin: Involvement of Caspase Cascade-Dependent and Independent Mitochondrial Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Yu, Chun-Shu; Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Huang, Hui-Ying; Tang, Nou-Ying; Yang, Jen-Hung; Huang, An-Cheng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2012-01-01

    Bufalin was obtained from the skin and parotid venom glands of toad and has been shown to induce cytotoxic effects in various types of cancer cell lines, but there is no report to show that whether bufalin affects human skin cancer cells. The aim of this investigation was to study the effects of bufalin on human malignant melanoma A375.S2 cells and to elucidate possible mechanisms involved in induction of apoptosis. A375.S2 cells were treated with different concentrations of bufalin for a specific time period and investigated for effects on apoptotic analyses. Our results indicated that cells after exposure to bufalin significantly decreased cell viability, and induced cell morphological changes and chromatin condensation in a concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometric assays indicated that bufalin promoted ROS productions, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), intracellular Ca2+ release, and nitric oxide (NO) formations in A375.S2 cells. Additionally, the apoptotic induction of bufalin on A375.S2 cells resulted from mitochondrial dysfunction-related responses (disruption of the ΔΨm and releases of cytochrome c, AIF, and Endo G), and activations of caspase-3, caspase-8 and caspase-9 expressions. Based on those observations, we suggest that bufalin-triggered apoptosis in A375.S2 cells is correlated with extrinsic- and mitochondria-mediated multiple signal pathways. PMID:22719785

  18. Cellular mechanisms involved in iso-osmotic high K+ solutions-induced contraction of the estrogen-primed rat myometrium.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, M M; Ausina, P; Savineau, J P; Marthan, R; Strippoli, G; Advenier, C; Pinto, F M; Candenas, M L

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanisms involved in the contraction evoked by iso-osmotic high K+ solutions in the estrogen-primed rat uterus. In Ca2+-containing solution, iso-osmotic addition of KCl (30, 60 or 90 mM K+) induced a rapid, phasic contraction followed by a prolonged sustained plateau (tonic component) of smaller amplitude. The KCl (60 mM)-induced contraction was unaffected by tetrodotoxin (3 microM), omega-conotoxin MVIIC (1 microM), GF 109203X (1 microM) or calphostin C (3 microM) but was markedly reduced by tissue treatment with neomycin (1 mM), mepacrine (10 microM) or U-73122 (10 microM). Nifedipine (0.01-0.1 microM) was significantly more effective as an inhibitor of the tonic component than of the phasic component. After 60 min incubation in Ca2+-free solution containing 3 mM EGTA, iso-osmotic KCl did not cause any increase in tension but potentiated contractions evoked by oxytocin (1 microM), sodium orthovanadate (160 micrM) or okadaic acid (20 microM) in these experimental conditions. In freshly dispersed myometrial cells maintained in Ca2+-containing solution and loaded with indo 1, iso-osmotic KCl (60 mM) caused a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). In cells superfused for 60 min in Ca2+-free solution containing EGTA (1 mM), KCl did not increase [Ca2+]i. In Ca2+-containing solution, KCl (60 mM) produced a 76.0 +/- 16.2% increase in total [3H]inositol phosphates above basal levels and increased the intracellular levels of free arachidonic acid. These results suggest that, in the estrogen-primed rat uterus, iso-osmotic high K+ solutions, in addition to their well known effect on Ca2+ influx, activate other cellular processes leading to an increase in the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile machinery by a mechanism independent of extracellular Ca2+.

  19. The syntaxin 4 N terminus regulates its basolateral targeting by munc18c-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Torres, Jacqueline; Funk, Holly M; Zegers, Mirjam M P; ter Beest, Martin B A

    2011-03-25

    To generate and maintain epithelial cell polarity, specific sorting of proteins into vesicles destined for the apical and basolateral domain is required. Syntaxin 3 and 4 are apical and basolateral SNARE proteins important for the specificity of vesicle fusion at the apical and basolateral plasma membrane domains, respectively, but how these proteins are specifically targeted to these domains themselves is unclear. Munc18/SM proteins are potential regulators of this process. Like syntaxins, they are crucial for exocytosis and vesicle fusion. However, how munc18c and syntaxin 4 regulate the function of each other is unclear. Here, we investigated the requirement of syntaxin 4 in the delivery of basolateral membrane and secretory proteins, the basolateral targeting of syntaxin 4, and the role of munc18c in this targeting. Depletion of syntaxin 4 resulted in significant reduction of basolateral targeting, suggesting no compensation by other syntaxin forms. Mutational analysis identified amino acids Leu-25 and to a lesser extent Val-26 as essential for correct localization of syntaxin 4. Recently, it was shown that the N-terminal peptide of syntaxin 4 is involved in binding to munc18c. A mutation in this region that affects munc18c binding shows that munc18c binding is required for stabilization of syntaxin 4 at the plasma membrane but not for its correct targeting. We conclude that the N terminus serves two functions in membrane targeting. First, it harbors the sorting motif, which targets syntaxin 4 basolaterally in a munc18c-independent manner and second, it allows for munc18c binding, which stabilizes the protein in a munc18c-dependent manner.

  20. DNA-histone complexes as ligands amplify cell penetration and nuclear targeting of anti-DNA antibodies via energy-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Zannikou, Markella; Bellou, Sofia; Eliades, Petros; Hatzioannou, Aikaterini; Mantzaris, Michael D; Carayanniotis, George; Avrameas, Stratis; Lymberi, Peggy

    2016-01-01

    We have generated three monoclonal cell-penetrating antibodies (CPAbs) from a non-immunized lupus-prone (NZB × NZW)F1 mouse that exhibited high anti-DNA serum titres. These CPAbs are polyreactive because they bind to DNA and other cellular components, and localize mainly in the nucleus of HeLa cells, albeit with a distinct nuclear labelling profile. Herein, we have examined whether DNA-histone complexes (DHC) binding to CPAbs, before cell entry, could modify the cell penetration of CPAbs or their nuclear staining properties. By applying confocal microscopy and image analysis, we found that extracellular binding of purified CPAbs to DHC significantly enhanced their subsequent cell-entry, both in terms of percentages of positively labelled cells and fluorescence intensity (internalized CPAb amount), whereas there was a variable effect on their nuclear staining profile. Internalization of CPAbs, either alone or bound to DHC, remained unaltered after the addition of endocytosis-specific inhibitors at 37° or assay performance at 4°, suggesting the involvement of energy-independent mechanisms in the internalization process. These findings assign to CPAbs a more complex pathogenetic role in systemic lupus erythematosus where both CPAbs and nuclear components are abundant.

  1. More than one way to evolve a weed: parallel evolution of U.S. weedy rice through independent genetic mechanisms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many crop species were independently selected for a shared suite of “domestication traits,” which facilitates their use for studies of parallel evolution. Within domesticated rice (Oryza sativa), there has also been independent evolution of weedy strains from different cultivated varieties. This mak...

  2. The mechanism of binding staphylococcal protein A to immunoglobin G does not involve helix unwinding.

    PubMed

    Jendeberg, L; Tashiro, M; Tejero, R; Lyons, B A; Uhlén, M; Montelione, G T; Nilsson, B

    1996-01-09

    maintains its three-helical bundle structure in the Z-Fc complex, though there may be a small structural change involved in the binding mechanism.

  3. Mechanisms involved in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govia, Ishtar O.

    The mental health of ethnic minorities in the United States is of urgent concern. The accelerated growth of groups of ethnic minorities and immigrants in the United States and the stressors to which they are exposed, implores academic researchers to investigate more deeply health disparities and the factors that exacerbate or minimize such inequalities. This dissertation attended to that concern. It used data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the first survey with a national representative sample of Black Caribbeans, to explore mechanisms that involved in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans in the United States. In a series of three studies, the dissertation investigated the role and consequence of (1) chronic discrimination, immigration factors, and closeness to ethnic and racial groups; (2) personal control and social support; and (3) family relations and social roles in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans. Study 1 examined how the associations between discrimination and psychological distress were buffered or exacerbated by closeness to ethnic group and closeness to racial group. It also examined how these associations differed depending on immigration factors. Results indicated that the buffering or exacerbating effect of ethnic and racial group closeness varied according to the type of discrimination (subtle or severe) and were more pronounced among those born in the United States. Using the stress process framework, Study 2 tested moderation and mediation models of the effects of social support and personal control in the association between discrimination and distress. Results from a series of analyses on 579 respondents suggested that personal control served as a mediator in this relationship and that emotional support exerted a direct distress deterring function. Study 3 investigated sex differences in the associations between social roles, intergenerational family relationship perceptions and distress. Results

  4. Involvement of the MyD88-independent pathway in controlling the intracellular fate of Burkholderia pseudomallei infection in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7.

    PubMed

    Tangsudjai, S; Pudla, M; Limposuwan, K; Woods, D E; Sirisinha, S; Utaisincharoen, P

    2010-05-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a facultative intracellular Gram-negative bacterium which is capable of surviving and multiplying inside macrophages. B. pseudomallei strain SRM117, a LPS mutant which lacks the O-antigenic polysaccharide moiety, is more susceptible to macrophage killing during the early phase of infection than is its parental wild type strain (1026b). In this study, it was shown that the wild type is able to induce expression of genes downstream of the MyD88-dependent (ikappabzeta, il-6 and tnf-alpha), but not of the MyD88-independent (inos, ifn-beta and irg-1), pathways in the mouse macrophage cell line RAW 264.7. In contrast, LPS mutant-infected macrophages were able to express genes downstream of both pathways. To elucidate the significance of activation of the MyD88-independent pathway in B. pseudomallei-infected macrophages, the expression of TBK1, an essential protein in the MyD88-independent pathway, was silenced prior to the infection. The results showed that silencing the tbk1 expression interferes with the gene expression profile in LPS mutant-infected macrophages and allows the bacteria to replicate intracellularly, thus suggesting that the MyD88-independent pathway plays an essential role in controlling intracellular survival of the LPS mutant. Moreover, exogenous IFN-gamma upregulated gene expression downstream of the MyD88-independent pathway, and interfered with intracellular survival in both wild type and tbk1-knockdown macrophages infected with either the wild type or the LPS mutant. These results suggest that gene expression downstream of the MyD88-independent pathway is essential in regulating the intracellular fate of B. pseudomallei, and that IFN-gamma regulates gene expression through the TBK1-independent pathway.

  5. Mangiferin, a natural xanthone, accelerates gastrointestinal transit in mice involving cholinergic mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Morais, Talita Cavalcante; Lopes, Synara Cavalcante; Carvalho, Karine Maria Martins Bezerra; Arruda, Bruno Rodrigues; de Souza, Francisco Thiago Correia; Trevisan, Maria Teresa Salles; Rao, Vietla Satyanarayana; Santos, Flávia Almeida

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of mangiferin on gastrointestinal transit (GIT) in normal and constipated mice, together with the possible mechanism. METHODS: Intragastrically-administered charcoal meal was used to measure GIT in overnight starved Swiss mice. In the first experiments, mangiferin (3 mg/kg, 10 mg/kg, 30 mg/kg, and 100 mg/kg, po) or tegaserod (1 mg/kg, ip) were administered 30 min before the charcoal meal to study their effects on normal transit. In the second series, mangiferin (30 mg/kg) was tested on delayed GIT induced by several different pharmacological agonists (morphine, clonidine, capsaicin) or antagonists (ondansetron, verapamil, and atropine) whereas in the third series, mangiferin (30 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg and 300 mg/kg) or tegaserod (1 mg/kg) were tested on 6 h fecal pellets outputted by freely fed mice. The ratio of wet to dry weight was calculated and used as a marker of fecal water content. RESULTS: Mangiferin administered orally significantly (P < 0.05) accelerated GIT at 30 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg (89% and 93%, respectively), similarly to 5-hydroxytryptamine4 (5-HT4) agonist tegaserod (81%) when compared to vehicle-treated control (63%). Co-administered mangiferin (30 mg/kg) totally reversed the inhibitory effect of opioid agonist morphine, 5-HT3-receptor antagonist ondansetron and transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 receptor agonist capsaicin on GIT, but only to a partial extent with the GIT-delay induced by α2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine, and calcium antagonist verapamil. However, co-administered atropine completely blocked the stimulant effect of mangiferin on GIT, suggesting the involvement of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation. Although mangiferin significantly enhanced the 6 h fecal output at higher doses (245.5 ± 10.43 mg vs 161.9 ± 10.82 mg and 227.1 ± 20.11 mg vs 161.9 ± 10.82 mg of vehicle-treated control, at 30 and 100 mg/kg, P < 0.05, respectively), the effect of tegaserod was more potent (297.4 ± 7.42 mg

  6. Another look at the mechanism involving trimeric dUTPases in Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island induction involves novel players in the party

    PubMed Central

    Maiques, Elisa; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Donderis, Jorge; Ciges-Tomas, J. Rafael; Alite, Christian; Bowring, Janine Z.; Humphrey, Suzanne; Penadés, José R.; Marina, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    We have recently proposed that the trimeric staphylococcal phage encoded dUTPases (Duts) are signaling molecules that act analogously to eukaryotic G-proteins, using dUTP as a second messenger. To perform this regulatory role, the Duts require their characteristic extra motif VI, present in all the staphylococcal phage coded trimeric Duts, as well as the strongly conserved Dut motif V. Recently, however, an alternative model involving Duts in the transfer of the staphylococcal islands (SaPIs) has been suggested, questioning the implication of motifs V and VI. Here, using state-of the-art techniques, we have revisited the proposed models. Our results confirm that the mechanism by which the Duts derepress the SaPI cycle depends on dUTP and involves both motifs V and VI, as we have previously proposed. Surprisingly, the conserved Dut motif IV is also implicated in SaPI derepression. However, and in agreement with the proposed alternative model, the dUTP inhibits rather than inducing the process, as we had initially proposed. In summary, our results clarify, validate and establish the mechanism by which the Duts perform regulatory functions. PMID:27112567

  7. Another look at the mechanism involving trimeric dUTPases in Staphylococcus aureus pathogenicity island induction involves novel players in the party.

    PubMed

    Maiques, Elisa; Quiles-Puchalt, Nuria; Donderis, Jorge; Ciges-Tomas, J Rafael; Alite, Christian; Bowring, Janine Z; Humphrey, Suzanne; Penadés, José R; Marina, Alberto

    2016-06-20

    We have recently proposed that the trimeric staphylococcal phage encoded dUTPases (Duts) are signaling molecules that act analogously to eukaryotic G-proteins, using dUTP as a second messenger. To perform this regulatory role, the Duts require their characteristic extra motif VI, present in all the staphylococcal phage coded trimeric Duts, as well as the strongly conserved Dut motif V. Recently, however, an alternative model involving Duts in the transfer of the staphylococcal islands (SaPIs) has been suggested, questioning the implication of motifs V and VI. Here, using state-of the-art techniques, we have revisited the proposed models. Our results confirm that the mechanism by which the Duts derepress the SaPI cycle depends on dUTP and involves both motifs V and VI, as we have previously proposed. Surprisingly, the conserved Dut motif IV is also implicated in SaPI derepression. However, and in agreement with the proposed alternative model, the dUTP inhibits rather than inducing the process, as we had initially proposed. In summary, our results clarify, validate and establish the mechanism by which the Duts perform regulatory functions.

  8. Involvement of mast cells and proteinase-activated receptor 2 in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ayumi; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2016-03-01

    The chemotherapeutic agent oxaliplatin induces neuropathic pain, a dose-limiting side effect, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we show the potential involvement of cutaneous mast cells in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. A single intraperitoneal injection of oxaliplatin induced mechanical allodynia, which peaked on day 10 after injection. Oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia was almost completely prevented by congenital mast cell deficiency. The numbers of total and degranulated mast cells was significantly increased in the skin after oxaliplatin administration. Repetitive topical application of the mast cell stabilizer azelastine hydrochloride inhibited mechanical allodynia and the degranulation of mast cells without affecting the number of mast cells in oxaliplatin-treated mice. The serine protease inhibitor camostat mesilate and the proteinase-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonist FSLLRY-NH2 significantly inhibited oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. However, it was not inhibited by the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. Single oxaliplatin administration increased the activity of cutaneous serine proteases, which was attenuated by camostat and mast cell deficiency. Depletion of the capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents by neonatal capsaicin treatment almost completely prevented oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia, the increase in the number of mast cells, and the activity of cutaneous serine proteases. These results suggest that serine protease(s) released from mast cells and PAR2 are involved in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Therefore, oxaliplatin may indirectly affect the functions of mast cells through its action on capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents.

  9. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jennifer A; Mamounis, Kyle J; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2's actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B's actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression.

  10. Regulation of gene expression by 17β-estradiol in the arcuate nucleus of the mouse through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jennifer A.; Mamounis, Kyle J.; Yasrebi, Ali; Roepke, Troy A.

    2016-01-01

    17β-estradiol (E2) modulates gene expression in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) to control homeostatic functions. In the ARC, estrogen receptor (ER) α is highly expressed and is an important contributor to E2’s actions, controlling gene expression through estrogen response element (ERE)-dependent and -independent mechanisms. The objective of this study was to determine if known E2-regulated genes are regulated through these mechanisms. The selected genes have been shown to regulate homeostasis and have been separated into three subsections: channels, receptors, and neuropeptides. To determine if ERE-dependent or ERE-independent mechanisms regulate gene expression, two transgenic mouse models, an ERα knock-out (ERKO) and an ERα knock-in/knock-out (KIKO), which lacks a functional ERE binding domain, were used in addition to their wild-type littermates. Females of all genotypes were ovariectomized and injected with oil or estradiol benzoate (E2B). Our results suggest that E2B regulates multiple genes through these mechanisms. Of note, Cacna1g and Kcnmb1 channel expression was increased by E2B in WT females only, suggesting an ERE-dependent regulation. Furthermore, the NKB receptor, Tac3r, was suppressed by E2B in WT and KIKO females but not ERKO females, suggesting that ERα-dependent, ERE-independent signaling is necessary for Tac3r regulation. The adrenergic receptor Adra1b was suppressed by E2B in all genotypes indicating that ERα is not the primary receptor for E2B’s actions. The neuropeptide Tac2 was suppressed by E2B through ERE-dependent mechanisms. These results indicate that E2B activates both ERα-dependent and independent signaling in the ARC through ERE-dependent and ERE-independent mechanisms to control gene expression. PMID:26768413

  11. Involvement of a glibenclamide-sensitive mechanism in the nitrergic neurotransmission of the pig intravesical ureter

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Medardo; Prieto, Dolores; Orensanz, Luis M; Barahona, María Victoria; Jiménez-Cidre, Miguel; Rivera, Luis; García-Sacristán, Albino; Simonsen, Ulf

    1997-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether potassium (K+) channels are involved in the relaxations to nitric oxide (NO) of pig intravesical ureteral preparations suspended in organ baths for isometric tension recordings. In ureteral strips treated with guanethidine (10−5 M) and atropine (10−7 M) to block adrenergic neurotransmission and muscarinic receptors, respectively, NO was either released from nitrergic nerves by electrical field stimulation (EFS, 0.5–10 Hz, 1 ms duration, 20 s trains), or exogenously-applied as an acidified solution of sodium nitrite (NaNO2, 10−6–10−3 M).Incubation with an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase activation by NO, methylene blue (10−5 M) did not change the basal tension of intravesical ureteral strips but inhibited the relaxation induced by EFS or exogenous NO on ureteral preparations contracted with the thromboxane analogue U46619 (10−7 M).Incubation with charybdotoxin (3×10−8 M) and apamin (5×10−7 M), which are inhibitors of large and small conductance calcium (Ca2+)-activated K+ channels, respectively, did not modify basal tension or the relaxations induced by EFS and exogenous NO. Treatment with charybdotoxin or apamin plus methylene blue (10−5 M) significantly reduced the relaxations to EFS and exogenous NO. However, in both cases the reductions were similar to the inhibition evoked by methylene blue alone. The combined addition of charybdotoxin plus apamin did not change the relaxations to EFS or exogenously added NO of the porcine intravesical ureter.Cromakalim (10−8–3×10−6 M), an opener of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, evoked a dose-dependent relaxation with a pD2 of 7.3±0.2 and maximum relaxant effect of a 71.8±4.2% of the contraction induced by U46619 in the pig intravesical ureter. The blocker of ATP-sensitive K+ channels, glibenclamide (10−6 M), inhibited markedly the relaxations to cromakalim.Glibenclamide (10−6 M) had no effect on the basal tone of

  12. Swarming mechanisms in the yellow fever mosquito: aggregation pheromones involved in the mating behavior of Aedes aegypti

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosquitoes of various species mate in swarms comprised of tens to thousands flying males. Yet little information is known about mosquito swarming mechanism. Discovering chemical cues involved in mosquito biology leads to better adaptation of disease control interventions. In this study, we aimed ...

  13. Combined Quantum Mechanical and Molecular Mechanics Studies of the Electron-Transfer Reactions Involving Carbon Tetrachloride in Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Valiev, Marat; Bylaska, Eric J.; Dupuis, Michel; Tratnyek, Paul G.

    2008-03-27

    The reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride, CC₄, was investigated using combined high level quantum mechanical and molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach. The first electron transfer process was assumed to proceed by a concerted electron transfer-bond breaking mechanism, and reaction barriers for the first electron reduction were estimated by using the crossing point of the free energy profiles of CCl₃-Cl and CCl₃-Cl•- as a function of the CCl₃-Cl distance. The results of these calculations showed that the activation barriers for this reaction are reachable under a wide range of reduction potentials. In the gas-phase, the barrier to reduction varied from 0.8 kcal/mol for reducing agent with a -5 kcal/mol work function to 24.7 kcal/mol for a reducing agent with a 40 kcal/mol work function at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level. In the aqueous phase, QM/MM calculations at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVDZ level predicted that the barrier to reduction varied from 0.7 kcal/mol to 35.2 kcal/mol for -2.32 V and 0.93 V reduction potentials respectively. COSMO continuum solvation calculations were also performed for comparison. For strong reducing agents (EH < -1.5V) very little difference was seen between the QM/MM and COSMO activation barriers. For weak reducing agents (EH > 0V) the activation barriers differed by as much as 6 kcal/mol between the QM/MM and COSMO calculations. These results demonstrate that ab initio electronic structure methods coupled with explicit molecular mechanics representation of the aqueous environment offer an efficient and accurate way to calculate the free energy reaction barriers for dissociative electron transfer reactions of organochlorine compounds to identify the potentially important environmental degradation processes.

  14. An auxin transport independent pathway is involved in phosphate stress-induced root architectural alterations in Arabidopsis. Identification of BIG as a mediator of auxin in pericycle cell activation.

    PubMed

    López-Bucio, José; Hernández-Abreu, Esmeralda; Sánchez-Calderón, Lenin; Pérez-Torres, Anahí; Rampey, Rebekah A; Bartel, Bonnie; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2005-02-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants display a number of root developmental responses to low phosphate availability, including primary root growth inhibition, greater formation of lateral roots, and increased root hair elongation. To gain insight into the regulatory mechanisms by which phosphorus (P) availability alters postembryonic root development, we performed a mutant screen to identify genetic determinants involved in the response to P deprivation. Three low phosphate-resistant root lines (lpr1-1 to lpr1-3) were isolated because of their reduced lateral root formation in low P conditions. Genetic and molecular analyses revealed that all lpr1 mutants were allelic to BIG, which is required for normal auxin transport in Arabidopsis. Detailed characterization of lateral root primordia (LRP) development in wild-type and lpr1 mutants revealed that BIG is required for pericycle cell activation to form LRP in both high (1 mm) and low (1 microm) P conditions, but not for the low P-induced alterations in primary root growth, lateral root emergence, and root hair elongation. Exogenously supplied auxin restored normal lateral root formation in lpr1 mutants in the two P treatments. Treatment of wild-type Arabidopsis seedlings with brefeldin A, a fungal metabolite that blocks auxin transport, phenocopies the root developmental alterations observed in lpr1 mutants in both high and low P conditions, suggesting that BIG participates in vesicular targeting of auxin transporters. Taken together, our results show that auxin transport and BIG function have fundamental roles in pericycle cell activation to form LRP and promote root hair elongation. The mechanism that activates root system architectural alterations in response to P deprivation, however, seems to be independent of auxin transport and BIG.

  15. Alternative NF-κB Regulates RANKL-induced Osteoclast Differentiation and Mitochondrial Biogenesis via Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Rong; Faccio, Roberta; Novack, Deborah V

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis, the generation of new mitochondrial DNA and proteins, has been linked to osteoclast (OC) differentiation and function. In this study we used mice with mutations in key alternative NF-κB pathway proteins, RelB and NIK, to dissect the complex relationship between mitochondrial biogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. OC precursors lacking either NIK or RelB, RANKL were unable to increase mitochondrial DNA or OxPhos protein expression, associated with lower oxygen consumption rates. Transgenic OC precursors expressing constitutively active NIK showed normal RANKL-induced mitochondrial biogenesis (OxPhos expression and mitochondria copy number) compared to controls, but larger mitochondrial dimensions and increased oxygen consumption rates, suggesting increased mitochondrial function. To deduce the mechanism for mitochondrial biogenesis defects in NIK- and RelB-deficient precursors, we examined expression of genes known to control this process. PGC-1β (Ppargc1b) expression, but not PGC-1α, PPRC1 or ERRα, was significantly reduced in RelB−/− and NIK−/− OCs. Because PGC-1β has been reported to positively regulate both mitochondrial biogenesis and differentiation in OCs, we retrovirally overexpressed PGC-1β in RelB−/− cells, but surprisingly found that it did not affect differentiation, nor restore RANKL-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. To determine whether the blockade in osteoclastogenesis in RelB-deficient cells precludes mitochondrial biogenesis, we rescued RelB−/− differentiation via overexpression of NFATc1. Mitochondrial parameters in neither WT nor RelB-deficient cultures were affected by NFATc1 overexpression, and bone resorption in RelB −/− was not restored. Furthermore, NFATc1 co-overexpression with PGC-1β, while allowing OC differentiation, did not rescue mitochondrial biogenesis or bone resorption in RelB−/− OCs, by CTX-I levels. Thus, our results indicate that the alternative NF-κB pathway plays dual, but

  16. Resveratrol Increases Serum BDNF Concentrations and Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Contractility via a NOS-3-Independent Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wiciński, Michał; Malinowski, Bartosz; Węclewicz, Mateusz M; Grześk, Elżbieta; Grześk, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that presents both antineuroinflammatory properties and the ability to interact with NOS-3, what contributes to vasorelaxation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF), a molecule associated with neuroprotection in many neurodegenerative disorders, is considered as an important element of maintaining stable cerebral blood flow. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are considered to be an important element in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and a potential preventative target by agents which reduce the contractility of the vessels. Our main objectives were to define the relationship between serum and long-term oral resveratrol administration in the rat model, as well as to assess the effect of resveratrol on phenylephrine- (PHE-) induced contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Moreover, we attempt to define the dependence of contraction mechanisms on endothelial NO synthase. Experiments were performed on Wistar rats (n = 17) pretreated with resveratrol (4 weeks; 10 mg/kg p.o.) or placebo. Serum BDNF levels were quantified after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with ELISA. Contraction force was measured on isolated and perfused tail arteries as the increase of perfusion pressure with a constant flow. Values of serum BNDF in week 0 were 1.18 ± 0.12 ng/mL (treated) and 1.17 ± 0.13 ng/mL (control) (p = ns). After 2 weeks of treatment, BDNF in the treatment group was higher than in controls, 1.52 ± 0.23 ng/mL and 1.24 ± 0.13 ng/mL, respectively. (p = 0.02) Following 4 weeks of treatment, BDNF values were higher in the resveratrol group compared to control 1.64 ± 0.31 ng/mL and 1.32 ± 0.26 ng/mL, respectively (p = 0.031). EC50 values obtained for PHE in resveratrol pretreated arteries were significantly higher than controls (5.33 ± 1.7 × 10(-7 )M/L versus 4.53 ± 1.2 × 10(-8 )M/L, p < 0.05). These results show a significant increase in BDNF concentration in the resveratrol pretreated group. The

  17. Resveratrol Increases Serum BDNF Concentrations and Reduces Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Contractility via a NOS-3-Independent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Malinowski, Bartosz; Grześk, Elżbieta; Grześk, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol that presents both antineuroinflammatory properties and the ability to interact with NOS-3, what contributes to vasorelaxation. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BNDF), a molecule associated with neuroprotection in many neurodegenerative disorders, is considered as an important element of maintaining stable cerebral blood flow. Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are considered to be an important element in the pathogenesis of neurodegeneration and a potential preventative target by agents which reduce the contractility of the vessels. Our main objectives were to define the relationship between serum and long-term oral resveratrol administration in the rat model, as well as to assess the effect of resveratrol on phenylephrine- (PHE-) induced contraction of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Moreover, we attempt to define the dependence of contraction mechanisms on endothelial NO synthase. Experiments were performed on Wistar rats (n = 17) pretreated with resveratrol (4 weeks; 10 mg/kg p.o.) or placebo. Serum BDNF levels were quantified after 2 and 4 weeks of treatment with ELISA. Contraction force was measured on isolated and perfused tail arteries as the increase of perfusion pressure with a constant flow. Values of serum BNDF in week 0 were 1.18 ± 0.12 ng/mL (treated) and 1.17 ± 0.13 ng/mL (control) (p = ns). After 2 weeks of treatment, BDNF in the treatment group was higher than in controls, 1.52 ± 0.23 ng/mL and 1.24 ± 0.13 ng/mL, respectively. (p = 0.02) Following 4 weeks of treatment, BDNF values were higher in the resveratrol group compared to control 1.64 ± 0.31 ng/mL and 1.32 ± 0.26 ng/mL, respectively (p = 0.031). EC50 values obtained for PHE in resveratrol pretreated arteries were significantly higher than controls (5.33 ± 1.7 × 10−7 M/L versus 4.53 ± 1.2 × 10−8 M/L, p < 0.05). These results show a significant increase in BDNF concentration in the resveratrol pretreated group. The

  18. Group I mGluRs increase excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons by a PLC-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ireland, David R; Abraham, Wickliffe C

    2002-07-01

    Previous studies have implicated phospholipase C (PLC)-linked Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in regulating the excitability of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. We used intracellular recordings from rat hippocampal slices and specific antagonists to examine in more detail the mGluR receptor subtypes and signal transduction mechanisms underlying this effect. Application of the Group I mGluR agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) suppressed slow- and medium-duration afterhyperpolarizations (s- and mAHP) and caused a consequent increase in cell excitability as well as a depolarization of the membrane and an increase in input resistance. Interestingly, with the exception of the suppression of the mAHP, these effects were persistent, and in the case of the sAHP lasting for more than 1 h of drug washout. Preincubation with the specific mGluR5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), reduced but did not completely prevent the effects of DHPG. However, preincubation with both MPEP and the mGluR1 antagonist LY367385 completely prevented the DHPG-induced changes. These results demonstrate that the DHPG-induced changes are mediated partly by mGluR5 and partly by mGluR1. Because Group I mGluRs are linked to PLC via G-protein activation, we also investigated pathways downstream of PLC activation, using chelerythrine and cyclopiazonic acid to block protein kinase C (PKC) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-(IP(3))-activated Ca(2+) stores, respectively. Neither inhibitor affected the DHPG-induced suppression of the sAHP or the increase in excitability nor did an inhibitor of PLC itself, U-73122. Taken together, these results argue that in CA1 pyramidal cells in the adult rat, DHPG activates mGluRs of both the mGluR5 and mGluR1 subtypes, causing a long-lasting suppression of the sAHP and a consequent persistent increase in excitability via a PLC-, PKC-, and IP(3)-independent transduction pathway.

  19. [Participation of proteinkinase CK2 in regulation of human erythrocytes plasma membrane redox system activity: relative contribution of ca(2+)-dependent and ca(2+)-independent mechanisms of its activation].

    PubMed

    Iakovenko, I N; Zhirnov, V V; Kozachenko, O P; Shablykin, O V; Brovarets', V S

    2012-01-01

    Involvement of protein kinase CK2 (2.7.11.1) in modulation of live cells trans-plasma membrane electron transport was first discovered. Using human erythrocytes a decrease of plasma membrane redox system (PMRS) activity is shown under the action of specific protein kinase CK2 inhibitors. Using inhibitory analysis the activity regulation of human erythrocytes PMRS by Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent mechanisms were investigated. It was shown that functional Ca(2+)-antagonists (nitrendipine and calmidazolium) significantly increased, and functional Ca(2+)-agonists to some extent reduced or did not affect the trans-plasma membrane electron transport in these cells.

  20. Relaxation of endothelin-1-induced pulmonary arterial constriction by niflumic acid and NPPB: mechanism(s) independent of chloride channel block.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Evans, A M; Kozlowski, R Z

    1999-03-01

    We investigated the effects of the Cl- channel blockers niflumic acid, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) and 4, 4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) on endothelin-1 (ET-1)-induced constriction of rat small pulmonary arteries (diameter 100-400 microm) in vitro, following endothelium removal. ET-1 (30 nM) induced a sustained constriction of rat pulmonary arteries in physiological salt solution. Arteries preconstricted with ET-1 were relaxed by niflumic acid (IC50: 35.8 microM) and NPPB (IC50: 21.1 microM) in a reversible and concentration-dependent manner. However, at concentrations known to block Ca++-activated Cl- channels, DIDS (mechanism by which niflumic acid and NPPB inhibit pulmonary artery constriction is independent of Cl- channel blockade. One possibility is that these compounds may block the Ca++-dependent contractile processes.

  1. A Mechanism for Land-Atmosphere Feedback Involving Planetary Wave Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koster, Randal D.; Chang, Yehui; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    2014-01-01

    While the ability of land surface conditions to influence the atmosphere has been demonstrated in various modeling and observational studies, the precise mechanisms by which land-atmosphere feedback occurs are still largely unknown particularly the mechanisms that allow land moisture state in one region to affect atmospheric conditions in another. Such remote impacts are examined here in the context of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, leading to the identification of one potential mechanism: the phase-locking and amplification of a planetary wave through the imposition of a spatial pattern of soil moisture at the land surface. This mechanism, shown here to be relevant in the AGCM, apparently also operates in nature, as suggested by supporting evidence found in reanalysis data.

  2. Molecules and mechanisms involved in the generation and migration of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Miranda, Luis R; Parnavelas, John G; Chiara, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-containing interneurons of the neocortex are largely derived from the ganglionic eminences in the subpallium. Numerous studies have previously defined the migratory paths travelled by these neurons from their origins to their destinations in the cortex. We review here results of studies that have identified many of the genes expressed in the subpallium that are involved in the specification of the subtypes of cortical interneurons, and the numerous transcription factors, motogenic factors and guidance molecules that are involved in their migration. PMID:20360946

  3. Molecules and mechanisms involved in the generation and migration of cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Miranda, Luis R; Parnavelas, John G; Chiara, Francesca

    2010-03-31

    The GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-containing interneurons of the neocortex are largely derived from the ganglionic eminences in the subpallium. Numerous studies have previously defined the migratory paths travelled by these neurons from their origins to their destinations in the cortex. We review here results of studies that have identified many of the genes expressed in the subpallium that are involved in the specification of the subtypes of cortical interneurons, and the numerous transcription factors, motogenic factors and guidance molecules that are involved in their migration.

  4. In vitro reassortment between Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus (IPNV) strains: The mechanisms involved and its effect on virulence.

    PubMed

    Lago, María; Bandín, Isabel; Olveira, José G; Dopazo, Carlos P

    2017-01-15

    Reassortment is one of the main mechanisms of evolution in dsRNA viruses with segmented genomes. It contributes to generate genetic diversity and plays an important role in the emergence and spread of new strains with altered virulence. Natural reassorment has been demonstrated among infectious pancreatic necrosis-like viruses (genus Aquabirnavirus, Birnaviridae). In the present study, coinfections between different viral strains, and genome sequencing by the Sanger and Illumina methods were applied to analyze the frequency of reassortment of this virus in vitro, the possible mechanisms involved, and its effect on virulence. Results have demonstrated that reassortment is a cell-dependent and non-random process, probably through differential expression of the different mRNA classes in the ribosomes of a specific cell, and by specific associations between the components to construct the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes and/or RNP cross-inhibition. However, the precise mechanisms involved, known in other viruses, still remain to be demonstrated in birnaviruses.

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone stimulates prolactin release from lactotrophs in photoperiodic species through a gonadotropin-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Helen L; Hodson, David J; Gregory, Susan J; Townsend, Julie; Tortonese, Domingo J

    2008-02-01

    Previous studies have provided evidence for a paracrine interaction between pituitary gonadotrophs and lactotrophs. Here, we show that GnRH is able to stimulate prolactin (PRL) release in ovine primary pituitary cultures. This effect was observed during the breeding season (BS), but not during the nonbreeding season (NBS), and was abolished by the application of bromocriptine, a specific dopamine agonist. Interestingly, GnRH gained the ability to stimulate PRL release in NBS cultures following treatment with bromocriptine. In contrast, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, a potent secretagogue of PRL, stimulated PRL release during both the BS and NBS and significantly enhanced the PRL response to GnRH during the BS. These results provide evidence for a photoperiodically modulated functional interaction between the GnRH/gonadotropic and prolactin axes in the pituitary gland of a short day breeder. Moreover, the stimulation of PRL release by GnRH was shown not to be mediated by the gonadotropins, since immunocytochemical, Western blotting, and PCR studies failed to detect pituitary LH or FSH receptor protein and mRNA expressions. Similarly, no gonadotropin receptor expression was observed in the pituitary gland of the horse, a long day breeder. In contrast, S100 protein, a marker of folliculostellate cells, which are known to participate in paracrine mechanisms within this tissue, was detected throughout the pituitaries of both these seasonal breeders. Therefore, an alternative gonadotroph secretory product, a direct effect of GnRH on the lactotroph, or another cell type, such as the folliculostellate cell, may be involved in the PRL response to GnRH in these species.

  6. Sensitizing Children to the Social and Emotional Mechanisms Involved in Racism: A Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Triliva, Sofia; Anagnostopoulou, Tanya; Vleioras, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes and discusses the results of an intervention aiming to sensitize children to the social and emotional processes involved in racism. The intervention was applied and evaluated in 10 Greek elementary schools. The goals and the intervention methods of the program modules are briefly outlined and the results of the program…

  7. Dysregulation of apoptosis is a major mechanism in the lymph node involvement in colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bandres, Eva; Catalan, Victoria; Sola, Iosu; Honorato, Beatriz; Cubedo, Elena; Cordeu, Lucia; Andion, Esther; Escalada, Alvaro; Zarate, Ruth; Salgado, Esteban; Zabalegui, Natalia; García, Fermin; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to define gene expression profile changes in colorectal tumors in order to identify target genes involved in neoplastic progression. cDNA microarray analysis was used to detect differences in gene expression profiles between colon tumor samples obtained from 20 patients in different tumor stages. Genes included in the cDNA microarray were selected according to their role in the cell cycle, apoptosis process, drug resistance and transcription factor regulation. Cluster analysis showed 2 well differentiated gene expression profiles between colorectal tumors with or without lymph node involvement. Some of these genes are important regulators of apoptotic pathways (DAD1, APO3, DRAK1 or BIK), suggesting that this process could be associated with node involvement. Subsequent analysis of certain genes identified in the microarray analysis were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Our data suggest that microarray technology could discriminate between the involvement of regional lymph node in colon cancer where apoptosis-related genes would be implied. This preliminary analysis also suggests that the gene expression profile may be useful in improving risk-group stratification.

  8. Cumulative asbestos exposure for US automobile mechanics involved in brake repair (circa 1950s-2000).

    PubMed

    Finley, Brent L; Richter, Richard O; Mowat, Fionna S; Mlynarek, Steve; Paustenbach, Dennis J; Warmerdam, John M; Sheehan, Patrick J

    2007-11-01

    We analyzed cumulative lifetime exposure to chrysotile asbestos experienced by brake mechanics in the US during the period 1950-2000. Using Monte Carlo methods, cumulative exposures were calculated using the distribution of 8-h time-weighted average exposure concentrations for brake mechanics and the distribution of job tenure data for automobile mechanics. The median estimated cumulative exposures for these mechanics, as predicted by three probabilistic models, ranged from 0.16 to 0.41 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cm(3)) year for facilities with no dust-control procedures (1970s), and from 0.010 to 0.012 f/cm(3) year for those employing engineering controls (1980s). Upper-bound (95%) estimates for the 1970s and 1980s were 1.96 to 2.79 and 0.07-0.10 f/cm(3) year, respectively. These estimates for US brake mechanics are consistent with, but generally slightly lower than, those reported for European mechanics. The values are all substantially lower than the cumulative exposure of 4.5 f/cm(3) year associated with occupational exposure to 0.1 f/cm(3) of asbestos for 45 years that is currently permitted under the current occupational exposure limits in the US. Cumulative exposures were usually about 100- to 1,000-fold less than those of other occupational groups with asbestos exposure for similar time periods. The cumulative lifetime exposure estimates presented here, combined with the negative epidemiology data for brake mechanics, could be used to refine the risk assessments for chrysotile-exposed populations.

  9. Recombination reactions as a possible mechanism of mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes in the Archean atmosphere of Earth.

    PubMed

    Babikov, Dmitri

    2017-03-21

    A hierarchy of isotopically substituted recombination reactions is formulated for production of sulfur allotropes in the anoxic atmosphere of Archean Earth. The corresponding system of kinetics equations is solved analytically to obtain concise expressions for isotopic enrichments, with focus on mass-independent isotope effects due to symmetry, ignoring smaller mass-dependent effects. Proper inclusion of atom-exchange processes is shown to be important. This model predicts significant and equal depletions driven by reaction stoichiometry for all rare isotopes: (33)S, (34)S, and (36)S. Interestingly, the ratio of capital [Formula: see text] values obtained within this model for (33)S and (36)S is -1.16, very close to the mass-independent fractionation line of the Archean rock record. This model may finally offer a mechanistic explanation for the striking mass-independent fractionation of sulfur isotopes that took place in the Archean atmosphere of Earth.

  10. Mechanisms involved in the recent large reductions in US road fatalities.

    PubMed

    Sivak, M

    2009-06-01

    Road fatalities in the USA have recently decreased, and these reductions are greater than the corresponding reductions in the amount of driving. A multiple regression analysis was performed on monthly data from January 2007 through December 2008. The dependent variable was the number of road fatalities. The independent variables were distance driven, proportion of driving on rural roads, and the average price of unleaded gasoline as a proxy for the proportion of leisure driving. The results suggest that the larger-than-expected fall in road fatalities is partly a consequence of the disproportional decreases in rural driving (which is more risky than urban driving) and leisure driving (which is more risky than commuter driving).

  11. Adenovirus type 5 early region 1B 55-kDa oncoprotein can promote cell transformation by a mechanism independent from blocking p53-activated transcription.

    PubMed

    Härtl, B; Zeller, T; Blanchette, P; Kremmer, E; Dobner, T

    2008-06-12

    Inhibition of p53-activated transcription is an integral part of the mechanism by which early region 1B 55K oncoprotein (E1B-55K) from adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) contributes to complete cell transformation in combination with Ad E1A. In addition, more recent data suggest that the mode of action of the Ad protein during transformation may involve additional functions and other protein interactions. In the present study, we performed a comprehensive mutational analysis to assign further transforming functions of Ad5 E1B-55K to distinct domains within the viral polypeptide. Results from these studies show that the functions required for transformation are encoded within several patches of the 55K primary sequence, including several clustered cysteine and histidine residues, some of which match the consensus for zinc fingers. In addition, two amino-acid substitutions (C454S/C456S) created a 55K mutant protein, which had substantially reduced transforming activity. Interestingly, the same mutations neither affected binding to p53 nor inhibition of p53-mediated transactivation. Therefore, an activity necessary for efficient transformation of primary rat cells can be separated from functions required for inhibition of p53-stimulated transcription. Our data indicate that this activity is linked to the ability of the Ad5 protein to bind to components of the Mre11/Rad50/NBS1 DNA double-strand break repair complex, and/or its ability to assemble multiprotein aggregates in the cytoplasm and nucleus of transformed rat cells. These results introduce a new function for Ad5 E1B-55K and suggest that the viral protein contributes to cell transformation through p53 transcription-dependent and -independent pathways.

  12. Rapid and reversible responses to IVIG in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases suggest mechanisms of action involving competition with functionally important autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Melvin; McCallus, Daniel E; Lin, Cindy Shin-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is widely used in autoimmune neuromuscular diseases whose pathogenesis is undefined. Many different effects of IVIG have been demonstrated in vitro, but few studies actually identify the mechanism(s) most important in vivo. Doses and treatment intervals are generally chosen empirically. Recent studies in Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy show that some effects of IVIG are readily reversible and highly dependent on the serum IgG level. This suggests that in some autoantibody-mediated neuromuscular diseases, IVIG directly competes with autoantibodies that reversibly interfere with nerve conduction. Mechanisms of action of IVIG which most likely involve direct competition with autoantibodies include: neutralization of autoantibodies by anti-idiotypes, inhibition of complement deposition, and increasing catabolism of pathologic antibodies by saturating FcRn. Indirect immunomodulatory effects are not as likely to involve competition and may not have the same reversibility and dose-dependency. Pharmacodynamic analyses should be informative regarding most relevant mechanism(s) of action of IVIG as well as the role of autoantibodies in the immunopathogenesis of each disease. Better understanding of the role of autoantibodies and of the target(s) of IVIG could lead to more efficient use of this therapy and better patient outcomes. PMID:24200120

  13. Are immunological mechanisms involved in colon cancer and are they possible markers for biotherapy improvement?

    PubMed

    Berghella, Anna Maria; Contasta, Ida; Pellegrini, Patrizia; Del Beato, Tiziana; Adorno, Domenico

    2006-10-01

    This paper focuses on our data on colon cancer patients. Our overall results lead us to believe that the suppressive effect of specific cytokines in colon cancer patients alters the functionality of TH1 and TH2 subsets of CD4+ T-cells, with an expansion of TH2 cells and a malfunctioning of TH1 cells. This immunological disregulation appears to increase with stage progression, suggesting a direct role in the mechanisms that allow the tumour to locate and expand within the host. It is also clear that in order to identify disease markers and generate an in vivo immune response that corrects the imbalance between TH1 and TH2 cells, we need to understand how tumour mechanisms cause this imbalance to begin with.

  14. The independence of international civil servants during the neoliberal decades: implications of the work stoppage involving 700 staff of the World Health Organization in November 2005.

    PubMed

    Katz, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The independence of international civil servants is critical to the fulfillment of their organizations' mandates, but it has been seriously undermined during 25 years of neoliberal influence in U.N. agencies, including the World Health Organization. In November 2005, 700 staff at WHO headquarters participated in a one-hour work stoppage--the first industrial action in the organization's history. Hierarchical and arbitrary management, abuse of rules and procedures, nepotism and harassment, and undue influence of international financial institutions, powerful member states, and transnational corporations have exhausted morale and motivation, creating a conformist environment and interfering with technical health work. In the neoliberal era, WHO staff confront conflicting duties of loyalty to a handful of member states and their private interests and loyalty to WHO's constitutional mandate. International civil servants need support from governing bodies and from the world's people in finding the correct balance. A first essential step would be respect for international labor standards within the U.N. family and, in particular, negotiation status and collective bargaining--human rights in the workplace and prerequisites for staff independence, integrity, and competence, qualities required to serve the world's people.

  15. Long-term expression of human contextual fear and extinction memories involves amygdala, hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex: a reinstatement study in two independent samples.

    PubMed

    Lonsdorf, Tina B; Haaker, Jan; Kalisch, Raffael

    2014-12-01

    Human context conditioning studies have focused on acquisition and extinction. Subsequent long-term changes in fear behaviors not only depend on associative learning processes during those phases but also on memory consolidation processes and the later ability to retrieve and express fear and extinction memories. Clinical theories explain relapse after successful exposure-based treatment with return of fear memories and remission with stable extinction memory expression. We probed contextual fear and extinction memories 1 week (Day8) after conditioning (Day1) and subsequent extinction (Day2) by presenting conditioned contexts before (Test1) and after (Test2) a reinstatement manipulation. We find consistent activation patterns in two independent samples: activation of a subgenual part of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex before reinstatement (Test1) and (albeit with different temporal profiles between samples) of the amygdala after reinstatement (Test2) as well as up-regulation of anterior hippocampus activity after reinstatement (Test2 > Test1). These areas have earlier been implicated in the expression of cued extinction and fear memories. The present results suggest a general role for these structures in defining the balance between fear and extinction memories, independent of the conditioning mode. The results are discussed in the light of hypotheses implicating the anterior hippocampus in the processing of situational ambiguity.

  16. Possible mechanism of psoralen phototoxicity not involving direct interaction with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Laskin, J.D.; Lee, E.; Yurkow, E.J.; Laskin, D.L.; Gallo, M.A.

    1985-09-01

    Psoralens in combination with ultraviolet light (UVA; 320-400 nm) are used in the photochemical treatment of a variety of skin diseases including vitiligo, a skin depigmentational disorder, and psoriasis, a disease of accelerated epidermal cell proliferation. Although it is generally assumed that the major site of action of the psoralens is DNA, the authors have obtained evidence that another site may be the primary target for these compounds. They have identified specific, saturable, high-affinity binding sites for 8-methoxypsoralen on HeLa cells and have detected specific binding of 8-methoxypsoralen to four other human cell lines and five mouse cell lines. In HeLa cells, specific binding is reversible and independent of the ability of the compound to intercalate into DNA. In addition, binding sites become covalently modified by the psoralen after UVA exposure. Specific binding of 8-(methyoxy-/sup 3/H)methoxypsoralen constitutes 79% of the label bound to the cells. Scatchard analysis indicated two classes of psoralen binding sites. Based on these findings, the authors hypothesize that specific binding sites for psoralens on mammalian cells mediate, at least in part, psoralen-induced phototoxicity.

  17. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in nicotine dependence and reward: participation of the endogenous opioid system

    PubMed Central

    Berrendero, Fernando; Robledo, Patricia; Trigo, José Manuel; Martín-García, Elena; Maldonado, Rafael

    2010-01-01

    Nicotine is the primary component of tobacco that maintains the smoking habit and develops addiction. The adaptive changes of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors produced by repeated exposure to nicotine play a crucial role in the establishment of dependence. However, other neurochemical systems also participate in the addictive effects of nicotine including glutamate, cannabinoids, GABA and opioids. This review will cover the involvement of these neurotransmitters in nicotine addictive properties, with a special emphasis on the endogenous opioid system. Thus, endogenous enkephalins and beta-endorphins acting on mu-opioid receptors are involved in nicotine rewarding effects, whereas opioid peptides derived from prodynorphin participate in nicotine aversive responses. An upregulation of mu-opioid receptors has been reported after chronic nicotine treatment that could counteract the development of nicotine tolerance, whereas the downregulation induced on kappa-opioid receptors seems to facilitate nicotine tolerance. Endogenous enkephalins acting on mu-opioid receptors also play a role in the development of physical dependence to nicotine. In agreement with these actions of the endogenous opioid system, the opioid antagonist naltrexone has shown to be effective for smoking cessation in certain subpopulations of smokers. PMID:20170672

  18. On a Class of Laplace Inverses Involving Doubly-Nested Square Roots and their Applications in Continuum Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Micropolar fluids Dipolar fluids a b s t r a c t The exact inverses of a class of Laplace transforms involving doubly-nested square roots and two branch...mechanics, for a micropolar fluid is determined. Published by Elsevier Ltd. 1. Introduction and problem formulation Using the Laplace transform, we...to the case of micropolar fluids, the theory of which was formulated by Eringen (1966). In doing so, we also extend the re- sults of Jordan et al

  19. Involvement of three mechanisms in the alteration of cytokine responses by sodium methyldithiocarbamate

    SciTech Connect

    Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@LSUHSC.edu; Fan, Ruping; Zheng, Qiang

    2006-06-01

    Sodium methyldithiocarbamate (SMD) is the third most abundantly used conventional pesticide in the U.S. We recently reported that it alters the induction of cytokine production mediated though Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 at relevant dosages in mice. Its chemical properties and evidence from the literature suggest thee potential mechanisms of action for this compound. It could either act as a free radical scavenger (by means of its free S{sup -}group) or promote oxidation by breaking down to form methylisothiocyanate, which can deplete glutathione. It is a potent copper chelator and may affect the availability of copper to a number of copper-dependent enzymes (including some signaling molecules). SMD induces a classical neuroendocrine stress response characterized by elevated serum corticosterone concentrations, which could affect cytokine production. Although each of these mechanisms could potentially contribute to altered cytokine responses, direct evidence is lacking. The present study was conducted to obtain such evidence. The role of redox balance was investigated by pretreating mice with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), which increases cellular glutathione concentrations, before administration of SMD. NAC exacerbated the SMD-induced suppression of IL-12 and the SMD-induced enhancement of IL-10 in the serum. The role of copper chelation was investigated by comparing the effects of SMD with an equimolar dose to SMD that was administered in the form of a copper chelation complex. Addition of copper significantly decreased the action of SMD on IL-12 production but not on IL-10 production. The role of the stress response was investigated by pretreating mice with antagonists of corticosterone and catecholamines. This treatment partially prevented the action of SMD on IL-10 and IL-12 in the peritoneal fluid. The results suggest that all of the proposed mechanisms have some role in the alteration of cytokine production by SMD.

  20. The principal motions involved in the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke of the myosin motor.

    SciTech Connect

    Mesentean, Sidonia; Koppole, Sampath; Smith, Jeremy C; Fischer, S.

    2007-03-01

    Muscle contraction is driven by a cycle of conformational changes in the myosin II head. After myosin binds ATP and releases from the actin fibril, myosin prepares for the next power stroke by rotating back the converter domain that carries the lever arm by 60{sup o}. This recovery stroke is coupled to the activation of myosin ATPase by a mechanism that is essential for an efficient motor cycle. The mechanics of this coupling have been proposed to occur via two distinct and successive motions of the two helices that hold the converter domain: in a first phase a seesaw motion of the relay helix, followed by a piston-like motion of the SH1 helix in a second phase. To test this model, we have determined the principal motions of these structural elements during equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of the crystallographic end states of the recovery-stroke by using principal component analysis. This reveals that the only principal motions of these two helices that make a large-amplitude contribution towards the conformational change of the recovery stroke are indeed the predicted seesaw and piston motions. Moreover, the results demonstrate that the seesaw motion of the relay helix dominates in the dynamics of the pre-recovery stroke structure, but not in the dynamics of the post-recovery stroke structure, and vice versa for the piston motion of the SH1 helix. This is consistent with the order of the proposed two-phase model for the coupling mechanism of the recovery stroke. Molecular movies of these principal motions are available at http://www.iwr.uni-heidelberg.de/groups/biocomp/fischer.

  1. Quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate inhibit glucose uptake and metabolism by breast cancer cells by an estrogen receptor-independent mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Moreira, Liliana; Araújo, Isabel; Costa, Tito; Correia-Branco, Ana; Faria, Ana; Martel, Fátima; Keating, Elisa

    2013-07-15

    In this study we characterized {sup 3}H-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 3}H -DG) uptake by the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive MCF7 and the ER-negative MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines and investigated the effect of quercetin (QUE) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) upon {sup 3}H-DG uptake, glucose metabolism and cell viability and proliferation. In both MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells {sup 3}H-DG uptake was (a) time-dependent, (b) saturable with similar capacity (V{sub max}) and affinity (K{sub m}), (c) potently inhibited by cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of the facilitative glucose transporters (GLUT), (d) sodium-independent and (e) slightly insulin-stimulated. This suggests that {sup 3}H-DG uptake by both cell types is mediated by members of the GLUT family, including the insulin-responsive GLUT4 or GLUT12, while being independent of the sodium-dependent glucose transporter (SGLT1). QUE and EGCG markedly and concentration-dependently inhibited {sup 3}H-DG uptake by MCF7 and by MDA-MB-231 cells, and both compounds blocked lactate production by MCF7 cells. Additionally, a 4 h-treatment with QUE or EGCG decreased MCF7 cell viability and proliferation, an effect that was more potent when glucose was available in the extracellular medium. Our results implicate QUE and EGCG as metabolic antagonists in breast cancer cells, independently of estrogen signalling, and suggest that these flavonoids could serve as therapeutic agents/adjuvants even for ER-negative breast tumors. -- Highlights: • Glucose uptake by MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells is mainly mediated by GLUT1. • QUE and EGCG inhibit cellular glucose uptake thus abolishing the Warburg effect. • This process induces cytotoxicity and proliferation arrest in MCF7 cells. • The flavonoids’ effects are independent of estrogen receptor signalling.

  2. A Novel Approach to the Elucidation of the Mechanism of Development of Androgen-Independent Growth of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    Receiving Pay From Research Effort James L. Mohler, M.D. Christopher Gregory, Ph.D. Tammy Morris Conclusion In summary, we have identified candidate...Using Color Video Image Analysis Desok Kim,1 Christopher W. Gregory,2 GaryJ. Smith, 3,4 andJames L. Mohler1,3,4. ’Department of Surgery, Division of...Androgen-independent Prostate Cancer Is Associated with Increased Expression of Androgen-regulated Genes’ Christopher W. Gregory, Katherine G. Hamil

  3. GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in anesthetized rats: are 5-HT5B receptors involved?

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Maldonado, Carolina; López-Sánchez, Pedro; Anguiano-Robledo, Liliana; Leopoldo, Marcello; Lacivita, Enza; Terrón, José A

    2015-04-01

    The 5-HT1B/1D receptor antagonist, GR-127935, inhibits hypotensive responses produced by the 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B/1D and 5-HT7 receptor agonist, and 5-HT5A/5B receptor ligand, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-CT), in rats. This work further characterized the above mechanism using more selective 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptor antagonists. Also, expression of 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in blood vessels was searched by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Decreases in diastolic blood pressure induced by 5-CT (0.001-10 μg/kg, intravenously) were analyzed in anesthetized rats that had received intravenous vehicle (1 mL/kg), SB-224289 (5-HT1B antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), BRL15572 (5-HT1D antagonist; 0.3 and 1.0 mg/kg), SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each), or SB-224289 + BRL15572 (0.3 mg/kg, each) + GR-127935 (1 mg/kg). Because only the latter treatment inhibited 5-CT-induced hypotension, suggestive of a mechanism unrelated to 5-HT1B/1D receptors, the effects of antagonists/ligands at 5-HT5A (SB-699551, 1 mg/kg), 5-HT6 (SB-399885, 1 mg/kg), and 5-HT1B/1D/5A/5B/7 receptors (ergotamine, 0.1 mg/kg) on 5-CT-induced hypotension were tested. Interestingly, only ergotamine blocked 5-CT-induced responses; this effect closely paralleled that of SB-224289 + BRL-15572 + GR-127935. Neither did ergotamine nor GR-127935 inhibit hypotensive responses induced by the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP-44. Faint but clear bands corresponding to 5-HT5A and 5-HT5B receptor mRNAs in aorta and mesenteric arteries were detected. Results suggest that the GR-127935-sensitive mechanism mediating hypotension in rats is unrelated to 5-HT1B, 5-HT1D, 5-HT5A, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors. This mechanism, however, resembles putative 5-HT5B receptors.

  4. A novel mechanism involved in the coupling of mitochondrial biogenesis to oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Jelena; Rago, Jean-Paul; Dujardin, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential organelles that are central to a multitude of cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which produces most of the ATP in animal cells. Thus it is important to understand not only the mechanisms and biogenesis of this energy production machinery but also how it is regulated in both physiological and pathological contexts. A recent study by Ostojić et al. [Cell Metabolism (2013) 18, 567-577] has uncovered a regulatory loop by which the biogenesis of a major enzyme of the OXPHOS pathway, the respiratory complex III, is coupled to the energy producing activity of the mitochondria. PMID:28357209

  5. Insulin response sequence-dependent and -independent mechanisms mediate effects of insulin on glucocorticoid-stimulated insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lixia; Pan, Haiyun; Unterman, Terry G

    2005-10-01

    IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) gene expression is stimulated by glucocorticoids and suppressed by insulin in the liver. Insulin response sequences (IRSs) mediate effects of insulin on basal promoter function, whereas glucocorticoids stimulate promoter activity through a contiguous glucocorticoid response element. Here we examined the role of IRS-dependent and -independent mechanisms in mediating insulin and glucocorticoids effects on IGFBP-1 promoter activity. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulates IGFBP-1 promoter activity in HepG2 cells, and mutation of IRSs reduces this effect, indicating that IRS-associated factors enhance glucocorticoid effects on promoter function. Conversely, insulin inhibits basal promoter activity by 40% and Dex-stimulated promoter activity by 65%, indicating that glucocorticoids enhance the ability of insulin to suppress promoter activity. Mutation of IRSs completely disrupts the insulin effect on basal promoter activity and reduces but does not abolish inhibition of Dex-stimulated promoter activity, indicating that insulin suppresses glucocorticoid-stimulated promoter activity through both IRS-dependent and -independent mechanisms. IRS-independent effects of insulin are context dependent because insulin does not suppress glucocorticoid-stimulated activity of a promoter containing multiple glucocorticoid response elements. Cotransfection studies indicate that suppression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, an insulin-regulated coactivator of the glucocorticoid receptor, is not required for this effect of insulin. Studies with pharmacological inhibitors indicate that both phosphatidylinositol-3' kinase and mitogen-activated kinase kinase pathways contribute to IRS-independent effects. These studies indicate that glucocorticoids and IRS-associated factors function together to mediate effects of insulin and glucocorticoids on promoter activity and that glucocorticoid treatment creates a complex environment in

  6. Mechanism of silver staining of histones: evidence for involvement of clustered lysine residues.

    PubMed

    Kurosaki, T; Tsutsui, K; Tsutsui, K; Aoyama, K; Oda, T

    1984-09-17

    Pretreatment of histones with formaldehyde markedly enhances the formation of metalic silver from ammoniacal silver ion. The rate of silver reduction was determined with different histones by spectrophotometric measurement of colloidal silver stabilized in solution, and the apparent reactivity thus determined was found to be in the decreasing order of H1 greater than H2B greater than H2A greater than H3 greater than H4. Involvement of lysine residues was suggested since this order coincides with that of lysine content of these histones. However, the exceptionally high reactivity of histone H1 can be explained only when greater contribution of clustered lysine residues is assumed. Amino group modification and tryptic digestion studies of H1 corroborated this assumption.

  7. Involvement of TACE in colon inflammation: a novel mechanism of regulation via SIRT-1 activation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Manoranjan; Mohapatra, Jogeswar; Wagh, Akshaya; Patel, Hiren M; Pandey, Dheerendra; Kadam, Shekhar; Argade, Anil; Deshpande, Shrikalp S; Shah, Gourang B; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Jain, Mukul R

    2014-03-01

    TNF-α converting enzyme (TACE) processes the membrane TNF-α to release the bioactive soluble TNF-α. Several evidences suggest the involvement of TNF-α and TACE in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-3, an endogenous inhibitor of TACE, is positively associated with silent information regulator (SIRT)-1. We aimed to study the expression of TACE, TIMP-3 and SIRT-1 at different stages of colitis and how TACE is regulated in response to SIRT-1 activation. Acute colitis was induced by 3.5% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water for 5days and levels of cytokines and mRNA expression of TACE, TIMP-3 and SIRT-1 were measured in colon at different time intervals. Next, the effect of SIRT-1 activator (resveratrol) or a selective TACE inhibitor (compound 11p) treatment was evaluated. Elevated levels of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1β, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-17 were observed during DSS exposure phase which restored to the normal level after DSS removal. A significant increase in TACE and suppression in TIMP-3 and SIRT-1 mRNA level was observed during DSS exposure phase which reverts back to normal towards the remission phase. Treatment with resveratrol significantly elevated SIRT-1 and TIMP-3 and suppressed TACE mRNA expression and was associated with amelioration of disease. Furthermore, treatment with selective TACE inhibitor significantly suppressed body weight loss, disease activity index, colonic myeloperoxidase activity and the elevated levels of cytokines after DSS challenge. These results strongly emphasize the involvement of TACE in colon inflammation and inhibition of TACE directly or indirectly via SIRT-1 activation ameliorates colitis.

  8. Mechanisms of Prescription Drug Diversion Among Drug-Involved Club- and Street-Based Populations

    PubMed Central

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Cicero, Theodore J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Prescription drug diversion involves the unlawful channeling of regulated pharmaceuticals from legal sources to the illicit marketplace, and can occur along all points in the drug delivery process, from the original manufacturing site to the wholesale distributor, the physician's office, the retail pharmacy, or the patient. However, empirical data on diversion are limited. Method In an attempt to develop a better understanding of how specific drug-using populations are diverting prescription opioids and other medications, or obtaining controlled drugs that have already been diverted, qualitative interviews and focus group data were collected on four separate populations of prescription drug abusers in Miami, Florida—club drug users, street-based illicit drug users, methadone maintenance patients, and HIV positive individuals who abuse and/or divert drugs. Results Sources of abused prescription drugs cited by focus group participants were extremely diverse, including their physicians and pharmacists; parents and relatives; “doctor shopping”; leftover supplies following an illness or injury; personal visits to Mexico, South America and the Caribbean; prescriptions intended for the treatment of mental illness; direct sales on the street and in nightclubs; pharmacy and hospital theft; through friends or acquaintances; under-the-door apartment flyers advertising telephone numbers to call; and “stealing from grandma's medicine cabinet.” Conclusion While doctor shoppers, physicians and the Internet receive much of the attention regarding diversion, the data reported in this paper suggest that there are numerous active street markets involving patients, Medicaid recipients and pharmacies as well. In addition, there are other data which suggest that the contributions of residential burglaries, pharmacy robberies and thefts, and “sneak thefts” to the diversion problem may be understated. PMID:17305688

  9. CD4 down-modulation during infection of human T cells with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves independent activities of vpu, env, and nef.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B K; Gandhi, R T; Baltimore, D

    1996-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genes vpu, env, and nef have all been implicated in modulating the levels of cell surface CD4 on infected cells. To quantitatively assess the relative contribution of each gene product to the regulation of CD4 during HIV infection of Jurkat T cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we have developed an infectious HIV reporter system which expresses different combinations of these genes. To distinguish infected cells in the early or late stages of infection from uninfected cells, these viruses were designed to express human placental alkaline phosphatase with the kinetics of either early or late viral genes. Flow cytometry to detect placental alkaline phosphatase and CD4 in infected cells showed that vpu, env, and nef are independently capable of down-modulation of CD4. As predicted by their respective expression patterns, nef down-modulated CD4 rapidly during the early phase of virus infection whereas vpu and env functioned late in the infection. In both Jurkat cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a combination of the three genes was more efficient than any one or two genes, demonstrating that all three genes are required to achieve maximal CD4 down-modulation. In primary cells, down-modulation of CD4 was less efficient than in Jurkat cells and there was a stronger dependence on nef function for reducing cell surface CD4. HIV therefore has three genes that are able to independently down-modulate CD4; together, they can eliminate the bulk of cell surface CD4. PMID:8709227

  10. Modulation of a voltage-gated Na+ channel by sevoflurane involves multiple sites and distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Barber, Annika F; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Klein, Michael L; Eckenhoff, Roderic G; Covarrubias, Manuel

    2014-05-06

    Halogenated inhaled general anesthetic agents modulate voltage-gated ion channels, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not understood. Many general anesthetic agents regulate voltage-gated Na(+) (NaV) channels, including the commonly used drug sevoflurane. Here, we investigated the putative binding sites and molecular mechanisms of sevof