Science.gov

Sample records for independent seismic evaluation

  1. Independent review of Oak Ridge HCTW test program and development of seismic evaluation criteria

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Many of the existing buildings at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant are steel frame construction with unreinforced hollow clay tile infill walls (HCTW). The HCTW infill provides some lateral seismic resistance to the design/evaluation basis earthquake; however acceptance criteria for this construction must be developed. The basis for the development of seismic criteria is the Oak Ridge HCTW testing and analysis program and the target performance goals of DOE 5480.28 and DOE-STD-1020-94. This report documents and independent review of the testing and analysis program and development of recommended acceptance criteria for Oak Ridge HCTW construction. The HCTW test program included ``macro`` wall in-plane and out-of-plane tests, full-scale wall in-plane and out-of-plane tests, in-situ out-of-plane test, shake table tests, and masonry component tests.

  2. Independent seismic evaluation of the 24-580-680 south connector ramps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.C.

    1997-05-01

    Site response analyses were performed using the computer program SHAKE at the I-24/580/980 site to provide seismic ground motions for independent evaluations of the freeway interchange structure. Analytical models and soil parameters for SHAKE analysis were developed from geotechnical data obtained from several site investigation programs conducted at the site in 1960, 1991 and 1995. Two sets of rock outcropping input motions were used: (1) modified Santa Cruz earthquake records provided by Caltrans, and (2) LLNL synthetic strong ground motions. The LLNL synthetic ground motions were developed using LLNL Empirical Green functions method simulating strong earthquakes of moment magnitude 7.25 from the nearby Hayward Fault about 4 km from the site. Calculated ground surface motions using LLNL median rock input-motions are compatible with Caltrans design/evaluation motions.

  3. BUILDING 341 Seismic Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Halle, J.

    2015-06-15

    The Seismic Evaluation of Building 341 located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California has been completed. The subject building consists of a main building, Increment 1, and two smaller additions; Increments 2 and 3.

  4. Stress drop with constant, scale independent seismic efficiency and overshoot

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.

    2001-01-01

    To model dissipated and radiated energy during earthquake stress drop, I calculate dynamic fault slip using a single degree of freedom spring-slider block and a laboratory-based static/kinetic fault strength relation with a dynamic stress drop proportional to effective normal stress. The model is scaled to earthquake size assuming a circular rupture; stiffness varies inversely with rupture radius, and rupture duration is proportional to radius. Calculated seismic efficiency, the ratio of radiated to total energy expended during stress drop, is in good agreement with laboratory and field observations. Predicted overshoot, a measure of how much the static stress drop exceeds the dynamic stress drop, is higher than previously published laboratory and seismic observations and fully elasto-dynamic calculations. Seismic efficiency and overshoot are constant, independent of normal stress and scale. Calculated variation of apparent stress with seismic moment resembles the observational constraints of McGarr [1999].

  5. Source-independent full waveform inversion of seismic data

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ki Ha

    2006-02-14

    A set of seismic trace data is collected in an input data set that is first Fourier transformed in its entirety into the frequency domain. A normalized wavefield is obtained for each trace of the input data set in the frequency domain. Normalization is done with respect to the frequency response of a reference trace selected from the set of seismic trace data. The normalized wavefield is source independent, complex, and dimensionless. The normalized wavefield is shown to be uniquely defined as the normalized impulse response, provided that a certain condition is met for the source. This property allows construction of the inversion algorithm disclosed herein, without any source or source coupling information. The algorithm minimizes the error between data normalized wavefield and the model normalized wavefield. The methodology is applicable to any 3-D seismic problem, and damping may be easily included in the process.

  6. Seismic evaluation of municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect

    Hovind, C.; Slyh, R.

    1995-12-31

    With the promulgation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery (RCRA) Subtitle D, landfills situated within seismic impact zones must be evaluated for seismic hazards to demonstrate that the containment structures of the landfill can resist the maximum horizontal acceleration in lithified earth materials (bedrock) for the site. If a landfill is sited on saturated soils, it must also be evaluated for liquefaction and lateral spreading. In 1994, EMCON evaluated the seismic hazard for a landfill located along the Columbia River in southwestern Washington. The landfill was founded on dredge fill over natural alluvial deposits. Laboratory testing and state-of-the-art engineering analyses indicated that the sand unit below the landfill had a high potential for liquefaction. The seismic hazard evaluation for the site included a site-specific seismic response analysis, a liquefaction potential analysis, and seismic stability and deformation analysis. The seismic response analysis was conducted for nonliquefied, partially liquefied, and fully liquefied foundation soil conditions. Results are described.

  7. Functional seismic evaluation of hospitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guevara, L. T.

    2003-04-01

    Functional collapse of hospitals (FCH) occurs when a medical complex, or part of it, although with neither structural nor nonstructural damage, is unable to provide required services for immediate attention to earthquake victims and for the recovery of the affected community. As it is known, FCH during and after an earthquake, is produced, not only by the damage to nonstructural components, but by an inappropriate or deficient distribution of essential and supporting medical spaces. This paper presents some conclusions on the analysis of the traditional architectural schemes for the design and construction of hospitals in the 20th Century and some recommendations for the establishment of evaluation parameters for the remodeling and seismic upgrade of existing hospitals in seismic zones based on the new concepts of: a) the relative location of each essential service (ES) into the medical complex, b) the capacity of each of these spaces for housing temporary activities required for the attention of a massive emergency (ME); c) the relationship between ES and the supporting services (SS); d) the flexibility of transformation of nonessential services into complementary spaces for the attention of extraordinary number of victims; e) the dimensions and appropriateness of evacuation routes; and d) the appropriate supply and maintenance of water, electricity and vital gases emergency installations.

  8. Evaluation of seismic energy evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    -Emilian Toader, Victorin; Marmureanu, Alexandru

    2013-04-01

    The program analyzes seismicity on a defined area with the use of bulletins (event information) provided by ANTELOPE software. These include earthquake localization (moment, latitude, longitude, magnitude, depth, P and S for each station and other parameters). The evolution of the calculated energy from the Richter magnitude is characterized by steps which can be linearly interpolated. In this way tendencies of energy accumulation / release through tectonic movement can be estimated. Also, it will be calculated and displayed the 'b' coefficient from the Gutenberg - Richter law. The results will be saved as a HTML list which allows global and individual visualization of the seismic forecasts accompanied by the epicenter position on the map. The ANTELOPE users are the first beneficiaries but the program could be modified for other formats of data which include the same information related to the earthquakes localization. The software allows to select the analysis area in which the epicenters are located. In this respect, we are using the free Google Static Maps service (in this case an internet connection is necessary) as well as there is an offline option. In a configuration file the coordinates of the epicenter area has to be defined, the zoom level and the map type if Google Maps is used. The user may redefine the investigation area in online mode. Furthermore, the program allows the selection of the time interval during which the analysis is performed, the configuration of the magnitude and depth intervals, the folders in which the ANTELOPE bulletins are located and where the results will be saved in HTML format. In a separate panel the time intervals between 2 seismic events, the resulted energy from the magnitude conversion (Ml or Md) and magnitudes - depths evolution at which the earthquakes took place can be visualized. During the analysis of the seismic bulletins generated by ANTELOPE, the epicenters are displayed dynamically in the original selected area

  9. Seismic performance evaluation of substation structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, H.H.M.; Huo, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an approach for evaluating seismic hazards at the site and generating fragility curves for structures such as the capacitor bank in one of the major substations in the Memphis electric transmission system. The results from this study will be used to determine the adequacy of electric supply to several major hospitals in downtown Memphis after a large New Madrid earthquake.

  10. Seismic Performance Evaluation of Concentrically Braced Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsiao, Po-Chien

    Concentrically braced frames (CBFs) are broadly used as lateral-load resisting systems in buildings throughout the US. In high seismic regions, special concentrically braced frames (SCBFs) where ductility under seismic loading is necessary. Their large elastic stiffness and strength efficiently sustains the seismic demands during smaller, more frequent earthquakes. During large, infrequent earthquakes, SCBFs exhibit highly nonlinear behavior due to brace buckling and yielding and the inelastic behavior induced by secondary deformation of the framing system. These response modes reduce the system demands relative to an elastic system without supplemental damping. In design the re reduced demands are estimated using a response modification coefficient, commonly termed the R factor. The R factor values are important to the seismic performance of a building. Procedures put forth in FEMAP695 developed to R factors through a formalized procedure with the objective of consistent level of collapse potential for all building types. The primary objective of the research was to evaluate the seismic performance of SCBFs. To achieve this goal, an improved model including a proposed gusset plate connection model for SCBFs that permits accurate simulation of inelastic deformations of the brace, gusset plate connections, beams and columns and brace fracture was developed and validated using a large number of experiments. Response history analyses were conducted using the validated model. A series of different story-height SCBF buildings were designed and evaluated. The FEMAP695 method and an alternate procedure were applied to SCBFs and NCBFs. NCBFs are designed without ductile detailing. The evaluation using P695 method shows contrary results to the alternate evaluation procedure and the current knowledge in which short-story SCBF structures are more venerable than taller counterparts and NCBFs are more vulnerable than SCBFs.

  11. Standards for the testing and evaluation of seismic isolation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, A.W.; Chung, R.M.; Shenton, H.W.

    1995-12-01

    Draft guidelines for the testing and evaluation of seismic isolation systems have recently been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). These guidelines are organized into three sections: pre-qualification, prototype, and quality control testing. The guidelines are broadly applicable, since they are independent of the type of isolation system and superstructure. The guidelines will serve as a resource document for industry, and as a basis for developing future standards for testing of isolation systems. This paper gives an overview of the NIST draft guidelines, emphasizing the philosophy behind the development of the guidelines. A brief summary of the contents of the guidelines is also presented.

  12. Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Independent Review of Seismic Structural Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-09-22

    The following separate reports and correspondence pertains to the independent review of the seismic analysis. The original analysis was performed by GEC-Alsthom Engineering Systems Limited (GEC-ESL) under subcontract to Foster-Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWEC) who was the prime integration contractor to the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project for the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine (MHM). The original analysis was performed to the Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) response spectra using 5% damping as required in specification, HNF-S-0468 for the 90% Design Report in June 1997. The independent review was performed by Fluor-Daniel (Irvine) under a separate task from their scope as Architect-Engineer of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) in 1997. The comments were issued in April 1998. Later in 1997, the response spectra of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) was revised according to a new soil-structure interaction analysis and accordingly revised the response spectra for the MHM and utilized 7% damping in accordance with American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) NOG-1, ''Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes (Top Running Bridge, Multiple Girder).'' The analysis was re-performed to check critical areas but because manufacturing was underway, designs were not altered unless necessary. FWEC responded to SNF Project correspondence on the review comments in two separate letters enclosed. The dispositions were reviewed and accepted. Attached are supplier source surveillance reports on the procedures and process by the engineering group performing the analysis and structural design. All calculation and analysis results are contained in the MHM Final Design Report which is part of the Vendor Information File 50100. Subsequent to the MHM supplier engineering analysis, there was a separate analyses for nuclear safety accident concerns that used the electronic input data files provided by FWEC/GEC-ESL and are contained in document SNF-6248

  13. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sewell, R.T.; Wu, S.C.

    1996-07-01

    This report documents research pertaining to conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates. Specifically, it examines whether or not artificial motions produce unrealistic evaluation demands, i.e., demands significantly inconsistent with those expected from real earthquake motions. To study these issues, two types of artificial motions are considered: (a) motions with smooth response spectra, and (b) motions with realistic variations in spectral amplitude across vibration frequency. For both types of artificial motion, time histories are generated to match target spectral shapes. For comparison, empirical motions representative of those that might result from strong earthquakes in the Eastern U.S. are also considered. The study findings suggest that artificial motions resulting from typical simulation approaches (aimed at matching a given target spectrum) are generally adequate and appropriate in representing the peak-response demands that may be induced in linear structures and equipment responding to real earthquake motions. Also, given similar input Fourier energies at high-frequencies, levels of input Fourier energy at low frequencies observed for artificial motions are substantially similar to those levels noted in real earthquake motions. In addition, the study reveals specific problems resulting from the application of Western U.S. type motions for seismic evaluation of Eastern U.S. nuclear power plants.

  14. The Illusion of Independence in Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Terry Cobb

    Values and beliefs underlying assumptions concerning the independent evaluations of persons and programs involved in the educational process are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on M. Scriven's treatise on bias in evaluation (1976). Works by E. R. House, R. E. Stake, L. Stenhouse, M. Parlett and D. Hamilton, and D. L. Stufflebeam are also…

  15. Independent seismic evaluation of the 24-580-980 south connector ramps response to the south connector ramps to a magnitude 7.25 Hayward Fault earthquake. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, D. B.; Gerhard, M. A.; Trummer, D. J.; Murray, R. C.

    1996-11-01

    The 24/580/980 interchange is located near Oakland California on the Eastern perimeter of the San Francisco Bay (Fig. 1 and Fig. 2). This interchange is a major artery in the Eastern San Francisco Bay area and provides a critical link between major bay area highways. The main Concord line of the Bay Area Rapid Transit System (BART), with ridership of approximately 270,000 per day, runs underneath the interchange. The interchange site is approximately 4 Km from the Hayward fault and 16 Km from the San Andreas fault. The reinforced concrete interchange was designed and constructed in the mid 1960`s and thus the asphalt structure has many of the vulnerabilities associated with typical pre-1970`s concrete structures (Roberts [1], Zefinski [2], Chai et. al. [3], Priestly and Seible [4]). In 1980 some of the seismic vulnerabilities were addressed as the interchange was retrofit with deck hinge restrainers as part of the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) state-wide seismic retrofit of bridge expansion joints. The interchange was subjected to earthquake motion during the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake and sustained minor damage in some of the concrete diaphragms which support the hinge restrainer forces [5]. Caltrans engineers, working together with their external consultants Imbsen and Associates, have recently completed a seismic retrofit design for portions of the interchange. The retrofit is primarily intended to fix inadequacies in many of the 1960`s vintage reinforced concrete elements which constitute the bridge superstructure and foundations.

  16. Including foreshocks and aftershocks in time-independent probabilistic seismic hazard analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver S.

    2012-01-01

    Time‐independent probabilistic seismic‐hazard analysis treats each source as being temporally and spatially independent; hence foreshocks and aftershocks, which are both spatially and temporally dependent on the mainshock, are removed from earthquake catalogs. Yet, intuitively, these earthquakes should be considered part of the seismic hazard, capable of producing damaging ground motions. In this study, I consider the mainshock and its dependents as a time‐independent cluster, each cluster being temporally and spatially independent from any other. The cluster has a recurrence time of the mainshock; and, by considering the earthquakes in the cluster as a union of events, dependent events have an opportunity to contribute to seismic ground motions and hazard. Based on the methods of the U.S. Geological Survey for a high‐hazard site, the inclusion of dependent events causes ground motions that are exceeded at probability levels of engineering interest to increase by about 10% but could be as high as 20% if variations in aftershock productivity can be accounted for reliably.

  17. Revision of Time-Independent Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Maps for Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wesson, Robert L.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Mueller, Charles S.; Bufe, Charles G.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    We present here time-independent probabilistic seismic hazard maps of Alaska and the Aleutians for peak ground acceleration (PGA) and 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 second spectral acceleration at probability levels of 2 percent in 50 years (annual probability of 0.000404), 5 percent in 50 years (annual probability of 0.001026) and 10 percent in 50 years (annual probability of 0.0021). These maps represent a revision of existing maps based on newly obtained data and assumptions reflecting best current judgments about methodology and approach. These maps have been prepared following the procedures and assumptions made in the preparation of the 2002 National Seismic Hazard Maps for the lower 48 States. A significant improvement relative to the 2002 methodology is the ability to include variable slip rate along a fault where appropriate. These maps incorporate new data, the responses to comments received at workshops held in Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, in May, 2005, and comments received after draft maps were posted on the National Seismic Hazard Mapping Web Site. These maps will be proposed for adoption in future revisions to the International Building Code. In this documentation we describe the maps and in particular explain and justify changes that have been made relative to the 1999 maps. We are also preparing a series of experimental maps of time-dependent hazard that will be described in future documents.

  18. Independent Analysis of Seismicity and Rock fall Scenarios for the Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect

    Apted, M.J.; Kemeny, J.M.; Martin, C.D.; James, R.J.

    2006-07-01

    Yucca Mountain is located in the somewhat seismically active Basin and Range province. Future seismic activity is identified by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the US National Academy of Sciences as a key scenario for safety assessment of a proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. As part of its on-going program of conducting independent analyses of scientific and technical issues that could be important to the licensing of the Yucca Mountain repository, EPRI has conducted an analysis of the combined scenarios of seismic activity and stability of emplacement drifts with respect to the long-term repository safety. In this paper we present the results of 3D finite element simulations of both static and dynamic loading of a degraded waste package. For the static case, the expected maximum static load is determined by utilizing relationships between cave height and the bulking factor. A static load representing 30 meters of broken rock was simulated using the finite element model. For the dynamic case, block size and velocity data from the most recent Drift Degradation AMR are used. Based on this, a rock block with a volume of 3.11 m{sup 3} and with an impact velocity of 4.81 m/s was simulated using the finite element model. In both cases, the results indicate that the waste package remains intact. (authors)

  19. Seismic body wave separation in volcano-tectonic activity inferred by the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, Paolo; De Lauro, Enza; De Martino, Salvatore; Falanga, Mariarosaria; Petrosino, Simona

    2015-04-01

    One of the main challenge in volcano-seismological literature is to locate and characterize the source of volcano/tectonic seismic activity. This passes through the identification at least of the onset of the main phases, i.e. the body waves. Many efforts have been made to solve the problem of a clear separation of P and S phases both from a theoretical point of view and developing numerical algorithms suitable for specific cases (see, e.g., Küperkoch et al., 2012). Recently, a robust automatic procedure has been implemented for extracting the prominent seismic waveforms from continuously recorded signals and thus allowing for picking the main phases. The intuitive notion of maximum non-gaussianity is achieved adopting techniques which involve higher-order statistics in frequency domain., i.e, the Convolutive Independent Component Analysis (CICA). This technique is successful in the case of the blind source separation of convolutive mixtures. In seismological framework, indeed, seismic signals are thought as the convolution of a source function with path, site and the instrument response. In addition, time-delayed versions of the same source exist, due to multipath propagation typically caused by reverberations from some obstacle. In this work, we focus on the Volcano Tectonic (VT) activity at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the 2006 ground uplift (Ciaramella et al., 2011). The activity was characterized approximately by 300 low-magnitude VT earthquakes (Md < 2; for the definition of duration magnitude, see Petrosino et al. 2008). Most of them were concentrated in distinct seismic sequences with hypocenters mainly clustered beneath the Solfatara-Accademia area, at depths ranging between 1 and 4 km b.s.l.. The obtained results show the clear separation of P and S phases: the technique not only allows the identification of the S-P time delay giving the timing of both phases but also provides the independent waveforms of the P and S phases. This is an enormous

  20. Evaluation Of The Seismic Vulnerability of Fortified Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Baratta, Alessandro; Corbi, Ileana; Coppari, Sandro

    2008-07-08

    In the paper a prompt method to evaluate the seismic vulnerability of an ancient structure has been applied to the seismic vulnerability of the fortified structures in Italy, having as basics the elaboration of rather gross information about the state, the consistency and the history of the considered population of fabrics. The procedure proves to be rather effective and able to produce reliable results, despite the poor initial data.

  1. Evaluation Of The Seismic Vulnerability of Fortified Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratta, Alessandro; Corbi, Ileana; Coppari, Sandro

    2008-07-01

    In the paper a prompt method to evaluate the seismic vulnerability of an ancient structure has been applied to the seismic vulnerability of the fortified structures in Italy, having as basics the elaboration of rather gross information about the state, the consistency and the history of the considered population of fabrics. The procedure proves to be rather effective and able to produce reliable results, despite the poor initial data.

  2. Delineation of tectonic provinces of New York state as a component of seismic-hazard evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fakundiny, R.H.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic-hazard evaluations in the eastern United States must be based on interpretations of the composition and form of Proterozoic basement-rock terranes and overlying Paleozoic strata, and on factors that can cause relative movements among their units, rather than Phanerozoic orogenic structures, which may be independent of modern tectonics. The tectonic-province concept is a major part of both probabilistic and deterministic seismic-hazard evaluations, yet those that have been proposed to date have not attempted to geographically correlate modern earthquakes with regional basement structure. Comparison of basement terrane (megablock) boundaries with the spatial pattern of modern seismicity may lead to the mechanically sound definition of tectonic provinces, and thus, better seismic-hazard evaluation capability than is currently available. Delineation of megablock boundaries will require research on the many factors that affect their structure and movement. This paper discusses and groups these factors into two broad categories-megablock tectonics in relation to seismicity and regional horizontal-compressive stresses, with megablock tectonics divided into subcategories of basement, overlying strata, regional lineaments, basement tectonic terranes, earthquake epicenter distribution, and epeirogeny, and compressive stresses divided into pop-ups and the contemporary maximum horizontal-compressive stress field. A list presenting four to nine proposed research topics for each of these categories is given at the end.

  3. Application of remote sensing image interpretation in seismic safety evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Feng; Wei, Wen-xia; Wang, Gang

    2005-10-01

    As one of essential design gist in important engineering projects, the seismic safety evaluation on choosing engineering site has been applied widely. Using remote sensing images, the analysis to regional seismotectonic environment can bring macroscopic, integrative, dynamic and high efficiency information, so the application of remote sensing technology in seismic safety evaluation of engineering site has fine prospect and will bring great benefit. In this paper, based on remote sensing interpretation to Landsat7 ETM images, also using GIS and field geological investigations, as a case study in Qingdao City, we analyze the physiognomy environment, new tectonic movement, faults activities, and the distributing of deleterious geological objects around the site. Then we find this method can provide good basic geological information for seismic safety evaluation.

  4. Blind Source Separation of Seismic Events with Independent Component Analysis: CTBT related exercise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhkov, Mikhail; Kitov, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Blind Source Separation (BSS) methods used in signal recovery applications are attractive for they use minimal a priori information about the signals they are dealing with. Homomorphic deconvolution and cepstrum estimation are probably the only methods used in certain extent in CTBT applications that can be attributed to the given branch of technology. However Expert Technical Analysis (ETA) conducted in CTBTO to improve the estimated values for the standard signal and event parameters according to the Protocol to the CTBT may face problems which cannot be resolved with certified CTBTO applications and may demand specific techniques not presently used. The problem to be considered within the ETA framework is the unambiguous separation of signals with close arrival times. Here, we examine two scenarios of interest: (1) separation of two almost co-located explosions conducted within fractions of seconds, and (2) extraction of explosion signals merged with wavetrains from strong earthquake. The importance of resolving the problem related to case 1 is connected with the correct explosion yield estimation. Case 2 is a well-known scenario of conducting clandestine nuclear tests. While the first case can be approached somehow with the means of cepstral methods, the second case can hardly be resolved with the conventional methods implemented at the International Data Centre, especially if the signals have close slowness and azimuth. Independent Component Analysis (in its FastICA implementation) implying non-Gaussianity of the underlying processes signal's mixture is a blind source separation method that we apply to resolve the mentioned above problems. We have tested this technique with synthetic waveforms, seismic data from DPRK explosions and mining blasts conducted within East-European platform as well as with signals from strong teleseismic events (Sumatra, April 2012 Mw=8.6, and Tohoku, March 2011 Mw=9.0 earthquakes). The data was recorded by seismic arrays of the

  5. Tritium glovebox stripper system seismic design evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Grinnell, J. J.; Klein, J. E.

    2015-09-01

    The use of glovebox confinement at US Department of Energy (DOE) tritium facilities has been discussed in numerous publications. Glovebox confinement protects the workers from radioactive material (especially tritium oxide), provides an inert atmosphere for prevention of flammable gas mixtures and deflagrations, and allows recovery of tritium released from the process into the glovebox when a glovebox stripper system (GBSS) is part of the design. Tritium recovery from the glovebox atmosphere reduces emissions from the facility and the radiological dose to the public. Location of US DOE defense programs facilities away from public boundaries also aids in reducing radiological doses to the public. This is a study based upon design concepts to identify issues and considerations for design of a Seismic GBSS. Safety requirements and analysis should be considered preliminary. Safety requirements for design of GBSS should be developed and finalized as a part of the final design process.

  6. Structural evaluation of the 2736Z Building for seismic loads

    SciTech Connect

    Giller, R.A.

    1994-09-23

    The 2736Z building structure is evaluated for high-hazard loads. The 2736Z building is analyzed herein for normal and seismic loads and is found to successfully meet the guidelines of UCRL-15910 along with the related codes requirements.

  7. 78 FR 13097 - Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... NRC staff's evaluation of the earthquake and tsunami, and resulting nuclear accident, at the Fukushima... as the 2011 Mineral, VA earthquake) that had occurred after the model was developed, and determined that those events did not change their interpretations of seismic sources or earthquake...

  8. Age-independent seismic anisotropy under oceanic plates explained by strain history in the asthenosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedjazian, Navid; Garel, Fanny; Davies, D. Rhodri; Kaminski, Edouard

    2017-02-01

    The depth of the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), as inferred from shear wave velocities, increases with lithospheric age, in agreement with models of cooling oceanic lithosphere. On the other hand, the distribution of radial anisotropy under oceanic plates is almost age-independent. In particular, radial anisotropy shows a maximum positive gradient at a depth of ∼70 km, which, if used as a proxy, indicates an age-independent LAB depth. These contrasting observations have fueled a controversy on the seismological signature of the LAB. To better understand the discrepancy between these observations, we model the development of lattice preferred orientation (LPO) in upper mantle crystal aggregates and predict the seismic anisotropy produced by plate-driven mid-ocean ridge flows. The model accounts for the progressive cooling of the lithosphere with age and can incorporate both diffusion and dislocation creep deformation mechanisms. We find that an age-independent distribution of radial anisotropy is the natural consequence of these simple flows. The depth and strength of anisotropy is further controlled by the deformation regime - dislocation or diffusion creep - experienced by crystals during their ascent towards, and subsequent motion away from, the ridge axis. Comparison to surface wave tomography models yield constraints on rheological parameters such as the activation volume. Although not excluded, additional mechanisms proposed to explain some geophysical signatures of the LAB, such as the presence of partial melt or changes in water content, are not required to explain the radial anisotropy proxy. Our prediction, that the age-independent radial anisotropy proxy marks the transition to flow-induced asthenospheric anisotropy, provides a way to reconcile thermal, mechanical and seismological views of the LAB.

  9. 76 FR 57767 - Proposed Generic Communication; Draft NRC Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Proposed Generic Communication; Draft NRC Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for... NRC Generic Letter 2011- XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for Operating Reactors. This action is...

  10. 34 CFR 300.502 - Independent educational evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Independent educational evaluation. 300.502 Section 300... Independent educational evaluation. (a) General. (1) The parents of a child with a disability have the right under this part to obtain an independent educational evaluation of the child, subject to paragraphs...

  11. 34 CFR 300.502 - Independent educational evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Independent educational evaluation. 300.502 Section 300... Independent educational evaluation. (a) General. (1) The parents of a child with a disability have the right under this part to obtain an independent educational evaluation of the child, subject to paragraphs...

  12. 76 FR 69294 - Proposed Generic Communication Draft Generic Letter on Seismic Risk Evaluations for Operating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Generic Communication Draft Generic Letter on Seismic Risk Evaluations for Operating... public comment Draft Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for Operating Reactors. The public... for public comment Draft Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for Operating Reactors...

  13. Seismic risk evaluation aided by IR thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinzato, E.; Cadelano, G.; Bison, P.; Petracca, A.

    2009-05-01

    Conservation of buildings in areas at seismic risk must take prevention into account. The safeguard architectonic heritage is an ambitious objective, but a priority for planning programmes at varying levels of decision making. Preservation and restoration activities must be optimized to cover a vast and widespread historical and architectonic heritage present in many countries. Masonry buildings requires an adequate level of knowledge based on the importance of structural geometry, which may include the damage, details of construction and properties of materials. For identification and classification of masonry is necessary to find shape, type and size of the elements, texture, size of mortar joints, assemblage. The recognition can be done through a visual inspection of the surface of walls, which can be examined, where is not visible, removing a layer of plaster. Thermography is an excellent tool for a fast survey and collection of vital information for this purpose, but it is extremely important define a precise procedure in the development of more efficient monitoring tools. Thermography is a non-destructive method that allows recognizing the structural damage below plaster, detecting the presence of discontinuity in masonry, for added storeys, cavity, filled openings, and repairs. Furthermore, the fast identification of subsurface state allows to select areas where other methods either more penetrating or partially destructive have to be applied. The paper reports experimental results achieved in the mainframe of the European project RECES Modiquus. The main aim of the project is to improve methods, techniques and instruments for facing antiseismic options. Both passive and active thermographic techniques have been applied in different weather conditions and time schemes. A dedicated algorithm has been developed to enhance the visibility of wall bonding.

  14. Contracting for Independent Evaluation: Approaches to an Inherent Tension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klerman, Jacob Alex

    2010-01-01

    There has recently been discussion of whether independent contract evaluation is possible. This article acknowledges the inherent tension in contract evaluation and in response suggests a range of constructive approaches to improving the independence of contract evaluation. In particular, a clear separation between the official evaluation report…

  15. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    M. Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; O. Djordjevic

    2003-03-20

    The ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342) began September 1, 2002. During this second quarter: A Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator (DHI) symposium was held at UH; Current DHI methods were presented and forecasts made on future techniques; Dr. Han moved his laboratory from HARC to the University of Houston; Subcontracts were re-initiated with UH and TAMU; Theoretical and numerical modeling work began at TAMU; Geophysical Development Corp. agreed to provide petrophysical data; Negotiations were begun with Veritas GDC to obtain limited seismic data; Software licensing and training schedules were arranged with Paradigm; and Data selection and acquisition continues. The broad industry symposium on Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators was held at the University of Houston as part of this project. This meeting was well attended and well received. A large amount of information was presented, not only on application of the current state of the art, but also on expected future trends. Although acquisition of appropriate seismic data was expected to be a significant problem, progress has been made. A 3-D seismic data set from the shelf has been installed at Texas A&M University and analysis begun. Veritas GDC has expressed a willingness to provide data in the deep Gulf of Mexico. Data may also be available from TGS.

  16. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-08-12

    We are now entering the final stages of our ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342). We have now developed several techniques to help distinguish economic hydrocarbon deposits from false ''Fizz'' gas signatures. These methods include using the proper in situ rock and fluid properties, evaluating interference effects on data, and doing better constrained inversions for saturations. We are testing these techniques now on seismic data from several locations in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition, we are examining the use of seismic attenuation as indicated by frequency shifts below potential reservoirs. During this quarter we have: Began our evaluation of our latest data set over the Neptune Field; Developed software for computing composite reflection coefficients; Designed and implemented stochastic turbidite reservoir models; Produced software & work flow to improve frequency-dependent AVO analysis; Developed improved AVO analysis for data with low signal-to-noise ratio; and Examined feasibility of detecting fizz gas using frequency attenuation. Our focus on technology transfer continues, both by generating numerous presentations for the upcoming SEG annual meeting, and by beginning our planning for our next DHI minisymposium next spring.

  17. Evaluating the Gutenberg-Richter Relationship for Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tymchak, M. P.; Flewelling, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Large volumes of flowback and produced water generated from hydraulic fracturing and oil and gas production have led to increased wastewater disposal through underground injection wells. Several recent studies have linked recently felt seismic events to underground injection wells in Arkansas, Ohio, Texas and Oklahoma, among others. However, in some cases, such as in Oklahoma, there is a lack of consensus as to whether the earthquakes were the result of fluid injection (Keranan et al., 2013), natural tectonic processes (Oklahoma Geological Survey, 2013), or were related to remote events (van der Elst et al., 2013). Moreover, it is unclear why earthquakes have occurred near some injection wells but not others, with apparently similar geology, target reservoirs, and injection rates (e.g., Frohlich, 2012). In instances where injection occurred near a fault (e.g., Rangely, CO), the timing and distribution of seismic events was well correlated to fluid volumes, and the interaction between injection and induced seismicity was easily resolved. In other cases (e.g., Oklahoma, Texas), it appears more difficult to interpret whether a particular injection well was related to observed seismic events. Therefore, metrics are needed as diagnostic tools to help differentiate between natural and induced seismicity. It has been well established that the frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes follows the Gutenberg-Richter distribution log N(M) = a - bM, where the slope (b-value) is typically near one. However, in some instances of deep fluid injection, b-values may vary, depending on specific injection activities, such as enhanced geothermal or hydraulic fracturing (Dinske and Shapiro, 2013). In some cases, b-values may vary during successive fracture stages of a single horizontal well (e.g., Williams and Calvarez, 2013), and seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing may deviate from the Gutenberg-Richter relationship altogether (Hurd and Zoback, 2012). We evaluate

  18. Seismic evaluation of vulnerability for SAMA educational buildings in Tehran

    SciTech Connect

    Amini, Omid Nassiri; Amiri, Javad Vaseghi

    2008-07-08

    Earthquake is a destructive phenomenon that trembles different parts of the earth yearly and causes many destructions. Iran is one of the (high seismicity) quack- prone parts of the world that has received a lot of pecuniary damages and life losses each year, schools are of the most important places to be protected during such crisis.There was no special surveillance on designing and building of school's building in Tehran till the late 70's, and as Tehran is on faults, instability of such buildings may cause irrecoverable pecuniary damages and especially life losses, therefore preventing this phenomenon is in an urgent need.For this purpose, some of the schools built during 67-78 mostly with Steel braced frame structures have been selected, first, by evaluating the selected Samples, gathering information and Visual Survey, the prepared questionnaires were filled out. With the use of ARIA and SABA (Venezuela) Methods, new modified combined method for qualified evaluations was found and used.Then, for quantified evaluation, with the use of computer 3D models and nonlinear statically analysis methods, a number of selected buildings of qualified evaluation, were reevaluated and finally with nonlinear dynamic analysis method the real behavior of structures on the earthquakes is studied.The results of qualified and quantified evaluations were compared and a proper Pattern for seismic evaluation of Educational buildings was presented. Otherwise the results can be a guidance for the person in charge of retrofitting or if necessary rebuilding the schools.

  19. Seismic evaluation of vulnerability for SAMA educational buildings in Tehran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Omid Nassiri; Amiri, Javad Vaseghi

    2008-07-01

    Earthquake is a destructive phenomenon that trembles different parts of the earth yearly and causes many destructions. Iran is one of the (high seismicity) quack- prone parts of the world that has received a lot of pecuniary damages and life losses each year, schools are of the most important places to be protected during such crisis. There was no special surveillance on designing and building of school's building in Tehran till the late 70's, and as Tehran is on faults, instability of such buildings may cause irrecoverable pecuniary damages and especially life losses, therefore preventing this phenomenon is in an urgent need. For this purpose, some of the schools built during 67-78 mostly with Steel braced frame structures have been selected, first, by evaluating the selected Samples, gathering information and Visual Survey, the prepared questionnaires were filled out. With the use of ARIA and SABA (Venezuela) Methods, new modified combined method for qualified evaluations was found and used. Then, for quantified evaluation, with the use of computer 3D models and nonlinear statically analysis methods, a number of selected buildings of qualified evaluation, were reevaluated and finally with nonlinear dynamic analysis method the real behavior of structures on the earthquakes is studied. The results of qualified and quantified evaluations were compared and a proper Pattern for seismic evaluation of Educational buildings was presented. Otherwise the results can be a guidance for the person in charge of retrofitting or if necessary rebuilding the schools.

  20. Robust control of seismic structures using independent modal-space techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Kerry S.; Rao, Vittal S.; Cheng, Franklin Y.

    1996-04-01

    Active robust structural controls have been utilized in the control of aerospace structures for many years but they have only been recently investigated in the context of control for civil engineering structures. The results of an investigation of the utilization of these methods on building-like structures are presented in this paper. The closed-loop systems take into account the limited available actuation force and are inherently insensitive to parameter variations and modeling uncertainties. Independent modal-space control (IMSC) is a structural control technique where the multi-input-multi-output configuration-space system is transformed into a set of uncoupled single-input-single-output modal-space systems. A modal controller is designed for each modal-space system and the set of modal controllers is transformed back into configuration-space. By combining IMSC with robust control techniques such as LQG/LTR or H(infinity ), a robust structural control design technique is proposed in this paper. Robust IMSC techniques are employed for control of seismic structures where a small number of actuators are used to control the first few modes of the structure. We have designed and implemented robust IMSC controllers on an experimental building-like structure. This structure utilizes torque motor driven active tendons as actuators and rests on a shaking table which is capable of providing one dimensional base excitation similar to earthquake ground motion. A three input-three output model of the structure, including the torque motor actuators, was developed using experimental data. The experimental structural identification technique, based on standard modal analysis methods, provides the mathematical model that describes the behavior of the structure. An H(infinity ) based IMSC controller has been designed and implemented on this structure using a dSPACE control development system. The results show that the performance of the system is satisfactory in the presence of

  1. Uncertainties in evaluation of hazard and seismic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmureanu, Gheorghe; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Ortanza Cioflan, Carmen; Manea, Elena-Florinela

    2015-04-01

    Two methods are commonly used for seismic hazard assessment: probabilistic (PSHA) and deterministic(DSHA) seismic hazard analysis.Selection of a ground motion for engineering design requires a clear understanding of seismic hazard and risk among stakeholders, seismologists and engineers. What is wrong with traditional PSHA or DSHA ? PSHA common used in engineering is using four assumptions developed by Cornell in 1968:(1)-Constant-in-time average occurrence rate of earthquakes; (2)-Single point source; (3).Variability of ground motion at a site is independent;(4)-Poisson(or "memory - less") behavior of earthquake occurrences. It is a probabilistic method and "when the causality dies, its place is taken by probability, prestigious term meant to define the inability of us to predict the course of nature"(Nils Bohr). DSHA method was used for the original design of Fukushima Daichii, but Japanese authorities moved to probabilistic assessment methods and the probability of exceeding of the design basis acceleration was expected to be 10-4-10-6 . It was exceeded and it was a violation of the principles of deterministic hazard analysis (ignoring historical events)(Klügel,J,U, EGU,2014, ISSO). PSHA was developed from mathematical statistics and is not based on earthquake science(invalid physical models- point source and Poisson distribution; invalid mathematics; misinterpretation of annual probability of exceeding or return period etc.) and become a pure numerical "creation" (Wang, PAGEOPH.168(2011),11-25). An uncertainty which is a key component for seismic hazard assessment including both PSHA and DSHA is the ground motion attenuation relationship or the so-called ground motion prediction equation (GMPE) which describes a relationship between a ground motion parameter (i.e., PGA,MMI etc.), earthquake magnitude M, source to site distance R, and an uncertainty. So far, no one is taking into consideration strong nonlinear behavior of soils during of strong earthquakes. But

  2. Seismic evaluation criteria for existing critical industrial facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Manrod, W.E.; Hall, W.J.; Beavers, J.E.

    1981-01-01

    Guidelines for the development of seismic evaluation criteria for existing critical industrial facilities are presented. Critical industrial facilities are considered as those facilities that, if damaged by natural phenomena, could result in the release of substances harmful to the public or the environment, or that could result in what owners consider as unacceptable financial losses. The guidelines are intended to assist in developing evaluation criteria for such facilities, which will result in realistic assessments that are representative of the state-of-the-art.

  3. Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle

    2006-04-30

    During this last period of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we finalized integration of rock physics, well log analysis, seismic processing, and forward modeling techniques. Most of the last quarter was spent combining the results from the principal investigators and come to some final conclusions about the project. Also much of the effort was directed towards technology transfer through the Direct Hydrocarbon Indicators mini-symposium at UH and through publications. As a result we have: (1) Tested a new method to directly invert reservoir properties, water saturation, Sw, and porosity from seismic AVO attributes; (2) Constrained the seismic response based on fluid and rock property correlations; (3) Reprocessed seismic data from Ursa field; (4) Compared thin layer property distributions and averaging on AVO response; (5) Related pressures and sorting effects on porosity and their influence on DHI's; (6) Examined and compared gas saturation effects for deep and shallow reservoirs; (7) Performed forward modeling using geobodies from deepwater outcrops; (8) Documented velocities for deepwater sediments; (9) Continued incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models; (10) Held an open DHI symposium to present the final results of the project; (11) Relations between Sw, porosity, and AVO attributes; (12) Models of Complex, Layered Reservoirs; and (14) Technology transfer Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our

  4. Evaluating 1d Seismic Models of the Lunar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Y.; Thorne, M. S.; Weber, R. C.; Schmerr, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    A four station seismic network was established on the Moon from 1969 to 1977 as part of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiment Package (ALSEP). A total of nine 1D seismic velocity models were generated using a variety of different techniques. In spite of the fact that these models were generated from the same data set, significant differences exist between them. We evaluate these models by comparing predicted travel-times to published catalogs of lunar events. We generate synthetic waveform predictions for 1D lunar models using a modified version of the Green's Function of the Earth by Minor Integration (GEMINI) technique. Our results demonstrate that the mean square errors between predicted and measured P-wave travel times are smaller than those for S-wave travel times in all cases. Moreover, models fit travel times for artificial and meteoroid impacts better than for shallow and deep moonquakes. Overall, models presented by Nakamura [Nakamura, 1983] and Garcia et al. [Garcia et al., 2011] predicted the observed travel times better than all other models and were comparable in their explanation of travel-times. Nevertheless, significant waveform differences exist between these models. In particular, the seismic velocity structure of the lunar crust and regolith strongly affect the waveform characteristics predicted by these models. Further complexity is added by possible mantle discontinuity structure that exists in a subset of these models. We show synthetic waveform predictions for these models demonstrating the role that crustal structure has in generating long duration seismic coda inherent in the lunar waveforms.

  5. Development of a Combination Approach for Seismic Hazard Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Huai-zhong; Zhou, Fa-ren; Zhu, Qing-yong; Zhang, Xiao-tao; Zhang, Yong-xian

    2016-01-01

    We developed a synth esis approach to augment current techniques for seismic hazard evaluation by combining four previously unrelated subjects: the pattern informatics (PI), load/unload response ratio (LURR), state vector (SV), and accelerating moment release (AMR) methods. Since the PI is proposed in the premise that the change in the seismicity rate is a proxy for the change in the tectonic stress, this method is used to quantify localized changes surrounding the epicenters of large earthquakes to objectively quantify the anomalous areas (hot spots) of the upcoming events. On the short-to-intermediate-term estimation, we apply the LURR, SV, and AMR methods to examine the hazard regions derived from the PI hot spots. A predictive study of the 2014 earthquake tendency in Chinese mainland, using the seismic data from 1970-01-01 to 2014-10-01, shows that, during Jan 01 to Oct 31, 2014, most of the M > 5.0 earthquakes, especially the Feb 12 M7.3 Yutian, May 30 M6.1 Yingjiang, Aug. 03 M6.5 Ludian, and Oct 07 M6.6 earthquakes, occurred in the seismic hazard regions predicted. Comparing the predictions produced by the PI and combination approaches, it is clear that, by using the combination approach, we can screen out the false-alarm regions from the PI estimation, without reducing the hit rate, and therefore effectively augment the predictive power of current techniques. This provided evidence that the multi-method combination approach may be a useful tool to detect precursory information of future large earthquakes.

  6. Evaluation of induced seismicity forecast models in the Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Zechar, Jeremy; Doetsch, Joseph; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. Here, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models that incorporate a different mix of physical understanding and stochastic representation of the induced sequences: Shapiro in Space (SiS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). SiS is based on three pillars: the seismicity rate is computed with help of the seismogenic index and a simple exponential decay of the seismicity; the magnitude distribution follows the Gutenberg-Richter relation; and seismicity is distributed in space based on smoothing seismicity during the learning period with 3D Gaussian kernels. The HySei model describes seismicity triggered by pressure diffusion with irreversible permeability enhancement. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. HySei forecasts the seismicity rate well, but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SiS forecasts the spatial distribution well but not the seismicity rate. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in. Ensemble models that combine HySei's rate forecast with SiS's spatial forecast outperform each individual model.

  7. Evaluation of seismic performance and effectiveness of multiple slim-type damper system for seismic response control of building structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, David; Sung, Eun Hee; Park, Kwan-Soon; Park, Jaegyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of a multiple slim-type damper system developed for the vibration control of earthquake excited buildings. The multiple slim-type damper (MSD) that consists of several small slim-type dampers and linkage units can control damping capacity easily by changing the number of small dampers. To evaluate the performance of the MSD, dynamic loading tests are performed with three slim-type dampers manufactured at a real scale. Numerical simulations are also carried out by nonlinear time history analysis with a ten-story earthquake excited building structure. The seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of the MSD system are investigated according to the various installation configurations of the MSD system. From the results of numerical simulation and cost-effectiveness evaluation, it is shown that combinations of the MSD systems can effectively improve the seismic performance of earthquake excited building structures.

  8. Evaluation of Seismic Performance and Effectiveness of Multiple Slim-Type Damper System for Seismic Response Control of Building Structures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, David; Sung, Eun Hee; Park, Kwan-Soon; Park, Jaegyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of a multiple slim-type damper system developed for the vibration control of earthquake excited buildings. The multiple slim-type damper (MSD) that consists of several small slim-type dampers and linkage units can control damping capacity easily by changing the number of small dampers. To evaluate the performance of the MSD, dynamic loading tests are performed with three slim-type dampers manufactured at a real scale. Numerical simulations are also carried out by nonlinear time history analysis with a ten-story earthquake excited building structure. The seismic performance and cost-effectiveness of the MSD system are investigated according to the various installation configurations of the MSD system. From the results of numerical simulation and cost-effectiveness evaluation, it is shown that combinations of the MSD systems can effectively improve the seismic performance of earthquake excited building structures. PMID:25301387

  9. Independent Consulting and the American Evaluation Association: Twenty Years Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnet, Deborah G.

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews the evolution of American Evaluation Association's (AEA) Independent Consulting Topical Interest Group (IC TIG). The TIG goes back a joint meeting held in San Francisco in 1984 of the Evaluation Network (ENet) and the Evaluation Research Society (ERS), two years before the organizations merged to become the AEA. On the fringes…

  10. Evaluation of the Deployable Seismic Verification System at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.

    1993-08-01

    The intent of this report is to examine the performance of the Deployable Seismic Verification System (DSVS) developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its national laboratories to support monitoring of underground nuclear test treaties. A DSVS was installed at the Pinedale Seismic Research Facility (PSRF) near Boulder, Wyoming during 1991 and 1992. This includes a description of the system and the deployment site. System performance was studied by looking at four areas: system noise, seismic response, state of health (SOH) and operational capabilities.

  11. Independent Living Evaluation-Training Program. Reprint Series No. 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Soest, Eileen; And Others

    Intended to be used both as a guide for general program direction and as an individual evaluation and training tool this rehabilitation training guide includes materials and evaluation devices for use with mentally and/or physically handicapped clients on basic, intermediate and advanced living center levels. The eight independent living skill…

  12. Contracting for independent evaluation: approaches to an inherent tension.

    PubMed

    Klerman, Jacob Alex

    2010-08-01

    There has recently been discussion of whether independent contract evaluation is possible. This article acknowledges the inherent tension in contract evaluation and in response suggests a range of constructive approaches to improving the independence of contract evaluation. In particular, a clear separation between the official evaluation report and a contractor's own publication of analysis from the underlying evaluation appears to be a promising approach. In this approach, the funder would retain almost unfettered rights to the official contract report (including the right never to publish but not the right to change the contractor's text while leaving the contractor's authorship) and the contractor would retain clearly defined rights to publish any findings from the evaluation (subject only to the limitations of human subjects and proprietary data and some minimal notice).

  13. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF HYDROCARBON SATURATION IN DEEP-WATER RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-01-22

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  14. Seismic Evaluation of Hydorcarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Batzle; D-h Han; R. Gibson; Huw James

    2005-10-31

    During this last quarter of the ''Seismic Evaluation of Hydrocarbon Saturation in Deep-Water Reservoirs'' project (Grant/Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT15342), we have moved forward on several fronts, including data acquisition as well as analysis and application. During this quarter we have: (1) Completed our site selection (finally); (2) Measured fluid effects in Troika deep water sand sample; (3) Applied the result to Ursa ''fizz gas'' zone; (4) Compared thin layer property averaging on AVO response; (5) Developed target oriented NMO stretch correction; (6) Examined thin bed effects on A-B crossplots; and (7) Begun incorporating outcrop descriptive models in seismic forward models. Several factors can contribute to limit our ability to extract accurate hydrocarbon saturations in deep water environments. Rock and fluid properties are one factor, since, for example, hydrocarbon properties will be considerably different with great depths (high pressure) when compared to shallow properties. Significant over pressure, on the other hand will make the rocks behave as if they were shallower. In addition to the physical properties, the scale and tuning will alter our hydrocarbon indicators. Reservoirs composed of thin bed effects will broaden the reflection amplitude distribution with incident angle. Normal move out (NMO) stretch corrections based on frequency shifts can be applied to offset this effect. Tuning will also disturb the location of extracted amplitudes on AVO intercept and gradient (A-B) plots. Many deep water reservoirs fall this tuning thickness range. Our goal for the remaining project period is to systematically combine and document these various effects for use in deep water exploration.

  15. Using a physics-based earthquake simulator to evaluate seismic hazard in NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaverdian, A.; Zafarani, H.; Rahimian, M.

    2016-07-01

    NW Iran is a region of active deformation in the Eurasia-Arabia collision zone. This high strain field has caused intensive faulting accompanied by several major (M > 6.5) earthquakes as it is evident from historical records. Whereas seismic data (i.e. instrumental and historical catalogues) are either short, or inaccurate and inhomogeneous, physics-based long-term simulations are beneficial to better assess seismic hazard. In this study, a deterministic seismicity model, which consists of major active faults, is first constructed, and used to generate a synthetic catalogue of large-magnitude (M > 5.5) earthquakes. The frequency-magnitude distribution of the synthetic earthquake catalogue, which is based on the physical characteristic and slip rate of the mapped faults, is consistent with the empirical distribution evaluated using record of instrumental and historical events. The obtained results are also in accordance with palaeoseismic studies and other independent kinematic deformation models of the Iranian Plateau. Using the synthetic catalogue, characteristic magnitude for all 16 active faults in the study area is determined. Magnitude and epicentre of these earthquakes are comparable with the historical records. Large earthquake recurrence times and their variations are evaluated, either for an individual fault or for the region as a whole. Goodness-of-fitness tests revealed that recurrence times can be well described by the Weibull distribution. Time-dependent conditional probabilities for large earthquakes in the study area are also estimated for different time intervals. The resulting synthetic catalogue can be utilized as a useful data set for hazard and risk assessment instead of short, incomplete and inhomogeneous available catalogues.

  16. Best Estimate Method vs Evaluation Method: a comparison of two techniques in evaluating seismic analysis and design

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, S.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Smith, P.D.

    1980-05-01

    The concept of how two techniques, Best Estimate Method and Evaluation Method, may be applied to the traditional seismic analysis and design of a nuclear power plant is introduced. Only the four links of the seismic analysis and design methodology chain (SMC) - seismic input, soil-structure interaction, major structural response, and subsystem response - are considered. The objective is to evaluate the compounding of conservatisms in the seismic analysis and design of nuclear power plants, to provide guidance for judgments in the SMC, and to concentrate the evaluation on that part of the seismic analysis and design which is familiar to the engineering community. An example applies the effects of three-dimensional excitations on a model of a nuclear power plant structure. The example demonstrates how conservatisms accrue by coupling two links in the SMC and comparing those results to the effects of one link alone. The utility of employing the Best Estimate Method vs the Evaluation Method is also demonstrated.

  17. Application of time-independent and time-dependent occurrence models on the seismic hazard estimations in the Marmara region, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murru, M.; Akinci, A.; Console, R.; Falcone, G.; Pucci, S.

    2014-12-01

    We show the effect of time-independent and time-dependent occurrence models on the seismic hazard estimations. The time-dependence is introduced by 1) the Brownian Passage Time (BPT) probability model that is based on a simple physical model of the earthquake cycle, and 2) the fusion of the BPT renewal model with a physical model that considers the earthquake probability perturbation for interacting faults by static Coulomb stress changes We treat the uncertainties in the fault parameters (e.g. slip rate, characteristic magnitude and aperiodicity) of the statistical distribution associated to each examined fault source by a Monte Carlo technique. For a comparison among the results obtained from three different models, we give the probabilities of occurrence of earthquakes Mw > 6.5 for individual fault sources in the Marmara region, over the future 5-10-30 and 50 years, starting on January 1, 2013, considering the 10th, 50th and 90th percentiles of the Monte Carlo distribution. In order to evaluate the impact of the earthquake probability models to ground motion hazard we attempt to calculate the fault-based probabilistic seismic hazard maps (PSHA) of mean Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) having 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years on rock site condition. We adopted only one Ground Motion Prediction Equation (GMPE) for the active shallow crustal region for assessing the ground shaking hazard in the Marmara region. We observed that the impact of the different occurrence models on the seismic hazard estimate of selected sites is quite high: the hazard may increase by more than 70% or decrease by as much as 70%, depending on the applied model in the selected sites. This difference mostly depends on the time elapsed after the latest major earthquake on a specific fault. We demonstrate that the estimated average recurrence time and the associated magnitude, together with the elapsed time, are crucial parameters in the earthquake probability calculations.

  18. Seismic hazard evaluation of the Oman India pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.W.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Mullee, J.E.; Preston, R.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed Oman India pipeline will traverse approximately 1,135 km of the northern Arabian Sea floor and adjacent continental shelves at depths of over 3 km on its route from Ra`s al Jifan, Oman, to Rapar Gadhwali, India. The western part of the route crosses active faults that form the transform boundary between the Arabian and Indian tectonic plates. The eastern terminus of the route lies in the vicinity of the great (M {approximately} 8) 1829 Kutch, India earthquake. A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis was used to estimate the values of peak ground acceleration (PGA) with return periods of 200, 500 and 1,000 years at selected locations along the pipeline route and the submarine Indus Canyon -- a possible source of large turbidity flows. The results defined the ground-shaking hazard along the pipeline route and Indus Canyon for evaluation of risks to the pipeline from potential earthquake-induced geologic hazards such as liquefaction, slope instability, and turbidity flows. 44 refs.

  19. Evaluation of Horizontal Seismic Hazard of Shahrekord, Iran

    SciTech Connect

    Amiri, G. Ghodrati; Dehkordi, M. Raeisi; Amrei, S. A. Razavian; Kamali, M. Koohi

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents probabilistic horizontal seismic hazard assessment of Shahrekord, Iran. It displays the probabilistic estimate of Peak Ground Horizontal Acceleration (PGHA) for the return period of 75, 225, 475 and 2475 years. The output of the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis is based on peak ground acceleration (PGA), which is the most common criterion in designing of buildings. A catalogue of seismic events that includes both historical and instrumental events was developed and covers the period from 840 to 2007. The seismic sources that affect the hazard in Shahrekord were identified within the radius of 150 km and the recurrence relationships of these sources were generated. Finally four maps have been prepared to indicate the earthquake hazard of Shahrekord in the form of iso-acceleration contour lines for different hazard levels by using SEISRISK III software.

  20. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 90-168-2248, Independence Police Department Indoor Range, Independence, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Rinehart, R.D.; Almaguer, D.; Klein, M.K.; Crouch, K.G.

    1992-08-01

    On February 14, 1990, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from a management representative of the Independence, Missouri, Police Department Headquarters for a Health Hazard Evaluation. The Police Department requested NIOSH to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly redesigned air handling system installed inside their indoor firing range. On August 6, 1991, NIOSH investigators met with the firing range supervisor and toured the facility. On August 8, ten personal breathing-zone (PBZ) air samples and 3 area air samples were collected on filters inside the range and the filters were subsequently analyzed for lead by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Surface lead contamination inside the firing range was measured in two locations and hand (dermal) lead contamination was measured on two instructors and two field officers. These samples were also analyzed for lead by AAS.

  1. SEISMIC EVALUATION OF ATYPICAL SPECIAL PLATE SHEAR WALLS

    SciTech Connect

    Mark J. Russell; Robert E. Spears; Ryan G. Kobbe

    2007-07-01

    The structure of a building undergoing a seismic reevaluation at the Idaho National Laboratory includes a number of steel plate walls and a roof liner which will act as shear diaphragms during an earthquake. Since the facility was designed and built long before such criteria were formulated, it is not surprising that these walls are not configured to meet all of the recently formulated requirements for such structures. To take advantage of this unusual structural feature, nonlinear analysis was used to ensure accurate modeling of the plate walls in a linear elastic seismic analysis of the full superstructure. The modeling was also used to establish the capacity of the plate.

  2. Seismic evaluation of K basin bridge cranes (HOI-320 & HOI-418) and supporting structure

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, B.V.; Kanjilad, S.K.

    1996-03-01

    The Safety Class 1 100-K fuel storage basins are vulnerable to impact damage if a bridge crane were to fall during a seismic event. The pupose of this report is to address the adequacy of the K Basin bridge cranes to resist a seismic-induced fall. The approach used to demonstrate adequacy against falling, was to evaluate the crane structural components relative to requirements specified in ASME NOG-1, Rules for Construction of Overhead and Gantry Cranes. Additionally, wheel lift-off and the adequacy of the crane supporting structure, are addressed. Seismic adequacy of the mechanical hoist equipment is not addressed in this report.

  3. An evaluation of the seismic- window theory for earthquake prediction.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McNutt, M.; Heaton, T.H.

    1981-01-01

    Reports studies designed to determine whether earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay area respond to a fortnightly fluctuation in tidal amplitude. It does not appear that the tide is capable of triggering earthquakes, and in particular the seismic window theory fails as a relevant method of earthquake prediction. -J.Clayton

  4. Independent Evaluation of Air Filter Media from Chornobyl

    SciTech Connect

    MD Hoover; AF Fencl; GJ Vargo

    1999-12-21

    An independent evaluation was performed to assess the morphology, pressure drop characteristics, alpha spectroscopy characteristics, and collection efficiency of an air sampling filter media and two types of aerosol face masks provided from Chernobyl by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The evaluation included characterizing the filter morphology by scqg electron microscopy; measuring the filter pressure drop as a function of air flowrate; evaluating the spectroscopy characteristics of the filter for alpha-emitting radionuclides by sampling ambient radon progeny aerosols in an Eberline Alpha-6A alpha continuous air monitor; determining the particle collection efficiency of the filter media for 0.3 {micro}m aerodynamic diameter monodisperse particles at 1 and 2 cfm; and comparing the apparent construction, durability, and performance similarities of the filter media to other media commonly used for monitoring airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides.

  5. Evaluation of the RSTN (Regional Seismic Test Network) Network and Further Improvement to Automatic Association.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-30

    received at CSS and partly recorded at SCARS. A description of RSTN station localities is contained in Taylor and Qualheim (1983). All RSTN stations...Laboratory, Alexandria, Va. Taylor, S. R. and B. J. Qualheim (1983). Regional Seismic Test Network Site Descriptions , Lawrence Livermore Laboratory...RD-A146 395 EVALUATION OF THE RSTN (REGIONAL SEISMIC TEST NETWORK) 1/ NET44ORK AND FURTHE (U) TELEDYNE GEOTECH ALEXANDRIA VA ALEXANDRIA LABS R R

  6. Seismic evaluation of NOSR 2. Naval Oil Shale Reserves management support and systems engineering project. [Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    In June 1981, the Department of Energy (DOE) elected to conduct a seismic evaluation of NOSR 2 in Utah. This survey was carried out by TRW for DOE as part of the resource assessment of the Naval Oil Shale Reserves. The objective of the seismic survey was to determine if there are any structures on the Reserve which may have trapped hydrocarbons. An evaluation of the results indicated the elongated anticlinal structure in the southeast corner (Tabyago Dome) does have dip reversal and that there is a closed structure. Centered in Section 21, T13S, R19E, that structure has a high probability of having trapped hydrocarbons. Any well drilled on that structure should test all the potential producing formations down to the Pre-Cambrian (15,000 feet). It is also possible that several stratigraphic traps exist on a north-trending anticline in R19E. The seismic survey was carried out during August-September 1981 when the Seismograph Service Corporation (SSC) shot an additional eight seismic lines over the entire Reserve. With the three existing commercial seismic lines, a total of 66.25 miles of seismic profiles were available for the evaluation. Additional geologic information from existing reports and data from producing areas which surround the Reserve also were used in making the final assessment. 9 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Seismic hazard evaluation for Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservations, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.K.; Toro, G.F.; Hunt, R.J.

    1992-09-30

    This study presents the results of an investigation of seismic hazard at the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservations (K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratories, and Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant), located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Oak Ridge is located in eastern Tennessee, in an area of moderate to high historical seismicity. Results from two separate seismic hazard analyses are presented. The EPRI/SOG analysis uses the input data and methodology developed by the Electric Power Research Institute, under the sponsorship of several electric utilities, for the evaluation of seismic hazard in the central and eastern United States. The LLNL analysis uses the input data and methodology developed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Both the EPRI/SOG and LLNL studies characterize earth-science uncertainty on the causes and characteristics of earthquakes in the central and eastern United States. This is accomplished by considering multiple hypotheses on the locations and parameters of seismic source zones and by considering multiple attenuation functions for the prediction of ground shaking given earthquake size and location. These hypotheses were generated by multiple expert teams and experts. Furthermore, each team and expert was asked to generate multiple hypotheses in order to characterize his own internal uncertainty. The seismic-hazard calculations are performed for all hypotheses. Combining the results from each hypothesis with the weight associated to that hypothesis, one obtains an overall representation of the seismic hazard at the Oak Ridge site and its uncertainty.

  8. 78 FR 29159 - Electric Power Research Institute; Seismic Evaluation Guidance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Guidance: EPRI Guidance for the Resolution of Fukushima Near-Term Task Force Recommendation 2.1: Seismic... 2.1, 2.3, and 9.3, of the Near-Term Task Force Review of Insights from the Fukushima Dai-ichi... Recommendations 2.1, 2.3, and 9.3, of the Near-Term Task Force (NTTF) Review of Insights from the Fukushima...

  9. Evaluation of a seismic quiescence pattern in southeastern sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, F.; Broccio, F.; Achilli, V.; Baldi, P.

    1985-07-01

    Southeastern Sicily experienced a very peculiar seismic activity in historic times, with a long series of ruinous earthquakes. A last large event, with magnitude probably in excess of 7.5, occurred on Jan., 11, 1693, totally destroying the city of Catania and killing 60,000 people. Only a few moderate events were reported since then, and a seismic gap issue has been proposed on this basis. A close scrutiny of the available data further shows that all significant seismic activity ceased after year 1850, suggesting one of the largest quiescence patterns ever encountered. This is examined together with the complex tectonic setting of the region, characterized by a wrenching mechanism with most significant seismicity located in its northern graben structure. An attempt to ascertain the imminence and the size of a future earthquake through commonly accepted empirical relations based on size and duration of the quiescence pattern did not provide any feasible result. A precision levelling survey which we recently completed yielded a relative subsidence of ~ 3 mm/yr, consistent with an aseismic slip on the northern graben structure at a rate of ~ 15 mm/yr. Comparing these results with sedimentological and tidal data suggests that the area is undergoing an accelerated deformation process; this issue is further supported by Rikitake's ultimate strain statistics. If the imminence of a damaging ( M = 5.4) event is strongly favoured by Weibull statistics applied to the time series of occurrence of large events, the accumulated strain does not appear sufficient for a large earthquake ( M ⪸ 7.0). Within the limits of reliability of present semi-empirical approaches we conclude that the available evidence is consistent with the occurrence of a moderate-to-large ( M ≅ 6.0) event in the near future. Several questions regarding the application of simple models to real (and complex) tectonic settings remain nevertheless unanswered.

  10. Evaluating the impact of seismic prospecting on artisanal shrimp fisheries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriguetto-Filho, José M.; Ostrensky, Antonio; Pie, Marcio R.; Silva, Ubiratã A.; Boeger, Walter A.

    2005-09-01

    The constant need to discover new hydrocarbon deposits is causing the use of air-guns to become a very widespread method of seismic prospecting. However, there is still disagreement regarding their impact on the marine environment. This uncertainty is particularly severe in the case of shellfish, which account for a substantial share of commercial fisheries and seafood trade in many parts of the world. In this paper we report on the first study to explicitly assess the impact of seismic prospecting on shrimp resources. We measured bottom trawl yields of a nonselective commercial shrimp fishery comprising the Southern white shrimp, Litopenaeus schmitti, the Southern brown shrimp, Farfantepenaeus subtilis, and the Atlantic Seabob, Xyphopenaeus kroyeri (Decapoda: Penaeidae), before and after the use of an array of four synchronized air-guns, each with 635 in 3 of total capacity, 2.000 psi, and peak pressure of 196 dB (re 1 μPa at 1 m). Our results did not detect significant deleterious impact of seismic prospecting on the studied species, suggesting that shrimp stocks are resilient to the disturbance by air-guns under our experimental conditions.

  11. Seismic demand evaluation of medium ductility RC moment frames using nonlinear procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffarzadeh, Hosein; Talebian, Nima; Kohandel, Roya

    2013-09-01

    Performance-based earthquake engineering is a recent focus of research that has resulted in widely developed design methodologies due to its ability to realistically simulate structural response characteristics. Precise prediction of seismic demands is a key component of performance-based design methodologies. This paper presents a seismic demand evaluation of reinforced concrete moment frames with medium ductility. The accuracy of utilizing simplified nonlinear static analysis is assessed by comparison against the results of time history analysis on a number of frames. Displacement profiles, drift demand and maximum plastic rotation were computed to assess seismic demands. Estimated seismic demands were compared to acceptance criteria in FEMA 356. The results indicate that these frames have sufficient capacity to resist interstory drifts that are greater than the limit value.

  12. Development and implementation of seismic design and evaluation criteria for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, S.C.; MacCalden, P.B.

    1998-03-17

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as an international research center for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This paper will provide an overview of NIF, review NIF seismic criteria, and briefly discuss seismic analyses of NIF optical support structures that have been performed by LLNL and the Ralph M. Parsons Company, the Architect and Engineer (A&E) for NIF. The NIF seismic design and evaluation criteria is based on provisions in DOE Standard 1020 (DOE-STD-1020), the Uniform Building Code (UBC), and the LLNL Mechanical Engineering Design Safety Standards (MEDSS). Different levels of seismic requirements apply to NIF structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on their function. The highest level of requirements are defined for optical support structures and SSCs which could influence the performance of optical support structures, while the minimum level of requirements are Performance Category 2 (PC2) requirements in DOE-STD-1020. To demonstrate that the NIF seismic criteria is satisfied, structural analyses have been performed by LLNL and Parsons to evaluate the responses of optical support structures and other SSCs to seismic-induced forces.

  13. Style-independent document labeling: design and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Song; Kim, Jong Woo; Thoma, George R.

    2003-12-01

    The Medical Article Records System or MARS has been developed at the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) for automated data entry of bibliographical information from medical journals into MEDLINE, the premier bibliographic citation database at NLM. Currently, a rule-based algorithm (called ZoneCzar) is used for labeling important bibliographical fields (title, author, affiliation, and abstract) on medical journal article page images. While rules have been created for medical journals with regular layout types, new rules have to be manually created for any input journals with arbitrary or new layout types. Therefore, it is of interest to label any journal articles independent of their layout styles. In this paper, we first describe a system (called ZoneMatch) for automated generation of crucial geometric and non-geometric features of important bibliographical fields based on string-matching and clustering techniques. The rule based algorithm is then modified to use these features to perform style-independent labeling. We then describe a performance evaluation method for quantitatively evaluating our algorithm and characterizing its error distributions. Experimental results show that the labeling performance of the rule-based algorithm is significantly improved when the generated features are used.

  14. Independent safety evaluation of the enriched uranium oxide test UO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1989-11-01

    The UO-1 test is designed to provide information on the performance of D9 clad, enriched uranium oxide fuel in FFTF. The Series IV FFTF driver fuel will utilize enriched uranium oxide fuel with D9 cladding. Irradiation data are needed for computer code calibration to support the FSAR analysis effort for the series IV fuel. The UO-1 assembly consists of a 217-pin bundle with the same pin and duct dimensions as a standard driver fuel assembly. The test consists of seven UO{sub 2} pins, 30 mixed oxide test pins, and 180 driver type pins. The test will be irradiated for approximately 250 EFPD. An Independent Safety Evaluation (ISE) of the test has been conducted. Information has been taken from the Test Design Documents, but independent calculations have been made of the safety-related parameters. The scope includes all items specified in the Users` Guide for Irradiation of Experiments in the FTR. Areas investigated include Technical Specification Compliance, Steady State Operation, Transient Operation, Failure Consequences, Stress and Seismic, HCDA, and Test Handling and Criticality Considerations.

  15. Seismic fragility evaluation of a piping system in a nuclear power plant by shaking table test and numerical analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, M. K.; Kim, J. H.; Choi, I. K.

    2012-07-01

    In this study, a seismic fragility evaluation of the piping system in a nuclear power plant was performed. For the evaluation of seismic fragility of the piping system, this research was progressed as three steps. At first, several piping element capacity tests were performed. The monotonic and cyclic loading tests were conducted under the same internal pressure level of actual nuclear power plants to evaluate the performance. The cracks and wall thinning were considered as degradation factors of the piping system. Second, a shaking tale test was performed for an evaluation of seismic capacity of a selected piping system. The multi-support seismic excitation was performed for the considering a difference of an elevation of support. Finally, a numerical analysis was performed for the assessment of seismic fragility of piping system. As a result, a seismic fragility for piping system of NPP in Korea by using a shaking table test and numerical analysis. (authors)

  16. Re-evaluation and updating of the seismic hazard of Lebanon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huijer, Carla; Harajli, Mohamed; Sadek, Salah

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to evaluate the implications of the newly mapped offshore Mount Lebanon Thrust (MLT) fault system on the seismic hazard of Lebanon and the current seismic zoning and design parameters used by the local engineering community. This re-evaluation is critical, given that the MLT is located at close proximity to the major cities and economic centers of the country. The updated seismic hazard was assessed using probabilistic methods of analysis. The potential sources of seismic activities that affect Lebanon were integrated along with any/all newly established characteristics within an updated database which includes the newly mapped fault system. The earthquake recurrence relationships of these sources were developed from instrumental seismology data, historical records, and earlier studies undertaken to evaluate the seismic hazard of neighboring countries. Maps of peak ground acceleration contours, based on 10 % probability of exceedance in 50 years (as per Uniform Building Code (UBC) 1997), as well as 0.2 and 1 s peak spectral acceleration contours, based on 2 % probability of exceedance in 50 years (as per International Building Code (IBC) 2012), were also developed. Finally, spectral charts for the main coastal cities of Beirut, Tripoli, Jounieh, Byblos, Saida, and Tyre are provided for use by designers.

  17. Seismic hazards of the Iberian Peninsula - evaluation with kernel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, M. J.; Martínez, F.; Martí, J.

    2013-08-01

    The seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula is analysed using a nonparametric methodology based on statistical kernel functions; the activity rate is derived from the catalogue data, both its spatial dependence (without a seismogenetic zonation) and its magnitude dependence (without using Gutenberg-Richter's law). The catalogue is that of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional, supplemented with other catalogues around the periphery; the quantification of events has been homogenised and spatially or temporally interrelated events have been suppressed to assume a Poisson process. The activity rate is determined by the kernel function, the bandwidth and the effective periods. The resulting rate is compared with that produced using Gutenberg-Richter statistics and a zoned approach. Three attenuation laws have been employed, one for deep sources and two for shallower events, depending on whether their magnitude was above or below 5. The results are presented as seismic hazard maps for different spectral frequencies and for return periods of 475 and 2475 yr, which allows constructing uniform hazard spectra.

  18. Seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula: evaluation with kernel functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespo, M. J.; Martínez, F.; Martí, J.

    2014-05-01

    The seismic hazard of the Iberian Peninsula is analysed using a nonparametric methodology based on statistical kernel functions; the activity rate is derived from the catalogue data, both its spatial dependence (without a seismogenic zonation) and its magnitude dependence (without using Gutenberg-Richter's relationship). The catalogue is that of the Instituto Geográfico Nacional, supplemented with other catalogues around the periphery; the quantification of events has been homogenised and spatially or temporally interrelated events have been suppressed to assume a Poisson process. The activity rate is determined by the kernel function, the bandwidth and the effective periods. The resulting rate is compared with that produced using Gutenberg-Richter statistics and a zoned approach. Three attenuation relationships have been employed, one for deep sources and two for shallower events, depending on whether their magnitude was above or below 5. The results are presented as seismic hazard maps for different spectral frequencies and for return periods of 475 and 2475 yr, which allows constructing uniform hazard spectra.

  19. Best estimate method versus evaluation method: a comparison of two techniques in evaluating seismic analysis and design. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Bumpus, S.E.; Johnson, J.J.; Smith, P.D.

    1980-07-01

    The concept of how two techniques, Best Estimate Method and Evaluation Method, may be applied to the tradditional seismic analysis and design of a nuclear power plant is introduced. Only the four links of the seismic analysis and design methodology chain (SMC)--seismic input, soil-structure interaction, major structural response, and subsystem response--are considered. The objective is to evaluate the compounding of conservatisms in the seismic analysis and design of nuclear power plants, to provide guidance for judgments in the SMC, and to concentrate the evaluation on that part of the seismic analysis and design which is familiar to the engineering community. An example applies the effects of three-dimensional excitations on the model of a nuclear power plant structure. The example demonstrates how conservatisms accrue by coupling two links in the SMC and comparing those results to the effects of one link alone. The utility of employing the Best Estimate Method vs the Evauation Method is also demonstrated.

  20. Evaluation of collapse resistance of RC frame structures for Chinese schools in seismic design categories B and C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Baoxin; Lu, Xinzheng; Ye, Lieping; Shi, Wei

    2011-09-01

    According to the Code for Seismic Design of Buildings (GB50011-2001), ten typical reinforced concrete (RC) frame structures, used as school classroom buildings, are designed with different seismic fortification intensities (SFIs) (SFI=6 to 8.5) and different seismic design categories (SDCs) (SDC=B and C). The collapse resistance of the frames with SDC=B and C in terms of collapse fragility curves are quantitatively evaluated and compared via incremental dynamic analysis (IDA). The results show that the collapse resistance of structures should be evaluated based on both the absolute seismic resistance and the corresponding design seismic intensity. For the frames with SFI from 6 to 7.5, because they have relatively low absolute seismic resistance, their collapse resistance is insufficient even when their corresponding SDCs are upgraded from B to C. Thus, further measures are needed to enhance these structures, and some suggestions are proposed.

  1. Probabilistic evaluation of seismic isolation effect with respect to siting of a fusion reactor facility

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Masatoshi; Komura, Toshiyuki; Hirotani, Tsutomu; Ohkawa, Yoshinao; Akutsu, Youich

    1995-12-01

    Annual failure probabilities of buildings and equipment were roughly evaluated for two fusion-reactor-like buildings, with and without seismic base isolation, in order to examine the effectiveness of the base isolation system regarding siting issues. The probabilities are calculated considering nonlinearity and rupture of isolators. While the probability of building failure for both buildings on the same site was almost equal, the function failures for equipment showed that the base-isolated building had higher reliability than the non-isolated building. Even if the base-isolated building alone is located on a higher seismic hazard area, it could compete favorably with the ordinary one in reliability of equipment.

  2. Seismic hazard for the Savannah River Site: A comparative evaluation of the EPRI and LLNL assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Wingo, H.E.

    1992-05-20

    This report was conducted to: (1) develop an understanding of causes for the vast differences between the two comprehensive studies, and (2) using a methodology consistent with the reconciled methods employed in the two studies, develop a single seismic hazard for the Savannah River Site suitable for use in seismic probabilistic risk assessments with emphasis on the K Reactor. Results are presented for a rock site which is a typical because detailed evaluations of soil characteristics at the K Reactor are still in progress that account for the effects of a soil stablizing grouting program. However when the soils analysis is completed, the effects of soils can be included with this analysis with the addition of a single factor that will decrease slightly the seismic hazard for a rock site.

  3. EVALUATION ON SEISMIC DAMAGE OF TRANSPORTATION NETWORK BASED ON FRAGILITY CURVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimi, Toshio; Mazda, Taiji; Mizokami, Shoshi; Kiyota, Reo

    This paper evaluates the seismic damage probabilistically. The target area of this study is Kumamoto urban road network. The procedures of this study are making the fragility curve, and then calculating indirect traffic damage based on fragility curve. Making the fragility curve includes three types of bridge pier. GUIDELINE FOR HIGHWAY BRIDGE SEISMIC DESIGN in 1972, SPECIFICATION FOR HIGHWAY BRIDGES Part V Seismic design in 1980 and 1990. To calculate traffic damage, it is considered scenario earthquake and the model of traffic assignment. Scenario earthquake is of Futagawa-Hinagu fault zone. The model of assignment is User Equilibrium Assignment. This study has yielded two results as the distribution of indirect traffic damage is normal, and there are 69 bridges in the area has failure probability, which are designed before 1980, and exist within 10km from the epicenter.

  4. Evaluating the Relationship Between Seismicity and Subsurface Well Activity in Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajoie, L. J.; Bennett, S. E. K.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the relationship between seismicity and subsurface well activity is crucial to evaluating the seismic hazard of transient, non-tectonic seismicity. Several studies have demonstrated correlations between increased frequency of earthquake occurrence and the injection/production of fluids (e.g. oil, water) in nearby subsurface wells in intracontinental settings (e.g. Arkansas, Colorado, Ohio, Oklahoma, Texas). Here, we evaluate all earthquake magnitudes for the past 20-30 years across the diverse seismotectonic settings of Utah. We explore earthquakes within 5 km and subsequent to completion dates of oil and gas wells. We compare seismicity rates prior to well establishment with rates after well establishment in an attempt to discriminate between natural and anthropogenic earthquakes in areas of naturally high background seismicity. In a few central Utah locations, we find that the frequency of shallow (0-10 km) earthquakes increased subsequent to completion of gas wells within 5 km, and at depths broadly similar to bottom hole depths. However, these regions typically correspond to mining regions of the Wasatch Plateau, complicating our ability to distinguish between earthquakes related to either well activity or mining. We calculate earthquake density and well density and compare their ratio (earthquakes per area/wells per area) with several published metrics of seismotectonic setting. Areas with a higher earthquake-well ratio are located in relatively high strain regions (determined from GPS) associated with the Intermountain Seismic Belt, but cannot be attributed to any specific Quaternary-active fault. Additionally, higher ratio areas do not appear to coincide with anomalously high heat flow values, where rocks are typically thermally weakened. Incorporation of timing and volume data for well injection/production would allow for more robust temporal statistical analysis and hazard analysis.

  5. The Contribution of Paleoseismology to Seismic Hazard Assessment in Site Evaluation for Nuclear Installations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, Kurt; Guerrieri, Luca; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu

    2015-04-01

    In the framework of site evaluation/re-evaluation procedures for nuclear power plants (NPP), paleoseismology plays an essential role not only for Fault Displacement Hazard Assessment (FDHA) but also for Seismic Hazard Assessment (SHA). The relevance of paleoseismology is recommended in the reference IAEA Safety Guide (IAEA SSG-9) and has been dramatically confirmed in recent time especially after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP caused by the disastrous great Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred on 11 March 2011. After this event, the IAEA International Seismic Safety Center promoted a technical document aimed at encouraging and supporting Member States, especially from newcomer countries, to include paleoseismic investigations into the geologic database, highlighting the value of earthquake geology studies and paleoseismology for nuclear safety and providing standard methodologies to perform such investigations. In detail, paleoseismic investigations in the context of site evaluation of nuclear installations have the following main objectives: i) identification of seismogenic structures based on the recognition of effects of past earthquakes in the regional area; ii) improvement of the completeness of earthquake catalogs, through the identification and dating of ancient moderate to large earthquakes, whose trace has been preserved in the geologic records; iii) estimation of the maximum seismic potential associated with an identified seismogenic structure/source, typically on the basis of the amount of displacement per event (evaluable in paleoseismic trenches), as well as of the geomorphic and stratigraphic features interpretable as the cumulative effect of repeated large seismic events (concept of "seismic landscape"); iv) rough calibration of probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA), by using the recurrence interval of large earthquakes detectable by paleoseismic investigations, and providing a "reality check" based on direct observations of

  6. Seismic and tornado evaluation of Building 221H at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-30

    This report summarizes the results of the seismic and tornado evaluation of Building 221-H and Penthouse Additions 221-SH, TH, and UH at the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina. The main objective of this project was to determine whether Building 221-H and the two-story penthouse addition over Sections 2 through 6 meet the established acceptance criteria for the criterion seismic and tornado loadings. The analyses and evaluations of three related structures -- the exhaust stack 291-H, sand filters 294-H/294-lH, and the connecting air tunnel -- are presented in a separate report. During the progress of the project, both the scope of work and the acceptance criteria for the seismic analyses of Building 221-H went through several revisions since the original criteria were established. As a result, linear elastic, quasi-nonlinear, and nonlinear dynamic analyses were performed to assess the building. The seismic criteria was based on the design response spectrum developed by Dr. George W. Housner with a Design Basis Earthquake ground acceleration of 0.2g and an Operating Basis Earthquake ground acceleration of 0.1g. Chapter 1 discusses the seismic analysis history of this project and the various analysis phases performed. The tornado analysis was performed for a Design Basis Tornado. The analyses considered the effects of wind velocity pressure, atmospheric pressure drop, and missile impact for structural response effects. The evaluation for wind velocity pressure and atmospheric pressure drop effects included consideration of both local and overall structural adequacy. The evaluation of missile impact effects included consideration of overall structural and individual panel response.

  7. Shallow prospect evaluation in Shahbazpur structure using seismic attributes analysis, Southern Bangladesh.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M.

    2015-12-01

    Shahbazpur structure is located within the Hatia trough a southern extension of prolific Surma Basin, where lies all of the largest Gas fields of Bangladesh. A method is established to delineate the structural mapping precisely by interpreting four 2D seismic lines that are acquired over Shahbazpur structure. Moreover direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHI) related attributes analyzed for further confirmation of presence of hydrocarbon. To do this synthetic generation, seismic well tie, velocity modelling and depth conversion has been performed. Seismic attribute analysis used in this study is mostly related to bright spot identification in reservoir zones as well as to identify the similar response in both below and above of the reservoir zones. Seismic interpretation shows that Shahbazpur structure is roughly an oval shaped anticline with simple four way dip closure which will be a good trap for hydrocarbon accumulation. A limited number of seismic attributes functions that are available in an academic version of Petrel software are applied to analyze attributes. Taking in consideration of possible interpretation pitfalls, attributes analysis confirmed that bright spots exist in the shallower part of the structure above the present reservoir zones which might be a potential shallow gas reserve. The bright spots are located within Shahbazpur sequence I of Dupi Tila Group of Pleistocene age and Shahbazpur sequence II of Tipam Group of Pleistocene-Pliocene age. This signature will play a very important role in next well planning on the same structure to test the shallow accumulation of hydrocarbon. For better understanding of this shallow reserve, it is suggested to acquire 3D seismic data over Shahbazpur structure which will help to evaluate the hydrocarbon accumulation and to identify gas migration pathways.

  8. Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations

    SciTech Connect

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-05-15

    Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

  9. [Independent ethics committees for clinical research in Argentina. An evaluation and a system to guarantee their independence].

    PubMed

    Gonorazky, Sergio E

    2008-01-01

    The Administración Nacional de Medicamentos, Alimentos y Tecnología Médica de la República Argentina (ANMAT) requires that an independent ethics committee of sponsors and/or researchers must previously evaluate and approve all the new pharmacological research protocols carried out on human beings. However, due to the lucrative nature of the evaluation, and because the selection of the Independent Ethics Committee is carried out by the sponsors and/or researchers, the assumed autonomy of the former can be reduced to merely a relationship of "service provider-customer". The Institutional Review Board of the Mar del Plata s Community Hospital has evaluated, between 2005 and 2006, thirty three research protocols (with their corresponding information sheets for patients and informed consent forms) previously approved by a non-institutional Independent Ethics Committee. The median number of objections made by the Institutional Review Board, which prompted the previously mentioned protocols to be modified in order to be approved, was of three per protocol. In other words, the accreditation of an Independent Ethics Committee requires a system that guarantees actual independence from the sponsors and/or researchers, as well as management control mechanisms that may lead them into an eventual loss of accreditation. Several measures are proposed in order to correct the deficiencies of the present system.

  10. Test definitions for the evaluation of seismic sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Kromer, Richard Paul; Hart, Darren M.; Harris, James Mark

    2007-07-01

    Most test methodologies referenced in this Test Definition and Test Procedures were designed by Sandia specifically for geophysical instrumentation evaluation. When appropriate, test instrumentation calibration is traceable to the National Institute for Standards Technology (NIST).

  11. Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category - B Precast Concrete Beam-Column Connection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    ER D C TR -1 4 -1 2 Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category – B Precast Concrete Beam-Column Connection...ERDC TR-14-12 December 2014 Experimental Evaluation of the Failure of a Seismic Design Category – B Precast Concrete Beam-Column Connection...experiment to test a precast concrete beam-column system to failure. This experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of precast frame

  12. Evaluation of seismic design spectrum based on UHS implementing fourth-generation seismic hazard maps of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ali; Hasan, Rafiq; Pekau, Oscar A.

    2016-12-01

    Two recent developments have come into the forefront with reference to updating the seismic design provisions for codes: (1) publication of new seismic hazard maps for Canada by the Geological Survey of Canada, and (2) emergence of the concept of new spectral format outdating the conventional standardized spectral format. The fourth -generation seismic hazard maps are based on enriched seismic data, enhanced knowledge of regional seismicity and improved seismic hazard modeling techniques. Therefore, the new maps are more accurate and need to incorporate into the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code (CHBDC) for its next edition similar to its building counterpart National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). In fact, the code writers expressed similar intentions with comments in the commentary of CHBCD 2006. During the process of updating codes, NBCC, and AASHTO Guide Specifications for LRFD Seismic Bridge Design, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington (2009) lowered the probability level from 10 to 2% and 10 to 5%, respectively. This study has brought five sets of hazard maps corresponding to 2%, 5% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years developed by the GSC under investigation. To have a sound statistical inference, 389 Canadian cities are selected. This study shows the implications of the changes of new hazard maps on the design process (i.e., extent of magnification or reduction of the design forces).

  13. An evaluation of generalized likelihood Ratio Outlier Detection to identification of seismic events in Western China

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.R.; Hartse, H.E.

    1996-09-24

    The Generalized Likelihood Ratio Outlier Detection Technique for seismic event identification is evaluated using synthetic test data and frequency-dependent P{sub g}/L{sub g} measurements from western China. For most seismic stations that are to be part of the proposed International Monitoring System for the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, there will be few or no nuclear explosions in the magnitude range of interest (e.g. M{sub b} < 4) on which to base an event-identification system using traditional classification techniques. Outlier detection is a reasonable alternative approach to the seismic discrimination problem when no calibration explosions are available. Distance-corrected P{sub g}/L{sub g} data in seven different frequency bands ranging from 0.5 to 8 Hz from the Chinese Digital Seismic Station WMQ are used to evaluate the technique. The data are collected from 157 known earthquakes, 215 unknown events (presumed earthquakes and possibly some industrial explosions), and 18 known nuclear explosions (1 from the Chinese Lop Nor test site and 17 from the East Kazakh test site). A feature selection technique is used to find the best combination of discriminants to use for outlier detection. Good discrimination performance is found by combining a low-frequency (0.5 to 1 Hz) P{sub g}/L{sub g} ratio with high-frequency ratios (e.g. 2 to 4 and 4 to 8 Hz). Although the low-frequency ratio does not discriminate between earthquakes and nuclear explosions well by itself, it can be effectively combined with the high-frequency discriminants. Based on the tests with real and synthetic data, the outlier detection technique appears to be an effective approach to seismic monitoring in uncalibrated regions.

  14. An Algorithm for Evaluating Fresnel-Zone Textural Roughness for Seismic Facies Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, H.; Gao, D.

    2014-12-01

    In reflection seismic interpretation, a 1-D convolutional model is commonly used to interpret amplitude variations based on the geometric ray theory assuming seismic wave to reflect at a reflection point; however, the propagation of seismic waves actually occurs in a finite zone around the geometric ray path and gets reflected from a zone known as Fresnel zone. The collected signal at the surface turns out to be the superposition of reflections from within the Fresnel zone, which is a function of texture. Generally, for a rough texture such as sandstone, the dominant reflection is from the zone margin, while for a smooth texture such as marine shale, the dominant reflection is from the zone center. Based on this concept, Fresnel-zone texture directly affects amplitude variations with offset (AVO), azimuth (AVAZ), and frequency (AVF). Here we develop a computer algorithm for evaluating Fresnel-zone textural roughness. The algorithm starts with dividing the Fresnel zone into a set of micro-zones. It then builds an initial texture model to be convolved with an extracted wavelet. By comparing the synthetic signal from a Fresnel zone to the real seismic signal within an analysis window at a target location, the model is adjusted and updated until both synthetic and real signals match best. The roughness is evaluated as the correlation coefficient between the generated texture model within the Fresnel zone and the ideal model for a rough texture medium. Our new algorithm is applied to a deep-water 3D seismic volume over offshore Angola, west Africa. The results show that a rough texture is associated with channel sands, whereas a smooth texture with marine shale.

  15. Independent Evaluators of Federal Programs: Approaches, Devices, and Examples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-16

    Stufflebeam , “Joint Standards for Education Evaluation,” in Encyclopedia of Evaluation, pp. 213-214. 18 Among the many GAO products that demonstrate...28 See Stufflebeam , “Joint Committee for Education Evaluation.” 29 Joint Committee, Program Evaluation Standards, pp. 223-224

  16. Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 2. Evaluation of seismic designs: a review of seismic design requirements for Nuclear Power Plant Piping

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This document reports the position and recommendations of the NRC Piping Review Committee, Task Group on Seismic Design. The Task Group considered overlapping conservation in the various steps of seismic design, the effects of using two levels of earthquake as a design criterion, and current industry practices. Issues such as damping values, spectra modification, multiple response spectra methods, nozzle and support design, design margins, inelastic piping response, and the use of snubbers are addressed. Effects of current regulatory requirements for piping design are evaluated, and recommendations for immediate licensing action, changes in existing requirements, and research programs are presented. Additional background information and suggestions given by consultants are also presented.

  17. The ESI scale, an ethical approach to the evaluation of seismic hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porfido, Sabina; Nappi, Rosa; De Lucia, Maddalena; Gaudiosi, Germana; Alessio, Giuliana; Guerrieri, Luca

    2015-04-01

    The dissemination of correct information about seismic hazard is an ethical duty of scientific community worldwide. A proper assessment of a earthquake severity and impact should not ignore the evaluation of its intensity, taking into account both the effects on humans, man-made structures, as well as on the natural evironment. We illustrate the new macroseismic scale that measures the intensity taking into account the effects of earthquakes on the environment: the ESI 2007 (Environmental Seismic Intensity) scale (Michetti et al., 2007), ratified by the INQUA (International Union for Quaternary Research) during the XVII Congress in Cairns (Australia). The ESI scale integrates and completes the traditional macroseismic scales, of which it represents the evolution, allowing to assess the intensity parameter also where buildings are absent or damage-based diagnostic elements saturate. Each degree reflects the corresponding strength of an earthquake and the role of ground effects, evaluating the Intensity on the basis of the characteristics and size of primary (e.g. surface faulting and tectonic uplift/subsidence) and secondary effects (e.g. ground cracks, slope movements, liquefaction phenomena, hydrological changes, anomalous waves, tsunamis, trees shaking, dust clouds and jumping stones). This approach can be considered "ethical" because helps to define the real scenario of an earthquake, regardless of the country's socio-economic conditions and level of development. Here lies the value and the relevance of macroseismic scales even today, one hundred years after the death of Giuseppe Mercalli, who conceived the homonymous scale for the evaluation of earthquake intensity. For an appropriate mitigation strategy in seismic areas, it is fundamental to consider the role played by seismically induced effects on ground, such as active faults (size in length and displacement) and secondary effects (the total area affecting). With these perspectives two different cases

  18. Evaluation of seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings under near-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniri, Hassan

    2017-03-01

    Near-field ground motions are significantly severely affected on seismic response of structure compared with far-field ground motions, and the reason is that the near-source forward directivity ground motions contain pulse-long periods. Therefore, the cumulative effects of far-fault records are minor. The damage and collapse of engineering structures observed in the last decades' earthquakes show the potential of damage in existing structures under near-field ground motions. One important subject studied by earthquake engineers as part of a performance-based approach is the determination of demand and collapse capacity under near-field earthquake. Different methods for evaluating seismic structural performance have been suggested along with and as part of the development of performance-based earthquake engineering. This study investigated the results of illustrious characteristics of near-fault ground motions on the seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, by the use of Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (IDA) method. Due to the fact that various ground motions result in different intensity-versus-response plots, this analysis is done again under various ground motions in order to achieve significant statistical averages. The OpenSees software was used to conduct nonlinear structural evaluations. Numerical modelling showed that near-source outcomes cause most of the seismic energy from the rupture to arrive in a single coherent long-period pulse of motion and permanent ground displacements. Finally, a vulnerability of RC building can be evaluated against pulse-like near-fault ground motions effects.

  19. Evaluation of seismic performance of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings under near-field earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniri, Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Near-field ground motions are significantly severely affected on seismic response of structure compared with far-field ground motions, and the reason is that the near-source forward directivity ground motions contain pulse-long periods. Therefore, the cumulative effects of far-fault records are minor. The damage and collapse of engineering structures observed in the last decades' earthquakes show the potential of damage in existing structures under near-field ground motions. One important subject studied by earthquake engineers as part of a performance-based approach is the determination of demand and collapse capacity under near-field earthquake. Different methods for evaluating seismic structural performance have been suggested along with and as part of the development of performance-based earthquake engineering. This study investigated the results of illustrious characteristics of near-fault ground motions on the seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) structures, by the use of Incremental Nonlinear Dynamic Analysis (IDA) method. Due to the fact that various ground motions result in different intensity-versus-response plots, this analysis is done again under various ground motions in order to achieve significant statistical averages. The OpenSees software was used to conduct nonlinear structural evaluations. Numerical modelling showed that near-source outcomes cause most of the seismic energy from the rupture to arrive in a single coherent long-period pulse of motion and permanent ground displacements. Finally, a vulnerability of RC building can be evaluated against pulse-like near-fault ground motions effects.

  20. Independent Panel Evaluation of Dry Sludge PISA Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.F.

    1999-10-20

    Dr. Kirk Yeager and Mr. Marvin Banks from Energetic Material Research and Technology Center (EMRTC) evaluated the Savannah River Site (SRS) efforts in the Dry Sludge program. They evaluated four program areas: energetic material formation, stability, initiation, and propagation. The panel evaluation included a site visit (July 13, 1999 and July 14, 1999) as well as a review of various reports and presentations by researchers involved in the program.

  1. Probabilistic seismic and geotechnical evaluation at a dam site

    SciTech Connect

    Vanmarcke, E.H.

    1983-09-01

    This report examines the use of probabilistic methods in dealing with the problem of potential earthquake-induced liquefaction of foundation soils at an example dam site located in the central United States, near the New Madrid earthquake zone. The example dam is assumed to be a 1-mile long rolled-filled embankment founded on a 100-ft deep deposit of interbedded alluvial gravels, sands, silts, and clays. The study is seen as an opportunity to examine probabilistic concepts and procedures in the framework of an example engineering project. In this context, the main practical value of a probabilistic approach is that it permits more informed decision making about further data acquisition, additional engineering analysis, and if necessary, remedial action. The specific aim of the study is to show how probabilistic procedures complement and help to reinterpret the results of deterministic (earthquake-induced) liquefaction analysis. The procedures focus on evaluating the impact of the different sources of variability (in the input parameters) on the uncertainty in performance predictions, and they permit results of the liquefaction analyses to be seen in the broader framework of assessment of earthquake-related dam failure risks.

  2. ESP Toolbox: A Computational Framework for Precise, Scale-Independent Analysis of Bulk Elastic and Seismic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. E.; Vel, S. S.; Cook, A. C.; Song, W. J.; Gerbi, C. C.; Okaya, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Owing to the abundance of highly anisotropic minerals in the crust, the Voigt and Reuss bounds on the seismic velocities can be separated by more than 1 km/s. These bounds are determined by modal mineralogy and crystallographic preferred orientations (CPO) of the constituent minerals, but where the true velocities lie between these bounds is determined by other fabric parameters such as the shapes, shape-preferred orientations, and spatial arrangements of grains. Thus, the calculation of accurate bulk stiffness relies on explicitly treating the grain-scale heterogeneity, and the same principle applies at larger scales, for example calculating accurate bulk stiffness for a crustal volume with varying proportions and distributions of folds or shear zones. We have developed stand-alone GUI software - ESP Toolbox - for the calculation of 3D bulk elastic and seismic properties of heterogeneous and polycrystalline materials using image or EBSD data. The GUI includes a number of different homogenization techniques, including Voigt, Reuss, Hill, geometric mean, self-consistent and asymptotic expansion homogenization (AEH) methods. The AEH method, which uses a finite element mesh, is most accurate since it explicitly accounts for elastic interactions of constituent minerals/phases. The user need only specify the microstructure and material properties of the minerals/phases. We use the Toolbox to explore changes in bulk elasticity and related seismic anisotropy caused by specific variables, including: (a) the quartz alpha-beta phase change in rocks with varying proportions of quartz, (b) changes in modal mineralogy and CPO fabric that occur during progressive deformation and metamorphism, and (c) shear zones of varying thickness, abundance and geometry in continental crust. The Toolbox allows rapid sensitivity analysis around these and other variables, and the resulting bulk stiffness matrices can be used to populate volumes for synthetic wave propagation experiments that

  3. A Study on Seismic Hazard Evaluation at the Nagaoka CO2 Storage Site, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, S.

    2015-12-01

    RITE carried out the first Japanese pilot-scale CO2 sequestration project from July, 2003 to January, 2005 in Nagaoka City.Supercritical CO2 was injected into an onshore saline aquifer at a depth of 1,100m. CO2 was injected at a rate of 10,400 tonnes. 'Mid Niigata Prefecture Earthquake in 2004' (Mw6.6) and 'The Niigataken Chuetsu-oki Earthquake in 2007' (Mw6.6) occurred during the CO2 injection-test and after the completion of injection-test. Japan is one of the world's major countries with frequent earthquakes.This paper presents a result of seismic response analysis, and reports of seismic hazard evaluation of a reservoir and a caprock. In advance of dynamic response analysis, the earthquake motion recorded on the earth surface assumed the horizontally layer model, and set up the input wave from a basement layer by SHAKE ( = One-Dimensional Seismic Response Analysis). This wave was inputted into the analysis model and the equation of motion was solved using the direct integral calculus by Newmark Beta Method. In Seismic Response Analysis, authors have used Multiple Yield Model (MYM, Iwata, et al., 2013), which can respond also to complicated geological structure. The intensity deformation property of the foundation added the offloading characteristic to the composition rule of Duncan-Chang model in consideration of confining stress dependency, and used for and carried out the nonlinear repetition model. And the deformation characteristic which made it depend on confining stress with the cyclic loadings and un-loadings, and combined Mohr-Coulomb's law as a strength characteristic.The maximum dynamic shearing strain of caprock was generated about 1.1E-04 after the end of an earthquake. Although the dynamic safety factor was 1.925 on the beginning, after the end of an earthquake fell 0.05 point. The dynamic safety factor of reservoir fell to 1.20 from 1.29. As a result of CO2 migration monitoring by the seismic cross-hole tomography, CO2 has stopped in the reservoir

  4. Covariance Matrix Evaluations for Independent Mass Fission Yields

    SciTech Connect

    Terranova, N.; Serot, O.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.

    2015-01-15

    Recent needs for more accurate fission product yields include covariance information to allow improved uncertainty estimations of the parameters used by design codes. The aim of this work is to investigate the possibility to generate more reliable and complete uncertainty information on independent mass fission yields. Mass yields covariances are estimated through a convolution between the multi-Gaussian empirical model based on Brosa's fission modes, which describe the pre-neutron mass yields, and the average prompt neutron multiplicity curve. The covariance generation task has been approached using the Bayesian generalized least squared method through the CONRAD code. Preliminary results on mass yields variance-covariance matrix will be presented and discussed from physical grounds in the case of {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f) reactions.

  5. An independent evaluation of the Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Surovell, Todd A; Holliday, Vance T; Gingerich, Joseph A M; Ketron, Caroline; Haynes, C Vance; Hilman, Ilene; Wagner, Daniel P; Johnson, Eileen; Claeys, Philippe

    2009-10-27

    Based on elevated concentrations of a set of "impact markers" at the onset of the Younger Dryas stadial from sedimentary contexts across North America, Firestone, Kennett, West, and others have argued that 12.9 ka the Earth experienced an impact by an extraterrestrial body, an event that had devastating ecological consequences for humans, plants, and animals in the New World [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104:16016-16021]. Herein, we report the results of an independent analysis of magnetic minerals and microspherules from seven sites of similar age, including two examined by Firestone et al. We were unable to reproduce any results of the Firestone et al. study and find no support for Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact.

  6. An independent evaluation of the Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Surovell, Todd A.; Holliday, Vance T.; Gingerich, Joseph A. M.; Ketron, Caroline; Haynes, C. Vance; Hilman, Ilene; Wagner, Daniel P.; Johnson, Eileen; Claeys, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Based on elevated concentrations of a set of “impact markers” at the onset of the Younger Dryas stadial from sedimentary contexts across North America, Firestone, Kennett, West, and others have argued that 12.9 ka the Earth experienced an impact by an extraterrestrial body, an event that had devastating ecological consequences for humans, plants, and animals in the New World [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 104:16016–16021]. Herein, we report the results of an independent analysis of magnetic minerals and microspherules from seven sites of similar age, including two examined by Firestone et al. We were unable to reproduce any results of the Firestone et al. study and find no support for Younger Dryas extraterrestrial impact. PMID:19822748

  7. Development of Independence: Locus of Control, Achievement Motivation and Self vs. Adult Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickie, Jane R.; Mast, Vicki A.

    The development and interrelationship of various measures of independence in children ages 3-12 are examined. Subjects were scored on measures of locus of control and achievement motivation and were rated by teachers on independence and achievement. Subjects were also scored on reliance on adult evaluation and self-evaluation. The results showed…

  8. Seismic stability evaluation of Alben Barkley Lock and Dam Project. Volume 1. Summary report. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.E.; Bluhm, P.F.

    1992-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of seismological, geological, laboratory, field, and analytical investigations conducted to evaluate the seismic stability of two earth embankment sections of the Alben Barkley Lock and Dam Project, Kentucky. These represent typical sections of the powerhouse/switch-yard area and the main embankment. Detailed documentation of each of the major topical areas of this study are contained in Volumes 2 through 5 of this series of reports. The design earthquake, from the New Madrid Seismic Zone, had a body-wave magnitude of 7.5. Of particular interest in this study, was the seismic performance of silty sands in the foundation and their overall effect on the stability of these embankment sections. The results of this study indicate that large scale deformations and/or slope failure which would result in the loss of reservoir are not deformations on the order of 2 to 3 ft are expected. These deformations are relatively small in light of the fact that 28 ft of freeboard are expected to be available during the design earthquake.

  9. Independent seismic evaluation of the 24-580-980 south connector ramps

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Jarpe, S.P.; Foxall, W.

    1997-05-01

    The interchange for highways 24, 580, and 980 (the Stack) in Oakland, California, lies 4.3 km from the surface expression of the Hayward fault and 26 km from the San Andreas fault. The purpose of this project is to compute realistic, linear, strong ground motion (rock outcrop motion) likely to affect this interchange during a hazardous earth-quake on the Hayward fault. With the exception of very long period ( >20 sec) motion, the Hayward fault will be the controlling deterministic ground motion hazard to this structure. We identified a magnitude M = 7.25 earthquake that ruptures 82 km of the Hayward fault as the principal hazard to the Stack; it has a moment of 8.5 x 10{sup 26} dyne-cm. Moment magnitudes (Hanks and Kanamori, 1979) are used in this report. Our goal is to produce realistic synthesized ground motion for three components and the full wavetrain and for frequencies from 0.05 to 33.0 Hz.

  10. Seismic Stability Evaluation of Alben Barkley Dam and Lake Project. Volume 2. Geological and Seismological Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    On his second visit to the United States, Sir Charles Lyell spent a few days in the New Madrid area late in March, 1846, and reported this earthquake...agreed exactly with the time when my companion had felt the motion. ( Lyell , Sir Charles : A Second Visit to the United States of America, Second...34 (in preparation), Paper presented at the New Madrid Seismic Zone Symposium, Cape Girardeau, Mo. Stearns, Richard G., and Wilson, Charles W., Jr. 1972

  11. Proceedings of Conference XIII, evaluation of regional seismic hazards and risk

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Charonnat, Barbara B.

    1981-01-01

    The participants in the conference concluded that a great deal of useful research has been performed in the national Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program by USGS and non-USGS scientists and engineers and that the state-of-knowledge concerning the evaluation of seismic hazards and risk has been advanced substantially. Many of the technical issues raised during the conference are less controversial now because of new information and insights gained during the first three years of the expanded research program conducted under the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act. Utilization of research results by many groups of users has also improved during this period and further improvement in utilization appears likely. Additional research is still required to resolve more completely the many complex technical issues summarized above and described in the papers contained in the proceedings. Improved certainty of research results on the evaluation of regional seismic hazards and risk is required before full utilization can be made by state and local governments who deal. with people frequently having a different perception of the hazard and its risk to them than that perceived by scientists or engineers. Each of the papers contained in the proceedings contain throughtful recommendations for improving the state-of-knowledge. Two papers, in particular, focussed on this particular theme. The first was presented by Lynn Sykes in the Geologic Keynote Address. He identified geographic areas throughout the world which may be considered as counterparts or analogues of seismic zones in the United States. He concluded that much can be learned about prediction, tectonic settings, earthquake hazards, and earthquake risk for sites in the United States by studying their tectonic analogues in other countries. The second paper was presented by John Blume in the Engineering Keynote Address. He suggested 20 specific research topics that, in his opinion, will significantly advance the state

  12. An engineering rock classification to evaluate seismic rock-fall susceptibility and its application to the Wasatch front

    SciTech Connect

    Harp, E.L.; Noble, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    The authors examine the characteristics of rock slopes that make them susceptible to failures caused by earthquakes. They discuss these characteristics, namely the fracture and joint properties that define the structural behavior of a rock mass at the surface, and then present an empirical engineering classification or ranking system that rates the relative seismic susceptibility of rock masses. They next apply the engineering classification in a case study of seismically-triggered rock falls in the Mammoth Lakes area. The engineering classification is correlated with the concentration of seismically-triggered rock falls, and the resulting statistical model can be used to predict the probability of a rock fall for a given magnitude earthquake. Finally, they apply the classification and probability analysis to similar slopes in the Wasatch Range near Salt Lake City and evaluate the relative susceptibility of slopes in this area to seismically-induced failure.

  13. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last know occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.

  14. Relative Evaluation of the Independent Volume Measures of Caverns

    SciTech Connect

    MUNSON,DARRELL E.

    2000-08-01

    Throughout the construction and operation of the caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), three types of cavern volume measurements have been maintained. These are: (1) the calculated solution volume determined during initial construction by solution mining and any subsequent solutioning during oil transfers, (2) the calculated sonar volume determined through sonar surveys of the cavern dimensions, and (3) the direct metering of oil to determine the volume of the cavern occupied by the oil. The objective of this study is to compare these measurements to each other and determine, if possible, the uncertainties associated with a given type of measurement. Over time, each type of measurement has acquired a customary, or an industry accepted, stated uncertainty. This uncertainty is not necessarily the result of a technical analysis. Ultimately there is one definitive quantity, the oil volume measure by the oil custody transfer meters, taken by all parties to the transfer as the correct ledger amount and for which the SPR Project is accountable. However, subsequent transfers within a site may not be with meters of the same accuracy. In this study, a very simple theory of the perfect relationship is used to evaluate the correlation (deviation) of the various measures. This theory permits separation of uncertainty and bias. Each of the four SPR sites are examined, first with comparisons between the calculated solution volumes and the sonar volumes determined during construction, then with comparisons of the oil inventories and the sonar volumes obtained either by surveying through brine prior to oil filling or through the oil directly.

  15. Evaluation of seismic hazard in Marmara region based on the new datasets developed in the EU-MARSITE Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesetyan, Karin; Akinci, Aybige; Betül Demircioglu, Mine

    2016-04-01

    Several studies with various degrees of sophistication have been conducted for the probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard in the Marmara Region (e.g. Atakan et al., 2002; Erdik et al., 2004; Kalkan et al., 2008; Gülerce and Ocak, 2013),. The common point of these studies was that they have all addressed the hazard in the region in terms of both time-independent probabilistic (simple Poissonian) and time-dependent probabilistic (renewal) models. This tendency was governed by the following considerations: 1) the region has experienced a considerable number of large magnitude events in the history, which have also shown some periodicity; 2) the existing seismic gap and the post-1999 earthquake stress transfer at the western portion of the 1000km-long NAFZ indicates a high probability of having a M>7 event in the near future close to the city of Istanbul; 3)the seismic history of the region was well documented and studied and there have been, especially in the aftermath of the 1999 Kocaeli and Düzce events, several geological investigations both on-shore and off-shore aiming to obtain a regional fault model as complete as possible, which were reflected in the fault segmentation models of the PSHA studies. Task 5.5. of the MARSITE Project aimed at a reassessment of the probabilistic seismic hazard of the Marmara region in the light of the new datasets compiled in the project. The improvement of the knowledge on the seismotectonic regime of the Marmara region paved the path for the development of alternative source models for the improvement of the existing probabilistic seismic hazard maps. In this connection, the most recent findings and outputs of different work packages of the project, in terms of seismicity, fault segmentation and slip rate data are utilized. A revised fault segementation model and associated Poisson and renewal recurrence models as well as recently emerged global and regional ground motion prediction equations are used to assessed the seismic

  16. Soil depth mapping using seismic surface waves: Evaluation on eroded loess covered hillslopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardie, Severine; Samyn, Kevin; Cerdan, Olivier; Grandjean, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    The purposes of the multidisciplinary DIGISOIL project are the integration and improvement of in situ and proximal technologies for the assessment of soil properties and soil degradation indicators. Foreseen developments concern sensor technologies, data processing and their integration to applications of (digital) soil mapping (DSM). Among available techniques, the seismic one is, in this study, particularly tested for characterising soil vulnerability to erosion. The spectral analysis of surface waves (SASW) method is an in situ seismic technique used for evaluation of the stiffnesses (G) and associated depth in layered systems. A profile of Rayleigh wave velocity versus frequency, i.e., the dispersion curve, is calculated from each recorded seismogram before to be inverted to obtain the vertical profile of shear wave velocity Vs. Then, the soil stiffness can easily be calculated from the shear velocity if the material density is estimated, and the soil stiffness as a function of depth can be obtained. This last information can be a good indicator to identify the soil bedrock limit. SASW measurements adapted to soil characterisation is proposed in the DIGISOIL project, as it produces in an easy and quick way a 2D map of the soil. This system was tested for the digital mapping of the depth of loamy material in a catchment of the European loess belt. The validation of this methodology has been performed with the realisation of several acquisitions along the seismic profiles: - Several boreholes were drilled until the bedrock, permitting to get the geological features of the soil and the depth of the bedrock; - Several laboratory measurements of various parameters were done on samples taken from the boreholes at various depths, such as dry density, solid density, and water content; - Dynamic penetration tests were also conducted along the seismic profile, until the bedrock is attained. Some empirical correlations between the parameters measured with laboratory tests

  17. A provisional effective evaluation when errors are present in independent variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurin, L. S.

    1983-01-01

    Algorithms are examined for evaluating the parameters of a regression model when there are errors in the independent variables. The algorithms are fast and the estimates they yield are stable with respect to the correlation of errors and measurements of both the dependent variable and the independent variables.

  18. Evaluating Late Pleistocene and Holocene Rupture, Seismic Hazards and Ground Motion in the Lake Tahoe Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmauder, Gretchen Cathleen

    Chapter two in this study is a reevaluation of active faulting across the Tahoe basin a combination of airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) imagery, high-resolution seismic CHIRP profiles, multibeam bathymetric mapping, and field mapping. The combined lateral and vertical resolution has allowed a straight forward identification of the landward extension of fault scarps associated with the three major active fault zones in the Tahoe basin: the West Tahoe-Dollar Point fault, Stateline-North Tahoe fault, and Incline Village fault. Chapter 3 in this study evaluates seismic hazard within the basin as a result of earthquake rupture on the faults identified in the first part of this study. The Ground motions modeled using Nevada ShakeZoning, a physics-based method incorporating geotechnical information and basin shape determined from geophysical methods, peak ground velocity (PGV) maps considerably different (and more accurate) than those obtained from ShakeMap, a standard USGS tool for ground motion estimation. Although ShakeMap over-predicts ground shaking outside the Lake Tahoe basin, it substantially under-predicts ground motions within the basin. eWave propagation models indicate strong, sustained shaking in the basin, threatening several communities. Annual rates of exceedance maps show the higher rates of exceedance of key ground-motion levels strongly correlate with the basin shape. The purpose of this study is to provide both better ground motion estimates and more useful shaking maps to local communities. Chapter 4 begins the validation process of the models developed as part of Chapter 3 to events recorded at Nevada Seismological Laboratory seismic stations.

  19. An Evaluation of Seismic Reflection Studies in the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada Test Site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGovern, Thomas F.; Introduction by Pankratz, L. W.; Ackermann, H.D.

    1983-01-01

    As part of a total geophysical evaluation of Yucca Mountain for use as a Nuclear Waste Repository the seismic reflection technique has been applied. This study has been conducted to analyze the historical and technical efforts which have been used by three geophysical contractors employing a wide variety of techniques ranging from the most simple to very elaborate 3-D surveys. In each case elaborate noise studies were conducted, and based upon their evaluation parameters were chosen for multifold CDP recording. In every case, the signal-to-noise ratio was such that no reflections were discernable. Since the reflections cannot be separated from the noise even using very elaborate noise suppression techniques and up to 384 fold multiplicity it is apparent that in this volcanic terrain reflection surveys, can not work.

  20. Implementation of seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy high-level waste storage tanks and appurtenances

    SciTech Connect

    Conrads, T.J.

    1993-06-01

    In the fall of 1992, a draft of the Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for the Department of Energy (DOE) High-level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances was issued. The guidelines were prepared by the Tanks Seismic Experts Panel (TSEP) and this task was sponsored by DOE, Environmental Management. The TSEP is comprised of a number of consultants known for their knowledge of seismic ground motion and expertise in the analysis of structures, systems and components subjected to seismic loads. The development of these guidelines was managed by staff from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Engineering Research and Applications Division, Department of Nuclear Energy. This paper describes the process used to incorporate the Seismic Design and Evaluation Guidelines for the DOE High-Level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances into the design criteria for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Project at the Hanford Site. This project will design and construct six new high-level waste tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. This paper also discusses the vehicles used to ensure compliance to these guidelines throughout Title 1 and Title 2 design phases of the project as well as the strategy used to ensure consistent and cost-effective application of the guidelines by the structural analysts. The paper includes lessons learned and provides recommendations for other tank design projects which might employ the TSEP guidelines.

  1. Pattern recognition applied to seismic signals of Llaima volcano (Chile): An evaluation of station-dependent classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curilem, Millaray; Huenupan, Fernando; Beltrán, Daniel; San Martin, Cesar; Fuentealba, Gustavo; Franco, Luis; Cardona, Carlos; Acuña, Gonzalo; Chacón, Max; Khan, M. Salman; Becerra Yoma, Nestor

    2016-04-01

    Automatic pattern recognition applied to seismic signals from volcanoes may assist seismic monitoring by reducing the workload of analysts, allowing them to focus on more challenging activities, such as producing reports, implementing models, and understanding volcanic behaviour. In a previous work, we proposed a structure for automatic classification of seismic events in Llaima volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in the Southern Andes, located in the Araucanía Region of Chile. A database of events taken from three monitoring stations on the volcano was used to create a classification structure, independent of which station provided the signal. The database included three types of volcanic events: tremor, long period, and volcano-tectonic and a contrast group which contains other types of seismic signals. In the present work, we maintain the same classification scheme, but we consider separately the stations information in order to assess whether the complementary information provided by different stations improves the performance of the classifier in recognising seismic patterns. This paper proposes two strategies for combining the information from the stations: i) combining the features extracted from the signals from each station and ii) combining the classifiers of each station. In the first case, the features extracted from the signals from each station are combined forming the input for a single classification structure. In the second, a decision stage combines the results of the classifiers for each station to give a unique output. The results confirm that the station-dependent strategies that combine the features and the classifiers from several stations improves the classification performance, and that the combination of the features provides the best performance. The results show an average improvement of 9% in the classification accuracy when compared with the station-independent method.

  2. Importance of independent evaluation of initial anatomic results after endovascular coiling for ruptured cerebral aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Taki, Waro; Sakai, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Hidenori

    2013-04-01

    Initial incomplete occlusion is been an important predictor of aneurysm recurrence, rebleeding or retreatment after endovascular coiling. In 129 patients in the Prospective Registry of Subarachnoid Aneurysms Treatment (PRESAT) cohort, ruptured aneurysms were coiled within 14days of onset, and initial post-coiling and 1-year follow-up aneurysm-occlusion status were evaluated by both local investigators and independent reviewers. The aim of this study was to investigate whether self-reported evaluations of initial aneurysm occlusion by treating physicians predicted incomplete aneurysm occlusion at 1year after coiling for ruptured cerebral aneurysms as well as that done by independent evaluations. The relationships between self-reported or independent evaluations of initial anatomic results and 1-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion (retreatment within 1year, or residual aneurysms at 1year) were determined. Both initial and 1-year aneurysm-occlusion status were judged significantly worse by independent reviewers than by local investigators (p<0.001). One-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion was identified in 59 patients: 10 patients, including two patients with re-ruptured aneurysms, were retreated and 49 other patients were judged to have residual aneurysms by independent reviewers. On immediate post-coiling angiograms, both residual neck or aneurysm judged by local investigators, and residual aneurysm judged by independent reviewers, were predictive for 1-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion on univariate analyses. However, multivariate analyses found that the initial aneurysm occlusion status judged by independent reviewers (p=0.02, odds ratio=2.83, 95% confidence interval=1.15-6.95), but not by local investigators, was a significant predictor for 1-year incomplete aneurysm occlusion. This study demonstrates the importance of independent evaluations of aneurysm occlusion status for management of coiled aneurysms.

  3. Seismic review of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant as part of the Systematic Evaluation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Ma, S.M.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1980-11-15

    A limited seismic reassessment of Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant was performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The reassessment focused generally on the reactor coolant pressure boundary and on those systems and components necessary to shut down the reactor safety and to maintain it in a safe shutdown condition following a postulated earthquake characterized by a peak horizontal ground acceleration of 0.22 g. Unlike a comprehensive design analysis, the reassessment was limited to structures and components deemed representative of generic classes. Conclusions and recommendations about the ability of selected structures, equipment, and piping to withstand the postulated earthquake are presented. 86 refs., 44 figs., 19 tabs.

  4. Simulation of complete seismic surveys for evaluation of experiment design and processing

    SciTech Connect

    Oezdenvar, T.; McMechan, G.A.; Chaney, P.

    1996-03-01

    Synthesis of complete seismic survey data sets allows analysis and optimization of all stages in an acquisition/processing sequence. The characteristics of available survey designs, parameter choices, and processing algorithms may be evaluated prior to field acquisition to produce a composite system in which all stages have compatible performance; this maximizes the cost effectiveness for a given level of accuracy, or for targets with specific characteristics. Data sets synthesized for three salt structures provide representative comparisons of time and depth migration, post-stack and prestack processing, and illustrate effects of varying recording aperture and shot spacing, iterative focusing analysis, and the interaction of migration algorithms with recording aperture. A final example demonstrates successful simulation of both 2-D acquisition and processing of a real data line over a salt pod in the Gulf of Mexico.

  5. Investigations on local seismic phases and evaluation of body waves magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffet, Stephane; Massinon, Bernard; Mechler, Pierre; Riviere, Florence

    1988-09-01

    For near events, synthetics seismograms are computed using BOUCHON's method, for various heterogeneous structures. A special emphasis is put on topographic irregularities. This work was presented in the poster session at the 10th annual DARPA/AFGL SEISMIC RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (2 to 5 May 1988). The programs used for this work are now implemented on our new SUN 3/280 system. For teleseisms, the main effort was first to obtain attenuation models between Eastern Kazakh and several regions in France. The application of those results to source functions for a series of events recorded in France is currently being done. A first by-product from this study was a re-evaluation of the magnitude of all events and a determination of stations corrections.

  6. Numerical Evaluation Of Shape Memory Alloy Recentering Braces In Reinforced Concrete Buildings Subjected To Seismic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charles, Winsbert Curt

    Seismic protective techniques utilizing specialized energy dissipation devices within the lateral resisting frames have been successfully used to limit inelastic deformation in reinforced concrete buildings by increasing damping and/or altering the stiffness of these structures. However, there is a need to investigate and develop systems with self-centering capabilities; systems that are able to assist in returning a structure to its original position after an earthquake. In this project, the efficacy of a shape memory alloy (SMA) based device, as a structural recentering device is evaluated through numerical analysis using the OpenSees framework. OpenSees is a software framework for simulating the seismic response of structural and geotechnical systems. OpenSees has been developed as the computational platform for research in performance-based earthquake engineering at the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER). A non-ductile reinforced concrete building, which is modelled using OpenSees and verified with available experimental data is used for the analysis in this study. The model is fitted with Tension/Compression (TC) SMA devices. The performance of the SMA recentering device is evaluated for a set of near-field and far-field ground motions. Critical performance measures of the analysis include residual displacements, interstory drift and acceleration (horizontal and vertical) for different types of ground motions. The results show that the TC device's performance is unaffected by the type of ground motion. The analysis also shows that the inclusion of the device in the lateral force resisting system of the building resulted in a 50% decrease in peak horizontal displacement, and inter-story drift elimination of residual deformations, acceleration was increased up to 110%.

  7. Seismic hazard evaluation for the high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.K.; Toro, G.R. )

    1991-09-01

    This study investigates the probabilistic hazard of earthquake-induced ground shaking at the HFIR facility, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. These results will be used to calculate plant response and potential effects in a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA). For this purpose, several guidelines apply to this work. First, both the frequency of exceedance and the uncertainty in frequency of exceedance of various ground motion levels must be represented. These are required by the PRA so that the frequency and uncertainty of various possible plant states can be expressed. Second, there is a deliberate attempt to provide an unbiased distribution of frequencies of exceedance, i.e. to present results that are neither conservative nor unconservative. This is consistent with the goals of a PRA, to provide unbiased estimates of plant effects from which appropriate decisions (for instance about evaluating existing levels of seismic design) can be reached. Recent intensive studies of seismic hazard in the central and eastern United States (CEUS) have been completed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). These studies represent major efforts to characterize the seismic hazard for nuclear power plants in the CEUS, and use the most recent, up-to-date understandings of seismicity and ground motion relations for the region. With these studies as a resource, the current effort relies exclusively on the seismicity and ground motion assumptions therein to formulate seismic hazard curves for the HFIR facility. The interpretation of these studies to derive seismic hazard curves in a format suitable for input to a PRA is described in this report. 29 refs., 40 figs., 22 tabs.

  8. Evaluation of the seismicity of the southern Great Basin and its relationship to the tectonic framework of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, A.M.; Harmsen, S.C.; Meremonte, M.E.

    1987-12-31

    Seismograph network recordings of local and regional earthquakes are being collected in the southern Great Basin to aid in the evaluation of the seismic hazard at a potential high-level radioactie waste repository site at Yucca Mountain in the southwestern Nevada Test Site. Data for 1522 earthquakes for the calendar years 1982 and 1983 are reported herein. In the period August, 1978 through December, 1983, 2800 earthquakes were located within and adjacent to the southern Great Basin seismograph network. Earthquake hypocenters, selected focal mechanisms, and other inferred seismicity characteristics are presented and discussed in relation to the local and regional geologic framework. 105 refs., 94 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Seismic hazard for the Savannah River Site: A comparative evaluation of the EPRI and LLNL assessments. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Wingo, H.E.

    1992-05-20

    This report was conducted to: (1) develop an understanding of causes for the vast differences between the two comprehensive studies, and (2) using a methodology consistent with the reconciled methods employed in the two studies, develop a single seismic hazard for the Savannah River Site suitable for use in seismic probabilistic risk assessments with emphasis on the K Reactor. Results are presented for a rock site which is a typical because detailed evaluations of soil characteristics at the K Reactor are still in progress that account for the effects of a soil stablizing grouting program. However when the soils analysis is completed, the effects of soils can be included with this analysis with the addition of a single factor that will decrease slightly the seismic hazard for a rock site.

  10. Seismic shake table testing program for hollow clay tile wall evaluation at DOE facilities in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Walls, J.C.; Webb, D.S.; Stone, N.E. ); Bennett, R.M. . Dept. of Civil Engineering)

    1991-01-01

    A seismic test facility located at the K-25 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been refurbished after shutdown since 1985. The facility shake table is being recertified in order to provide seismic testing capability to an extensive multi-year evaluation program of hollow clay tile walls in buildings at the DOE site in Oak Ridge. The program, directed by teh Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering at Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., the managing contractor for DOE in Oak Ridge, is reviewed. Emphasis is given to the recertification efforts for the seismic test facility, and results of facility and specimen testing to data are discussed and plans for future testing are reviewed. Features and capabilities of the shake table are presented. The dynamic testing of masonry structures is reviewed, and a hollow clay tile wall testing program is projected based on the shake table capability. 13 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Broadband Waveform Modeling to Evaluate the USGS Seismic Velocity Model for the San Francisco Bay Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, A.; Petersson, A.; Nilsson, S.; Sjogreen, B.; McCandless, K.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake centenary, the USGS developed a three-dimensional seismic velocity and attenuation model for Northern California based on detailed geologic and geophysical constraints. The model was used to predict ground motions for the 1906 rupture. In this study we evaluate the model to assess its ability to accurately predict ground motions from moderate earthquakes recorded on broadband stations. Satisfactory prediction of ground motions from these events will provide hope for accurate modeling of future scenario earthquakes. Simulations were performed on large parallel computer(s) with a new elastic finite difference code developed at LLNL. We simulated broadband ground motions (0-0.25 Hz) for several moderate (magnitude 3.5-5.0) earthquakes in the region observed at Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN) broadband stations. These events are well located and can be modeled with simple point moment tensor sources (taken from the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory catalog), helping to isolate the effects of structure on the waveforms. These data sample the region's diverse tectonic structures, such as the bay muds, sedimentary basins and hard rock complexes. Preliminary results indicate that the simulations reproduce many important features in the data. For example, observed long duration surface waves are often predicted for complex paths (traveling across contrasting structures) and through sedimentary basins. Excellent waveform fits were frequently obtained for long-period comparisons (0.02-0.1) and good fits were often obtained for shorter periods. We will attempt higher frequency simulations to test the ability of the model to match the high frequency response. Finally, we performed large scenario earthquake simulations for the Hayward Fault. These simulations predict large amplifications across the Santa Clara and San Ramon/Livermore Valley sedimentary basins and with the Sacramento/San Joaquin River Delta.

  12. Evaluation of functional independence after discharge from the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Curzel, Juliane; Forgiarini Junior, Luiz Alberto; Rieder, Marcelo de Mello

    2013-01-01

    Objective 1) To evaluate the functional independence measures immediately after discharge from an intensive care unit and to compare these values with the FIMs 30 days after that period. 2) To evaluate the possible associated risk factors. Methods The present investigation was a prospective cohort study that included individuals who were discharged from the intensive care unit and underwent physiotherapy in the unit. Functional independence was evaluated using the functional independence measure immediately upon discharge from the intensive care unit and 30 days thereafter via a phone call. The patients were admitted to the Hospital Santa Clara intensive care unit during the period from May 2011 to August 2011. Results During the predetermined period of data collection, 44 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.4±10.5 years. Twenty-seven of the subjects were female, and 15 patients were admitted due to pulmonary disease. The patients exhibited an functional independence measure of 84.1±24.2. When this measure was compared to the measure at 30 days after discharge, there was improvement across the functional independence variables except for that concerned with sphincter control. There were no significant differences when comparing the gender, age, clinical diagnosis, length of stay in the intensive care unit, duration of mechanical ventilation, and the presence of sepsis during this period. Conclusion Functional independence, as evaluated by the functional independence measure scale, was improved at 30 days after discharge from the intensive care unit, but it was not possible to define the potentially related factors. PMID:23917973

  13. Evaluation of Jumping and Creeping Regularization Approaches Applied to 3D Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, M.; Ramachandran, K.

    2011-12-01

    Regularization deals with the ill-posedness of the inverse problem. The under-determined part of the problem is controlled by providing a priori knowledge on the physical solution in the form of additional constraints that the solution must satisfy. The final model is constrained to fit the data and also to satisfy some additional property. In seismic tomography, this property is selected such that the final model is as smooth as possible. This concept is physically meaningful as smooth models are sought that include only structure that is required to fit the data according to its uncertainty. The motivation for seeking a smooth model is that features present in the model should be essential to match the observations. Such a class of models is referred to as minimum structure models. The amount of structure in the estimated model parameters is measured in terms of roughness. In seismic tomography, second spatial derivatives are generally employed to quantify the model roughness. In this kind of regularized inversion, an objective function is minimized which includes norms that measure model roughness and data misfit. A tradeoff parameter is selected that provides the model with the least structure for a given level of data misfit. The regularized inverse problem that solves for model perturbation and also constrains perturbation flatness or smoothness during the inversion is known as creeping approach. The disadvantage of the creeping approach is that the final model will have no special properties and will be just a sum of smooth deviations added to the starting model. The regularized inverse problem that solves for model perturbation and also constrains model properties during the inversion is known as creeping approach. In the jumping approach, the final model can be constructed to have properties such as flatness or smoothness, since the regularization implements smoothing constraints on the model and not on the perturbation. The jumping and creeping approaches

  14. Evaluation and developmental studies of possible active seismic experiments during the post-Apollo period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Seismic velocity studies pertinent to the lunar crust and mantle are briefly summarized. The compressional and shear wave velocities in loose aggregates are discussed along with the effects of temperature on seismic velocity in compacted powders. Abstracts of papers concerning the lunar structure are included.

  15. 76 FR 54507 - Proposed Generic Communication; Draft NRC Generic Letter 2011-XX: Seismic Risk Evaluations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... seismic source and ground motion models provided by applicants. These seismic updates included new Electric Power Research Institute models to estimate earthquake ground motion and updated models for... earthquake-related data and models. These data and models suggest that the probability for earthquake...

  16. The social psychology of seismic hazard adjustment: re-evaluating the international literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solberg, C.; Rossetto, T.; Joffe, H.

    2010-08-01

    The majority of people at risk from earthquakes do little or nothing to reduce their vulnerability. Over the past 40 years social scientists have tried to predict and explain levels of seismic hazard adjustment using models from behavioural sciences such as psychology. The present paper is the first to synthesise the major findings from the international literature on psychological correlates and causes of seismic adjustment at the level of the individual and the household. It starts by reviewing research on seismic risk perception. Next, it looks at norms and normative beliefs, focusing particularly on issues of earthquake protection responsibility and trust between risk stakeholders. It then considers research on attitudes towards seismic adjustment attributes, specifically beliefs about efficacy, control and fate. It concludes that an updated model of seismic adjustment must give the issues of norms, trust, power and identity a more prominent role. These have been only sparsely represented in the social psychological literature to date.

  17. Evaluation of seismic hazard of the Gökova bay in terms of seismotectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erkoç, Ebru Aktepe; Uluǧ, Atilla

    2016-04-01

    While discovering the seismicity of our country, knowing the array of earthquake occurrence which reflects the characteristic tectonic features of each region makes vital contributions to the earthquakes that have occurred and to the pursuit of the processes which might occur in the future. When considering the region's seismic activity, the presence of active faults that create earthquake within the bay is obvious. Many active fault parts in the Gulf of Gökova region continues their seismic activity with the opening effect that is generally prevailing in Western Anatolia. The region has generally been continuing its seismic activity under the control of normal faults. Considering the marine studies that are made and marine continuity of the faults which are on land in addition to the seismological and tectonic studies, the determination of seismic hazard in the Gulf of Gökova and its surroundings is also important in terms of introducing the earthquake scenarios with minimized errors.

  18. Parent Leadership Training Project, October 1, 1970-September 30, 1972. Independent Evaluator's Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arter, Rhetta M.

    The Parent Leadership Training Project (PLTP) through Adult Basic Education was established as a two-year demonstration project designed to increase the reading skills of adults (16 and over) through a language-experience approach, using topics selected by the participants. The independent project evaluation covers the entire operational period…

  19. Chapter 1 Regular Even Start Project. Independent Evaluation Report, 1994-1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta-Macias, Ana

    The report presents an evaluation of the Ysleta Independent School District (Texas) state-funded Even Start Project, a comprehensive family literacy program consisting of adult education (basic skills, English as a second language, citizenship, transition to college), intergenerational literacy classes with preschool children, early childhood…

  20. Evaluation Report of the Harlandale Independent School District's Bilingual Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Helene W.

    The 1973 report evaluates the Bilingual Education Program of Harlandale Independent School District. The bilingual program is designed for Spanish speaking pupils in grades K-5 (1,517 children in 8 of the district's 15 elementary schools) who have limited English-speaking ability. The 1972-73 project involved (1) development and revision of…

  1. An Independent Evaluation of the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System (KIRIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo. Evaluation Center.

    This document contains the executive summary and the detailed report which provide an independent evaluation of Kentucky's new system for assessing student performance, the Kentucky Instructional Results Information System (KIRIS). The summary gauges progress to date, highlights some strengths to be built on and problems to be solved, and provides…

  2. Edgewood Independent School District, Title VII Bilingual Education Program. Final Evaluation Report, 1970-71.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgewood Independent School District, San Antonio, TX.

    The 1970-71 evaluation of the Title VII bilingual education program in the Edgewood Independent School District in San Antonio, Texas, is presented in this report. The report discusses the program with regard to (1) curriculum development, (2) staff development, (3) community involvement, and (4) the pre- and post-tests given to the students. The…

  3. Evaluation Report of the San Marcos Independent School District's Bilingual Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Helene W.

    The San Marcos Independent School District's Bilingual Education Program for 1972-73 was evaluated in this report. The program consisted of 684 students in grades K-5 in 4 elementary schools. The majority of these students were Mexican American with only 18% monolingual English speakers. The program's objectives were, first, to provide bilingual…

  4. Oregon Small Schools Program: A Title III Project. Independent Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Coordinates Northwest, Salem, OR.

    An independent evaluation report (May 1971) by Educational Coordinates Northwest, this document examines the Oregon Small Schools Program (a Title III project of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act). Three major areas were considered: the extent to which member schools implemented methodological and organizational changes, the established…

  5. An evaluation of applicability of seismic refraction method in identifying shallow archaeological features A case study at archaeological site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahangardi, Morteza; Hafezi Moghaddas, Naser; Keivan Hosseini, Sayyed; Garazhian, Omran

    2015-04-01

    We applied the seismic refraction method at archaeological site, Tepe Damghani located in Sabzevar, NE of Iran, in order to determine the structures of archaeological interests. This pre-historical site has special conditions with respect to geographical location and geomorphological setting, so it is an urban archaeological site, and in recent years it has been used as an agricultural field. In spring and summer of 2012, the third season of archaeological excavation was carried out. Test trenches of excavations in this site revealed that cultural layers were often disturbed adversely due to human activities such as farming and road construction in recent years. Conditions of archaeological cultural layers in southern and eastern parts of Tepe are slightly better, for instance, in test trench 3×3 m²1S03, third test trench excavated in the southern part of Tepe, an adobe in situ architectural structure was discovered that likely belongs to cultural features of a complex with 5 graves. After conclusion of the third season of archaeological excavation, all of the test trenches were filled with the same soil of excavated test trenches. Seismic refraction method was applied with12 channels of P geophones in three lines with a geophone interval of 0.5 meter and a 1.5 meter distance between profiles on test trench 1S03. The goal of this operation was evaluation of applicability of seismic method in identification of archaeological features, especially adobe wall structures. Processing of seismic data was done with the seismic software, SiesImager. Results were presented in the form of seismic section for every profile, so that identification of adobe wall structures was achieved hardly. This could be due to that adobe wall had been built with the same materials of the natural surrounding earth. Thus, there is a low contrast and it has an inappropriate effect on seismic processing and identifying of archaeological features. Hence the result could be that application of

  6. Characterization and performance evaluation of a vertical seismic isolator using link and crank mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiuchi, N.; Ito, A.; Sekiya, Y.; Nan, C.; Yasuda, M.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, various seismic isolators have been developed to prevent earthquake damage to valuable art and other rare objects. Many seismic isolators only defend against horizontal motions, which are the usual cause of falling objects. However, the development of a seismic isolator designed for vertical vibration is necessary since such great vertical vibration earthquakes as the 2004 Niigata Prefecture Chuetsu Earthquake have occurred, and their increased height characteristics are undesirable. In this study, we developed a vertical seismic isolator that can be installed at a lower height and can support loads using a horizontal spring without requiring a vertical spring. It has a mechanism that combines links and cranks. The dynamic model was proposed and the frequency characteristics were simulated when the sine waves were the input. Shaking tests were also performed. The experimental value of the natural frequency was 0.57 Hz, and the theoretical values of the frequency characteristics were close to the experimental values. In addition, we verified this vertical seismic isolator's performance through shaking tests and simulation for typical seismic waves in Japan. We verified the seismic isolation's performance from the experimental result because the average reduction rate of the acceleration was 0.21.

  7. EVALUATION OF SEISMIC INDUCED WALL PRESSURES FOR DEEPLY EMBEDDED NPP STRUCTURES.

    SciTech Connect

    XU, J.; MILLER, C.; COSTANTINO, C.; HOFMAYER, C.; GRAVES, H.

    2005-03-30

    The extent to which finite element models of partially buried nuclear power plant structures may be used to compute seismic induced wall pressures is investigated in this paper. Stresses in three dimensional finite elements modeling the soil adjacent to the structure are used and stresses in these elements are used to evaluate wall pressures. Depths of burial of the structure varying from 1/4 to 1 times the height of the structure are considered. The SASSI computer code is used to perform the analyses. The wall pressures for the shallower depths of burial are found to depend on the inertial interaction loads, while the pressures for the deeper embedded structures are found to depend on kinematic interaction loads. The input ground motion for the study has a ZPA equal to 0.3 g. The maximum wall pressures are examined to determine whether non linear effects (separation of the wall and soil or slippage of the soil relative to the wall) are important. Non-linear effects are found to occur for depths of burial less than one half of the height and are found to occur over one half of the buried depth.

  8. VS30 mapping and soil classification for seismic site effect evaluation in Dinar region, SW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismet Kanlı, Ali; Tildy, Péter; Prónay, Zsolt; Pınar, Ali; Hermann, László

    2006-04-01

    The Dinar earthquake (MS= 6.1) of 1995 October 1 killed 90 people and destroyed more than 4000 buildings. Despite the moderate size of the earthquake, the level of damage was extremely high, which led to many studies that were carried out in the region. The majority of these studies concluded that the main reasons for the damage were the construction errors and the poor soil conditions. However, at that time no appropriate soil condition map based on extended, high density measurements was available. Shear wave velocity is an important parameter for evaluating the dynamic behaviour of soil in the shallow subsurface. Thus site characterization in calculating seismic hazards is usually based on the near surface shear wave velocity values. The average shear wave velocity for the top 30 m of soil is referred to as VS30. For earthquake engineering design purposes, both the Uniform Building Code (UBC) and Eurocode 8 (EC8) codes use VS30 to classify sites according to the soil type. The Vs30 values calculated by using multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) were used to create a new soil classification map of the Dinar region. Surface seismic measurements were carried out at 50 locations mostly in Dinar city and its surroundings. The dispersion data of the recorded Rayleigh waves were inverted using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) method to obtain shear wave velocity profiles of the investigated sites. Thus the derived Vs30 map of the Dinar region was transformed to the UBC and EC8 standards. Soil classification results show that most parts of the region, located in alluvial basin, have low shear wave velocity values. These values are within the range of 160-240 m s-1 and thus fall into the SD and SE categories according to the UBC and the C and D categories according to EC8. Within the region, some parts located on the hill zone and the transition zone have better soil conditions [corresponding to SC (UBC) and B (EC8) categories] and have comparatively high shear wave

  9. Evaluation of the southern California seismic velocity models through simulation of recorded events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Khoshnevis, Naeem; Cheng, Keli

    2016-06-01

    Significant effort has been devoted over the last two decades to the development of various seismic velocity models for the region of southern California, United States. These models are mostly used in forward wave propagation simulation studies, but also as base models for tomographic and source inversions. Two of these models, the community velocity models CVM-S and CVM-H, are among the most commonly used for this region. This includes two alternative variations to the original models, the recently released CVM-S4.26 which incorporates results from a sequence of tomographic inversions into CVM-S, and the user-controlled option of CVM-H to replace the near-surface profiles with a VS30-based geotechnical model. Although either one of these models is regarded as acceptable by the modeling community, it is known that they have differences in their representation of the crustal structure and sedimentary deposits in the region, and thus can lead to different results in forward and inverse problems. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of these models when used to predict the ground motion in the greater Los Angeles region by means of an assessment of a collection of simulations of recent events. In total, we consider 30 moderate-magnitude earthquakes (3.5 < Mw < 5.5) between 1998 and 2014, and compare synthetics with data recorded by seismic networks during these events. The simulations are done using a finite-element parallel code, with numerical models that satisfy a maximum frequency of 1 Hz and a minimum shear wave velocity of 200 m s-1. The comparisons between data and synthetics are ranked quantitatively by means of a goodness-of-fit (GOF) criteria. We analyse the regional distribution of the GOF results for all events and all models, and draw conclusions from the results and how these correlate to the models. We find that, in light of our comparisons, the model CVM-S4.26 consistently yields better results.

  10. Probabilistic stability evaluation and seismic triggering scenarios of submerged slopes in Lake Zurich (Switzerland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, M.; Hilbe, M.; Anselmetti, F. S.; Kopf, A. J.; Fleischmann, T.; Strasser, M.

    2017-01-01

    Subaqueous landslides and their consequences, such as tsunamis, can cause serious damage to offshore infrastructure and coastal communities. Stability analyses of submerged slopes are therefore crucial, yet complex steps for hazard assessment, as many geotechnical and morphological factors need to be considered. Typically, deterministic models with data from a few sampling locations are used for the evaluation of slope stabilities, as high efforts are required to ensure high spatial data coverage. This study presents a simple but flexible approach for the probabilistic stability assessment of subaqueous slopes that takes into account the spatial variability of geotechnical data. The study area ( 2 km2) in Lake Zurich (northern Switzerland) shows three distinct subaquatic landslides with well-defined headscarps, translation areas (i.e. the zone where translational sliding occurred) and mass transport deposits. The ages of the landslides are known ( 2,210 and 640 cal. yr BP, and 1918 AD), and their triggers have been assigned to different mechanisms by previous studies. A combination of geophysical, geotechnical, and sedimentological methods served to analyse the subaquatic slope in great spatial detail: 3.5 kHz pinger seismic reflection data and a 300 kHz multibeam bathymetric dataset (1 m grid) were used for the detection of landslide features and for the layout of a coring and an in situ cone penetration testing campaign. The assignment of geotechnical data to lithological units enabled the construction of a sediment-mechanical stratigraphy that consists of four units, each with characteristic profiles of bulk density and shear strength. The thickness of each mechanical unit can be flexibly adapted to the local lithological unit thicknesses identified from sediment cores and seismic reflection profiles correlated to sediment cores. The sediment-mechanical stratigraphy was used as input for a Monte Carlo simulated limit-equilibrium model on an infinite slope for

  11. Evaluation of the effect of pressurized bushings on seismic qualification of SF sub 6 circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Okuno, M.; Setoyama, T.; Murase, S. ); Hellested, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Stresses on the porcelain of high voltage switchgear under seismic vibration are statically biased by internal pressure. However, restrictions from the seismic test facility pose some difficulties in practical procedure of test with pressure. This paper discusses the effect of pressure on the strain and proposes an equivalent test method to simulate a pressurized condition without actually filling the SF{sub 6} gas to the operating pressure.

  12. Independent evaluation of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions to better than 10%

    PubMed Central

    Turnbull, Jocelyn Christine; Keller, Elizabeth D.; Norris, Margaret W.; Wiltshire, Rachael M.

    2016-01-01

    Independent estimates of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions are key to ensuring that emission reductions and regulations are effective and provide needed transparency and trust. Point source emissions are a key target because a small number of power plants represent a large portion of total global emissions. Currently, emission rates are known only from self-reported data. Atmospheric observations have the potential to meet the need for independent evaluation, but useful results from this method have been elusive, due to challenges in distinguishing CO2ff emissions from the large and varying CO2 background and in relating atmospheric observations to emission flux rates with high accuracy. Here we use time-integrated observations of the radiocarbon content of CO2 (14CO2) to quantify the recently added CO2ff mole fraction at surface sites surrounding a point source. We demonstrate that both fast-growing plant material (grass) and CO2 collected by absorption into sodium hydroxide solution provide excellent time-integrated records of atmospheric 14CO2. These time-integrated samples allow us to evaluate emissions over a period of days to weeks with only a modest number of measurements. Applying the same time integration in an atmospheric transport model eliminates the need to resolve highly variable short-term turbulence. Together these techniques allow us to independently evaluate point source CO2ff emission rates from atmospheric observations with uncertainties of better than 10%. This uncertainty represents an improvement by a factor of 2 over current bottom-up inventory estimates and previous atmospheric observation estimates and allows reliable independent evaluation of emissions. PMID:27573818

  13. Independent evaluation of point source fossil fuel CO2 emissions to better than 10.

    PubMed

    Turnbull, Jocelyn Christine; Keller, Elizabeth D; Norris, Margaret W; Wiltshire, Rachael M

    2016-09-13

    Independent estimates of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) emissions are key to ensuring that emission reductions and regulations are effective and provide needed transparency and trust. Point source emissions are a key target because a small number of power plants represent a large portion of total global emissions. Currently, emission rates are known only from self-reported data. Atmospheric observations have the potential to meet the need for independent evaluation, but useful results from this method have been elusive, due to challenges in distinguishing CO2ff emissions from the large and varying CO2 background and in relating atmospheric observations to emission flux rates with high accuracy. Here we use time-integrated observations of the radiocarbon content of CO2 ((14)CO2) to quantify the recently added CO2ff mole fraction at surface sites surrounding a point source. We demonstrate that both fast-growing plant material (grass) and CO2 collected by absorption into sodium hydroxide solution provide excellent time-integrated records of atmospheric (14)CO2 These time-integrated samples allow us to evaluate emissions over a period of days to weeks with only a modest number of measurements. Applying the same time integration in an atmospheric transport model eliminates the need to resolve highly variable short-term turbulence. Together these techniques allow us to independently evaluate point source CO2ff emission rates from atmospheric observations with uncertainties of better than 10%. This uncertainty represents an improvement by a factor of 2 over current bottom-up inventory estimates and previous atmospheric observation estimates and allows reliable independent evaluation of emissions.

  14. Milwaukee Independent Charter Schools Study: Final Report on Four-Year Achievement Gains. SCDP Milwaukee Evaluation Report #31

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, John F.; Wolf, Patrick J.; Carlson, Deven; Dean, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    The general purpose of this five-year evaluation is to assess the effectiveness of Milwaukee's independent charter schools in promoting student achievement growth. Independent charter schools are authorized by nonschool-district entities and are considered "independent" because they are not a part of the Milwaukee Public School District…

  15. EVALUATIONS BY QUESTIONNAIRES ABOUT SIMPLE METHODS OF SEISMIC STRENGTHENING AND SETBACK OF HOUSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Norio; Miyajima, Masakatsu

    Law on promotion of renovation for earthquake-resistant structures was revised in 2006. Since then administrative agencies have been promoting seismic diagnosis and retrofit of houses. But citizens living in densely built-up areas cannot rebuild their houses because of their economic reasons and Building Standards Act regulations. Therefore, we conducted questionnaire surveys of construction companies located in Ishikawa Prefecture and citizens living in Kanazawa City. The results of surveys show that many construction companies are not in favor of simple method of seismic retrofit, and that width of roads hardly influence the citizens' consciousness to renovation for earthquake-resistant structures.

  16. Independent safety evaluation of the CR562 (CR6) control rod test

    SciTech Connect

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1988-10-01

    This report documents the Independent Safety Evaluation performed for the CR562 control rod. CR562 is a reference Series II control rod which has been designated as an experiment (CR-6) since post- irradiation examination has been planned as part of the surveillance program for FFTF control rods. Prior analysis as an experiment has not been required since the test operated within the Technical Specification Limits up to this time. The control rod will be operated beyond the Technical Specification fluence limit during the last 30 days of Cycle 10B. A TDD-1A has been written to support this extension, and this ISE documents the independent review. A similar procedure was used for the CR544 control rod. 9 refs.

  17. Integration of independent component analysis with near infrared spectroscopy for evaluation of rice freshness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yung-Kun; Chen, Suming; Delwiche, Stephen R.; Lo, Y. Martin; Tsai, Chao-Yin; Yang, I.-Chang; Hu, Yi-Ping

    2012-05-01

    Determination of freshness is an important issue for rice quality. Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy, a rapid nondestructive inspection method based on specific absorptions within a given range of wavelengths corresponding to the constituents in the sample, has been widely applied for evaluation of internal quality of agricultural products. Since NIR spectra of a mixture may be approximated as the linear addition of individual spectra of the constituents in the mixture, such a mixture spectrum thus can be regarded as 'blind sources' as the proportion of constituents in the samples remains unknown. A multiuse statistical approach, independent component analysis (ICA), is capable of disassembling the mixture signals of Gaussian distribution into non-Gaussian independent constituents, and (with assumption of independent constituent spectral response) can give a complete explanation about the property of constituents in the mixture. By example, a total of 180 white rice samples were collected from 6 crop seasons (from 2006 to 2010) for the purpose of developing an ICA NIR based procedure for rice freshness. , Values of pH were determined by a conventional (bromothymol blue methyl red) method. The calibration model of white rice yielded Rc = 0.939, SEC = 0.202, rp = 0.803 and SEP = 0.233 using original full wavelength range (400 to 2498 nm) spectra and 5 independent components (ICs). Freshness of the white rice can be distinguished either visually by 3-dimensional diagram composed from ICs 2, 3 and 4, or statistically by a calibration model. The results show that ICA with NIR can quickly identify and effectively quantify the pH value in white rice with high predictability, and has the potential to be a useful tool for evaluating rice freshness.

  18. Acoustic monitoring of co-seismic changes in gas bubble rupture rate in a hydrothermal reservoir: field evaluation of a possible precursor and mechanism for remote seismic triggering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crews, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    Remotely triggered seismicity is a phenomenon in which an earthquake at one location triggers others over distances up to thousands of kilometers. The mechanism by which low-amplitude dynamic oscillations of the confining stress can produce such an effect, often after a time delay of minutes-to-days, is unclear, but a concentration of remotely triggered seismic events in carbon-dioxide-rich volcanic and geothermal regions suggests that an increase in pore fluid pressure associated with the nucleation and growth of carbon-dioxide gas bubbles may reduce the effective stress in critically loaded geologic faults. While this hypothesis has been tested in bench-scale laboratory experiments, field detection of seismically initiated gas bubble growth in groundwater may provide further evidence for this remote triggering mechanism. In the present study, a hydrophone continuously records the acoustic power spectrum in CH-10B, a hydrothermal well located in Long Valley Caldera, California - a site that is susceptible to remotely seismic triggering. This well exhibits co-seismic changes in water level in response to near and distant earthquakes, including every magnitude-six or greater at any location on Earth. Exploiting the inverse relationship between gas bubble radius and the peak acoustic frequency emitted when a gas bubble ruptures, this investigation seeks to detect changes in the acoustic power spectrum arising from a shift in the size-distribution or count rate of rupturing gas bubbles, coincident with a distant earthquake. By resolving the timing and intensity of the onset of a change in gas bubble rupture rate after the passage of seismic wave from a distant source, it may be possible to establish the extent to which seismically initiated gas bubble growth contributes to co-seismic borehole water level response, pore fluid pressure perturbations, and the onset of remotely triggered seismicity.

  19. Seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy High-Level Waste Storage Tanks and Appurtenances

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Cornell, A.; Costantino, C.; Kennedy, R.; Miller, C.; Veletsos, A.

    1995-10-01

    This document provides seismic design and evaluation guidelines for underground high-level waste storage tanks. The guidelines reflect the knowledge acquired in the last two decades in defining seismic ground motion and calculating hydrodynamic loads, dynamic soil pressures and other loads for underground tank structures, piping and equipment. The application of the guidelines is illustrated with examples. The guidelines are developed for a specific design of underground storage tanks, namely double-shell structures. However, the methodology discussed is applicable for other types of tank structures as well. The application of these and of suitably adjusted versions of these concepts to other structural types will be addressed in a future version of this document. The original version of this document was published in January 1993. Since then, additional studies have been performed in several areas and the results are included in this revision. Comments received from the users are also addressed. Fundamental concepts supporting the basic seismic criteria contained in the original version have since then been incorporated and published in DOE-STD-1020-94 and its technical basis documents. This information has been deleted in the current revision.

  20. Re-evaluation of Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffels, Alexandra; Knapmeyer, Martin; Oberst, Jürgen; Haase, Isabel

    2017-01-01

    We re-analyzed Apollo 17 Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment (LSPE) data to improve our knowledge of the subsurface structure of this landing site. We use new geometrically accurate 3-D positions of the seismic equipment deployed by the astronauts, which were previously derived using high-resolution images by Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) in combination with Apollo astronaut photography. These include coordinates of six Explosive Packages (EPs) and four geophone stations. Re-identified P-wave arrival times are used to calculate two- and three-layer seismic velocity models. A strong increase of seismic velocity with depth can be confirmed, in particular, we suggest a more drastic increase than previously thought. For the three-layer model the P-wave velocities were calculated to 285, 580, and 1825 m/s for the uppermost, second, and third layer, respectively, with the boundaries between the layers being at 96 and 773 m depth. When compared with results obtained with previously published coordinates, we find (1) a slightly higher velocity (+4%) for the uppermost layer, and (2) lower P-wave velocities for the second and third layers, representing a decrease of 34% and 12% for second and third layer, respectively. Using P-wave arrival time readings of previous studies, we confirm that velocities increase when changing over from old to new coordinates. In the three-layer case, this means using new coordinates alone leads to thinned layers, velocities rise slightly for the uppermost layer and decrease significantly for the layers below.

  1. Evaluation of the Seismic Characterision of Select Engineered Nanoparticles in Saturated Glass Beads

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory testing apparatus was developed for the study of seismic body wave propagation through nanoparticles dispersed in pore fluid that is essentially saturating glass beads. First, the responses of water-saturated glass bead specimens were studied to establish baseline si...

  2. Seismic velocity deviation log: An effective method for evaluating spatial distribution of reservoir pore types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirmohamadi, Mohamad; Kadkhodaie, Ali; Rahimpour-Bonab, Hossain; Faraji, Mohammad Ali

    2017-04-01

    Velocity deviation log (VDL) is a synthetic log used to determine pore types in reservoir rocks based on a combination of the sonic log with neutron-density logs. The current study proposes a two step approach to create a map of porosity and pore types by integrating the results of petrographic studies, well logs and seismic data. In the first step, velocity deviation log was created from the combination of the sonic log with the neutron-density log. The results allowed identifying negative, zero and positive deviations based on the created synthetic velocity log. Negative velocity deviations (below - 500 m/s) indicate connected or interconnected pores and fractures, while positive deviations (above + 500 m/s) are related to isolated pores. Zero deviations in the range of [- 500 m/s, + 500 m/s] are in good agreement with intercrystalline and microporosities. The results of petrographic studies were used to validate the main pore type derived from velocity deviation log. In the next step, velocity deviation log was estimated from seismic data by using a probabilistic neural network model. For this purpose, the inverted acoustic impedance along with the amplitude based seismic attributes were formulated to VDL. The methodology is illustrated by performing a case study from the Hendijan oilfield, northwestern Persian Gulf. The results of this study show that integration of petrographic, well logs and seismic attributes is an instrumental way for understanding the spatial distribution of main reservoir pore types.

  3. Agreement between therapists, parents, patients, and independent evaluators on clinical improvement in pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Adam B.; Peris, Tara S.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective Independent evaluators (IE) are employed widely in clinical trials to make unbiased determinations of treatment response. By virtue of being kept blind to treatment condition, however, IEs are also kept unaware of many pertinent clinical details that are relevant for decisions about clinical improvement. In this study, agreement among raters (children, parents, therapists, and IEs) about treatment response over the course of a 14-week clinical trial for pediatric obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) was examined in order to determine the utility of non-blind clinician and patient ratings of treatment response. Method Participants were 71 youth (mean age= 12.2 years; 63.4% female) with a primary diagnosis of OCD and their parents participating in a psychotherapy trial. Independent evaluators provided response ratings (Clinician's Global Impressions-Improvement Scale; CGI-I) at weeks 4, week 8 and 14 and therapists, children and parents completed independent CGI-I ratings at weeks 2, 4, 8 and 14. Results Nonlinear mixed models revealed differences in rating parties, with therapists and IEs slower to rate treatment improvement compared to children and parents and growth curve models suggested that therapists and IEs produced generally consistent ratings. In addition, no evidence was found for an evaluator-by-treatment interaction, indicating that raters displayed these differences consistently across both active and placebo conditions. Conclusions Youth and parents may be able to provide accurate ratings of global improvement; non-blinded treating clinicians (with training in research-oriented assessment) can offer global improvement ratings commensurate with blinded IEs. Findings suggest that alternatives (or additions) to the blinded-IE model may be appropriate for assessing global improvement, especially with the growing emphasis on dissemination and effectiveness trials. PMID:22963592

  4. Array analysis methods for detection, classification and location of seismic sources: a first evaluation for aftershock analysis using dense temporary post-seismic array network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poiata, N.; Satriano, C.; Vilotte, J.; Bernard, P.

    2012-12-01

    Detection, separation, classification and location of distributed non stationary seismic sources in broadband noisy environment is an important problem in seismology, in particular for monitoring the high-level post-seismic activity following large subduction earthquakes, like the off-shore Maule (Mw 8.8, 2010) earthquake in Central Chile. Multiple seismic arrays, and local antenna, distributed over a region allow exploiting frequency selective coherence of the signals that arrive at widely-separated array stations, leading to improved detection, convolution blind source separation, and location of distributed non stationary sources. We present here first results on the investigation of time-frequency adaptive array analysis techniques for detection and location of broadband distributed seismic events recorded by the dense temporary seismic network (International Maule Aftershock Deployment, IMAD) installed for monitoring the high-level seismic activity following the 27 February 2010 Maule earthquake (Mw 8.8). This seismic network is characterized by a large aperture, with variable inter-station distances, corroborated with a high level of distributed near and far field seismic source activity and noise. For this study, we first extract from the post-seismic network a number of seismic arrays distributed over the region covered by this network. A first aspect is devoted to passive distributed seismic sources detection, classification and separation. We investigate a number of narrow and wide band signal analysis methods both in time and time-frequency domains for energy arrival detection and tracking, including time adaptive higher order statistics, e.g. like kurtosis, and multiband band-pass filtering, together with adaptive time-frequency transformation and extraction techniques. We demonstrate that these techniques provide superior resolution and robustness than classical STA/LTA techniques in particular in the case of distributed sources with potential signal

  5. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS AND RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2009-01-14

    failure leading to global buckling of the tank under increased vacuum) could occur. After releasing Revision 0 of this report, an independent review of the Double Shell Tanks (DST) Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis was conducted by Dr. Robert P. Kennedy of RPK Structural Mechanics Consulting and Dr. Anestis S. Veletsos of Rice University. Revision I was then issued to address their review comments (included in Appendix D). Additional concerns involving the evaluation of concrete anchor loads and allowables were found during a second review by Drs. Kennedy and Veletsos (see Appendix G). Extensive additional analysis was performed on the anchors, which is detailed by Deibler et al. (2008a, 2008b). The current report (Revision 2) references this recent work, and additional analysis is presented to show that anchor loads do not concentrate significantly in the presence of a local buckle.

  6. Independent evaluation of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) 'dot' dosemeters for environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Bindu; Gesell, Thomas F

    2011-01-01

    Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) 'dot' dosemeters (manufactured by Landauer®) are reported to have a high degree of environmental stability, high level of sensitivity and provide wide range of dose measuring capabilities from 0.05 mGy to 100 Gy. The optical read out method is fast and relatively simple and permits repeated read out, but few studies have been performed about its application in monitoring radiation in the environment. This study was initiated to independently test the performance of OSL dot dosemeters for the application of measuring doses of radiation in the outdoor environment. Testing was performed in the laboratory to evaluate reproducibility and stability and in the field to evaluate accuracy relative to calibrated high-pressure ionisation chambers. The results showed that OSL dot dosemeters had good reproducibility and stability in both laboratory and field tests and met the performance requirements of standards of the American National Standards Institute.

  7. Response of a 2-story test-bed structure for the seismic evaluation of nonstructural systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soroushian, Siavash; Maragakis, E. "Manos"; Zaghi, Arash E.; Rahmanishamsi, Esmaeel; Itani, Ahmad M.; Pekcan, Gokhan

    2016-03-01

    A full-scale, two-story, two-by-one bay, steel braced-frame was subjected to a number of unidirectional ground motions using three shake tables at the UNR-NEES site. The test-bed frame was designed to study the seismic performance of nonstructural systems including steel-framed gypsum partition walls, suspended ceilings and fire sprinkler systems. The frame can be configured to perform as an elastic or inelastic system to generate large floor accelerations or large inter story drift, respectively. In this study, the dynamic performance of the linear and nonlinear test-beds was comprehensively studied. The seismic performance of nonstructural systems installed in the linear and nonlinear test-beds were assessed during extreme excitations. In addition, the dynamic interactions of the test-bed and installed nonstructural systems are investigated.

  8. Geotechnical Seismic Hazard Evaluation At Sellano (Umbria, Italy) Using The GIS Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Capilleri, P.; Maugeri, M.

    2008-07-08

    A tool that has been widely-used in civil engineering in recent years is the geographic information system (GIS). Geographic Information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for organizing, analyzing, and presenting spatial data. The GIS can be used by geotechnical engineers to aid preliminary assessment through to the final geotechnical design. The aim of this work is to provide some indications for the use of the GIS technique in the field of seismic geotechnical engineering, particularly as regards the problems of seismic hazard zonation maps. The study area is the village of Sellano located in the Umbrian Apennines in central Italy, about 45 km east of Perugia and 120 km north-east of Rome The increasing importance attributed to microzonation derives from the spatial variability of ground motion due to particular local conditions. The use of GIS tools can lead to an early identification of potential barriers to project completion during the design process that may help avoid later costly redesign.

  9. Seismic stability evaluation of Alben Barkley Lock and Dam Project. Volume 4. Liquefaction susceptibility evaluation and post-earthquake strength determination. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, R.E.; Olsen, R.S.; Bluhm, P.F.; Yule, D.E.; Hynes, M.E.

    1992-09-01

    This report documents the results of seismological, geological, laboratory, field, and analytical investigations conducted to evaluate the liquefaction potential of two earth embankment sections of the Alben Barkley Lock and Dam Project, Kentucky. these sections are representative of those of the main embankment and powerhouse/switch-yard areas. The design earthquake, from the New Madrid Seismic Zone, had a body-wave magnitude of 7.5. Of particular interest in this study was the evaluation of the liquefaction potential of silty sands in the foundation.

  10. Seismic Evaluation and Preliminary Design of Regular Setback Masonry Infilled Open Ground Storey RC Frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashmi, Arshad K.

    2016-06-01

    Current seismic code presents certain stringent factors for defining frame as regular and irregular. Thereby these stringent factors only decide the type of analysis (i.e. equivalent static analysis or dynamic analysis) to be done. On the contrary, development of new simplified methods such as pushover analysis can give lateral load capacity of any structure (e.g. regular or irregular frame etc.) easily. Design by iterative procedure with the help of pushover analysis for serviceability requirement (i.e. inter storey drift limitation) provided by present seismic code, can provide an alternative to present practicing procedure. Present paper deals with regular setback frame in combination with vulnerable layout of masonry infill walls over the frame elevation (i.e. probable case of "Vertical Stiffness Irregularities"). Nonlinear time history analysis and Capacity Spectrum Method have been implemented to investigate the seismic performance of these frames. Finally, recently developed preliminary design procedure satisfying the serviceability criterion of inter storey drift limitation has been employed for the preliminary design of these frames.

  11. Evaluation of Overall Insolation Fluctuation Property Considering Insolation Fluctuation Independence among Various Points in Large Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeyoshi; Inoue, Takato; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    Power output fluctuation of photovoltaic power generation systems (PVSs) of high penetration may cause negative impact on the load frequency control (LFC) of existing electric power utility. For the cost-effective mitigation, the proper evaluation of power output fluctuation of PVSs dispersed in large-area is very important. Based on the independence in insolation fluctuation among various points, this paper discusses the practical usability of the standard deviation (STD) of total power output fluctuation of PVSs simply calculated as 1/√N value of STD at the representative point. The statistical evaluation using the insolation observed at 5 points within 25km × 25km reveals that STD with simplified calculation would be useful to evaluate STD of ensemble average of insolation on average for a certain period. Besides, the probability density of STD with simplified calculation is almost the same with that of STD of ensemble average for the period with large STD. As a result, the simplified calculation of STD would be useful for the stochastic evaluation of STD of ensemble average insolation among area at least 25km × 25km.

  12. 2010 Solar Program Peer Review Report: An Independent Evaluation of Program Activities for FY2009 and FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2010-12-01

    This document summarizes the recommendations and evaluations provided by an independent external panel of experts at the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program's 2010 Program Review meeting, held on May 24?27, 2010, in Washington, D.C.

  13. An Independent Psychometric Evaluation of the PROMS Measure of Music Perception Skills

    PubMed Central

    Willems, Roel M.; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Profile of Music Perception Skills (PROMS) is a recently developed measure of perceptual music skills which has been shown to have promising psychometric properties. In this paper we extend the evaluation of its brief version to three kinds of validity using an individual difference approach. The brief PROMS displays good discriminant validity with working memory, given that it does not correlate with backward digit span (r = .04). Moreover, it shows promising criterion validity (association with musical training (r = .45), musicianship status (r = .48), and self-rated musical talent (r = .51)). Finally, its convergent validity, i.e. relation to an unrelated measure of music perception skills, was assessed by correlating the brief PROMS to harmonic closure judgment accuracy. Two independent samples point to good convergent validity of the brief PROMS (r = .36; r = .40). The same association is still significant in one of the samples when including self-reported music skill in a partial correlation (rpartial = .30; rpartial = .17). Overall, the results show that the brief version of the PROMS displays a very good pattern of construct validity. Especially its tuning subtest stands out as a valuable part for music skill evaluations in Western samples. We conclude by briefly discussing the choice faced by music cognition researchers between different musical aptitude measures of which the brief PROMS is a well evaluated example. PMID:27398805

  14. An Independent Psychometric Evaluation of the PROMS Measure of Music Perception Skills.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Richard; Willems, Roel M; Hagoort, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The Profile of Music Perception Skills (PROMS) is a recently developed measure of perceptual music skills which has been shown to have promising psychometric properties. In this paper we extend the evaluation of its brief version to three kinds of validity using an individual difference approach. The brief PROMS displays good discriminant validity with working memory, given that it does not correlate with backward digit span (r = .04). Moreover, it shows promising criterion validity (association with musical training (r = .45), musicianship status (r = .48), and self-rated musical talent (r = .51)). Finally, its convergent validity, i.e. relation to an unrelated measure of music perception skills, was assessed by correlating the brief PROMS to harmonic closure judgment accuracy. Two independent samples point to good convergent validity of the brief PROMS (r = .36; r = .40). The same association is still significant in one of the samples when including self-reported music skill in a partial correlation (rpartial = .30; rpartial = .17). Overall, the results show that the brief version of the PROMS displays a very good pattern of construct validity. Especially its tuning subtest stands out as a valuable part for music skill evaluations in Western samples. We conclude by briefly discussing the choice faced by music cognition researchers between different musical aptitude measures of which the brief PROMS is a well evaluated example.

  15. An Independent Evaluation of the FMEA/CIL Hazard Analysis Alternative Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Paul S.

    1996-01-01

    The present instruments of safety and reliability risk control for a majority of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) programs/projects consist of Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Hazard Analysis (HA), Critical Items List (CIL), and Hazard Report (HR). This extensive analytical approach was introduced in the early 1970's and was implemented for the Space Shuttle Program by NHB 5300.4 (1D-2. Since the Challenger accident in 1986, the process has been expanded considerably and resulted in introduction of similar and/or duplicated activities in the safety/reliability risk analysis. A study initiated in 1995, to search for an alternative to the current FMEA/CIL Hazard Analysis methodology generated a proposed method on April 30, 1996. The objective of this Summer Faculty Study was to participate in and conduct an independent evaluation of the proposed alternative to simplify the present safety and reliability risk control procedure.

  16. Evaluation of the seismic reflection method as a monitoring tool during primary and enhanced coalbed methane production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lespinasse Fung, Diane Jael

    In this thesis I present an evaluation of the seismic reflection method as a monitoring tool during coalbed methane (CBM) production and enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) production by CO2 injection. This evaluation is based on a workflow previously developed for monitoring CO2 storage in the Big George coalbeds in the Powder River Basin. I study the changes in seismic and the AVO response associated with coalbeds during primary production using a data set from the Mannville coals, which represent one of the most important CBM resources in the Province of Alberta. Using published data, I perform a single well flow simulation to make an assessment of its production forecast in a 10 year period. The flow simulation provides information on methane saturation and reservoir pressure during production, while the changes in porosity and permeability due to depletion are estimated according to the Palmer and Mansoori permeability model. Using well log data of the Corbett Field and the results of the flow simulation, I complete a Gassmann fluid substitution to replace brine by a mixture of brine and methane in the pore space and estimate the variations in Vp, Vs and density due to changes in fluid saturation. I evaluate offset dependent synthetic seismograms before and after fluid substitution, and I use different coalbed thicknesses to establish resolution limits. To observe significant changes in the character and phase of the wavelet due to the replacement of brine by methane I find that coalbed thickness must be at least 10 m, also in terms of AVO I observe that there is a decrease in amplitude with offset caused by the presence of methane in the pore space. Using the same methodology and production data from the Fruitland Coals Fairway in the North of the San Juan Basin U.S.A, which is considered the most productive CBM reservoir in the world, I evaluate Elastic Impedance (EI) and Elastic Impedance Coefficient (EC) response during ECBM by CO2 injection. In this case, I

  17. Seismic hazard in the Istanbul metropolitan area: A preliminary re-evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, E.; Gulkan, Polat; Ozturk, N.Y.; Celebi, M.

    2008-01-01

    In 1999, two destructive earthquakes (M7.4 Kocaeli and M7.2 Duzce) occurred in the north west of Turkey and resulted in major stress-drops on the western segment of the North Anatolian Fault system where it continues under the Marmara Sea. These undersea fault segments were recently explored using bathymetric and reflection surveys. These recent findings helped to reshape the seismotectonic environment of the Marmara basin, which is a perplexing tectonic domain. Based on collected new information, seismic hazard of the Marmara region, particularly Istanbul Metropolitan Area and its vicinity, were re-examined using a probabilistic approach. Two seismic source and alternate recurrence models combined with various indigenous and foreign attenuation relationships were adapted within a logic tree formulation to quantify and project the regional exposure on a set of hazard maps. The hazard maps show the peak horizontal ground acceleration and spectral acceleration at 1.0 s. These acceleration levels were computed for 2 and 10 % probabilities of transcendence in 50 years.

  18. Geotechnical Seismic Hazard Evaluation At Sellano (Umbria, Italy) Using The GIS Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capilleri, P.; Maugeri, M.

    2008-07-01

    A tool that has been widely-used in civil engineering in recent years is the geographic information system (GIS) [1]. Geographic Information systems (GIS) are powerful tools for organizing, analyzing, and presenting spatial data. The GIS can be used by geotechnical engineers to aid preliminary assessment through to the final geotechnical design. The aim of this work is to provide some indications for the use of the GIS technique in the field of seismic geotechnical engineering, particularly as regards the problems of seismic hazard zonation maps. The study area is the village of Sellano located in the Umbrian Apennines in central Italy, about 45 km east of Perugia and 120 km north-east of Rome The increasing importance attributed to microzonation derives from the spatial variability of ground motion due to particular local conditions. The use of GIS tools can lead to an early identification of potential barriers to project completion during the design process that may help avoid later costly redesign.

  19. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Independent School Teacher Development Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, John M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study the author examined the psychometrics of an instrument, the Independent School Teacher Development Inventory, designed to assess the professional learning opportunities in U.S. independent schools. The inventory was sent to 3,422 independent school administrators and of these, 2,474 returned completed surveys. Exploratory factor…

  20. INDEPENDENT REVIEW OF THE X-701B GROUNDWATER REMEDY, PORTSMOUTH, OHIO: TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Costanza, J.; Rossabi, J.; Early, T.; Skubal, K.; Magnuson, C.

    2008-12-15

    The Department of Energy Portsmouth Paducah Project Office requested assistance from Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM-22) to provide independent technical experts to evaluate past and ongoing remedial activities at the Portsmouth facility that were completed to address TCE contamination associated with the X-701B groundwater plume and to make recommendations for future efforts. The Independent Technical Review team was provided with a detailed and specific charter. The charter requested that the technical team first review the past and current activities completed for the X-701B groundwater remedy for trichloroethene (TCE) in accordance with a Decision Document that was issued by Ohio EPA on December 8, 2003 and a Work Plan that was approved by Ohio EPA on September 22, 2006. The remedy for X-701B divides the activities into four phases: Phase I - Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II - Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III - Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV - Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase I of the remedy was completed during FY2006, and DOE has now completed six oxidant injection events within Phase II. The Independent Technical Review team was asked to evaluate Phase II activities, including soil and groundwater results, and to determine whether or not the criteria that were defined in the Work Plan for the Phase II end point had been met. The following criteria are defined in the Work Plan as an acceptable Phase II end point: (1) Groundwater samples from the identified source area monitoring wells have concentrations below the Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) for TCE in groundwater, or (2) The remedy is no longer effective in removing TCE mass from the source area. In addition, the charter specifies that if the Review Team determines that the Phase II endpoint has not been reached, then the team should address the following issues: (1) If additional injection events are

  1. Independent Assessment of the Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Alternatives Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    J. T. Case; M. L. Renfro

    1998-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Independent Project Evaluation (IPE) Team assessment of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering (SE) Team's deliberations, evaluations, and selections. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company concluded in early 1998 that production goals and safety requirements for processing SRS HLW salt to remove Cs-137 could not be met in the existing In-Tank Precipitation Facility as currently configured for precipitation of cesium tetraphenylborate. The SE Team was chartered to evaluate and recommend an alternative(s) for processing the existing HLW salt to remove Cs-137. To replace the In-Tank Precipitation process, the Savannah River Site HLW Salt Disposition SE Team downselected (October 1998) 140 candidate separation technologies to two alternatives: Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate (TPB) Precipitation (primary alternative) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Nonelutable Ion Exchange (backup alternative). The IPE Team, commissioned by the Department of Energy, concurs that both alternatives are technically feasible and should meet all salt disposition requirements. But the IPE Team judges that the SE Team's qualitative criteria and judgments used in their downselection to a primary and a backup alternative do not clearly discriminate between the two alternatives. To properly choose between Small-Tank TPB and CST Ion Exchange for the primary alternative, the IPE Team suggests the following path forward: Complete all essential R and D activities for both alternatives and formulate an appropriate set of quantitative decision criteria that will be rigorously applied at the end of the R and D activities. Concurrent conceptual design activities should be limited to common elements of the alternatives.

  2. Probabilistic stability evaluation of submerged slopes in Lake Zurich (Switzerland) and seismic triggering scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strupler, Michael; Hilbe, Michael; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Kopf, Achim J.; Fleischmann, Timo; Strasser, Michael

    2016-04-01

    The consequences of subaquatic slope failures both in the marine and the lacustrine realm can be very serious. For hazard assessments, stability analyses of submerged slopes are therefore crucial steps, yet very complex ones, as they require knowledge of several geotechnical and morphological factors. Traces of subaquatic mass movements are often used to extract paleoseismological information. For Lake Zurich, a perialpine lake in Northern Switzerland, coeval subaquatic landslide occurrences along distinct time-correlative horizons have been previously interpreted as earthquake-triggered. The 'Oberrieden' study area (˜2 km2) shows three distinct, dated subaquatic landslides with well-defined headscarps, translation areas and mass-transport deposits. The respective failures have been assigned to different trigger mechanisms ranging from human-induced shore loading to earthquake shaking. However, the local shaking intensities leading to slope failures are unknown. A 3.5 kHz pinger seismic reflection dataset and a 300 kHz multibeam bathymetric dataset (1 m grid) were used for the detection of landslide features and for the layout of a coring campaign and in situ geotechnical testing. A total of 8 Kullenberg-system piston cores (4 cores /km2) and 22 short gravity cores (11 cores /km2) were taken and 39 in situ Cone Penetration Tests (CPT) (˜20 CPT /km2) were performed. The high density of sediment cores and CPT sites in a well-known area allows us to include the spatial variability in the slope model. With a probabilistic back analysis of the earthquake-triggered ˜2210 BP subaquatic landslide and an assessment of the actual stability of the neighbouring, unfailed sediment drape, we analyse different scenarios of slope stability under static conditions and under seismic shaking in order to quantitatively constrain failure mechanisms and triggers. We apply a Monte Carlo two-dimensional limit-equilibrium infinite-slope stability model that includes a sediment

  3. Predicting occupancy for pygmy rabbits in Wyoming: an independent evaluation of two species distribution models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germaine, Stephen S.; Ignizio, Drew; Keinath, Doug; Copeland, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Species distribution models are an important component of natural-resource conservation planning efforts. Independent, external evaluation of their accuracy is important before they are used in management contexts. We evaluated the classification accuracy of two species distribution models designed to predict the distribution of pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis habitat in southwestern Wyoming, USA. The Nature Conservancy model was deductive and based on published information and expert opinion, whereas the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model was statistically derived using historical observation data. We randomly selected 187 evaluation survey points throughout southwestern Wyoming in areas predicted to be habitat and areas predicted to be nonhabitat for each model. The Nature Conservancy model correctly classified 39 of 77 (50.6%) unoccupied evaluation plots and 65 of 88 (73.9%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 63.3%. The Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model correctly classified 53 of 95 (55.8%) unoccupied plots and 59 of 88 (67.0%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 61.2%. Based on 95% asymptotic confidence intervals, classification success of the two models did not differ. The models jointly classified 10.8% of the area as habitat and 47.4% of the area as nonhabitat, but were discordant in classifying the remaining 41.9% of the area. To evaluate how anthropogenic development affected model predictive success, we surveyed 120 additional plots among three density levels of gas-field road networks. Classification success declined sharply for both models as road-density level increased beyond 5 km of roads per km-squared area. Both models were more effective at predicting habitat than nonhabitat in relatively undeveloped areas, and neither was effective at accounting for the effects of gas-energy-development road networks. Resource managers who wish to know the amount of pygmy rabbit habitat present in an

  4. A Clash of Cultures: Improving the "Fit" between Evaluative Independence and the Political Requirements of a Democratic Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chelimsky, Eleanor

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a plenary address wherein the author talks about cultural clashes, about what happens when evaluation meets politics. In her address, the author talks about the kinds of clashes that occur on a regular basis between evaluative independence and the political culture it challenges, along with possible ways to predict, parry, or…

  5. Design and development of safety evaluation system of buildings on a seismic field based on the network platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baitao; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Xiangzhao; Zhang, Xinghua

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes a set of on-site earthquake safety evaluation systems for buildings, which were developed based on a network platform. The system embedded into the quantitative research results which were completed in accordance with the provisions from Post-earthquake Field Works, Part 2: Safety Assessment of Buildings, GB18208.2 -2001, and was further developed into an easy-to-use software platform. The system is aimed at allowing engineering professionals, civil engineeing technicists or earthquake-affected victims on site to assess damaged buildings through a network after earthquakes. The authors studied the function structure, process design of the safety evaluation module, and hierarchical analysis algorithm module of the system in depth, and developed the general architecture design, development technology and database design of the system. Technologies such as hierarchical architecture design and Java EE were used in the system development, and MySQL5 was adopted in the database development. The result is a complete evaluation process of information collection, safety evaluation, and output of damage and safety degrees, as well as query and statistical analysis of identified buildings. The system can play a positive role in sharing expert post-earthquake experience and promoting safety evaluation of buildings on a seismic field.

  6. Evaluation of Sloped Bottom Tuned Liquid Damper for Reduction of Seismic Response of Tall Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, G. R.; Singh, K. D.

    2016-12-01

    Due to migration of people to urban area, high land costs and use of light weight materials modern buildings tend to be taller, lighter and flexible. These buildings possess low damping. This increases the possibility of failure during earthquake ground motion and also affect the serviceability during wind vibrations. Out of many available techniques today, to reduce the response of structure under dynamic loading, Tuned Liquid Damper (TLD) is a recent technique to mitigate seismic response. However TLD has been used to mitigate the wind induced structural vibrations. Flat bottom TLD gives energy back to the structure after event of dynamic loading and it is termed as beating. Beating affects the performance of TLD. Study attempts to analyze the effectiveness of sloped bottom TLD for reducing seismic vibrations of structure. Concept of equivalent flat bottom LD has been used to analyze sloped bottom TLD. Finite element method (EM) is used to model the structure and the liquid in the TLD. MATLAB code is developed to study the response of structure, the liquid sloshing in the tank and the coupled fluid-structure interaction. A ten storey two bay RC frame is analyzed for few inputs of ground motion. A sinusoidal ground motion corresponding to resonance condition with fundamental frequency of frame is analyzed. In the analysis the inherent damping of structure is not considered. Observations from the study shows that sloped bottom TLD uses less amount of liquid than flat bottom TLD. Also observed that efficiency of sloped bottom TLD can be improved if it is properly tuned.

  7. Seismic review of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power plant as part of the systematic evaluation program. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, R.C.; Nelson, T.A.; Ma, S.M.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1981-04-01

    A limited seismic reassessment of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant was performed by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as part of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP). The reassessment focused generally on the reactor coolant pressure boundary and on those systems and components necessary to shut down the reactor safely and to maintain it in a safe shutdown condition following a postulated earthquake characterized by a peak horizontal ground acceleration of 0.22 g. Unlike a comprehensive design analysis, the reassessment was limited to structures and components deemed representative of generic classes. Conclusions and recommendations about the ability of selected structures, equipment, and piping to withstand the postulated earthquake are presented.

  8. Seismic design and evaluation guidelines for the Department of Energy high-level waste storage tanks and appurtenances

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.; Cornell, A.; Costantino, C.; Kennedy, R.; Miller, C.; Veletsos, A.

    1993-01-01

    This document provides guidelines for the design and evaluation of underground high-level waste storage tanks due to seismic loads. Attempts were made to reflect the knowledge acquired in the last two decades in the areas of defining the ground motion and calculating hydrodynamic loads and dynamic soil pressures for underground tank structures. The application of the analysis approach is illustrated with an example. The guidelines are developed for specific design of underground storage tanks, namely double-shell structures. However, the methodology discussed is applicable for other types of tank structures as well. The application of these and of suitably adjusted versions of these concepts to other structural types will be addressed in a future version of this document.

  9. The spectral analysis of photoplethysmography to evaluate an independent cardiovascular risk factor

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Pratiksha G; Rao, Gundu HR

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we evaluate homeostatic markers correlated to autonomic nervous and endothelial functions in a population of coronary artery disease (CAD) patients versus a control group. Since CAD is the highest risk marker for sudden cardiac death, the study objective is to determine whether an independent cardiovascular risk score based on these markers can be used alongside known conventional cardiovascular risk markers to strengthen the understanding of a patient’s vascular state. Materials and methods Sixty-five subjects (13 women) with a mean age of 62.9 years (range 40–80 years) who were diagnosed with CAD using coronary angiography (group 1) and seventy-two subjects (29 women) with a mean age of 45.1 years (range 18–85 years) who claimed they were healthy (group 2) were included in the study. These subjects underwent examination with the TM-Oxi and SudoPath systems at IPC Heart Care Centers in Mumbai, India. The TM-Oxi system takes measurements from a blood pressure device and a pulse oximeter. The SudoPath measures galvanic skin response to assess the sudomotor pathway function. Spectral analysis of the photoplethysmograph (PTG) waveform and electrochemical galvanic skin response allow the TM-Oxi and SudoPath systems to calculate several homeostatic markers, such as the PTG index (PTGi), PTG very low frequency index (PTGVLFi), and PTG ratio (PTGr). The focus of this study was to evaluate these markers (PTGi, PTGVLFi, and PTGr) in CAD patients against a control group, and to calculate an independent cardiovascular risk factor score: the PTG cardiovascular disease risk score (PTG CVD), calculated solely from these markers. We compared PTGi, PTGVLFi, PTGr, and PTG CVD scores between the CAD patient group and the healthy control group. Statistical analyses were performed using receiver operating characteristic curves to determine the specificity and sensitivity of the markers to detect CAD at optimal cutoff values for PTGi, PTGVLFi, PTGr, and

  10. Potential use of river suspended-sediment observations to evaluate the effects of seismic shaking on sediment yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avşar, Ulaş

    2014-05-01

    It has been empirically proved that large earthquakes (M>6) trigger landslides and shattering of landscapes, which increase the sediment yield in drainage basins and hence sediment delivery to the rivers. Besides the historical records reporting eyewitness accounts of muddy rivers after earthquakes, this phenomenon was also supported by quantitative analyses on the suspended sediment load of rivers before and after the Chi-Chi Earthquake (Mw=7.6) in 1999 in Taiwan. Observations and understanding of this phenomenon is crucial to trace the sedimentological fingerprints of paleoearthquakes in marine and lacustrine sedimentary sequences. This study presents the evaluation of the publicly available river discharge and suspended-sediment concentration measurements to assess the possible effects of earthquakes on sediment yields in Turkey. For this purpose, measurements from 10 hydrometric stations are utilized, which are located near the epicentres of the 1998 Adana-Ceyhan Earthquake (Mw=6.2), the 1999 İzmit Earthquake (Mw=7.4) and the 1999 Düzce Earthquake (Mw=7.2). The dataset contains ca. 1600 measurements between 1991 and 2005. At only a few stations, anomalies in sediment concentration are observed immediately after the earthquakes. On the other hand, at most of the stations, the data through longer periods after the earthquakes (3-4 years) reveal slight increases in sediment concentration. The low temporal resolution of the measurements (every 20-30 days) limits the observation of possible sudden increase in sediment concentration immediately after the earthquakes. According to the preliminary results, sediment yield seems to be affected from seismic shaking. However, for more robust results, longer-term measurements with higher temporal resolution are required. The future study will focus on a quantitative evaluation and modelling on expected sediment yield after seismic shaking.

  11. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Gill; Concanen, Karyn; Youens, David

    2016-01-01

    The Home Independence Program (HIP), an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC) service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably with the outcomes achieved in HIP when health professionals take the Care Manager role. These findings will be of interest to managers of home care services and to policy makers interested in reducing the long-term care needs of older community dwelling individuals. PMID:27382264

  12. Independent Technical Review of the X-740 Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio: Technical Evaluation and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.; Rhia, B.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

    2010-04-30

    Two major remedial campaigns have been applied to a plume of trichloroethene (TCE) contaminated groundwater near the former X-740 facility at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant in Piketon Ohio. The two selected technologies, phytoremediation using a stand of hybrid poplar trees from 1999-2007 and in situ chemical oxidation using modified Fenton's Reagent from 2008-2009, have proven ineffective in achieving remedial action objectives (RAOs). The 'poor' performance of these technologies is a direct result of site specific conditions and the local contaminant hydrogeology. Key among these challenges is the highly heterogeneous subsurface geology with a thin contaminated aquifer zone (the Gallia) - the behavior of the contamination in the Gallia is currently dominated by slow release of TCE from the clay of the overlying Minford formation, from the sandstone of the underlying Berea formation, and from clayey layers within the Gallia itself. In response to the remediation challenges for the X-740 plume, the Portsmouth team (including the US Department of Energy (DOE), the site contractor (CDM), and the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA)) is evaluating the feasibility of remediation at this site and identifying specific alternatives that are well matched to site conditions and that would maximize the potential for achieving RAOs. To support this evaluation, the DOE Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation (EM-32) assembled a team of experts to serve as a resource and provide input and recommendations to Portsmouth. Despite the challenging site conditions and the failure of the previous two remediation campaigns to adequately move the site toward RAOs, the review team was unanimous in the conclusion that an effective combination of cost effective technologies can be identified. Further, the team expressed optimism that RAOs can be achieved if realistic timeframes are accepted by all parties. The initial efforts of the review team focused on reviewing the

  13. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  14. South Carolina Family Independence Program Process Evaluation: Overall Findings, Context, and Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pindus, Nancy; Koralek, Robin

    The Family Independence (FI) program transformed South Carolina's welfare program into a transitional assistance program emphasizing engagement in socially responsible behavior and participation in employment and employment-related activities. It helps families become economically independent through reform of: employment and training, welfare…

  15. Seismic hazard evaluation for design and/or verification of a high voltage system

    SciTech Connect

    Grases, J.; Malaver, A.; Lopez, S.; Rivero, P.

    1995-12-31

    The Venezuelan capital, Caracas, with a population of about 5 million, is within the area of contact of the Caribbean and South American tectonic plates. Since 1567, the valley where it lies and surroundings have been shaken by at leas six destructive events from different seismogenic sources. Electric energy is served to the city by a high voltage system consisting of 4 power stations, 20 substations (230 KV downwards) and 80 km of high voltage lines, covering an area of about 135 x 60 km{sup 2}. Given the variety of soil conditions, topographical irregularities and proximity to potentially active faults, it was decided to perform a seismic hazard study. This paper gives the results of that study synthesized by two hazard-parameter maps, which allow a conservative characterization of the acceleration on firm soils. Specific site coefficients allow for changes in soil conditions and topographical effects. Sites whose proximity to fault lines is less than about 2 km, require additional field studies in order to rule out the possibility of permanent ground displacements.

  16. Re-evaluation Of The Shallow Seismicity On Mt Etna Applying Probabilistic Earthquake Location Algorithms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuve, T.; Mostaccio, A.; Langer, H. K.; di Grazia, G.

    2005-12-01

    A recent research project carried out together with the Italian Civil Protection concerns the study of amplitude decay laws in various areas on the Italian territory, including Mt Etna. A particular feature of seismic activity is the presence of moderate magnitude earthquakes causing frequently considerable damage in the epicentre areas. These earthquakes are supposed to occur at rather shallow depth, no more than 5 km. Given the geological context, however, these shallow earthquakes would origin in rather weak sedimentary material. In this study we check the reliability of standard earthquake location, in particular with respect to the calculated focal depth, using standard location methods as well as more advanced approaches such as the NONLINLOC software proposed by Lomax et al. (2000) using it with its various options (i.e., Grid Search, Metropolis-Gibbs and Oct-Tree) and 3D velocity model (Cocina et al., 2005). All three options of NONLINLOC gave comparable results with respect to hypocenter locations and quality. Compared to standard locations we note a significant improve of location quality and, in particular a considerable difference of focal depths (in the order of 1.5 - 2 km). However, we cannot find a clear bias towards greater or lower depth. Further analyses concern the assessment of the stability of locations. For this purpose we carry out various Monte Carlo experiments perturbing travel time reading randomly. Further investigations are devoted to possible biases which may arise from the use of an unsuitable velocity model.

  17. Ground motion input in seismic evaluation studies: impacts on risk assessment of uniform hazard spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, S.C.; Sewell, R.T.

    1996-07-01

    Conservatism and variability in seismic risk estimates are studied: effects of uniform hazard spectrum (UHS) are examined for deriving probabilistic estimates of risk and in-structure demand levels, as compared to the more-exact use of realistic time history inputs (of given probability) that depend explicitly on magnitude and distance. This approach differs from the conventional in its exhaustive treatment of the ground-motion threat and in its more detailed assessment of component responses to that threat. The approximate UH-ISS (in-structure spectrum) obtained based on UHS appear to be very close to the more-exact results directed computed from scenario earthquakes. This conclusion does not depend on site configurations and structural characteristics. Also, UH-ISS has composite shapes and may not correspond to the characteristics possessed a single earthquake. The shape is largely affected by the structural property in most cases and can be derived approximately from the corresponding UHS. Motions with smooth spectra, however, will not have the same damage potential as those of more realistic motions with jagged spectral shapes. As a result, UHS-based analysis may underestimate the real demands in nonlinear structural analyses.

  18. Evaluation of infrasound signals from the shuttle Atlantis using a large seismic network.

    PubMed

    de Groot-Hedlin, Catherine D; Hedlin, Michael A H; Walker, Kristoffer T; Drob, Douglas P; Zumberge, Mark A

    2008-09-01

    Inclement weather in Florida forced the space shuttle "Atlantis" to land at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California on June 22, 2007, passing near three infrasound stations and several hundred seismic stations in northern Mexico, southern California, and Nevada. The high signal-to-noise ratio, broad receiver coverage, and Atlantis' positional information allow for the testing of infrasound propagation modeling capabilities through the atmosphere to regional distances. Shadow zones and arrival times are predicted by tracing rays that are launched at right angles to the conical shock front surrounding the shuttle through a standard climatological model as well as a global ground to space model. The predictions and observations compare favorably over much of the study area for both atmospheric specifications. To the east of the shuttle trajectory, there were no detections beyond the primary acoustic carpet. Infrasound energy was detected hundreds of kilometers to the west and northwest (NW) of the shuttle trajectory, consistent with the predictions of ducting due to the westward summer-time stratospheric jet. Both atmospheric models predict alternating regions of high and low ensonifications to the NW. However, infrasound energy was detected tens of kilometers beyond the predicted zones of ensonification, possibly due to uncertainties in stratospheric wind speeds.

  19. Selecting services for a service robot: evaluating the problematic activities threatening the independence of elderly persons.

    PubMed

    Bedaf, Sandra; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; de Witte, Luc; Syrdal, Dag; Lehmann, Hagen; Amirabdollahian, Farshid; Dautenhahn, Kerstin; Hewson, David

    2013-06-01

    Sustaining independent living for the elderly is desirable both for the individual as well as for societies as a whole. Substantial care interventions are provided to citizens supporting their independent living. Currently, such interventions are primarily based on human care provision, but due to demographic changes the demand for such support is continuously increasing. Assistive Robotics has the potential to answer this growing demand. The notions research towards service robots that support the independence of elderly people has been given increased attention. The challenge is to develop robots that are able to adequately support with those activities that pose the greatest problems for elderly people seeking to remain independent. In order to develop the capabilities of the Care-O-bot 3 in the ACCOMPANY project, problematic activities that may threaten continued independent living of elderly people were studied. Focus groups were conducted in the Netherlands, UK, and France and included three separate user groups: (1) elderly (N=41), (2) formal caregivers (N=40), and (3) informal caregivers (N=32). This resulted in a top 3 of problematic activity domains that received the highest priority: (1) Mobility, (2) Self-care, and (3) Social isolation. The findings inform the further development of the Care-O-bot. In the ACCOMPANY project the Care-O-bot 3 will be developed further to enable it to support independently living older persons in one of these domains.

  20. Understanding the Influence of Independent Civil Society Monitoring and Evaluation at the District Level: A Case Study of Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gildemyn, Marie

    2014-01-01

    In developing countries, an increasing number of civil society organizations (CSOs) engage in independent monitoring and evaluation (M&E) of government programs and policies. Most CSOs rely on a range of M&E tools in combination with advocacy strategies to hold government accountable and improve the implementation of programs and policies.…

  1. Agreement between Therapists, Parents, Patients, and Independent Evaluators on Clinical Improvement in Pediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewin, Adam B.; Peris, Tara S.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; McCracken, James T.; Piacentini, John

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Independent evaluators (IE) are used widely in clinical trials to make unbiased determinations of treatment response. By virtue of being kept blind to treatment condition, however, IEs are also kept unaware of many pertinent clinical details that are relevant for decisions about clinical improvement. In this study, agreement among…

  2. Prediction of rockburst probability given seismic energy and factors defined by the expert method of hazard evaluation (MRG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornowski, Jerzy; Kurzeja, Joanna

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we suggest that conditional estimator/predictor of rockburst probability (and rockburst hazard, P T(t)) can be approximated with the formula P T(t) = P 1(θ 1)…P N(θ N)·P dynT(t), where P dynT(t) is a time-dependent probability of rockburst given only the predicted seismic energy parameters, while P i(θ i) are amplifying coefficients due to local geologic and mining conditions, as defined by the Expert Method of (rockburst) Hazard Evaluation (MRG) known in the Polish mining industry. All the elements of the formula are (approximately) calculable (on-line) and the resulting P T value satisfies inequalities 0 ≤ P T(t) ≤ 1. As a result, the hazard space (0-1) can be always divided into smaller subspaces (e.g., 0-10-5, 10-5-10-4, 10-4-10-3, 10-3-1), possibly named with symbols (e.g., A, B, C, D, …) called "hazard states" — which saves the prediction users from worrying of probabilities. The estimator P T can be interpreted as a formal statement of (reformulated) Comprehensive Method of Rockburst State of Hazard Evaluation, well known in Polish mining industry. The estimator P T is natural, logically consistent and physically interpretable. Due to full formalization, it can be easily generalized, incorporating relevant information from other sources/methods.

  3. Seismic Performance Evaluation of the Jacket Type Offshore Platforms through Incremental Dynamic Analysis considering Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Asgarian, Behrouz; Shokrgozar, Hamed R.; Talarposhti, Ali Shakeri

    2008-07-08

    Of great interest in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) is the accurate estimation of the seismic performance of structures. A performance prediction and evaluation procedure is based on nonlinear dynamics and reliability theory. In this method, a full integration over the three key stochastic models is as follow: ground motion hazard curve, nonlinear dynamic displacement demand, and displacement capacity. Further, both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties are evaluated and carried through the analysis.In this paper, jacket and soil-pile system have been modeled using Finite Element program (OpenSees) and the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) are performed to investigate nonlinear behavior of offshore platforms. The system demand is determined by performing time history response analyses of the jacket under a suite of FEMA/SAC uniform hazard ground motions. The system capacity in terms of the drift ratio against incipient collapse is generally difficult to predict since the structural response goes into nonlinear range before collapse. All the analyses are performed in two directions and the results are compared with each others. The confidence level of a jacket in each direction for a given hazard level is calculated using the procedure described.

  4. Seismic Performance Evaluation of the Jacket Type Offshore Platforms through Incremental Dynamic Analysis considering Soil-Pile-Structure Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgarian, Behrouz; Shokrgozar, Hamed R.; Talarposhti, Ali Shakeri

    2008-07-01

    Of great interest in Performance-Based Earthquake Engineering (PBEE) is the accurate estimation of the seismic performance of structures. A performance prediction and evaluation procedure is based on nonlinear dynamics and reliability theory. In this method, a full integration over the three key stochastic models is as follow: ground motion hazard curve, nonlinear dynamic displacement demand, and displacement capacity. Further, both epistemic and aleatory uncertainties are evaluated and carried through the analysis. In this paper, jacket and soil-pile system have been modeled using Finite Element program (OpenSees) and the incremental dynamic analysis (IDA) are performed to investigate nonlinear behavior of offshore platforms. The system demand is determined by performing time history response analyses of the jacket under a suite of FEMA/SAC uniform hazard ground motions. The system capacity in terms of the drift ratio against incipient collapse is generally difficult to predict since the structural response goes into nonlinear range before collapse. All the analyses are performed in two directions and the results are compared with each others. The confidence level of a jacket in each direction for a given hazard level is calculated using the procedure described.

  5. Seismic analysis of the Par Pond Dam: Study of slope failure and liquefaction. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, N.; Reich, M.

    1994-07-01

    Stability concerns of the Par Pond Dam, an embankment structure in the Savannah River Site complex, resulted in a comprehensive evaluation of the state of its integrity. Specifically, excessive seepage through the embankment, slope failure due to an earthquake event as well as liquefaction potential of the embankment and the foundation are addressed and the potential of failure is evaluated. Lastly, remedial benefits of the addition of a berm structure are also assessed.

  6. Evaluation of soil-foundation-structure interaction effects on seismic response demands of multi-story MRF buildings on raft foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Raheem, Shehata E.; Ahmed, Mohamed M.; Alazrak, Tarek M. A.

    2015-03-01

    Soil conditions have a great deal to do with damage to structures during earthquakes. Hence the investigation on the energy transfer mechanism from soils to buildings during earthquakes is critical for the seismic design of multi-story buildings and for upgrading existing structures. Thus, the need for research into soil-structure interaction (SSI) problems is greater than ever. Moreover, recent studies show that the effects of SSI may be detrimental to the seismic response of structure and neglecting SSI in analysis may lead to un-conservative design. Despite this, the conventional design procedure usually involves assumption of fixity at the base of foundation neglecting the flexibility of the foundation, the compressibility of the underneath soil and, consequently, the effect of foundation settlement on further redistribution of bending moment and shear force demands. Hence the SSI analysis of multi-story buildings is the main focus of this research; the effects of SSI are analyzed for typical multi-story building resting on raft foundation. Three methods of analysis are used for seismic demands evaluation of the target moment-resistant frame buildings: equivalent static load; response spectrum methods and nonlinear time history analysis with suit of nine time history records. Three-dimensional FE model is constructed to investigate the effects of different soil conditions and number of stories on the vibration characteristics and seismic response demands of building structures. Numerical results obtained using SSI model with different soil conditions are compared to those corresponding to fixed-base support modeling assumption. The peak responses of story shear, story moment, story displacement, story drift, moments at beam ends, as well as force of inner columns are analyzed. The results of different analysis approaches are used to evaluate the advantages, limitations, and ease of application of each approach for seismic analysis.

  7. Development and implementation of an independence rating scale and evaluation process for nursing orientation of new graduates.

    PubMed

    Durkin, Gregory J

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of evaluation formats are available for new graduate nurses, but most of them are single-point evaluation tools that do not provide a clear picture of progress for orientee or educator. This article describes the development of a Web-based evaluation tool that combines learning taxonomies with the Synergy model into a rating scale based on independent performance. The evaluation tool and process provides open 24/7 access to evaluation documentation for members of the orientation team, demystifying the process and clarifying expectations. The implementation of the tool has proven to be transformative in the perceptions of evaluation and performance expectations of new graduates. This tool has been successful at monitoring progress, altering education, and opening dialogue about performance for over 125 new graduate nurses since inception.

  8. Promoting Autonomy and Independence among Older People: An Evaluation of Educational Programmes in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooker, Charles; Davies, Sue; Ellis, Lorraine; Laker, Sara; Philp, Ian; Walker, Alan; Warnes, Anthony

    A study explored the relationship between the content of educational programs in nursing and the quality of nursing care for older people, especially the extent to which nurses promote autonomy and independence. Activities included an analysis of curricula for pre- and postregistration nursing education programs in Britain, investigation of…

  9. Evaluating Independent Proportions for Statistical Difference, Equivalence, Indeterminacy, and Trivial Difference Using Inferential Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tryon, Warren W.; Lewis, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Tryon presented a graphic inferential confidence interval (ICI) approach to analyzing two independent and dependent means for statistical difference, equivalence, replication, indeterminacy, and trivial difference. Tryon and Lewis corrected the reduction factor used to adjust descriptive confidence intervals (DCIs) to create ICIs and introduced…

  10. Evaluation of geological conditions for coalbed methane occurrence based on 3D seismic information: a case study in Fowa region, Xinjing coal mine, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juanjuan; Li, Fanjia; Hu, Mingshun; Zhang, Wei; Pan, Dongming

    2017-03-01

    The research on geological conditions of coalbed methane (CBM) occurrence is of great significance for predicting the high abundance CBM rich region and gas outburst risk area pre-warning. The No. 3 coal seam, in Yangquan coalfield of Qinshui basin, is the research target studied by 3D seismic exploration technique. The geological factors which affect CBM occurrence are interpreted based on the 3D seismic information. First, the geological structure (faults, folds, and collapse columns) is found out by the 3D seismic structural interpretation and the information of buried depth and thickness of the coal seam is calculated by the seismic horizons. Second, 3D elastic impedance (EI) and natural gamma attribute volumes are generated by prestack EI inversion and multi-attribute probabilistic neural network (PNN) inversion techniques which reflect the information of coal structure types and lithology of the roof and floor. Then, the information of metamorphic degree of seam and hydrogeology conditions can be obtained by the geological data. Consequently, geological conditions of CBM occurrence in No. 3 coal seam are evaluated which will provide scientific reference for high abundance CBM rich region prediction and gas outburst risk area pre-warning.

  11. Evaluation of Seismicity Using Density Analysis of 2000-2015 Earthquakes in The West Coastal Zone of Anatolia (Turkey) And Its Correlation with Geothermal Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakak, Özde

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the seismic activity using the density analysis methods (point density and Kernel density analysis) for 2000-2015 earthquake catalogue belonging to the study area surrounded by Qanakkale to the north, Fethiye to the south and Denizli (Buharkent) to the east, and also to apply its correlation with geothermal regions. The earthquake data, in total 6.675 earthquakes with M>3 magnitudes were obtained from DDA Catalogue of Prime Ministry Disaster & Emergency Management Authority (AFAD) official website. In this survey, data analysis and maps were prepared using ArcGIS (version_10.1) program. The analysis maps present (1) the intensity clustered earthquakes dominant in Sigacik and Gokova Gulfs, (2) regions which have high seismic risk were determined according to Buffer analysis for 2 km distance, (3) geothermal areas (21.4-153°C) in the west coastal zone of Anatolia were mapped, (4) regions the most affected by seismic activity for the last 15 years were detected from 2015 population data, and as latest (5) Seferihisar, Urla, Gulbahge, Demircili, Bodrum, and Datga provinces are identified as areas having high seismic activity for the last 15 years. Consequently, all analysis results were compared with the geothermal areas, and the review made that earthquake catalogue has not the relationship with hot regions and also these shocks triggered by active faults in this region using ArcGIS program. the author recommends that these regions should be investigated the earthquake sensitivity analysis in the near future.

  12. Seismic Safety Study

    SciTech Connect

    Tokarz, F J; Coats, D W

    2006-05-16

    During the past three decades, the Laboratory has been proactive in providing a seismically safe working environment for its employees and the general public. Completed seismic upgrades during this period have exceeded $30M with over 24 buildings structurally upgraded. Nevertheless, seismic questions still frequently arise regarding the safety of existing buildings. To address these issues, a comprehensive study was undertaken to develop an improved understanding of the seismic integrity of the Laboratory's entire building inventory at the Livermore Main Site and Site 300. The completed study of February 2005 extended the results from the 1998 seismic safety study per Presidential Executive Order 12941, which required each federal agency to develop an inventory of its buildings and to estimate the cost of mitigating unacceptable seismic risks. Degenkolb Engineers, who performed the first study, was recontracted to perform structural evaluations, rank order the buildings based on their level of seismic deficiencies, and to develop conceptual rehabilitation schemes for the most seriously deficient buildings. Their evaluation is based on screening procedures and guidelines as established by the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC). Currently, there is an inventory of 635 buildings in the Laboratory's Facility Information Management System's (FIMS's) database, out of which 58 buildings were identified by Degenkolb Engineers that require seismic rehabilitation. The remaining 577 buildings were judged to be adequate from a seismic safety viewpoint. The basis for these evaluations followed the seismic safety performance objectives of DOE standard (DOE STD 1020) Performance Category 1 (PC1). The 58 buildings were ranked according to three risk-based priority classifications (A, B, and C) as shown in Figure 1-1 (all 58 buildings have structural deficiencies). Table 1-1 provides a brief description of their expected performance and damage state

  13. An evaluation of methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays, and ducts in ALWR plants by use of experience data

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kana, D.D.; Kennedy, R.P.; Schiff, A.J.

    1997-07-01

    Advanced Reactor Corporation (ARC) has developed a methodology for seismic qualification of equipment, cable trays and ducts in Advanced Light Water Reactor plants. A Panel (members of which acted as individuals) supported by the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has evaluated this methodology. The review approach and observations are included in this report. In general, the Panel supports the ARC methodology with some exceptions and provides recommendations for further improvements. 26 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Seismic Vulnerability Evaluations Within The Structural And Functional Survey Activities Of The COM Bases In Italy

    SciTech Connect

    Zuccaro, G.; Cacace, F.; Albanese, V.; Mercuri, C.; Papa, F.; Pizza, A. G.; Sergio, S.; Severino, M.

    2008-07-08

    The paper describes technical and functional surveys on COM buildings (Mixed Operative Centre). This activity started since 2005, with the contribution of both Italian Civil Protection Department and the Regions involved. The project aims to evaluate the efficiency of COM buildings, checking not only structural, architectonic and functional characteristics but also paying attention to surrounding real estate vulnerability, road network, railways, harbours, airports, area morphological and hydro-geological characteristics, hazardous activities, etc. The first survey was performed in eastern Sicily, before the European Civil Protection Exercise 'EUROSOT 2005'. Then, since 2006, a new survey campaign started in Abruzzo, Molise, Calabria and Puglia Regions. The more important issue of the activity was the vulnerability assessment. So this paper deals with a more refined vulnerability evaluation technique by means of the SAVE methodology, developed in the 1st task of SAVE project within the GNDT-DPC programme 2000-2002 (Zuccaro, 2005); the SAVE methodology has been already successfully employed in previous studies (i.e. school buildings intervention programme at national scale; list of strategic public buildings in Campania, Sicilia and Basilicata). In this paper, data elaborated by SAVE methodology are compared with expert evaluations derived from the direct inspections on COM buildings. This represents a useful exercise for the improvement either of the survey forms or of the methodology for the quick assessment of the vulnerability.

  15. A reappraisal of seismic Q evaluated at Mt. Etna volcano. Receipt for the application to risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Bianco, Francesca; Giampiccolo, Elisabetta; Tusa, Giuseppina; Tuvé, Tiziana

    2015-01-01

    A new approach in dealing with seismic risk in the volcanic areas of Italy, by taking into account the possible occurrence of damaging pre- or syn-eruptive seismic events, is exciting the scientific interest and is actually the topic developed in several research projects funded by the European Community (e.g., UPStrat-MAFA, www.upstrat-mafa.ov.ingv.it/UPstrat/) and the Civil Defense Department of Italy. To achieve this goal, it is necessary to have a detailed knowledge of the local attenuation-distance relations. In the present paper, we make a survey of the estimates of the seismic quality factor of the medium reported in literature for the Etna area. In the framework of a similar paper published for the Campi Flegrei zone in Southern Italy, we first review the results on seismic attenuation already obtained for Etna and then apply a standard technique to separately measure intrinsic and scattering attenuation coefficients from passive seismic data recorded by the Etna seismological network. Indications are then given for the correct utilization of the attenuation parameters to obtain the best candidate quality factor Q to be used in this area for seismic risk purposes.

  16. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double shell waste tanks. The analysis is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raise by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review (in April and May 2001) of work being performed on the double-shell tank farms, and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system.

  17. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT BUCKLING EVALUATION METHODS & RESULTS FOR THE PRIMARY TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; JOHNSON KI; DEIBLER JE; PILLI SP; RINKER MW; KARRI NK

    2007-02-14

    This report documents a detailed buckling evaluation of the primary tanks in the Hanford double-shell waste tanks (DSTs), which is part of a comprehensive structural review for the Double-Shell Tank Integrity Project. This work also provides information on tank integrity that specifically responds to concerns raised by the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Oversight (EH-22) during a review of work performed on the double-shell tank farms and the operation of the aging waste facility (AWF) primary tank ventilation system. The current buckling review focuses on the following tasks: (1) Evaluate the potential for progressive I-bolt failure and the appropriateness of the safety factors that were used for evaluating local and global buckling. The analysis will specifically answer the following questions: (a) Can the EH-22 scenario develop if the vacuum is limited to -6.6-inch water gage (w.g.) by a relief valve? (b) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario can develop? (c) What is the appropriate factor of safety required to protect against buckling if the EH-22 scenario cannot develop? (2) Develop influence functions to estimate the axial stresses in the primary tanks for all reasonable combinations of tank loads, based on detailed finite element analysis. The analysis must account for the variation in design details and operating conditions between the different DSTs. The analysis must also address the imperfection sensitivity of the primary tank to buckling. (3) Perform a detailed buckling analysis to determine the maximum allowable differential pressure for each of the DST primary tanks at the current specified limits on waste temperature, height, and specific gravity. Based on the I-bolt loads analysis and the small deformations that are predicted at the unfactored limits on vacuum and axial loads, it is very unlikely that the EH-22 scenario (i.e., progressive I-bolt failure leading to global

  18. Evaluation of a microwave resonator for predicting grain moisture independent of bulk density

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This work evaluated the ability of a planar whispering mode resonator to predict moisture considering moisture and densities expected in an on-harvester application. A calibration model was developed to accurately predict moisture over the moisture, density and temperature ranges evaluated. This mod...

  19. Independent Living Capacity Evaluation in Home-Based Primary Care: Considerations and Outcomes of a Quality Improvement Project

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Michelle C.; Murphy, Margaret R.; Mlinac, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This article describes results of a quality improvement project review of 5 years of capacity evaluations for independent living conducted in one Home-Based Primary Care (HBPC) Program. Methods A retrospective chart review was conducted for all patients evaluated for independent living capacity through the Boston VA HBPC Program (N = 25) to identify differences in outcomes for those with and without capacity. Descriptive information included referral sources, capacity decisions, time remaining in the home, and trajectory of patients following evaluation. Results All patients evaluated had been diagnosed with a cognitive disorder, and on average, a relatively lower prevalence of mental illness compared with the national HBPC population. Referrals were made primarily by the HBPC team. Patients with capacity were found to have remained in their home longer than those who lacked capacity. Conclusions Referral for a higher level of care was typically only recommended when no further intervention could be implemented and active risk in the home could not be managed. Clinical Implications In home capacity evaluations are complex and challenging, yet results help family and HBPC team support patients’ preferences for staying in their own home as long as possible. PMID:28111494

  20. Application of seismic surface-waves in concrete bridge-deck evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetrat, Farhad

    Accurate and timely condition assessment of bridge decks is essential for economic management of aging highway bridges. The ability to evaluate concrete modulus profile in a bridge deck can help the detection of early signs of deterioration and optimize the bridge maintenance procedures. This study presents a new method for modulus profiling of concrete bridge decks. The stiffness matrix method is used to simulate wave propagation in a layered media. The results are compared to numerical finite element models. Dispersion analysis is done using the multi-channel analysis of surface waves (MASW) and phase-shift methods. The characteristics of dispersion surface are analyzed and the effects of model parameters on dispersion surface are examined through a series of parametric studies. An inversion technique is proposed for a fast inversion of surface-wave data collected on bridge decks. This technique utilizes a database of pre-calculated dispersion surfaces and takes advantage of the observed patterns in the parametric study as a priori information for the inversion process.

  1. Analysis of the LaSalle Unit 2 nuclear power plant: Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Volume 8, Seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, J.E.; Lappa, D.A.; Bernreuter, D.L.; Chen, J.C.; Chuang, T.Y.; Johnson, J.J.; Campbell, R.D.; Hashimoto, P.S.; Maslenikov, O.R.; Tiong, L.W.; Ravindra, M.K.; Kincaid, R.H.; Sues, R.H.; Putcha, C.S.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes the methodology used and the results obtained from the application of a simplified seismic risk methodology to the LaSalle County Nuclear Generating Station Unit 2. This study is part of the Level I analysis being performed by the Risk Methods Integration and Evaluation Program (RMIEP). Using the RMIEP developed event and fault trees, the analysis resulted in a seismically induced core damage frequency point estimate of 6.OE-7/yr. This result, combined with the component importance analysis, indicated that system failures were dominated by random events. The dominant components included diesel generator failures (failure to swing, failure to start, failure to run after started), and condensate storage tank.

  2. A Seismic Shift: Evaluating Changes in Scientists' Attitudes Regarding Journalists and Science Communication After Media Workshops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, S.; Herbulock, D.

    2015-12-01

    Providing natural hazards scientists the opportunity to question and engage directly with journalists in a workshop setting proved effective at shifting scientists' attitudes on their role in media and public communication during natural disasters. Scientists surveyed after the encounter expressed a more responsive attitude to communicating during crises, increased willingness to support scientific peers' communication efforts and more realistic perspectives on journalists' needs and objectives. Geoscientists experienced unprecedented and intensive media and public scrutiny during the Canterbury, New Zealand earthquakes of 2010-2012. Following major quakes and aftershocks, there was a sustained high level of public demand for information and expert analysis of the underlying geological events and ongoing hazards and risks. Once the crisis ended, a period of reflection gave rise to understanding of the need for further media and communication training amongst natural hazards scientists. A workshop designed to explore scientists' attitudes to public communication during disasters and challenge their views on media, press offices and the expectations of the public was developed and implemented by the Science Media Centre, New Zealand and Massey University. This research was developed as an evaluation of this workshop. Quantitative analysis with some qualititive analysis were the methods used. Some findings include: a shift in how journalists were perceived by scientists after the workshop, largely influenced by perspectives shared during a panel where invited journalists reflected on their own experiences and answered questions from scientists. discussions on different spokespeople from different science institutions contributing to the public discussion showed a change in perception from a preference for one central spokesperson to increased support for a variety of perspectives from multiple scientists. This was influenced by insight provided by journalists during

  3. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-31

    for second-order Sturm - Liouville boundary-value problems, such a count of eigenvalues may be established in terms of the number of zero crossings of...will be operational during the next six months. Section 11 describes a series of activities in the development and imple- mentation of the seismic...element of seismic research. with emphasis on those areas directly related to tho operations of the SDC. Substantial progress has been made in the

  4. Seismic seiches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, Arthur; Gupta, Harsh K.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic seiche is a term first used by Kvale (1955) to discuss oscillations of lake levels in Norway and England caused by the Assam earthquake of August 15, 1950. This definition has since been generalized to apply to standing waves set up in closed, or partially closed, bodies of water including rivers, shipping channels, lakes, swimming pools and tanks due to the passage of seismic waves from an earthquake.

  5. An Evaluation of Attitude-Independent Magnetometer-Bias Determination Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, J. A.; Deutschmann, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Although several algorithms now exist for determining three-axis magnetometer (TAM) biases without the use of attitude data, there are few studies on the effectiveness of these methods, especially in comparison with attitude dependent methods. This paper presents the results of a comparison of three attitude independent methods and an attitude dependent method for computing TAM biases. The comparisons are based on in-flight data from the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). The effectiveness of an algorithm is measured by the accuracy of attitudes computed using biases determined with that algorithm. The attitude accuracies are determined by comparison with known, extremely accurate, star-tracker-based attitudes. In addition, the effect of knowledge of calibration parameters other than the biases on the effectiveness of all bias determination methods is examined.

  6. Design and Evaluation of a Medication Adherence Application with Communication for Seniors in Independent Living Communities

    PubMed Central

    Dasgupta, Dipanwita; Johnson, Reid A.; Chaudhry, Beenish; Reeves, Kimberly G.; Willaert, Patty; Chawla, Nitesh V.

    2016-01-01

    Medication non-adherence is a pressing concern among seniors, leading to a lower quality of life and higher healthcare costs. While mobile applications provide a viable medium for medication management, their utility can be limited without tackling the specific needs of seniors and facilitating the active involvement of care providers. To address these limitations, we are developing a tablet-based application designed specifically for seniors to track their medications and a web portal for their care providers to track medication adherence. In collaboration with a local Aging in Place program, we conducted a three-month study with sixteen participants from an independent living facility. Our study found that the application helped participants to effectively track their medications and improved their sense of wellbeing. Our findings highlight the importance of catering to the needs of seniors and of involving care providers in this process, with specific recommendations for the development of future medication management applications. PMID:28269843

  7. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 94-0182-2519, Little Blue Valley Sewer District, Independence, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    In response to a confidential request, an investigation was begun into possible hazardous working conditions at the Little Blue Valley Sewer District wastewater treatment facility (SIC-4952), Independence, Missouri. Complaints received included gastrointestinal disurbances, sore throats, fatigue, headaches, eye irritation, and coughing among those working in the belt press room. Personal breathing zone samples for total particulate ranged from 0.03 to 0.28mg/m3. Measurements also indicated a range of 2.50 to 6.82 endotoxin units per cubic meter of air. Sludge samples containing 40% solids had the highest concentrations and largest variety of volatile organic compounds. Analysis indicated that the belt room workers were exposed to hydrogen-sulfide at concentrations which exceeded the NIOSH 10 minute ceiling of 10 parts per million (ppm) in eight of 13 breathing zone samples; three also exceeded the OSHA limit of 20ppm. The author concludes that workers were overexposed to hydrogen-sulfide.

  8. Independent evaluation of conflicting microspherule results from different investigations of the Younger Dryas impact hypothesis.

    PubMed

    LeCompte, Malcolm A; Goodyear, Albert C; Demitroff, Mark N; Batchelor, Dale; Vogel, Edward K; Mooney, Charles; Rock, Barrett N; Seidel, Alfred W

    2012-10-30

    Firestone et al. sampled sedimentary sequences at many sites across North America, Europe, and Asia [Firestone RB, et al. (2007) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 106:16016-16021]. In sediments dated to the Younger Dryas onset or Boundary (YDB) approximately 12,900 calendar years ago, Firestone et al. reported discovery of markers, including nanodiamonds, aciniform soot, high-temperature melt-glass, and magnetic microspherules attributed to cosmic impacts/airbursts. The microspherules were explained as either cosmic material ablation or terrestrial ejecta from a hypothesized North American impact that initiated the abrupt Younger Dryas cooling, contributed to megafaunal extinctions, and triggered human cultural shifts and population declines. A number of independent groups have confirmed the presence of YDB spherules, but two have not. One of them [Surovell TA, et al. (2009) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104:18155-18158] collected and analyzed samples from seven YDB sites, purportedly using the same protocol as Firestone et al., but did not find a single spherule in YDB sediments at two previously reported sites. To examine this discrepancy, we conducted an independent blind investigation of two sites common to both studies, and a third site investigated only by Surovell et al. We found abundant YDB microspherules at all three widely separated sites consistent with the results of Firestone et al. and conclude that the analytical protocol employed by Surovell et al. deviated significantly from that of Firestone et al. Morphological and geochemical analyses of YDB spherules suggest they are not cosmic, volcanic, authigenic, or anthropogenic in origin. Instead, they appear to have formed from abrupt melting and quenching of terrestrial materials.

  9. Independent circuits in the basal ganglia for the evaluation and selection of actions.

    PubMed

    Stephenson-Jones, Marcus; Kardamakis, Andreas A; Robertson, Brita; Grillner, Sten

    2013-09-17

    The basal ganglia are critical for selecting actions and evaluating their outcome. Although the circuitry for selection is well understood, how these nuclei evaluate the outcome of actions is unknown. Here, we show in lamprey that a separate evaluation circuit, which regulates the habenula-projecting globus pallidus (GPh) neurons, exists within the basal ganglia. The GPh neurons are glutamatergic and can drive the activity of the lateral habenula, which, in turn, provides an indirect inhibitory influence on midbrain dopamine neurons. We show that GPh neurons receive inhibitory input from the striosomal compartment of the striatum. The striosomal input can reduce the excitatory drive to the lateral habenula and, consequently, decrease the inhibition onto the dopaminergic system. Dopaminergic neurons, in turn, provide feedback that inhibits the GPh. In addition, GPh neurons receive direct projections from the pallium (cortex in mammals), which can increase the GPh activity to drive the lateral habenula to increase the inhibition of the neuromodulatory systems. This circuitry, thus, differs markedly from the "direct" and "indirect" pathways that regulate the pallidal (e.g., globus pallidus) output nuclei involved in the control of motion. Our results show that a distinct reward-evaluation circuit exists within the basal ganglia, in parallel to the direct and indirect pathways, which select actions. Our results suggest that these circuits are part of the fundamental blueprint that all vertebrates use to select actions and evaluate their outcome.

  10. Integration of independent component analysis with near infrared spectroscopy for evaluation of rice freshness

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Determination of freshness is an important issue for rice quality. Near infrared spectroscopy, a rapid non-destructive inspection method based on specific absorptions within a given range of wavelengths, has been widely applied for evaluation of internal quality of agricultural products. For the pur...

  11. On Neglect of the Independent Variable in Program Evaluation. Project MITT Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charters, W. W., Jr.; Jones, John E.

    This paper illustrates the need for full description and measurement of differences between "experimental" and "control" situations in school program evaluation studies. Two studies were completed at the University of Oregon involving the innovative program--differentiated staffing (DS). The first study, a doctoral investigation, sought to assess…

  12. Independent Thinkers and Learners: A Critical Evaluation of the "Growing Together Schools Programme"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, Darren

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on primary data following an evaluative research project examining an innovative outdoor learning programme in the South East of England with pupils from year six in a primary school. The programme focused on enhancing the skills, experiences and personal attributes of children and young people to cope better with the…

  13. Independent Children's Social Work Practice Pilots: Evaluating Practitioners' Job Control and Burnout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hussein, Shereen; Manthorpe, Jill; Ridley, Julie; Austerberry, Helen; Farrelly, Nicola; Larkins, Cath; Bilson, Andy; Stanley, Nicky

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether a new model that delegates some out-of-home care services from the public to the private and not-for-profit sectors in England enhances practitioners' job control and stress levels. Methods: A 3-year longitudinal matched-control evaluation examined changes in Karasek demand-control model and Maslach burnout…

  14. Independent technical evaluation and recommendations for contaminated groundwater at the department of energy office of legacy management Riverton processing site

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, Brain B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.

    2014-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site – a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks – spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical – in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated).

  15. Evaluation of 3D modality-independent elastography for breast imaging: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, J. J.; Ong, R. E.; Yankeelov, T. E.; Miga, M. I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the development and preliminary testing of a three-dimensional implementation of an inverse problem technique for extracting soft-tissue elasticity information via non-rigid model-based image registration. The modality-independent elastography (MIE) algorithm adjusts the elastic properties of a biomechanical model to achieve maximal similarity between images acquired under different states of static loading. A series of simulation experiments with clinical image sets of human breasts were performed to test the ability of the method to identify and characterize a radiographically occult stiff lesion. Because boundary conditions are a critical input to the algorithm, a comparison of three methods for semi-automated surface point correspondence was conducted in the context of systematic and randomized noise processes. The results illustrate that 3D MIE was able to successfully reconstruct elasticity images using data obtained from both magnetic resonance and x-ray computed tomography systems. The lesion was localized correctly in all cases and its relative elasticity found to be reasonably close to the true values (3.5% with the use of spatial priors and 11.6% without). In addition, the inaccuracies of surface registration performed with thin-plate spline interpolation did not exceed empiric thresholds of unacceptable boundary condition error.

  16. Seismic hazard estimation of northern Iran using smoothed seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnevis, Naeem; Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Cramer, Chris H.

    2017-03-01

    This article presents a seismic hazard assessment for northern Iran, where a smoothed seismicity approach has been used in combination with an updated seismic catalog and a ground motion prediction equation recently found to yield good fit with data. We evaluate the hazard over a geographical area including the seismic zones of Azerbaijan, the Alborz Mountain Range, and Kopeh-Dagh, as well as parts of other neighboring seismic zones that fall within our region of interest. In the chosen approach, seismic events are not assigned to specific faults but assumed to be potential seismogenic sources distributed within regular grid cells. After performing the corresponding magnitude conversions, we decluster both historical and instrumental seismicity catalogs to obtain earthquake rates based on the number of events within each cell, and smooth the results to account for the uncertainty in the spatial distribution of future earthquakes. Seismicity parameters are computed for each seismic zone separately, and for the entire region of interest as a single uniform seismotectonic region. In the analysis, we consider uncertainties in the ground motion prediction equation, the seismicity parameters, and combine the resulting models using a logic tree. The results are presented in terms of expected peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps and hazard curves at selected locations, considering exceedance probabilities of 2 and 10% in 50 years for rock site conditions. According to our results, the highest levels of hazard are observed west of the North Tabriz and east of the North Alborz faults, where expected PGA values are between about 0.5 and 1 g for 10 and 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, respectively. We analyze our results in light of similar estimates available in the literature and offer our perspective on the differences observed. We find our results to be helpful in understanding seismic hazard for northern Iran, but recognize that additional efforts are necessary to

  17. Seismic ruggedness of relays

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, K.L. )

    1991-08-01

    This report complements EPRI report NP-5223 Revision 1, February 1991, and presents additional information and analyses concerning generic seismic ruggedness of power plant relays. Existing and new test data have been used to construct Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectra (GERS) which can be used in identifying rugged relays during seismic re-evaluation of nuclear power plants. This document is an EPRI tier 1 report. The results of relay fragility tests for both old and new relays are included in an EPRI tier 2 report with the same title. In addition to the presentation of relay GERS, the tier 2 report addresses the applicability of GERS to relays of older vintage, discusses the important identifying nomenclature for each relay type, and examines relay adjustment effects on seismic ruggedness. 9 refs., 3 figs, 1 tab.

  18. Evaluation of the Most Frequently Prescribed Extemporaneously Compounded Veterinary Medications at a Large Independent Community Pharmacy.

    PubMed

    Karara, Adel H; Hines, Ryan; Demir, Zehra; Nnorom, Bethran; Horsey, Robert; Twigg, Geoffrey

    2016-01-01

    Extemporaneous drug formulation is essential to provide optimal pharmaceutical care to veterinary patients. The need for this is exacerbated by the fact that commercially produced veterinary-specific products, without a human indication, require specialty veterinary manufacturing facilities and a new animal drug application process to gain marketing approval. This study examined the prescription patterns of extemporaneously compounded veterinary preparations in the compounding department at a large independent community pharmacy. Data was obtained from a total of 1348 prescriptions requiring extemporaneous compounding over the course of a two-year period (2014-2015). A database was constructed and each compounded prescription was allocated to a therapeutic category based on the American Hospital Formulary Service Drug Information. Data analysis showed that the most commonly prescribed preparations belonged to the central nervous system (39%), anti-infective agents (21%), and hormones (12%) therapeutic categories. Overall, suspensions were the most dispensed (47%), extemporaneously compounded dosage forms followed by solutions (28%), and capsules (10%). The majority (88%) of compounded preparations were administered by the oral route. The top three drugs that are compounded for veterinary medicine were (1) potassium bromide oral solution for canine epilepsy, (2) methimazole solution used to treat hyperthyroidism in cats, and (3) metronidazole suspension, an antibiotic for the treatment of diarrhea and other infections in dogs and cats. Remarkably, our findings are in good agreement with previously published survey data on the top drugs that are compounded for veterinary medicine. In the era of personalized medicine, veterinary extemporaneous compounding for specialized needs will continue to play an important role providing optimum therapy for veterinary patients.

  19. Evaluation of Cross-Correlation Methods on a Massive Scale for Accurate Relocation of Seismic Events in East Asia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-21

    purposes, such as scientific study of earthquake interactions in a fault zone or seismic sources associated with magma conduits in a volcano , relative... Kilauea , J. Geophys. Res., 99, 375-393. HARRIS, D.B. (1991), A waveform correlation method for identifying quarry explosions, Bull. Seismol. Soc. Am

  20. FURTHER EVALUATION OF RESPONSE-INDEPENDENT DELIVERY OF PREFERRED STIMULI AND CHILD COMPLIANCE

    PubMed Central

    Normand, Matthew P; Beaulieu, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    The effect of a fixed-time (FT) schedule involving the delivery of preferred stimuli prior to the issuance of a low-probability instruction was evaluated with 2 young children with autism. The FT schedule was introduced according to a reversal design with 3 target instructions, 1 for the first child and 2 for the second child. Compliance increased for 2 of the 3 cases. A high-probability instruction sequence and guided compliance were implemented for the second instruction targeted for 1 child, with compliance increasing with guided compliance. PMID:21941401

  1. Evaluation of stress and saturation effects on seismic velocity and electrical resistivity - laboratory testing of rock samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilhelm, Jan; Jirků, Jaroslav; Slavík, Lubomír; Bárta, Jaroslav

    2016-04-01

    Repository, located in a deep geological formation, is today considered the most suitable solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level waste. The geological formations, in combination with an engineered barrier system, should ensure isolation of the waste from the environment for thousands of years. For long-term monitoring of such underground excavations special monitoring systems are developed. In our research we developed and tested monitoring system based on repeated ultrasonic time of flight measurement and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). As a test site Bedřichov gallery in the northern Bohemia was selected. This underground gallery in granitic rock was excavated using Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM). The seismic high-frequency measurements are performed by pulse-transmission technique directly on the rock wall using one seismic source and three receivers in the distances of 1, 2 and 3 m. The ERT measurement is performed also on the rock wall using 48 electrodes. The spacing between electrodes is 20 centimeters. An analysis of relation of seismic velocity and electrical resistivity on water saturation and stress state of the granitic rock is necessary for the interpretation of both seismic monitoring and ERT. Laboratory seismic and resistivity measurements were performed. One series of experiments was based on uniaxial loading of dry and saturated granitic samples. The relation between stress state and ultrasonic wave velocities was tested separately for dry and saturated rock samples. Other experiments were focused on the relation between electrical resistivity of the rock sample and its saturation level. Rock samples with different porosities were tested. Acknowledgments: This work was partially supported by the Technology Agency of the Czech Republic, project No. TA 0302408

  2. Integration of high-resolution seismic and aeromagnetic data for earthquake hazards evaluations: An example from the Willamette Valley, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liberty, L.M.; Trehu, A.M.; Blakely, R.J.; Dougherty, M.E.

    1999-01-01

    Aeromagnetic and high-resolution seismic reflection data were integrated to place constraints on the history of seismic activity and to determine the continuity of the possibly active, yet largely concealed Mount Angel fault in the Willamette Valley, Oregon. Recent seismic activity possibly related to the 20-km-long fault includes a swarm of small earthquakes near Woodburn in 1990 and the magnitude 5.6 Scotts Mills earthquake in 1993. Newly acquired aeromagnetic data show several large northwest-trending anomalies, including one associated with the Mount Angel fault. The magnetic signature indicates that the fault may actually extend 70 km across the Willamette Valley to join the Newberg and Gales Creek faults in the Oregon Coast Range. We collected 24-fold high-resolution seismic reflection data along two transects near Woodburn, Oregon, to image the offset of the Miocene-age Columbia River Basalts (CRB) and overlying sediments at and northwest of the known mapped extent of the Mount Angel fault. The seismic data show a 100-200-m offset in the CRB reflector at depths from 300 to 700 m. Folded or offset sediments appear above the CRB with decreasing amplitude to depths as shallow as were imaged (approximately 40 m). Modeling experiments based on the magnetic data indicate, however, that the anomaly associated with the Mount Angel fault is not caused solely by an offset of the CRB and overlying sediments. Underlying magnetic sources, which we presume to be volcanic rocks of the Siletz terrane, must have vertical offsets of at least 500 m to fit the observed data. We conclude that the Mount Angel fault appears to have been active since Eocene age and that the Gales Creek, Newberg, and Mount Angel faults should be considered a single potentially active fault system. This fault, as well as other parallel northwest-trending faults in the Willamette Valley, should be considered as risks for future potentially damaging earthquakes.

  3. A Device-Independent Evaluation of Carbonyl Emissions from Heated Electronic Cigarette Solvents

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenhao; Liao, Jiawen; Matsuo, Toshiki; Ito, Kazuhide; Fowles, Jeff; Shusterman, Dennis; Mendell, Mark; Kumagai, Kazukiyo

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate how the two main electronic (e-) cigarette solvents—propylene glycol (PG) and glycerol (GL)—modulate the formation of toxic volatile carbonyl compounds under precisely controlled temperatures in the absence of nicotine and flavor additives. Methods PG, GL, PG:GL = 1:1 (wt/wt) mixture, and two commercial e-cigarette liquids were vaporized in a stainless steel, tubular reactor in flowing air ranging up to 318°C to simulate e-cigarette vaping. Aerosols were collected and analyzed to quantify the amount of volatile carbonyls produced with each of the five e-liquids. Results Significant amounts of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde were detected at reactor temperatures ≥215°C for both PG and GL. Acrolein was observed only in e-liquids containing GL when reactor temperatures exceeded 270°C. At 318°C, 2.03±0.80 μg of formaldehyde, 2.35±0.87 μg of acetaldehyde, and a trace amount of acetone were generated per milligram of PG; at the same temperature, 21.1±3.80 μg of formaldehyde, 2.40±0.99 μg of acetaldehyde, and 0.80±0.50 μg of acrolein were detected per milligram of GL. Conclusions We developed a device-independent test method to investigate carbonyl emissions from different e-cigarette liquids under precisely controlled temperatures. PG and GL were identified to be the main sources of toxic carbonyl compounds from e-cigarette use. GL produced much more formaldehyde than PG. Besides formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, measurable amounts of acrolein were also detected at ≥270°C but only when GL was present in the e-liquid. At 215°C, the estimated daily exposure to formaldehyde from e-cigarettes, exceeded United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and California Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) acceptable limits, which emphasized the need to further examine the potential cancer and non-cancer health risks associated with e-cigarette use. PMID:28076380

  4. Seismic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    R. Quittmeyer

    2006-09-25

    This technical work plan (TWP) describes the efforts to develop and confirm seismic ground motion inputs used for preclosure design and probabilistic safety 'analyses and to assess the postclosure performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. As part of the effort to develop seismic inputs, the TWP covers testing and analyses that provide the technical basis for inputs to the seismic ground-motion site-response model. The TWP also addresses preparation of a seismic methodology report for submission to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The activities discussed in this TWP are planned for fiscal years (FY) 2006 through 2008. Some of the work enhances the technical basis for previously developed seismic inputs and reduces uncertainties and conservatism used in previous analyses and modeling. These activities support the defense of a license application. Other activities provide new results that will support development of the preclosure, safety case; these results directly support and will be included in the license application. Table 1 indicates which activities support the license application and which support licensing defense. The activities are listed in Section 1.2; the methods and approaches used to implement them are discussed in more detail in Section 2.2. Technical and performance objectives of this work scope are: (1) For annual ground motion exceedance probabilities appropriate for preclosure design analyses, provide site-specific seismic design acceleration response spectra for a range of damping values; strain-compatible soil properties; peak motions, strains, and curvatures as a function of depth; and time histories (acceleration, velocity, and displacement). Provide seismic design inputs for the waste emplacement level and for surface sites. Results should be consistent with the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for Yucca Mountain and reflect, as appropriate, available knowledge on the limits to extreme ground motion at

  5. In-depth evaluation of software tools for data-independent acquisition based label-free quantification.

    PubMed

    Kuharev, Jörg; Navarro, Pedro; Distler, Ute; Jahn, Olaf; Tenzer, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    Label-free quantification (LFQ) based on data-independent acquisition workflows currently experiences increasing popularity. Several software tools have been recently published or are commercially available. The present study focuses on the evaluation of three different software packages (Progenesis, synapter, and ISOQuant) supporting ion mobility enhanced data-independent acquisition data. In order to benchmark the LFQ performance of the different tools, we generated two hybrid proteome samples of defined quantitative composition containing tryptically digested proteomes of three different species (mouse, yeast, Escherichia coli). This model dataset simulates complex biological samples containing large numbers of both unregulated (background) proteins as well as up- and downregulated proteins with exactly known ratios between samples. We determined the number and dynamic range of quantifiable proteins and analyzed the influence of applied algorithms (retention time alignment, clustering, normalization, etc.) on quantification results. Analysis of technical reproducibility revealed median coefficients of variation of reported protein abundances below 5% for MS(E) data for Progenesis and ISOQuant. Regarding accuracy of LFQ, evaluation with synapter and ISOQuant yielded superior results compared to Progenesis. In addition, we discuss reporting formats and user friendliness of the software packages. The data generated in this study have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with identifier PXD001240 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001240).

  6. OAK FOREST CARBON AND WATER SIMULATIONS: MODEL INTERCOMPARISONS AND EVALUATIONS AGAINST INDEPENDENT DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Paul J; Amthor, Jeffrey S; Wullschleger, Stan D; Wilson, K.; Grant, Robert F.; Hartley, Anne; Hui, D.; HuntJr., E. Raymond; Johnson, Dale W.; Kimball, John S.; King, Anthony Wayne; Luo, Yiqi; McNulty, Steven G.; Sun, G.; Thornton, Peter; Wang, S.; Williams, M.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Cushman, Robert Michael

    2004-01-01

    Models represent our primary method for integration of small-scale, processlevel phenomena into a comprehensive description of forest-stand or ecosystem function. They also represent a key method for testing hypotheses about the response of forest ecosystems to multiple changing environmental conditions. This paper describes the evaluation of 13 stand-level models varying in their spatial, mechanistic, and temporal complexity for their ability to capture intra- and interannual components of the water and carbon cycle for an upland, oak-dominated forest of eastern Tennessee. Comparisons between model simulations and observations were conducted for hourly, daily, and annual time steps. Data for the comparisons were obtained from a wide range of methods including: eddy covariance, sapflow, chamber-based soil respiration, biometric estimates of stand-level net primary production and growth, and soil water content by time or frequency domain reflectometry. Response surfaces of carbon and water flux as a function of environmental drivers, and a variety of goodness-of-fit statistics (bias, absolute bias, and model efficiency) were used to judge model performance. A single model did not consistently perform the best at all time steps or for all variables considered. Intermodel comparisons showed good agreement for water cycle fluxes, but considerable disagreement among models for predicted carbon fluxes. The mean of all model outputs, however, was nearly always the best fit to the observations. Not surprisingly, models missing key forest components or processes, such as roots or modeled soil water content, were unable to provide accurate predictions of ecosystem responses to short-term drought phenomenon. Nevertheless, an inability to correctly capture short-term physiological processes under drought was not necessarily an indicator of poor annual water and carbon budget simulations. This is possible because droughts in the subject ecosystem were of short duration and

  7. Procedures for computing site seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferritto, John

    1994-02-01

    This report was prepared as part of the Navy's Seismic Hazard Mitigation Program. The Navy has numerous bases located in seismically active regions throughout the world. Safe effective design of waterfront structures requires determining expected earthquake ground motion. The Navy's problem is further complicated by the presence of soft saturated marginal soils that can significantly amplify the levels of seismic shaking as evidenced in the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake. The Naval Facilities Engineering Command's seismic design manual, NAVFAC P355.l, requires a probabilistic assessment of ground motion for design of essential structures. This report presents the basis for the Navy's Seismic Hazard Analysis procedure that was developed and is intended to be used with the Seismic Hazard Analysis computer program and user's manual. This report also presents data on geology and seismology to establish the background for the seismic hazard model developed. The procedure uses the historical epicenter data base and available geologic data, together with source models, recurrence models, and attenuation relationships to compute the probability distribution of site acceleration and an appropriate spectra. This report discusses the developed stochastic model for seismic hazard evaluation and the associated research.

  8. Independent Evaluation of the integrated Community Case Management of Childhood Illness Strategy in Malawi Using a National Evaluation Platform Design.

    PubMed

    Amouzou, Agbessi; Kanyuka, Mercy; Hazel, Elizabeth; Heidkamp, Rebecca; Marsh, Andrew; Mleme, Tiope; Munthali, Spy; Park, Lois; Banda, Benjamin; Moulton, Lawrence H; Black, Robert E; Hill, Kenneth; Perin, Jamie; Victora, Cesar G; Bryce, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the impact of integrated community case management of childhood illness (iCCM) on careseeking for childhood illness and child mortality in Malawi, using a National Evaluation Platform dose-response design with 27 districts as units of analysis. "Dose" variables included density of iCCM providers, drug availability, and supervision, measured through a cross-sectional cellular telephone survey of all iCCM-trained providers. "Response" variables were changes between 2010 and 2014 in careseeking and mortality in children aged 2-59 months, measured through household surveys. iCCM implementation strength was not associated with changes in careseeking or mortality. There were fewer than one iCCM-ready provider per 1,000 under-five children per district. About 70% of sick children were taken outside the home for care in both 2010 and 2014. Careseeking from iCCM providers increased over time from about 2% to 10%; careseeking from other providers fell by a similar amount. Likely contributors to the failure to find impact include low density of iCCM providers, geographic targeting of iCCM to "hard-to-reach" areas although women did not identify distance from a provider as a barrier to health care, and displacement of facility careseeking by iCCM careseeking. This suggests that targeting iCCM solely based on geographic barriers may need to be reconsidered.

  9. Reliability of chemotherapy preparation processes: Evaluating independent double-checking and computer-assisted gravimetric control.

    PubMed

    Carrez, Laurent; Bouchoud, Lucie; Fleury-Souverain, Sandrine; Combescure, Christophe; Falaschi, Ludivine; Sadeghipour, Farshid; Bonnabry, Pascal

    2017-03-01

    Background and objectives Centralized chemotherapy preparation units have established systematic strategies to avoid errors. Our work aimed to evaluate the accuracy of manual preparations associated with different control methods. Method A simulation study in an operational setting used phenylephrine and lidocaine as markers. Each operator prepared syringes that were controlled using a different method during each of three sessions (no control, visual double-checking, and gravimetric control). Eight reconstitutions and dilutions were prepared in each session, with variable doses and volumes, using different concentrations of stock solutions. Results were analyzed according to qualitative (choice of stock solution) and quantitative criteria (accurate, <5% deviation from the target concentration; weakly accurate, 5%-10%; inaccurate, 10%-30%; wrong, >30% deviation). Results Eleven operators carried out 19 sessions. No final preparation (n = 438) contained a wrong drug. The protocol involving no control failed to detect 1 of 3 dose errors made and double-checking failed to detect 3 of 7 dose errors. The gravimetric control method detected all 5 out of 5 dose errors. The accuracy of the doses measured was equivalent across the control methods ( p = 0.63 Kruskal-Wallis). The final preparations ranged from 58% to 60% accurate, 25% to 27% weakly accurate, 14% to 17% inaccurate and 0.9% wrong. A high variability was observed between operators. Discussion Gravimetric control was the only method able to detect all dose errors, but it did not improve dose accuracy. A dose accuracy with <5% deviation cannot always be guaranteed using manual production. Automation should be considered in the future.

  10. An Independent Evaluation of a Novel Peptide Mimetic, Brilacidin (PMX30063), for Ocular Anti-Infective

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Eric G.; Yates, Kathleen A.; Mah, Francis S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: Brilacidin (BRI), a novel defensin mimetic, was evaluated as an ocular anti-infective. Methods: In vitro: Potency based on MIC90s was compared for 50 Staphylococcus aureus (SA), 50 Staphylococcus epidermidis (SE), and 25 each of Streptococcus pneumonia (SP), Streptococcus viridans (SV), Moraxella (MS), Haemophilus influenzae (HI), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA), and Serratia marcescens (SM). In vivo: Using established methods, ocular toxicity was graded with Draize testing. For efficacy testing, both corneas of 24 rabbits were infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), whereas the corneal epithelium was removed in the left eye. After 4 h, 21 topical drops over 5 h were administered to 4 groups: BRI 0.5%, vancomycin (VAN) 5%, saline, and no treatment. The eyes were clinically graded and the corneas were harvested for colony counts. Results: In vitro: Both SA and SE had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentrations among the bacterial groups. The MIC90s to BRI for SP, SV, MS, HI, PA, and SM were 4, 32, 256, 32, 16, and 128-fold higher, respectively, than SA and SE. In vivo: Draize testing determined BRI 0.5% to be minimally irritating. For abraded corneas, BRI was not statistically different from VAN for reducing MRSA. BRI was bactericidal. For intact corneas, VAN reduced more CFU than BRI. BRI reduced CFU in abraded corneas more than intact corneas suggesting poor corneal penetration. Conclusions: BRI has Gram-positive in vitro activity; topical BRI 0.5% was minimally irritating; and BRI 0.5% was equally efficacious as VAN in a MRSA keratitis model when the corneal epithelium was removed. PMID:26501484

  11. A reappraisal of seismic Q evaluated in Campi Flegrei caldera. Receipt for the application to risk analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Pezzo, Edoardo; Bianco, Francesca

    2013-04-01

    The civil defense of Italy and the European community have planned to reformulate the volcanic risk in several volcanic areas of Italy, among which Mt. Vesuvius and Campi Flegrei, by taking into account the possible occurrence of damaging pre- or syn-eruptive seismic events. Necessary to achieve this goal is the detailed knowledge of the local attenuation-distance relations. In the present note, we make a survey of the estimates of seismic quality factor (the inverse is proportional to the attenuation coefficient with distance) reported in literature for the area of Campi Flegrei where many, but sometimes contradictory results have been published on this topic. We try to review these results in order to give indications for their correct use when calculating the attenuation laws for this area.

  12. Seismic detection and evaluation of delta and turbidite sequences: their application to exploration for the subtle trap

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, O.R.

    1982-09-01

    Energy conditions at the seaward edge of deltas allow their division into fluvial-dominated, wave-dominated, and tide-dominated deltas. Each kind of delta has a distinct framework orientation and depositional pattern which results in a characteristic seismic reflection pattern. Certain seismic events and reflection patterns occurring in various combinations may suggest the presence of turbidites. These indicators include troughs, submarine canyons, mounds, prograded fluvial-dominated delta reflection patterns which vary in thickness, and onlap-offlap patterns on depositional slopes. Regional studies provide the best means of identifying and mapping depositional sequences. Examples from the North Sea, Gulf Coast, and Sacramento Valley illustrate the geologic and geophysical expression of delta and turbidite sequences and their interrelations.

  13. Performance evaluation of shape memory alloy/rubber-based isolation systems for seismic response mitigation of bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozbulut, Osman E.; Hurlebaus, Stefan

    2010-04-01

    Base isolation is an effective method of reducing seismic response of bridges during an earthquake. Rubber isolators are one of the most common types of base isolation systems. As an alternative to conventional rubber isolators such as high damping rubber bearing and lead rubber bearing, smart rubber bearing systems with shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been proposed in recent years. As a class of smart materials, shape memory alloys shows excellent re-centering and considerable damping capabilities which can be exploited to obtain an efficient seismic isolation system. This paper explores effectiveness of shape memory alloy/rubber-based isolation systems for protecting bridges against seismic loads by performing a sensitivity analysis. The isolation system considered in this study consists of a laminated rubber bearing which provides lateral flexibility while supplying high vertical load-carrying capacity and an auxiliary device made of multiple loops SMA wires. The SMA device offers additional energy dissipating and re-centering capability. A threespan continuous bridge is modeled with SMA/rubber-based isolation system. Numerical simulations of the bridge are conducted for various historical ground motions that are spectrally matched to a target design spectrum. The normalized yield strength, yield displacement and pre-stress level of the SMA device and ambient temperature are selected as parameters of the sensitivity study. The variation of seismic response of the bridge with considered parameters is assessed. The optimum values of the normalized yield strength and the yield displacement of the SMA device is found to be in the range of 0.20-0.25 and 40-50 mm, respectively. Also, the SMA/rubber-based isolation system is observed to be more effective when the SMA device is pre-stressed. In addition, it is found that ambient temperature considerably affects the performance of the bridge isolated by SMA/rubber-based isolators.

  14. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-31

    dyn-cm. It can be seen that there is a wide range of the potential con- tribution of different seismic zones to excitation of the Chandler wobble ...Correction to the Excitation of the Chandler Wobble by Earthquakes," Geophys. J. R. Astron. Soc. 32, 203-217 (1973). 22. S. C. Solomon, N. H. Sleep

  15. Seismic Tomography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Don L.; Dziewonski, Adam M.

    1984-01-01

    Describes how seismic tomography is used to analyze the waves produced by earthquakes. The information obtained from the procedure can then be used to map the earth's mantle in three dimensions. The resulting maps are then studied to determine such information as the convective flow that propels the crustal plates. (JN)

  16. A Site Characterization Protocol for Evaluating the Potential for Triggered or Induced Seismicity Resulting from Wastewater Injection and Hydraulic Fracturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Zoback, M. D.; Gupta, A.; Baker, J.; Beroza, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    Regulatory and governmental agencies, individual companies and industry groups and others have recently proposed, or are developing, guidelines aimed at reducing the risk associated with earthquakes triggered by waste water injection or hydraulic fracturing. While there are a number of elements common to the guidelines proposed, not surprisingly, there are also some significant differences among them and, in a number of cases, important considerations that are not addressed. The goal of this work is to develop a comprehensive protocol for site characterization based on a rigorous scientific understanding of the responsible processes. Topics addressed will include the geologic setting (emphasizing faults that might be affected), historical seismicity, hydraulic characterization of injection and adjacent intervals, geomechanical characterization to identify potentially active faults, plans for seismic monitoring and reporting, plans for monitoring and reporting injection (pressure, volumes, and rates), other factors contributing to risk (potentially affected population centers, structures, and facilities), and implementing a modified Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA). The guidelines will be risk based and adaptable, rather than prescriptive, for a proposed activity and region of interest. They will be goal oriented and will rely, to the degree possible, on established best practice procedures, referring to existing procedures and recommendations. By developing a risk-based site characterization protocol, we hope to contribute to the development of rational and effective measures for reducing the risk posed by activities that potentially trigger earthquakes.

  17. Geologic site evaluation for siting of municipal solid waste landfill in the southeast Missouri seismic impact zone of Stoddard County

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, J.B. )

    1993-03-01

    A combined permit application and design report for a 5 E6 cubic yard (50-ac) private-sector municipal solid waste landfill (MSWLF) was submitted to Missouri Department of Natural Resources in June 1992. This facility is located in a seismic impact zone (as defined under 40 CFR 257 and 258; the new [Oct. 1992] USEPA Subtitle D regulations). These zones are considered to represent potential ground motions > 0.10 g. Subtitle D regulations generally preclude siting of MSWLFs in seismic impact zones, unless a waiver can be obtained through demonstration of appropriate seismic-withstand design, as based on site geologic conditions. The proposed MSWLF lies in an area expected to experience a potential maximum horizontal ground acceleration of 0.3 g. The current permit application is based on favorable site geologic conditions; (1) relatively deep ground water, (2) dense, cohesive foundation soil, (3) considerable natural subgrade depths of 13 to 18 feet of Paleocene-aged Porters Creek Formation. Above the natural clay subgrade of in-situ hydraulic conductivity of 10--8 cm/sec., a Porter Creek high-plasticity, fat-clay (CH; USCS) liner will be recompacted to a 2-ft-thickness.

  18. Inversion of ambient seismic noise HVSR to evaluate velocity and structural models of the Lower Tagus Basin, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borges, J. F.; Silva, H. G.; Torres, R. J. G.; Caldeira, B.; Bezzeghoud, M.; Furtado, J. A.; Carvalho, J.

    2016-07-01

    During its history, several significant earthquakes have shaken the Lower Tagus Valley (Portugal). These earthquakes were destructive; some strong earthquakes were produced by large ruptures in offshore structures located southwest of the Portuguese coastline, and other moderate earthquakes were produced by local faults. In recent years, several studies have successfully obtained strong-ground motion syntheses for the Lower Tagus Valley using the finite difference method. To confirm the velocity model of this sedimentary basin obtained from geophysical and geological data, we analysed the ambient seismic noise measurements by applying the horizontal to vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. This study reveals the dependence of the frequency and amplitude of the low-frequency (HVSR) peaks (0.2-2 Hz) on the sediment thickness. We have obtained the depth of the Cenozoic basement along a profile transversal to the basin by the inversion of these ratios, imposing constraints from seismic reflection, boreholes, seismic sounding and gravimetric and magnetic potentials. This technique enables us to improve the existing three-dimensional model of the Lower Tagus Valley structure. The improved model will be decisive for the improvement of strong motion predictions in the earthquake hazard analysis of this highly populated basin. The methodology discussed can be applied to any other sedimentary basin.

  19. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    The project started in 2008 as a sound installation, a collaboration between an artist, a barrel organ builder and a seismologist. The work differs from other attempts of sound transposition of seismic records. In this case seismic frequencies are not converted automatically into the "sound of the earthquake." However, it has been studied a musical translation system that, based on the organ tonal scale, generates a totally unexpected sequence of sounds which is intended to evoke the emotions aroused by the earthquake. The symphonies proposed in the project have somewhat peculiar origins: they in fact come to life from the translation of graphic tracks into a sound track. The graphic tracks in question are made up by copies of seismograms recorded during some earthquakes that have taken place around the world. Seismograms are translated into music by a sculpture-instrument, half a seismograph and half a barrel organ. The organ plays through holes practiced on paper. Adapting the documents to the instrument score, holes have been drilled on the waves' peaks. The organ covers about three tonal scales, starting from heavy and deep sounds it reaches up to high and jarring notes. The translation of the seismic records is based on a criterion that does match the highest sounds to larger amplitudes with lower ones to minors. Translating the seismogram in the organ score, the larger the amplitude of recorded waves, the more the seismogram covers the full tonal scale played by the barrel organ and the notes arouse an intense emotional response in the listener. Elisa Strinna's Seismic Symphonies installation becomes an unprecedented tool for emotional involvement, through which can be revived the memory of the greatest disasters of over a century of seismic history of the Earth. A bridge between art and science. Seismic Symphonies is also a symbolic inversion: the instrument of the organ is most commonly used in churches, and its sounds are derived from the heavens and

  20. An Independent Human Factors Analysis and Evaluation of the Emergency Medical Protocol Checklist for the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas; Whitmore, Mihriban; Ortiz, Rosie; Segal, Michele; Smart, Kieran; Hughes, Catherine

    2003-01-01

    Emergency medical capabilities aboard the ISS include a Crew Medical Officer (CMO) (not necessarily a physician), and back-up, resuscitation equipment, and a medical checklist. It is essential that CMOs have reliable, usable and informative medical protocols that can be carried out independently in flight. The study evaluates the existing ISS Medical Checklist layout against a checklist updated to reflect a human factors approach to structure and organization. Method: The ISS Medical checklist was divided into non-emergency and emergency sections, and re-organized based on alphabetical and a body systems approach. A desk-top evaluation examined the ability of subjects to navigate to specific medical problems identified as representative of likely non-emergency events. A second evaluation aims to focus on the emergency section of the Medical Checklist, based on the preliminary findings of the first. The final evaluation will use Astronaut CMOs as subjects comparing the original checklist against the updated layout in the task of caring for a "downed crewmember" using a Human Patient Simulator [Medical Education Technologies, Inc.]. Results: Initial results have demonstrated a clear improvement of the re-organized sections to determine the solution to the medical problems. There was no distinct advantage for either alternative, although subjects stated having a preference for the body systems approach. In the second evaluation, subjects will be asked to identify emergency medical conditions, with measures including correct diagnosis, time to completion and solution strategy. The third evaluation will compare the original and fully updated checklists in clinical situations. Conclusions: Initial findings indicate that the ISS Medical Checklist will benefit from a reorganization. The present structure of the checklist has evolved over recent years without systematic testing of crewmember ability to diagnose medical problems. The improvements are expected to enable ISS

  1. Evaluation of artificial neural network algorithms for predicting METs and activity type from accelerometer data: validation on an independent sample

    PubMed Central

    Lyden, Kate; Kozey-Keadle, Sarah; Staudenmayer, John

    2011-01-01

    Previous work from our laboratory provided a “proof of concept” for use of artificial neural networks (nnets) to estimate metabolic equivalents (METs) and identify activity type from accelerometer data (Staudenmayer J, Pober D, Crouter S, Bassett D, Freedson P, J Appl Physiol 107: 1330–1307, 2009). The purpose of this study was to develop new nnets based on a larger, more diverse, training data set and apply these nnet prediction models to an independent sample to evaluate the robustness and flexibility of this machine-learning modeling technique. The nnet training data set (University of Massachusetts) included 277 participants who each completed 11 activities. The independent validation sample (n = 65) (University of Tennessee) completed one of three activity routines. Criterion measures were 1) measured METs assessed using open-circuit indirect calorimetry; and 2) observed activity to identify activity type. The nnet input variables included five accelerometer count distribution features and the lag-1 autocorrelation. The bias and root mean square errors for the nnet MET trained on University of Massachusetts and applied to University of Tennessee were +0.32 and 1.90 METs, respectively. Seventy-seven percent of the activities were correctly classified as sedentary/light, moderate, or vigorous intensity. For activity type, household and locomotion activities were correctly classified by the nnet activity type 98.1 and 89.5% of the time, respectively, and sport was correctly classified 23.7% of the time. Use of this machine-learning technique operates reasonably well when applied to an independent sample. We propose the creation of an open-access activity dictionary, including accelerometer data from a broad array of activities, leading to further improvements in prediction accuracy for METs, activity intensity, and activity type. PMID:21885802

  2. An independent evaluation on the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of Toyama classification system for cervical dumbbell tumors.

    PubMed

    Yin, Mengchen; Huang, Quan; Sun, Zhengwang; Gao, Xin; Chen, Guanghui; He, Shaohui; Xia, Ye; Ma, Junming; Mo, Wen; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-03-01

    Dumbbell tumors can not only cause the compression of cervical cord and nerve root, but also invade the important structures and the surrounding organs, causing great harm to the patient. Toyama classification that is commonly used has not been evaluated and still requires independent validation.The objectives of this study were to evaluate and analyze the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of Toyama classification system, explore the differences, discover the shortages, and evaluate the clinical value for diagnosis.One hundred sixty-five consecutive patients of a cervical dumbbell tumor with complete clinical and radiologic data were enrolled. Six surgeons determined the classification according to Toyama system. The classification was repeated 12 weeks later. Correlation coefficient (ICC) and kappa coefficient (κ) test were used to determine interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility.The interobserver reliability for Toyama classification was moderate with a value of 0.432. The interobserver reproducibility for Toyama classification was moderate with a value of 0.608.The Toyama classification has landmark value in clinical practice, but it is a relatively cumbersome system. This study shows that it has low reliability and reproducibility. Accordingly, surgical management of the resection of dumbbell cervical tumors raises several problems, including preservation of the cervical nerve root, control of the vertebral artery, and maintenance of spine. There is a need to optimize the classification in the future.

  3. An independent evaluation on the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of Toyama classification system for cervical dumbbell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Mengchen; Huang, Quan; Sun, Zhengwang; Gao, Xin; Chen, Guanghui; He, Shaohui; Xia, Ye; Ma, Junming; Mo, Wen; Xiao, Jianru

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Dumbbell tumors can not only cause the compression of cervical cord and nerve root, but also invade the important structures and the surrounding organs, causing great harm to the patient. Toyama classification that is commonly used has not been evaluated and still requires independent validation. The objectives of this study were to evaluate and analyze the interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility of Toyama classification system, explore the differences, discover the shortages, and evaluate the clinical value for diagnosis. One hundred sixty-five consecutive patients of a cervical dumbbell tumor with complete clinical and radiologic data were enrolled. Six surgeons determined the classification according to Toyama system. The classification was repeated 12 weeks later. Correlation coefficient (ICC) and kappa coefficient (κ) test were used to determine interobserver reliability and intraobserver reproducibility. The interobserver reliability for Toyama classification was moderate with a value of 0.432. The interobserver reproducibility for Toyama classification was moderate with a value of 0.608. The Toyama classification has landmark value in clinical practice, but it is a relatively cumbersome system. This study shows that it has low reliability and reproducibility. Accordingly, surgical management of the resection of dumbbell cervical tumors raises several problems, including preservation of the cervical nerve root, control of the vertebral artery, and maintenance of spine. There is a need to optimize the classification in the future. PMID:28272207

  4. Global environment facility: Independent evaluation of the pilot phase; Fonds pour l`environnement mondial: evaluation independante de la phase pilote

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    This study responds to a request by participants in the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for an independent evaluation of the pilot phase. It profiles the GEF, discusses its policy framework, and reviews project development procedures and the strategies and projects in each of the GEF`s four focal areas. The study concludes that fundamental changes must occur and recommends specific reforms, such as articulating more clearly the GEF`s mandate, objectives, and strategies; addressing deficiencies in meeting its global focus; improving capacities and procedures within implementing agencies for managing the portfolio; and increasing non-government organization (NGO), country and community-level participation.

  5. Who is Responsible for Evaluating the Safety and Effectiveness of Medical Devices? The Role of Independent Technology Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Amy J.; Karliner, Leah S.; Tice, Jeffrey A.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The global medical technology industry brings thousands of devices to market every year. However, significant gaps persist in the scientific literature, in the medical device approval process, and in the realm of postmarketing surveillance. Although thousands of drugs obtain approval only after review in randomized controlled trials, relatively few new medical devices are subject to comparable scrutiny. Objective To improve health outcomes, we must enhance our scrutiny of medical devices, and, without simply deferring to the Food and Drug Administration, we must ask ourselves: Who is responsible for evaluating the safety and effectiveness of medical devices? Conclusions Technology assessments by independent organizations are a part of the solution to this challenge and may motivate further research focused on patient outcomes. PMID:18095046

  6. Electrical conduction of organic ultrathin films evaluated by an independently driven double-tip scanning tunneling microscope.

    PubMed

    Takami, K; Tsuruta, S; Miyake, Y; Akai-Kasaya, M; Saito, A; Aono, M; Kuwahara, Y

    2011-11-02

    The electrical transport properties of organic thin films within the micrometer scale have been evaluated by a laboratory-built independently driven double-tip scanning tunneling microscope, operating under ambient conditions. The two tips were used as point contact electrodes, and current in the range from 0.1 pA to 100 nA flowing between the two tips through the material can be detected. We demonstrated two-dimensional contour mapping of the electrical resistance on a poly(3-octylthiophene) thin films as shown below. The obtained contour map clearly provided an image of two-dimensional electrical conductance between two point electrodes on the poly(3-octylthiophene) thin film. The conductivity of the thin film was estimated to be (1-8) × 10(-6) S cm(-1). Future prospects and the desired development of multiprobe STMs are also discussed.

  7. Seismic Gradiometry using Ambient Seismic Noise in an Anisotropic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Curtis, A.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a wavefield gradiometry technique to estimate both isotropic and anisotropic local medium characteristics from short recordings of seismic signals by inverting a wave equation. The method exploits the information in the spatial gradients of a seismic wavefield that are calculated using dense deployments of seismic arrays. The application of the method uses the surface wave energy in the ambient seismic field. To estimate isotropic and anisotropic medium properties we invert an elliptically anisotropic wave equation. The spatial derivatives of the recorded wavefield are evaluated by calculating finite differences over nearby recordings, which introduces a systematic anisotropic error. A two step approach corrects this error: finite difference stencils are first calibrated, then the output of the wave-equation inversion is corrected using the linearized impulse response to the inverted velocity anomaly. We test the procedure on ambient seismic noise recorded in a large and dense ocean bottom cable array installed over Ekofisk field. The estimated azimuthal anisotropy forms a circular geometry around the production-induced subsidence bowl. This conforms with results from studies employing controlled sources, and with interferometry correlating long records of seismic noise. Yet in this example, the results where obtained using only a few minutes of ambient seismic noise.

  8. Seismic Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-03-31

    Determining Phase and Group Velocities of Surface Seismic Waves 21 B. Group-Velocity Measurements Across Eurasia from Mashad SRO 22 C. Group-Velocity...Albuquerque), MAIO ( Mashad ), GUMO (Guam), NWAO (Australia), SNZO (New Zealand), and TATO (Taiwan). Fairly extensive data are now a|ailable for the...include a new rapid algorithm for the determination of group and phase velocity, a series of observations of Rayleigh-wave dispersion at the Mashad

  9. Seismic testing

    SciTech Connect

    Knott, S.

    1981-10-01

    Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research programs in seismic testing to improve earthquake design guidelines lowers the safety-design costs of nuclear power plants. Explosive tests that simulate earthquakes help to determine how structures respond to ground motion and how these are related to soil and geologic conditions at a specific site. Explosive tests develop data for simulation using several computer codes. Photographs illustrate testing techniques. 6 references. (DCK)

  10. Assessment of seismic loss dependence using copula.

    PubMed

    Goda, Katsuichiro; Ren, Jiandong

    2010-07-01

    The catastrophic nature of seismic risk is attributed to spatiotemporal correlation of seismic losses of buildings and infrastructure. For seismic risk management, such correlated seismic effects must be adequately taken into account, since they affect the probability distribution of aggregate seismic losses of spatially distributed structures significantly, and its upper tail behavior can be of particular importance. To investigate seismic loss dependence for two closely located portfolios of buildings, simulated seismic loss samples, which are obtained from a seismic risk model of spatially distributed buildings by taking spatiotemporally correlated ground motions into account, are employed. The characterization considers a loss frequency model that incorporates one dependent random component acting as a common shock to all buildings, and a copula-based loss severity model, which facilitates the separate construction of marginal loss distribution functions and nonlinear copula function with upper tail dependence. The proposed method is applied to groups of wood-frame buildings located in southwestern British Columbia. Analysis results indicate that the dependence structure of aggregate seismic losses can be adequately modeled by the right heavy tail copula or Gumbel copula, and that for the considered example, overall accuracy of the proposed method is satisfactory at probability levels of practical interest (at most 10% estimation error of fractiles of aggregate seismic loss). The developed statistical seismic loss model may be adopted in dynamic financial analysis for achieving faster evaluation with reasonable accuracy.

  11. SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR PRECLOSURE SAFETY

    SciTech Connect

    E.N. Lindner

    2004-12-03

    The purpose of this seismic preclosure safety analysis is to identify the potential seismically-initiated event sequences associated with preclosure operations of the repository at Yucca Mountain and assign appropriate design bases to provide assurance of achieving the performance objectives specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 10 CFR Part 63 for radiological consequences. This seismic preclosure safety analysis is performed in support of the License Application for the Yucca Mountain Project. In more detail, this analysis identifies the systems, structures, and components (SSCs) that are subject to seismic design bases. This analysis assigns one of two design basis ground motion (DBGM) levels, DBGM-1 or DBGM-2, to SSCs important to safety (ITS) that are credited in the prevention or mitigation of seismically-initiated event sequences. An application of seismic margins approach is also demonstrated for SSCs assigned to DBGM-2 by showing a high confidence of a low probability of failure at a higher ground acceleration value, termed a beyond-design basis ground motion (BDBGM) level. The objective of this analysis is to meet the performance requirements of 10 CFR 63.111(a) and 10 CFR 63.111(b) for offsite and worker doses. The results of this calculation are used as inputs to the following: (1) A classification analysis of SSCs ITS by identifying potential seismically-initiated failures (loss of safety function) that could lead to undesired consequences; (2) An assignment of either DBGM-1 or DBGM-2 to each SSC ITS credited in the prevention or mitigation of a seismically-initiated event sequence; and (3) A nuclear safety design basis report that will state the seismic design requirements that are credited in this analysis. The present analysis reflects the design information available as of October 2004 and is considered preliminary. The evolving design of the repository will be re-evaluated periodically to ensure that seismic hazards are properly

  12. Quantitative profiling of polar metabolites in herbal medicine injections for multivariate statistical evaluation based on independence principal component analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Miaomiao; Jiao, Yujiao; Wang, Yuefei; Xu, Lei; Wang, Meng; Zhao, Buchang; Jia, Lifu; Pan, Hao; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiumei

    2014-01-01

    Botanical primary metabolites extensively exist in herbal medicine injections (HMIs), but often were ignored to control. With the limitation of bias towards hydrophilic substances, the primary metabolites with strong polarity, such as saccharides, amino acids and organic acids, are usually difficult to detect by the routinely applied reversed-phase chromatographic fingerprint technology. In this study, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) profiling method was developed for efficient identification and quantification of small polar molecules, mostly primary metabolites in HMIs. A commonly used medicine, Danhong injection (DHI), was employed as a model. With the developed method, 23 primary metabolites together with 7 polyphenolic acids were simultaneously identified, of which 13 metabolites with fully separated proton signals were quantified and employed for further multivariate quality control assay. The quantitative 1H NMR method was validated with good linearity, precision, repeatability, stability and accuracy. Based on independence principal component analysis (IPCA), the contents of 13 metabolites were characterized and dimensionally reduced into the first two independence principal components (IPCs). IPC1 and IPC2 were then used to calculate the upper control limits (with 99% confidence ellipsoids) of χ2 and Hotelling T2 control charts. Through the constructed upper control limits, the proposed method was successfully applied to 36 batches of DHI to examine the out-of control sample with the perturbed levels of succinate, malonate, glucose, fructose, salvianic acid and protocatechuic aldehyde. The integrated strategy has provided a reliable approach to identify and quantify multiple polar metabolites of DHI in one fingerprinting spectrum, and it has also assisted in the establishment of IPCA models for the multivariate statistical evaluation of HMIs.

  13. Progress in Evaluating Potential EM Earthquake Precursors: Comparison of Independent Ultra Low-Frequency Electro-Magnetic (ULFEM) Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Glen, J. M. G.; Klemperer, S. L.; Christman, L.; Bleier, T.; Dunson, J. C.; DeKlotz, M.

    2014-12-01

    Ultra-low frequency anomalies in the magnetic and electric fields have been reported prior to several earthquakes. Because most prominent ULFEM anomalies have thus far only been observed on individual stations, some authors have argued that some of these anomalies have an instrumental cause, rather than being earthquake precursors. Two independent ULFEM networks are presently operating in the greater San Francisco Bay Area; one managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Stanford University and the other by QuakeFinder (QF).The case that these anomalies are not instrumental would be strengthened by a demonstration that identical anomalies are seen on the two networks, despite their different components (magnetometers, digitizers and telemetry). A detailed comparison of the two systems will allow data from each of the two networks to be used to confirm anomalies and to evaluate potential precursor signals. To provide this comparison, the USGS-Stanford and QF acquired data on two independent ULFEM systems at the USGS-Stanford ULFEM station located at the Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve, CA, from March 31-May 13, 2014. The two systems were set up~50m from each other and away from potential sources of noise. Both systems recorded the magnetic field with induction coils oriented along the three cardinal directions aligned with magnetic north. The results of this experiment reveal that the two systems have very similar response functions and comparable noise and drift characteristics. Both complex "noise" (a, b) and single discrete pulses (c, d) were recorded with essentially identical characteristics by the two systems. We also found, in a few instances, where the signals were observed on one system but were absent on the other, clearly indicating either internal system noise or reflecting extremely local site phenomena affecting a single system. Future efforts will involve analyses of pulses, spectral characteristics, correlation coefficients and noise.

  14. Evaluation of Ki-67 Staining Levels as an Independent Biomarker of Biochemical Recurrence After Salvage Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Alexander S.; Heckman, Michael G.; Wu, Kevin J.; Crook, Julia E.; Hilton, Tracy W.; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Bernard, Johnny R.; Schild, Steven E.; Khor, Li Yan; Hammond, Elizabeth H.; Pollack, Alan; Buskirk, Steven J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: We recently published a scoring algorithm to predict biochemical recurrence (BCR) after salvage radiation therapy (SRT) for prostate cancer. Currently, this algorithm is based on clinicopathologic features and does not incorporate information from tumor-based biomarkers. Herein, we evaluate the ability of Ki-67 staining in primary prostate cancer to independently aid in the prediction of BCR among men undergoing SRT. Methods and Materials: We identified 147 patients who were treated with SRT between July 1987 and July 2003 at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN; Jacksonville, FL; Scottsdale, AZ). Staining levels of Ki-67 in primary tumor samples were detected by use of a monoclonal antibody and quantified by use of a computer-assisted method. We used Cox proportional hazards models to examine the association of Ki-67 staining and BCR in single-variable models and after multivariable adjustment. Results: The risk of BCR for men with tumors in the highest tertile of Ki-67 staining is approximately two times that for men with tumors in the lower two tertiles (relative risk, 2.02; 95% confidence interval, 1.23-3.32; p = 0.005) after adjustment for the features in our original scoring algorithm. Further adjustment for additional covariates did not attenuate this association. Evidence from concordance index values supports that Ki-67 staining adds to the predictive ability of our existing scoring algorithm. Conclusions: Our data suggest that higher levels of Ki-67 staining are associated with increased risk of BCR after SRT, independent of existing clinicopathologic covariates. Future studies involving larger numbers of patients are required to validate these results and also explore possible means of combining this biomarker with existing prognostic tools.

  15. Precipitation and Latent Heating Distributions from Satellite Passive Microwave Radiometry. Part 2; Evaluation of Estimates Using Independent Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Song; Olson, William S.; Wang, Jian-Jian; Bell, Thomas L.; Smith, Eric A.; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2004-01-01

    Rainfall rate estimates from space-borne k&ents are generally accepted as reliable by a majority of the atmospheric science commu&y. One-of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRh4M) facility rain rate algorithms is based upon passive microwave observations fiom the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI). Part I of this study describes improvements in the TMI algorithm that are required to introduce cloud latent heating and drying as additional algorithm products. Here, estimates of surface rain rate, convective proportion, and latent heating are evaluated using independent ground-based estimates and satellite products. Instantaneous, OP5resolution estimates of surface rain rate over ocean fiom the improved TMI algorithm are well correlated with independent radar estimates (r approx. 0.88 over the Tropics), but bias reduction is the most significant improvement over forerunning algorithms. The bias reduction is attributed to the greater breadth of cloud-resolving model simulations that support the improved algorithm, and the more consistent and specific convective/stratiform rain separation method utilized. The bias of monthly, 2.5 deg. -resolution estimates is similarly reduced, with comparable correlations to radar estimates. Although the amount of independent latent heating data are limited, TMI estimated latent heating profiles compare favorably with instantaneous estimates based upon dual-Doppler radar observations, and time series of surface rain rate and heating profiles are generally consistent with those derived from rawinsonde analyses. Still, some biases in profile shape are evident, and these may be resolved with: (a) additional contextual information brought to the estimation problem, and/or; (b) physically-consistent and representative databases supporting the algorithm. A model of the random error in instantaneous, 0.5 deg-resolution rain rate estimates appears to be consistent with the levels of error determined from TMI comparisons to collocated radar

  16. Time-dependent seismic tomography

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2010-01-01

    Of methods for measuring temporal changes in seismic-wave speeds in the Earth, seismic tomography is among those that offer the highest spatial resolution. 3-D tomographic methods are commonly applied in this context by inverting seismic wave arrival time data sets from different epochs independently and assuming that differences in the derived structures represent real temporal variations. This assumption is dangerous because the results of independent inversions would differ even if the structure in the Earth did not change, due to observational errors and differences in the seismic ray distributions. The latter effect may be especially severe when data sets include earthquake swarms or aftershock sequences, and may produce the appearance of correlation between structural changes and seismicity when the wave speeds are actually temporally invariant. A better approach, which makes it possible to assess what changes are truly required by the data, is to invert multiple data sets simultaneously, minimizing the difference between models for different epochs as well as the rms arrival-time residuals. This problem leads, in the case of two epochs, to a system of normal equations whose order is twice as great as for a single epoch. The direct solution of this system would require twice as much memory and four times as much computational effort as would independent inversions. We present an algorithm, tomo4d, that takes advantage of the structure and sparseness of the system to obtain the solution with essentially no more effort than independent inversions require. No claim to original US government works Journal compilation ?? 2010 RAS.

  17. Evaluation of the "e-rater"® Scoring Engine for the "TOEFL"® Independent and Integrated Prompts. Research Report. ETS RR-12-06

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramineni, Chaitanya; Trapani, Catherine S.; Williamson, David M.; Davey, Tim; Bridgeman, Brent

    2012-01-01

    Scoring models for the "e-rater"® system were built and evaluated for the "TOEFL"® exam's independent and integrated writing prompts. Prompt-specific and generic scoring models were built, and evaluation statistics, such as weighted kappas, Pearson correlations, standardized differences in mean scores, and correlations with…

  18. An evaluation of the seismicity of the Nevada Test Site and vicinity; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Vortman, L.J.

    1991-12-01

    Two USGS catalogs of earthquakes in the Southern Great Basin were edited to remove man-made seisms. Editing reduced 11,988 entries to 8,161. Known location of underground nuclear explosions provided an opportunity to assess location accuracy showing that accuracy differed according to the source of earthquake data. No evidence was found of explosions triggering earthquakes distant from the working points. Relationships are developed between earthquake magnitude and explosion yield for explosions at Pahute Mesa and Yucca Flat. Comparison of the number of underground nuclear explosions with the number of earthquakes of comparable magnitude shows the former exceeds the latter when magnitude is greater than four. Edited catalogs are recommended for hazard analysis relative to repository siting because unedited catalogs tend to greatly exaggerate seismicity of the region.

  19. A metastasis or a second independent cancer? Evaluating the clonal origin of tumors using array copy number data.

    PubMed

    Ostrovnaya, Irina; Olshen, Adam B; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Orlow, Irene; Albertson, Donna G; Begg, Colin B

    2010-07-10

    When a cancer patient develops a new tumor it is necessary to determine if it is a recurrence (metastasis) of the original cancer, or an entirely new occurrence of the disease. This is accomplished by assessing the histo-pathology of the lesions. However, there are many clinical scenarios in which this pathological diagnosis is difficult. Since each tumor is characterized by a distinct pattern of somatic mutations, a more definitive diagnosis is possible in principle in these difficult clinical scenarios by comparing the two patterns. In this article we develop and evaluate a statistical strategy for this comparison when the data are derived from array copy number data, designed to identify all of the somatic allelic gains and losses across the genome. First a segmentation algorithm is used to estimate the regions of allelic gain and loss. The correlation in these patterns between the two tumors is assessed, and this is complemented with more precise quantitative comparisons of each plausibly clonal mutation within individual chromosome arms. The results are combined to determine a likelihood ratio to distinguish clonal tumor pairs (metastases) from independent second primaries. Our data analyses show that in many cases a strong clonal signal emerges. Sensitivity analyses show that most of the diagnoses are robust when the data are of high quality.

  20. LANL seismic screening method for existing buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dickson, S.L.; Feller, K.C.; Fritz de la Orta, G.O.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Seismic Screening Method is to provide a comprehensive, rational, and inexpensive method for evaluating the relative seismic integrity of a large building inventory using substantial life-safety as the minimum goal. The substantial life-safety goal is deemed to be satisfied if the extent of structural damage or nonstructural component damage does not pose a significant risk to human life. The screening is limited to Performance Category (PC) -0, -1, and -2 buildings and structures. Because of their higher performance objectives, PC-3 and PC-4 buildings automatically fail the LANL Seismic Screening Method and will be subject to a more detailed seismic analysis. The Laboratory has also designated that PC-0, PC-1, and PC-2 unreinforced masonry bearing wall and masonry infill shear wall buildings fail the LANL Seismic Screening Method because of their historically poor seismic performance or complex behavior. These building types are also recommended for a more detailed seismic analysis. The results of the LANL Seismic Screening Method are expressed in terms of separate scores for potential configuration or physical hazards (Phase One) and calculated capacity/demand ratios (Phase Two). This two-phase method allows the user to quickly identify buildings that have adequate seismic characteristics and structural capacity and screen them out from further evaluation. The resulting scores also provide a ranking of those buildings found to be inadequate. Thus, buildings not passing the screening can be rationally prioritized for further evaluation. For the purpose of complying with Executive Order 12941, the buildings failing the LANL Seismic Screening Method are deemed to have seismic deficiencies, and cost estimates for mitigation must be prepared. Mitigation techniques and cost-estimate guidelines are not included in the LANL Seismic Screening Method.

  1. Are seismic hazard assessment errors and earthquake surprises unavoidable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kossobokov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    Why earthquake occurrences bring us so many surprises? The answer seems evident if we review the relationships that are commonly used to assess seismic hazard. The time-span of physically reliable Seismic History is yet a small portion of a rupture recurrence cycle at an earthquake-prone site, which makes premature any kind of reliable probabilistic statements about narrowly localized seismic hazard. Moreover, seismic evidences accumulated to-date demonstrate clearly that most of the empirical relations commonly accepted in the early history of instrumental seismology can be proved erroneous when testing statistical significance is applied. Seismic events, including mega-earthquakes, cluster displaying behaviors that are far from independent or periodic. Their distribution in space is possibly fractal, definitely, far from uniform even in a single segment of a fault zone. Such a situation contradicts generally accepted assumptions used for analytically tractable or computer simulations and complicates design of reliable methodologies for realistic earthquake hazard assessment, as well as search and definition of precursory behaviors to be used for forecast/prediction purposes. As a result, the conclusions drawn from such simulations and analyses can MISLEAD TO SCIENTIFICALLY GROUNDLESS APPLICATION, which is unwise and extremely dangerous in assessing expected societal risks and losses. For example, a systematic comparison of the GSHAP peak ground acceleration estimates with those related to actual strong earthquakes, unfortunately, discloses gross inadequacy of this "probabilistic" product, which appears UNACCEPTABLE FOR ANY KIND OF RESPONSIBLE SEISMIC RISK EVALUATION AND KNOWLEDGEABLE DISASTER PREVENTION. The self-evident shortcomings and failures of GSHAP appeals to all earthquake scientists and engineers for an urgent revision of the global seismic hazard maps from the first principles including background methodologies involved, such that there becomes: (a) a

  2. Romanian Educational Seismic Network Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataru, Dragos; Ionescu, Constantin; Zaharia, Bogdan; Grecu, Bogdan; Tibu, Speranta; Popa, Mihaela; Borleanu, Felix; Toma, Dragos; Brisan, Nicoleta; Georgescu, Emil-Sever; Dobre, Daniela; Dragomir, Claudiu-Sorin

    2013-04-01

    will be installed in several schools in the most important seismic areas (Vrancea, Dobrogea), vulnerable cities (Bucharest, Ploiesti, Iasi) or high populated places (Cluj, Sibiu, Timisoara, Zalău). All the elements of the seismic station are especially designed for educational purposes and can be operated independently by the students and teachers themselves. The first stage of ROEDUSEIS project was centered on the work of achievement of educational materials for all levels of pre-university education (kindergarten, primary, secondary and high school). A study of necessity preceded the achievement of educational materials. This was done through a set of questionnaires for teachers and students sent to participating schools. Their responses formed a feedback instrument for properly materials editing. The topics covered within educational materials include: seismicity (general principles, characteristics of Romanian seismicity, historical local events), structure of the Earth, measuring of earthquakes, seismic hazard and risk.

  3. Novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets based on acid-independent mechanism: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Kan, Shuling; Zhao, Yi; Zhang, Wenli; Liu, Jianping

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop the novel naproxen/esomeprazole magnesium compound pellets (novel-NAP/EMZ) depending on EMZ acid-independent mechanism which has been proved to be predominate in the mechanism of co-therapy with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. The novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, composed of NAP colon-specific pellets (NAP-CSPs) and EMZ modified-release pellets (EMZ-MRPs), were prepared by fluid-bed coating technology with desired in vitro release profiles. The resulting pellets were filled into hard gelatin capsules for in vivo evaluation in rats and compared with the reference compound pellets, consisted of NAP enteric-coated pellets (NAP-ECPs) and EMZ immediate-release pellets (EMZ-IRPs). The reference compound pellets were prepared simulating the drug delivery system of VIMOVO(®). In vivo pharmacokinetics, EMZ-MRPs had significantly larger AUC0-t (p < 0.01), 1.67 times more than that of EMZ-IRPs, and prolonged mean residence time (7.55 ± 0.12 h) than that of IRPs (1.46 ± 0.39 h). NAP-CSPs and NAP-ECPs showed similar AUC0-t. Compared to the reference compound pellets, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets did not show distinct differences in histological mucosal morphology. However, biochemical tests exhibited enhanced total antioxidant capacity, increased nitric oxide content and reduced malondialdehyde level for novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets, indicating that the acid-independent action took effect. The gastric pH values of novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets were at a low and stable level, which could ensure normal physiological range of human gastric pH. As a result, the novel-NAP/EMZ compound pellets may be a more suitable formulation with potential advantages by improving bioavailability of drug and further reducing undesirable gastrointestinal damages.

  4. Causality between expansion of seismic cloud and maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuhira, Yusuke; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Ito, Takatoshi; Häring, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Occurrence of induced seismicity with large magnitude is critical environmental issues associated with fluid injection for shale gas/oil extraction, waste water disposal, carbon capture and storage, and engineered geothermal systems (EGS). Studies for prediction of the hazardous seismicity and risk assessment of induced seismicity has been activated recently. Many of these studies are based on the seismological statistics and these models use the information of the occurrence time and event magnitude. We have originally developed physics based model named "possible seismic moment model" to evaluate seismic activity and assess seismic moment which can be ready to release. This model is totally based on microseismic information of occurrence time, hypocenter location and magnitude (seismic moment). This model assumes existence of representative parameter having physical meaning that release-able seismic moment per rock volume (seismic moment density) at given field. Seismic moment density is to be estimated from microseismic distribution and their seismic moment. In addition to this, stimulated rock volume is also inferred by progress of microseismic cloud at given time and this quantity can be interpreted as the rock volume which can release seismic energy due to weakening effect of normal stress by injected fluid. Product of these two parameters (equation (1)) provide possible seismic moment which can be released from current stimulated zone as a model output. Difference between output of this model and observed cumulative seismic moment corresponds the seismic moment which will be released in future, based on current stimulation conditions. This value can be translated into possible maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in future. As this way, possible seismic moment can be used to have feedback to hydraulic stimulation operation in real time as an index which can be interpreted easily and intuitively. Possible seismic moment is defined as equation (1), where D

  5. An evaluation of density-dependent and density-independent influences on population growth rates in Weddell seals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rotella, J.J.; Link, W.A.; Nichols, J.D.; Hadley, G.L.; Garrott, R.A.; Proffitt, K.M.

    2009-01-01

    Much of the existing literature that evaluates the roles of density-dependent and density-independent factors on population dynamics has been called into question in recent years because measurement errors were not properly dealt with in analyses. Using state-space models to account for measurement errors, we evaluated a set of competing models for a 22-year time series of mark-resight estimates of abundance for a breeding population of female Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) studied in Erebus Bay, Antarctica. We tested for evidence of direct density dependence in growth rates and evaluated whether equilibrium population size was related to seasonal sea-ice extent and the Southern Oscillation Index (SOI). We found strong evidence of negative density dependence in annual growth rates for a population whose estimated size ranged from 438 to 623 females during the study. Based on Bayes factors, a density-dependence-only model was favored over models that also included en! vironmental covariates. According to the favored model, the population had a stationary distribution with a mean of 497 females (SD = 60.5), an expected growth rate of 1.10 (95% credible interval 1.08-1.15) when population size was 441 females, and a rate of 0.90 (95% credible interval 0.87-0.93) for a population of 553 females. A model including effects of SOI did receive some support and indicated a positive relationship between SOI and population size. However, effects of SOI were not large, and including the effect did not greatly reduce our estimate of process variation. We speculate that direct density dependence occurred because rates of adult survival, breeding, and temporary emigration were affected by limitations on per capita food resources and space for parturition and pup-rearing. To improve understanding of the relative roles of various demographic components and their associated vital rates to population growth rate, mark-recapture methods can be applied that incorporate both

  6. Infrasound Generation from the HH Seismic Hammer.

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kyle Richard

    2014-10-01

    The HH Seismic hammer is a large, "weight-drop" source for active source seismic experiments. This system provides a repetitive source that can be stacked for subsurface imaging and exploration studies. Although the seismic hammer was designed for seismological studies it was surmised that it might produce energy in the infrasonic frequency range due to the ground motion generated by the 13 metric ton drop mass. This study demonstrates that the seismic hammer generates a consistent acoustic source that could be used for in-situ sensor characterization, array evaluation and surface-air coupling studies for source characterization.

  7. "The Most Important Thing Is to Learn the Way to Learn": Evaluating the Effectiveness of Independent Learning by Perceptual Changes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lau, Ken

    2017-01-01

    The mission of universities today is not only to nurture experts in various professions, but also to cultivate lifelong autonomous learners. Independent learning and pedagogies that aim to foster learner autonomy have grown in importance over the past decade. However, the extent to which independent learning is successful in fostering autonomy has…

  8. Novel 3-D cell culture system for in vitro evaluation of anticancer drugs under anchorage-independent conditions.

    PubMed

    Aihara, Ayako; Abe, Natsuki; Saruhashi, Koichiro; Kanaki, Tatsuro; Nishino, Taito

    2016-12-01

    Anticancer drug discovery efforts have used 2-D cell-based assay models, which fail to forecast in vivo efficacy and result in a lower success rate of clinical approval. Recent 3-D cell culture models are expected to bridge the gap between 2-D and in vivo models. However, 3-D cell culture methods that are available for practical anticancer drug screening have not yet been fully attained. In this study, we screened several polymers for their ability to suspend cells or cell spheroids homogeneously in a liquid medium without changing the viscosity behavior, and identified gellan gum (FP001), as the most potent polymer. FP001 promoted cell dispersion in the medium and improved the proliferation of a wide range of cancer cell lines under low attachment conditions by inhibiting the formation of large-sized spheroids. In addition, cancer cells cultured with FP001-containing medium were more susceptible to inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling than those cultured under attachment conditions. We also showed that ligands of the EGF receptor family clearly enhance proliferation of SKOV3 ovarian carcinoma cells under anchorage-independent conditions with FP001. Consistent with this result, the cells grown with FP001 showed higher EGF receptor content compared with cells cultured under attachment conditions. In conclusion, we developed a novel 3-D cell culture system that is available for high throughput screening of anticancer agents, and is suitable for evaluation of molecular-targeted anticancer drugs. Three-dimensional cell culture using FP001 will be of value in the development of useful technologies for anticancer drug discovery.

  9. Evaluation of a moderate resolution, satellite-based impervious surface map using an independent, high-resolution validation data set

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, J.W.; Jarnagin, T.

    2009-01-01

    Given the relatively high cost of mapping impervious surfaces at regional scales, substantial effort is being expended in the development of moderate-resolution, satellite-based methods for estimating impervious surface area (ISA). To rigorously assess the accuracy of these data products high quality, independently derived validation data are needed. High-resolution data were collected across a gradient of development within the Mid-Atlantic region to assess the accuracy of National Land Cover Data (NLCD) Landsat-based ISA estimates. Absolute error (satellite predicted area - "reference area") and relative error [satellite (predicted area - "reference area")/ "reference area"] were calculated for each of 240 sample regions that are each more than 15 Landsat pixels on a side. The ability to compile and examine ancillary data in a geographic information system environment provided for evaluation of both validation and NLCD data and afforded efficient exploration of observed errors. In a minority of cases, errors could be explained by temporal discontinuities between the date of satellite image capture and validation source data in rapidly changing places. In others, errors were created by vegetation cover over impervious surfaces and by other factors that bias the satellite processing algorithms. On average in the Mid-Atlantic region, the NLCD product underestimates ISA by approximately 5%. While the error range varies between 2 and 8%, this underestimation occurs regardless of development intensity. Through such analyses the errors, strengths, and weaknesses of particular satellite products can be explored to suggest appropriate uses for regional, satellite-based data in rapidly developing areas of environmental significance. ?? 2009 ASCE.

  10. An engineering rock classification to evaluate seismic rock-fall susceptibility and its application to the Wasatch Front

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harp, E.L.; Noble, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of earthquakes world wide show that rock falls are the most abundant type of landslide that is triggered by earthquakes. An engineering classification originally used in tunnel design, known as the rock mass quality designation (Q), was modified for use in rating the susceptibility of rock slopes to seismically-induced failure. Analysis of rock-fall concentrations and Q-values for the 1980 earthquake sequence near Mammoth Lakes, California, defines a well-constrained upper bound that shows the number of rock falls per site decreases rapidly with increasing Q. Because of the similarities of lithology and slope between the Eastern Sierra Nevada Range near Mammoth Lakes and the Wasatch Front near Salt Lake City, Utah, the probabilities derived from analysis of the Mammoth Lakes region were used to predict rock-fall probabilities for rock slopes near Salt Lake City in response to a magnitude 6.0 earthquake. These predicted probabilities were then used to generalize zones of rock-fall susceptibility. -from Authors

  11. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, M.A.; Cook, N.G.W.; McEvilly, T.V.; Majer, E.L.; Witherspoon, P.A.

    1987-04-20

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Longitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements for more than about one minute. 9 figs.

  12. Post-Earthquake People Loss Evaluation Based on Seismic Multi-Level Hybrid Grid: A Case Study on Yushu Ms 7.1 Earthquake in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaohong; Xie, Zhong; Ling, Feng; Luo, Xiangang; Zhong, Ming

    2016-01-01

    People loss is one of the most important information that the government concerns after an earthquake, because it affects appropriate rescue levels. However, existing evaluation methods often consider an entire stricken region as a whole assessment area but disregard the spatial disparity of influencing factors. As a consequence, results are inaccurately evaluated. In order to address this problem, this paper proposes a post-earthquake evaluation approach of people loss based on the seismic multi-level hybrid grid (SMHG). In SMHG, the whole area is divided into grids at different levels with various sizes. In this manner, the efficiency of data management is improved. With SMHG, disaster statistics can be easily counted under both the administrative unit and per unit area. The proposed approach was then applied to investigate Yushu Ms7.1 earthquake in China. Results revealed that the number of deaths varied with different exposure grids. Among all the different grids, we found that using the 50×50 exposure grid can get the most satisfactory results, and the estimated number of deaths was 2,203, with an 18.3% deviation from the actual loss. People loss results obtained through the proposed approach were more accurate than those obtained through traditional GIS-based methods.

  13. Seismic assessment of buried pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Chaar, G.; Brady, P.; Fernandez, G.

    1995-12-31

    A structure and its lifelines are closely linked because the disruption of lifeline systems will obstruct emergency service functions that are vitally needed after an earthquake. As an example of the criticality of these systems, the Association of Bay Area Government (ABAG) recorded thousands of leaks in pipelines that resulted in more than twenty million gallons of hazardous materials being released in several recorded earthquakes. The cost of cleaning the spills from these materials was very high. This information supports the development of seismic protection of lifeline systems. The US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL) has, among its missions, the responsibility to develop seismic vulnerability assessment procedures for military installations. Within this mission, a preliminary research program to assess the seismic vulnerability of buried pipeline systems on military installations was initiated. Phase 1 of this research project resulted in two major studies. In the first, evaluating current procedures to seismically design or evaluate existing lifeline systems, the authors found several significant aspects that deserve special consideration and need to be addressed in future research. The second was focused on identifying parameters related to buried pipeline system vulnerability and developing a generalized analytical method to relate these parameters to the seismic vulnerability assessment of existing pipeline systems.

  14. Three-month performance evaluation of the Nanometrics, Inc., Libra Satellite Seismograph System in the northern California Seismic Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oppenheimer, David H.

    2000-01-01

    In 1999 the Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN) purchased a Libra satellite seismograph system from Nanometrics, Inc to assess whether this technology was a cost-effective and robust replacement for their analog microwave system. The system was purchased subject to it meeting the requirements, criteria and tests described in Appendix A. In early 2000, Nanometrics began delivery of various components of the system, such as the hub and remote satellite dish and mounting hardware, and the NCSN installed and assembled most equipment in advance of the arrival of Nanometrics engineers to facilitate the configuration of the system. The hub was installed in its permanent location, but for logistical reasons the "remote" satellite hardware was initially configured at the NCSN for testing. During the first week of April Nanometrics engineers came to Menlo Park to configure the system and train NCSN staff. The two dishes were aligned with the satellite, and the system was fully operational in 2 days with little problem. Nanometrics engineers spent the remaining 3 days providing hands-on training to NCSN staff in hardware/software operation, configuration, and maintenance. During the second week of April 2000, NCSN staff moved the entire remote system of digitizers, dish assembly, and mounting hardware to Mammoth Lakes, California. The system was reinstalled at the Mammoth Lakes water treatment plant and communications successfully reestablished with the hub via the satellite on 14 April 2000. The system has been in continuous operation since then. This report reviews the performance of the Libra system for the three-month period 20 April 2000 through 20 July 2000. The purpose of the report is to assess whether the system passed the acceptance tests described in Appendix A. We examine all data gaps reported by NCSN "gap list" software and discuss their cause.

  15. A study on seismicity and seismic hazard for Karnataka State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitharam, T. G.; James, Naveen; Vipin, K. S.; Raj, K. Ganesha

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a detailed study on the seismic pattern of the state of Karnataka and also quantifies the seismic hazard for the entire state. In the present work, historical and instrumental seismicity data for Karnataka (within 300 km from Karnataka political boundary) were compiled and hazard analysis was done based on this data. Geographically, Karnataka forms a part of peninsular India which is tectonically identified as an intraplate region of Indian plate. Due to the convergent movement of the Indian plate with the Eurasian plate, movements are occurring along major intraplate faults resulting in seismic activity of the region and hence the hazard assessment of this region is very important. Apart from referring to seismotectonic atlas for identifying faults and fractures, major lineaments in the study area were also mapped using satellite data. The earthquake events reported by various national and international agencies were collected until 2009. Declustering of earthquake events was done to remove foreshocks and aftershocks. Seismic hazard analysis was done for the state of Karnataka using both deterministic and probabilistic approaches incorporating logic tree methodology. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) at rock level was evaluated for the entire state considering a grid size of 0.05° × 0.05°. The attenuation relations proposed for stable continental shield region were used in evaluating the seismic hazard with appropriate weightage factors. Response spectra at rock level for important Tier II cities and Bangalore were evaluated. The contour maps showing the spatial variation of PGA values at bedrock are presented in this work.

  16. Three Independent Evaluations of Healthy Kids Programs Find Substantial Gains in Children's Dental Health Care. In Brief, September 2008, Number 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Dana; Howell, Embry; Trenholm, Christopher; Hill, Ian; Dubay, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This brief presents highlights from rigorous, independent evaluations of the Healthy Kids programs in three California counties: Los Angeles, San Mateo, and Santa Clara. Launched by Children's Health Initiatives (CHIs) in these counties between 2001 and 2003, the three Healthy Kids programs provide children with comprehensive health insurance…

  17. An Independent Psychometric Evaluation of a Speech and Language Tool for Two-Year-Old Children from a Sure Start Trailblazer Site in the West Midlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson-Macedo, Elvidina N.; Patel, Reena; Sallah, David K.

    2009-01-01

    Speech and language difficulties can be indicative of other cognitive, social and developmental problems. Tools used in the UK have not (1) targeted two-year-old children, (2) included both parents' reports and independent observations, and (3) simultaneously evaluated expression, understanding and speech. This cross-sectional study of two…

  18. Arsenic Removal from Drinking Water by Adsorptive Media U.S. EPA Demonstration Project at Webb Consolidated Independent School District in Bruni, TX - Final Performance Evaluation Report

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the activities performed and the results obtained from the arsenic removal treatment technology demonstration project at the Webb Consolidated Independent School District (Webb CISD) in Bruni, TX. The main objective of the project was to evaluate the effect...

  19. Are Independent Probes Truly Independent?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Gino; Pecher, Diane; Schmidt, Henk G.; Zeelenberg, Rene

    2009-01-01

    The independent cue technique has been developed to test traditional interference theories against inhibition theories of forgetting. In the present study, the authors tested the critical criterion for the independence of independent cues: Studied cues not presented during test (and unrelated to test cues) should not contribute to the retrieval…

  20. Expanding Conventional Seismic Stratigrphy into the Multicomponent Seismic Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Innocent Aluka

    2008-08-31

    Multicomponent seismic data are composed of three independent vector-based seismic wave modes. These wave modes are, compressional mode (P), and shear modes SV and SH. The three modes are generated using three orthogonal source-displacement vectors and then recorded using three orthogonal vector sensors. The components travel through the earth at differing velocities and directions. The velocities of SH and SV as they travel through the subsurface differ by only a few percent, but the velocities of SV and SH (Vs) are appreciably lower than the P-wave velocity (Vp). The velocity ratio Vp/Vs varies by an order of magnitude in the earth from a value of 15 to 1.5 depending on the degree of sedimentary lithification. The data used in this study were acquired by nine-component (9C) vertical seismic profile (VSP), using three orthogonal vector sources. The 9C vertical seismic profile is capable of generating P-wave mode and the fundamental S-wave mode (SH-SH and SV-SV) directly at the source station and permits the basic components of elastic wavefield (P, SH-SH and SV-SV) to be separated from one another for the purposes of imaging. Analysis and interpretations of data from the study area show that incident full-elastic seismic wavefield is capable of reflecting four different wave modes, P, SH , SV and C which can be utilized to fully understand the architecture and heterogeneities of geologic sequences. The conventional seismic stratigraphy utilizes only reflected P-wave modes. The notation SH mode is the same as SH-SH; SV mode means SV-SV and C mode which is a converted shear wave is a special SV mode and is the same as P-SV. These four wave modes image unique geologic stratigraphy and facies and at the same time reflect independent stratal surfaces because of the unique orientation of their particle-displacement vectors. As a result of the distinct orientation of individual mode's particle-displacement vector, one mode may react to a critical subsurface sequence more

  1. A BENCHMARK PROGRAM FOR EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR COMPUTING SEISMIC RESPONSE OF COUPLED BUILDING-PIPING/EQUIPMENT WITH NON-CLASSICAL DAMPING.

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, J.; Degrassi, G.; Chokshi, N.

    2001-03-22

    Under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a comprehensive program to evaluate state-of-the-art methods and computer programs for seismic analysis of typical coupled nuclear power plant (NPP) systems with nonclassical damping. In this program, four benchmark models of coupled building-piping/equipment systems with different damping characteristics were analyzed for a suite of earthquakes by program participants applying their uniquely developed methods and computer programs. This paper presents the results of their analyses, and their comparison to the benchmark solutions generated by BNL using time domain direct integration methods. The participant's analysis results established using complex modal time history methods showed good comparison with the BNL solutions, while the analyses produced with either complex-mode response spectrum methods or classical normal-mode response spectrum method, in general, produced more conservative results, when averaged over a suite of earthquakes. However, when coupling due to damping is significant, complex-mode response spectrum methods performed better than the classical normal-mode response spectrum method. Furthermore, as part of the program objectives, a parametric assessment is also presented in this paper, aimed at evaluation of the applicability of various analysis methods to problems with different dynamic characteristics unique to coupled NPP systems. It is believed that the findings and insights learned from this program will be useful in developing new acceptance criteria and providing guidance for future regulatory activities involving licensing applications of these alternate methods to coupled systems.

  2. Review on Seismic Rehabilitation of a 56-Story RC Tall Building having Shear Wall System Based on A Nonlinear Dynamic Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Epackachi, S.; Esmaili, O.; Mirghaderi, S. R.; Taheri, A. A.

    2008-07-08

    Tehran tower is a 56 story reinforced concrete tall building consisting of three wings with identical plan dimensions each approximately 48 meters by 22 meters. The three wings are at 120 degree from each other and have no expansions/seismic Joints. This paper contains the consideration of the retrofitting of the Tehran tower based on the findings of an exhaustive investigation of the nonlinear performance evaluation efforts. It has tried to show the procedure followed, methodologies utilized, and the results obtained for life-safety and collapse-prevention evaluation of the building. More over the weak zones of the structure due to analysis results are introduced and appropriate retrofit technique for satisfaction related life-safety and collapse-prevention criteria is presented. Actually in this project to improve the local behavior of coupling panels which are located regularly in main walls and definitely have been recognized as the most vulnerable structural elements, making use of steel plates which are connected to concrete members by chemical anchors has been used as the best retrofitting method for this case. Therefore in the final section of this paper it has been tried to explain the professional practical method utilized to perform the mentioned retrofitting project.

  3. On the distribution of seismic reflection coefficients and seismic amplitudes

    SciTech Connect

    Painter, S.; Paterson, L.; Beresford, G.

    1995-07-01

    Reflection coefficient sequences from 14 wells in Australia have a statistical character consistent with a non-Gaussian scaling noise model based on the Levy-stable family of probability distributions. Experimental histograms of reflection coefficients are accurately approximated by symmetric Levy-stable probability density functions with Levy index between 0.99 and 1.43. These distributions have the same canonical role in mathematical statistics as the Gaussian distribution, but they have slowly decaying tails and infinite moments. The distribution of reflection coefficients is independent of the spatial scale (statistically self-similar), and the reflection coefficient sequences have long-range dependence. These results suggest that the logarithm of seismic impedance can be modeled accurately using fractional Levy motion, which is a generalization of fractional Brownian motion. Synthetic seismograms produced from the authors` model for the reflection coefficients also have Levy-stable distributions. These isolations include transmission losses, the effects of reverberations, and the loss of resolution caused by band-limited wavelets, and suggest that actual seismic amplitudes with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio should also have a Levy-stable distribution. This prediction is verified using post-stack seismic data acquired in the Timor Sea and in the continental USA. However, prestack seismic amplitudes from the Timor Sea are nearly Gaussian. They attribute the difference between prestack and poststack data to the high level of measurement noise in the prestack data.

  4. High-precision geologic mapping to evaluate the potential for seismic surface rupture at TA-55, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, J.N.; Lavine, A.; Vaniman, D.; WoldeGabriel, G.

    1998-06-01

    In this report the authors document results of high-precision geologic mapping in the vicinity of TA-55 that has been done to identify parts of the southern portion of the Rendija Canyon Fault, or any other faults, with the potential for seismic surface rupture. To assess the potential for surface rupture at TA-55, an area of approximately 3 square miles that includes the Los Alamos County Landfill and Twomile, Mortandad, and Sandia Canyons has been mapped in detail. Map units are mostly cooling or flow units within the Tshirege Member (1.2 Ma) of the Bandelier Tuff. Stratigraphic markers that are useful for determining offsets in the map area include a distinct welding break at or near the cooling Unit 2-Unit 3 contact, and the Unit 3-Unit 4 contact. At the County Landfill the contact between the Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff and overlying Quaternary alluvium has also been mapped. The mapping indicates that there is no faulting in the near-surface directly below TA-55, and that the closest fault is about 1500 feet west of the Plutonium Facility. Faulting is more abundant on the western edge of the map area, west of TA-48 in uppermost Mortandad Canyon, upper Sandia Canyon, and at the County Landfill. Measured vertical offsets on the faults range from 1 to 8 feet on mapped Bandelier Tuff contacts. Faulting exposed at the Los Alamos County Landfill has deformed a zone over 1000 feet wide, and has a net vertical down-to-the-west displacement of at least 15 feet in the Bandelier Tuff. Individual faults at the landfill have from less than 1 foot to greater than 15 feet of vertical offset on the Bandelier Tuff. Most faults in the landfill trend N-S, N20W, or N45E. Results of the mapping indicate that the Rendija Canyon Fault does not continue directly south to TA-55. At present, the authors have insufficient data to connect faulting they have mapped to areas of known faulting to the north or south of the study area.

  5. Seismic sources

    DOEpatents

    Green, Michael A.; Cook, Neville G. W.; McEvilly, Thomas V.; Majer, Ernest L.; Witherspoon, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    Apparatus is described for placement in a borehole in the earth, which enables the generation of closely controlled seismic waves from the borehole. Pure torsional shear waves are generated by an apparatus which includes a stator element fixed to the borehole walls and a rotor element which is electrically driven to rapidly oscillate on the stator element to cause reaction forces transmitted through the borehole walls to the surrounding earth. Logitudinal shear waves are generated by an armature that is driven to rapidly oscillate along the axis of the borehole relative to a stator that is clamped to the borehole, to cause reaction forces transmitted to the surrounding earth. Pressure waves are generated by electrically driving pistons that press against opposite ends of a hydraulic reservoir that fills the borehole. High power is generated by energizing the elements at a power level that causes heating to over 150.degree. C. within one minute of operation, but energizing the elements for no more than about one minute.

  6. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  7. Evaluation in the Older Blind Independent Living Program: Advantages of a Structural Equation Modeling Approach. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giesen, Martin J.; Cavenaugh, Brenda S.

    2006-01-01

    Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) requires that independent living programs annually report demographic information on consumers receiving services and the numbers receiving specific types of services. Although some states collect information on consumer outcomes (for example, improvement in daily living skills), RSA does not request…

  8. Mathematics Motivation and Engagement: An Independent Evaluation of a Complex Model with Australian Rural High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plenty, Stephanie; Heubeck, Bernd G.

    2011-01-01

    Most traditional models of academic motivation focus on a small number of specific factors. However, the Student Motivation and Engagement Scale (MES) (Martin, 2007b) includes a fairly comprehensive range of perspectives on general student motivation. The current study set out (a) to provide an independent test of the proposed 11-factor structure…

  9. Evaluation of the late life disability instrument in the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE-P) study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The late life disability instrument (LLDI) was developed to assess limitations in instrumental and management roles using a small and restricted sample. In this paper we examine the measurement properties of the LLDI using data from the Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders Pilot (LIFE...

  10. Understanding through seeing - the role of seismic in an integrated study of a mature Nigerian field

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, M.

    1996-12-31

    The impact of integration of both data and disciplines is presented in the case of an Nigerian field, with particular emphasis on the central role of seismic data: A pre-requisite for any seismic interpretation is a reliable well-to-seismic tie. Due to log data availability and quality, this match was only achieved by generating synthetic seismograms based on acoustic impedance models. The seismic time interpretation was guided by the geological framework following sequence stratigraphical principles. Depth conversion and evaluation of volumetric uncertainties were based on all data. The resulting STOIIP estimates have been compared to the volumes derived independently from production data. It then became possible to explain apparent mismatches seen in some reservoirs by modifying the best-estimate volumes within the uncertainties and by comparison with analogue reservoirs Channel-like amplitude features encountered in shallow reservoirs helped to explain variable production performance and consequently to identify appraisal and development opportunities. Some of the deeper, shoreface sands seem to behave in a more tank-like manner. This is not only confirmed by recent RST-logs, but also by seismic flatspots. The flatspots are conformable to structure and reflect the remaining oil distribution. These results highlight the value of continuous integration of data and disciplines to the petroleum engineering study.

  11. Understanding through seeing - the role of seismic in an integrated study of a mature Nigerian field

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, M.

    1996-01-01

    The impact of integration of both data and disciplines is presented in the case of an Nigerian field, with particular emphasis on the central role of seismic data: A pre-requisite for any seismic interpretation is a reliable well-to-seismic tie. Due to log data availability and quality, this match was only achieved by generating synthetic seismograms based on acoustic impedance models. The seismic time interpretation was guided by the geological framework following sequence stratigraphical principles. Depth conversion and evaluation of volumetric uncertainties were based on all data. The resulting STOIIP estimates have been compared to the volumes derived independently from production data. It then became possible to explain apparent mismatches seen in some reservoirs by modifying the best-estimate volumes within the uncertainties and by comparison with analogue reservoirs Channel-like amplitude features encountered in shallow reservoirs helped to explain variable production performance and consequently to identify appraisal and development opportunities. Some of the deeper, shoreface sands seem to behave in a more tank-like manner. This is not only confirmed by recent RST-logs, but also by seismic flatspots. The flatspots are conformable to structure and reflect the remaining oil distribution. These results highlight the value of continuous integration of data and disciplines to the petroleum engineering study.

  12. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka; Robert Stokes; Jeffery Sutherland; Ron Evans; Jim Musser

    2008-06-30

    . An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been identified

  13. Ground motion simulations for seismic stations in southern and eastern Romania and seismic hazard assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavel, Florin; Vacareanu, Radu

    2017-03-01

    This research focuses on the evaluation of soil conditions for seismic stations in southern and eastern Romania, their influence on stochastic finite-fault simulations, and the impact of using them on the seismic hazard assessment. First, the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratios (HVSR) are evaluated using ground motions recorded in 32 seismic stations during small magnitude (M W ≤ 6.0) Vrancea seismic events. Most of the seismic stations situated in the southern part of Romania exhibit multiple HVSR peaks over a broad period range. However, only the seismic stations in the eastern-most part of Romania have clear short-period predominant periods. Subsequently, stochastic finite-fault simulations are performed in order to evaluate the influence of the soil conditions on the ground motion amplitudes. The analyses show that the earthquake magnitude has a larger influence on the computed ground motion amplitudes for the short- and medium-period range, while the longer-period spectral ordinates tend to be influenced more by the soil conditions. Next, the impact of the previously evaluated soil conditions on the seismic hazard results for Romania is also investigated. The results reveal a significant impact of the soil conditions on the seismic hazard levels, especially for the sites characterized by long-period amplifications (sites situated mostly in southern Romania), and a less significant influence in the case of sites which have clear short predominant periods.

  14. Quantitative evaluation of thin-layer thickness and CO2 mass utilizing seismic complex decomposition at the Ketzin CO2 storage site, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei; Juhlin, Christopher; Han, Li; Kempka, Thomas; Lüth, Stefan; Zhang, Fengjiao

    2016-10-01

    Determining thin layer thickness is very important for reservoir characterization and CO2 quantification. Given its high time-frequency resolution and robustness, the complex spectral decomposition method was applied on time-lapse 3-D seismic data from the Ketzin pilot site for CO2 storage to evaluate the frequency-dependent characteristics of thin layers at the injection level. Higher temporal resolution and more stratigraphic details are seen in the all-frequency and monochromatic reflectivity amplitude sections obtained by complex spectral decomposition compared to the stacked sections. The mapped geologic discontinuities within the reservoir are consistent with the preferred orientation of CO2 propagation. Tuning frequency mapping shows the thicknesses of the reservoir sandstone and gaseous CO2 is consistent with the measured thickness of the sandstone unit from well logging. An attempt to discriminate between pressure effects and CO2 saturation using the extracted tuning frequency indicates that CO2 saturation is the main contributor to the amplitude anomaly at the Ketzin site. On the basis of determined thickness of gaseous CO2 in the reservoir, quantitative analysis of the amount of CO2 was performed and shows a discrepancy between the injected and calculated CO2 mass. This may be explained by several uncertainties, like structural reservoir heterogeneity, a limited understanding of the complex subsurface conditions, error of determined tuning frequency, the presence of ambient noise and ongoing CO2 dissolution.

  15. Seismic safety of high concrete dams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Houqun

    2014-08-01

    China is a country of high seismicity with many hydropower resources. Recently, a series of high arch dams have either been completed or are being constructed in seismic regions, of which most are concrete dams. The evaluation of seismic safety often becomes a critical problem in dam design. In this paper, a brief introduction to major progress in the research on seismic aspects of large concrete dams, conducted mainly at the Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Research (IWHR) during the past 60 years, is presented. The dam site-specific ground motion input, improved response analysis, dynamic model test verification, field experiment investigations, dynamic behavior of dam concrete, and seismic monitoring and observation are described. Methods to prevent collapse of high concrete dams under maximum credible earthquakes are discussed.

  16. Identification of a gene set to evaluate the potential effects of loud sounds from seismic surveys on the ears of fishes: a study with Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Andrews, C D; Payne, J F; Rise, M L

    2014-06-01

    identified the transcript encoding growth hormone I as up-regulated by loud sound, supporting previous evidence linking growth hormone to hair cell regeneration in fishes. Quantitative (q) reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses confirmed dysregulation of some microarray-identified transcripts and in some cases revealed a high level of biological variability in the exposed group. These results support the potential utility of molecular biomarkers to evaluate the effect of seismic surveys on fishes with studies on the ears being placed in a priority category for development of exposure-response relationships. Knowledge of such relationships is necessary for addressing the question of potential size of injury zones.

  17. Identification of a gene set to evaluate the potential effects of loud sounds from seismic surveys on the ears of fishes: a study with Salmo salar

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, C D; Payne, J F; Rise, M L

    2014-01-01

    identified the transcript encoding growth hormone I as up-regulated by loud sound, supporting previous evidence linking growth hormone to hair cell regeneration in fishes. Quantitative (q) reverse transcription (RT) polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses confirmed dysregulation of some microarray-identified transcripts and in some cases revealed a high level of biological variability in the exposed group. These results support the potential utility of molecular biomarkers to evaluate the effect of seismic surveys on fishes with studies on the ears being placed in a priority category for development of exposure–response relationships. Knowledge of such relationships is necessary for addressing the question of potential size of injury zones. PMID:24814183

  18. Some considerations for establishing seismic design criteria for nuclear plant piping

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.P.; Chokshi, N.C.

    1997-01-01

    The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is providing assistance to the U.S. NRC in developing regulatory positions on the seismic analysis of piping. As part of this effort, ETEC previously performed reviews of the ASME Code, Section III piping seismic design criteria as revised by the 1994 Addenda. These revised criteria were based on evaluations by the ASME Special Task Group on Integrated Piping Criteria (STGIPC) and the Technical Core Group (TCG) of the Advanced Reactor Corporation (ARC) of the earlier joint Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI)/NRC Piping & Fitting Dynamic Reliability (PFDR) program. Previous ETEC evaluations reported at the 23rd WRSM of seismic margins associated with the revised criteria are reviewed. These evaluations had concluded, in part, that although margins for the timed PFDR tests appeared acceptable (>2), margins in detuned tests could be unacceptable (<1). This conclusion was based primarily on margin reduction factors (MRFs) developed by the ASME STGIPC and ARC/TCG from realistic analyses of PFDR test 36. This paper reports more recent results including: (1) an approach developed for establishing appropriate seismic margins based on PRA considerations, (2) independent assessments of frequency effects on margins, (3) the development of margins based on failure mode considerations, and (4) the implications of Code Section III rules for Section XI.

  19. Evaluation of treatment in the Smart Home IRIS in terms of functional independence and occupational performance and satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Ocepek, Julija; Roberts, Anne E K; Vidmar, Gaj

    2013-01-01

    The development of assistive technologies, home modifications, and smart homes has rapidly advanced in the last two decades. Health professionals have recognised the benefits of these technologies in improving individual's quality of life. The Smart Home IRIS was established in 2008 within the University Rehabilitation Institute in Ljubljana with the aim to enable persons with disabilities and elderly people to test various assistive technologies and technical solutions for their independent living. We investigated the effect of treatments in the Smart Home IRIS. A convenience sample of 59 persons with disabilities and elderly people (aged 24-81 years) who were treated in the Smart Home IRIS from April to December 2011 participated. Standardised instruments--the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM)--were administered at the first assessment in the Smart Home IRIS and at a second assessment at the participant's home after 6-12 months. All the outcomes statistically significantly improved from the first to the second assessment. The treatments in the Smart Home IRIS appeared to contribute to higher occupational performance and satisfaction with performance and higher functional independence of persons with disabilities and elderly people.

  20. Evaluation Of Sensitivity Of Mass-independent Oxygen Isotopes In Aerosol Nitrate To Environmental Factors Using A Photochemical Box Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, G.; Wilkins, G.; Jackson, T.; Brothers, L.; McCabe, J.; Thiemens, M. H.

    2007-12-01

    An existing photochemical box model for use in polluted marine boundary layers was modified to allow for the explicit tracking of the mass-independent isotopic composition of oxygen in aerosol nitrate as well as other atmospheric species such as OH and H2O2. This modified model was then used to study the sensitivity of the mass-independent isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrate(HNO3) to variables such as relative humidity, temperature ozone and NOx concentrations. Here we present the results of these studies and compare model predictions of the mass-independent oxygen isotopic composition of aerosol nitrate to measurements taken in fine (<1micron) and coarse (>1 micron) aerosol samples taken in a variety of locations, from coastal urban environments, the tropics (Ecuador), inland California (Riverside), and Antarctica. Regarding Antarctica, we comment on the isotopic composition of OH there and the ramifications of these findings for the isotopic composition of other oxygen bearing compounds in the Antarctic atmosphere.

  1. 2015 USGS Seismic Hazard Model for Induced Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, M. D.; Mueller, C. S.; Moschetti, M. P.; Hoover, S. M.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Llenos, A. L.; Michael, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past several years, the seismicity rate has increased markedly in multiple areas of the central U.S. Studies have tied the majority of this increased activity to wastewater injection in deep wells and hydrocarbon production. These earthquakes are induced by human activities that change rapidly based on economic and policy decisions, making them difficult to forecast. Our 2014 USGS National Seismic Hazard Model and previous models are intended to provide the long-term hazard (2% probability of exceedance in 50 years) and are based on seismicity rates and patterns observed mostly from tectonic earthquakes. However, potentially induced earthquakes were identified in 14 regions that were not included in the earthquake catalog used for constructing the 2014 model. We recognized the importance of considering these induced earthquakes in a separate hazard analysis, and as a result in April 2015 we released preliminary models that explored the impact of this induced seismicity on the hazard. Several factors are important in determining the hazard from induced seismicity: period of the catalog that optimally forecasts the next year's activity, earthquake magnitude-rate distribution, earthquake location statistics, maximum magnitude, ground motion models, and industrial drivers such as injection rates. The industrial drivers are not currently available in a form that we can implement in a 1-year model. Hazard model inputs have been evaluated by a broad group of scientists and engineers to assess the range of acceptable models. Results indicate that next year's hazard is significantly higher by more than a factor of three in Oklahoma, Texas, and Colorado compared to the long-term 2014 hazard model. These results have raised concern about the impacts of induced earthquakes on the built environment and have led to many engineering and policy discussions about how to mitigate these effects for the more than 7 million people that live near areas of induced seismicity.

  2. Seismic intrusion detector system

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  3. Salam's independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    In his kind review of my biography of the Nobel laureate Abdus Salam (December 2008 pp45-46), John W Moffat wrongly claims that Salam had "independently thought of the idea of parity violation in weak interactions".

  4. An Integrated Approach to Seismic Event Location. 1. Evaluating How Method of Location Affects the Volume of Groups of Hypocenters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-12

    1985: and Pujol , 1988). 3) Methods for evaluating errors in event locations. The classical approach to error analysis utilizes a formal statistical...minimum volume polyhedron as a practical enclosure for a set of points has not been suggested previously in the seismological or geological literature. 4 2...Set of Points in Space Background: There exist’numerous applications in seismology and geology where it is useful to define a volume in space which

  5. Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A

    2008-01-16

    In this report we describe the data sets used to evaluate ground motion hazards in Las Vegas from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This analysis is presented in Rodgers et al. (2005, 2006) and includes 13 nuclear explosions recorded at the John Blume and Associates network, the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and a temporary deployment of broadband station in Las Vegas. The data are available in SAC format on CD-ROM as an appendix to this report.

  6. Evaluation of seismic reflection data in the Davis and Lavender Canyons study area, Paradox Basin, Utah. [Faults, folds, joints, and collapse structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kitcho, C.A.; Wong, I.G.; Turcotte, F.T.

    1986-08-01

    Seismic reflection data purchased from petroleum industry brokers and acquired through group speculative surveys were interpreted for information on the regional subsurface geologic structure and stratigraphy within and surrounding the Davis and Lavender Canyons study area in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah. Structures of interest were faults, folds, joints, and collapse structures related to salt dissolution. The seismic reflection data were used to interpret stratigraphy by identifying continuous and discontinuous reflectors on the seismic profiles. Thickening and thinning of strata and possible areas of salt flowage or dissolution could be identified from the seismic data. Identifiable reflectors included the tops of the Precambrian and Mississippian, a distinctive interbed close to the middle of the Pennsylvanian Paradox salt formation (probably the interval between Salt Cycles 10 and 13), and near the top of the Paradox salt. Of the 56 faults identified from the seismic reflection interpretation, 33 trend northwest, west-northwest, or west, and most affect only the deeper part of the stratigraphic section. These faults are part of the deep structural system found throughout the Paradox Basin, including the fold and fault belt in the northeast part of the basin. The faults bound basement Precambrian blocks that experienced minor activity during Mississippian and early Pennsylvanian deposition, and showed major displacement during early Paradox salt deposition as the Paradox Basin subsided. Based on the seismic data, most of these faults appear to have an upward terminus between the top of the Mississippian and the salt interbed reflector.

  7. Seismic Stability Evaluation of Alben Barkley Lock and Dam Project. Volume 4. Liquefaction Susceptibility Evaluation and Post-Earthquake Strength Determination.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    Additionally, the Seed method was extended to estimate the earthquake induced pore pressure buildup in areas of the foundation where safety factors...independent database relating CPT values to liquefaction susceptibility did not exist and the most advanced method for SPT (N1 )6 prediction from CPT...data was that developed by Olsen (1984) and Olsen and Farr (1986). The (N1 )6 prediction chart used in this study is shown in Figure 82. This method

  8. Seismic electromagnetic study in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qinghua

    2016-04-01

    Seismo-electromagnetism is becoming a hot interdisciplinary study in both geosciences and electromagnetism. Numerous electromagnetic changes at a broad range of frequencies associated with earthquakes have been reported independently. There are some attempts of applying such electromagnetic data to short-term earthquake prediction. Although due to the complexity of seismogenic process and underground structure, the seismic electromagnetic phenomena cannot be fully understood, the seismic electromagnetic study plays a key role in the mitigation of seismic hazard. China is one of the countries which have the earliest reports on seismo-electromagnetic phenomena. The seismic electromagnetic study in China started in late 1960's. There are almost 50 years continuous observation data up to now, which provides a unique database for seismo-electromagnetic study not only in China, but also in the world. Therefore, seismo-electromagnetic study in China is interested broadly by international communities of geosciences and electromagnetism. I present here a brief review on seismic electromagnetic study in China, especially focusing on geo-electromagnetic observation and empirical prediction based on the observation data. After summarizing various electromagnetic observations such as apparent resistivity, geoelectric potential, geomagnetic field, electromagnetic disturbance, and so on, I show the cases of the empirical prediction based on the observed electromagnetic data associated with some earthquakes in China. Finally, based on the above review, I propose an integrated research scheme of earthquake-related electromagnetic phenomena, which includes the interaction between appropriate observations, robust methodology of data processing, and theoretical model analysis. This study is supported partially by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41274075) and the National Basic Research Program of China (2014CB845903).

  9. Evaluation of functional recovery by motor functional independence measure test of elderly after hip fracture in Serbia.

    PubMed

    Radosavljevic, Natasa; Nikolic, Dejan; Lazovic, Milica; Radosavljevic, Zoran; Jeremic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: o objectivo do estudo é a avaliação do nível de independência funcional através da aplicação da escala de Medida da Independência Funcional (Functional Independence Measure [FIM]) em doentes com idade superior a 65 anos, após fractura da anca.Material e Métodos: Foram estudados 203 doentes após fractura da anca, aplicando a escala MIF em 3 momentos: admissão do doente no hospital (Período 1), no momento da alta (Período 2) e 3 meses após a alta (Período 3); os doentes foram englobados em 3 grupos etários: Grupo65-74 , Grupo75-84 e Grupo+85 e em dois grupos, consoante o Índice de Gravidade (IG): grupo 0-1,99 (IG1) e grupo ≥ 2 (IG2).Resultados: No grupo de doentes com idêntico IG, observou-se um aumento dos valores da MIF no Período 2 e 3 em ambos osgéneros e nas primeiras duas classes etárias, ao passo que em doentes acima dos 85 anos, com IG mais elevado, observámos uma variação não significativa dos valores da MIF entre o momento da alta hospitalar e 3 meses após a alta.Discussão: A melhoria mais significativa da MIF foi obtida em doentes do sexo feminino no primeiro e terceiro grupos etários e com IG mais elevado.Conclusão: O género não constitui um factor preditivo significativo da recuperação da independência funcional medida através da aplicação da escala MIF em doentes com fractura da anca, embora a MIF no momento da admissão seja um bom indicador de recuperação funcional em doentes do sexo feminino em certos grupos etários (primeiro e terceiro grupos etários).

  10. Seismicity prior to the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanjo, Kazuyoshi Z.; Izutsu, Jun; Orihara, Yoshiaki; Furuse, Nobuhiro; Togo, Shoho; Nitta, Hidetoshi; Okada, Tomohiro; Tanaka, Rika; Kamogawa, Masashi; Nagao, Toshiyasu

    2016-11-01

    We report precursory seismic patterns prior to the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes, as measured by four different methods based on changes in seismicity that can be used for earthquake forecasting: the b-value method, two methods of seismic quiescence evaluation, and an analysis of seismicity density in space and time. The spatial extent of precursory patterns differs from one method to the other and ranges from local scales (typically, asperity size) to regional scales (e.g., 2° × 3° around the source zone). The earthquakes were preceded by periods of pronounced anomalies, which lasted in yearly scales (1.5 years), or longer (>3 years). We demonstrate that a combination of multiple methods detected different signals prior to the Kumamoto earthquakes. This indicates great potential to reduce the hazard at possible future sites of earthquakes relative to long-term seismic hazard assessment. We also found that the seismic quiescence in a regional-scale area, detected by using the two methods of seismic quiescence evaluation, was a common precursor to the 2016 Kumamoto earthquakes and 2015 Off Satsuma Peninsula earthquake. The result allows us to interpret both events as the onset that occurred at a section along the tectonic line from the Okinawa Trough through the Beppu-Shimabara graben.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Use of a fishery-independent trawl survey to evaluate distribution patterns of subadult sharks in Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Belcher, C.N.; Jennings, Cecil A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the utility of a fishery-independent trawl survey for assessing a potential multispecies shark nursery in Georgia's nearshore and inshore waters. A total of 234 subadult sharks from six species were captured during 85 of 216 trawls. Catch rates and size distributions for subadult sharks and the ratio of neonates to juveniles were consistent among areas. The highest concentrations of subadult sharks occurred in creeks and sounds. Species composition varied among areas. The Atlantic sharpnose shark Rhizoprionodon terraenovae was the most abundant species in sound and nearshore stations, whereas the bonnethead Sphyrna tiburo was the most abundant species in creeks. The aggregate of other species occurred with higher frequency in the sounds and nearshore. Sampling characteristics of the trawl survey were compared with those from a fishery-independent longline survey of subadult sharks to assess the similarity of the two gears. A total of 193 subadult sharks from seven species were captured during 57 of 96 longline sets, whereas 52 subadults from four species were captured during 20 of 48 trawls. Selectivity and efficiency differed between the two gears. The trawl had lower catch rates, caught smaller sharks, and encountered a different suite of species than the longline. General seasonal trends in relative abundance also differed between the two gears; the longline showed an increasing trend in abundance, whereas the trawl showed a stable trend. Although trawls were not found to be efficient for sampling subadult sharks from most species, they can be a useful source of supplemental data.

  12. Assessment of seismic margin calculation methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P.; Murray, R.C.; Ravindra, M.K.; Reed, J.W.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1989-03-01

    Seismic margin review of nuclear power plants requires that the High Confidence of Low Probability of Failure (HCLPF) capacity be calculated for certain components. The candidate methods for calculating the HCLPF capacity as recommended by the Expert Panel on Quantification of Seismic Margins are the Conservative Deterministic Failure Margin (CDFM) method and the Fragility Analysis (FA) method. The present study evaluated these two methods using some representative components in order to provide further guidance in conducting seismic margin reviews. It is concluded that either of the two methods could be used for calculating HCLPF capacities. 21 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Evaluation of Relation between Distance and Insolation Fluctuation Independence based on Coherence and Ensemble Average of Insolation Fluctuations at Two Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeyoshi; Inoue, Takato; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    Power output fluctuation of high penetration photovoltaic power generation systems (PVSs) may cause negative impacts on the load frequency control (LFC) of an electric power utility. For the cost-effective mitigation, the proper evaluation of apparent electricity demand fluctuation is important, taking the power output of PVSs into account as a negative demand. If the actual power output patterns are independent among several points, the standard deviation (STD) of total power output fluctuation of PVSs located in several points can be estimated based on the addition theorem of variance. Moreover, the central limit theorem may be applied if the probability distribution of insolation fluctuation is the same among several points. As a fundamental study to apply the stochastic methods, this study evaluates the following two factors to determine the distance between two points with which the insolation patterns of two points can be considered as independent: 1) the coherence of insolation fluctuation for various combinations of two points with different distances, 2) the correlation diagram of two different STDs, i.e. the STD of ensemble average insolation fluctuation observed at two points and the averaged STD of each STD of insolation fluctuation at two points. The results suggest that the insolation fluctuation consisting of the cycles shorter than 30min can be considered as independent if the distance between two points is longer than 5km-10km.

  14. Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nathanson, Jeanne H., Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This issue of "OSERS" addresses the subject of independent living of individuals with disabilities. The issue includes a message from Judith E. Heumann, the Assistant Secretary of the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services (OSERS), and 10 papers. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Changes in the…

  15. Adult learner centered processes in an online ADRN to BSN nursing program: independent evaluator and peer self-assessments.

    PubMed

    Shuster, George; Birkholz, Gloria; Petri, Linda

    2007-01-01

    A five year fully online RN to BSN program was assessed by faculty and a consultant using the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's Partnerships for Training (PFT) learner-centered evaluation tool. Faculty were more critical of their expertise in learner-centered online course criteria than the consultant. The consultant identified minimal use of peer support, collaborative activities, faculty preference for visual learner activities, and a tendency toward faculty ownership of learning goals and creation of activity rules and guidelines. The need to bring online discussions to a higher level of thinking was also noted. The dual evaluation perspectives helped identify strengths and weaknesses in the curriculum.

  16. Seismicity of California's north coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bakun, W.H.

    2000-01-01

    At least three moment magnitude (M) 7 earthquakes occurred along California's north coast in the second half of the nineteenth century. The M 7.3 earthquake on 23 November 1873 occurred near the California-Oregon coast and likely was located on the Cascadia subduction zone or within the North American plate. The M 7.0 + earthquake on 9 May 1878 was located about 75 km offshore near the Mendocino fault. The surface-wave magnitude (M(s)) 7.0 earthquake on 16 April 1899 was located about 150 km offshore within the Gorda plate. There were at least three M 7 north-coast earthquakes in the 35 years before 1906, two M 7 earthquakes in the 20 years after 1906, no M 7 earthquakes from 1923 until 1980, and four M 7 earthquakes since 1980. The relative seismic quiescence after 1906 for M 7 earthquakes along California's north coast mimics the post-1906 seismic quiescence in the San Francisco Bay area for M 6 earthquakes. The post-1906 relative quiescence did not extend to lower magnitudes in either area. The 18 April 1906 earthquake apparently influenced the rate of occurrence of M 7 north-coast earthquakes as it apparently influenced the rate of M 6 earthquakes in the San Francisco Bay area. The relative seismic quiescence along the California north-coast region after 1906 should be taken into account when evaluating seismic hazards in northwest California.

  17. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  18. Mathematical evaluation of similarity factor using various weighing approaches on aceclofenac marketed formulations by model-independent method.

    PubMed

    Soni, T G; Desai, J U; Nagda, C D; Gandhi, T R; Chotai, N P

    2008-01-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) guidance for industry on dissolution testing of immediate-release solid oral dosage forms describes that drug dissolution may be the rate limiting step for drug absorption in the case of low solubility/high permeability drugs (BCS class II drugs). US FDA Guidance describes the model-independent mathematical approach proposed by Moore and Flanner for calculating a similarity factor (f2) of dissolution across a suitable time interval. In the present study, the similarity factor was calculated on dissolution data of two marketed aceclofenac tablets (a BCS class II drug) using various weighing approaches proposed by Gohel et al. The proposed approaches were compared with a conventional approach (W = 1). On the basis of consideration of variability, preference is given in the order of approach 3 > approach 2 > approach 1 as approach 3 considers batch-to-batch as well as within-samples variability and shows best similarity profile. Approach 2 considers batch-to batch variability with higher specificity than approach 1.

  19. Evaluation of results from genome-wide studies of language and reading in a novel independent dataset.

    PubMed

    Carrion-Castillo, A; van Bergen, E; Vino, A; van Zuijen, T; de Jong, P F; Francks, C; Fisher, S E

    2016-07-01

    Recent genome-wide association scans (GWAS) for reading and language abilities have pin-pointed promising new candidate loci. However, the potential contributions of these loci remain to be validated. In this study, we tested 17 of the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from these GWAS studies (P < 10(-6) in the original studies) in a new independent population dataset from the Netherlands: known as Familial Influences on Literacy Abilities. This dataset comprised 483 children from 307 nuclear families and 505 adults (including parents of participating children), and provided adequate statistical power to detect the effects that were previously reported. The following measures of reading and language performance were collected: word reading fluency, nonword reading fluency, phonological awareness and rapid automatized naming. Two SNPs (rs12636438 and rs7187223) were associated with performance in multivariate and univariate testing, but these did not remain significant after correction for multiple testing. Another SNP (rs482700) was only nominally associated in the multivariate test. For the rest of the SNPs, we did not find supportive evidence of association. The findings may reflect differences between our study and the previous investigations with respect to the language of testing, the exact tests used and the recruitment criteria. Alternatively, most of the prior reported associations may have been false positives. A larger scale GWAS meta-analysis than those previously performed will likely be required to obtain robust insights into the genomic architecture underlying reading and language.

  20. Application of culture culture-independent molecular biology based methods to evaluate acetic acid bacteria diversity during vinegar processing.

    PubMed

    Ilabaca, Carolina; Navarrete, Paola; Mardones, Pamela; Romero, Jaime; Mas, Albert

    2008-08-15

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are considered fastidious microorganisms because they are difficult to isolate and cultivate. Different molecular approaches were taken to detect AAB diversity, independently of their capacity to grow in culture media. Those methods were tested in samples that originated during traditional vinegar production. Bacterial diversity was assessed by analysis of 16S rRNA gene, obtained by PCR amplifications of DNA extracted directly from the acetification container. Bacterial composition was analyzed by RFLP-PCR of 16S rRNA gene, Temporal Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TTGE) separation of amplicons containing region V3-V5 of 16S rRNA gene and cloning of those amplicons. TTGE bands and clones were grouped based on their electrophoretic pattern similarity and sequenced to be compared with reference strains. The main microorganism identified in vinegar was Acetobacter pasteurianus, which at the end of the acetification process was considered to be the only microorganism present. The diversity was the highest at 2% acetic acid, where indefinite species of Gluconacetobacter xylinus/europaeus/intermedius were also present.

  1. Detecting aseismic strain transients from seismicity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llenos, A. L.; McGuire, J. J.

    2011-06-01

    Aseismic deformation transients such as fluid flow, magma migration, and slow slip can trigger changes in seismicity rate. We present a method that can detect these seismicity rate variations and utilize these anomalies to constrain the underlying variations in stressing rate. Because ordinary aftershock sequences often obscure changes in the background seismicity caused by aseismic processes, we combine the stochastic Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model that describes aftershock sequences well and the physically based rate- and state-dependent friction seismicity model into a single seismicity rate model that models both aftershock activity and changes in background seismicity rate. We implement this model into a data assimilation algorithm that inverts seismicity catalogs to estimate space-time variations in stressing rate. We evaluate the method using a synthetic catalog, and then apply it to a catalog of M ≥ 1.5 events that occurred in the Salton Trough from 1990 to 2009. We validate our stressing rate estimates by comparing them to estimates from a geodetically derived slip model for a large creep event on the Obsidian Buttes fault. The results demonstrate that our approach can identify large aseismic deformation transients in a multidecade long earthquake catalog and roughly constrain the absolute magnitude of the stressing rate transients. Our method can therefore provide a way to detect aseismic transients in regions where geodetic resolution in space or time is poor.

  2. Detecting aseismic strain transients from seismicity data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Llenos, A.L.; McGuire, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    Aseismic deformation transients such as fluid flow, magma migration, and slow slip can trigger changes in seismicity rate. We present a method that can detect these seismicity rate variations and utilize these anomalies to constrain the underlying variations in stressing rate. Because ordinary aftershock sequences often obscure changes in the background seismicity caused by aseismic processes, we combine the stochastic Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model that describes aftershock sequences well and the physically based rate- and state-dependent friction seismicity model into a single seismicity rate model that models both aftershock activity and changes in background seismicity rate. We implement this model into a data assimilation algorithm that inverts seismicity catalogs to estimate space-time variations in stressing rate. We evaluate the method using a synthetic catalog, and then apply it to a catalog of M???1.5 events that occurred in the Salton Trough from 1990 to 2009. We validate our stressing rate estimates by comparing them to estimates from a geodetically derived slip model for a large creep event on the Obsidian Buttes fault. The results demonstrate that our approach can identify large aseismic deformation transients in a multidecade long earthquake catalog and roughly constrain the absolute magnitude of the stressing rate transients. Our method can therefore provide a way to detect aseismic transients in regions where geodetic resolution in space or time is poor. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Understanding independence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annan, James; Hargreaves, Julia

    2016-04-01

    In order to perform any Bayesian processing of a model ensemble, we need a prior over the ensemble members. In the case of multimodel ensembles such as CMIP, the historical approach of ``model democracy'' (i.e. equal weight for all models in the sample) is no longer credible (if it ever was) due to model duplication and inbreeding. The question of ``model independence'' is central to the question of prior weights. However, although this question has been repeatedly raised, it has not yet been satisfactorily addressed. Here I will discuss the issue of independence and present a theoretical foundation for understanding and analysing the ensemble in this context. I will also present some simple examples showing how these ideas may be applied and developed.

  4. Ethicted (evaluation process model to improve personalised ICT services for independent living and active ageing)--future scenario.

    PubMed

    Kärki, Anne; Sävel, Jaana; Sallinen, Merja; Kuusinen, Jere

    2013-01-01

    ICT innovations are constantly developed, and there is no lack of elderly customers, as the number of the elderly is dramatically increasing. Elderly are willing to use ICT to increase their own safety and social activity, but they need trust on the reliability, accessibility and other ethical aspects of ICT including the maintenance of privacy and self-determination. Ethical standards for ICT are usually not considered. "Ethicted" characterizes an ICT service or product as ethically evaluated. As a standardized procedure, it will not only increase the acceptability of ICT, but also provide services for ICT developers. In the future scenario, ICT under development should be evaluated by using a process model that is specifically built to find the lacks in ethical aspects. The model would then be tested by end-users, the formal and informal care givers, to receive direct feedback for redeveloping solutions. As final outcomes, there should be standards for ICT in elderly care and a service for ICT developers to utilize the evaluation model. This future scenario work included partners from 6 EU member countries. The combination of academic research and industrial/commercial interest of ICT developers should and can bring new value to assistive ICT for elderly care.

  5. Independent criticality safety evaluation of deposits in cooler equipment in Building K-31 at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This report provides an independent assessment of nuclear criticality issues associated with uranium deposits in the West and East Coolers for the 6A Booster Station in Building K-31 at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site. This assessment investigates the applicability of the initial assumptions used by Lockheed Martin Energy Systems (Energy Systems) and evaluates criticality calculations previously completed by Energy Systems. The calculations were independently verified. Each component was evaluated for its ability to satisfy requirements for subcriticality and meet the double contingency principle. Facility walk downs, detailed neutronics analysis, and fault tree analysis (FTA) were performed. The facility walk downs provided a better understanding of the building condition and status, equipment configuration, and uranium deposit locations. The detailed neutronics analysis focused on system geometry and moderation levels applicable to the individual components. The FTA considered the annual rate of occurrence for the events identified as potential causes of criticality issues. This report also examines the advantages of using this type of evaluation to assess the removal process for additional components and equipment.

  6. A multiple receiver - multiple transmitter VLF high-order differential analysis evaluation network for near real-time detection and discrimination of seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeberis, Christos; Zaharis, Zaharias; Xenos, Thomas; Spatalas, Spyridon; Stratakis, Dimitrios; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Biagi, Pier francesco

    2016-04-01

    This study provides an evaluation of the application of high-order differential analysis on VLF signals on a multiple-receiver multiple-transmitter network. This application provides a method for near-real-time detection of disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena and can discriminate disturbances that could be classified as false positives and thus should be attributed to other geomagnetic influences. VLF data acquired in Thessaloniki, Greece (40.59N, 22,78E) Herakleion, Greece (35.31N, 25.10E), Nicosia, Cyprus (35.17N, 33.35E), Italy (42.42N, 13.08E) and transmitted by the VLF station in Tavolara, Italy (ICV station 40.923N, 9.731E) and the station in Keflavik, Iceland (ICE 64.02N, 22.57W) from January 2015 to January 2016 were used for the purpose of this paper. The receivers have been developed by Elettronika Srl and are part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). The process applied for this study has been further developed and is based on differential analysis. The signals undergo transformation using an enhanced version of the Hilbert Huang Transform, and relevant spectra are produced. On the product of this process, differential analysis is applied. Finally, the method produces the correlation coefficient of signals that are on the same path over an earthquake epicenter in order to highlight disturbances, and on the opposite can make comparisons with unrelated transmitted signals of different paths to eliminate disturbances that are not localized to the area of interest. This improvement provides a simple method of noise cancellation to signals that would otherwise be considered as false positives. A further evaluation of the method is provided with the presentation and discussion of sample results. The method seems to be a robust tool of analysis of VLF signals and also an automatic detection tool with built-in noise cancellation of outside disturbances.

  7. Global environment facility: Independent evaluation of the pilot phase; Fondo para el medio ambiente mundial: evaluacion independiente de la etapa experimental

    SciTech Connect

    1994-06-01

    This study responds to a request by participants in the Global Environment Facility (GEF) for an independent evaluation of the pilot phase. It profiles the GEF, discusses its policy framework, and reviews project development procedures and the strategies and projects in each of the GEF`s four focal areas. The study concludes that fundamental changes must occur and recommends specific reforms, such as articulating more clearly the GEF`s mandate, objectives, and strategies; addressing deficiencies in meeting its global focus; improving capacities and procedures within implementing agencies for managing the portfolio; and increasing non-government organization (NGO), country and community-level participation.

  8. An independent evaluation of plutonium body burdens in populations near Los Alamos Laboratory using human autopsy data.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, Shannon H; Donovan, Ellen P; Shonka, Joseph J; Le, Matthew H; Widner, Thomas E

    2013-06-01

    In the mid-1940s, the United States began producing atomic weapon components at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In an attempt to better understand historical exposure to nearby residents, this study evaluates plutonium activity in human tissue relative to residential location and length of time at residence. Data on plutonium activity in the lung, vertebrae, and liver of nearby residents were obtained during autopsies as a part of the Los Alamos Tissue Program. Participant residential histories and the distance from each residence to the primary plutonium processing buildings at LANL were evaluated in the analysis. Summary statistics, including Student t-tests and simple regressions, were calculated. Because the biological half-life of plutonium can vary significantly by organ, data were analyzed separately by tissue type (lung, liver, vertebrae). The ratios of plutonium activity (vertebrae:liver; liver:lung) were also analyzed in order to evaluate the importance of timing of exposure. Tissue data were available for 236 participants who lived in a total of 809 locations, of which 677 were verified postal addresses. Residents of Los Alamos were found to have higher plutonium activities in the lung than non-residents. Further, those who moved to Los Alamos before 1955 had higher lung activities than those who moved there later. These trends were not observed with the liver, vertebrae, or vertebrae:liver and liver:lung ratio data, however, and should be interpreted with caution. Although there are many limitations to this study, including the amount of available data and the analytical methods used to analyze the tissue, the overall results indicate that residence (defined as the year that the individual moved to Los Alamos) may have had a strong correlation to plutonium activity in human tissue. This study is the first to present the results of Los Alamos Autopsy Program in relation to residential status and location in Los Alamos.

  9. A citation-based, author- and age-normalized, logarithmic index for evaluation of individual researchers independently of publication counts

    PubMed Central

    Belikov, Aleksey V.; Belikov, Vitaly V.

    2015-01-01

    The use of citation metrics for evaluation of individual researchers has dramatically increased over the last decade. However, currently existing indices either are based on misleading premises or are cumbersome to implement. This leads to poor assessment of researchers and creates dangerous trends in science, such as overproduction of low quality articles. Here we propose an index (namely, the L-index) that does not depend on the number of publications, accounts for different co-author contributions and age of publications, and scales from 0.0 to 9.9. Moreover, it can be calculated with the help of freely available software.

  10. New Madrid Seismic Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NEW MADRID SEISMIC ZONE BY COLONEL J.DAVID NORWOOD United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...mCTBB l USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT New Madrid Seismic Zone by J. David Norwood, COL, USA Michael A. Pearson, COL, USA Project Advisor The...ABSTRACT AUTHOR: J. David Norwood, Colonel, U.S. Army TITLE: New Madrid Seismic Zone FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 22 April 1998 . PAGES:

  11. Seismic monitoring at Deception Island volcano (Antarctica): the 2010-2011 survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín, R.; Carmona, E.; Almendros, J.; Serrano, I.; Villaseñor, A.; Galeano, J.

    2012-04-01

    As an example of the recent advances introduced in seismic monitoring of Deception Island volcano (Antarctica) during recent years, we describe the instrumental network deployed during the 2010-2011 survey by the Instituto Andaluz de Geofísica of University of Granada, Spain (IAG-UGR). The period of operation extended from December 19, 2010 to March 5, 2011. We deployed a wireless seismic network composed by four three-component seismic stations. These stations are based on 24-bit SL04 SARA dataloggers sampling at 100 sps. They use a PC with embedded linux and SEISLOG data acquisition software. We use two types of three-component seismometers: short-period Mark L4C with natural frequency of 1 Hz and medium-period Lennartz3D/5s with natural frequency of 0.2 Hz. The network was designed for an optimum spatial coverage of the northern half of Deception, where a magma chamber has been reported. Station locations include the vicinity of the Spanish base "Gabriel de Castilla" (GdC), Obsidianas Beach, a zone near the craters from the 1970 eruptions, and the Chilean Shelter located south of Pendulum Cove. Continuous data from the local seismic network are received in real-time in the base by wifi transmission. We used Ubiquiti Networks Nanostation2 antennas with 2.4 GHz, dual-polarity, 10 dBi gain, and 54 Mbps transmission rate. They have shown a great robustness and speed for real-time applications. To prioritize data acquisition when the battery level is low, we have designed a circuit that allows independent power management for the seismic station and wireless transmission system. The reception antenna located at GdC is connected to a computer running SEISCOMP. This software supports several transmission protocols and manages the visualization and recording of seismic data, including the generation of summary plots to show the seismic activity. These twelve data channels are stored in miniseed format and displayed in real time, which allows for a rapid evaluation of

  12. Seismic Waveguide of Metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Das, Mukunda P.

    We developed a new method of an earthquake-resistant design to support conventional aseismic system using acoustic metamaterials. The device is an attenuator of a seismic wave that reduces the amplitude of the wave exponentially. Constructing a cylindrical shell-type waveguide composed of many Helmholtz resonators that creates a stop-band for the seismic frequency range, we convert the seismic wave into an attenuated one without touching the building that we want to protect. It is a mechanical way to convert the seismic energy into sound and heat.

  13. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lianjie

    2012-07-09

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  14. Evaluation of the efficiency and effectiveness of independent dose calculation followed by machine log file analysis against conventional measurement based IMRT QA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Boddu, Sunita; Goddu, Murty; Yang, Deshan; Palaniswaamy, Geethpriya; Yaddanapudi, Sridhar; Wooten, Omar; Mutic, Sasa

    2012-09-06

    Experimental methods are commonly used for patient-specific IMRT delivery verification. There are a variety of IMRT QA techniques which have been proposed and clinically used with a common understanding that not one single method can detect all possible errors. The aim of this work was to compare the efficiency and effectiveness of independent dose calculation followed by machine log file analysis to conventional measurement-based methods in detecting errors in IMRT delivery. Sixteen IMRT treatment plans (5 head-and-neck, 3 rectum, 3 breast, and 5 prostate plans) created with a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) were recalculated on a QA phantom. All treatment plans underwent ion chamber (IC) and 2D diode array measurements. The same set of plans was also recomputed with another commercial treatment planning system and the two sets of calculations were compared. The deviations between dosimetric measurements and independent dose calculation were evaluated. The comparisons included evaluations of DVHs and point doses calculated by the two TPS systems. Machine log files were captured during pretreatment composite point dose measurements and analyzed to verify data transfer and performance of the delivery machine. Average deviation between IC measurements and point dose calculations with the two TPSs for head-and-neck plans were 1.2 ± 1.3% and 1.4 ± 1.6%, respectively. For 2D diode array measurements, the mean gamma value with 3% dose difference and 3 mm distance-to-agreement was within 1.5% for 13 of 16 plans. The mean 3D dose differences calculated from two TPSs were within 3% for head-and-neck cases and within 2% for other plans. The machine log file analysis showed that the gantry angle, jaw position, collimator angle, and MUs were consistent as planned, and maximal MLC position error was less than 0.5 mm. The independent dose calculation followed by the machine log analysis takes an average 47 ± 6 minutes, while the experimental approach (using IC and

  15. Exploring hydrocarbon-bearing shale formations with multi-component seismic technology and evaluating direct shear modes produced by vertical-force sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkan, Engin

    It is essential to understand natural fracture systems embedded in shale-gas reservoirs and the stress fields that influence how induced fractures form in targeted shale units. Multicomponent seismic technology and elastic seismic stratigraphy allow geologic formations to be better images through analysis of different S-wave modes as well as the P-wave mode. Significant amounts of energy produced by P-wave sources radiate through the Earth as downgoing SV-wave energy. A vertical-force source is an effective source for direct SV radiation and provides a pure shear-wave mode (SV-SV) that should reveal crucial information about geologic surfaces located in anisotropic media. SV-SV shear wave modes should carry important information about petrophysical characteristics of hydrocarbon systems that cannot be obtained using other elastic-wave modes. Regardless of the difficulties of extracting good-quality SV-SV signal, direct shear waves as well as direct P and converted S energy should be accounted for in 3C seismic studies. Acquisition of full-azimuth seismic data and sampling data at small intervals over long offsets are required for detailed anisotropy analysis. If 3C3D data can be acquired with improved signal-to-noise ratio, more uniform illumination of targets, increased lateral resolution, more accurate amplitude attributes, and better multiple attenuation, such data will have strong interest by the industry. The objectives of this research are: (1) determine the feasibility of extracting direct SV-SV common-mid-point sections from 3-C seismic surveys, (2) improve the exploration for stratigraphic traps by developing systematic relationship between petrophysical properties and combinations of P and S wave modes, (3) create compelling examples illustrating how hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs in low-permeable rocks (particularly anisotropic shale formations) can be better characterized using different Swave modes (P-SV, SV-SV) in addition to the conventional P

  16. Implementation of Seismic Stops in Piping Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bezler, P.; Simos, N.; Wang, Y.K.

    1993-02-01

    Commonwealth Edison has submitted a request to NRC to replace the snubbers in the Reactor Coolant Bypass Line of Byron Station-Unit 2 with gapped pipe supports. The specific supports intended for use are commercial units designated ''Seismic Stops'' manufactured by Robert L. Cloud Associates, Inc. (RLCA). These devices have the physical appearance of snubbers and are essentially spring supports incorporating clearance gaps sized for the Byron Station application. Although the devices have a nonlinear stiffness characteristic, their design adequacy is demonstrated through the use of a proprietary linear elastic piping analysis code ''GAPPIPE'' developed by RLCA. The code essentially has all the capabilities of a conventional piping analysis code while including an equivalent linearization technique to process the nonlinear spring elements. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has assisted the NRC staff in its evaluation of the RLCA implementation of the equivalent Linearization technique and the GAPPIPE code. Towards this end, BNL performed a detailed review of the theoretical basis for the method, an independent evaluation of the Byron piping using the nonlinear time history capability of the ANSYS computer code and by result comparisons to the RLCA developed results, an assessment of the adequacy of the response estimates developed with GAPPIPE. Associated studies included efforts to verify the ANSYS analysis results and the development of bounding calculations for the Byron Piping using linear response spectrum methods.

  17. IMPLEMENTATION OF SEISMIC STOPS IN PIPING SYSTEMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BEZLER,P.

    1993-02-01

    Commonwealth Edison has submitted a request to NRC to replace the snubbers in the Reactor Coolant Bypass Line of Byron Station -Unit 2 with gapped pipe supports. The specific supports intended for use are commercial units designated ''Seismic Stops'' manufactured by Robert L. Cloud Associates, Inc. (RLCA). These devices have the physical appearance of snubbers and are essentially spring supports incorporating clearance gaps sized for the Byron Station application. Although the devices have a nonlinear stiffness characteristic, their design adequacy is demonstrated through the use of a proprietary linear elastic piping analysis code ''GAPPIPE'' developed by RLCA. The code essentially has all the capabilities of a conventional piping analysis code while including an equivalent linearization technique to process the nonlinear spring elements. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has assisted the NRC staff in its evaluation of the RLCA implementation of the equivalent linearization technique and the GAPPIPE code. Towards this end, BNL performed a detailed review of the theoretical basis for the method, an independent evaluation of the Byron piping using the nonlinear time history capability of the ANSYS computer code and by result comparisons to the RLCA developed results, an assessment of the adequacy of the response estimates developed with GAPPIPE. Associated studies included efforts to verify the ANSYS analysis results and the development of bounding calculations for the Byron Piping using linear response spectrum methods.

  18. Summary of November 2010 meeting to evaluate turbidite data for constraining the recurrence parameters of great Cascadia earthquakes for the update of national seismic hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a meeting of geologists, marine sedimentologists, geophysicists, and seismologists that was held on November 18–19, 2010 at Oregon State University in Corvallis, Oregon. The overall goal of the meeting was to evaluate observations of turbidite deposits to provide constraints on the recurrence time and rupture extent of great Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) earthquakes for the next update of the U.S. national seismic hazard maps (NSHM). The meeting was convened at Oregon State University because this is the major center for collecting and evaluating turbidite evidence of great Cascadia earthquakes by Chris Goldfinger and his colleagues. We especially wanted the participants to see some of the numerous deep sea cores this group has collected that contain the turbidite deposits. Great earthquakes on the CSZ pose a major tsunami, ground-shaking, and ground-failure hazard to the Pacific Northwest. Figure 1 shows a map of the Pacific Northwest with a model for the rupture zone of a moment magnitude Mw 9.0 earthquake on the CSZ and the ground shaking intensity (in ShakeMap format) expected from such an earthquake, based on empirical ground-motion prediction equations. The damaging effects of such an earthquake would occur over a wide swath of the Pacific Northwest and an accompanying tsunami would likely cause devastation along the Pacifc Northwest coast and possibly cause damage and loss of life in other areas of the Pacific. A magnitude 8 earthquake on the CSZ would cause damaging ground shaking and ground failure over a substantial area and could also generate a destructive tsunami. The recent tragic occurrence of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-Oki, Japan, earthquake highlights the importance of having accurate estimates of the recurrence times and magnitudes of great earthquakes on subduction zones. For the U.S. national seismic hazard maps, estimating the hazard from the Cascadia subduction zone has been based on coastal paleoseismic evidence of great

  19. CPT site characterization for seismic hazards in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liao, T.; Mayne, P.W.; Tuttle, M.P.; Schweig, E.S.; Van Arsdale, R.B.

    2002-01-01

    A series of cone penetration tests (CPTs) were conducted in the vicinity of the New Madrid seismic zone in central USA for quantifying seismic hazards, obtaining geotechnical soil properties, and conducting studies at liquefaction sites related to the 1811-1812 and prehistoric New Madrid earthquakes. The seismic piezocone provides four independent measurements for delineating the stratigraphy, liquefaction potential, and site amplification parameters. At the same location, two independent assessments of soil liquefaction susceptibility can be made using both the normalized tip resistance (qc1N) and shear wave velocity (Vs1). In lieu of traditional deterministic approaches, the CPT data can be processed using probability curves to assess the level and likelihood of future liquefaction occurrence. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Probabilistic seismic risk of the territory of Bishkek city, Kyrgyzstan

    SciTech Connect

    Kamchybekov, Murataly Pakirovich

    2008-07-08

    For seismic risk analysis were gathered information about district's seismicity, tectonics, topography, and engineering--geotechnical conditions, which present in apartments, infrastructures and demographies. All of these informations are joined within the limits of GIS for father probabilistic evaluations from different losses levels from earthquake, and also definitions of effective arrangements by reaction. There were given analysis of obtained results with the purpose to take into the consideration and falling of seismic risk's levels.

  1. Seismic tomography of compressional wave attenuation structure for Kı¯lauea Volcano, Hawai`i

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Guoqing; Shearer, Peter M.; Amelung, Falk; Okubo, Paul G.

    2015-04-01

    We present a frequency-independent three-dimensional (3-D) compressional wave attenuation model (indicated by the reciprocal of quality factor Qp) for Kı¯lauea Volcano in Hawai`i. We apply the simul2000 tomographic algorithm to the attenuation operator t* values for the inversion of Qp perturbations through a recent 3-D seismic velocity model and earthquake location catalog. The t* values are measured from amplitude spectra of 26708 P wave arrivals of 1036 events recorded by 61 seismic stations at the Hawaiian Volcanology Observatory. The 3-D Qp model has a uniform horizontal grid spacing of 3 km, and the vertical node intervals range between 2 and 10 km down to 35 km depth. In general, the resolved Qp values increase with depth, and there is a correlation between seismic activity and low-Qp values. The area beneath the summit caldera is dominated by low-Qp anomalies throughout the entire resolved depth range. The Southwest Rift Zone and the East Rift Zone exhibit very high Qp values at about 9 km depth, whereas the shallow depths are characterized with low-Qp anomalies comparable with those in the summit area. The seismic zones and fault systems generally display relatively high Qp values relative to the summit. The newly developed Qp model provides an important complement to the existing velocity models for exploring the magmatic system and evaluating and interpreting intrinsic physical properties of the rocks in the study area.

  2. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  3. A procedure to evaluate the efficiency of surface sterilization methods in culture-independent fungal endophyte studies.

    PubMed

    Burgdorf, R J; Laing, M D; Morris, C D; Jamal-Ally, S F

    2014-01-01

    Extraneous DNA interferes with PCR studies of endophytic fungi. A procedure was developed with which to evaluate the removal of extraneous DNA. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) leaves were sprayed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and then subjected to physical and chemical surface treatments. The fungal ITS1 products were amplified from whole tissue DNA extractions. ANOVA was performed on the DNA bands representing S. cerevisiae on the agarose gel. Band profile comparisons using permutational multivariate ANOVA (PERMANOVA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were performed on DGGE gel data, and band numbers were compared between treatments. Leaf surfaces were viewed under variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM). Yeast band analysis of the agarose gel showed that there was no significant difference in the mean band DNA quantity after physical and chemical treatments, but they both differed significantly (p < 0.05) from the untreated control. PERMANOVA revealed a significant difference between all treatments (p < 0.05). The mean similarity matrix showed that the physical treatment results were more reproducible than those from the chemical treatment results. The NMDS showed that the physical treatment was the most consistent. VPSEM indicated that the physical treatment was the most effective treatment to remove surface microbes and debris. The use of molecular and microscopy methods for the post-treatment detection of yeast inoculated onto wheat leaf surfaces demonstrated the effectiveness of the surface treatment employed, and this can assist researchers in optimizing their surface sterilization techniques in DNA-based fungal endophyte studies.

  4. Evidence-based intervention against bullying and cyberbullying: Evaluation of the NoTrap! program in two independent trials.

    PubMed

    Palladino, Benedetta E; Nocentini, Annalaura; Menesini, Ersilia

    2016-01-01

    The NoTrap! (Noncadiamointrappola!) program is a school-based intervention, which utilizes a peer-led approach to prevent and combat both traditional bullying and cyberbullying. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of the third Edition of the program in accordance with the recent criteria for evidence-based interventions. Towards this aim, two quasi-experimental trials involving adolescents (age M = 14.91, SD = .98) attending their first year at different high schools were conducted. In Trial 1 (control group, n = 171; experimental group, n = 451), latent growth curve models for data from pre-, middle- and post-tests showed that intervention significantly predicted change over time in all the target variables (victimization, bullying, cybervictimization, and cyberbullying). Specifically, target variables were stable for the control group but decreased significantly over time for the experimental group. Long-term effects at the follow up 6 months later were also found. In Trial 2 (control group, n = 227; experimental group, n = 234), the moderating effect of gender was examined and there was a reported decrease in bullying and cyberbullying over time (pre- and post-test) in the experimental group but not the control group, and this decrease was similar for boys and girls.

  5. A procedure to evaluate the efficiency of surface sterilization methods in culture-independent fungal endophyte studies

    PubMed Central

    Burgdorf, R.J.; Laing, M.D.; Morris, C.D.; Jamal-Ally, S.F.

    2014-01-01

    Extraneous DNA interferes with PCR studies of endophytic fungi. A procedure was developed with which to evaluate the removal of extraneous DNA. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) leaves were sprayed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and then subjected to physical and chemical surface treatments. The fungal ITS1 products were amplified from whole tissue DNA extractions. ANOVA was performed on the DNA bands representing S. cerevisiae on the agarose gel. Band profile comparisons using permutational multivariate ANOVA (PERMANOVA) and non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMDS) were performed on DGGE gel data, and band numbers were compared between treatments. Leaf surfaces were viewed under variable pressure scanning electron microscopy (VPSEM). Yeast band analysis of the agarose gel showed that there was no significant difference in the mean band DNA quantity after physical and chemical treatments, but they both differed significantly (p < 0.05) from the untreated control. PERMANOVA revealed a significant difference between all treatments (p < 0.05). The mean similarity matrix showed that the physical treatment results were more reproducible than those from the chemical treatment results. The NMDS showed that the physical treatment was the most consistent. VPSEM indicated that the physical treatment was the most effective treatment to remove surface microbes and debris. The use of molecular and microscopy methods for the post-treatment detection of yeast inoculated onto wheat leaf surfaces demonstrated the effectiveness of the surface treatment employed, and this can assist researchers in optimizing their surface sterilization techniques in DNA-based fungal endophyte studies. PMID:25477934

  6. The evaluation of the earthquake hazard using the exponential distribution method for different seismic source regions in and around Aǧrı

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Yusuf; Türker, Tuǧba

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study; were determined of the earthquake hazard using the exponential distribution method for different seismic sources of the Aǧrı and vicinity. A homogeneous earthquake catalog has been examined for 1900-2015 (the instrumental period) with 456 earthquake data for Aǧrı and vicinity. Catalog; Bogazici University Kandilli Observatory and Earthquake Research Institute (Burke), National Earthquake Monitoring Center (NEMC), TUBITAK, TURKNET the International Seismological Center (ISC), Seismological Research Institute (IRIS) has been created using different catalogs like. Aǧrı and vicinity are divided into 7 different seismic source regions with epicenter distribution of formed earthquakes in the instrumental period, focal mechanism solutions, and existing tectonic structures. In the study, the average magnitude value are calculated according to the specified magnitude ranges for 7 different seismic source region. According to the estimated calculations for 7 different seismic source regions, the biggest difference corresponding with the classes of determined magnitudes between observed and expected cumulative probabilities are determined. The recurrence period and earthquake occurrence number per year are estimated of occurring earthquakes in the Aǧrı and vicinity. As a result, 7 different seismic source regions are determined occurrence probabilities of an earthquake 3.2 magnitude, Region 1 was greater than 6.7 magnitude, Region 2 was greater than than 4.7 magnitude, Region 3 was greater than 5.2 magnitude, Region 4 was greater than 6.2 magnitude, Region 5 was greater than 5.7 magnitude, Region 6 was greater than 7.2 magnitude, Region 7 was greater than 6.2 magnitude. The highest observed magnitude 7 different seismic source regions of Aǧrı and vicinity are estimated 7 magnitude in Region 6. Region 6 are determined according to determining magnitudes, occurrence years of earthquakes in the future years, respectively, 7.2 magnitude was in 158

  7. 'Independence' Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for 'Independence' Panorama (QTVR)

    This is the Spirit 'Independence' panorama, acquired on martian days, or sols, 536 to 543 (July 6 to 13, 2005), from a position in the 'Columbia Hills' near the summit of 'Husband Hill.' The summit of 'Husband Hill' is the peak near the right side of this panorama and is about 100 meters (328 feet) away from the rover and about 30 meters (98 feet) higher in elevation. The rocky outcrops downhill and on the left side of this mosaic include 'Larry's Lookout' and 'Cumberland Ridge,' which Spirit explored in April, May, and June of 2005.

    The panorama spans 360 degrees and consists of 108 individual images, each acquired with five filters of the rover's panoramic camera. The approximate true color of the mosaic was generated using the camera's 750-, 530-, and 480-nanometer filters. During the 8 martian days, or sols, that it took to acquire this image, the lighting varied considerably, partly because of imaging at different times of sol, and partly because of small sol-to-sol variations in the dustiness of the atmosphere. These slight changes produced some image seams and rock shadows. These seams have been eliminated from the sky portion of the mosaic to better simulate the vista a person standing on Mars would see. However, it is often not possible or practical to smooth out such seams for regions of rock, soil, rover tracks or solar panels. Such is the nature of acquiring and assembling large panoramas from the rovers.

  8. Hydraulic and hydrologic evaluation of PAR Pond Dam. Technical evaluation report

    SciTech Connect

    Reich, M.; Wang, P.C.; Khanbilvardi, R.; Bezler, P.

    1993-10-01

    The PAR Pond Dam at Savannah River Plant was constructed in 1958--1959. Seepage, depressions, boils and spring flow were observed in varying locations on the dam in the last few years. Comprehensive geotechnical and hydraulic investigations pertaining to the effects of the above observations on the abilities of the dam to withstand future floods were made in 1991 and early 1993 where dam capacity to survive flooding and seismic events were evaluated. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was asked by the Department of Energy (EH) to carry out an independent review of the PAR Pond Dam response to future flooding and seismic events. This report addresses the studies made to evaluate the capacity of the dam to survive floods. A companion report will summarize the evaluations performed to assess the seismic capacity of the dam.

  9. A robust economic technique for crosswell seismic profiling. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hardage, B.A.; Simmons, J.L. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to investigate a novel way to acquire crosswell tomographic data, that being to use a standard surface-positioned seismic energy source stationed inline with two wells that have downhole receiver arrays. This field technique differs from the traditional way that crosswell tomography is done, which requires that a downhole receiver array be in one well and that a downhole seismic source be in a second well. The purpose of the research effort was to evaluate the relative merits of the potential advantages and pitfalls of surface-source crosswell tomography, which some also refer to as twin-receiver-well crosswell tomography. The principal findings were: (1) surface-source crosswell tomography is a viable technology and can be used in appropriate reservoir conditions, (2) raypath modeling should be done to determine if the targeted interwell space is properly illuminated by surface-generated wavefields before proceeding to collect surface-source tomographic data, (3) crosswell data generated by a surface-based source are subject to a greater range of traveltime errors than are data generated by a downhole source, primarily due to shot statics caused by variable weathered layers, and (4) the accuracy and reliability of the interwell tomogram increase as more independent velocity information (sonic logs, velocity checkshots, vertical seismic profiles, downhole-source crosswell data) is available to constrain the inversion. The surface-source approach to crosswell tomography was evaluated by recording twin-receiver well data at the Texaco Borehole Test Site in Humble, Texas.

  10. Incorporating induced seismicity in the 2014 United States National Seismic Hazard Model: results of the 2014 workshop and sensitivity studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Mueller, Charles S.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Hoover, Susan M.; Rubinstein, Justin L.; Llenos, Andrea L.; Michael, Andrew J.; Ellsworth, William L.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Holland, Austin A.; Anderson, John G.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Model for the conterminous United States was updated in 2014 to account for new methods, input models, and data necessary for assessing the seismic ground shaking hazard from natural (tectonic) earthquakes. The U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Model project uses probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to quantify the rate of exceedance for earthquake ground shaking (ground motion). For the 2014 National Seismic Hazard Model assessment, the seismic hazard from potentially induced earthquakes was intentionally not considered because we had not determined how to properly treat these earthquakes for the seismic hazard analysis. The phrases “potentially induced” and “induced” are used interchangeably in this report, however it is acknowledged that this classification is based on circumstantial evidence and scientific judgment. For the 2014 National Seismic Hazard Model update, the potentially induced earthquakes were removed from the NSHM’s earthquake catalog, and the documentation states that we would consider alternative models for including induced seismicity in a future version of the National Seismic Hazard Model. As part of the process of incorporating induced seismicity into the seismic hazard model, we evaluate the sensitivity of the seismic hazard from induced seismicity to five parts of the hazard model: (1) the earthquake catalog, (2) earthquake rates, (3) earthquake locations, (4) earthquake Mmax (maximum magnitude), and (5) earthquake ground motions. We describe alternative input models for each of the five parts that represent differences in scientific opinions on induced seismicity characteristics. In this report, however, we do not weight these input models to come up with a preferred final model. Instead, we present a sensitivity study showing uniform seismic hazard maps obtained by applying the alternative input models for induced seismicity. The final model will be released after

  11. Visual evaluation and usefulness of medical high-resolution liquid-crystal displays with use of independent sub-pixel driving technology.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Seigo; Hirata, Yoshiharu; Ishii, Rie; Ogawa, Toshihide

    2011-07-01

    Liquid-crystal displays (LCDs) used for medical imaging, such as luminance characteristics and panel surface processing, have been developed as a medium substituting for film. There are various models of and specifications for display, but those compatible with high-resolution radiographic diagnostic images have been required with the recent progression of high-resolution modalities. Displays are necessary for faithful presentation of radiographic diagnostic images acquired by X-ray systems. In independent sub-pixel driving (ISD) technology, aiming at high-resolution display, three sub-pixels contained in one pixel of the LCD independently display images, which increases the threefold resolutions in direction of the sub-pixels, facilitating faithful image display with less curtailed pixels. This is a new display technology which may improve the diagnostic performance with regard to reading of medical images. We evaluated the characteristics of ISD technology and performed a visual evaluation of phantom images to investigate its usefulness. After confirming the physical properties of LCDs, we performed a visual evaluation of CDMAM phantom images employing the calculated image quality figure (IQF). The detectability of 15 mega-sub-pixel (15 MsP) significantly improved despite the specification being 5 mega-pixel (5 MP), and that of 9 MsP was higher than that of 5 MP despite the specification being 3 MP. The usefulness of ISD for 6 MsP was also confirmed. Therefore, ISD technology was useful for all LCDs. ISD technology markedly advanced the LCD display performance for medical use.

  12. Environment, Safety and Health independent evaluation of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Company`s (FERMCO) Comprehensive Environmental Occupational Safety and Health Program (CEOSHP)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The Office of Environmental Management (EM) requested the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) to perform an independent evaluation of Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corporation`s (FERMCO`s) Comprehensive Environmental occupational Safety and Health Program (CEOSHP) document. In 1992, FERMCO was awarded the Department of Energy`s (DOE) first Environmental Restoration Management Contract and developed the CEOSHP to respond to contract requirements. EH limited its review to the CEOSHP because this document constitutes FERMCO`s written environment, safety and health (ES&H) program document and thus provides the basis for FERMCO`s ES&H program. EH`s independent review identified several major areas of the CEOSHP that need to be revised if it is to function successfully as the program-level document for FERMCO`s environment, safety and health program. The problems identified occur throughout the document and apply across the three CEOSHP sections evaluated by EH: the Occupational Safety and Health program, the Environmental Protection program, and the Radiological Control program. Primary findings of the CEOSHP: (1) Does not fully reflect the occupational safety and health, environmental protection, and radiological control requirements of the Department; (2) Does not convey a strong sense of management leadership of the program or clearly delineate employee rights, responsibilities, and roles in FERMCO`s ES&H program; (3) Is not a program management-level document; (4) Does not describe a ``seamless`` ES&H program; and (5) Does not clearly convey how FERMCO`s ES&H program actually works. EH`s detailed evaluation of FERMCO`s CEOSHP, along with specific recommendations are presented in Sections 2, 3, and 4 of this report. EH believes that EM will find this review and analysis useful in its efforts to assist FERMCO in a comprehensive redrafting of the CEOSHP.

  13. SOAR Telescope seismic performance II: seismic mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Jonathan H.; Muñoz, Freddy; Warner, Michael; Rivera, Rossano; Martínez, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    We describe design modifications to the SOAR telescope intended to reduce the impact of future major earthquakes, based on the facility's experience during recent events, most notably the September 2015 Illapel earthquake. Specific modifications include a redesign of the encoder systems for both azimuth and elevation, seismic trigger for the emergency stop system, and additional protections for the telescope secondary mirror system. The secondary mirror protection may combine measures to reduce amplification of seismic vibration and "fail-safe" components within the assembly. The status of these upgrades is presented.

  14. Seismic Velocity Measurements at Expanded Seismic Network Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Woolery, Edward W; Wang, Zhenming

    2005-01-01

    Structures at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), as well as at other locations in the northern Jackson Purchase of western Kentucky may be subjected to large far-field earthquake ground motions from the New Madrid seismic zone, as well as those from small and moderate-sized local events. The resultant ground motion a particular structure is exposed from such event will be a consequence of the earthquake magnitude, the structures' proximity to the event, and the dynamic and geometrical characteristics of the thick soils upon which they are, of necessity, constructed. This investigation evaluated the latter. Downhole and surface (i.e., refraction and reflection) seismic velocity data were collected at the Kentucky Seismic and Strong-Motion Network expansion sites in the vicinity of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to define the dynamic properties of the deep sediment overburden that can produce modifying effects on earthquake waves. These effects are manifested as modifications of the earthquake waves' amplitude, frequency, and duration. Each of these three ground motion manifestations is also fundamental to the assessment of secondary earthquake engineering hazards such as liquefaction.

  15. Seismic monitoring at The Geysers

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Romero, A.; Vasco, D.; Kirkpatrick, A.; Peterson, J.E.; Zucca, J.J.; Hutchings, L.J.; Kasameyer, P.W.

    1993-04-01

    During the last several years Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have been working with industry partners at The Geysers geothermal field to evaluate and develop methods for applying the results of microearthquake (MEQ) monitoring. It is a well know fact that seismicity at The Geysers is a common occurrence, however, there have been many studies and papers written on the origin and significance of the seismicity. The attitude toward MEQ data ranges from being nothing more than an curious artifact of the production activities, to being a critical tool in evaluating the reservoir performance. The purpose of the work undertaken b y LBL and LLNL is to evaluate the utility, as well as the methods and procedures used in of MEQ monitoring, recommend the most cost effective implementation of the methods, and if possible link physical processes and parameters to the generation of MEQ activity. To address the objectives above the MEQ work can be categorized into two types of studies. The first type is the direct analysis of the spatial and temporal distribution of MEQ activity and studying the nature of the source function relative to the physical or chemical processes causing the seismicity. The second broad area of study is imaging the reservoir/geothermal areas with the energy created by the MEQ activity and inferring the physical and/or chemical properties within the zone of imaging. The two types of studies have obvious overlap, and for a complete evaluation and development require high quality data from arrays of multicomponent stations. Much of the effort to date at The Geysers by both DOE and the producers has concentrated establishing a high quality data base. It is only within the last several years that this data base is being fully evaluated for the proper and cost effective use of MEQ activity. Presented here are the results to date of DOE`s effort in the acquisition and analysis of the MEQ data.

  16. Seismic Safety Of Simple Masonry Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnuolo, Mariateresa; Faella, Giuseppe

    2008-07-08

    Several masonry buildings comply with the rules for simple buildings provided by seismic codes. For these buildings explicit safety verifications are not compulsory if specific code rules are fulfilled. In fact it is assumed that their fulfilment ensures a suitable seismic behaviour of buildings and thus adequate safety under earthquakes. Italian and European seismic codes differ in the requirements for simple masonry buildings, mostly concerning the building typology, the building geometry and the acceleration at site. Obviously, a wide percentage of buildings assumed simple by codes should satisfy the numerical safety verification, so that no confusion and uncertainty have to be given rise to designers who must use the codes. This paper aims at evaluating the seismic response of some simple unreinforced masonry buildings that comply with the provisions of the new Italian seismic code. Two-story buildings, having different geometry, are analysed and results from nonlinear static analyses performed by varying the acceleration at site are presented and discussed. Indications on the congruence between code rules and results of numerical analyses performed according to the code itself are supplied and, in this context, the obtained result can provide a contribution for improving the seismic code requirements.

  17. Letter report seismic shutdown system failure mode and effect analysis

    SciTech Connect

    KECK, R.D.

    1999-09-01

    The Supply Ventilation System Seismic Shutdown ensures that the 234-52 building supply fans, the dry air process fans and vertical development calciner are shutdown following a seismic event. This evaluates the failure modes and determines the effects of the failure modes.

  18. A comparison between MRI, sonography and Functional Independence Score in Haemophilia methods in diagnosis, evaluation and classification of arthropathy in severe haemophilia A and B.

    PubMed

    Tasbihi, Mandana; Pishdad, Parisa; Haghpanah, Sezaneh; Ardeshiri, Rezvan; Tavoosi, Hakimeh; Karimi, Mehran

    2016-03-01

    Evaluation of joints in children with haemophilia is important in detecting abnormalities, staging their severity and following the effects of treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the correlation of FISH score (Functional Independence Score in Haemophilia) with the scores obtained by MRI and sonography for the diagnosis, evaluation and classification of arthropathy in severe haemophilia. In this cross-sectional study on 25 severe haemophilia patients, FISH, MRI and sonography procedures were performed in the elbow or knee joint. All patients' information, including age, type of haemophilia, affected joint, scores of MRI, sonography and FISH, dose of factor consumed, weight and prophylaxis protocol were collected and analysed. Among the 25 patients (age range of 11-70 years), 22 patients were haemophilia A and three patients were haemophilia B. Affected joints were right knee in 12 patients, left knee in nine and right elbow in four. There was only a statistically significant negative correlation between FISH and MRI Additive (A) scale (rs = -0.537, P = 0.006). Considering cartilage loss domain (related MRI A scale: 13-20), 20 patients (80%) were classified in this group with FISH scores ranged from 17 to 22. On the basis of our results, FISH scores in severe haemophilia patients were negatively correlated with MRI A scale. Also, it seems that a FISH score less than 22 could be considered as loss of cartilage; however, due to the small number of our patients, it needs further assessment in different populations.

  19. Evaluating the power to detect temporal trends in fishery independent surveys: A case study based on Gillnets Set in the Ohio waters of Lake Erie for walleye

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Tyler; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Tyson, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Fishery-independent (FI) surveys provide critical information used for the sustainable management and conservation of fish populations. Because fisheries management often requires the effects of management actions to be evaluated and detected within a relatively short time frame, it is important that research be directed toward FI survey evaluation, especially with respect to the ability to detect temporal trends. Using annual FI gill-net survey data for Lake Erie walleyes Sander vitreus collected from 1978 to 2006 as a case study, our goals were to (1) highlight the usefulness of hierarchical models for estimating spatial and temporal sources of variation in catch per effort (CPE); (2) demonstrate how the resulting variance estimates can be used to examine the statistical power to detect temporal trends in CPE in relation to sample size, duration of sampling, and decisions regarding what data are most appropriate for analysis; and (3) discuss recommendations for evaluating FI surveys and analyzing the resulting data to support fisheries management. This case study illustrated that the statistical power to detect temporal trends was low over relatively short sampling periods (e.g., 5–10 years) unless the annual decline in CPE reached 10–20%. For example, if 50 sites were sampled each year, a 10% annual decline in CPE would not be detected with more than 0.80 power until 15 years of sampling, and a 5% annual decline would not be detected with more than 0.8 power for approximately 22 years. Because the evaluation of FI surveys is essential for ensuring that trends in fish populations can be detected over management-relevant time periods, we suggest using a meta-analysis–type approach across systems to quantify sources of spatial and temporal variation. This approach can be used to evaluate and identify sampling designs that increase the ability of managers to make inferences about trends in fish stocks.

  20. Hatchery Evaluation Report / Lyons Ferry Hatchery - Fall Chinook : An Independent Audit Based on Integrated Hatchery Operations Teams (IHOT) Performance Measures : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, Montgomery

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the findings of the independent audit of the Lyons Ferry Hatchery (Fall Chinook). The audit is being conducted as a requirement of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) ``Strategy for Salmon`` and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Under the audit, the hatcheries are evaluated against policies and related performance measures developed by the Integrated Hatchery Operations Team (IHOT). IHOT is a multi-agency group established by the NPPC to direct the development of new basinwide standards for managing and operating fish hatcheries. The audit was conducted in April 1996 as part of a two-year effort that will include 67 hatcheries and satellite facilities located on the Columbia and Snake River system in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington. The hatchery operating agencies include the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

  1. Radiative transfer theory for estimation of the seismic moment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sens-Schönfelder, C.; Wegler, U.

    2006-12-01

    We propose a new technique to obtain source spectra and seismic moments of regional earthquakes from envelopes of seismic coda. As compared to existing methods, our approach is based on a physical model of the scattering process that produces the seismic coda. This allows the direct estimation of source parameters, without the necessity to fix proportionality coefficients with reference events. We see an appreciable advantage because the method is independent of the output from other techniques, such as reference events provided by moment inversions. The main component of our method is a joint inversion of the seismic records for source and site parameters, as well as for medium parameters assuming isotropic sources and isotropic, acoustic scattering in a half-space. The method is tested with recordings of 11 earthquakes (4 <= Ml <= 6) by the German Regional Seismic Network at epicentral distances less than 1000 km. We invert the traces in eight frequency bands between 0.2 and 24 Hz and demonstrate that our estimates of the seismic moment are in good agreement with values obtained in independent studies using waveform inversion techniques. In fact our estimates of the seismic moment are better than approximations obtained from local magnitudes using empirical relations specifically derived for the region under study. The parameters that describe the scattering medium are mean free path that we found to average around 690 km and the intrinsic quality factor for which we obtain IQ = 500 below 3 Hz.

  2. Evaluating the robustness of models developed from field spectral data in predicting African grass foliar nitrogen concentration using WorldView-2 image as an independent test dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutanga, Onisimo; Adam, Elhadi; Adjorlolo, Clement; Abdel-Rahman, Elfatih M.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the extent to which the resampled field spectra compare with the actual image spectra of the new generation multispectral WorldView-2 (WV-2) satellite. This was achieved by developing models from resampled field spectra data and testing them on an actual WV-2 image of the study area. We evaluated the performance of reflectance ratios (RI), normalized difference indices (NDI) and random forest (RF) regression model in predicting foliar nitrogen concentration in a grassland environment. The field measured spectra were used to calibrate the RF model using a randomly selected training (n = 70%) nitrogen data set. The model developed from the field spectra resampled to WV-2 wavebands was validated on an independent field spectral test dataset as well as on the actual WV-2 image of the same area (n = 30%, bootstrapped a 100 times). The results show that the model developed using RI could predict nitrogen with a mean R2 of 0.74 and 0.65 on an independent field spectral test data set and on the actual WV-2 image, respectively. The root mean square error of prediction (RMSE %) was 0.17 and 0.22 for the field test data set and the WV-2 image, respectively. Results provide an insight on the magnitude of errors that are expected when up-scaling field spectral models to airborne or satellite image data. The prediction also indicates the unceasing relevance of field spectroscopy studies to better understand the spectral models critical for vegetation quality assessment.

  3. Spatial Distributed Seismicity Model of Seismic Hazard Mapping in the North-China Region: A Comparison with the GSHAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Q.; Shi, B.; Meng, L.

    2010-12-01

    The North China is one of the most seismically active regions in the mainland China. The moderate to large earthquakes have occurred here throughout history, resulting in huge losses of human life and properties. With the probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) approach, we investigate the influence of different seismic environments, incorporating both near surface soil properties and distributed historical and modern seismicity. A simplified seismic source model, derived with the consideration of regional active fault distributions, is presented for the North China region. The spatial distributed seismicity model of PSHA is used to calculate the level of ground motion likely to be exceeded in a given time period. Following Frankel (1995) approach of circular Gaussian smoothing procedure, in the PSHA’s calculation, we proposed the fault-rupture-oriented elliptical Gaussian smoothing with the assumptions that earthquakes occur on faults or fault zones of past earthquakes to delineate the potential seismic zones (Lapajine et al., 2003). This is combined with regional active fault strike directions and the seismicity distribution patterns. Next Generation Attenuation model ((NGA), Boore et al., 2007) is used in generating hazard map for PGA with 2%, 5%, and 10 % probability of being exceeded in 50 years, and the resultant hazard map is compared with the result given by Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Project (GSHAP). There is general agreement for PGA distribution patterns between the results of this study and the GSHAP map that used the same seismic source zones. However, peak ground accelerations predicted in this study are typically 10-20% less than those of the GSHAP, and the seismic source models, such as fault distributions and regional seismicity used in the GSHAP seem to be oversimplified. We believe this study represents an improvement on prior seismic hazard evaluations for the region. In addition to the updated input data, we believe that, by

  4. Oklahoma seismic network. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Luza, K.V.; Lawson, J.E. Jr. |

    1993-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established rigorous guidelines that must be adhered to before a permit to construct a nuclear-power plant is granted to an applicant. Local as well as regional seismicity and structural relationships play an integral role in the final design criteria for nuclear power plants. The existing historical record of seismicity is inadequate in a number of areas of the Midcontinent region because of the lack of instrumentation and (or) the sensitivity of the instruments deployed to monitor earthquake events. The Nemaha Uplift/Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly is one of five principal areas east of the Rocky Mountain front that has a moderately high seismic-risk classification. The Nemaha uplift, which is common to the states of Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska, is approximately 415 miles long and 12-14 miles wide. The Midcontinent Geophysical Anomaly extends southward from Minnesota across Iowa and the southeastern corner of Nebraska and probably terminates in central Kansas. A number of moderate-sized earthquakes--magnitude 5 or greater--have occurred along or west of the Nemaha uplift. The Oklahoma Geological Survey, in cooperation with the geological surveys of Kansas, Nebraska, and Iowa, conducted a 5-year investigation of the seismicity and tectonic relationships of the Nemaha uplift and associated geologic features in the Midcontinent. This investigation was intended to provide data to be used to design nuclear-power plants. However, the information is also being used to design better large-scale structures, such as dams and high-use buildings, and to provide the necessary data to evaluate earthquake-insurance rates in the Midcontinent.

  5. Seismic monitoring of Central Asia territory in KNDC.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukambayev, Aidyn; Mikhailova, Natalia

    2015-04-01

    The Central Asia territory includes the territory of five post-Soviet countries: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. Every country has its own independent network of seismic observations and Data Processing Center aimed at every day seismic monitoring of one country territory. However, seismic hazard of Central Asia territory is stipulated by one geodynamic system that generates simultaneous large earthquakes on the territory of different countries. Thus, it is necessary to observe seismic situation for the whole region for emergency situations and for compilation of joint seismic bulletins of Central Asia region. A new contemporary network of seismic observations operated by the Institute of Geophysical Researches has been installed in Kazakhstan during last 15 years. Mainly, these are seismic arrays located throughout the country perimeter. The arrays were constructed under support of the CTBTO, and AFTAC. There are also IRIS and CAREMON stations. All data arrive to KNDC (Kazakhstan National Data Center) in real time mode. In addition, KNDC receives data in real time from stations Zalesovo (Russia), Alibek (Turkmenistan), Ala-Archa and Tokmak (Kyrgyzstan). Arrival times in the form of tables are received with 24-hours delay from almost 20 Kazakhstan stations belonging to SEME MES RK. This observation system allows monitoring the Central Asian seismicity by earthquakes with representative magnitude more than 3.5. In some regions, the events with magnitude 1.5 are recorded. As result, different products with different operativity are created for Central Asia territory: -bulletin of urgent alerts; -automatic seismic bulletin; -interactive seismic bulletin; -joint seismic operative bulletin by data arrived on-line and in table form. After that, in retrospective mode, the events nature is identified to discriminate mining explosions (up to 4000 per year) and natural earthquakes (up to 15000 per year). The results are available at KNDC web

  6. Ischia Island: Historical Seismicity and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlino, S.; Cubellis, E.; Iannuzzi, R.; Luongo, G.; Obrizzo, F.

    2003-04-01

    The seismic energy release in volcanic areas is a complex process and the island of Ischia provides a significant scenario of historical seismicity. This is characterized by the occurence of earthquakes with low energy and high intensity. Information on the seismicity of the island spans about eight centuries, starting from 1228. With regard to effects, the most recent earthquake of 1883 is extensively documented both in the literature and unpublished sources. The earthquake caused 2333 deaths and the destruction of the historical and environmental heritage of some areas of the island. The most severe damage occurred in Casamicciola. This event, which was the first great catastrophe after the unification of Italy in the 1860s (Imax = XI degree MCS), represents an important date in the prevention of natural disasters, in that it was after this earthquake that the first Seismic Safety Act in Italy was passed by which lower risk zones were identified for new settlements. Thanks to such detailed analysis, reliable modelling of the seismic source was also obtained. The historical data onwards makes it possible to identify the area of the epicenter of all known earthquakes as the northern slope of Monte Epomeo, while analysis of the effects of earthquakes and the geological structures allows us to evaluate the stress fields that generate the earthquakes. In a volcanic area, interpretation of the mechanisms of release and propagation of seismic energy is made even more complex as the stress field that acts at a regional level is compounded by that generated from migration of magmatic masses towards the surface, as well as the rheologic properties of the rocks dependent on the high geothermic gradient. Such structural and dynamic conditions make the island of Ischia a seismic area of considerable interest. It would appear necessary to evaluate the expected damage caused by a new event linked to the renewal of dynamics of the island, where high population density and the

  7. Seismic hazard assessment of Syria using seismicity, DEM, slope, active tectonic and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Raed; Adris, Ahmad; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we discuss the use of an integrated remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques for evaluation of seismic hazard areas in Syria. The present study is the first time effort to create seismic hazard map with the help of GIS. In the proposed approach, we have used Aster satellite data, digital elevation data (30 m resolution), earthquake data, and active tectonic maps. Many important factors for evaluation of seismic hazard were identified and corresponding thematic data layers (past earthquake epicenters, active faults, digital elevation model, and slope) were generated. A numerical rating scheme has been developed for spatial data analysis using GIS to identify ranking of parameters to be included in the evaluation of seismic hazard. The resulting earthquake potential map delineates the area into different relative susceptibility classes: high, moderate, low and very low. The potential earthquake map was validated by correlating the obtained different classes with the local probability that produced using conventional analysis of observed earthquakes. Using earthquake data of Syria and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) data is introduced to the model to develop final seismic hazard map based on Gutenberg-Richter (a and b values) parameters and using the concepts of local probability and recurrence time. The application of the proposed technique in Syrian region indicates that this method provides good estimate of seismic hazard map compared to those developed from traditional techniques (Deterministic (DSHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard (PSHA). For the first time we have used numerous parameters using remote sensing and GIS in preparation of seismic hazard map which is found to be very realistic.

  8. New opportunities seen for independents

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, G.A. )

    1990-10-22

    The collapse of gas and oil prices in the mid-1980s significantly reduced the number of independent exploration companies. At the same time, a fundamental shift occurred among major oil companies as they allocated their exploration budgets toward international operations and made major production purchases. Several large independents also embraced a philosophy of budget supplementation through joint venture partnership arrangements. This has created a unique and unusual window of opportunity for the smaller independents (defined for this article as exploration and production companies with a market value of less than $1 billion) to access the extensive and high quality domestic prospect inventories of the major and large independent oil and gas companies and to participate in the search for large reserve targets on attractive joint venture terms. Participation in these types of joint ventures, in conjunction with internally generated plays selected through the use of today's advanced technology (computer-enhanced, high-resolution seismic; horizontal drilling; etc.) and increasing process for oil and natural gas, presents the domestic exploration-oriented independent with an attractive money-making opportunity for the 1990s.

  9. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOEpatents

    Ober, Curtis C.; Romero, Louis A.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  10. Deep Seismic Reflection Images of the Sumatra Seismic and Aseismic Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N. D.; Chauhan, A.; Carton, H. D.; Midenet, S.; Djajadihardja, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is seismically most active region on the Earth, and has been the site of three great earthquakes only in the last four years. The first of the series, the 2004 Boxing Day earthquake, broke 1300 km of the plate boundary and produced the devastating tsunami around the Indian Ocean. The second great earthquake occurred three months later in March 2005, about 150 km SE of the 2004 event. The Earth waited for three years, and then broke again in September 2007 at 1300 km SE of the 2004 event producing a twin earthquake of magnitudes of 8.5 and 7.9 at an interval of 12 hours, leaving a seismic gap of about 600 km between the second and third earthquake, the Sumatra Seismic Gap. Seismological and geodetic studies suggest that this gap is fully locked and may break any time. In order to study the seismic and tsunami risk in this locked region, a deep seismic reflection survey (Tsunami Investigation Deep Evaluation Seismic -TIDES) was carried out in May 2009 using the CGGVeritas vessel Geowave Champion towing a 15 long streamer, the longest ever used during a seismic survey, to image the nature of the subducting plate and associated features, including the seismogenic zone, from seafloor down to 50 km depth. A total of 1700 km of deep seismic reflection data were acquired. Three dip lines traverse the Sumatra subduction zone; one going through the Sumatra Seismic Gap, one crossing the region that broke during the 2007 great earthquake, and one going through the aseismic zone. These three dip profiles should provide insight about the locking mechanism and help us to understand why an earthquake occurs in one zone and not in aseismic zone. A strike-line was shot in the forearc basin connecting the locked zone with broken zone profiles, which should provide insight about barriers that might have stopped propagation of 2007 earthquake rupture further northward.

  11. Seismic Imaging of UXO-Contaminated Underwater Sites (Interim Report)

    SciTech Connect

    Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Nihei, Kurt; Johnson, Lane

    2004-11-30

    Finite difference modeling with 2-dimensional models were conducted to evaluate the performance of source-receiver arrays to locate UXO in littoral environments. The model parameters were taken from measurements in coastal areas with typical bay mud and from examples in the literature. Seismic arrays are well suited to focus energy by steering the elements of the array to any point in the medium that acts as an energy source. This principle also applies to seismic waves that are backscattered by buried UXO. The power of the array is particularly evident in strong noise conditions when the signal-to-noise ratio is too low to observe the scattered signal on the seismograms. Using a seismic array, it was possible to detect and locate the UXO with a reliability similar to noise free situations. When the UXO was positioned within 3-6 wavelengths of the incident signal from the source array, the resolution was good enough to determine the dimensions of the UXO from the scattered waves. Beyond this distance this distinction decreased gradually while the location and the center of the UXO were still determined reliably. The location and the dimensions of two adjacent UXO were resolved down to a separation of 1/3 of the dominant wavelength of the incident wave, at which time interference effects began to appear. In the investigated cases, the ability to locate a UXO was independent on the use of a model with a rippled or a flat seafloor, as long as the array was located above the UXO. Nevertheless, the correct parameters of the seafloor interface were obtained in these cases. An investigation to find the correct migration velocity in the sediments to locate the UXO revealed that a range of velocity gradients centered around the correct velocity model produced comparable results, which needs to be further investigated with physical modeling.

  12. Generic seismic ruggedness of power plant equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, K.L. )

    1991-08-01

    This report updates the results of a program with the overall objective of demonstrating the generic seismic adequacy of as much nuclear power plant equipment as possible by means of collecting and evaluating existing seismic qualification test data. These data are then used to construct ruggedness'' spectra below which equipment in operating plants designed to earlier earthquake criteria would be generically adequate. This document is an EPRI Tier 1 Report. The report gives the methodology for the collection and evaluation of data which are used to construct a Generic Equipment Ruggedness Spectrum (GERs) for each equipment class considered. The GERS for each equipment class are included in an EPRI Tier 2 Report with the same title. Associated with each GERS are inclusion rules, cautions, and checklists for field screening of in-place equipment for GERS applicability. A GERS provides a measure of equipment seismic resistance based on available test data. As such, a GERS may also be used to judge the seismic adequacy of similar new or replacement equipment or to estimate the seismic margin of equipment re-evaluated with respect to earthquake levels greater than considered to date, resulting in fifteen finalized GERS. GERS for relays (included in the original version of this report) are now covered in a separate report (NP-7147). In addition to the presentation of GERS, the Tier 2 report addresses the applicability of GERS to equipment of older vintage, methods for estimating amplification factors for evaluating devices installed in cabinets and enclosures, and how seismic test data from related studies relate to the GERS approach. 28 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Engineering Seismic Base Layer for Defining Design Earthquake Motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Nozomu

    2008-07-08

    Engineer's common sense that incident wave is common in a widespread area at the engineering seismic base layer is shown not to be correct. An exhibiting example is first shown, which indicates that earthquake motion at the ground surface evaluated by the analysis considering the ground from a seismic bedrock to a ground surface simultaneously (continuous analysis) is different from the one by the analysis in which the ground is separated at the engineering seismic base layer and analyzed separately (separate analysis). The reason is investigated by several approaches. Investigation based on eigen value problem indicates that the first predominant period in the continuous analysis cannot be found in the separate analysis, and predominant period at higher order does not match in the upper and lower ground in the separate analysis. The earthquake response analysis indicates that reflected wave at the engineering seismic base layer is not zero, which indicates that conventional engineering seismic base layer does not work as expected by the term 'base'. All these results indicate that wave that goes down to the deep depths after reflecting in the surface layer and again reflects at the seismic bedrock cannot be neglected in evaluating the response at the ground surface. In other words, interaction between the surface layer and/or layers between seismic bedrock and engineering seismic base layer cannot be neglected in evaluating the earthquake motion at the ground surface.

  14. Seismic attenuation in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, J.J.; Bartolini, T.J.; Lord, K.M.; Smith, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Seismic signals recorded by the expanded distribution of earthquake seismograph stations throughout Florida and data from a comprehensive review of record archives from stations GAI contribute to an initial seismic attenuation model for the Florida Plateau. Based on calculations of surface particle velocity, a pattern of attenuation exists that appears to deviate from that established for the remainder of the southeastern US. Most values suggest greater seismic attenuation within the Florida Plateau. However, a separate pattern may exist for those signals arising from the Gulf of Mexico. These results have important implications for seismic hazard assessments in Florida and may be indicative of the unique lithospheric identity of the Florida basement as an exotic terrane.

  15. The seismic design handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Naeim, F. )

    1989-01-01

    This book contains papers on the planning, analysis, and design of earthquake resistant building structures. Theories and concepts of earthquake resistant design and their implementation in seismic design practice are presented.

  16. Deepwater seismic acquisition technology

    SciTech Connect

    Caldwell, J.

    1996-09-01

    Although truly new technology is not required for successful acquisition of seismic data in deep Gulf of Mexico waters, it is helpful to review some basic aspects of these seismic surveys. Additionally, such surveys are likely to see early use of some emerging new technology which can improve data quality. Because such items as depth imaging, borehole seismic, 4-D and marine 3-component recording were mentioned in the May 1996 issue of World Oil, they are not discussed again here. However, these technologies will also play some role in the deepwater seismic activities. What is covered in this paper are some new considerations for: (1) longer data records needed in deeper water, (2) some pros and cons of very long steamer use, and (3) two new commercial systems for quantifying data quality.

  17. Photocatalytic degradation of water contaminants in multiple photoreactors and evaluation of reaction kinetic constants independent of photon absorption, irradiance, reactor geometry, and hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Grčić, Ivana; Li Puma, Gianluca

    2013-12-03

    The literature on photocatalytic oxidation of water pollutants often reports reaction kinetic constants, which cannot be unraveled from photoreactor type and experimental conditions. This study addresses this challenging aspect by presenting a general and simple methodology for the evaluation of fundamental "intrinsic" reaction kinetic constants of photocatalytic degradation of water contaminants, which are independent of photoreactor type, catalyst concentration, irradiance levels, and hydrodynamics. The degradation of the model contaminant, oxalic acid (OA) on titanium dioxide (TiO2) aqueous suspensions, was monitored in two annular photoreactors (PR1 and PR2). The photoreactors with significantly different geometries were operated under different hydrodynamic regimes (turbulent batch mode and laminar flow-through recirculation mode), optical thicknesses, catalyst and OA concentrations, and photon irradiances. The local volumetric rate of photon absorption (LVRPA) was evaluated by the six-flux radiation absorption-scattering model (SFM). The SFM was further combined with a comprehensive kinetic model for the adsorption and photodecomposition of OA on TiO2 to determine local reaction rates and, after integration over the reactor volume, the intrinsic reaction kinetic constants. The model could determine the oxidation of OA in both PR1 and PR2 under a wide range of experimental conditions. This study demonstrates a more meaningful way for determining reaction kinetic constants of photocatalytic degradation of water contaminants.

  18. Modeling seismic swarms triggered by aseismic transients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llenos, Andrea L.; McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Ogata, Yosihiko

    2009-04-01

    The rate of earthquake occurrence varies by many orders of magnitude in a given region due to variations in the stress state of the crust. Our focus here is on variations in seismicity rate triggered by transient aseismic processes such as fluid flow, fault creep or magma intrusion. While these processes have been shown to trigger earthquakes, converting observed seismicity variations into estimates of stress rate variations has been challenging. Essentially aftershock sequences often obscure changes in the background seismicity rate resulting from aseismic processes. Two common approaches for estimating the time dependence of the underlying driving mechanisms are the stochastic Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence model (ETAS) [Ogata, Y., (1988), Statistical models for earthquake occurrences and residual analysis for point processes, J. Am. Stat. Assoc., 83, 9-27.] and a physical approach based on the rate- and state-model of fault friction [Dieterich, J., (1994), A constitutive law for rate of earthquake production and its application to earthquake clustering, J. Geophys. Res., 99, 2601-2618.]. The models have different strengths that could be combined to allow more quantitative studies of earthquake triggering. To accomplish this, we identify the parameters that relate to one another in the two models and examine their dependence on stressing rate. A particular conflict arises because the rate-state model predicts that aftershock productivity scales with stressing rate while the ETAS model assumes that it is time independent. To resolve this issue, we estimate triggering parameters for 4 earthquake swarms contemporaneous with geodetically observed deformation transients in various tectonic environments. We find that stressing rate transients increase the background seismicity rate without affecting aftershock productivity. We then specify a combined model for seismicity rate variations that will allow future studies to invert seismicity catalogs for variations in

  19. Using epicenter location to differentiate events from natural background seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S C; Walter, W R

    1999-07-26

    Efforts to more effectively monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (commonly referred to as the CTBT) include research into methods of seismic discrimination. The most common seismic discriminants exploit differences in seismic amplitude for differing source types. Amplitude discriminants are quite effective when wave-propagation (a.k.a. path) effects are properly accounted for. However, because path effects can be exceedingly complex, path calibration is often accomplished empirically by spatially interpolating amplitude characteristics for a set of calibration earthquakes with techniques like Bayesian kriging. As a result, amplitude discriminants can be highly effective when natural seismicity provides sufficient event coverage to characterize a region. However, amplitude discrimination can become less effective for events that are far from historical (path-calibration) events. It is intuitive that events occurring at a distance from historical seismicity patterns are inherently suspect. However, quantifying the degree to which a particular event is unexpected could be of great utility in CTBT monitoring. Epicenter location is commonly used as a qualitative discriminant. For instance, if a seismic event is located in the deep ocean, then the event is generally considered to be an earthquake. Such qualitative uses of seismic location have great utility; however, a quantitative method to differentiate events from the natural pattern of seismicity could significantly advance the applicability of location as a discriminant for source type. Clustering of earthquake epicenters is the underlying aspect of earthquake seismicity that allows for an epicenter-based discriminant, and we explore the use of fractal characterization of clustering to characterize seismicity patters. We then evaluate the likelihood that an event at any given location is drawn from the background population. The use of this technique can help to identifying events that are inconsistent

  20. Recent Impacts on Mars: Cluster Properties and Seismic Signal Predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justine Daubar, Ingrid; Schmerr, Nicholas; Banks, Maria; Marusiak, Angela; Golombek, Matthew P.

    2016-10-01

    Impacts are a key source of seismic waves that are a primary constraint on the formation, evolution, and dynamics of planetary objects. Geophysical missions such as InSight (Banerdt et al., 2013) will monitor seismic signals from internal and external sources. New martian craters have been identified in orbital images (Malin et al., 2006; Daubar et al., 2013). Seismically detecting such impacts and subsequently imaging the resulting craters will provide extremely accurate epicenters and source crater sizes, enabling calibration of seismic velocities, the efficiency of impact-seismic coupling, and retrieval of detailed regional and local internal structure.To investigate recent impact-induced seismicity on Mars, we have assessed ~100 new, dated impact sites. In approximately half of new impacts, the bolide partially disintegrates in the atmosphere, forming multiple craters in a cluster. We incorporate the resulting, more complex, seismic effects in our model. To characterize the variation between sites, we focus on clustered impacts. We report statistics of craters within clusters: diameters, morphometry indicating subsurface layering, strewn-field azimuths indicating impact direction, and dispersion within clusters indicating combined effects of bolide strength and elevation of breakup.Measured parameters are converted to seismic predictions for impact sources using a scaling law relating crater diameter to the momentum and source duration, calibrated for impacts recorded by Apollo (Lognonne et al., 2009). We use plausible ranges for target properties, bolide densities, and impact velocities to bound the seismic moment. The expected seismic sources are modeled in the near field using a 3-D wave propagation code (Petersson et al., 2010) and in the far field using a 1-D wave propagation code (Friederich et al., 1995), for a martian seismic model. Thus we calculate the amplitudes of seismic phases at varying distances, which can be used to evaluate the detectability

  1. Seismic offset balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, C.P.; Beale, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    The ability to successfully predict lithology and fluid content from reflection seismic records using AVO techniques is contingent upon accurate pre-analysis conditioning of the seismic data. However, all too often, residual amplitude effects remain after the many offset-dependent processing steps are completed. Residual amplitude effects often represent a significant error when compared to the amplitude variation with offset (AVO) response that the authors are attempting to quantify. They propose a model-based, offset-dependent amplitude balancing method that attempts to correct for these residuals and other errors due to sub-optimal processing. Seismic offset balancing attempts to quantify the relationship between the offset response of back-ground seismic reflections and corresponding theoretical predictions for average lithologic interfaces thought to cause these background reflections. It is assumed that any deviation from the theoretical response is a result of residual processing phenomenon and/or suboptimal processing, and a simple offset-dependent scaling function is designed to correct for these differences. This function can then be applied to seismic data over both prospective and nonprospective zones within an area where the theoretical values are appropriate and the seismic characteristics are consistent. A conservative application of the above procedure results in an AVO response over both gas sands and wet sands that is much closer to theoretically expected values. A case history from the Gulf of Mexico Flexure Trend is presented as an example to demonstrate the offset balancing technique.

  2. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  3. Comparison of Standard Culture-Based Method to Culture-Independent Method for Evaluation of Hygiene Effects on the Hand Microbiome.

    PubMed

    Zapka, C; Leff, J; Henley, J; Tittl, J; De Nardo, E; Butler, M; Griggs, R; Fierer, N; Edmonds-Wilson, S

    2017-03-28

    Hands play a critical role in the transmission of microbiota on one's own body, between individuals, and on environmental surfaces. Effectively measuring the composition of the hand microbiome is important to hand hygiene science, which has implications for human health. Hand hygiene products are evaluated using standard culture-based methods, but standard test methods for culture-independent microbiome characterization are lacking. We sampled the hands of 50 participants using swab-based and glove-based methods prior to and following four hand hygiene treatments (using a nonantimicrobial hand wash, alcohol-based hand sanitizer [ABHS], a 70% ethanol solution, or tap water). We compared results among culture plate counts, 16S rRNA gene sequencing of DNA extracted directly from hands, and sequencing of DNA extracted from culture plates. Glove-based sampling yielded higher numbers of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but had less diversity in bacterial community composition than swab-based sampling. We detected treatment-induced changes in diversity only by using swab-based samples (P < 0.001); we were unable to detect changes with glove-based samples. Bacterial cell counts significantly decreased with use of the ABHS (P < 0.05) and ethanol control (P < 0.05). Skin hydration at baseline correlated with bacterial abundances, bacterial community composition, pH, and redness across subjects. The importance of the method choice was substantial. These findings are important to ensure improvement of hand hygiene industry methods and for future hand microbiome studies. On the basis of our results and previously published studies, we propose recommendations for best practices in hand microbiome research.IMPORTANCE The hand microbiome is a critical area of research for diverse fields, such as public health and forensics. The suitability of culture-independent methods for assessing effects of hygiene products on microbiota has not been demonstrated. This is the first

  4. GIS-based landslide hazard evaluation at the regional scale: some critical points in the permanent displacement approach for seismically-induced landslide maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vessia, Giovanna; Parise, Mario

    2013-04-01

    Landslide susceptibility and hazard are commonly developed by means of GIS (Geographic Information Systems) tools. Many products such as DTM (Digital Terrain Models), and geological, morphological and lithological layers (often, to be downloaded for free and integrated within GIS) are nowadays available on the web and ready to be used for urban planning purposes. The multiple sources of public information enable the local authorities to use these products for predicting hazards within urban territories by limited investments on technological infrastructures. On the contrary, the necessary expertise required for conducting pertinent hazard analyses is high, and rarely available at the level of the local authorities. In this respect, taking into account the production of seismically-induced landslide hazard maps at regional scale drawn by GIS tool, these can be performed according to the permanent displacement approach derived by Newmark's sliding block method (Newmark, 1965). Some simplified assumptions are considered for occurrence of a seismic mass movement, listed as follows: (1) the Mohr-Coulomb criterion is used for the plastic displacement of the rigid block; (2) only downward movements are accounted for; (3) a translative sliding mechanism is assumed. Under such conditions, several expressions have been proposed for predicting permanent displacements of slopes during seismic events (Ambresys and Menu, 1988; Luzi and Pergalani 2000; Romeo 2000; Jibson 2007, among the others). These formulations have been provided by researchers for different ranges of seismic magnitudes, and for indexes describing the seismic action, such as peak ground acceleration, peak ground velocity, Arias Intensity, and damage potential. With respect to the resistant properties of the rock units, the critical acceleration is the relevant strength variable in every expressions; it is a function of local slope, groundwater level, unit weight shear resistance of the surficial sediments, and

  5. Using Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis in Assessing Seismic Risk for Taipei City and New Taipei City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Ming-Kai; Wang, Yu-Ju; Cheng, Chin-Tung; Ma, Kuo-Fong; Ke, Siao-Syun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we evaluate the seismic hazard and risk for Taipei city and new Taipei city, which are important municipalities and the most populous cities in Taiwan. The evaluation of seismic risk involves the combination of three main components: probabilistic seismic hazard model, exposure model defining the spatial distribution of elements exposed to the hazard and vulnerability functions capable of describing the distribution of percentage of loss for a set of intensity measure levels. Seismic hazard at Taipei city and New Taipei city assumed as the hazard maps are presented in terms of ground motion values expected to be exceed at a 10% probability level in 50 years (return period 475 years) and a 2% probability level in 50 years (return period 2475 years) according to the Taiwan Earthquake Model (TEM), which assesses two seismic hazard models for Taiwan. The first model adopted the source parameters of 38 seismogenic structures identified by the TEM geologists. The other model considered 33 active faults and was published by the Central Geological Survey (CGS), Taiwan, in 2010. The 500m by 500m Grid-based building data were selected for the evaluation which capable of providing detail information about the location, value and vulnerability classification of the exposed elements. The results from this study were evaluated by the Openquake engine, the open-source software for seismic risk and hazard assessment developed within the global earthquake model (GEM) initiative. Our intention is to give the first attempt on the modeling the seismic risk from hazard in an open platform for Taiwan. An analysis through disaggregation of hazard components will be also made to prioritize the risk for further policy making.

  6. CHARACTERIZING MARINE GAS-HYDRATE RESERVOIRS AND DETERMINING MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF MARINE GAS-HYDRATE STRATA WITH 4-COMPONENT OCEAN-BOTTOM-CABLE SEISMIC DATA

    SciTech Connect

    B.A. Hardage; M.M. Backus; M.V. DeAngelo; R.J. Graebner; P. Murray; L.J. Wood assisted by K. Rogers

    2002-01-01

    The technical approach taken in this gas-hydrate research is unique because it is based on applying large-scale, 3-D, multi-component seismic surveys to improve the understanding of marine gas-hydrate systems. Other gas-hydrate research uses only single-component seismic technology. In those rare instances when multi-component seismic data have been acquired for gas-hydrate research, the data acquisition has involved only a few receiver stations and a few source stations, sometimes only three or four of each. In contrast, the four-component, 3-D, ocean-bottom-cable (4C3D OBC) data used in this study were acquired at thousands of receiver stations spaced 50 m apart over an area of approximately 1,000 km{sup 2} using wavefields generated at thousands of source stations spaced 75 m apart over this same survey area. The reason for focusing research attention on marine multi-component seismic data is that 4C3D OBC will provide a converted-SV image of gas-hydrate systems in addition to an improved P-wave image. Because P and SV reflectivities differ at some stratal surfaces, P and SV data provide two independent, and different, images of subsurface geology. The existence of these two independent seismic images and the availability of facies-sensitive SV seismic attributes, which can be combined with conventional facies-sensitive, P-wave seismic attributes, means that marine gas-hydrate systems should be better evaluated using multi-component seismic data than using conventional single-component seismic data. Conventional seismic attributes, such as instantaneous reflection amplitude and reflection coherency, have been extracted from the P and SV data volumes created from the 4C3D OBC data used in this research. Comparisons of these attributes and comparisons of P and SV time slices and vertical slices show that SV data provide a more reliable image of stratigraphy and structure associated with gas-invaded strata than do P-wave data. This finding confirms that multi

  7. Lunar seismic profiling experiment natural activity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duennebier, F. K.

    1976-01-01

    The Lunar Seismic Experiment Natural Activity Study has provided a unique opportunity to study the high frequency (4-20 Hz) portion to the seismic spectrum on the moon. The data obtained from the LSPE was studied to evaluate the origin and importance of the process that generates thermal moonquakes and the characteristics of the seismic scattering zone at the lunar surface. The detection of thermal moonquakes by the LSPE array made it possible to locate the sources of many events and determine that they are definitely not generated by astronaut activities but are the result of a natural process on the moon. The propagation of seismic waves in the near-surface layers was studied in a qualitative manner. In the absence of an adequate theoretical model for the propagation of seismic waves in the moon, it is not possible to assign a depth for the scattering layer. The LSPE data does define several parameters which must be satisfied by any model developed in the future.

  8. Permafrost Active Layer Seismic Interferometry Experiment (PALSIE).

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, Robert; Knox, Hunter Anne; James, Stephanie; Lee, Rebekah; Cole, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We present findings from a novel field experiment conducted at Poker Flat Research Range in Fairbanks, Alaska that was designed to monitor changes in active layer thickness in real time. Results are derived primarily from seismic data streaming from seven Nanometric Trillium Posthole seismometers directly buried in the upper section of the permafrost. The data were evaluated using two analysis methods: Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) and ambient noise seismic interferometry. Results from the HVSR conclusively illustrated the method's effectiveness at determining the active layer's thickness with a single station. Investigations with the multi-station method (ambient noise seismic interferometry) are continuing at the University of Florida and have not yet conclusively determined active layer thickness changes. Further work continues with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to determine if the ground based measurements can constrain satellite imagery, which provide measurements on a much larger spatial scale.

  9. Protocol for Addressing Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, Ernie; Nelson, James; Robertson-Tait, Ann; Savy, Jean; Wong, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    This Protocol is a living guidance document for geothermal developers, public officials, regulators and the general public that provides a set of general guidelines detailing useful steps to evaluate and manage the effects of induced seismicity related to EGS projects.

  10. Seismic Techniques for Subsurface Voids Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritto, Roland; Korneev, Valeri; Elobaid Elnaiem, Ali; Mohamed, Fathelrahman; Sadooni, Fadhil

    2016-04-01

    A major hazards in Qatar is the presence of karst, which is ubiquitous throughout the country including depressions, sinkholes, and caves. Causes for the development of karst include faulting and fracturing where fluids find pathways through limestone and dissolve the host rock to form caverns. Of particular concern in rapidly growing metropolitan areas that expand in heretofore unexplored regions are the collapse of such caverns. Because Qatar has seen a recent boom in construction, including the planning and development of complete new sub-sections of metropolitan areas, the development areas need to be investigated for the presence of karst to determine their suitability for the planned project. In this paper, we present the results of a study to demonstrate a variety of seismic techniques to detect the presence of a karst analog in form of a vertical water-collection shaft located on the campus of Qatar University, Doha, Qatar. Seismic waves are well suited for karst detection and characterization. Voids represent high-contrast seismic objects that exhibit strong responses due to incident seismic waves. However, the complex geometry of karst, including shape and size, makes their imaging nontrivial. While karst detection can be reduced to the simple problem of detecting an anomaly, karst characterization can be complicated by the 3D nature of the problem of unknown scale, where irregular surfaces can generate diffracted waves of different kind. In our presentation we employ a variety of seismic techniques to demonstrate the detection and characterization of a vertical water collection shaft analyzing the phase, amplitude and spectral information of seismic waves that have been scattered by the object. We used the reduction in seismic wave amplitudes and the delay in phase arrival times in the geometrical shadow of the vertical shaft to independently detect and locate the object in space. Additionally, we use narrow band-pass filtered data combining two

  11. FiSH: put fault data in a seismic hazard basket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pace, Bruno; Visini, Francesco; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The practice of using fault sources in seismic hazard studies is growing in popularity, including in regions with moderate seismic activity, such as the European countries. In these areas, fault identification may be affected by similarly large uncertainties in the historical and instrumental seismic histories of more active areas that have not been inhabited for long periods of time. Certain studies have effectively applied a time-dependent perspective to combine historical and instrumental seismic data with geological and paleoseismological information, partially compensating for a lack of information. We present a package of Matlab® tools (called FiSH), in publication on Seismological Research Letters, designed to help seismic hazard modellers analyse fault data. These tools enable the derivation of expected earthquake rates given common fault data, and allow you to test the consistency between the magnitude frequency distributions assigned to a fault and some available observations. The basic assumption of FiSH is that the geometric and kinematic features of a fault are the expression of its seismogenic potential. Three tools have been designed to integrate the variable levels of information available: (a) the first tool allows users to convert fault geometry and slip rates into a global budget of the seismic moment released in a given time frame, taking uncertainties into account; (b) the second tool computes the recurrence parameters and associated uncertainties from historical and/or paleoseismological data; 
(c) the third tool outputs time-independent or time-dependent earthquake rates for different magnitude frequency distribution models. We present moreover a test case to illustrate the capabilities of FiSH, on the Paganica normal fault in Central Italy that ruptured during the L'Aquila 2009 earthquake sequence (mainshock Mw 6.3). FiSH is available at http://fish-code.com, and the source codes are open. We encourage users to handle the scripts

  12. Evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed 2 μm IPDA lidar for simultaneous and independent atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide measurements.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Ismail, Syed; Kavaya, Michael J; Davis, Kenneth J

    2015-02-20

    Water vapor and carbon dioxide are the most dominant greenhouse gases directly contributing to the Earth's radiation budget and global warming. A performance evaluation of an airborne triple-pulsed integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar system for simultaneous and independent monitoring of atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide column amounts is presented. This system leverages a state-of-the-art Ho:Tm:YLF triple-pulse laser transmitter operating at 2.05 μm wavelength. The transmitter provides wavelength tuning and locking capabilities for each pulse. The IPDA lidar system leverages a low risk and technologically mature receiver system based on InGaAs pin detectors. Measurement methodology and wavelength setting are discussed. The IPDA lidar return signals and error budget are analyzed for airborne operation on-board the NASA B-200. Results indicate that the IPDA lidar system is capable of measuring water vapor and carbon dioxide differential optical depth with 0.5% and 0.2% accuracy, respectively, from an altitude of 8 km to the surface and with 10 s averaging. Provided availability of meteorological data, in terms of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity vertical profiles, the differential optical depth conversion into weighted-average column dry-air volume-mixing ratio is also presented.

  13. A translational research evaluation of the Stay Active and Independent for Life (SAIL) community-based fall prevention exercise and education program.

    PubMed

    York, Sally C; Shumway-Cook, Anne; Silver, Ilene F; Morrison, A Clare

    2011-11-01

    Falls in older adults are the leading cause of injury hospitalizations and fatalities in the United States; primary risk factors are muscle weakness, impaired mobility, and balance deficits. This article describes the 12-month translational research evaluation of the Stay Active and Independent for Life (SAIL) community-based public health, public domain fall prevention exercise and education program. Recruitment reached the target goal by 154%; 331 adults (mean age = 74.6) attended more than one class (mean classes attended = 24.8, SD = 26.6, range = 1-120) at nine community sites in one county in the 12-month period; 173 completed health and demographic forms, 132 completed program surveys, and 91 completed baseline and follow-up physical function tests. Physical function test results showed significant improvements in strength, balance, and mobility in those who were below normal limits at baseline, and in those who attended classes twice a week or more for more than 2 months. Survey results found that 93% of respondents reported improved performance of daily activities; 92% reported improved strength, balance, fitness, or flexibility; and 80% found the SAIL information guide education component helpful.

  14. Estimation of reservoir fluid saturation from 4D seismic data: effects of noise on seismic amplitude and impedance attributes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Rafael; Lumley, David; Shragge, Jeffrey

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse (4D) seismic data sets have proven to be extremely useful for reservoir monitoring. Seismic-derived impedance estimates are commonly used as a 4D attribute to constrain updates to reservoir fluid flow models. However, 4D seismic estimates of P-wave impedance can contain significant errors associated with the effects of seismic noise and the inherent instability of inverse methods. These errors may compromise the geological accuracy of the reservoir model leading to incorrect reservoir model property updates and incorrect reservoir fluid flow predictions. To evaluate such errors and uncertainties we study two time-lapse scenarios based on 1D and 3D reservoir model examples, thereby exploring a number of inverse theory concepts associated with the instability and error of coloured inversion operators and their dependence on seismic noise levels. In the 1D example, we show that inverted band-limited impedance changes have a smaller root-mean-square (RMS) error in comparison to their absolute broadband counterpart for signal-to-noise ratios 10 and 5 while for signal-to-noise ratio (S/N)  =  3 both inversion methods present similarly high errors. In the 3D example we use an oilfield benchmark case based on the Namorado Field in Campos Basin, Brazil. We introduce a histogram similarity measure to quantify the impact of seismic noise on maps of 4D seismic amplitude and impedance changes as a function of S/N levels, which indicate that amplitudes are less sensitive to 4D seismic noise than impedances. The RMS errors in the estimates of water saturation changes derived from 4D seismic amplitudes are also smaller than for 4D seismic impedances, over a wide range of typical seismic noise levels. These results quantitatively demonstrate that seismic amplitudes can be more accurate and robust than seismic impedances for quantifying water saturation changes with 4D seismic data, and emphasize that seismic amplitudes may be more reliable to update fluid flow

  15. Interpretation of seismic reflection data from the Piledriver Event Area, Nevada Test Site; A case study for evaluation of technique for characterization of void and chimney features

    SciTech Connect

    Tonander, Karl E.

    1993-12-31

    A remote sensing geophysical method is needed to properly characterize the void and chimney characteristics of underground nuclear tests. Various techniques were considered and a seismic reflection survey was selected. This survey was then fitted to the conditions at the test site so as to give optimum results. The data was then reduced via DOS computer and analyzed for content. The planned survey using a 50 ft offset did not show any useful information, however, a second survey with a variable longer offset was also conducted which was capable of determining the depth to the top and the bottom of the chimney with reasonable accuracy. Measurements of the horizontal spread of the structure, though, were inconclusive.

  16. Seismic hazard studies at the Department of Energy owned Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion plants

    SciTech Connect

    Beavers, J.E.; Brock, W.R.; Hunt, R.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Seismic hazard levels for free-field rock motion are defined and presented in this paper as annual exceedance probabilities versus peak acceleration and as uniform hazard response spectra. The conclusions of an independent review are also summarized. Based on the seismic hazard studies, peak horizontal acceleration values and uniform hazard response spectra for rock conditions are recommended. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Evaluation of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic method to determine sediment thickness in the vicinity of the south well field, Franklin county, OH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, R.J.; Sheets, R.A.; Andrews, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    The horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic method involves analyzing measurements of ambient seismic noise in three dimensions to determine the fundamental site resonance frequency. Resonance is excited by the interaction of surface waves (Rayleigh and Love) and body waves (vertically incident shear) with the high-contrast acoustic impedance boundary at the bedrock-sediment interface. Measurements were made to determine the method's utility for estimating thickness of unconsolidated glacial sediments at 18 locations at the South Well Field, Franklin County, OH, and at six locations in Pickaway County where sediment thickness was already known. Measurements also were made near a high-capacity production well (with pumping on and off ) and near a highway and a limestone quarry to examine changes in resonance frequencies over a 20-hour period. Although the regression relation for resonance frequency and sediment thickness had a relatively low r 2(0.322), estimates of sediment thickness were, on average, within 14 percent of known thicknesses. Resonance frequencies for pumping on and pumping off were identical, although the amplitude of the peak was nearly double under pumping conditions. Resonance frequency for the 20-hour period did not change, but the amplitude of the peak changed considerably, with a maximum amplitude in the early afternoon and minimum in the very early morning hours. Clay layers within unconsolidated sediments may influence resonance frequency and the resulting regression equation, resulting in underestimation of sediment thickness; however, despite this and other complicating factors, hydrogeologists should consider this method when thickness data are needed for unconsolidated sediments. ?? 2011 by The Ohio Academy of Science. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic method to determine sediment thickness in the vicinity of the South Well Field, Franklin County, OH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haefner, Ralph J.; Sheets, Rodney A.; Andrews, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    The horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) seismic method involves analyzing measurements of ambient seismic noise in three dimensions to determine the fundamental site resonance frequency. Resonance is excited by the interaction of surface waves (Rayleigh and Love) and body waves (vertically incident shear) with the high-contrast aconstic impedance boundary at the bedrock-sediment interface. Measurements were made to determine the method's utility for estimating thickness of unconsolidated glacial sediments at 18 locations at the South Well Field, Franklin County, OH, and at six locations in Pickaway County where sediment thickness was already known. Measurements also were made near a high-capacity production well (with pumping on and off) and near a highway and a limestone quarry to examine changes in resonance frequencies over a 20-hour period. Although the regression relation for resonance frequency and sediment thickness had a relatively low [r.sup.2] (0.322), estimates of sediment thickness were, on average, within 14 percent of known thicknesses. Resonance frequencies for pumping on and pumping off were identical, although the amplitude of the peak was nearly double under pumping conditions. Resonance frequency for the 20-hour period did not change, but the amplitude of the peak changed considerably, with a maximum amplitude in the early afternoon and minimum in the very early morning hours. Clay layers within unconsolidated sediments may influence resonance frequency and the resulting regression equation, resulting in underestimation of sediment thickness; however, despite this and other complicating factors, hydrogeologists should consider this method when thickness data are needed for unconsolidated sediments.

  19. Landslide seismic magnitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C. H.; Jan, J. C.; Pu, H. C.; Tu, Y.; Chen, C. C.; Wu, Y. M.

    2015-11-01

    Landslides have become one of the most deadly natural disasters on earth, not only due to a significant increase in extreme climate change caused by global warming, but also rapid economic development in topographic relief areas. How to detect landslides using a real-time system has become an important question for reducing possible landslide impacts on human society. However, traditional detection of landslides, either through direct surveys in the field or remote sensing images obtained via aircraft or satellites, is highly time consuming. Here we analyze very long period seismic signals (20-50 s) generated by large landslides such as Typhoon Morakot, which passed though Taiwan in August 2009. In addition to successfully locating 109 large landslides, we define landslide seismic magnitude based on an empirical formula: Lm = log ⁡ (A) + 0.55 log ⁡ (Δ) + 2.44, where A is the maximum displacement (μm) recorded at one seismic station and Δ is its distance (km) from the landslide. We conclude that both the location and seismic magnitude of large landslides can be rapidly estimated from broadband seismic networks for both academic and applied purposes, similar to earthquake monitoring. We suggest a real-time algorithm be set up for routine monitoring of landslides in places where they pose a frequent threat.

  20. Overview of seismic considerations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, R.J.; Stoddart, W.C.; Burnett, W.A.; Beavers, J.E.

    1992-10-01

    This paper presents an overview of seismic considerations at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for the Department of Energy (DOE). The overview describes the original design, the seismic evaluations performed for the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) issued in 1985, and current evaluations and designs to address revised DOE requirements. Future plans to ensure changes in requirements and knowledge are addressed.

  1. Induced seismicity in Carbon and Emery counties, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Megan R. M.

    Utah is one of the top producers of oil and natural gas in the United States. Over the past 18 years, more than 4.2 billion gallons of wastewater from the petroleum industry have been injected into the Navajo Sandstone, Kayenta Formation, and Wingate Sandstone in two areas in Carbon and Emery County, Utah, where seismicity has increased during the same period. In this study, I investigated whether or not wastewater injection is related to the increased seismicity. Previous studies have attributed all of the seismicity in central Utah to coal mining activity. I found that water injection might be a more important cause. In the coal mining area, seismicity rate increased significantly 1-5 years following the commencement of wastewater injection. The increased seismicity consists almost entirely of earthquakes with magnitudes of less than 3, and is localized in areas seismically active prior to the injection. I have established the spatiotemporal correlations between the coal mining activities, the wastewater injection, and the increased seismicity. I used simple groundwater models to estimate the change in pore pressure and evaluate the observed time gap between the start of injection and the onset of the increased seismicity in the areas surrounding the injection wells. To ascertain that the increased seismicity is not fluctuation of background seismicity, I analyzed the magnitude-frequency relation of these earthquakes and found a clear increase in the b-value following the wastewater injection. I conclude that the marked increase of seismicity rate in central Utah is induced by both mining activity and wastewater injection, which raised pore pressure along pre-existing faults.

  2. Influence of seismicity on the Lusi mud eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Maxwell L.; Manga, Michael; Tingay, Mark; Davies, Richard J.

    2015-09-01

    Earthquakes trigger the eruption of mud and magmatic volcanoes and influence ongoing eruptive activity. One mechanism that could trigger an eruption is clay liquefaction. Here we model the propagation of seismic waves beneath the Lusi mud eruption (East Java, Indonesia) using available seismic velocity and density models to assess the effect of subsurface structure on the amplification of incident seismic waves. We find that using an updated subsurface density and velocity structure, there is no significant amplification of incident seismic energy in the Upper Kalibeng Formation, the source of the erupting solids. Hence, the hypothesis that the Lusi eruption was triggered by clay liquefaction appears unlikely to be correct. Independent constraints from gas chemistry as well as analyses of drilling activities at the nearby Banjar-Panji 1 gas exploration well and an analysis of the effects of other earthquakes all favor a drilling trigger.

  3. 2013 East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE): implosion data, Hayward, Calif

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catchings, Rufus D.; Strayer, Luther M.; Goldman, Mark R.; Criley, Coyn J.; Garcia, Susan; Sickler, Robert R.; Catchings, Marisol K.; Chan, Joanne; Gordon, Leslie C.; Haefner, Scott; Blair, James Luke; Gandhok, Gini; Johnson, Michaela R.

    2015-01-01

    In August 2013, the California State University, East Bay (CSUEB) in Hayward, California imploded a 13-story building (Warren Hall) that was deemed unsafe because of its immediate proximity to the active trace of the Hayward Fault. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the CSUEB collaborated on a program to record the seismic waves generated by the collapse of the building. We refer to this collaboration as the East Bay Seismic Experiment (EBSE). The principal objective of recording the seismic energy was to observe ground shaking as it radiated from the source, but the data also may be useful for other purposes. For example, the seismic data may be useful in evaluating the implosion process as it relates to structural engineering purposes. This report provides the metadata needed to utilize the seismic data.

  4. Seismic hazard assessment in Grecce: Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makropoulos, Kostas; Chousianitis, Kostas; Kaviris, George; Kassaras, Ioannis

    2013-04-01

    Greece is the most earthquake prone country in the eastern Mediterranean territory and one of the most active areas globally. Seismic Hazard Assessment (SHA) is a useful procedure to estimate the expected earthquake magnitude and strong ground-motion parameters which are necessary for earthquake resistant design. Several studies on the SHA of Greece are available, constituting the basis of the National Seismic Code. However, the recently available more complete, accurate and homogenous seismological data (the new earthquake catalogue of Makropoulos et al., 2012), the revised seismic zones determined within the framework of the SHARE project (2012), new empirical attenuation formulas extracted for several regions in Greece, as well as new algorithms of SHA, are innovations that motivated the present study. Herewith, the expected earthquake magnitude for Greece is evaluated by applying the zone-free, upper bounded Gumbel's third asymptotic distribution of extreme values method. The peak ground acceleration (PGA), velocity (PGV) and displacement (PGD) are calculated at the seismic bedrock using two methods: (a) the Gumbel's first asymptotic distribution of extreme values, since it is valid for initial open-end distributions and (b) the Cornell-McGuire approach, using the CRISIS2007 (Ordaz et. al., 2007) software. The latter takes into account seismic source zones for which seismicity parameters are assigned following a Poisson recurrence model. Thus, each source is characterized by a series of seismic parameters, such as the magnitude recurrence and the recurrence rate for threshold magnitude, while different predictive equations can be assigned to different seismic source zones. Recent available attenuation parameters were considered. Moreover, new attenuation parameters for the very seismically active Corinth Gulf deduced during this study, from recordings of the RASMON accelerometric array, were used. The hazard parameters such as the most probable annual maximum

  5. Canadian Seismic Agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lapointe, S.P.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Adams, J.; Cajka, M.G.; McNeil, W.; Drysdale, J.A. )

    1992-05-01

    This is a progress report of work carried out under the terms of a research agreement entitled the Canadian Seismic Agreement'' between the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), the Canadian Commercial Corporation and the Geophysics Division of the Geological Survey of Canada (GD/GSC) during the period from July 01, 1989 to June 30, 1990. The Canadian Seismic Agreement'' supports generally the operation of various seismograph stations in eastern Canada and the collection and analysis of earthquake data for the purpose of mitigating seismic hazards in eastern Canada and the northeastern US. The specific activities carried out in this one-year period are summarized below under four headings; Eastern Canada Telemetred Network and local network developments, Datalab developments, strong-motion network developments and earthquake activity. During this period the first surface fault unequivocably determined to have accompanied a historic earthquake in eastern North America, occurred in northern Quebec.

  6. Induced seismicity. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.

    1997-09-18

    The objective of this project has been to develop a fundamental understanding of seismicity associated with energy production. Earthquakes are known to be associated with oil, gas, and geothermal energy production. The intent is to develop physical models that predict when seismicity is likely to occur, and to determine to what extent these earthquakes can be used to infer conditions within energy reservoirs. Early work focused on earthquakes induced by oil and gas extraction. Just completed research has addressed earthquakes within geothermal fields, such as The Geysers in northern California, as well as the interactions of dilatancy, friction, and shear heating, on the generation of earthquakes. The former has involved modeling thermo- and poro-elastic effects of geothermal production and water injection. Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers are used to measure deformation associated with geothermal activity, and these measurements along with seismic data are used to test and constrain thermo-mechanical models.

  7. Unraveling Megathrust Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; van Dinther, Ylona; Heuret, Arnauld

    2013-12-01

    The majority of global seismicity originates at subduction zones, either within the converging plates or along the plate interface. In particular, events with Mw ≥ 8.0 usually occur at the subduction megathrust, which is the frictional interface between subducting and overriding plates. Consequently, seismicity at subduction megathrusts is responsible for most of the seismic energy globally released during the last century [Pacheco and Sykes, 1992]. What's more, during the last decade giant megathrust earthquakes occurred at an increased rate with respect to the last century [Ammon et al., 2010], often revealing unexpected characteristics and resulting in catastrophic effects. Determining the controlling factors of these events would have fundamental implications for earthquake and tsunami hazard assessment.

  8. 3-D Seismic Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Gregory F.

    2009-05-01

    This volume is a brief introduction aimed at those who wish to gain a basic and relatively quick understanding of the interpretation of three-dimensional (3-D) seismic reflection data. The book is well written, clearly illustrated, and easy to follow. Enough elementary mathematics are presented for a basic understanding of seismic methods, but more complex mathematical derivations are avoided. References are listed for readers interested in more advanced explanations. After a brief introduction, the book logically begins with a succinct chapter on modern 3-D seismic data acquisition and processing. Standard 3-D acquisition methods are presented, and an appendix expands on more recent acquisition techniques, such as multiple-azimuth and wide-azimuth acquisition. Although this chapter covers the basics of standard time processing quite well, there is only a single sentence about prestack depth imaging, and anisotropic processing is not mentioned at all, even though both techniques are now becoming standard.

  9. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrell, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2015-09-29

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  10. Controllable seismic source

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Antonio; DeRego, Paul Jeffrey; Ferrel, Patrick Andrew; Thom, Robert Anthony; Trujillo, Joshua J.; Herridge, Brian

    2014-08-19

    An apparatus for generating seismic waves includes a housing, a strike surface within the housing, and a hammer movably disposed within the housing. An actuator induces a striking motion in the hammer such that the hammer impacts the strike surface as part of the striking motion. The actuator is selectively adjustable to change characteristics of the striking motion and characteristics of seismic waves generated by the impact. The hammer may be modified to change the physical characteristics of the hammer, thereby changing characteristics of seismic waves generated by the hammer. The hammer may be disposed within a removable shock cavity, and the apparatus may include two hammers and two shock cavities positioned symmetrically about a center of the apparatus.

  11. Four-dimensional seismic analysis of the Hibernia oil field, Grand Banks, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Richard James

    2004-12-01

    the application of 4D seismic in other fields on the Grand Banks, which compared to Hibernia, prove to have similar 4D seismic potential. In accomplishing these objectives, this thesis makes new contributions in the areas of rock physics modeling, 4D seismic in marginal environments, methods for 4D seismic pressure/saturation inversion, and 4D seismic interpretation. As Hibernia is the first producing field in the region, this thesis provides an important benchmark for the evaluation of the potential role of 4D seismic analysis on development decisions for other Grand Banks fields currently in early production (Terra Nova), or under development (White Rose, Hebron).

  12. Interpolation of aliased seismic traces

    SciTech Connect

    Monk, D.J.; McBeath, R.G.; Wason, C.B.

    1993-08-10

    A method is described of interpolating seismic traces comprising the steps of: (a) processing seismic data to produce input seismic traces; (b) transforming the input seismic traces from the x, y, and time domain into the x-slope, y-slope and time domain (domains) by using a two dimensional power diversity slant stack; and (c) transforming the product of step (b) back into the x, y, and time domain using an inverse slant stack.

  13. OGS improvements in 2012 in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: the Ferrara VBB borehole seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Romanelli, Marco; Barnaba, Carla; Bragato, Pier Luigi; Durì, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Center) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 17 very sensitive broad band and 18 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data center in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of Northeastern Italy. The southwestern edge of the OGS seismic network stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. OGS ha already experience in running a local seismic network in high noise conditions making use of borehole installations in the case of the micro-seismicity monitoring of a local gas storage site for a private company. Following the ML=5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on May 20, 2012 at 02:03:53 UTC, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate the seismic response at the site. We will describe improvements in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network, including details of the Ferrara VBB

  14. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  15. Seismicity and seismotectonics in eastern Canada and vicinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shutian

    The aim of this thesis is to explore the fundamental nature of seismicity and seismotectonics in eastern Canada and vicinity. The findings have some instructive roles in seismological research and seismic hazard assessments. The first part is focused on developments and refinements to methodologies required for analysis of seismic phenomena. The second part is devoted to case histories, in which these methods are applied with the goal of developing greater insight into the nature of intraplate seismicity. Chapter Two describes a hybrid method for precise determination of earthquake hypocenters. The method partitions the inversion process by separating the inversion into distinct steps. The benefits of splitting the problem up stem from inherent tradeoffs between the focal depth, epicentral location and the origin time in the inversion process. Examples show that the approach yields more accurate solutions than those obtained using the original hypoDD analysis procedure. In Chapter Three a new moment-tensor inversion method is described and tested. The method is tailored for small earthquakes. It is interactive and uses adjustable, independently weighted time windows to isolate crustal phases. The technique is applied to a number of small earthquakes and also verified using a synthetic event. In Chapter Four, the developed techniques are applied to investigate seismicity of the WQSZ in western Quebec. Seismicity in this zone is mainly localized along a hotspot track. A statistical approach is used to delineate spatial clusters of seismicity. The locations of several clusters are consistent with paleoseismic evidence for large prehistoric earthquakes, suggesting these clusters may be exceptionally long-lived aftershock sequences from prehistoric earthquakes. Chapter Five provides an analysis of seismicity and seismotectonics in northern Ontario. Four distinct types of seismic activity are noted. No obvious correlation was found between the seismicity on the Severn

  16. Probabilistic seismic vulnerability and risk assessment of stone masonry structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abo El Ezz, Ahmad

    Earthquakes represent major natural hazards that regularly impact the built environment in seismic prone areas worldwide and cause considerable social and economic losses. The high losses incurred following the past destructive earthquakes promoted the need for assessment of the seismic vulnerability and risk of the existing buildings. Many historic buildings in the old urban centers in Eastern Canada such as Old Quebec City are built of stone masonry and represent un-measurable architectural and cultural heritage. These buildings were built to resist gravity loads only and generally offer poor resistance to lateral seismic loads. Seismic vulnerability assessment of stone masonry buildings is therefore the first necessary step in developing seismic retrofitting and pre-disaster mitigation plans. The objective of this study is to develop a set of probability-based analytical tools for efficient seismic vulnerability and uncertainty analysis of stone masonry buildings. A simplified probabilistic analytical methodology for vulnerability modelling of stone masonry building with systematic treatment of uncertainties throughout the modelling process is developed in the first part of this study. Building capacity curves are developed using a simplified mechanical model. A displacement based procedure is used to develop damage state fragility functions in terms of spectral displacement response based on drift thresholds of stone masonry walls. A simplified probabilistic seismic demand analysis is proposed to capture the combined uncertainty in capacity and demand on fragility functions. In the second part, a robust analytical procedure for the development of seismic hazard compatible fragility and vulnerability functions is proposed. The results are given by sets of seismic hazard compatible vulnerability functions in terms of structure-independent intensity measure (e.g. spectral acceleration) that can be used for seismic risk analysis. The procedure is very efficient for

  17. Towards Exascale Seismic Imaging and Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tromp, J.; Bozdag, E.; Lefebvre, M. P.; Smith, J. A.; Lei, W.; Ruan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Post-petascale supercomputers are now available to solve complex scientific problems that were thought unreachable a few decades ago. They also bring a cohort of concerns tied to obtaining optimum performance. Several issues are currently being investigated by the HPC community. These include energy consumption, fault resilience, scalability of the current parallel paradigms, workflow management, I/O performance and feature extraction with large datasets. In this presentation, we focus on the last three issues. In the context of seismic imaging and inversion, in particular for simulations based on adjoint methods, workflows are well defined.They consist of a few collective steps (e.g., mesh generation or model updates) and of a large number of independent steps (e.g., forward and adjoint simulations of each seismic event, pre- and postprocessing of seismic traces). The greater goal is to reduce the time to solution, that is, obtaining a more precise representation of the subsurface as fast as possible. This brings us to consider both the workflow in its entirety and the parts comprising it. The usual approach is to speedup the purely computational parts based on code optimization in order to reach higher FLOPS and better memory management. This still remains an important concern, but larger scale experiments show that the imaging workflow suffers from severe I/O bottlenecks. Such limitations occur both for purely computational data and seismic time series. The latter are dealt with by the introduction of a new Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). Parallel I/O libraries, namely HDF5 and ADIOS, are used to drastically reduce the cost of disk access. Parallel visualization tools, such as VisIt, are able to take advantage of ADIOS metadata to extract features and display massive datasets. Because large parts of the workflow are embarrassingly parallel, we are investigating the possibility of automating the imaging process with the integration of scientific workflow

  18. Excess pressure integral predicts cardiovascular events independent of other risk factors in the conduit artery functional evaluation substudy of Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial.

    PubMed

    Davies, Justin E; Lacy, Peter; Tillin, Therese; Collier, David; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Francis, Darrel P; Malaweera, Anura; Mayet, Jamil; Stanton, Alice; Williams, Bryan; Parker, Kim H; McG Thom, Simon A; Hughes, Alun D

    2014-07-01

    Excess pressure integral (XSPI), a new index of surplus work performed by the left ventricle, can be calculated from blood pressure waveforms and may indicate circulatory dysfunction. We investigated whether XSPI predicted future cardiovascular events and target organ damage in treated hypertensive individuals. Radial blood pressure waveforms were acquired by tonometry in 2069 individuals (aged, 63±8 years) in the Conduit Artery Functional Evaluation (CAFE) substudy of the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial (ASCOT). Measurements of left ventricular mass index (n=862) and common carotid artery intima media thickness (n=923) were also performed. XSPI and the integral of reservoir pressure were lower in people treated with amlodipine±perindopril than in those treated with atenolol±bendroflumethiazide, although brachial systolic blood pressure was similar. A total of 134 cardiovascular events accrued during a median 3.4 years of follow-up; XSPI was a significant predictor of cardiovascular events after adjustment for age and sex, and this relationship was unaffected by adjustment for conventional cardiovascular risk factors or Framingham risk score. XSPI, central systolic blood pressure, central augmentation pressure, central pulse pressure, and integral of reservoir pressure were correlated with left ventricular mass index, but only XSPI, augmentation pressure, and central pulse pressure were associated positively with carotid artery intima media thickness. Associations between left ventricular mass index, XSPI, and integral of reservoir pressure and carotid artery intima media thickness and XSPI were unaffected by multivariable adjustment for other covariates. XSPI is a novel indicator of cardiovascular dysfunction and independently predicts cardiovascular events and targets organ damage in a prospective clinical trial.

  19. Comparison of Standard Culture-Based Method to Culture-Independent Method for Evaluation of Hygiene Effects on the Hand Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Leff, J.; Henley, J.; Tittl, J.; De Nardo, E.; Butler, M.; Griggs, R.; Fierer, N.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hands play a critical role in the transmission of microbiota on one’s own body, between individuals, and on environmental surfaces. Effectively measuring the composition of the hand microbiome is important to hand hygiene science, which has implications for human health. Hand hygiene products are evaluated using standard culture-based methods, but standard test methods for culture-independent microbiome characterization are lacking. We sampled the hands of 50 participants using swab-based and glove-based methods prior to and following four hand hygiene treatments (using a nonantimicrobial hand wash, alcohol-based hand sanitizer [ABHS], a 70% ethanol solution, or tap water). We compared results among culture plate counts, 16S rRNA gene sequencing of DNA extracted directly from hands, and sequencing of DNA extracted from culture plates. Glove-based sampling yielded higher numbers of unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but had less diversity in bacterial community composition than swab-based sampling. We detected treatment-induced changes in diversity only by using swab-based samples (P < 0.001); we were unable to detect changes with glove-based samples. Bacterial cell counts significantly decreased with use of the ABHS (P < 0.05) and ethanol control (P < 0.05). Skin hydration at baseline correlated with bacterial abundances, bacterial community composition, pH, and redness across subjects. The importance of the method choice was substantial. These findings are important to ensure improvement of hand hygiene industry methods and for future hand microbiome studies. On the basis of our results and previously published studies, we propose recommendations for best practices in hand microbiome research. PMID:28351915

  20. Demonstration of NonLinear Seismic Soil Structure Interaction and Applicability to New System Fragility Seismic Curves

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Justin

    2014-09-01

    Risk calculations should focus on providing best estimate results, and associated insights, for evaluation and decision-making. Specifically, seismic probabilistic risk assessments (SPRAs) are intended to provide best estimates of the various combinations of structural and equipment failures that can lead to a seismic induced core damage event. However, in general this approach has been conservative, and potentially masks other important events (for instance, it was not the seismic motions that caused the Fukushima core melt events, but the tsunami ingress into the facility). SPRAs are performed by convolving the seismic hazard (the frequency of certain magnitude events) with the seismic fragility (the conditional probability of failure of a structure, system, or component given the occurrence of earthquake ground motion). In this calculation, there are three main pieces to seismic risk quantification, 1) seismic hazard and nuclear power plants (NPPs) response to the hazard, fragility or capacity of structures, systems and components (SSC), and systems analysis. Figure 1 provides a high level overview of the risk quantification process. The focus of this research is on understanding and removing conservatism (when possible) in the quantification of seismic risk at NPPs.

  1. The seismic analyzer: interpreting and illustrating 2D seismic data.

    PubMed

    Patel, Daniel; Giertsen, Christopher; Thurmond, John; Gjelberg, John; Gröller, M Eduard

    2008-01-01

    We present a toolbox for quickly interpreting and illustrating 2D slices of seismic volumetric reflection data. Searching for oil and gas involves creating a structural overview of seismic reflection data to identify hydrocarbon reservoirs. We improve the search of seismic structures by precalculating the horizon structures of the seismic data prior to interpretation. We improve the annotation of seismic structures by applying novel illustrative rendering algorithms tailored to seismic data, such as deformed texturing and line and texture transfer functions. The illustrative rendering results in multi-attribute and scale invariant visualizations where features are represented clearly in both highly zoomed in and zoomed out views. Thumbnail views in combination with interactive appearance control allows for a quick overview of the data before detailed interpretation takes place. These techniques help reduce the work of seismic illustrators and interpreters.

  2. Correlation between Changes in Seismicity Rates and Well Injection Volumes in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, A.; Baker, J.; Walsh, R.; Zoback, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    We present a statistical approach to establish correlations between locations with seismicity increase in Oklahoma and nearby well injection volumes. Seismicity rates in the state have significantly increased since approximately 2008. Fluid injection into deep wells has been theorized to be the cause of this seismicity, but the increase occurred significantly after the start of injection activities in the region. Further, injection-induced earthquakes depend on the presence and orientation of basement faults and the stress state in the region. Because of these complexities, it has been difficult to directly correlate fluid injection with seismicity. Here we show that a statistical correlation between increase in seismicity and injection volumes can be established in Oklahoma. We first employ a change point method to locate the regions where a change in seismicity rates has occurred. We then use a logistic regression model to relate the injection volumes in a region with the presence or absence of seismicity change in the region. This model is further used to evaluate the relative contribution of cumulative injection volumes and monthly injection rates to seismicity. The model can be used to identify "seismically sensitive regions" where seismicity increase has been observed with little fluid injection, and "seismically stable regions" where seismicity changes have not been observed even with high fluid injection. This information can be combined with geological information in a region, and used to make decisions about acceptable volumes for injection and to identify lower-risk regions for injection.

  3. The accuracy of seismic estimates of dynamic strains: an evaluation using strainmeter and seismometer data from Piñon Flat Observatory, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan S.; Agnew, Duncan Carr

    1996-01-01

    The dynamic strains associated with seismic waves may play a significant role in earthquake triggering, hydrological and magmatic changes, earthquake damage, and ground failure. We determine how accurately dynamic strains may be estimated from seismometer data and elastic-wave theory by comparing such estimated strains with strains measured on a three-component long-base strainmeter system at Pin??on Flat, California. We quantify the uncertainties and errors through cross-spectral analysis of data from three regional earthquakes (the M0 = 4 ?? 1017 N-m St. George, Utah; M0 = 4 ?? 1017 N-m Little Skull Mountain, Nevada; and M0 = 1 ?? 1019 N-m Northridge, California, events at distances of 470, 345, and 206 km, respectively). Our analysis indicates that in most cases the phase of the estimated strain matches that of the observed strain quite well (to within the uncertainties, which are about ?? 0.1 to ?? 0.2 cycles). However, the amplitudes are often systematically off, at levels exceeding the uncertainties (about 20%); in one case, the predicted strain amplitudes are nearly twice those observed. We also observe significant ?????? strains (?? = tangential direction), which should be zero theoretically; in the worst case, the rms ?????? strain exceeds the other nonzero components. These nonzero ?????? strains cannot be caused by deviations of the surface-wave propagation paths from the expected azimuth or by departures from the plane-wave approximation. We believe that distortion of the strain field by topography or material heterogeneities give rise to these complexities.

  4. Application of Genetic Algorithms in Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soupios, Pantelis; Akca, Irfan; Mpogiatzis, Petros; Basokur, Ahmet; Papazachos, Constantinos

    2010-05-01

    application of hybrid genetic algorithms in seismic tomography is examined and the efficiency of least squares and genetic methods as representative of the local and global optimization, respectively, is presented and evaluated. The robustness of both optimization methods has been tested and compared for the same source-receiver geometry and characteristics of the model structure (anomalies, etc.). A set of seismic refraction synthetic (noise free) data was used for modeling. Specifically, cross-well, down-hole and typical refraction studies using 24 geophones and 5 shoots were used to confirm the applicability of the genetic algorithms in seismic tomography. To solve the forward modeling and estimate the traveltimes, the revisited ray bending method was used supplemented by an approximate computation of the first Fresnel volume. The root mean square (rms) error as the misfit function was used and calculated for the entire random velocity model for each generation. After the end of each generation and based on the misfit of the individuals (velocity models), the selection, crossover and mutation (typical process steps of genetic algorithms) were selected continuing the evolution theory and coding the new generation. To optimize the computation time, since the whole procedure is quite time consuming, the Matlab Distributed Computing Environment (MDCE) was used in a multicore engine. During the tests, we noticed that the fast convergence that the algorithm initially exhibits (first 5 generations) is followed by progressively slower improvements of the reconstructed velocity models. Thus, to improve the final tomographic models, a hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) approach was adopted by combining the GAs with a local optimization method after several generations, on the basis of the convergence of the resulting models. This approach is shown to be efficient, as it directs the solution search towards a model region close to the global minimum solution.

  5. Mobile seismic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dräbenstedt, A.; Cao, X.; Polom, U.; Pätzold, F.; Zeller, T.; Hecker, P.; Seyfried, V.; Rembe, C.

    2016-06-01

    Laser-Doppler-Vibrometry (LDV) is an established technique to measure vibrations in technical systems with picometer vibration-amplitude resolution. Especially good sensitivity and resolution can be achieved at an infrared wavelength of 1550 nm. High-resolution vibration measurements are possible over more than 100 m distance. This advancement of the LDV technique enables new applications. The detection of seismic waves is an application which has not been investigated so far because seismic waves outside laboratory scales are usually analyzed at low frequencies between approximately 1 Hz and 250 Hz and require velocity resolutions in the range below 1 nm/s/√Hz. Thermal displacements and air turbulence have critical influences to LDV measurements at this low-frequency range leading to noise levels of several 100 nm/√Hz. Commonly seismic waves are measured with highly sensitive inertial sensors (geophones or Micro Electro-Mechanical Sensors (MEMS)). Approaching a laser geophone based on LDV technique is the topic of this paper. We have assembled an actively vibration-isolated optical table in a minivan which provides a hole in its underbody. The laser-beam of an infrared LDV assembled on the optical table impinges the ground below the car through the hole. A reference geophone has detected remaining vibrations on the table. We present the results from the first successful experimental demonstration of contactless detection of seismic waves from a movable vehicle with a LDV as laser geophone.

  6. Hanford Seismic Network

    SciTech Connect

    Reidel, S.P.; Hartshorn, D.C.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the Hanford Seismic Network. The network consists of two instrument arrays: seismometers and strong motion accelerometers. The seismometers determine the location and magnitude of earthquakes, and the strong motion accelerometers determine ground motion. Together these instruments arrays comply with the intent of DOE Order 5480.20, Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation.

  7. Nonstructural seismic restraint guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, D.M.; Czapinski, R.H.; Firneno, M.J.; Feemster, H.C.; Fornaciari, N.R.; Hillaire, R.G.; Kinzel, R.L.; Kirk, D.; McMahon, T.T.

    1993-08-01

    The Nonstructural Seismic Restraint Guidelines provide general information about how to secure or restrain items (such as material, equipment, furniture, and tools) in order to prevent injury and property, environmental, or programmatic damage during or following an earthquake. All SNL sites may experience earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Therefore, these guidelines are written for all SNL sites.

  8. 3D Modelling of Seismically Active Parts of Underground Faults via Seismic Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, Theofanis; Konstantaras, Anthony

    2015-04-01

    During the last few years rapid steps have been taken towards drilling for oil in the western Mediterranean sea. Since most of the countries in the region benefit mainly from tourism and considering that the Mediterranean is a closed sea only replenishing its water once every ninety years careful measures are being taken to ensure safe drilling. In that concept this research work attempts to derive a three dimensional model of the seismically active parts of the underlying underground faults in areas of petroleum interest. For that purpose seismic spatio-temporal clustering has been applied to seismic data to identify potential distinct seismic regions in the area of interest. Results have been coalesced with two dimensional maps of underground faults from past surveys and seismic epicentres, having followed careful reallocation processing, have been used to provide information regarding the vertical extent of multiple underground faults in the region of interest. The end product is a three dimensional map of the possible underground location and extent of the seismically active parts of underground faults. Indexing terms: underground faults modelling, seismic data mining, 3D visualisation, active seismic source mapping, seismic hazard evaluation, dangerous phenomena modelling Acknowledgment This research work is supported by the ESPA Operational Programme, Education and Life Long Learning, Students Practical Placement Initiative. References [1] Alves, T.M., Kokinou, E. and Zodiatis, G.: 'A three-step model to assess shoreline and offshore susceptibility to oil spills: The South Aegean (Crete) as an analogue for confined marine basins', Marine Pollution Bulletin, In Press, 2014 [2] Ciappa, A., Costabile, S.: 'Oil spill hazard assessment using a reverse trajectory method for the Egadi marine protected area (Central Mediterranean Sea)', Marine Pollution Bulletin, vol. 84 (1-2), pp. 44-55, 2014 [3] Ganas, A., Karastathis, V., Moshou, A., Valkaniotis, S., Mouzakiotis

  9. Investigation of the Seismic Performance of Reinforced Highway Embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toksoy, Y. S.; Edinçliler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the fact that highway embankments are highly prone to earthquake induced damage, there are not enough studies in the literature concentrated on improving the seismic performance of highway embankments. Embankments which are quite stable under static load conditions can simply collapse during earthquakes due to the destructive seismic loading. This situation poses a high sequence thread to the structural integrity of the embankment, service quality and serviceability. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of the geosynthetic reinforcement on the seismic performance of the highway embankments and evaluate the seismic performance of the geotextile reinforced embankment under different earthquake motions. A 1:50 scale highway embankment model is designed and reinforced with geosynthetics in order to increase the seismic performance of the embankment model. A series of shaking table tests were performed for the identical unreinforced and reinforced embankment models using earthquake excitations with different characteristics. The experimental results were evaluated comparing the unreinforced and reinforced cases. Results revealed that reinforced embankment models perform better seismic performance especially under specificied ground excitations used in this study. Also, the prototype embankment was numerically modelled. It is seen that similar seismic behavior trend is obtained in the finite element simulations.

  10. Seismicity and plate tectonics in south central Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Wormer, J. D.; Davies, J.; Gedney, L.

    1974-01-01

    Hypocenter distribution shows that the Benioff zone associated with the Aleutian arc terminates in interior Alaska some 75 km north of the Denali fault. There appears to be a break in the subducting Pacific plate in the Yentna River-Prince William Sound area which separates two seismically independent blocks, similar to the segmented structure reported for the central Aleutian arc.

  11. Integrated reservoir characterization for unconventional reservoirs using seismic, microseismic and well log data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Debotyam

    This study is aimed at an improved understanding of unconventional reservoirs which include tight reservoirs (such as shale oil and gas plays), geothermal developments, etc. We provide a framework for improved fracture zone identification and mapping of the subsurface for a geothermal system by integrating data from different sources. The proposed ideas and methods were tested primarily on data obtained from North Brawley geothermal field and the Geysers geothermal field apart from synthetic datasets which were used to test new algorithms before actual application on the real datasets. The study has resulted in novel or improved algorithms for use at specific stages of data acquisition and analysis including improved phase detection technique for passive seismic (and teleseismic) data as well as optimization of passive seismic surveys for best possible processing results. The proposed workflow makes use of novel integration methods as a means of making best use of the available geophysical data for fracture characterization. The methodology incorporates soft computing tools such as hybrid neural networks (neuro-evolutionary algorithms) as well as geostatistical simulation techniques to improve the property estimates as well as overall characterization efficacy. The basic elements of the proposed characterization workflow involves using seismic and microseismic data to characterize structural and geomechanical features within the subsurface. We use passive seismic data to model geomechanical properties which are combined with other properties evaluated from seismic and well logs to derive both qualitative and quantitative fracture zone identifiers. The study has resulted in a broad framework highlighting a new technique for utilizing geophysical data (seismic and microseismic) for unconventional reservoir characterization. It provides an opportunity to optimally develop the resources in question by incorporating data from different sources and using their temporal

  12. High Voltage Seismic Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogacz, Adrian; Pala, Damian; Knafel, Marcin

    2015-04-01

    This contribution describes the preliminary result of annual cooperation of three student research groups from AGH UST in Krakow, Poland. The aim of this cooperation was to develop and construct a high voltage seismic wave generator. Constructed device uses a high-energy electrical discharge to generate seismic wave in ground. This type of device can be applied in several different methods of seismic measurement, but because of its limited power it is mainly dedicated for engineering geophysics. The source operates on a basic physical principles. The energy is stored in capacitor bank, which is charged by two stage low to high voltage converter. Stored energy is then released in very short time through high voltage thyristor in spark gap. The whole appliance is powered from li-ion battery and controlled by ATmega microcontroller. It is possible to construct larger and more powerful device. In this contribution the structure of device with technical specifications is resented. As a part of the investigation the prototype was built and series of experiments conducted. System parameter was measured, on this basis specification of elements for the final device were chosen. First stage of the project was successful. It was possible to efficiently generate seismic waves with constructed device. Then the field test was conducted. Spark gap wasplaced in shallowborehole(0.5 m) filled with salt water. Geophones were placed on the ground in straight line. The comparison of signal registered with hammer source and sparker source was made. The results of the test measurements are presented and discussed. Analysis of the collected data shows that characteristic of generated seismic signal is very promising, thus confirms possibility of practical application of the new high voltage generator. The biggest advantage of presented device after signal characteristics is its size which is 0.5 x 0.25 x 0.2 m and weight approximately 7 kg. This features with small li-ion battery makes

  13. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS WITH SEISMIC ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; RINKER MW; JOHNSON KI; ABATT FG; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; STOOPS KL

    2009-01-15

    design waste temperature of 350 F and the full 60-year corrosion allowance on the tank wall of 0.060 inch. However, analysis at a more realistic temperature of 250 F or corrosion allowance of 0.025 inch results in an acceptable demand/capacity ratio according to the ASME code criteria. Thus, buckling of the primary tank is judged to be unlikely for the current lack of corrosion in the tanks, and the expectation that the maximum waste temperature will not exceed 210 F. The reinforced concrete structure was evaluated as specified by the American Concrete Institute (ACI) code requirements for nuclear safety-related structures (ACI-349). The demand was demonstrated to be lower than the capacity at all locations. Revision 1 is being issued to document changes to the anchor bolt evaluation. RPP-RPT-32237 Rev. 1, Hanford Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Seismic Project-Increased Liquid Level Analysis for 241AP Tank Farms, described changes to the anchor bolt modeling and evaluation which were implemented in response to the independent reviewer's comments. Similar changes have been made in the bounding tank analysis and are documented in RPP-RPT-28968 Rev. 1. The conclusions of the previous releases of this report remain unchanged.

  14. Comparison of smoothing methods for the development of a smoothed seismicity model for Alaska and the implications for seismic hazard

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mueller, Charles S.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    In anticipation of the update of the Alaska seismic hazard maps (ASHMs) by the U. S. Geological Survey, we report progress on the comparison of smoothed seismicity models developed using fixed and adaptive smoothing algorithms, and investigate the sensitivity of seismic hazard to the models. While fault-based sources, such as those for great earthquakes in the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone and for the ~10 shallow crustal faults within Alaska, dominate the seismic hazard estimates for locations near to the sources, smoothed seismicity rates make important contributions to seismic hazard away from fault-based sources and where knowledge of recurrence and magnitude is not sufficient for use in hazard studies. Recent developments in adaptive smoothing methods and statistical tests for evaluating and comparing rate models prompt us to investigate the appropriateness of adaptive smoothing for the ASHMs. We develop smoothed seismicity models for Alaska using fixed and adaptive smoothing methods and compare the resulting models by calculating and evaluating the joint likelihood test. We use the earthquake catalog, and associated completeness levels, developed for the 2007 ASHM to produce fixed-bandwidth-smoothed models with smoothing distances varying from 10 to 100 km and adaptively smoothed models. Adaptive smoothing follows the method of Helmstetter et al. and defines a unique smoothing distance for each earthquake epicenter from the distance to the nth nearest neighbor. The consequence of the adaptive smoothing methods is to reduce smoothing distances, causing locally increased seismicity rates, where seismicity rates are high and to increase smoothing distances where seismicity is sparse. We follow guidance from previous studies to optimize the neighbor number (n-value) by comparing model likelihood values, which estimate the likelihood that the observed earthquake epicenters from the recent catalog are derived from the smoothed rate models. We compare likelihood

  15. Production induced subsidence and seismicity in the Groningen gas field - can it be managed?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waal, J. A.; Muntendam-Bos, A. G.; Roest, J. P. A.

    2015-11-01

    Reliable prediction of the induced subsidence resulting from gas production is important for a near sea level country like the Netherlands. Without the protection of dunes, dikes and pumping, large parts of the country would be flooded. The predicted sea-level rise from global warming increases the challenge to design proper mitigation measures. Water management problems from gas production induced subsidence can be prevented if measures to counter its adverse effects are taken timely. This requires reliable subsidence predictions, which is a major challenge. Since the 1960's a number of large, multi-decade gas production projects were started in the Netherlands. Extensive, well-documented subsidence prediction and monitoring technologies were applied. Nevertheless predicted subsidence at the end of the Groningen field production period (for the centre of the bowl) went from 100 cm in 1971 to 77 cm in 1973 and then to 30 cm in 1977. In 1984 the prediction went up again to 65 cm, down to 36 cm in 1990 and then via 38 cm (1995) and 42 cm (2005) to 47 cm in 2010 and 49 cm in 2013. Such changes can have large implications for the planning of water management measures. Until 1991, when the first event was registered, production induced seismicity was not observed nor expected for the Groningen field. Thereafter the number of observed events rose from 5 to 10 per year during the 1990's to well over a hundred in 2013. The anticipated maximum likely magnitude rose from an initial value of less than 3.0 to a value of 3.3 in 1993 and then to 3.9 in 2006. The strongest tremor to date occurred near the village of Huizinge in August 2012. It had a magnitude of 3.6, caused significant damage and triggered the regulator into an independent investigation. Late 2012 it became clear that significantly larger magnitudes cannot be excluded and that values up to magnitude 5.0 cannot be ruled out. As a consequence the regulator advised early 2013 to lower Groningen gas production by as

  16. International exploration by independent

    SciTech Connect

    Bertragne, R.G.

    1992-04-01

    Recent industry trends indicate that the smaller U.S. independents are looking at foreign exploration opportunities as one of the alternatives for growth in the new age of exploration. Foreign finding costs per barrel usually are accepted to be substantially lower than domestic costs because of the large reserve potential of international plays. To get involved in overseas exploration, however, requires the explorationist to adapt to different cultural, financial, legal, operational, and political conditions. Generally, foreign exploration proceeds at a slower pace than domestic exploration because concessions are granted by a country's government, or are explored in partnership with a national oil company. First, the explorationist must prepare a mid- to long-term strategy, tailored to the goals and the financial capabilities of the company; next, is an ongoing evaluation of quality prospects in various sedimentary basins, and careful planning and conduct of the operations. To successfully explore overseas also requires the presence of a minimum number of explorationists and engineers thoroughly familiar with the various exploratory and operational aspects of foreign work. Ideally, these team members will have had a considerable amount of on-site experience in various countries and climates. Independents best suited for foreign expansion are those who have been financially successful in domestic exploration. When properly approached, foreign exploration is well within the reach of smaller U.S. independents, and presents essentially no greater risk than domestic exploration; however, the reward can be much larger and can catapult the company into the 'big leagues.'

  17. International exploration by independents

    SciTech Connect

    Bertagne, R.G. )

    1991-03-01

    Recent industry trends indicate that the smaller US independents are looking at foreign exploration opportunities as one of the alternatives for growth in the new age of exploration. It is usually accepted that foreign finding costs per barrel are substantially lower than domestic because of the large reserve potential of international plays. To get involved overseas requires, however, an adaptation to different cultural, financial, legal, operational, and political conditions. Generally foreign exploration proceeds at a slower pace than domestic because concessions are granted by the government, or are explored in partnership with the national oil company. First, a mid- to long-term strategy, tailored to the goals and the financial capabilities of the company, must be prepared; it must be followed by an ongoing evaluation of quality prospects in various sedimentary basins, and a careful planning and conduct of the operations. To successfully explore overseas also requires the presence on the team of a minimum number of explorationists and engineers thoroughly familiar with the various exploratory and operational aspects of foreign work, having had a considerable amount of onsite experience in various geographical and climatic environments. Independents that are best suited for foreign expansion are those that have been financially successful domestically, and have a good discovery track record. When properly approached foreign exploration is well within the reach of smaller US independents and presents essentially no greater risk than domestic exploration; the reward, however, can be much larger and can catapult the company into the big leagues.

  18. Concept design for seismic upgrade of Keck telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Frank W.; Park, Samuel; Sarawit, Andrew T.; Cranston, P. Graham

    2016-08-01

    On 15 October 2006, a large earthquake damaged both telescopes at W. M. Keck Observatory resulting in weeks of observing downtime. A significant portion of the downtime was attributed to recovery efforts repairing damage to telescope bearing journals, radial pad support structures, and encoder subsystems. To reduce the risk of damage and loss of observing time in future seismic events, we developed a conceptual design for the seismic upgrade of the twin Keck Telescopes. The paper covers the design requirements and constraints for the seismic upgrade, the evaluation method used to check the safety of sensitive components, and the trade-off study used to compare different options and to select the best design. Various design options such as base isolating the structure, strengthening seismic restraints, adding dampers, adding break-away mechanisms, and combinations of these design options are considered in this study. Nonlinear time history analyses are performed to evaluate the performance of the design concepts.

  19. Development, evaluation and comparison of two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde vapors and condensation aerosols in air† ‡

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two independent sampling and analytical methods for ortho-phthalaldehyde (OPA) in air have been developed, evaluated and compared (1) a reagent-coated solid sorbent HPLC-UV method and (2) an impinger-fluorescence method. In the first method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L min−1 with a sampler containing 350 mg of silica gel coated with 1 mg of acidified 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (DNPH). After sampling, excess DNPH in ethyl acetate is added to the sampler prior to storage for 68 hours. The OPA-DNPH derivative is eluted with 4.0 mL of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for measurement by HPLC with a UV detector set at 3S5 nm. The estimated detection limit is 0.016 µg per sample or 0.067 µg m−3 (0.012 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of vapor spikes at levels of 1.2 to 6.2 µg were 96 to 101%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapor and condensation aerosols were 97 to 100%. In the second method, air sampling is conducted at 1.0 L mm−1 with a midget impinger containing 10 mL of DMSO solution containing N-acetyl-l-cysteine and ethylenediamine. The fluorescence reading is taken 80 min after the completion of air sampling. Since the time of taking the fluorescence reading is critical, the reading is taken with a portable fluorometer. The estimated detection limit is 0.024 µg per sample or 0.1 µg m−3 (0.018 ppb) for a 240 L air sample. Recoveries of OPA vapor spikes at levels of 1.4 to 5.0 µg per sample were 97 to 105%. Recoveries of spikes as mixtures of vapors and condensation aerosols were 95 to 99%. The collection efficiency for a mixture of vapor and condensation aerosol was 99.4%. The two methods were compared side-by-side in a generation system constructed for producing controlled atmospheres of OPA vapor in air. Average air concentrations of OPA vapor found by both methods agreed within ±10%. PMID:26346658

  20. Self-induced seismicity due to fluid circulation along faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aochi, Hideo; Poisson, Blanche; Toussaint, Renaud; Rachez, Xavier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we develop a system of equations describing fluid migration, fault rheology, fault thickness evolution and shear rupture during a seismic cycle, triggered either by tectonic loading or by fluid injection. Assuming that the phenomena predominantly take place on a single fault described as a finite permeable zone of variable width, we are able to project the equations within the volumetric fault core onto the 2-D fault interface. From the basis of this `fault lubrication approximation', we simulate the evolution of seismicity when fluid is injected at one point along the fault to model-induced seismicity during an injection test in a borehole that intercepts the fault. We perform several parametric studies to understand the basic behaviour of the system. Fluid transmissivity and fault rheology are key elements. The simulated seismicity generally tends to rapidly evolve after triggering, independently of the injection history and end when the stationary path of fluid flow is established at the outer boundary of the model. This self-induced seismicity takes place in the case where shear rupturing on a planar fault becomes dominant over the fluid migration process. On the contrary, if healing processes take place, so that the fluid mass is trapped along the fault, rupturing occurs continuously during the injection period. Seismicity and fluid migration are strongly influenced by the injection rate and the heterogeneity.

  1. The Virtual Seismic Atlas Project: sharing the interpretation of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R.; Mortimer, E.; McCaffrey, B.; Stuart, G.; Sizer, M.; Clayton, S.

    2007-12-01

    Through the activities of academic research programs, national institutions and corporations, especially oil and gas companies, there is a substantial volume of seismic reflection data. Although the majority is proprietary and confidential, there are significant volumes of data that are potentially within the public domain and available for research. Yet the community is poorly connected to these data and consequently geological and other research using seismic reflection data is limited to very few groups of researchers. This is about to change. The Virtual Seismic Atlas (VSA) is generating an independent, free-to-use, community based internet resource that captures and shares the geological interpretation of seismic data globally. Images and associated documents are explicitly indexed using not only existing survey and geographical data but also on the geology they portray. By using "Guided Navigation" to search, discover and retrieve images, users are exposed to arrays of geological analogues that provide novel insights and opportunities for research and education. The VSA goes live, with evolving content and functionality, through 2008. There are opportunities for designed integration with other global data programs in the earth sciences.

  2. Quantification of seismic liquefaction risk

    SciTech Connect

    Arango, I.; Ostadan, F.; Lewis, M.R.; Gutierrez, B.J.

    1996-02-29

    Explicit goals of acceptable risk for natural phenomena hazards (earthquake, extreme wind, and flood) have been established by the Department of Energy (DOE) 1994. Closely associated to the earthquake risk is the issue of seismically-induced liquefaction. Because deterministic methods currently available to answer the question to whether a site is liquefiable or not are incapable of providing a clue as to the likelihood or risk of liquefaction, the application of the criteria to a given facility requires that alternative evaluation techniques be formulated. This paper describes the application to a nuclear facility of a newly developed probabilistic methodology which rigorously accounts for geotechnical and seismologic uncertainties. The results of the analyses are compared with the acceptable levels of risk presented by DOE. This comparison is used to emphasize the power of the methodology as a tool in the decision-making processes.

  3. Deployment of the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Harben, P.E.; Rock, D.W.

    1989-01-20

    This paper discusses the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment, currently in operation, set up by members of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Treaty Verification Program and the Oklahoma Geophysical Observatory to determine deep-borehole seismic characteristics in geology typical of large regions in the Soviet Union. We evaluated and logged an existing 772-m deep borehole on the Observatory site by running caliper, cement bonding, casing inspection, and hole-deviation logs. Two Teledyne Geotech borehole-clamping seismometers were placed at various depths and spacings in the deep borehole. Currently, they are deployed at 727 and 730 m. A Teledyne Geotech shallow-borehole seismometer was mounted in a 4.5-m hole, one meter from the deep borehole. The seismometers' system coherency were tested and found to be excellent to 35 Hz. We have recorded seismic noise, quarry blasts, regional earthquakes and teleseisms in the present configuration. We will begin a study of seismic noise and attenuation as a function of depth in the near future. 7 refs., 18 figs.

  4. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne D. Pennington

    2002-09-29

    The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a

  5. CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

    2002-10-01

    The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a

  6. Seismic detection of tornadoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatom, F. B.

    1993-01-01

    Tornadoes represent the most violent of all forms of atmospheric storms, each year resulting in hundreds of millions of dollars in property damage and approximately one hundred fatalities. In recent years, considerable success has been achieved in detecting tornadic storms by means of Doppler radar. However, radar systems cannot determine when a tornado is actually in contact with the ground, expect possibly at extremely close range. At the present time, human observation is the only truly reliable way of knowing that a tornado is actually on the ground. However, considerable evidence exists indicating that a tornado in contact with the ground produces a significant seismic signal. If such signals are generated, the seismic detection and warning of an imminent tornado can become a distinct possibility. 

  7. Canadian seismic agreement

    SciTech Connect

    Wetmiller, R.J.; Lyons, J.A.; Shannon, W.E.; Munro, P.S.; Thomas, J.T.; Andrew, M.D.; Lamontagne, M.; Wong, C.; Anglin, F.M.; Plouffe, M.; Adams, J.; Drysdale, J.A. . Geophysics Div.)

    1990-04-01

    During the period of this report, the contract resources were spent on operation and maintenance of the Eastern Canada Telemetred Network (ECTN), development of special purpose local network systems, servicing and maintenance of the strong-motion seismograph network in eastern Canada, operation of the Ottawa data lab and earthquake monitoring and reporting. Of special note in this period was the final completion of the Sudbury (SLTN) and Charlevoix (CLTN) local networks and the integration of their data processing and analysis requirements in the regular analysis stream for ECTN data. These networks now acquire high quality digital data for detailed analysis of seismic activity and source properties from these two areas, thus effectively doubling the amount of seismic data being received by the Ottawa data lab. 37 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Contemporary accuracy of death certificates for coding prostate cancer as a cause of death: Is reliance on death certification good enough? A comparison with blinded review by an independent cause of death evaluation committee

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Emma L; Metcalfe, Chris; Donovan, Jenny L; Noble, Sian; Sterne, Jonathan A C; Lane, J Athene; I Walsh, Eleanor; Hill, Elizabeth M; Down, Liz; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oliver, Steven E; Evans, Simon; Brindle, Peter; Williams, Naomi J; Hughes, Laura J; Davies, Charlotte F; Ng, Siaw Yein; Neal, David E; Hamdy, Freddie C; Albertsen, Peter; Reid, Colette M; Oxley, Jon; McFarlane, John; Robinson, Mary C; Adolfsson, Jan; Zietman, Anthony; Baum, Michael; Koupparis, Anthony; Martin, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accurate cause of death assignment is crucial for prostate cancer epidemiology and trials reporting prostate cancer-specific mortality outcomes. Methods: We compared death certificate information with independent cause of death evaluation by an expert committee within a prostate cancer trial (2002–2015). Results: Of 1236 deaths assessed, expert committee evaluation attributed 523 (42%) to prostate cancer, agreeing with death certificate cause of death in 1134 cases (92%, 95% CI: 90%, 93%). The sensitivity of death certificates in identifying prostate cancer deaths as classified by the committee was 91% (95% CI: 89%, 94%); specificity was 92% (95% CI: 90%, 94%). Sensitivity and specificity were lower where death occurred within 1 year of diagnosis, and where there was another primary cancer diagnosis. Conclusions: UK death certificates accurately identify cause of death in men with prostate cancer, supporting their use in routine statistics. Possible differential misattribution by trial arm supports independent evaluation in randomised trials. PMID:27253172

  9. Seismic traveltime tomography: a simulated annealing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wéber, Zoltán

    2000-04-01

    Seismic traveltime tomography involves finding a velocity model that minimizes the error energy between the measured and the theoretical traveltimes. When solving this nonlinear inverse problem, a local optimization technique can easily produce a solution for which the gradient of the error energy function vanishes, but the energy function itself does not take its global minimum. Other methods such as simulated annealing can be applied to such global optimization problems. The simulated annealing approach to seismic traveltime tomography described in this paper has been tested on synthetic as well as real seismic data. It is shown that unlike local methods, the convergence of the simulated annealing algorithm is independent of the initial model: even in cases of virtually no prior information, it is capable of producing reliable results. The method can provide a number of acceptable solutions. When prior information is sparse, the solution of the global optimization can be used as an input to a local optimization procedure, such as, e.g., simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique (SIRT), producing an even more accurate result.

  10. Seismic Safety Margins Research Program. Phase I, final report - overview

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, P. D.; Dong, R. G.; Bernreuter, D. L.; Bohn, M. P.; Chuang, T. Y.; Cummings, G. E.; Johnson, J. J.; Mensing, R. W.; Wells, J. E.

    1981-03-06

    The Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) is a multiyear, multiphase program whose overall objective is to develop improved methods for seismic safety assessments of nuclear power plants, using a probabilistic computational procedure. The program is being carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and is sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Phase I of the SSMRP was successfully completed in January 1981: A probabilistic computational procedure for the seismic risk assessment of nuclear power plants has been developed and demonstrated. The methodology is implemented by three computer programs: HAZARD, which assesses the seismic hazard at a given site, SMACS, which computes in-structure and subsystem seismic responses, and SEISIM, which calculates system failure probabilities and radioactive release probabilities, given (1) the response results of SMACS, (2) a set of event trees, (3) a family of fault trees, (4) a set of structural and component fragility descriptions, and (5) a curve describing the local seismic hazard. The practicality of this methodology was demonstrated by computing preliminary release probabilities for Unit 1 of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant north of Chicago, Illinois. Studies have begun aimed at quantifying the sources of uncertainty in these computations. Numerous side studies were undertaken to examine modeling alternatives, sources of error, and available analysis techniques. Extensive sets of data were amassed and evaluated as part of projects to establish seismic input parameters and to produce the fragility curves. 66 refs., 29 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Quantitative risk analysis of oil storage facilities in seismic areas.

    PubMed

    Fabbrocino, Giovanni; Iervolino, Iunio; Orlando, Francesca; Salzano, Ernesto

    2005-08-31

    Quantitative risk analysis (QRA) of industrial facilities has to take into account multiple hazards threatening critical equipment. Nevertheless, engineering procedures able to evaluate quantitatively the effect of seismic action are not well established. Indeed, relevant industrial accidents may be triggered by loss of containment following ground shaking or other relevant natural hazards, either directly or through cascade effects ('domino effects'). The issue of integrating structural seismic risk into quantitative probabilistic seismic risk analysis (QpsRA) is addressed in this paper by a representative study case regarding an oil storage plant with a number of atmospheric steel tanks containing flammable substances. Empirical seismic fragility curves and probit functions, properly defined both for building-like and non building-like industrial components, have been crossed with outcomes of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for a test site located in south Italy. Once the seismic failure probabilities have been quantified, consequence analysis has been performed for those events which may be triggered by the loss of containment following seismic action. Results are combined by means of a specific developed code in terms of local risk contour plots, i.e. the contour line for the probability of fatal injures at any point (x, y) in the analysed area. Finally, a comparison with QRA obtained by considering only process-related top events is reported for reference.

  12. Patterns of significant seismic quiescence on the Mexican Pacific coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz-Diosdado, A.; Rudolf-Navarro, A. H.; Angulo-Brown, F.; Barrera-Ferrer, A. G.

    Many authors have proposed that the study of seismicity rates is an appropriate technique for evaluating how close a seismic gap may be to rupture. We designed an algorithm for identification of patterns of significant seismic quiescence by using the definition of seismic quiescence proposed by Schreider (1990). This algorithm shows the area of quiescence where an earthquake of great magnitude may probably occur. We have applied our algorithm to the earthquake catalog on the Mexican Pacific coast located between 14 and 21 degrees of North latitude and 94 and 106 degrees West longitude; with depths less than or equal to 60 km and magnitude greater than or equal to 4.3, which occurred from January, 1965 until December, 2014. We have found significant patterns of seismic quietude before the earthquakes of Oaxaca (November 1978, Mw = 7.8), Petatlán (March 1979, Mw = 7.6), Michoacán (September 1985, Mw = 8.0, and Mw = 7.6) and Colima (October 1995, Mw = 8.0). Fortunately, in this century earthquakes of great magnitude have not occurred in Mexico. However, we have identified well-defined seismic quiescences in the Guerrero seismic-gap, which are apparently correlated with the occurrence of silent earthquakes in 2002, 2006 and 2010 recently discovered by GPS technology.

  13. Independent Peer Reviews

    SciTech Connect

    2012-03-16

    Independent Assessments: DOE's Systems Integrator convenes independent technical reviews to gauge progress toward meeting specific technical targets and to provide technical information necessary for key decisions.

  14. Albuquerque Basin seismic network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaksha, Lawrence H.; Locke, Jerry; Thompson, J.B.; Garcia, Alvin

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has recently completed the installation of a seismic network around the Albuquerque Basin in New Mexico. The network consists of two seismometer arrays, a thirteen-station array monitoring an area of approximately 28,000 km 2 and an eight-element array monitoring the area immediately adjacent to the Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory. This report describes the instrumentation deployed in the network.

  15. Establishing seismic design criteria to achieve an acceptable seismic margin

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    In order to develop a risk based seismic design criteria the following four issues must be addressed: (1) What target annual probability of seismic induced unacceptable performance is acceptable? (2). What minimum seismic margin is acceptable? (3) Given the decisions made under Issues 1 and 2, at what annual frequency of exceedance should the Safe Shutdown Earthquake ground motion be defined? (4) What seismic design criteria should be established to reasonably achieve the seismic margin defined under Issue 2? The first issue is purely a policy decision and is not addressed in this paper. Each of the other three issues are addressed. Issues 2 and 3 are integrally tied together so that a very large number of possible combinations of responses to these two issues can be used to achieve the target goal defined under Issue 1. Section 2 lays out a combined approach to these two issues and presents three potentially attractive combined resolutions of these two issues which reasonably achieves the target goal. The remainder of the paper discusses an approach which can be used to develop seismic design criteria aimed at achieving the desired seismic margin defined in resolution of Issue 2. Suggestions for revising existing seismic design criteria to more consistently achieve the desired seismic margin are presented.

  16. Seismic basement in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grad, Marek; Polkowski, Marcin

    2016-06-01

    The area of contact between Precambrian and Phanerozoic Europe in Poland has complicated structure of sedimentary cover and basement. The thinnest sedimentary cover in the Mazury-Belarus anteclize is only 0.3-1 km thick, increases to 7-8 km along the East European Craton margin, and 9-12 km in the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ). The Variscan domain is characterized by a 1- to 2-km-thick sedimentary cover, while the Carpathians are characterized by very thick sediments, up to c. 20 km. The map of the basement depth is created by combining data from geological boreholes with a set of regional seismic refraction profiles. These maps do not provide data about the basement depth in the central part of the TESZ and in the Carpathians. Therefore, the data set is supplemented by 32 models from deep seismic sounding profiles and a map of a high-resistivity (low-conductivity) layer from magnetotelluric soundings, identified as a basement. All of these data provide knowledge about the basement depth and of P-wave seismic velocities of the crystalline and consolidated type of basement for the whole area of Poland. Finally, the differentiation of the basement depth and velocity is discussed with respect to geophysical fields and the tectonic division of the area.

  17. Preparing for a "Next Generation" Evaluation of Independent Living Programs for Youth in Foster Care: Project Overview. OPRE Report No. 2014-71

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Marla; Courtney, Mark E.; Pergamit, Michael R.; Lowenstein, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Youth transitioning out of foster care and into adulthood need multiple supports to navigate the challenges they face. Over the past three decades, federal child welfare policy has significantly increased the availability of those supports. In 1999, the Chafee Foster Care Independence Program was created, increasing the amount of funds potentially…

  18. Seismic upgrades of healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, A

    1997-06-01

    Before 1989 seismic upgrading of hospital structures was not a primary consideration among hospital owners. However, after extensive earthquake damage to hospital buildings at Loma Prieta in Northern California in 1989 and then at Northridge in Southern California in 1994, hospital owners, legislators, and design teams become concerned about the need for seismic upgrading of existing facilities. Because the damage hospital structures sustained in the earthquakes was so severe and far-reaching, California has enacted laws that mandate seismic upgrading for existing facilities. Now hospital owners will have to upgrade buildings that do not conform to statewide seismic adequacy laws. By 2030, California expects all of its hospital structures to be sufficiently seismic-resistant. Slowly, regions in the Midwest and on the East Coast are following their example. This article outlines reasons and ways for seismic upgrading of existing facilities.

  19. Seismic surveys test on Innerhytta Pingo, Adventdalen, Svalbard Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boaga, Jacopo; Rossi, Giuliana; Petronio, Lorenzo; Accaino, Flavio; Romeo, Roberto; Wheeler, Walter

    2015-04-01

    We present the preliminary results of an experimental full-wave seismic survey test conducted on the Innnerhytta a Pingo, located in the Adventdalen, Svalbard Islands, Norway. Several seismic surveys were adopted in order to study a Pingo inner structure, from classical reflection/refraction arrays to seismic tomography and surface waves analysis. The aim of the project IMPERVIA, funded by Italian PNRA, was the evaluation of the permafrost characteristics beneath this open-system Pingo by the use of seismic investigation, evaluating the best practice in terms of logistic deployment. The survey was done in April-May 2014: we collected 3 seismic lines with different spacing between receivers (from 2.5m to 5m), for a total length of more than 1 km. We collected data with different vertical geophones (with natural frequency of 4.5 Hz and 14 Hz) as well as with a seismic snow-streamer. We tested different seismic sources (hammer, seismic gun, fire crackers and heavy weight drop), and we verified accurately geophone coupling in order to evaluate the different responses. In such peculiar conditions we noted as fire-crackers allow the best signal to noise ratio for refraction/reflection surveys. To ensure the best geophones coupling with the frozen soil, we dug snow pits, to remove the snow-cover effect. On the other hand, for the surface wave methods, the very high velocity of the permafrost strongly limits the generation of long wavelengths both with these explosive sources as with the common sledgehammer. The only source capable of generating low frequencies was a heavy drop weight system, which allows to analyze surface wave dispersion below 10 Hz. Preliminary data analysis results evidence marked velocity inversions and strong velocity contrasts in depth. The combined use of surface and body waves highlights the presence of a heterogeneous soil deposit level beneath a thick layer of permafrost. This is the level that hosts the water circulation from depth controlling

  20. DARHT Multi-intelligence Seismic and Acoustic Data Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Garrison Nicole; Van Buren, Kendra Lu; Hemez, Francois M.

    2016-07-21

    The purpose of this report is to document the analysis of seismic and acoustic data collected at the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for robust, multi-intelligence decision making. The data utilized herein is obtained from two tri-axial seismic sensors and three acoustic sensors, resulting in a total of nine data channels. The goal of this analysis is to develop a generalized, automated framework to determine internal operations at DARHT using informative features extracted from measurements collected external of the facility. Our framework involves four components: (1) feature extraction, (2) data fusion, (3) classification, and finally (4) robustness analysis. Two approaches are taken for extracting features from the data. The first of these, generic feature extraction, involves extraction of statistical features from the nine data channels. The second approach, event detection, identifies specific events relevant to traffic entering and leaving the facility as well as explosive activities at DARHT and nearby explosive testing sites. Event detection is completed using a two stage method, first utilizing signatures in the frequency domain to identify outliers and second extracting short duration events of interest among these outliers by evaluating residuals of an autoregressive exogenous time series model. Features extracted from each data set are then fused to perform analysis with a multi-intelligence paradigm, where information from multiple data sets are combined to generate more information than available through analysis of each independently. The fused feature set is used to train a statistical classifier and predict the state of operations to inform a decision maker. We demonstrate this classification using both generic statistical features and event detection and provide a comparison of the two methods. Finally, the concept of decision robustness is presented through a preliminary analysis where

  1. Seismic Wave Attenuation and Yield Determination at Regional Distances

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-25

    Rayleigh and 1-Hz Lg data for eastern North America, eastern South America, and the Indian Shield, respectively. If Q is assumed to be independent of...system, the Atlas Mountains, and the Cape Fold Belt, regions which have undergone Mesozoic or younger deformation. A seismically active region in an...seismic zone 56 VI. Attenuative body wave dispersion at La Cerdanya ( Eastern Pyrenees) 88 AeoesstI- For NTIS (;FA3& DTIC T’ ju t ,nic-,t Ion_ A;z1LbJ:Y

  2. Seismic hazard and risk assessment in the intraplate environment: The New Madrid seismic zone of the central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.

    2007-01-01

    Although the causes of large intraplate earthquakes are still not fully understood, they pose certain hazard and risk to societies. Estimating hazard and risk in these regions is difficult because of lack of earthquake records. The New Madrid seismic zone is one such region where large and rare intraplate earthquakes (M = 7.0 or greater) pose significant hazard and risk. Many different definitions of hazard and risk have been used, and the resulting estimates differ dramatically. In this paper, seismic hazard is defined as the natural phenomenon generated by earthquakes, such as ground motion, and is quantified by two parameters: a level of hazard and its occurrence frequency or mean recurrence interval; seismic risk is defined as the probability of occurrence of a specific level of seismic hazard over a certain time and is quantified by three parameters: probability, a level of hazard, and exposure time. Probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA), a commonly used method for estimating seismic hazard and risk, derives a relationship between a ground motion parameter and its return period (hazard curve). The return period is not an independent temporal parameter but a mathematical extrapolation of the recurrence interval of earthquakes and the uncertainty of ground motion. Therefore, it is difficult to understand and use PSHA. A new method is proposed and applied here for estimating seismic hazard in the New Madrid seismic zone. This method provides hazard estimates that are consistent with the state of our knowledge and can be easily applied to other intraplate regions. ?? 2007 The Geological Society of America.

  3. Seismic Imager Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Coste, Keith; Cunningham, J.; Sievers,Michael W.; Agnes, Gregory S.; Polanco, Otto R.; Green, Joseph J.; Cameron, Bruce A.; Redding, David C.; Avouac, Jean Philippe; Ampuero, Jean Paul; Leprince, Sebastien; Michel, Remi

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a geostationary seismic imager (GSI), a space telescope in geostationary orbit above the Pacific coast of the Americas that would provide movies of many large earthquakes occurring in the area from Southern Chile to Southern Alaska. The GSI movies would cover a field of view as long as 300 km, at a spatial resolution of 3 to 15 m and a temporal resolution of 1 to 2 Hz, which is sufficient for accurate measurement of surface displacements and photometric changes induced by seismic waves. Computer processing of the movie images would exploit these dynamic changes to accurately measure the rapidly evolving surface waves and surface ruptures as they happen. These measurements would provide key information to advance the understanding of the mechanisms governing earthquake ruptures, and the propagation and arrest of damaging seismic waves. GSI operational strategy is to react to earthquakes detected by ground seismometers, slewing the satellite to point at the epicenters of earthquakes above a certain magnitude. Some of these earthquakes will be foreshocks of larger earthquakes; these will be observed, as the spacecraft would have been pointed in the right direction. This strategy was tested against the historical record for the Pacific coast of the Americas, from 1973 until the present. Based on the seismicity recorded during this time period, a GSI mission with a lifetime of 10 years could have been in position to observe at least 13 (22 on average) earthquakes of magnitude larger than 6, and at least one (2 on average) earthquake of magnitude larger than 7. A GSI would provide data unprecedented in its extent and temporal and spatial resolution. It would provide this data for some of the world's most seismically active regions, and do so better and at a lower cost than could be done with ground-based instrumentation. A GSI would revolutionize the understanding of earthquake dynamics, perhaps leading ultimately to effective warning

  4. Seismic signals from Lascar Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellweg, M.

    1999-03-01

    Lascar, the most active volcano in northern Chile, lies near the center of the region studied during the Proyecto de Investigación Sismológica de la Cordillera Occidental 94 (PISCO '94). Its largest historical eruption occurred on 19 April 1993. By the time of the PISCO '94 deployment, its activity consisted mainly of a plume of water vapor and SO 2. In April and May 1994, three short-period, three-component seismometers were placed on the flanks of the volcano, augmenting the broadband seismometer located on the NW flank of the volcano during the entire deployment. In addition to the usual seismic signals recorded at volcanoes, Lascar produced two unique tremor types: Rapid-fire tremor and harmonic tremor. Rapid-fire tremor appears to be a sequence of very similar, but independent, "impulsive" events with a large range of amplitudes. Harmonic tremor, on the other hand, is a continuous, cyclic signal lasting several hours. It is characterized by a spectrum with peaks at a fundamental frequency and its integer multiples. Both types of tremor seem to be generated by movement of fluids in the volcano, most probably water, steam or gas.

  5. Seismic Sensor orientation by complex linear least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoli, Francesco; Cesca, Simone; Krieger, Lars; Olcay, Manuel; Tassara, Carlos; Sobiesiak, Monika; Dahm, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    Poorly known orientation of the horizontal components of seismic sensors is a common problem that limits data analysis and interpretation for several acquisition setups, including linear arrays of geophones deployed in borehole installations, ocean bottom seismometers deployed at the sea-floor and surface seismic arrays. To solve this problem we propose an inversion method based on complex linear least squares method. Relative orientation angles, with respect to a reference sensor, are retrieved by minimizing the l2-norm between the complex traces (hodograms) of adjacent pairs of sensors in a least-squares sense. The absolute orientations are obtained in a second step by the polarization analysis of stacked seismograms of a seismic event with known location. This methodology can be applied without restrictions, if the plane wave approximation for wavefields recorded by each pair of sensors is valid. In most cases, it is possible to satisfy this condition by low-pass filtering the recorded waveform. The main advantage of our methodology is that, finding the estimation of the relative orientations of seismic sensors in complex domain is a linear inverse problem, which allows a direct solution corresponding to the global minimum of a misfit function. It is also possible to use simultaneously more than one independent dataset (e.g. using several seismic events simultaneously) to better constrain the solution of the inverse problem itself. Furthermore, by a computational point of view, our method results faster than the relative orientation methods based on waveform cross-correlation. Our methodology can be also applied for testing the correct orientation/alignment of multicomponent land stations in seismological arrays or temporary networks and for determining the absolute orientation of OBS stations and borehole arrays. We first apply our method to real data resembling two different acquisition setups: a borehole sensor array deployed in a gas field located in the

  6. Barren Acidic Soil Assessment using Seismic Refraction Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajudin, S. A. A.; Abidin, M. H. Z.; Madun, A.; Zawawi, M. H.

    2016-07-01

    Seismic refraction method is one of the geophysics subsurface exploration techniques used to determine subsurface profile characteristics. From past experience, seismic refraction method is commonly used to detect soil layers, overburden, bedrock, etc. However, the application of this method on barren geomaterials remains limited due to several reasons. Hence, this study was performed to evaluate the subsurface profile characteristics of barren acidic soil located in Ayer Hitam, Batu Pahat, Johor using seismic refraction survey. The seismic refraction survey was conducted using ABEM Terraloc MK 8 (seismograph), a sledge hammer weighing 7 kg (source) and 24 units of 10 Hz geophones (receiver). Seismic data processing was performed using OPTIM software which consists of SeisOpt@picker (picking the first arrival and seismic configureuration data input) and SeisOpt@2D (generating 2D image of barren acidic soil based on seismic velocity (primary velocity, Vp) distribution). It was found that the barren acidic soil profile consists of three layers representing residual soil (Vp= 200-400 m/s) at 0-2 m, highly to completely weathered soil (Vp= 500-1800 m/s) at 3-8 m and shale (Vp= 2100-6200 m/s) at 9-20 m depth. Furthermore, result verification was successfully done through the correlation of seismic refraction data based on physical mapping and the geological map of the study area. Finally, it was found that the seismic refraction survey was applicable for subsurface profiling of barren acidic soil as it was very efficient in terms of time, cost, large data coverage and sustainable.

  7. Toward Building a New Seismic Hazard Model for Mainland China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Y.; Xu, X.; Chen, G.; Cheng, J.; Magistrale, H.; Shen, Z.

    2015-12-01

    At present, the only publicly available seismic hazard model for mainland China was generated by Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program in 1999. We are building a new seismic hazard model by integrating historical earthquake catalogs, geological faults, geodetic GPS data, and geology maps. To build the model, we construct an Mw-based homogeneous historical earthquake catalog spanning from 780 B.C. to present, create fault models from active fault data using the methodology recommended by Global Earthquake Model (GEM), and derive a strain rate map based on the most complete GPS measurements and a new strain derivation algorithm. We divide China and the surrounding regions into about 20 large seismic source zones based on seismotectonics. For each zone, we use the tapered Gutenberg-Richter (TGR) relationship to model the seismicity rates. We estimate the TGR a- and b-values from the historical earthquake data, and constrain corner magnitude using the seismic moment rate derived from the strain rate. From the TGR distributions, 10,000 to 100,000 years of synthetic earthquakes are simulated. Then, we distribute small and medium earthquakes according to locations and magnitudes of historical earthquakes. Some large earthquakes are distributed on active faults based on characteristics of the faults, including slip rate, fault length and width, and paleoseismic data, and the rest to the background based on the distributions of historical earthquakes and strain rate. We evaluate available ground motion prediction equations (GMPE) by comparison to observed ground motions. To apply appropriate GMPEs, we divide the region into active and stable tectonics. The seismic hazard will be calculated using the OpenQuake software developed by GEM. To account for site amplifications, we construct a site condition map based on geology maps. The resulting new seismic hazard map can be used for seismic risk analysis and management, and business and land-use planning.

  8. Modelling of NW Himalayan Seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, A. R.; Dimri, V. P.

    2014-12-01

    The northwest Himalaya is seismicity active region due to the collision of Indian and Eurasian plates and experienced many large earthquakes in past. A systematic analysis of seismicity is useful for seismic hazard estimation of the region. We analyzed the seismicity of northwestern Himalaya since 1980. The magnitude of completeness of the catalogue is carried out using different methods and found as 3.0. A large difference in magnitude of completeness is found using different methods and a reliable value is obtained after testing the distribution of magnitudes with time. The region is prone to large earthquake and many studied have shown that seismic activation or quiescence takes place before large earthquakes. We studied such behavior of seismicity based on Epidemic Type Aftershock Sequence (ETAS) model and found that a stationary ETAS model is more suitable for modelling the seismicity of this region. The earthquake catalogue is de-clustered using stochasting approach to study behavior of background and triggered seismicity. The triggered seismicity is found to have shallower depths as compared to the background events.

  9. SEISMIC